Read May 2010 Undergraduate Catalog.indd text version

undergraduate catalog 2009-2010 · effective may 2010

A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Our primary goal is to provide students with marketable skills leading to employment. Certainly, that means the technical skills and knowledge required in the career field chosen by the student. Our hands-on coursework and combination of academic and real-world instruction provide those skills. Marketable skills also encompass more. Employers expect technical competence, while also demanding good communication skills, teamwork, positive attitudes, high performance standards, and a willingness to accept responsibility in the workplace. In order to provide these equally necessary marketable skills, we integrate communication opportunities in all of our courses and encourage team involvement whenever appropriate. We also demonstrate and emphasize these performance standards to our students by requiring completion of a workplace-related project for appraisal.

Renée Herzing

At Herzing University students not only learn the technical and business skills required in professional occupations, they are also expected to develop essential work habits. Consequently, we stress the importance of attendance as an integral element of a complete education and as an important work habit to develop. Important work habits include responsibility and reliability, and attendance in class is a major factor in both these areas. Further, class attendance benefits the student through increased opportunity for learning, added success of team experiences, and demonstrated respect for the instructor and fellow students. At Herzing University, we believe in student service. We are focused on providing all that we can to help students graduate, attain their career objectives, and fulfill their goals. We stand ready and able to demonstrate our commitment to your success. Yours truly,

Renée Herzing President

The Three Cs: Career-FoCused · Convenient · Caring eduCation

Herzing University distinguishes itself from other academic institutions through the Three Cs: Caring, Convenient, and Career-Focused. Career-Focused

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACADEMIC CALENDAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 uNIvERSITy INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Vision Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Mission Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Institutional goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Educational Philosophy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Instructional Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Herzing History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Financial Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Statement of governance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Key System Administrators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Campus Administrators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Undergraduate Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Accreditation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 licenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Approvals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Memberships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Advisory boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Accommodations for the disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 library/Resource Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Changes to This Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

· · · ·

We believe in focusing on "Employment From day One." Our Career Services department works with you as soon as you start. Our educational programs are designed to meet industry needs by preparing you for industry certification tests or licensing. Our educational programs are regularly modified based upon Industry Advisory board input.

Convenient

· block · ·

Schedules: Resident classes are scheduled in blocks in the morning, afternoon, or evening to optimize the use of student time.

Flexible Education delivery: Take classes in the traditional resident classroom, part residential and part online, or all online. Scalability of Programs: Students can progress seamlessly to the next educational level, as diplomas are subsets of associate's degrees, which are subsets of bachelor's degrees. locations: Herzing University campuses are near mass transit options, and substantial student parking is also available.

· Our

Caring

ADMISSION INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Undergraduate Admission Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Admission Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Admission Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 International Student Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Special Students (Admission of Individuals not Seeking degrees/diplomas) . . . . . . . . 79 High School Transitions Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Readmission/Reentry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Continuing Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 new Student Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

· A student's needs are our first priority. · Every staff and faculty member commits himself or herself to assisting

the student.

· Administrative procedures are regularly re-evaluated to ensure the best

possible service to students. learning process.

· The faculty accepts responsibility to partner with the student in the · The small student-teacher ratio provides each student with more "face

time" with faculty.

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nondiscrimination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Transfer of Credits From Other Colleges and Universities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Transfer of Credits to Other Colleges and Universities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Advanced Placement Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

FINANCIAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

Cost of Attending. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Federal Student Aid Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 State Student Aid Programs--Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 State Student Aid programs--birmingham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 State Student Aid Programs--Minneapolis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 State Student Aid Programs--Omaha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Other Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Withdrawal From University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Refund Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

ACADEMIC INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

graduation Requirements--general . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Semester Credit Hour Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 EdFlex Education Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Online Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 grading Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Additional Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Academic Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Service Quality Assurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Three-Year bachelor of Science degree Completion Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Institutional Assessment of Student Academic Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 developmental Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Withdrawal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Add/drop Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Probation or Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Attendance Policy and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Program Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Auditing Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Course Exemptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Undergraduate Students Taking graduate Courses (dual Enrollment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Standards of Satisfactory Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Academic dishonesty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Acceptable Use of Computing Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Course numbering System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Majors, Minors, and Concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Army ROTC Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Privacy of Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

STuDENT SERvICES INFORMATION

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 119 123 123 124 124 124 124 125

Appeal, grievance, and Arbitration Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Housing Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crime Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anti-Hazing Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Organizations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PROGRAMS OF STuDy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

Chart of Programs Offered or Planned to be Offered by Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128

uNDERGRADuATE PROGRAMS OF STuDy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

general Education Statement and Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Accounting (bSA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 business Administration With a Concentration in business Management (bSbAbM). . . . 143 business Administration With no declared Minor or Concentration (bSbAnM) . . . . . 147 Computer Science With a Concentration in Software Engineering (bSCSSE). . . . . . . . 150 Computer Science With a Concentration in Computer networking and Security Technology (bSCSCnST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Criminal Justice With a Concentration in Homeland Security (bSCJHS). . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Criminal Justice With no Minor or Concentration (bSCJnM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Entrepreneurial Studies (bSES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

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game development (bSgAd) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 graphic design (bSgRd) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Health Care Management (bSHCM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Health Care Management--dental Hygiene Emphasis (bSHCMdH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Health Information Management (bSHIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Homeland Security and Public Safety With a Concentration in Criminal Justice (bSHSPSC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Homeland Security and Public Safety With a Concentration in Emergency Medical Technology (bSHSPSE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Homeland Security and Public Safety With no Minor or Concentration (bSHSPSn). . . . . 199 Human Resources Management (bSHRM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 International business (bSIb) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 legal Studies (bSlS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Marketing (bSM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 nursing (bSn) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 nursing--Minnesota (bSnMn) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 nursing--bridge (bSnb) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Technology Management With a Minor in Computer Electronics and Telecommunications Technology (bSTMCET). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Technology Management With a Minor in Computer networking and Security Technology (bSTMCnST). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Technology Management With a Minor in Computer Science (bSTMCS) . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Technology Management With a Minor in drafting and design Technology (bSTMddT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Technology Management With a Minor in Electronics Engineering Technology (bSTMEET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Technology Management With no declared Minor or Concentration (bSTMnM). . . . . 254

dental Assisting--Minnesota (AASdAM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dental Assisting--Ohio (AASdAOH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dental Hygiene--Minnesota (AASdH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . drafting and design Technology (ASddT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electronics Engineering Technology (ASEET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Science (ASFS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . graphic design (ASgRd/AASgRdOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Health Information Management (ASHIM/AASHIMOH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . legal Assisting, Paralegal (ASlAP/AASlAPM/AASlAPOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Assisting--Minnesota (AASMAM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Assisting (ASMA/AASMAOH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical billing and Insurance Coding--Minnesota (AASMbICM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical billing and Insurance Coding (ASMbIC/AASMbICO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Office Administration--Minnesota (AASMOA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Office Administration (ASMOA/AASMOAOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nursing (ASn/AASnSOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nursing--lPn to Rn bridge (ASnb/AASnbOH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nursing--Alabama (ASnAl) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nursing--Ohio (AASnOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nursing--Wisconsin (ASnWI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Occupational Therapy Assisting--Minnesota (AASOTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Therapist Assistant (ASPTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radiologic Technology (ASRT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Surgical Technology (ASST/AASST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Therapeutic Massage--nebraska (ASTMnE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

292 295 298 302 305 308 311 314 318 322 325 328 331 334 337 340 345 349 353 357 361 366 370 374 377 380 381 383 384 386 388 390 392 394 397 399 401 403 405

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE AND ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258

Accounting (ASA/AASAOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 business Administration--Minnesota (AASbAMPl) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 business Administration (ASbA/AASbA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 biomedical Engineering Technology (ASbET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Clinical laboratory Technician (AASClT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Computer, Electronics, and Telecommunications Technology (ASCETT) . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Computer networking and Security Technology (ASCnST/AASCnST). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Computer Science--Minnesota (AASCSMPl) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Computer Science (ASCS/AASCSOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 Criminal Justice (ASCJ/AASCJ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . bookkeeping and Payroll Accounting (dbPA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cisco networking (dCn/CCn) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Computed Tomography (CCT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dental Assisting--Minnesota (ddAM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dental Assisting--Ohio (ddAOH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electronics Technology (dET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency Medical Technician--basic (CEMTb) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency Medical Technician--Paramedic (dEMTP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Assisting (dMA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical billing and Insurance Coding (dMbIC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Office Administration (dMOA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Microsoft networking (dMn/CMn). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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network Systems (dnS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Practical nursing--Alabama (dPnAl) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Practical nursing--Wisconsin (dPnWI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Therapeutic Massage--nebraska (dTMnE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

407 409 412 415

ACADEMIC CALENDAR

Classes at Herzing University run year-round with breaks as listed below. The calendar at some Herzing University campuses may vary slightly, so please check with your local campus for the local calendar.

Note: For those terms that begin on a Monday, final examinations will normally be scheduled on or before the Tuesday of the last week of the term. For those terms that begin on a Wednesday, final examinations will normally be scheduled on or before Thursday of the last week of the term.

uNDERGRADuATE COuRSE DESCRIPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 CAMPuS CONTACT INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 CHANGES FROM PREvIOuS CATALOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565

GENERAL ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2009­2014

Semester/Term

Fall Semester--2009 Term A Term b Winter break Spring Semester--2010 Term A Term b Spring break Summer Semester--2010 Term A Summer break Term b Semester break Fall Semester--2010 Term A Term b Winter break Spring Semester--2011 Term A Term b Spring break Summer Semester--2011 Term A Summer break Term b Semester break Fall Semester--2011 Term A Term b Winter break

Start of Term

09/09/09 11/02/09 12/23/09 01/06/10 03/01/10 04/21/10 04/28/10 06/20/10 07/07/10 08/29/10 09/08/10 11/01/10 12/22/10 01/12/11 03/07/11 04/27/11 05/04/11 06/26/11 07/13/11 09/04/11 09/07/11 10/31/11 12/21/11

End of Term

10/31/09 12/22/09 01/05/10 02/27/10 04/20/10 04/27/10 06/19/10 07/06/10 08/28/10 09/07/10 10/30/10 12/21/10 01/11/11 03/05/11 04/26/11 05/03/11 06/25/11 07/12/11 09/03/11 09/06/11 10/29/11 12/20/11 01/10/12

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Semester/Term

Spring Semester--2012 Term A Term b Spring break Summer Semester--2012 Term A Summer break Term b Semester break Fall Semester--2012 Term A Term b Winter break Spring Semester--2013 Term A Term b Spring break Summer Semester--2013 Term A Summer break Term b Semester break Fall Semester--2013 Term A Term b Winter break Spring Semester--2014 Term A Term b Spring break Summer Semester--2014 Term A Summer break Term b Fall Semester--2014 Term A Term b Winter break

Start of Term

01/11/12 03/05/12 04/25/12 05/02/12 06/24/12 07/11/12 09/02/12 09/05/12 10/29/12 12/19/12 01/09/13 03/04/13 04/24/13 05/01/13 06/23/13 07/10/13 09/01/13 09/04/13 10/28/13 12/18/13 01/08/14 03/03/14 04/23/14 04/30/14 06/22/14 07/09/14 09/01/14 10/27/14 12/17/14

End of Term

03/03/12 04/24/12 05/01/12 06/23/12 07/10/12 09/01/12 09/04/12 10/27/12 12/18/12 01/08/12 03/02/13 04/23/13 04/30/13 06/22/13 07/09/13 08/31/13 09/03/13 10/26/13 12/17/13 01/07/14 03/01/14 04/22/14 04/29/14 06/21/14 07/08/14 08/30/14 10/25/14 12/16/14 01/06/15

uNIvERSITy INFORMATION

vISION STATEMENT

The vision of Herzing University is to be the preferred career-oriented university of students, employers, and employees.

Birmingham

MISSION STATEMENT

It is the mission of Herzing University to provide high-quality undergraduate and graduate degree and diploma programs to prepare a diverse and geographically distributed student population to meet the needs of employers in technology, business, health care, design, and public safety. Career-oriented degree programs include a complementary and integrated general education curriculum established to stimulate students' intellectual growth, to contribute to their personal development, and to enhance their potential for career advancement.

INSTITuTIONAL GOALS

Herzing University fulfills its mission by actively pursuing the following institutional goals: 1. To provide and promote a stable, self-perpetuating climate in which ethical behavior and community service are valued and where students and employees are challenged to excel and to develop their talent. 2. To recruit and provide admissions assistance for all qualified students, resulting in access to Herzing University's career-oriented higher education programs. 3. To develop and provide effective career-oriented higher education programs consisting of technical curricula that focus on skills sought by employers.

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4. To develop and provide general education curricula designed to enhance students' analytical, oral, and written communication skills, as well as stimulate their intellectual growth and personal development. 5. To develop and provide services to students that will enrich their educational experience and enhance their opportunity to achieve their career goals. 6. To periodically evaluate, revise, and improve the University's key programs and processes to ensure continual progress toward attainment of the institutional goals.

a)

Activities appropriate to the content of the course will be conducted to stimulate intellectual inquiry, encourage critical thinking, arouse academic curiosity, and promote cognitive development. Students will be expected to research and study topics and issues that are either assigned or self-generated through individual effort and determination. An atmosphere within the University will be maintained that will foster academic freedom and stimulate intellectual curiosity. Assignments will be reviewed in class after the due date of the assignment. Student knowledge will be tested periodically to determine the individual level of understanding. Appropriate laboratory exercises will be assigned to reinforce the lecture portion of the course. An end-term project or case study will be assigned (where appropriate) to reinforce the major topics of the course. This project can be a written or oral report depending on the nature of the assignment. Students in appropriate courses will be assigned a topic from the course material to research and present in a report to the class. Tutorials, videotapes, computer-based training materials, and/or mentoring will be available to complement the course content. All assignments, projects, case studies, tests, and examinations will be graded according to the performance objectives and content as stated in the course outline, as well as for correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

b) c)

2. Impart Technical Knowledge. a) b) c) d)

EDuCATIONAL PHILOSOPHy

The Herzing University educational philosophy is based upon the premise that higher education can enhance an individual's capacity to attain personal and career goals. The Herzing University programs balance the teaching of skills that are required of graduates in order to succeed in technical, business, allied health, and public safety careers with the general education fundamentals that will prepare them to think analytically, communicate effectively, and advance professionally and personally. This philosophy flows from the University's Institutional Mission Statement and is more specifically addressed by Institutional goals number Three and Four and the strategies, indicators, and measures associated with those institutional goals. In order to implement its educational philosophy, the University has identified the following educational objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Stimulate students' intellectual inquiry. Impart "state-of-the-industry" technical competence that can be applied by students in the workplace. develop students' written and oral communication skills. develop students' participation and leadership capabilities. develop attitudes and general knowledge within students that will assist them to grow and become successful. 3.

e) f) g)

develop Oral and Written Communication Skills. a) An end-term project or case study will be assigned (where appropriate) to reinforce the major topics of the course. This project can be a written or oral report depending on the nature of the assignment. b) All assignments, projects, case studies, tests, and examinations will be graded according to the performance objectives and content as stated in the course outline, as well as for correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation. c) Students in appropriate courses will be assigned a topic from the course material to research and present in a report to the class. d) Role-playing is an effective teaching technique and will be used when applicable. e) Students will be encouraged to participate in discussions, ask questions, and respond to questions.

INSTRuCTIONAL METHODOLOGy

The Herzing University instructional methodology is aligned with the University's educational philosophy and is based upon the premise that the relationship with each student is one of fairness, honesty, impartiality, and sincere interest and concern for the growth and development of the student. Instruction is structured to provide the necessary theory and practical application through teacher-led classroom and laboratory sessions as well as web-based distance learning and independent and group learning activities. A variety of instructional methods and techniques are used to help students achieve their goals: 1. Stimulate Intellectual Inquiry.

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4.

develop Team Participation and leadership Capabilities. a) Students will be given an opportunity to work in teams so that team building, leadership, and communications skills are developed. Students will be assigned to group projects or case studies in each course with content appropriate for this exercise.

Birmingham

Initially founded as Electronic Computer Programming Institute in 1965 at 1218 South 20th Street, the birmingham college was acquired by the Milwaukee college in 1968. The name was officially changed to Herzing Institute in 1970. In december 1994, the Institute was moved to its present address at 280 West Valley Avenue, birmingham, Alabama, and the official name was changed to Herzing College of business and Technology and then to Herzing College in September 1998.

5.

develop Appropriate Attitudes and general Knowledge for Success in the Public and Private Sectors. a) Projects, case studies, and, or other activities will be assigned that will require use of the library and Internet resources for research. b) Resource people from the business community and the public sector will be brought into the classroom to relate their experience and provide realworld examples to reinforce course content. c) Attendance and appropriate attire will be expected of all students. d) Personal development courses have been included in each degree program.

Brookfield

The Herzing University brookfield campus first opened its doors in March 2010 and is the newest addition to the Herzing University system.

Kenosha

The Kenosha campus began enrolling students in the fall of 2009 as an additional location of Herzing University to serve the communities of Kenosha, Racine, northern Illinois, and the surrounding areas.

Madison

Originally the Wisconsin School of Electronics, the school was founded in 1948 by several local Madison businessmen involved in the television and radio industry. In 1970 the school merged with Herzing Institute. In 1996 the name was changed to Herzing College to reflect its bachelor degree status and range of programs.

6.

general Education courses are included in each degree program to broaden students' educational experience, provide for the development of analytical and critical thinking skills, and promote intellectual inquiry.

HERzING HISTORy

Herzing University had its beginning in 1965 when it started as a computer training institute in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 1970 the name was changed to Herzing Institute, and the organization began to grow through the acquisition of other schools. These included the Wisconsin School of Electronics in Madison, Wisconsin, which has a history dating back to 1948. later, the Milwaukee location was closed in favor of the Madison location, but the system headquarters has remained in Milwaukee. The name of the school was changed to Herzing College in 1996, and the institution has grown to eleven campuses plus an online division now located with the system headquarters. With the addition of graduate programs, the name was changed to Herzing University in 2009.

Minneapolis

Herzing College, Minneapolis drafting School division, became part of Herzing College in June of 2000. Established in 1961, the Minneapolis drafting School trained and placed its graduates in all phases of drafting and design. The Minneapolis campus has since added programs in business, design, and public safety. Herzing College, lakeland Medical-dental Academy division, became part of Herzing College in May of 2002. Established in 1958, lakeland Medical-dental Academy has trained and placed its graduates in many phases of allied health.

New Orleans

The Herzing University new Orleans campus started its first class in 1996 as part of Herzing University--Atlanta. The campus relocated in 2010 to its present location in order to serve a greater number of community residents looking to obtain a Herzing education.

Akron Institute

The Akron Institute was founded in 1970 and has provided training in the Akron area continuously since that date. The school, which became a campus of Herzing University in 2003, has grown to its present size with the addition of programs, increases in staff, and expansion of facilities, necessitating a move to a larger building in 2004.

Omaha

Established in 1991, the Omaha School of Massage Therapy moved to its present location in 1995 and became part of Herzing University in June of 2008.

Atlanta

The Atlanta campus began in 1949 as Massey Junior College. Massey Junior College became part of the Herzing Institute in 1979. In 1996 its name was changed to Herzing College. Organizationally, Herzing University--Atlanta, was the main campus of two additional campuses in new Orleans, louisiana, and Orlando, Florida. The Atlanta campus moved to its present location in 2005.

Online

In 2003 Herzing College launched its Online Campus, making education available to students from the comfort of their own home, the local library, or a coffee shop. Providing educational opportunities whenever and wherever a student desires, Herzing University offers students the opportunity to enroll in diploma, associate degree, or bachelor degree programs. In 2009 Herzing Online ventured its way into the graduate

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school arena and began offering four different master of business administration programs, and it now also offers two master of science nursing programs.

kEy SySTEM ADMINISTRATORS

System director of financial Services and administration System director of Health Care System director of institutional research System Human resources Support Jackie Curtis, M.B.a. Mary Urbanski, r.n., M.S.n., d.ed eric Siegel, Ph.d. Carrisa Wycklendt, B.S.

Orlando

Herzing College in orlando started its first classes in 1995 as an additional location of Herzing College in atlanta.

Toledo

Herzing College in Toledo started its first classes in 2009.

fINANCIAL CONDITION

individuals seeking information about the financial viability of Herzing University may contact Mr. david Brzeczkowski, Corporate Secretary/Controller, Herzing, inc., 525 north 6th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53203.

CAMPUS ADMINISTRATORS

Akron Institute

President academic dean director of admissions director of Career Services director of financial Services david larue, B.a. Peggy McCann, Ph.d. Maribeth graham, B.S. Cindy garman, a.a.S. Sue Shaffer, a.a.S. frank Webster, M.B.a. Marsha Johnson, M.a. Christina ricks William Slaton, B.S. Stephanie gunby, M.B.a. don lewis, J.d. Mary Beth finn, M.ed. Tommy dennis, B.S. Bryan grindle, B.S. Kentray Sims, M.B.a. david B. george, ed.d. Casey Murray, B.S. don Madelung, M.a. Brian Willison, J.d., B.S. Matthew Schneider, B.S. Jeff Westra, B.S. Bev faga Krista Wills, M.ed., M.S. gerald lott, Ph.d. Monica Beere, B.S. Jessica Kroll, B.S.

UniVerSiTY inforMaTion 17

STATEMENT Of GOVERNANCE

Herzing University is a proprietary, coeducational university licensed to award master of science degrees, bachelor of science degrees, associate of science degrees, associate of applied science degrees, and diplomas. The university is a division of Herzing, inc., a Wisconsin corporation.

Atlanta

President academic dean director of admissions director of Career Services director of financial Services

Board of Directors

Chairman director director director director director director director director Joseph froehlich lynn Bardele alex Bell William rootham ava Youngblood Pat Todus Henry Herzing Suzanne Herzing renée Herzing renée Herzing, M.B.a. Henry Herzing, M.B.a. roger gugelmeyer, M.B.a. frank Cianciaruso, M.B.a. William getter, d.P.a. david Brzeczkowski, B.S., CPa Kurt drier, B.S. Todd rickel. Ph.d.

Birmingham

President academic dean and Vice President director of admissions director of Career Services director of financial Services

Executive Committee

President Chancellor Vice President of operations Vice President of admissions Vice President of academic affairs and institutional effectiveness Corporate Secretary/Controller Vice President of information Technology Vice President of e-learning

Brookfield

academic dean director of admissions

Madison

President academic dean director of admissions director of Career Services director of financial Services

kenosha

President academic dean director of admissions director of financial Services

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Herzing UniVerSiTY UndergradUaTe CaTalog MaY 2009­2010

Minneapolis

President Academic dean director of Admissions director of Financial Services director of Career Services John Slama, M.b.A. larry doty, M.A. Shelly larson, A.A. Jill Riverso, b.A. Amy davis, M.S. Mark Aspiazu, M.b.A. Stephanie burns, M.b.A. Chrissy Kalivitis, b.A. Myeshia Ambrose, M.A.O.M. Ava gomez Steve Carper, b.S., lMT Tina Sorensen, b.A., lMT Kathleen lomax, M.A. Todd A. Rickel, Ph.d. Elainna guerrette, M.S. Craig boswell, Ph.d. ben nirschl, b.S. bill Young, b.A. Amy Chastek, b.S. Eric Reeves, b.S. Amy Albers, b.S. bryn nettesheim, b.A. donnie Reeves, M.b.A. Cheryl Evans Smith, b.A. Jessica Fager, b.S. Heatherann Antonacci, M.b.A. guy Houk, Ph.d. Tessie Uranga, M.S.S.l. Sharon Rosin, b.F.A. Krista Kuhr, b.S. derek J. Mcbeth, M.b.A. donneia lawson, M.A. donna Holubik, b.A.

uNDERGRADuATE FACuLTy

Akron Institute

Murat Akgul, Assistant Professor Jean Andrick, Senior lecturer* Susan Austin, Assistant Professor Michael Baker, Assistant Professor* L'Tanya Barnes, Senior Instructor

( * = Adjunct) M.S. (Technology), Kent State University b.S.T.E., University of Akron M.S.n., Case Western Reserve University M.S.T.E., University of Akron b.S. (business Administration), Herzing University M.A., Kent State University

New Orleans

President Academic dean director of Admissions director of Career Services director of Financial Services

Omaha

President Academic dean director of Student Services Donnie Broadwater, Associate Professor Deborah Catera, Assistant Professor Terri Chapman, Associate Professor

Online Campus

President Academic dean for Undergraduate Education Academic dean for graduate Education director of Admissions director of business development director of Career Services director of Chicagoland Center director of Financial Services director of High School Recruitment director of Military Education director of native American Education director of Registration

M.S.n., University of Phoenix M.S.n. (Psychological, Mental Health), Kent State University M.S. (Technology), Kent State University M.Ed. (Instructional Technology), American Intercontinental University Microsoft Certified System Engineer M.H.C.A., St. Joseph College M.S.n., University of Akron M.Ed. (Rehab Counseling), Kent State University M.S. (Clinical Counseling), Ashland Theological Seminary

vonda Coffman, Assistant Professor Ken Conway, Associate Professor

Linda Cornmesser, Senior lecturer* Annette Creech, Assistant Professor Lou Anne Derry, Assistant Professor

Orlando

President Academic dean director of Admissions director of Career Services director of Financial Services

Beth Draman, Assistant Professor

Toledo

President Academic dean director of Financial Services

Kathleen Dremann, Assistant Professor* M.Ed., University of Akron Mark Duell, Assistant Professor M.Ed. (Math Education), Kent State University

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Jody Dunaway, Assistant Professor Leigh Felland, Senior lecturer Lorraine Fields, Assistant Professor* Carrie Gilcher, Assistant Professor* Tracy Kearns, Senior lecturer Michelle Kieffaber, Assistant Professor*

M.b.A., Ohio State University b.S. (Education), Perdue University

Mary Ryan, Assistant Professor

M.Ed. (Community Counseling), Kent State University b.S.T.E., University of Akron J.d., University of Akron M.S.n., University of Phoenix M.P.A., University of Akron b.S. (Education and Mathematics), University of Akron M.A. (Communications), Eastern Michigan University M.A. (Fine and Applied Arts), University of Akron

Tammi Sawyer, Senior lecturer* M.S.n., University of Akron d.C.M., life College b.S. (Education), Kent State University M.A. (Speech Communications), Miami University J.d., University of Akron M.S.T.E., University of Akron M.S.T.E., University of Akron b.S. (Medical Technology), University of Akron M.S.T.E., University of Akron b.S.T.E., University of Akron M.b.A., Colorado Technical University M.S.n., University of Akron M.S. (Applied Mathematics), University of Akron M.S.TE., University of Akron M.Ed. (Technology), American Intercontinental University M.S.T.E., University of Akron J.d., M.S., (Taxation), University of Akron M.S. (Technology), Youngstown State University Chuck Cannarella, Associate Professor* Anthea Andrade, Associate Professor* Helena Bonaparte, Associate Professor Tori Wilfred, Assistant Professor* Scott Stetson, Associate Professor Christine Tackett, Assistant Professor Alycia Taylor, Assistant Professor* Cedriee Thomas, Assistant Professor

Dawn King, Associate Professor* Christine Kirtley, Associate Professor Mary Lekic, Assistant Professor Lea Miller, Senior lecturer

Menyon Thomas, Senior lecturer

Atlanta

Mamie Allen, Associate Professor* M.A. (Administration), Trinity University b.S. (Health Sciences), Howard University M.A. (Health Care Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (biology), Kennesaw State University C. (Therapeutic Massage), Atlanta School of Massage M.A. (English), georgia State University b.A. (English), georgia State University M.b.A. (International business), Johnson and Wales University b.S. (Economics), Washington State University M.M.S. (Anesthesiology), Emory University b.S. (Environmental Health), East Tennessee State University

Angela Mitchell, Assistant Professor Phyllis Neal, Assistant Professor Dagmar Nicholas, Assistant Professor Darlene O'Leary, Assistant Professor Gary Orum, Assistant Professor

Raquel Anderson, Assistant Professor*

Diane Plumlee, Associate Professor Joe Reid, Assistant Professor

Pamela Rich, Assistant Professor* Winona Riddle, Associate Professor Daniel Robinson, Assistant Professor

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Jose Cardenas, Associate Professor

M.S. (Computer Information Systems), University of Phoenix b.S. (Industrial Engineering), national University, Frederico Villorreal b.S. (Computer network Technology), Herzing University b.A. (general Studies), Tulane University C. (neuromuscular Therapies), International Academy of neuromuscular Therapies C. (Massage Therapy), Rising Spirit Institute of natural Health J.d., north Carolina Central University b.S. (Accounting), Morris brown College

Alan Hunter, Associate Professor*

M.b.A. (Finance), Tulane University b.A. (Political Science), davidson College J.d., University of baltimore b.A. (Political Science), Clark Atlanta University M.A. (Education), Central Michigan University b.A. (Psychology, biology), University of South Alabama M.A. (Professional Counseling), georgia State University M.S., b.S. (Mathematics), georgia State University Ph.d. (nuclear Physics), University of Tennessee M.A. (nuclear Physics), Jinin University, China M.A. (Counseling and Psychology), Clark Atlanta University Ph.d. (Administrative Management), Walden University M.A. (Management), Central Michigan University M.A. (Spanish), georgia State University M.b.A., American Intercontinental University b.A. (Mass Media Arts), Clark Atlanta University J.d. (law), Saint Thomas University b.A. (English, Psychology), University of Miami

Karen Inniss, Associate Professor*

Karl Chambers, Associate Professor*

Fiona Jimill, Associate Professor*

Marcia Jones, Assistant Professor* Tesha Clemons, Associate Professor*

Hok-Sing Leung, Assistant Professor* Annie Daniel, Assistant Professor M.S. (Computer Science), Southern Polytechnical State University b.S. (Chemistry), national University of Singapore M.b.A. (Finance), Fontbonne University b.S. (legal Administration), ball State University M.S. (network and Communications Management), Keller graduate School M.b.A., garner-Webb University b.S. (zoology), north Carolina State University Alvaro Munoz, Associate Professor* Anatoliy Fridman, Professor* Ph.d. (Physics), Moscow University M.S. (Math), Kishinev State University M.F.A. (Creative Writing), naropa University M.A. (Theater History and Criticism), Ohio University b.S. (Theater and English), Central Michigan University Renée Ndiaye, Assistant Professor*

Xin Tao Liu, Professor

Sanford Dennis, Associate Professor*

Maurice Moore, Associate Professor*

Francisca Edwards, Assistant Professor*

Dennis Morrow, Professor

Ebony Fowler, Associate Professor*

Amy Hess, Associate Professor

Phoebe Palmer-Coquerel, Assistant Professor*

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23

Peggy Pearl, Assistant Professor*

M.A. (Accounting and Financial Management), Keller graduate School M.b.A., b.S. (Accounting), Troy University M.S., b.S. (Criminal Justice), georgia State University M.S. (Social Administration), Case Western Reserve University M.b.A. (Marketing), Clark Atlanta University b.A. (behavioral Science), Ursuline College M.S. (Industrial Engineering), University of Arizona b.S. (Industrial Engineering), Perdue University C. (Clinical Massage, neuromuscular Therapy), Atlanta School of Massage Ph.d. (Organization and Management), Capella University M.S. (Human Resources), b.A. (behavioral Science), national louis University M.b.A. (Finance), georgia State University b.S. (behavioral Science), University of Wisconsin J.d., John Marshall law School M.A. (Psychology), Argosy University b.A. (Political Science), long Island University M.S. (Administration), Central Michigan University b.A. (biology), Talladega College J.d., Cumberland School of law, Samford University b.S., (business Administration), Fayetteville State University Donald vest, Assistant Professor* Krystal Turner, Professor*

Donnie Perry, Assistant Professor*

Angela Primm-Bethea, Assistant Professor*

Jamie Robinson, Assistant Professor*

Madison d.C., life University b.S. (Microbiology), Auburn University M.S. (Elementary Reading and literacy), Walden University b.S. (Communications), bowie State University b.S. (Elementary Education), Salisbury State University Ph.d., M.b.A. (International Affairs), Clark Atlanta University b.A. (business Administration), Morehouse College M.A. (Information Technology), American Intercontinental University b.S. (biology), north georgia College and State University

Joy Rose, Professor*

Robin Turner, Assistant Professor*

Steven Shema, Associate Professor*

Jennifer Skeete-Cantor, Associate Professor

Steven Smith, Associate Professor

Maylon Walker, Associate Professor*

Wendy Theodore, Associate Professor*

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25

Birmingham

Janie Applegate, Instructor* M.P.H. (Public Health), University of Alabama b.S. (Health Sciences), San diego State University R.n. (nursing), druid City Hospital School of nursing b.S. (Technology Management), Herzing University A.S. (Electronics, business Administration), United Electronics Institute M.S. (nursing), University of Alabama b.S. (nursing), Jacksonville State A.S. (nursing), gadsden State M.b.A. (business), University of Alabama b.S. (business and Education), University of Alabama M.S.n. (nursing), University of Alabama b.S.n. (nursing), Troy State

Cynthia Hall, Instructor*

M.S.n. (nursing), Jacksonville State University b.S.n., A.d.n. (nursing), Wallace State Community College M.S. (nursing and Health System Management), University of Alabama b.S.n. (nursing), Auburn University M.S., b.S. (nursing), Samford University A.d. (nursing), University of Alabama M.b.A. (Marketing), Cameron University b.S. (Accounting), Troy State M.S. (nursing), Columbia University b.S. (nursing), University of Alabama b.S. (nursing), University of Alabama M.S.n. (nursing), University of Alabama b.S.n., A.d.n. (nursing), Troy State University M.S. (Clinical Psychology), Middle Tennessee State b.S.n. (nursing), Samford University b.A. (Psychology), University of Alabama b.S. (nursing), University of Alabama b.S. (business Administration and Economics), University of Alabama A.S.E.E.T. (Electronics and Computer Science), national Institute of Technology b.S.n. (nursing), University of Arizona M.S. (Commercial Aviation), delta State University b.A. (Transportation), delta State University

Sarah Harmon, Instructor

George Carmichael, Instructor

Donna Harrison, Instructor

Tracye Christian, Instructor

Scott Herron, Assistant Professor*

Bill Creel, Associate Professor

Minda Hogstrom, Instructor

Michi Isbell, Instructor* Moniaree Jones, Instructor*

Kathyrn Donahoo, Instructor*

Jennifer Roy Dalessandro, Assistant Professor*

M.P.A., University of Missouri--Kansas City b.S. (Physical Sciences), Kansas State University M.Ed. (Educational leadership), University of Alabama b.S. (Education), University of Alabama d.d.C. (Chiropractic Medicine), life University new York Chiropractic College M.S. (Kinesiology and Extreme Rehabilitation), Auburn University M.A. (Education, library Science), University of Alabama b.A. (Political Science), University of north Carolina

Nena Lavas, Instructor*

Mary Beth Finn, Associate Professor

Sherie Lurie, Instructor Stanley Middlebrooks, Senior Instructor

Taylor Flannagan, Instructor*

vicki Molliconi, Instructor* Stanley Murrell, Associate Professor*

Margaret Guice, Instructor, librarian*

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27

Stancel Phillips, Assistant Professor

M.A. (Secondary Education), University of Alabama b.A. (History), University of Alabama M.A., b.A. (Mass Communication), Auburn University b.S. (nursing), Emory University M.A., b.S. (Mathematics Education), University of Alabama M.Ed. (Educational leadership), University of Alabama b.S. (Secondary Education), Auburn University

Jennifer Romano, Assistant Professor

Wendy Siegal, Instructor* Karen Stewart, Instructor*

Linda Whatley, Assistant Professor*

Brookfield

Cheryl Downs, Instructor M.S. (Mathematics), Marquette University b.S. (Secondary Mathematics), State University of new York Ph.d. (Human development and gerontology), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.S. (Community Health nursing), University of California--San Francisco b.S. (nursing), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee Atlanta Cheryl Downs, Instructor M.S. (Mathematics), Marquette University b.S. (Secondary Mathematics), State University of new York M.A. (Communications), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee b.S. (Communications), University of Wisconsin--laCrosse M.l.S., School of library and Information Science, University of Washington b.A. (American Studies), Western Connecticut State University M.S. (Industrial Engineering), University of Wisconsin--Madison b.A. (Mathematics and Computer Science), University of Wisconsin--Madison

Karen Kapke, Professor

James Draeger, Instructor*

Kenosha

Rebecca Burdette, Associate Professor Ph.d. (Clinical and Health Psychology) Walden University M.S. (Clinical Psychology), Concordia University b.S. (Human Services), Ottawa University b.S. (business Administration), baker College A.A.S. (business Administration), Ivy Tech Community College A.A.S. (Surgical Technology), Ivy Tech Community College

Dawn Haggerty, librarian

Bry Coleman, Assistant Professor

Pamela Harris, Instructor

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29

Karen Kapke, Professor

Ph.d. (Human development and gerontology), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.S. (Community Health nursing), University of California--San Francisco b.S. (nursing), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee Ph.d. (Cognitive Psychology, Ethnography and Statistical Analysis), Michigan State University M.S.Ed (Mathematics and Statistical Analysis) Illinois State University b.S.Ed (Mathematics, business Administration and Science), Illinois State University M.A. (English), dePaul University b.A. (English), Marquette University Ph.d. (Philosophy), Marquette University M.A. (Philosophy), Cleveland State University b.A. (Philosophy), John Carroll University

Joseph Cann, Assistant Professor

M.S. (Project Management), University of Wisconsin--Platteville b.S. (networking), Herzing University b.S. (Electrical and Electronic Engineering), University of Science and Technology, ghana M.S. (nursing Administration), Edgewood College b.S. (nursing), lenoir Ryne College M.S. (Criminal Justice), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee b.S. (Criminal Justice), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.S. (Computer Information Systems), University of Wisconsin--Whitewater b.b.A. (business Administration), University of Wisconsin--Whitewater M.b.A. (business Administration), Cardinal Stritch University b.A. (Political Science, International Relations, University of Wisconsin--Madison M.A. (Secondary Education), Viterbo University b.A. (English and Education), University of Wisconsin M.S.n., University of Washington b.S.n., Seattle Pacific University M.F.A. (Studio Arts), Maine College of Art b.F.A. (Sculpture and Art History), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.A. (Interpersonal and Organizational Communication), Oklahoma State University b.A. (Speech Communication), Oklahoma State University

Rita Cordova, Assistant Professor Gerald Lott, dean of Academic Affairs

Jennifer Cramer, Assistant Professor*

Leo Cross, Assistant Professor Daniel Schultz, Instructor

Paul Shinkle, Assistant Professor*

Ross Demrow, Assistant Professor*

Madison

Phil Anderson, Assistant Professor M.b.A. (business Administration), brenau University b.A. (Communications Art), loyola University d.C. (Chiropractic), University of Minnesota b.S. (biology), Winona State University M.S.n., University of Phoenix b.S.n., Edgewood College M.S. (Systems and Information Management), University of Southern California b.S. (Information Systems), University of Maryland M.M.E., IIT India b.S. (Engineering), bangalore University Lynn DuPree, Associate Professor

Megan Blount, Professor

Beth Fahlberg, Assistant Professor,

Tammy Bomkamp, Assistant Professor

Michael Freiman, Assistant Professor

John Burgar, Assistant Professor

Ron Frye, Assistant Professor*

Harry Cadambi, Associate Professor

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31

Tom Gross, Associate Professor

M.b.A., M.A. (business Administration and Philosophy), University of Wisconsin b.A. (Philosophy), University of Wisconsin M.S., b.S., Indiana University M.A. (Architecture), University of nevada--las Vegas b.F.A. (Interior Architecture and design), Milwaukee Institute of Art and design

Catarina Poehnelt, Assistant Professor

M.S. (nursing), University of Phoenix b.S. (nursing), University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire M.E. (Computer Science), University of Colorado--boulder b.S. (broadcast Communication Technology), University of Wisconsin--Platteville M.A. (Education), Edgewood College b.S. (Art), University of Wisconsin

Paul Johann, Assistant Professor Robert Kraus, Assistant Professor*

Robert Porter, Assistant Professor*

Jim Renguette, Assistant Professor Karen Lange, Assistant Professor* M.S. (Education), University of Wisconsin--Platteville b.S. (Fine Arts), University of Wisconsin--Platteville M.S. (Applied Mathematics), northern Illinois University b.S. (Mathematics), University of Wisconsin M.S. (Accounting), Upper Iowa University b.S. (Accounting), Upper Iowa University M.S. (Education), University of Wisconsin--Oshkosh b.A. (English), Carroll College M.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago b.S. (Art), University of Wisconsin M.E., India institute of Science b.S.E., bangalore University J.d. (law), dePaul University M.A. (Educational Psychology), University of Michigan--Ann Arbor M.S. (Manufacturing Engineering), University of Wisconsin b.S. (Industrial Technology), University of Wisconsin M.S. (nursing and Health Care Education), University of Phoenix b.S. (nursing), Concordia University Thomas Stankey, Assistant Professor*

Tracy Seiler-Schultz, Assistant Professor M.A. (nurse Midwifery), Marquette University b.S. (nursing), graceland University Lauren Shapiro, Assistant Professor M.F.A., University of Iowa b.A., brown University M.b.A, M.S. (Administration, Management and Human Resources), University of Puerto Rico and University of Wisconsin--Madison b.S. (business Administration), University of Puerto Rico--Mayaguez M.S. (Electrical Engineering), M.S. (Physics), University of Wisconsin M.F.A. (Fine Arts), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee b.F.A. (Fine Arts), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.S. (Counseling Psychology), University of Wisconsin--Madison b.A. (Psychology and Religion), Olaf College M.b.A. (Technology and Training), University of Wisconsin--Whitewater b.S. (Information Technology and business Management), Upper Iowa University

Jong Lee, Associate Professor

Donald Majors, Assistant Professor

Isabel Simonetti, Assistant Professor*

Jenny Malueg, Assistant Professor*

Kathleen Mitchell, Associate Professor Keerti Nyaychavadi, Assistant Professor

Tom Traband, Associate Professor

Rudolph Oldeschulte, Assistant Professor

Denison Tucker, Assistant Professor*

Erik Pederson, Assistant Professor

Cherie Tuhus, Assistant Professor*

Diane Phillips, Assistant Professor

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33

Ed Walstead, Associate Professor

M.A. (Education), Edgewood College b.S. (business Management), Upper Upper Iowa University M.A. (business leadership), Upper Iowa University b.A. (business Administration), lakeland College M.S. (Marketing), Illinois Institute of Technology, Stuart School of business, Chicago, Illinois b.S. (Political Science, Sociology), Illinois State University M.S. (Computer Science), Western Michigan University b.S. (CIS), north Jiaotong University--China

Toni Hoffa, Senior Instructor

M.b.A. (business), Hamline University b.S. (Sociology), University of Wisconsin--Madison b.S. (Psychology), northwestern College A.A.S. (dental Hygiene), University of South dakota M.A. (Education), Argosy University b.S. (dental Hygiene), University of Minnesota b.S. (business Administration), Herzing University A.A.S. (dental Hygiene), Milwaukee Area Technical College b.S. (Agriculture), Western Illinois University A.A.S. (Medical billing and Insurance Coding), lakeland Academy M.A. (Counseling and Psychological Services), St. Mary's University of Minnesota b.A. (Psychology), Augsburg College

Patricia Ward, Associate Professor,

Sandra Johnston, Senior Instructor

Linda Koch, Assistant Professor Janet Staker Woerner, Assistant Professor

Lynette Koehl, Senior Instructor

Liping zhang, Associate Professor

Marta Kramer, Senior Instructor*

Minneapolis

Karri Bell, Instructor Carrie Cleven, Senior Instructor Julie Conner, Assistant Professor A.A.S. (dental Assisting), Herzing University b.S. (biology), Marion College d.C. (Chiropractic), northwest School of Chiropractic b.S. (Human biology), northwest School of Chiropractic M.A. (Human Resource Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (Human Resource Management), Winona State University b.S. (business Management), Cardinal Stritch University M.S. (biology), Eastern Kentucky University b.A. (Political Science), Eastern Kentucky University d.n.P. (nurse Practionare), north dakota State University Martina Kumar, Assistant Professor*

Amy Davis, Senior Instructor*

Kathy Devinny, Senior Instructor

Christopher Dickerson, Assistant Professor*

Jessica Hanzel, Assistant Professor

Toledo

UnIVERSITY InFORMATIOn 35

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Cyndy Luk, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Software Engineering), University of St. Thomas b.S. (Computer Science), University of Minnesota--duluth M.A. (English), University of Minnesota b.A. (English), University of Minnesota M.S. (Financial Mathematics), University of Chicago M.b.A., (business Administration), University of Minnesota M.S.n. (nursing), Pace University b.A. (English), University of Minnesota M.A. (Anthropology and Sociology), American University b.A. (Anthropology), University of Minnesota Ph.d. (Mathematics), University of California d.d.S. (dentistry), University of Minnesota b.S. (dental Hygiene), Minnesota State University A.A.S. (dental Hygiene), Argosy University d.C. (Chiropractic), northwest School of Chiropractic b.S. (Ecology, Evolution and behavior), University of Minnesota b.S. (Health Care Management), College of St. Catherines M.S. (Material Engineering and Science), South dakota School of Mines and Technology b.S. (Megallurgical Engineering), South dakota School of Mines and Technology

Amy Tong, Assistant Professor* Christy vanbuskirk, Instructor

M.S.n. (nursing), University of Minnesota b.S. (Finance), St. Cloud State University A.A.S. (dental Assisting), Herzing University

Michael Matejcek, Assistant Professor

New Orleans

Myeshia Ambrose, Instructor M.A.O.M. (Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (Speech Pathology), Southern University M.P.H. (Public Health Science), Jackson State University b.A. (Psychology), belhaven College J.d. (law), Southern University M.P.A. (Public Administration), Southern University b.A. (Political Science), Southern University b.S. (Marketing), University of new Orleans A.S. (Allied Health), Community College of the Air Force M.F.A. (English and Writing), University of new Orleans b.A. (English), University of new Orleans M.S.n. (nursing), louisiana State University b.S. (nursing), louisiana State University Medical Center M.d., University of Texas Medical branch--galveston b.S. (biology), Prairie View A&M University M. Ed. (Special Education), Southern University b.S. (Speech, language and Hearing), Southern University--new Orleans

Ashok Mehrotra, Assistant Professor*

Eldonne Datus, Instructor*

Laurel Ostrow, Assistant Professor*

Katherine Pavljuk, Assistant professor*

Kervin Doyle, Associate Professor

David Pearlman, Associate Professor*

Ladonna Eaglin, Instructor

Jay Rollinger, Associate Professor Lindsay Smith, Instructor

Susan Gebhardt, Associate Professor

Noah Strom, Assistant Professor*

Mary Green, Assistant Professor

Allyne Henderson, Assistant Professor* Susan Sturms, Senior Instructor

Annie Thompson, Assistant Professor*

Cherlyn Luna, Instructor*

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Michael Mickey, Instructor*

M.b.A. (Technology Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (Information Technology), University of Phoenix M.b.A. (Technology Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (Mathematics), Southern University M.b.A. (Accounting), University of Phoenix b.S. (Mathematics), Southern University

Catherine Tolliver, Instructor*

M.E. (Adult Education and Training), University of Phoenix b.A. (Professional development), Amberton University b.S. (Architecture), lawrence Technological University A.S. (Surgical Technology), Faulkner State Community College M.b.A. (Marketing and Management), Southern Methodist University b.S. (Mechanical Engineering), boston University b.S. (nursing), Pittsburg State University M.A. (Communications), bellevue University b.S. (Psychology), grace University b.S. (biopsychology), Wesleyan University M.A. (Management), bellevue University b.S. (Workforce Education and development), Southern Illinois University M.S. (Music and Religious Education), St. Joseph's College b.A. (Education), College of St. Mary's l.M.T., Omaha School of Massage Therapy M.S. (Secondary Education and Mathematics), University of nebraska--Omaha b.S. (Sociology), University of Central Missouri M.S. (Educational Psychology), University of Minnesota b.S. (Psychology), briar Cliff College M.A. (biology), University of nebraska--Omaha b.S. (biology and natural Science), Midland lutheran College

D'laun Oubre, Instructor

Jerrie vicari, Senior Instructor

Jamie Williams, Instructor Secole Patterson, Instructor*

Desiree young, Instructor* Said Raki, Instructor* M.S. (Math and Statistics), University of new Orleans b.S. (Mathematics), University of new Orleans b.S. (Technology Management), Herzing University J.d. (law), loyola University b.S. (Economics), University of new Orleans

Omaha

Carol Carlson, Senior Instructor Derrick Davis, Instructor*

Kevin Reed, Instructor

Jenac Senac, Professor

Brad Decker, Instructor* Eric Ewing, Instructor*

zaitasha Stepter, Senior Instructor

b.S. (Psychology), University of new Orleans A.S. (Allied Health), Community College of Air Force M.S. (nurse Anesthesiology), Charity Hospital, Xavier University M.S.n. (nursing), Pace University M.A. (Humanities), Arizona State University M.F.A. (Poetry), University of Alabama M.A. (English and Creative Writing), University of Colorado Ph.d. (Philosophy), University of banja luka M.A. (Philosophy), louisiana State University b.A. (Philosophy), louisiana State University

b.S. (nursing), University of Memphis

Linda Hess, Senior Instructor*

Josef Suter, Associate Professor

David Kay, Instructor*

Elizabeth Thomas, Instructor*

Kathleen Lomax, Instructor

vladimir Thomas, Associate Professor

Ron Maly, Instructor

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39

Andrea Porter, Instructor* Charla Session-Reed, Instructor*

b.A. (English), University of nebraska--Omaha M.b.A., bellevue University b.S. (business Administration and Marketing), University of north Texas b.A. (Exercise Science), northwestern College l.M.T., Omaha School of Massage Therapy M.S. (business Administration), bellevue University b.S. (business Administration and Marketing), College of St. Mary's l.M.T. (Massage Therapy), Omaha School of Massage Therapy b.S. (Health Arts), University of St. Franci l.M.T. (Massage Therapy), Omaha School of Massage Therapy

Dan Anguiano, Assistant Professor*

M.A. (graphic design), Savannah College of Art and design b.F.A. (graphic Communication), University of Texas M.b.A. (business Administration), University of Illinois M.A. (linguistics), University of Illinois M.A. (diplomacy Terrorism), norwich University b.S. (Criminal Justice), University of Maryland M.A. (Adult Education and distance learning, University of Phoenix b.A. (Communication), baldwin Wallace College M.A. (English), Illinois State University b.A. (English Education), Illinois State University M.A. (English literature), b.A. (English), University of Central Florida Ph.d. (Mathematics), M.S. (Computer Science), Alexandria University M.S. (Computer Science), b.S. (Mathematics), Alexandria University M.b.A. (business Administration), Texas Woman's University b.S. (Health Information Management), Texas Southern University M.S. (Physical Therapy), drexel University b.S. (biology and Psychology), St. bonaventure University M.b.A. (business Administration), Southeastern University b.S. (Accounting), York College M.S. (International Marketing), South bank University b.S. (Marketing), l'Ecoloe de Hautes Etudes Commerciales et Informatiques

Cindy Atchley, Assistant Professor*

Tina Sorensen, Senior Instructor

Thomas Barnes, Assistant Professor* Mary Barko, Assistant Professor*

Debbie Stogdill, Instructor

Dylan Barth, Assistant Professor*

vickie zenor, Instructor*

Laura Basso, Assistant Professor* Alfred Basta, Associate Professor* Nadine Basta, Assistant Professor* Dalona Beckham, Assistant Professor*

Online

Matthew Ademola, Associate Professor* d.b.A., Argosy University M.S. (Transportation Management), University of new York Maritime College Robert Allen, Associate Professor* J.d. (legal Studies), University of Alabama l.l.M. (Taxation), University of Alabama Ph.d. (nursing Research), University of Cincinnati M.S. (nursing), Villanova University M.A. (Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (Speech Pathology), Southern University and A&M College Melissa Bednarek, Assistant Professor*

Nezam Al-Nsair, Associate Professor*

Myeshia Ambrose, Assistant Professor*

Kevin Bell, Assistant Professor*

Kathryn Ambrozich, Assistant Professor* M.b.A. (Accounting), baker College b.A. (Accounting), College of St. Francis

Fatima Bendada, Associate Professor

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Dawn Berta-Strauss, Associate Professor*

d.C., Palmer College of Chiropractic b.A. (Music Education), Jersey City State College M.A. (English), Southern Connecticut State University b.A. (English), Fairleigh dickenson University M.P.H. (Public Health), b.S. (Psychology), University of Alabama at birmingham M.b.A. (Management), Salve Ragina University b.S. (business Administration), Charter Oak State College M.S. (Ecology and Evolutionary biology), University of West Florida b.A. (Anthropology), duke University M.F.A. (graphic design), Cranbrook b.F.A. (Photography), College for Creative Studies M.A. (Sociology), b.S. (Sociology), Sam Houston State University M.Ed. (Training and Performance Improvement), Capella University b.A. (Spanish and latin American Studies), University of Wisconsin M.A. (Health Care Administration), governors State University b.S. (business Administration), Robert Morris College M.P.A., University of Alabama b.S. (nursing), University of Alabama d.b.A. (Accounting), Argosy University M.S. (Management and Finance Marketing), northwestern University

Natasha Cauley, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Public Health), University of Alabama b.S. (Health Information Management), University of Alabama d.Mgt. (Organizational leadership), University of Phoenix M.S. (Accounting), University of Maryland b.S. (business Administration), Herzing University M.C.J. (Criminal Justice), boston University b.S. (Criminal Justice), Park University M.S. (Political Science), Universidad Centroamericana "José Simeon Canas" b.A. (Anthropology), grinnell College M.S. (Criminal Justice), University of Wisconsin--Madison b.S. (Criminal Justice), St. John's University M.S. (Engineering Management), Milwaukee School of Engineering b.S. (Criminal Justice), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.J.A. (Justice Administration), norwich University b.A. (Psychology), burlington College M.A. (Health Services Management), M.A. (Procurement and Acquisitions), Webster University M.b.A. (Health Care Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (Health Record Administration), York College of Pennsylvania M.S. (Software Engineering), b.S. (Computer Science), University of Michigan--dearborn

Peggy Bloomer, Assistant Professor*

Donna Chan, Associate Professor*

Tykeysha Boone, Assistant Professor*

Amy Chastek, Senior Instructor*

Stacey Bottone, Assistant Professor*

Travis Coldwell, Assistant Professor*

Erin Conrad, Assistant Professor*

Betsy Brantley, Assistant Professor*

James Conroy, Assistant Professor

Monica Breen, Assistant Professor*

Rachel Cribb, Assistant Professor

Tasha Brown, Assistant Professor*

Patricia Cadena, Assistant Professor*

Barbara Crowson, Assistant Professor*

Lisa Campbell, Assistant Professor*

Patricia Cunningham, Assistant Professor*

Michele D'Ambrosio, Assistant Professor

Tammy Card, Assistant Professor*

Robert Castaneda, Associate Professor*

Imam Dabaja, Assistant Professor*

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Alan Daszkiewicz, Assistant Professor*

M.b.A., Walsh College b.S. (Clinical laboratory Sciences), Michigan State University M.S. (Criminal Justice), Eastern Kentucky b.S. (Criminal Justice), University of Maryland Ph.d. (Holistic Science), Madison University M.S. (Physician Assistant Studies), University of nebraska Medical Center M.A. (Teaching and Communication), University of Texas b.A. (Communication), Concordia University M.A. (Mathematics), Villanova University M.A. (Education), Cabrini College Ph.d., M.S. (Industrial Engineering), Iowa State University J.d., University of Richmond b.S. (Administration of Justice--legal Studies), Virginia Commonwealth University M.b.A. (business and Human Resource Management), Southern California University M.A. (Psychology and Counseling), John F. Kennedy University M.S. (Human Resources and Organizational development), Wayne State University M.S. (Organizational development and Human Resources), Eastern Michigan University M.S. (Computer Information Systems), b.S. (business Management), University of Phoenix Ph.d. (nursing), Rush University M.S. (nursing), University of Maryland

Dwight Elliot, Associate Professor*

J.d., University of Maryland M.S. Telecommunications and network Management), Syracuse University Ph.d. (English), M.A. (English literature), Purdue University b.A. (Journalism), University of nebraska--lincoln M.S. (Information Technology), University of Maryland b.S. (Marketing Management), University of nebraska M.S. (Administrative Science), Fairleigh dickinson University b.S. (Police Science), City University of new York, John Jay College of Criminal Justice M.A. (Interdisciplinary Studies), b.S. (Criminal Justice), george Mason University M.b.A., (general Management), Keller graduate School of Management b.S. (Health Information Management), Florida A&M University Ph.d., M.S. (Mechanical Engineering), University of Wisconsin--Madison Ph.d. (Organization and Management), Capella University M.S. (Taxation), The American University M.A. (English), University of Florida b.A. (English), Suffolk University b.A. (literary Studies and Political Science), beloit College

Christopher Davis, Assistant Professor*

Anne Erickson, Associate Professor*

Kay Eilers, Instructor* Michelle Davis, Assistant Professor*

Eric Everson, Assistant Professor*

Paige Davis, Assistant Professor

Paul Delpo, Assistant Professor*

Ronald Facciponti, Assistant Professor*

Kurt Diesch, Associate Professor*

Shena Dixon, Associate Professor*

Murray Farr, Assistant Professor*

Eileen Domerchie, Assistant Professor*

Wanda Feaster, Assistant Professor*

Ramon Figueroa, Associate Professor*

Amy Drongowski, Assistant Professor*

Maryln Fisher, Associate Professor*

Elvia Earley, Assistant Professor*

James Fleming, Assistant Professor*

Holly Franson, Instructor*

Toni Eason, Associate Professor*

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Deborah Galanski-Maciak, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Community Health Administration), Independence University b.A.S. (Allied Health), Siena Heights University M.F.A. (Fine Arts and Communications), b.A. (English), University of new Orleans M.S. (Information Systems), Strayer University b.S. (Organizational leadership), Union University Ph.d. (Podiatric Medicine), new York College of Podiatric Medicine b.A. (Sociology), Howard University J.d., University of d.C. M.b.A. (Human Resource Management), University of Phoenix M.S.n., University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee b.S. (nursing), Alverno College M.b.A. (business, Finance and Investment banking), M.A. (Philosophy), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.S. (Information Systems), University of Phoenix

Tanweer Haroon, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Systems Science), louisiana State University b.S. (Electrical Engineering), J.M.I. University M.S. (Accounting), louisiana State University b.S. (Accounting), South Eastern louisiana University M.S. (general Administration), b.S. (Criminal Justice), Central Michigan University M.S. (Health System Administration), Rochester Institute of Technology b.S. (Health Care Administration), Empire State College J.d., University of Akron School of law M.P.A. (Public Administration), University of Akron b.S. (Educational Studies), Carroll College M.S. (general Administration), b.S. (Marketing and Advertising), Central Michigan University M.S. (Criminal Justice), Chicago State University M.P.A., Walden University M.S. (Human Resource Management), Troy State University b.A. (English), Columbus College M.A. (Arts and Humanities), b.A. (literary Studies), University of Texas at dallas M.b.A. (business Administration), Hamline University b.A. (Sociology), University of Wisconsin--Madison

Susan Gebhardt, Assistant Professor*

Ashley Harper, Assistant Professor*

Roger Goodman, Assistant Professor*

Jeff Harper, Assistant Professor*

Jillian Harrington, Assistant Professor* Cristal Grant-Spence, Associate Professor*

Denise Greaves, Assistant Professor*

Jamila Harris, Assistant Professor*

Michelle Gricar, Assistant Professor*

Tammy Hartley, Instructor* Christine Hazemy, Assistant Professor*

Tom Gross, Assistant Professor*

Eric Helvy, Assistant Professor*

Elainna Guerrette, Associate Professor

Kermelle Hensley, Assistant Professor* Loretta Hamilton, Associate Professor M.S. (natural Health), Clayton College b.S. (Health Management), Anthem College Christine Hilger, Assistant Professor* Donna Harlow, Assistant Professor* M.b.A. (business Administration), Averett University b.S. (business Administration), liberty University

Toni Hoffa, Instructor*

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Donna Hoff-Granbau, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Community Health nursing), University of Michigan b.S. (nursing), Wayne State University Ph.d. (Immunology and Microbiology), Medical College of georgia M.d., Meharry Medical College M.A. (Education), Viterbro University b.S. (Math Education), University of Wisconsin--Parkside M.S.W. (Social Work), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee b.A. (Social Welfare), University of Wisconsin--Madison d.b.A., M.b.A., nova Southeastern University Ph.d. (Human Services), Capella University M.b.A. (business Administration), lewis University M.A. (Accounting and Financial Management), deVry University M.b.A., University of Central Missouri M.A. (Communications and liberal Arts), b.S. (Communication), ball State University

Charlotte Johnson, Associate Professor*

Ph.d. (Psychology and Counseling), Capella University M.A. (Counseling and developmental disabilities), St. Mary's University d.Ed. (Educational leadership), University of Phoenix M.S. (Child Health nursing), georgia State University Ph.d. (nursing Clinical leadership), Case Western Reserve University M.S. (nursing), University of Hawaii M.b.A. (Finance), Kellstadt School of business b.S. (Accounting), dePaul University J.d., Vermont law School b.A. (History), Johnson State College M.S. (Mathematics), Texas A&M University M.S. (Chemistry), University of California--Irvine M.A. (English), dePaul University b.A. (Humanities), Michigan State University Ph.d. (Political Science), Ohio State University M.A. (Art), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.b.A. (Clinical Information Systems), Stephens College b.S. (Health Information Management), Indiana University M.A. (Information Resources and Management), M.b.A. (business Administration), Webster University M.A. (History), loyola University b.A. (History), Creighton

Charles Holsey, Associate Professor*

Michelle Johnson, Assistant Professor*

Dave Hyatt, Assistant Professor*

Holly Kailani, Associate Professor*

Deb Hyatt, Assistant Professor*

Beth Kane, Assistant Professor*

Kathleen Hyatt, Associate Professor* Donald Ibeabuchi, Associate Professor*

Kathryn Kent, Assistant Professor*

Pamela Kimbrough, Assistant Professor* Nora King, Assistant Professor*

Mike James, Assistant Professor*

Natalie Kistner, Associate Professor Ben Jedd, Assistant Professor*

Michelle Knighton, Assistant Professor Sarah Jedd, Associate Professor* Ph.d. (Communication Arts), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.A. (Communication), Miami University of Ohio Srinivas Korrapati, Assistant Professor* Patricia Jenkins, Associate Professor* Ph.d. (nursing), University of Tennessee M.b.A. (business), Tulane University M.S. (Quality Assurance), California State University--dominquez Hills b.S. (business), Upper Iowa University

Charles Johnson, Associate Professor

David Kosalka, Assistant Professor*

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Michelle Kosalka, Assistant Professor*

M.A. (English), b.A. (English and Psychology), University of northern Iowa M.b.A. (leadership), b.S. (Health Care Management), Walden University Ph.d., M.A. (Psychology), Southern Illinois University J.d., b.A. (Social Science Pre-law), Michigan State University

Andrea Leicht, Instructor*

b.A. (English), University of Wisconsin--Parkside M.A. (Human Resources development), Webster University b.A. (business Administration), Orlando College M.A. (Counseling), lakeland College b.S. (Psychology), University of Wisconsin--Parkside M.b.A. (business Administration), Cardinal Stritch University b.S. (Health Care Administration), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.F.A. (Marketing), baker College b.F.A. (graphic design), University of Michigan M.A. (Counseling and Psychotherapy), Alfred Adler graduate School b.A., Metropolitan State University Ph.d., M. Ed. (Education), Virginia Commonwealth University M.H. (Health Care Administration), University of South Carolina b.S. (Management), Clemson University M.b.A. (Management), M.S. (International business), University of Miami M.S. (Educational School Counseling), b.A. (Sociology), gwynedd-Mercy College M.F.A. (graphic design), Savannah College of Art and design b.A. (drawing and Painting), College of Charleston

Amber Krasny, Assistant Professor*

Evelyn Lenardos, Assistant Professor*

Creig Kronstedt, Associate Professor*

Denise Lorge, Assistant Professor*

Konnie Kustron, Associate Professor*

Eryn Lukic, Assistant Professor* Eppie LaBiche, Associate Professor* M.S. (nursing), University of Phoenix M.b.A. (Health Care Administration), South University M.b.A., b.S. (Health Information Management), Texas Woman's University M.S. (Public Health), b.S. (Health Education), Idaho State University M.A. (Health Information Management), College of Saint Scholastica b.S. (Health Sciences and Community Health), Minnesota State University M.S. (Health Administration), Cardinal Stritch University b.A. (Asian Studies), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.S. (Information Technology), American Intercontinental University b.S. (business Management and Economics), State University of new York J.d., M.b.A., Texas Tech University M.Ed. (Reading and literacy), Concordia University b.S. (biology), University of Houston Mary Lutfy, Assistant Professor

Jacqueline Lafleur, Assistant Professor*

Jennifer Lame, Assistant Professor*

Sherri Lutterman, Assistant Professor*

Kim Langer, Assistant Professor*

Mehdi Mansouri, Associate Professor*

Kevin Marshall, Assistant Professor* Don Laurin, Assistant Professor*

Jackie McAllister, Assistant Professor*

Hildalyn Lawal, Assistant Professor*

Michele Martin, Assistant Professor*

Justin Lawrence, Associate Professor* Susan Lee, Assistant Professor*

Cory McBee, Assistant Professor*

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Jack McCoy, Assistant Professor*

M.S., b.S. (Criminal Justice), Troy University Ed.d. (Educational leadership), M.Ed. (Education), Cambridge College

Shundra Mosby, Assistant Professor*

Riedetta McCreary, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Health Services Administration), Central Michigan University b.S. (Health Care Management), Southern Illinois University M.b.A. (business Administration), University of new Orleans M.S. (Health Administration), Central Michigan University d.C., logan College of Chiropractic, b.S. (biology), University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point d.Mgt. (Organizational leadership), University of Phoenix M.b.A. (International business), Temple University M.S. (Information Technology), American Intercontinental University M.A. (Organizational Management), Antioch University d.Ed. (Education Technology Management), north Central University M.S. (Psychology), California Coast University M.A. (Justice Administration), Wichita State University b.S. (Criminal Justice), northeastern Oklahoma State University M.A., baker University b.A. (English), Rockhurst University M.S. (Physical Therapy), Emory University b.A. (Sociology), University of California J.d., Western new England College b.A. (general business Studies), Eastern Connecticut University

Karen Moses, Assistant Professor* Lori McLaughlin-Howell, Assistant Professor* Tina McLeod, Associate Professor* M.S. (Human Resources), b.S.b.A., north Carolina A&T State University d.C., Palmer College of Chiropractic b.S. (Health Education), University of Wisconsin--Whitewater M.A. (Public Administration), b.S. (Criminology), University of new Mexico M.S. (Applied Math), Colorado State University b.S. (Mathematics), University of Minnesota M.S. (Health Care Administration), Central Michigan University b.S. (nursing), University of detroit M.S. (Criminal Justice), Troy University b.S. (Human Services), Wayland baptist Academy Ph.d. (Engineering), University of new Mexico M.S. (Physics), Texas Tech University M.b.A. (Management Information Systems), bellevue University b.A. (graphic design), Ashworth College b.A. (Cinema Productions), University of Southern California Ph.d. (general Education), Capella University M.S.n., bellarmine University M.S. (Human Resources and business), M.A. (Professional development), Amberton University Elisabeth Musil, Assistant Professor*

Todd Mueller, Professor

Tom Meyer, Assistant Professor

Matasha Murrell-Jones, Associate Professor*

Kirsten Meymaris, Assistant Professor*

Susan Miedzianowski, Associate Professor*

Roger Milam, Assistant Professor*

Kristina Nelson, Associate Professor*

Nancy Miller, Associate Professor

Gary Neumeyer, Assistant Professor*

Rex Miller, Assistant Professor*

Jaynelle Nixon, Assistant Professor*

Juniko Moody, Senior Instructor*

Caryn Oberman, Assistant Professor*

Georgia Moore, Associate Professor*

Mary Orcutt, Associate Professor*

Jim Morgan, Assistant Professor*

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Pamela Parkinson, Associate Professor*

J.d., University of Utah b.S. (U.S. History and American government Political Science), Webber State University J.d., Indiana University b.S. (Agricultural Communications), Purdue University

Rick Rava, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Vocational Education), State University of new York Institute of Technology b.A. (Computer Science), Potsdam College M.b.A., Ottawa University b.A. (business Management and Computer Studies), Alverno College M.S. (nursing), University of Phoenix b.S. (nursing), St. Joseph's Hospital of nursing M.b.A., Keller graduate School of Management b.S. (Information Technology), deVry Institute of Technology J.d., loyola University M.S. (business Administration), Tulane University Ph.d. (nursing), University of Missouri M.S. (Medical Surgical nursing), University of Illinois M.A. (Adult Education and distance learning), University of Phoenix b.A. (Art), buffalo State University of new York M.A. (Organizational Management), University of Phoenix graduate Certificate (Health Services Management), Keller graduate School of Management Ph.d. (nursing), M.S.n., University of Kentucky M.S. (Instructional design), University of South Alabama b.S. (Health Information Management), University of Alabama--birmingham d.b.A. (Management), Argosy University M.b.A. (International Trade), University of Sarasota

Erika Reyes, Assistant Professor* Sarah Parrish-Williamson, Associate Professor*

Mary Reynolds, Assistant Professor* Carol Patton, Associate Professor* d.P.H., University of Pittsburg M.S. (nursing), West Virginia University Tim Robinson, Assistant Professor* Theresa Pavone, Associate Professor* Ph.d. (Industrial and Organizational Psychology), Capella University M.A. (Organizational Management), University of Phoenix M.b.A., Marylhurst University b.S. (Physical Education, Recreation and Health Sciences), Illinois State University M.S. (Accounting and Financial Management), deVry University b.S. (Accounting), north Carolina Wesleyan College M.S. (Accounting), b.S. (business Accounting), liberty University M.b.A., (Health Care Management), University of Phoenix b.S. (business Administration), South Carolina State University usama Saleh, Associate Professor Sheri Putnam, Assistant Professor* M.b.A. (Administration), Holy Family University b.A. (Journalism), Rider University M.b.A. (Health Care Management), American Intercontinental University b.S. (Health Care Administration), Albany State University Courtney Sanderson, Assistant Professor*

Jim Rolfes, Assistant Professor*

JoDee Phillips, Assistant Professor*

Charlene Romer, Associate Professor*

Monica Phillis, Assistant Professor*

Alan Rossi, Assistant Professor*

Justin Pickering, Assistant Professor*

Shelley Safian, Assistant Professor*

Merle Pointe-Johnson, Assistant Professor

April Raines, Assistant Professor*

Thomas Schaefer, Associate Professor*

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Ann Schwalboski, Assistant Professor*

M.F.A. (Creative Writing), Emerson College M.A. (Mass Communication), bowling green University M.S. (Management and Organizational behavior), Silver lake College b.S. (Computer Science), State University of new York M.S. (Security Management), b.S. (Criminal Justice), bellevue University

Brandy Spears-Hunger, Assistant Professor* Robert Stage, Assistant Professor*

M.S. (Criminal Justice), boston University b.A. (Public Justice), Oswego State University M.S., (Student Personal Administration), b.A. (Psychology), State University of new York College--buffalo M.d., b.S. (biology, Criminal Justice and Political Science), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.b.A. (Medical group Management), University of St. Thomas b.A. (Health Information Management), College of St. Scholastica M.S. (Public Affairs), b.S. (general Studies), Indiana University J.d., Florida Coastal School of law b.A. (Political Science), Indiana University Ph.d. (Applied Management), Walden University M.b.A., Keller graduate School of Management M.S. (Manufacturing Systems Engineering), University of Wisconsin b.S. (Manufacturing Engineering Technology), Milwaukee School of Engineering M.b.A., (Executive Management), b.S. (Marketing, Sales and business), Ashland University M.Ed. (guidance and Counseling) b.A. (general Studies), Eastern Illinois University Ph.d. (Educational leadership and Policy Analysis), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.A. (Counseling Psychology), lewis and Clark College

Charlotte Scott, Assistant Professor*

Rebecca Stahl, Assistant Professor*

Richard Sczerbicki, Assistant Professor*

Marie Stangl, Assistant Professor* David Seckman, Assistant Professor* M.S. (Higher Education Administration), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee b.A. (Anthropology), University of Missouri--St. louis Ken Steeg, Assistant Professor* Elizabeth Serbia, Associate Professor* M.d., Tulane University b.A. (Physiology), University of California--berkeley M.F.A. (Creative Writing), University of Montana b.A. (English Writing), University of Pittsburgh M.S. (Information Technology), American Intercontinental University M.S. (Correctional Counseling and Management, Chicago State University d.C., Sherman College of Chiropractic b.A. (Speech Communication), University of Pittsburgh Ph.d. (Information Technology), Capella University M.b.A., Florida Metropolitan University M.b.A., University of Puerto Rico M.S. (business Management and HR), University of Wisconsin--Madison M.b.A. (Marketing), b.S. (Molecular genetics), University of Toledo

David Steele, Assistant Professor*

Dan Shapiro, Assistant Professor*

Dirk Stevens, Associate Professor*

Robert Shoffner, Assistant Professor*

Alex Stoltz, Assistant Professor*

Stephen Shore, Associate Professor*

Kathy Stricklin, Associate Professor*

Stephen Simmons, Associate Professor*

George Strohm, Assistant Professor*

Isabel Simonetti, Assistant Professor*

Genella Stubrud, Associate Professor*

Aileen Smith, Assistant Professor*

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Micheal Swank, Assistant Professor*

M.A. (Educational Technology), Peperdine University b.A. (Fine Arts), School of Art Institute of Chicago Ph.d. (Curriculum and Instruction) M.S. (Mathematics Education), University of Florida M.b.A. (Health Sciences), deVry University b.A. (business Administration), St. leo University Ph.d. (Philosophy), University of banja luka M.A. (Philosophy), louisiana State University

Charles vaziri, Assistant Professor*

M.S., b.S. (Mathematical Sciences), Virginia Commonwealth University Ph.d., M.S. (Computer Science), University of Texas M.A. (Mass Communication), bF.A. (Film Studies), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.A. (Organizational development), Upper Iowa University b.A. (business Administration), lakeland College M.Actg., georgia State University b.S. (Accounting), Spring Hill College d.b.A. (Management), Argosy University M.S. (Human Resource Management), Troy State University M.S. (Computer Science) brigham Young University M.b.A. (business), loyola University M.S. (Health Services Administration), Central Michigan University b.S. (Medical Record Administration), louisiana Tech University M.b.A. (Accounting), davenport University b.b.A. (Health Administration), davenport University M.S. (Accounting), b.S. (Accounting), Strayer University M.S. (Information Technology, network Architecture and design), Capella University b.S. (Technology Management), Herzing University

Felicia Taylor, Associate Professor*

Jay veerasamy, Associate Professor*

Greg Walsko, Assistant Professor*

Dolores Thomas, Assistant Professor*

Patricia Ward, Assistant Professor*

vladimir Thomas, Associate Professor*

Sharion Thompson, Assistant Professor* M.H.A., University of Phoenix b.S. (Individual Studies), Eastern Michigan University Patti Thornhill, Associate Professor* Sonia Toson, Associate Professor* J.d., george Mason University J.d., American University M.b.A. (business law), American University M.F.A. (Print Media), School of the Art Institute of Chicago b.F.A. (drawing and Print Making), Southern Illinois University M.S. (Counseling Psychology), Capella University b.S. (Psychology), Central Michigan University Ph.d. (Economics and Politics), Claremont graduate University M.b.A. (Finance), Wayne State University Ph.d. (Modern Studies), University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee M.A. (English), University of northern Iowa M.S. (Public Health), Suffolk University

George Wentworth, Assistant Professor* Annette West, Associate Professor*

Robert Whale, Assistant Professor*

Josephia Trupia, Assistant Professor*

Tanya White, Assistant Professor*

Nicole ubinger, Assistant Professor*

Janice Whittaker, Assistant Professor*

vilma vallilee, Associate Professor*

Jennifer Whitlow, Assistant Professor*

Michelle van Wert Kosalka, Associate Professor

James Wilhoit, Assistant Professor*

Debra vance, Assistant Professor*

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Michael Wills, Assistant Professor*

M.F.A. (Print Making), State University of new York--new Paltz b.F.A. (design), California College of the Arts M.S. (nursing), University of Phoenix b.S. (nursing), Indiana University d.C. (Chiropractic), life Chiropractic College b.S. (business Education), Tennessee State University M.S. (Information Systems), University of detroit--Mercy b.S.E. (Computer Engineering), University of Michigan M.S. (Accountancy), California State University--los Angeles M.S. (Management), Harbin University of Science and Technology M.b.A. (Marketing), baker College b.A. (business Administration), baker College

Kimberly Echeverria, Assistant Professor

M.S. (nursing Education), University of Phoenix b.S.n. (nursing), barry University M.S. (nursing), Emory University b.S.n. (nursing), Medical College of georgia M.S. (Psychology), Miami Institute of Psychology b.A. (Psychology, Education), Herbert H. lehman College b.S. (Electrical Engineering), University of Technology (baghdad) Ed.d. (Curriculum and Instruction), University of Central Florida M.A. (Communications), University of Central Florida d.n.P. (nursing Practice), Case Western Reserve University M.S.n. (nursing), Case Western Reserve University M.A. (English and Psychology), University of Kentucky b.A. (English), Fisk University Ph.d. (HR development), barry University M.H.S. (Physical Therapy), University of Florida M.S.n. (nursing), University of Phoenix b.S.n. (nursing), University of Phoenix M.S.n. (nursing), University of Phoenix b.S.n. (nursing), Marshall University d.C. (Chiropractic), life University b.S. (biological Science), University of Central Florida

Kelly Witter, Assistant Professor*

Patricia Edwards, Associate Professor

Dorothy Wright, Associate Professor*

Eric Farber, Associate Professor

Ray Wright, Assistant Professor*

yahia Fawzi, Senior Instructor

Edie Gaythwaite, Instructor*

Hong zhao, Associate Professor*

Stacy Gruka, Instructor*

Joan zito, Assistant Professor*

Orlando

Robert Boyte, Instructor* M.Ed. (English Education), University of Central Florida b.A. (English), University of Central Florida M.A. (Educational Technology), Jones International University b.S. (Information Technology), University of Phoenix b.S. (Health and Exercise Science), Oral Roberts University A.S.P.T.A. (Physical Therapy Assistant), Seminole Community College M.S.P.T. (Physical Therapy), University of St. Augustine b.S. (Physical Therapy), daemen College

Lori Guiseppi, Associate Professor

Scott Harp, Instructor

Jessica Chisholm, Instructor*

Randa Harrison, Assistant Professor

Kevin Colgan, Senior Instructor

Della Honeycutt, Associate Professor Cesar Irizarry, Instructor*

Daniel Curtis, Instructor*

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Donna Kini-Bowen, Associate Professor

M.S. (Integrative Medicine), Florida College of Integrative Medicine b.S. (Computer Science), Chaminade University of Honolulu M.S.n., b.S.n., University of Phoenix M.S.n., Emory University b.S.n., University of north Carolina

Michael Taylor, librarian

M.l.I.S. (library and Information Services), b.S. (Information Studies), Florida State University M.S.P.T. (Physical Therapy), Southwest Texas State University b.S. (Family and Consumer Science), baylor University b.S. (Health Services Administration), University of detroit--Mercy A.A.S. (Surgical Technology), University of detroit--Mercy M.d., (Medicine), Alexandria University

Amy vernon, Associate Professor Patricia Kry, Assistant Professor Terri Kyle, Associate Professor

Paulette Woods, Assistant Professor Jill Mall, Instructor* M.S.P.T. (Physical Therapy), Medical College of Virginia b.S. (biology), University of north Carolina b.S. (Radiologic Sciences), Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences M.S.C.S. (Computer Science), Farleigh dickinson University b.T.I.E. (Internet Technology), new York Institute of Technology M.S.n., Frontier School of Midwifery b.S.n., University of Central Florida M.S.b.A. (business Administration), nova Southeastern University b.S.C.S. (Computer Information Systems), Atlantic Union College M.S. (Exercise Physiology), East Carolina University b.S. (Exercise Physiology), East Carolina University M.b.A., (business Administration), baker College A.A.S. (Surgical Technology), baker College b.S., (Fisheries and Wildlife Management), Virginia Tech University A.A.S. (Radiology), Central Virginia Community College Nagi yousseff, Associate Professor

Jerrine May, Assistant Professor

Toledo

Elthham Baryaruha, Assistant Professor* M.S. (Mathematics), University of Toledo Sherri Benton, Assistant Professor* Angela Brown, Assistant Professor* M.A., b.A. (English), University of Toledo M.A. (Organizational Management), University of Phoenix b.A. (Sociology), lourdes College M.E. (business Education) b.A. (Human Resources Management), bowling green State University M.A. (Written Communications) b.S. (English and American literature), Eastern Michigan University M.P.A., b.S. (business Administration in Pre-law), bowling green State University M.A. (English), b.S. (Journalism), bowling green University M.C.J. (Forensic Psychology), Tiffin University A.A.S., Owens Community College

Michael McAlpin, Instructor*

Allyn McGee, Instructor*

Colette Purcell, Assistant Professor*

Kymberly Brownridge, Assistant Professor*

Matthew Robinson, Assistant Professor

Jennifer Castillo, Assistant Professor*

Sidney Childs, Assistant Professor*

Tammi Smith, Assistant Professor

Marc J. Delph, Instructor

Gary Svitek, Senior Instructor

Stacey Deshetler, Assistant Professor*

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Konra Friedberg, Assistant Professor*

M.A. (Mathematics), b.S. (Mathematics and Elementary Education), bowling green State University A.A.S. (Surgical Technology), Owens Community College A.A.S. (Surgical Technology), Owens Community College M.Ed. (Career and Technology Education), b.A. (Technology), bowling green State University M.S. (Medical Science), b.S. (biology), University of Toledo M.A. (Speech), b.S. (Journalism), bowling green State University M.S. (biology), University of Toledo b.S. (Microbiology), bowling green State University M.Ed. (Educational Psychology), b.S. (Human Relations), University of Toledo M.S. (Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry), University of Toledo b.S. (biology), American University of beirut M.S. (Computer Information Systems), Eastern Michigan University b.S. (Medical Technology and Microbiology), University of Phoenix M.A. (Mathematics), Wayne State University Ph.d. (English), bowling green State University M.A. (English), Eastern Washington University b.A. (Communication), Chapman University

Tracy Tabacynski, Assistant Professor*

M.A. (Psychology), bowling green State University b.A. (Semiotics), brown University M.S. (Human Resource Management), M.b.A. (Health Care Administration), national American University M.Ed. (Educational Technology), University of Toledo

Destani Fuhr, Assistant Professor*

Sandra Tuttle, Assistant Professor

Denice Giovanoli, Assistant Professor

London Weathers, Assistant Professor*

Julie Jackson, Assistant Professor

Samuel Lupica, Assistant Professor*

Ken Mackowiak, Assistant Professor*

Akisha McCarter, Assistant Professor*

Sandra Miller, Assistant Professor*

Maha Nassreddine, Assistant Professor*

Peggy Rapai, Assistant Professor*

Samir Sarsour, Assistant Professor* Russell Sprinkle, Assistant Professor*

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ACCREDITATION

Herzing University is accredited by the Higher learning Commission and is a member of the north Central Association. For further information, The Higher learning Commission can be contacted by phone at (800) 621-7440 or on the Commission's Website at: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org. Herzing University also holds the programmatic accreditations or approvals at selected locations as follows: 1. The Medical Assisting Programs at the Minneapolis and Akron Institute campuses are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review board (MAERb). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, Florida 33756 (727) 210-2350 2. The Medical Assisting Programs at the Madison, new Orleans, and Online campuses and the Surgical Technology Programs at the new Orleans and Orlando campuses are accredited by the Accrediting bureau of Health Education Schools (www.abhes.org). Accrediting bureau of Health Education Schools 7777 leesburg Pike, Suite 314 north Falls Church, Virginia 22043 (703) 917-9503 3. The dental Hygiene and dental Assisting Programs at the Minneapolis campus are accredited by the Commission on dental Accreditation of the American dental Association (www.ada.org). American dental Association 211 East Chicago Ave. Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678 (312) 440-2500 4. The diploma in Medical billing and Insurance Coding at the Minneapolis campus is approved by the American Health Information Management Association (www.ahima.org). American Health Information Management Association 213 north Michigan Avenue, 21st Floor Chicago, Illinois 60601-5809 (312) 233-1100

5. The Associate of Science in legal Assisting/Paralegal and the bachelor of Science in legal Studies at the new Orleans and Atlanta campuses are approved by the American bar Association (www.abanet.org). American bar Association 321 north Clark Street Chicago, Illinois 60654-7598 (800)-285-2221 6. The Associate of Science in nursing at the Madison campus is accredited by the national league for nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc. (www.nlnac.org). national league for nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc. 3343 Peachtree Road nE, Suite 500 Atlanta, georgia 30326 (404) 975-5000 7. Herzing University at Orlando has been granted Candidate for Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (1111 north Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia, 22314; 703-706-3245; [email protected]). Candidacy is not an accreditation status nor does it assure eventual accreditation. Candidate for Accreditation is a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education that indicates the program is progressing toward accreditation. 8. The bachelor of Science in Health Information Management at the Online campus is accredited by the Commission on Health Informatics and Information Management Education (www.CAHIIM.org). Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education 233 north Michigan Avenue, 31st Floor Chicago, Illinois 60601-5800 312-233-1100

LICENSES

Herzing University is authorized to offer its educational programs in the various states in which it operates by the following state boards, commissions, and departments.

Akron Institute

Ohio State board of Career Colleges and Schools Registration: 04-01-1704T 39 East gay Street, Suite 403 Columbus, Ohio 43215-3138 (614)466-2752·(877)275-4219 Further information may be obtained by contacting the board.

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Atlanta

georgia nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission 2189 northlake Parkway, building 10, Suite 100 Tucker, georgia 30084-4113 (770) 414-3300 Further information may be obtained by contacting the Commission.

lincoln, nebraska 68509 (402) 471-2847 Further information may be obtained by contacting the Commission.

Orlando

Commission for Independent Education Florida department of Education 325 West gaines Street, Suite 1414 Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400 (888) 224-6684 Further information may be obtained by contacting the Commission.

Birmingham

Alabama State department of Education gordon Persons building 50 north Ripley Street Montgomery, Alabama 36130-3901 (334) 242-9700 Further information may be obtained by contacting the department.

Toledo

Ohio State board of Career Colleges and Schools Registration: 08-09-1874b 39 East gay Street, Suite 403 Columbus, Ohio 43215-3138 (614)466-2752·(877)275-4219

Brookfield, Kenosha, Madison, and Online

State of Wisconsin Educational Approval board 131 West Wilson, Suite 904 Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (608) 266-1996 Further information may be obtained by contacting the board.

APPROvALS

The University has the following authorizations or approvals: · Authorizedunderfederallawtoenrollnon-immigrantalienstudents · ApprovedforthetrainingofVeterans* · ApprovedforthetrainingofVocationalRehabilitationstudents * not all programs are approved at all locations.

Minneapolis

Herzing University is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Registration does not mean that credits earned at the institution can be transferred to all other institutions. Minnesota Office of Higher Education 1450 Energy Park drive, Suite 350 St. Paul, Minnesota 55108 (651) 642-0533 Further information may be obtained by contacting the Office.

MEMBERSHIPS

The University holds memberships in the following organizations: · BetterBusinessBureau · CareerCollegeAssociation · ChamberofCommerce · NationalAssociationofCollegesandEmployers · NationalAssociationofStudentFinancialAidAdministrators · ServiceMembersOpportunityCollege · StateAssociationofStudentFinancialAidAdministrators · StateCollegePlacementAssociations · StatePrivateSchoolAssociations · UniversityContinuingEducationAssociation

New Orleans

louisiana State board of Regents 1201 north Third Street, Suite 6-200 baton Rouge, louisiana 70801 (225) 342-4253 Herzing University, new Orleans, is licensed by the lA board of Regents and adheres to the rules and regulations of the lA Proprietary Schools Advisory Commission. Further information may be obtained by contacting the board.

ADvISORy BOARDS

Advisory boards at each Herzing University have been established to provide input on curriculum content. Members of the advisory boards are professionals from a variety of local businesses. Their input and recommendations help ensure Herzing University offers educational programs that correspond with the skills and training required in today's competitive job market.

UnIVERSITY InFORMATIOn 69

Omaha School of Massage Therapy

Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education 140 north 8th Street, Suite 300

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FACILITIES

Akron Institute Akron Institute of Herzing University occupies 34,000 square feet with newly remodeled instructional rooms consisting of classrooms, large lecture halls, computer labs, medical labs, dental labs, nursing lab, library/ resource center, student lounges, administrative offices, and faculty office areas. The average lecture class size is 30, and the average lab class size is from 8-30 students per instructor. Atlanta Herzing University is located in the heart of buckhead and the Atlanta financial district, offering opportunities for students to interact with business professionals. Herzing University-Atlanta occupies an 18,000-square-foot facility adjacent to the lenox Mall with computer laboratories, an electronics laboratory, allied health laboratory, a library/ resource center, a student lounge, lecture rooms, and administrative offices. Average class size is 20 to 30. Birmingham Herzing University occupies a 40,000-square-foot office building that it acquired in 1994 and completely refurbished to meet its needs for a modern educational center. The university has 14 classrooms, including six computer labs and two electronics labs. It also has a resource center/library, several break areas, a reception area, and administration and admissions offices. The average class size is approximately 20 to 30 students. Brookfield Remodeled in 2010, Herzing University gives students access to the latest classroom learning equipment and state-of-the industry medical, technology, and design labs to simulate real-world situations. located on South Executive drive near brookfield Square Mall, the 13,000-square-foot campus boasts floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking a nature conservancy to create a comfortable, open environment to stimulate the learning process. The campus is easily accessible by car and mass transit and offers free parking. Kenosha Herzing University is located in a 14,000 square foot building at the corner of 39th Avenue and Washington Road in Kenosha, Wisconsin. In addition to modern classrooms, the building provides a library; computer, science and healthcare labs; and student services facilities for admissions, registration, financial aid and career services.

Madison Herzing University occupies a 40,000-square-foot facility specifically designed for the technological and allied health programs offered, including electronics, computer, drafting, design, and nursing labs and a computer commons. This facility is located in a newly-developed technical and business park. The centrally-positioned, glassed-in library and computer commons provide a sense of openness and easy access. Average class size is 20 to 25; lecture size is 15 to 60.

Minneapolis

Herzing University occupies a 25,000-square-foot building containing classrooms, computer, medical, and dental labs, library/resource center, student lounge, and administrative offices. labs and classrooms are designed to facilitate the learning process with hands-on instruction. The average lecture class size is 25 but can be as high as 50, and the average lab class size is from 6-30 students per instructor.

New Orleans

Herzing University is located in the Metairie/Kenner area of the city. Remodeled in 2010, the University presently occupies 17,000 square feet with classrooms, labs, a break room, library/resource center, and faculty and administrative offices. laboratories and classrooms have been designed to facilitate the learning experience with hands-on instruction on state-of-the-industry equipment. Average class size is 20 students or less.

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ACCOMMODATIONS FOR THE DISABLED

Omaha

The Omaha School of Massage Therapy of Herzing University is a 10,000-square-foot facility containing instructional classrooms, private therapy rooms, a spa room, hydrotherapy room, and administrative offices. The massage clinic classroom is equipped with a variety of massage tables and massage chairs. It is the policy of Herzing University to comply with the provisions of the Americans with disabilities Act (AdA). The AdA prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities on the basis of their disability. The AdA provides, in part, that qualified individuals with disabilities shall not be excluded from participating in or be denied the benefits of any program, service, or activity offered by the University. The AdA requires that all programs, services, and activities, when viewed in their entirety, be readily accessible to, and usable by, qualified individuals with disabilities. Students with disabilities who wish to request an accommodation under the AdA should contact the Campus President, who serves as the disability coordinator for the campus.

Orlando

Herzing University is located in 11,000 square feet in the campus atmosphere of the lakeview Office Park. There are classrooms and labs, a student lounge, a library/resource center, and related administrative offices included in the facility, which was remodeled in 2001. Average class size is 20 or fewer students with a maximum of 34.

LIBRARy, RESOuRCE CENTER

The library, resource center at each campus contains technical, business, general studies and other books, periodicals, audiovisuals, Cd-ROMs, and computers with Internet access that support classroom and laboratory learning and resource interests. Herzing University is a member of the library Information and Resource network (lIRn), an online consortium that provides high-quality academic materials through remote access. This membership enables students, faculty, and staff to have uninterrupted access to lIRn's virtual library, which is the equivalent of 8,000 Cd-ROMs, 24 hours a day from any Internet-enabled computer. lIRn's database-driven collection enables users to search several collections covering virtually every area of inquiry. Extensive resources exist to search newspapers (approximately 175 sources), reference books (approximately 115 sources), magazines (approximately 675 sources), and TV, radio transcripts (approximately 60 sources). After matriculation, students are provided with user names and passwords that enable them to log into the lIRn system and access its learning resources. The library, resource center supports development of independent learning skills by offering research information and assistance for both focused and general research. The library also provides an ideal environment for individual study. Herzing University students have access to all services offered by the library, including consultation with the librarian to obtain a particular reference or to conduct research. Herzing University campuses also have agreements with local public libraries that afford students the ability to borrow from the public libraries' collections. Certain campuses are members of state virtual libraries--check with the librarian at the individual campus to determine if that campus participates in such a program.

Toledo

Herzing University occupies a 17,000-square-foot building that was remodeled in 2008. The building is designed to facilitate the learning process. In addition to a large library/resource room, a wireless network, and modern classrooms, the facility offers a nice student lounge and is easily accessible by car and mass transit.

CHANGES TO THIS CATALOG

Curriculum, policies, and other matters discussed herein are subject to change at the discretion of the University. However, curriculum will not be changed to require existing students to take more credits to graduate. Changes will be reflected in an addendum to this catalog and will then be considered an integral part of this publication.

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3. Interest and Professional Attitude--Of importance is the applicant's succeed, a willingness to make those sacrifices necessary to successfully complete the program of study, and a commitment to adhere to the University's rules and expectations. 4. Availability of Time--An applicant must have the availability of time to attend classes and labs, to complete projects, and to submit assignments in a timely manner. An applicant must demonstrate an ability to devote a sufficient degree of time and effort to the program. Each student is expected to spend additional time outside of class hours studying, completing assignments, and doing research. PROGRAM ADMISSION Some programs or delivery formats (such as technology, dental hygiene, nursing, or the accelerated format) may have special admissions requirements. Refer to program descriptions and the EdFlex section of the catalog for any special admissions requirements. ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS FOR NuRSING, HEALTH CARE, AND DENTAL PROGRAMS Verification of immunization history is required of all students no later than 45 days after the first day of class. The Hepatitis b immunization series is required only for students accepted into the health care programs listed below: · · · · · · · DentalAssisting DentalHygiene Nursing OccupationalTherapyAssistant PhysicalTherapistAssistant RadiologicTechnology SurgicalTechnology

ADMISSION INFORMATION

uNDERGRADuATE ADMISSION CRITERIA

To be admitted to any Herzing University program, a prospective student must complete an interview with a Herzing admissions advisor and fill out a Personal Information Record and an Application Completion Form. The following factors are considered prior to acceptance: 1. Prior Education Requirement: An applicant must have a high school diploma or a general education development (gEd) certificate. 2. Entrance/Placement Testing or Prior College Success: An applicant must demonstrate the capacity to succeed in college-level education. This must be evidenced through one of the following methods: a. Successful completion of an entrance evaluation administered with examination scores deemed appropriate by Herzing University. b. Submission of an ACT score of 17 or better or a combined SAT score of 1,275 or better in place of the college entrance evaluation. (The college entrance evaluation is still required for math and English placement.) c. Successful completion of a minimum of 24 semester credit hours of college-level work with grades of "C" or higher at nationally or regionally accredited colleges or universities. (Students admitted under this method are still required to take the placement examination for the purpose of determining if developmental English or mathematics courses are needed unless they have completed a college-level English composition course and a college algebra course with grades of "C" or higher.) d. For limited admissions programs (including dental hygiene and nursing), applicants may be required to complete a specialized admissions test, and only the most qualified applicants are admitted.

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Additional verification of the status of a student's health may be required during the program if deemed necessary to meet safety requirements. Students in health care programs may be exposed to bloodborne infectious diseases. These professions and the educational processes that lead to entry into those professions have a number of unique requirements and standards. All nursing and health care students must accept and acknowledge the following statements of policy to enter or continue in any of these programs. 1. A student convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor other than a minor traffic violation for which a pardon has not be granted: a. May not be able to work in clinical sites required in the program (and thus would not be able to complete the program).

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b. May not be able to obtain a license from the state even if the program is completed. c. 2. May not be able to secure a job, even if licensed. A student may be required to pass a criminal background check and substance abuse test to the satisfaction of the clinical site prior to each scheduled clinical course. A student may be subject to drug and, or alcohol screening in conjunction with clinical classes, and a positive result from a screening could result in dismissal from the clinical and from the program. Clinical hours may be scheduled at any time-of-day or day-of-the-week--day, night, late night, weekends, or holidays--and the student must be available to attend clinical sites at any time the student is assigned. Clinical sites will require the student to have his/her immunizations up to date prior to the start of the clinical. A student may be required to complete a physical exam showing that the student is free of disease that may be transmitted to patients, families, or employees and includes: a. b. c. 7. 8. Proof of Tb skin testing and follow-up. Proof of Hepatitis b vaccination series or proof of immunity. Proof of MMR and Chickenpox vaccinations or proof of immunity.

repeated at the student's cost. There is only one repeat allowed, and there may not be an immediate opportunity to repeat a course, depending on when it is next offered. 13. The cost of tuition and fees at Herzing University includes: a. The cost of instruction and the use of the university facilities, library, employment assistance, and other normal services provided by the University to students, and supplies that are the normal part of lab courses (does not include personal writing instruments or stationery). Two nursing uniforms (not to include shoes or stockings). The use of needed textbooks on a loaned basis. (The student may buy books he or she would like to keep.)

3.

b. c.

4.

5. 6.

14. The student further understands that the cost of tuition and fees at Herzing University does not include: a. b. c. d. e. f. The cost of any required immunizations. The cost of personal health insurance that may be required to work at a clinical site. The cost of transportation to and from school or clinical sites, including parking. The cost of additional uniforms and apparel other than the two issued uniforms. The cost of criminal background checks or substance abuse tests. Any other cost that is not specifically identified above as being part of Herzing University tuition and fees.

Some clinical sites may require that a student be covered by his or her own personal or family health insurance. Successful completion of clinical classes may require that the student be able to perform common physical tasks related to his/her duties to the satisfaction of each clinical site. Patient privacy and the privacy of patient records must be protected, and failure on the part of the student protect patient privacy or patient records could result in dismissal from the clinical site and/or from the program.

9.

15. A student in this program is a potential representative of the health care profession, and the student's actions and inactions may reflect on Herzing University and the clinical sites to which the student is assigned. Therefore, the student must conduct himself or herself in a professional manner, with integrity and responsibility. Failure to behave professionally can be a basis for dismissal from the program. BACKGROuND CHECKS Students planning a program of study leading to employment in some disciplines (including, but not limited to: health care, nursing, law enforcement, and public safety) may be required to undergo a background check before working in that discipline. If this process results in an adverse finding, the student may not be able to complete the internship course, complete the program, sit for certification examinations, or be employed in that discipline.

10. Missing clinical site assignments can be a basis for dismissal from the program unless the student has well-documented mitigating circumstances that are acceptable to the University. 11. Although initial class hours are established for the first semester, class hours after that period of time can change due to availability of facilities, faculty, or other factors, and classes may be scheduled mornings, afternoons, evenings, weekends, or holidays. 12. nursing, dental hygiene, and surgical technology students need to get at least a grade of C+ (76%) in each core course to make satisfactory progress, in addition to any other satisfactory progress criteria of the University. A grade of less than C+ is equivalent to failing the course, and the course must be

ADMISSION PROCEDuRES

Prospective students are expected to complete a Personal Information Record and interview with a Herzing University admissions advisor. The advisor will provide information about programs, start dates, student services, and employment

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opportunities for graduates. Once all admission requirements have been fulfilled, the advisor will generally invite the prospective student to submit an Application Completion Form for admission to the University. The applicant will be notified in writing of the action taken by the University with respect to his/her application. When an application has been accepted, the applicant must establish appropriate financial arrangements and complete the necessary documentation. Once the applicant has completed these arrangements, signed a University Enrollment Agreement, and paid an enrollment fee, the applicant will be considered an enrolled student and will be automatically registered for appropriate classes. Students do not have to register for classes; the University will schedule students for the applicable courses in each term based upon their program of study. Students will have the right to request adjustments to their schedule, which will be accommodated whenever possible. Application for admission is on a continuous basis; however, those who apply first are accepted first, and enrollment is limited. no one will be admitted to class after the second day of the class unless approved by the Academic dean and the Campus President.

semester's tuition must be paid upon enrollment) and that all necessary living expenses for the international applicant will be provided. (Form I-134 may be used and is available online from the bCIS.) 4. Proof of English-language proficiency through any one of the following: a. A score of 500 or higher on the paper-based TOEFl. b. A score of 173 or higher on the computer-based TOEFl. c. A score of 61 or higher on the internet-based TOEFl. d. A score of 5.0 or higher on the IElTS. e. documentation of successful completion of an intermediate English course from a designated ESl center. f. documentation of successful completion of secondary studies (i.e., high school level) in English (a minimum of four years).

g. documentation of successful completion of post-secondary studies (i.e., college level) in English (a minimum of 12 semester hours). Herzing University is also authorized to accept and enroll international applicants currently attending other U.S. institutions who wish to transfer. In addition to providing the items listed above, transfer applicants must do the following: 1. notify their current institution of their intent to transfer. 2. Submit to Herzing University the I-20 issued by the school from which they are transferring in order to have Herzing University issue a new one. 3. Return the newly issued I-20 to Herzing University prior to attending classes. Note: International students cannot receive U.S. federal financial assistance, nor can they work legally in the United States without permission from the BCIS. The level of career services offered to international students/graduates will vary and will depend on the employment opportunities permitted by applicable law and/or on the students'/graduates' visas. Herzing will provide career-planning strategies if requested by international students. Applicants applying from abroad should check with their consulate or embassy for other pertinent requirements or restrictions.

ADMISSION APPLICATIONS

Although it is preferable for a prospective student to visit Herzing University to complete a Personal Information Record and an Application Completion Form, the forms may be obtained in the following ways: 1. Calling the University to request the forms. 2. E-mailing the University to request the forms. 3. Completing the forms on the University web site (www.herzing.edu).

INTERNATIONAL STuDENT ADMISSION

Herzing University is authorized by the U.S. bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Service (bCIS) to accept and enroll non=immigrant students. In order to be issued an I-20 authorization from the University, non-immigrant applicants must meet the University's general admissions requirements and provide the following documentation: 1. A certified copy of the high school transcripts, college transcripts, or the equivalent documents. diplomas and supporting transcripts not written in English must be accompanied by a certified English translation. 2. ACT/SAT scores or transcripts indicating prior post-secondary coursework deemed appropriate for placement into the intended program. Successful completion of an entrance evaluation administered with examination scores deemed appropriate by Herzing University (the evaluation scores also determine if developmental course(s) are needed). 3. A notarized statement of financial support or a certified government sponsor letter indicating that tuition will be paid in advance of each term (the first two

SPECIAL STuDENTS (ADMISSION OF INDIvIDuALS NOT SEEKING DEGREES/DIPLOMAS)

A "Special Student" is a student enrolled for courses not leading to a recognized credential degree or diploma. Applicants not seeking a degree/diploma must complete a Personal Information Record and an Application Completion Form and meet the general Entrance Requirements for the University except for the High School Transitions Program or other special circumstances approved by the Academic dean. In addition, the applicant must meet specific program criteria (if any) for a technical course related to a program major. The University may waive prerequisites for technical courses when appropriate prior education or experience can be shown. If space is available, the applicant will be accepted as a Special Student. The applicant must pay for the

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course(s) desired, complete all applicable forms, sign a college enrollment agreement, and pay the required enrollment fee. Special Students who apply for and are admitted to a degree/diploma may have credits transferred to the degree or diploma program for courses they have satisfactorily completed as a Special Student. Special Students are not eligible for employment assistance or financial aid.

HIGH SCHOOL TRANSITIONS PROGRAM

The Herzing University Transitions Program is offered to high school seniors (inclusive of students who have completed their junior year) who wish to begin working on college credits while attending high school. Interested students may attend Herzing University to take one course tuition-free. Participation is contingent upon space availability in classes; current Herzing University students will be given priority. The cost of all books and materials required will be the student's responsibility. Students participating in the Transitions Program will be considered "Special Students." With the exception of a high school diploma or gEd, the applicant must meet the University's general entrance requirements as well as specific program criteria (if any) for a technical course. The University may waive prerequisites for technical courses when appropriate prior education or competency in the course area can be demonstrated. Transition students will receive a transcript with the appropriate grade earned for the course taken. The Herzing University Transitions Program is available only to high school students who: 1. Have completed their junior year, but not their senior year of high school. 2. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or higher. 3. Submit an authorization signed by a high school official approving the student enrolling in the course and verifying the information under parts (1) and (2) above. Authorization forms may be obtained from the Herzing Admissions department.

A student applying for readmission or reentry who previously completed coursework involving clinical or related skills (including courses in dental assisting, dental hygiene, medical assisting, nursing, radiology, and surgical technology) may be required to repeat some or all of this coursework depending on when the student was last enrolled. This is to ensure that reentering students can perform at skill levels necessary for student and patient safety. Reentering students are responsible for all applicable tuition and fees for repeated coursework. The University also reserves the right to modify curriculum for all programs, and reentering students are required to meet all program requirements existing at the time of their reentry. Certain programs may include additional stipulations for readmission/reentry, and students should reference specific application materials for these programs when considering program withdrawal or reapplication.

CONTINuING STuDENTS

Continuing students who are making satisfactory academic progress and are current in their financial obligations to the University are automatically scheduled for future classes in their program of study. Adjustments may be made in consultation with the Registrar/Academic dean based upon the Add/drop Policy. Adjustments to schedules may affect expected graduation date and the University's undertaking of having a student complete a bachelor of science degree in three years.

NEW STuDENT ORIENTATION

Herzing University's new Student Orientation helps entering students prepare for college. It also enables students to become acquainted with Herzing University and its services. Students will have the opportunity to meet the University staff and faculty members and receive a review of important college policies and procedures. The University will send each enrollee a notification announcing the time and date of the new Student Orientation.

NONDISCRIMINATION

Herzing University, in recognition of its responsibility to its students, its faculty and staff, and the community it serves, reaffirms its policy to assure fair and equal treatment in all of its admission practices for all persons. We will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, age (except as mandated by state law) or national origin, nor against any qualified individual with a disability. Herzing University will not discriminate against any applicant for admission who is known to have a bloodborne infectious disease(s). Herzing University has no requirement for mandatory testing for bloodborne infectious diseases.

READMISSION/REENTRy

A student who withdraws or is terminated from the University may apply for readmission or reentry. However, if a student has been terminated for lack of satisfactory academic progress, the student will be required to appeal to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee (refer to "Appeal Procedures"). Any student applying for readmission/reentry will be required to sign a new enrollment agreement, and all financial obligations from previous enrollment periods must be resolved prior to readmission/reentry. In order for a student to be readmitted in the same program, the student generally must have been making satisfactory progress at the time of withdrawal or termination. A student may re-enter only twice if the student did not receive academic credit for the courses attempted immediately prior to withdrawal. Caution: Students are advised that the availability of courses required may be more difficult to arrange if they have interrupted their program.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS FROM OTHER COLLEGES AND uNIvERSITIES

Applicants desiring to transfer to Herzing University from other colleges must have official transcripts sent to Herzing University from those colleges. It is best if Herzing

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University receives official transcripts before class starts so that proper schedules can be prepared. This is typically done during the admission process prior to the beginning of the first semester but must be done by the end of the first eight weeks of the first semester. For a degree or diploma to be awarded by Herzing University, the last 12 semester credit hours and at least 25 percent of the total credits required for the degree/diploma must be taken at Herzing University. The total number of credits transferred to Herzing University, plus course exemption credits, must not exceed 75 percent of the credits required for a degree/diploma. To receive credit for any course taken elsewhere, the following applies: 1. The course for which credit is being sought must have been taken at an accredited post-secondary institution and must be comparable to the course at Herzing University for which transfer credits are being sought. 2. The student must have earned a grade of at least a "C" or better in that course. 3. The proper authorities at Herzing University must receive the official transcript. A catalog or official description of the course from the previous college is needed. As always, the acceptance of transfer credit is entirely at the discretion of the receiving college. In addition to the grade received, the length of time since the course was taken will be considered. Once an individual matriculates as a Herzing University student the first time and his/ her prior college work has been evaluated for transfer, all future coursework must be completed at Herzing University for it to apply to any degrees or diplomas awarded by Herzing University.

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Orlando

GRADuATION REquIREMENTS--GENERAL

The requirements for graduation are as follows: 1. Cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher in the courses applicable to the student's program. 2. Completion of the required number of credit hours and achieving a passing grade in all required courses. 3. Other requirements may be included under program descriptions. Note: Although keyboarding skill is a requirement for graduation only in the Associate of Science in Legal Assisting/Paralegal program and selected health care programs, all students are expected to have or develop a functional keyboarding skill of 30-35 words per minute. This is particularly true in business degree programs where it is expected that students can keyboard easily. Students who do not possess sufficient skill in this area may be assigned to independent study packages to develop an appropriate skill level.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS TO OTHER COLLEGES AND uNIvERSITIES

The decision to accept credit from another institution is entirely at the discretion of the receiving institution. Students should check with the school to which they desire to transfer regarding the credit they will transfer. In the absence of an articulation agreement between Herzing University and another institution, no one at Herzing University can represent that specific credits will transfer anywhere. A list of the institutions, if any, with whom Herzing University has articulation agreements is available in the administrative office of the University.

ADvANCED PLACEMENT COuRSES

Herzing University will accept credit for any applicable courses, as determined by the University, without the normal exemption testing or fee provided the student passed the nationally Recognized Placement Exam in a course that Herzing University offers in the student's program of study. The student should submit the test results as part of the application process. The Academic dean will determine if credit is to be granted.

SEMESTER CREDIT HOuR SCHEDuLING

Herzing University operates on a semester system with three 16-week semesters per year normally divided into 8-week or 4-week sessions. Courses are offered either in a traditional classroom/lab format or a fully online format or a hybrid format (combining both classroom and online delivery). For courses offered in the traditional classroom/

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lab format, the ratio of classroom/lab contact hours to semester credit hours awards is as follows:

· · ·

lecture Courses (including hands-on technology courses): 15 contact hours for each semester credit hour Science and Health Care labs: 30 contact hours for each semester credit hour Externship, Practicum and Clinic Courses: 45 contact hours for each semester credit hour

Online and hybrid courses (although not measured terms of contact hours) will be delivered in such a way as to achieve the same learning objectives as a classroom/lab course and will be scheduled as outlined above.

EDFLEX EDuCATION OPTIONS

EdFlex at Herzing University is a range of learning format options students may have available to choose from. Courses may be offered in one or more of four formats. Students may select the format that best fits their educational needs and circumstances when available. not all formats are available at all campuses for all courses. Check with your local campus for availability. TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM COuRSE FORMAT The traditional classroom format is intended for students wanting to pursue their courses in a traditional classroom setting. Students may combine the classroom format with the online format by taking some courses online and others in the traditional format. ONLINE COuRSE FORMAT The online format is intended for students who are not near one of our campuses or who prefer the flexibility of an online education. Students living near one of our campuses may combine the online format with the classroom format by taking some classroom courses on the campus and others online. HyBRID COuRSE FORMAT In the hybrid course format, students do part of their studies for a course online and part in the campus face-to-face. Typically, the laboratory portion of the course is done on the campus while the rest of the course is conducted online. ACCELERATED FORMAT Purpose. The accelerated format is designed specifically for experienced working adult students. Courses are offered in the evenings, and the format is available only at selected campus locations in selected programs. The courses are distance learningbased with a classroom component. The classes require less classroom time than in traditional courses and are then augmented by study groups that meet on their own either face-to-face, by phone, or over the web. Akron Institute Special Admission Requirements. Students applying for the accelerated format must meet special admissions requirement in addition to the general admission requirements of Herzing University. These special requirements are: 1. He or she must be at least 24 years of age. 2. He or she must have significant work experience, which is defined as any of the following: a. Two years full-time work. b. Five years of part-time post-high school work experience. c. Other qualifying work experience, as determined by the Academic dean. Class Scheduling. Classes in the accelerated format generally meet once a week as a class and once a week at a distance in independent study groups. All the courses required in the accelerated format are offered over seven semesters and can be completed in as little as 25 months for students who attend class year-round. If a student has prior college coursework that would apply to the program, the time to complete could be shortened and, if a student needs some remedial coursework, the time to complete could be longer. Group Work. Students in the accelerated format have both group work and individual assignments that are completed outside of class. Students are required to work with other students in peer-learning sessions that typically average 4 to 5 hours a week. These sessions are intended to enhance students' college experience by providing group-work projects that are similar to those experienced in the workplace. Students are encouraged during these sessions to share notes, discuss course concepts, and lead by example. All homework assignments must be completed prior to the start of each

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class. new students are required to attend an orientation session that explains some of the unique aspects of accelerated learning, including study groups, student-centered learning, first-session assignments, and once-a-week sessions.

ONLINE EDuCATION

Herzing University offers many of its courses and some full programs of study that lead to credentials in an online format. The number of courses and programs offered in this format is expected to increase. The full programs offered include: · MasterofBusinessAdministration · MasterofBusinessAdministrationinBusinessManagement · MasterofBusinessAdministrationinHealthCareManagement · MasterofBusinessAdministrationinTechnologyManagement · MasterofScienceinNursingWithaConcentrationinNursingEducation · MasterofScienceinNursingWithaConcentrationinNursingManagement · BachelorofScienceinAccounting · BachelorofScienceinBusinessAdministration · BachelorofScienceinComputerScience · BachelorofScienceinCriminalJustice · BachelorofScienceinEntrepreneurialStudies · BachelorofScienceinGraphicDesign · BachelorofScienceinHealthCareManagement · BachelorofScienceinHealthInformationManagement · BachelorofScienceinHomelandSecurityandPublicSafety · BachelorofScienceinHumanResourcesManagement · BachelorofScienceinInternationalBusiness · BachelorofScienceinLegalStudies* · BachelorofScienceinMarketing · BachelorofScienceinNursing--Bridge · BachelorofScienceinTechnologyManagement · AssociateofScienceinBusinessAdministration · AssociateofScienceinComputerScience · AssociateofScienceinCriminalJustice · AssociateofScienceinGraphicDesign · AssociateofScienceinHealthInformationManagement · AssociateofScienceinLegalAssisting/Paralegal* · AssociateofScienceinMedicalAssisting · AssociateofScienceinMedicalBillingandInsuranceCoding · AssociateofScienceinMedicalOfficeAdministration · DiplomainBookkeepingandPayrollAccounting · DiplomainMedicalAssisting · DiplomainMedicalBillingandInsuranceCoding · DiplomainMedicalOfficeAdministration

* Students at the Atlanta and new Orleans campuses must complete all paralegal courses at the campus in a traditional classroom format. Transfer students at the Atlanta and new Orleans campuses must complete at least ten semester credit hours of paralegal core courses in a traditional classroom format at the campus. Please check our Online Education Website (www.herzingonline.edu) for a current listing.

Online education results in the following benefits:

1. Students may be able to take a course that is not offered at the campus they attend in the academic term they need it. 2. Students who are unable to take preferred classes due to space or other limitations (e.g., "wait-listed students") may be able to take courses online and avoid disrupting their matriculation. 3. Students may be able to continue their program of study online when life changes (e.g., changes in employment status or physical condition) make it impossible for them to attend traditional courses. 4. Students may be able to take a program of study at Herzing University even if they do not live near a campus. 5. Students will gain valuable interactive experience with a medium that has become increasingly more crucial and pervasive. Effective use of the Internet will also provide a means of communication and a method for accessing and disseminating information for students and staff.

Criteria for Participation

Participation in online course offerings by currently enrolled Herzing University students can be initiated by the student or by the institution. Participation in an online course may be necessary to meet specific graduation timelines such as a three-year bachelor's degree. In all cases, whether student- or institution-initiated, the campus' Academic dean has the final authority regarding admission to the online courses. The additional criteria that must be met by currently enrolled Herzing University students for admission to an online course are: 1. The student must have all of the appropriate technology (e.g., hardware and software) available to him/her. Current requirements can be found on Herzing University's Online Education Website: http://www.herzingonline.edu/admissions/technology-requirements 2. The student must have appropriate computer skills (e.g., keyboarding, word processing, etc.). 3. The student must complete an online orientation session prior to starting their online course. Optional: Students pursuing a full program online must fulfill the same admissions criteria as on campus students (see Admissions). The required personal interview is conducted over the phone.

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Student Services

Herzing University students who participate in an online course or programs are eligible for any, all student services offered by the University. These services typically include financial aid for those who qualify, employment assistance, academic advising, tutoring programs, and learning resources. These services will be provided to the student electronically, through use of e-mail or referrals to Internet websites, or telephonically. Students are linked to certain of these services such as financial aid on Herzing University's Online Education Website located at http://www.herzingonline.edu/ learning resources are available to online students through the library Information Resources network (lIRn). After admissions requirements are met and satisfactory financial arrangements made, online students will be provided with lIRns Uniform Resource locator (URl), Herzing University campus code, and a personalized Id number. If a student has difficulty in accessing or navigating the lIRn Web site, he/she will be able to contact the campus librarian for assistance. Assistance will be provided electronically via e-mail or over the telephone, as needed. Career services for online graduates include completion of the Career development Seminar (Pd 200), assistance with online employment databases, coaching in the résumé development process, and help with devising a strategy to independently locate local job opportunities. Technical support can be contacted by calling (866) 350-5017 or by e-mailing [email protected]

GRADING POLICIES

Grade Scale

In most cases, letter grades are awarded as shown below unless a different scale is outlined in a specific course syllabus.

letter grade

A Ab+ b bC+ C d+ d F

Quality Points

4.00 3.75 3.25 3.00 2.75 2.25 2.00 1.25 1.00 0.00

Percentage Range

93-100 90-92 87-89 83-86 80-82 76-79 70-75 66-69 60-65 Anything below the minimum passing grade for the course

letter grade

W I TR EX P

Explanation

Withdrawal Prior to Mid-Term Incomplete Transfer Exempt Pass

Method of Instruction

Instructional methods may include: lecture in written, audio, and video forms; presentations; small group discussions; small group presentations; online audio conferencing; electronic blackboard; threaded discussion; online chat; peer critiques; and e-mail. Students are expected to log on several days per week and are expected to spend approximately eight hours per week on educational activities when taking a four-credit hour course over a 16-week period and 16 hours per week in a four-semester credit course scheduled over eight weeks. For courses of a greater or lesser number of credit hours, the time commitment will be proportional. In addition, there may be extra reading, studying, and assignment completion requirements during offline time.

Minimum Passing Grade

The minimum passing grade in most courses at Herzing University is a d (60%). However, the minimum passing grade for certain health care core courses is a C+ (76%). This affects courses with the course prefixes of dH, dS, nA, nF, nO, nW, Pn, PT, RT, and ST. Other courses may have other specific minimum passing grades, in which case they will be outlined in the course syllabus. When the minimum passing grade is not achieved, a grade of F is assigned.

Incompletes

A grade of Incomplete (I) will be given to a student only in cases where the student is not able to complete the work for a course due to extenuating circumstances. It is only given with the permission of the Academic dean. If the "I" is not removed and replaced with the actual grade earned within two class weeks after the start of the next academic period, it will automatically be replaced with the grade of "F," and the course will have to be repeated if required for graduation.

Transfer Grades

A grade of Transfer (TR) will be given to a student denoting credits allowed toward completion of a program based on completion of transferable work at another post-

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secondary institution. (See "Transfers of Credits from Other Colleges and Universities.") no more than 75% of a student's credits toward a degree/diploma may be transferred to the University. A grade of (TR) is not calculated into the grade point average.

Exemption Credit

A grade of Exempt (EX) will be given to a student denoting credits earned toward completion of a program by achieving a score of at least 85% on a comprehensive examination in a course which is an element of that program. no more than 25% of the student's credits toward a degree/diploma may be exempted and in combination with transfer credits may not exceed 75% of the credits toward a degree/diploma. Students who wish to attempt to exempt any course or courses in their education program should do so prior to starting classes but no later than eight weeks after matriculation. Students interested in exempting classes should see the Academic dean. Students with special circumstances may be allowed to take an exemption exam later than the first eight weeks of matriculation by appealing to the Academic dean. An exemption may result in a change of status from full-time to part-time and may impact a student's financial aid award. A fee will be charged per course exemption attempted. For additional information on exemptions, see the Course Exemptions section of this catalog.

The sum of 46.0 total points divided by 15.0 credits gives a grade point average of 3.07. In the case of a course being repeated, the second grade earned is used to determine cumulative grade point average. Any course below the 100 level (i.e., En 090, MA 090) are not included in the grade point average calculation.

ADDITIONAL COuRSEWORK

Other college courses may be selected outside a student's program of study within this catalog (with the approval of the Academic dean) for which the student has the appropriate prerequisite. Any additional coursework taken will count as attempted courses for purposes of satisfactory academic progress.

ACADEMIC AWARDS

SEMESTER AWARDS Students who complete six or more semester credit hours within a semester and achieve a semester grade point average of 3.50 will be placed on the dean's list and those who achieve a semester grade point average of 4.0 will be placed on the President's list. GRADuATION AWARDS Honors graduate From Associate and diploma Programs: Any graduate who has obtained a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or higher will be considered an Honors graduate and will have such status appropriately noted on the graduation exercises program and on the student's degree/diploma. Honors graduate from baccalaureate Program: An honors graduate from a baccalaureate program is eligible for one of the following designations:

Withdrawals

A grade of Withdrawal (W) will be given to a student withdrawing prior to the midpoint of any course. A "W" will not be calculated into the grade point average but will be counted as a course attempted. As such, it can affect a student's satisfactory progress. Refer to the Standards of Satisfactory Progress section of this catalog for more information. Following the midpoint of the course, a letter grade must be assigned.

Pass/Fail

A grade of Pass (P) will be given to a student who successfully completes any developmental education courses. Academic credit will be earned; however, a "P" will not be calculated into the grade point average. A "P" will be counted as a course attempted for purposes of a student's satisfactory academic progress.

Title

Cum laude Magna Cum laude Summa Cum laude

CGPA

3.50­3.69 3.70­3.89 3.90­4

Grade Point Average

Each grade is assigned a numerical value on a 4.0 system as shown under quality points in the preceding chart. In order to determine a student's grade point average, the credit hours for each course are multiplied by the quality points for the grade earned in the course. The total number of points, as calculated, is then divided by the total number of credits to obtain the grade point average. A sample calculation is shown:

STuDENT OF THE yEAR AWARD This award will be given to one student in each graduating program or to one student for the entire graduating class who has accomplished all of the following: · IsanHonorsGraduate. · Hasmaintainedahighattendanceaverage. · Hasdemonstratedleadershipandinspiringattributesthroughouttheprogram. · HasmadeoutstandingcontributionstotheUniversityandtofellowstudents. HERzING CuP The Herzing Cup is awarded for the best presentation by a student or student group (a maximum of four students to a group). The presentation must involve some analysis and study of a product, service, design, or process with the purpose of introducing a new product, service, design, or process or improving an existing one. The presentation

Course

MA107 College Algebra PS101 Psychology IS170 Visual basic® I IS112 Computer networks

Grade

b C b A

quality Points Credits Total Points

3.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 12.0 6.0 12.0 16.0

Totals

15.0

46.0

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is judged upon its overall effectiveness and professionalism, clarity of expression, proper grammatical usage, and organization. HERzING _________ PROJECT AWARD This is a campus award with the school name appearing in the blank, e.g., IT, business, design, Public Safety, or Health Care. This award is for the best Capstone or other project in each "School" at each campus based upon the following: · · · · Professionallevelofthecontent Theimportanceandpracticalityoftheproject Qualityofthework Originality

3.

A student repeating a course will do so on an "audit" basis (i.e., no grade will be received and the student's academic performance will not affect his or her transcript). A student repeating a course under the student assurance above must do so within 12 months of completing that course. Please note that the student is responsible for the purchase of books and materials.

4.

THREE-yEAR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE COMPLETION POLICy

For programs of 130 semester credit hours or less, students will be provided the classes they need to complete their bachelor of Science degree in three years or Herzing University will provide, at no tuition cost to the student, any additional courses required. The student may be required to take some courses online to remain on schedule. This policy does not apply to students transferring to Herzing University from other colleges or universities.

If this is a team effort, the team should be made up of no more than four students. A team or individual may win both the Herzing Cup and the Herzing ___________ Project Award.

SERvICE quALITy ASSuRANCE

Herzing University is committed to the complete satisfaction of our students and their employers. We pride ourselves in providing a quality, student-centered educational experience that successfully prepares our graduates for employment. We offer the following written service quality assurance to our valued student and employer customers.

Student Conditions

The student must meet the following conditions in order to qualify for the policy: 1. Attend all of the semesters each year after matriculating 2. Carry a normal full course load of at least 16 semester credit hours each semester. 3. Follow the course schedule, including online courses, as established by the Academic dean and not fail or withdraw from any course. 4. Earn a passing grade in each course. 5. Maintain a 2.0 or better cumulative grade point average.

Assurance to Students

A Herzing University student may retake any course that he or she is dissatisfied with at no additional charge for tuition provided the student completed and passed the course with a "C" or better, demonstrated compliance with the stated attendance policy for the course in question, is not in default on his/her student loan(s), and is current in financial standing with the University.

CuRRICuLuM

As educational programs are modified and updated to meet the needs of the students and the community, the University may need, and has the right upon approval of appropriate entities, to change the course curriculum, schedules, prerequisites and requirements, or to cancel a course or program for which there is insufficient enrollment. The total number of credit hours required for graduation will not be increased for current students.

Assurance to Employers

If an employer feels a Herzing University graduate is not functioning satisfactorily in a job reasonably related to his or her program of study that had been completed within the last 12 months, Herzing University will allow the student to retake any course offered in the student's completed curriculum without tuition cost to the student or the employer.

Notes on the Service quality Assurance Policy

1. For employers, a phone call or letter to the Career Services department, the Academic dean, or Campus President/director will be sufficient to allow students to repeat any course(s) that the employer believes is/are necessary. The student repeating a course will be expected to attend a class (on a spaceavailable basis) offered in the University's normal class schedule.

INSTITuTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF STuDENT ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

Herzing University is committed to the continual improvement of its educational processes and programs. To accomplish this, the University periodically conducts an assessment of student academic outcomes. Consequently, students can expect to participate in academic outcomes assessment activities during their education experience at the Univesity. The aggregated results of these assessment activities will be used exclusively to identify relative strengths and opportunities for improvement in the University's

2.

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educational processes and programs. The results for individual students will be kept strictly confidential, will not be maintained, and will not affect their academic standing in any way.

eight-week course, and the end of the eighth week in a 16-week course. A student who withdraws prior to the midpoint of the course will be assigned a course grade of "W" which is not included in the calculation of the student's gPA. After the midpoint of a course, all students will be assigned a letter grade based on each student's performance in the entire course even if a student stops attending class prior to the end of the course. Since critical graded assignments (such as a final exam) will be missed if a student stops attending prior to the end of a course, it is likely the resulting course grade will be an "F" (Failure). The course letter grade will be included in the calculation of the student's gPA. A student who withdraws from a course does not get a tuition reduction. If a student completely withdraws from college, the tuition reduction (if any) will conform to the refund policy of the University.

DEvELOPMENTAL STuDIES

The Herzing University administration recognizes that the University's students come from a variety of academic backgrounds. Consequently, the University acknowledges the need for and provides specialized developmental studies. These courses are designed to help students succeed in their college-level studies by improving their reading, writing, and mathematics skills. Fundamental knowledge of these skills is important in establishing a foundation for academic success at Herzing University and in the student's chosen career field. All students take a standardized placement examination to assess their individual need for developmental coursework and developmental learning labs. based upon the placement test results, students may be scheduled for appropriate developmental courses that may increase the length of time to graduate by four to eight semester credit hours, depending upon the student's performance on the placement examination, therefore increasing the corresponding cost. Students scheduled in any developmental studies courses benefit because: 1. Their skills are assessed prior to beginning classes in order to identify the specific areas in which developmental coursework may be needed. 2. The developmental coursework is focused on the specific area of need identified by the placement examination. 3. This type of coursework helps to increase the student's confidence that can encourage students to establish higher academic expectations. 4. Specialized developmental coursework can reduce the anxiety of adult learners who may be returning to academic endeavors. The developmental course(s) a student may be scheduled for are: MA 090 Fundamentals of Mathematics En 090 Principles of Communications 4.0 semester credit hours 4.0 semester credit hours

Withdrawal From university

A student may withdraw from Herzing University at any time by notifying the Academic dean or Registrar. If the withdrawal occurs during an ongoing term, the rules outlined under "Withdrawals from Individual Courses" above applies for grading purposes for the ongoing courses. How other rules apply depend on which state the campus attended is located in, as outlined below. Campuses in the States of Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. At campuses located in the states of Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin (Akron, Kenosha, Minneapolis, Madison, and Online), the University may withdraw a student if he or she fails to attend all their courses for a period of 14 days. The withdrawal will be effective from the last date of attendance. Campuses in the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Louisiana. At campuses located in the states of Alabama, Florida, georgia, and louisiana (Atlanta, birmingham, new Orleans, and Orlando), a student may be withdrawn from the University if they withdraw or fail all of their classes in one term and do not start in at least one class at the beginning of the following term.

Adding a Course or Courses

Students who do not advance sufficiently to pass the developmental courses will be required to repeat the course(s) until a passing grade is achieved. Students may add a course or courses to their schedules until the second meeting of the course with the approval of the Academic dean. Students using financial aid should check with that department to determine the effect of adding a course on their financial aid package. The last day to add online courses is the Friday of the first week of class.

ADD/DROP PERIOD

Withdrawals From Individual Courses

Students may voluntarily withdraw themselves from a course at any time up to the midpoint of a course by notifying the Academic dean or Registrar. no voluntary withdrawals are permitted after the midpoint of the course. The mid-point of the course varies depending on the length of the term. For example, the midpoint of the course is the end of the second week in a four week course, the end of the fourth week in an

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WITHDRAWAL

Dropping a Course or Courses

Continuing students may drop a course up until they begin attending the course. After they have sat in the course, they will be charged for the course.

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new students attending Herzing University for the first time will be given the first scheduled week of the course (through Saturday) at no charge. A new student will be charged and counted as a start when they have sat in the course at least once in the second week of the course.

Graduation Awards

A student who has maintained perfect attendance throughout the entire program will have this fact appropriately noted on the graduation exercises program.

PROBATION OR WARNING

The student may receive an academic warning or be placed on probation if the student is in danger of not making Satisfactory Academic Progress (see "Standards of Satisfactory Progress"). The student may also be placed on probation or receive a warning prior to termination for violation of policies regarding attendance, conduct, dress, or for other appropriate reasons in the judgment of the University. In the case of probation, the length of probation and conditions to be met will be specified.

PROGRAM CHANGES

If a program change is desired, it should be made only at the end of the semester and only after consultation with the Academic dean.

AuDITING COuRSES

A course may be audited with the permission of the Academic dean. All standard fees and tuition will apply unless the student has already received a bachelor's degree from Herzing University. no grade will be assigned and no credit hours accumulated towards attempted courses, diploma, or degree requirements. Financial aid or veterans benefits may not be used for an audited course. Previous bachelor of science degree graduates may audit one course per calendar year at a reduced fee (see "Fee Schedule").

Attendance Philosophy

ATTENDANCE POLICy AND PROCEDuRES

The philosophy of Herzing University is that college is not only a place to learn technical and business skills and to develop academically, but also a place to develop important work habits. Important work habits include responsibility and reliability, and attendance is a major factor in both. Also, a student should understand that missing a class affects more than the individual student. It affects the class if the student has to ask questions regarding what was covered when he or she was not there, and it affects the instructor who may have to assign make-up material or give other individual attention to the absentee. For that reason, and to avoid disruption to the educational process caused by erratic attendance, the University emphasizes attendance in all courses.

COuRSE EXEMPTIONS

An appointed faculty member or the Academic dean may exempt students from certain courses as the result of examination. Students are allowed only one attempt to take the challenge examination per course and must achieve a grade equivalent to a b or better (85%) to be exempted from the course. Students will receive credit for the course(s) from which they are exempted and the course(s) will be listed as "EX" on the student's transcript. Students may not exempt more than 25% of the credits required for a degree/diploma, and the total of credits transferred from other colleges plus course exemption credits may not exceed 75% of the credits required for the degree/ diploma sought. Students who wish to attempt to exempt any course or courses in their education program should do so prior to starting classes but no later than eight weeks after matriculation (refer to current "Fee Schedule" for course exemption examination fee). Students interested in exempting classes should see the Academic dean. Students with special circumstances may be allowed to take an exemption exam later than the first eight weeks of matriculation by appealing to the Academic dean.

Notification of Absences

As a courtesy, students are expected to inform their instructors or the office if they know they will have to miss a class. Students returning from an absence are expected to address missed material with the instructor outside of scheduled class hours.

Affect of Absences on Grading

Points will not be directly deducted from a student's academic average because of absences. However, students can expect tests, quizzes, or other graded assignments to be scheduled without notice during any given class session. If a student misses a test, quiz, or assignment because of an absence, the instructor is not obligated and will not normally allow a make-up quiz, test, or assignment. Extenuating circumstances will be taken into consideration when deciding if make-up work will be permitted.

(Dual Enrollment)

uNDERGRADuATE STuDENTS TAKING GRADuATE COuRSES

Extenuating Circumstances

If there are extenuating circumstances (such as a documented health problem, a family emergency, jury duty, military reserve service obligations, etc.) that caused an absence or is expected to cause absences in the future, the student should contact his or her instructor or the Academic dean immediately.

Undergraduate students within 24 credit hours of graduation from a bachelor's program may take up to two graduate courses (six semester credit hours), and the courses will count as both electives in the bachelor's program and toward the requirements of the master's program (if the student is later accepted and enrolls in the master's program). To be eligible, students must have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 at the time of registration. The tuition, books, and fees will be charged at the graduate rate.

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STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORy PROGRESS

Standards of satisfactory progress apply to all students at Herzing University, not just to those receiving financial assistance. A student at Herzing University is considered to be making satisfactory progress if he/she has achieved and maintained the minimum standard of a 2.0 CgPA (cumulative grade point average) for undergraduate students (3.0 CgPA for graduate students) and, as a regular student, has not attempted more than 150% of the minimum credit hours required for the student's program. If a student is not making satisfactory progress, the student may be placed on probation or will be terminated from enrollment following the standards below. In addition, students not achieving a semester gPA of 2.0 for undergraduate students (3.0 for graduate students) for any semester will be placed on academic warning. Students terminated from the University under these provisions who feel they have legitimate reasons or extenuating circumstances for not maintaining satisfactory progress may appeal termination from the University to the Satisfactory Progress Committee (see "Appeal Procedures"). Withdrawals (W) and Pass (P) are included in course completion calculations as "attempted courses." When a student repeats a course, the second grade earned will be used for the calculation of the cumulative grade point average; however, each course repeated will be included as an attempted course. A student who receives an Incomplete (I) must complete the work necessary to earn an actual grade within two weeks after the start of the next academic period or the grade will automatically be replaced with the grade of "F." A student who receives an Incomplete will be evaluated once the grade becomes permanent (within two weeks of the start of the next academic period). developmental education courses earning a Pass (P) or Fail (F) are offered at Herzing University and are counted as attempted courses for satisfactory academic progress. Herzing University does not grant approved leaves of absence. Students needing to interrupt their education may withdraw. They may subsequently reenter providing they are in good academic and financial standing (see "Caution" under the REAdMISSIOn section). If a student changes programs (majors), only those courses that apply toward the new program will be counted in calculating the number of credits attempted and in calculating the cumulative gPA for the purpose of establishing satisfactory progress. A student wishing to change programs must meet the admissions requirements for the new program. Only students in good academic standing (i.e., not on warning or probation) may change programs without the approval of the Academic dean.

not attaining a gPA of 2.0 or higher for a semester will be placed on academic warning. degree students not maintaining a cumulative gPA of 2.0 after completing their freshman year (24 attempted credits), or after any semester following their freshman year, will be placed on academic probation. Students in a diploma program not maintaining a cumulative gPA of 2.0 after any semester will be placed on academic probation. Students not meeting the conditions of their academic probation will be terminated from the University.

Special Provisions for Clinic-Based Heath Care Programs

In clinic-based health care programs where the minimum passing grade for core courses is a C+ (76%), students are subject to dismissal if they fail the same course more than once or if they have a combination of three or more failures in the core of the program. Students will be placed on probation following the first failure of a core course and dismissed if the same course is failed again or if the total number failures reaches three or more.

Academic Probation

A student placed on academic probation must attain a minimum of a 2.0 semester gPA (3.0 for graduate students) during each semester he or she is on probation or the student will be terminated. The student will remain on academic probation until he or she has achieved a CgPA of 2.0 (3.0 for graduate students). Other specific conditions of probation will be stated at the time of probation. However, a CgPA of 2.0 (3.0 for graduate students) must be achieved before applying for graduation.

Termination From the university for Lack of Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students who have not met the conditions of an academic probation will be terminated from the University.

Termination of Federal Financial Aid Eligibility

A student determined at the end of any semester to be unable to complete the program without his or her attempted credit hours applicable to the program exceeding 150% of the minimum program length will no longer be eligible for federal financial aid.

STuDENT CONDuCT

The student is expected to be familiar with the University rules and regulations as outlined in this catalog as well as the student handbook. because the administration believes college-level students should be offered the freedom of adulthood, the number of rules has been kept to a minimum. With freedom, however, comes the responsibility to behave in a manner consistent with the best interests of the student body. The University, therefore, reserves the right to suspend or to dismiss from the University any student at any time when such action is deemed by the administration to be in the best interest of the student body or the University. For example, the student may be dismissed for reasons including, but not limited to the following:

Specific Standards of Satisfactory Progress for undergraduate Students

Satisfactory progress is measured at the end of each semester. Undergraduate students

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1. Improper conduct 2. Improper dress 3. Intoxication 4. disruptive behavior

5. Cheating of any type 6. Forgery of work or work study materials 7. Violation of local, state, or federal law

Consequences and Sanctions

Herzing University will, upon finding that a student has violated its policies on Academic dishonesty, enact the following: 1. For the first offense, the student may receive a zero on the assignment involved or a failing grade in the course. The student will be required to repeat the entire course if completion of a failed course is needed to graduate. 2. Upon a second offense, the student may be immediately and permanently expelled from the University.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTy

Original Work, Cheating, Plagiarism, and Paraphrasing

The Herzing University Catalog addresses academic dishonesty in general in the "Student Conduct" section of the University Catalog. Original Work, Cheating, Plagiarism, and Paraphrasing are addressed in greater detail here. When completing an assignment for a Herzing University course, students are expected to do original work for the assignment and to not reuse work they may have done in previous courses or other settings unless specific prior approval is granted by the instructor. Cheating is defined as "the giving or receiving of aid (whether written, oral, or otherwise) in order for a student to receive undeserved credit on classwork, homework, tests or any other assignment that is his or her own responsibility." Plagiarism violates the central core of Herzing University's educational philosophy. It involves stealing another person's work and claiming it as one's own. It occurs whenever one directly copies another person's intellectual effort and integrates it into his/her class work without giving proper credit to the author. Paraphrasing is defined as "a restatement of a text or passage giving the meaning in another form" (Webster's new Universal Unabridged dictionary, 1996). When one paraphrases but intentionally omits authorship of the work, this, too, is a serious violation of academic honesty. All Herzing University students have an individual responsibility to understand what cheating, plagiarism, and paraphrasing are. The student must also be aware that the consequences for cheating and plagiarism, or for paraphrasing without proper attribution, are severe. Whenever you have doubt about what constitutes cheating, plagiarism, or paraphrasing, contact your instructor. With the advent of the Internet, the potential for cheating by simply cutting and pasting information into a paper is tempting. be aware that these dishonest activities will not be tolerated, and instructors have access to increasingly sophisticated search engines to "test" the validity of student work. Plagiarism, in particular, is easily traced.

Academic Appeal Process

The student is directed to the "grievance, Complaint Procedure" and "Academic Appeal for Termination" sections of the Herzing University Catalog for information for petitioning the University to reconsider its action.

ACCEPTABLE uSE OF COMPuTING RESOuRCES

This policy provides guidelines for the appropriate and inappropriate use of the computing resources of Herzing University. It applies to all users of the University's computing resources including students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests of the University. Computing resources include all computers, related equipment, software, data, and local area networks for which the University is responsible as well as networks throughout the world to which the University provides computer access. The computing resources of Herzing University are intended to be used for its programs of instruction and research and to conduct the legitimate business of the University. All users must have proper authorization for the use of the University's computing resources. Users are responsible for seeing that these computing resources are used in an effective, ethical, and legal manner. Users must apply standards of normal academic and professional ethics and considerate conduct to their use of the University's computing resources. Users must be aware of the legal and moral responsibility for ethical conduct in the use of computing resources. Users have a responsibility not to abuse the network and resources and to respect the privacy, copyrights, and intellectual property rights of others. In addition to the policy contained herein, usage must be in accordance with applicable University procedures and applicable state and federal laws. Among the more important laws are the Federal Computer Abuse Amendment Act of 1994, the Federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act, and the U.S. Copyright Act. Policy violations generally fall into four categories and involve the use of computing resources to: 1. Harass, threaten, or otherwise cause harm to specific individuals or classes of individuals. 2. Impede, interfere with, impair, or otherwise cause harm to the activities of others. 3. download, post, or install to University computers or transport across University networks material that is sexually explicit or offensive or material that is illegal,

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proprietary, in violation of license agreements, in violation of copyrights, in violation of University contracts, or otherwise damaging to the institution. 4. Recklessly or maliciously interfere with or damage computer or network resources or computer data, files, or other information. Penalties for violating these guidelines can range from a reprimand in the student's file to expulsion. Examples (not a comprehensive list) of policy violations related to the above four categories include: 1. Sending an individual or group repeated and unwanted (harassing) e-mail or using e-mail to threaten someone. 2. Accessing, or attempting to access, another individual's data or information without proper authorization (e.g., using another's computing account and password to look at their personal information). 3. Propagating electronic chain mail or sending forged or falsified e-mail. 4. Obtaining, possessing, using, or attempting to use someone else's password regardless of how the password was obtained. 5. Copying a graphical image from a website without permission. 6. Posting a University site-licensed program to a public bulletin board. 7. Using illegally obtained licensed data, software or licensed data, software in violation of their licenses or purchase agreements. 8. Releasing a virus, worm, or other program that damages or otherwise harms a system or network. 9. Accessing, displaying, storing, or transmitting sexually explicit or offensive language or images.

COuRSE NuMBERING SySTEM

The course numbering system consists of a two-character alpha prefix followed by a three-digit number. The meaning of the prefixes is shown below:

Prefix Course Area Focus

AC bU CJ Cl dH dS dT EC EE EM En ET Fl FS gA gd HC HI HR HS HU IS MA Accounting business Management Criminal Justice Clinical laboratory dental Hygiene dental Science drafting Technology Economics Electronics Engineering Emergency Medical Technician English Electronics Technology Foreign language Fire Science graphic Arts game development Health Care Management Health Information Management Human Resources Management Homeland Security Humanities Information Systems Mathematics

Prefix Course Area Focus

MC Ml MO MS nA nb nS nM nO nT nW OT Pd PH Pl Pn PS PT RT SC SS ST Tn Medical Coding Military Science Medical Office Administration Medical Science nursing (Alabama) nursing, nursing bridge nursing nursing (Minnesota) nursing (Ohio) network Technology nursing (Wisconsin) Occupational Therapy Assistant Personal development Public Health and Safety Paralegal Practical nursing Psychology Physical Therapy Assistant Radiologic Technology natural Science Social Science Surgical Technology Therapeutic Massage (nebraska)

The meaning of the three-digit number is shown below: Number Description 100 First-level undergraduate course focuses on basic knowledge in the subject and normally does not require a prerequisite course. 200 Second-level undergraduate course focuses on student comprehension and may require a prerequisite course. 300 Advanced third-level undergraduate course focuses on application of learning and normally requires a prerequisite course. 400 Advanced fourth-level undergraduate course focuses on analysis within the discipline and normally requires a prerequisite course.

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MAJORS, MINORS, AND CONCENTRATIONS

In the bachelor of Science programs, students first select a major (such as business administration, homeland security and public safety, or information technology). They may then also select a minor or concentration. A minor is a selection of courses drawn from a separate academic discipline from the major that allows the student to widen the breadth of his or her education (such as the Accounting Minor in the business Administration Major). A concentration is a selection of courses taken in the same academic discipline as the major, which allows the student to concentrate further in that discipline (such as the Criminal Justice Concentration in the Homeland Security and Public Safety Major). not all majors, minors, or concentrations are offered at all campuses. Check the program chart at the beginning of the Programs of Study section of this catalog for a list of options available at each campus.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ELECTIvES

Electives are not continuously offered at all campuses at all times. A student can request a copy of which electives are currently being offered at his or her campus.

ARMy ROTC PROGRAMS

Some Herzing University campuses offer the Army ROTC program in conjunction with another local college or university that hosts an Army ROTC detachment. Where these agreements exist, a student may take the military science courses that constitute the Army ROTC program at the hosting college and apply those courses as open electives toward Herzing University degree requirements and can earn a presidential commission as a reserve officer in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve, or the national guard. Check with your local Herzing University campus about the availability of the Army ROTC courses. Akron Institute Herzing University will help students develop financial plans to pay for their education through a combination of financial aid (if eligible), student contributions, family contributions and employer tuition reimbursement plans. Prospective students are expected to provide their own financial support, which may include: the use of savings; part-time or full-time job earnings; parental or guardian support; spousal support; or financial support from other family members. To help a student select the best method or methods for financing their education, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), http:, , www.fafsa.ed.gov, should be completed. This application serves as the student's application for federal and state student financial aid and as verification for any institutional grant funding or institutional scholarships. The FAFSA must be completed prior to the applicant's official enrollment at Herzing University. The FAFSA must also be completed annually by the student (and parent or spouse if applicable). The University determines available resources based upon a federally approved needs analysis formula. The student's expected expenses are compared to the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) to determine financial aid eligibility. In the event incorrect or incomplete data is provided, financial aid documentation will be requested. Upon receipt of a student's properly completed documentation, changes will be made to the student's application if necessary. After all of the appropriate processing of information has been completed, financial assistance packages are developed, and award letters are distributed to eligible students.

PRIvACy OF RECORDS

Herzing University complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The purpose of this act is to allow you, as a student, to know what educational records are kept by the University, to provide you the right to inspect such records and ask for corrections, if necessary, and to control the release of such information to those who are not involved in the educational process. Under The Privacy Act, directory information is made available to anyone who requests it unless you specifically ask that this not be done. The only information that Herzing University considers in this category is as follows: name, major field of study, dates of attendance, full-time, part-time status, activities, awards, school-sponsored e-mail, and diploma or degree awarded. The administrative office on each campus will, upon request, provide you with a statement showing which records are maintained, where to find them, how to make a request to inspect the records, how to ask for a correction, who has access to the records, and how you may release information to others.

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COST OF ATTENDING

Tuition is subject to change upon 60 days advance notice by the University but will not be changed more than once per calendar year. The use of textbooks is included in the tuition charges for all undergraduate programs. In the event a replacement copy of a textbook is needed, it will be at the expense of the student. Campus students are normally expected to return their books at the end of the term as part of the book loaning program.

· MustcompletetheFreeApplicationforFederalStudentAid(FAFSA)inorderfor Herzing University to determine a student's federal financial aid eligibility. Many Title IV programs use an undergraduate student's grade level as a factor when calculating eligibility. The chart on the following page outlines how Herzing University defines undergraduate student grade levels.

Grade Level

1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year* 4th Year*

Description

Student has completed less than 24 credit hours that apply toward their current program of study. Student has completed between 24 and 47 credit hours that apply toward their current program of study. Student has completed between 48 and 71 credit hours that apply toward their current program of study. Student has completed more than 71 credit hours that apply toward their current program of study.

FEDERAL STuDENT AID PROGRAMS

To help students pay for post-secondary education, the U.S. department of Education offers federal financial aid programs (Title IV). To ensure accuracy, much of the federal financial aid information found below has been taken directly from the 2008-2009 department of Education publication called "Funding Education beyond High School-- The guide to Federal Student Aid." Herzing University is eligible to participate in the following Title IV programs: FederalPellGrant(PELL) FederalSupplementalEducationalOpportunityGrant(FSEOG) NationalScienceandMathematicsAccesstoRetainTalentGrant(SMART) AcademicCompetitivenessGrants(ACG) FederalWorkStudy(FWS) FederalPerkinsLoan(PERKINS) FederalFamilyEducationLoanProgram(FFELP) Subsidized Federal Stafford loans Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans Federal PlUS loans · DirectLoanProgram Subsidized direct Stafford loans Unsubsidized direct Stafford loans direct PlUS loans In general, students may be eligible for Title IV aid if the following provisions apply. The student: · IsenrolledasaregularstudentinaTitleIVeligibleprogram. · IsaU.S.citizenoreligiblenon-citizen. · Meetstheneedrequirementsspecified. · Makessatisfactoryacademicprogresstowardcompletingtheirprogram. · IsnotindefaultonaTitleIVloanreceivedatanyinstitution. · Is not concurrently receiving Title IV financial aid from another institution of higher education. · Does not owe a refund or repayment on a Federal Pell Grant, ACG, National SMART grant, or Federal SEOg. · · · · · · ·

* 3rd and 4th year grade levels are only applicable to bachelor of science degree programs.

Federal Pell Grants (FPELL)

· PellGrantsarethefoundationoffederalstudentfinancialaidtowhichaidfrom other federal and non-federal sources might be added. · Pell Grants are generally awarded only to undergraduate students (those who have not earned a bachelor or graduate degree).

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

· FSEOGsareawardedtoundergraduatestudentswithexceptionalfinancialneed (those with the lowest Expected Family Contribution). · FederalPellGrantrecipientsreceivepriorityforFSEOGawards.

National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National SMART Grant)

· This grant program is for undergraduate students enrolled in the third or fourth academic year of study who are pursuing a major in physical, life or computer sciences or mathematics, technology, engineering, or a critical foreign language.

Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG)

· TheACGisforundergraduatestudents:whoareenrolledinthefirstorsecond academic year of an eligible program in any field; who have completed a rigorous secondary school program of study; and who also have at least a 3.0 cumulative gPA for the first academic year.

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Federal Work Study (FWS)

· UndertheFWSProgram,astudentcanworkpart-timetoearnmoneyforhis, her education. · Thisprogramprovidespart-timeemploymentwhileastudentisenrolledinschool and helps students pay for educational expenses. · This program is available to full-time or part-time undergraduate and graduate students and is administered by schools participating in the FWS Program. · FWSencouragescommunityserviceworkandworkrelatedtoastudent'scourse of study whenever possible.

Federal Stafford and Federal Direct Stafford Loans (Subsidized and unsubsidized)

· StaffordLoansareforundergraduate,graduateandprofessionaldegreestudents who are enrolled as at least half-time students. · TherearetwotypesofStaffordLoans:SubsidizedandUnsubsidized. · TheborrowermusthavefinancialneedtoreceiveaSubsidizedStaffordLoan.The U.S. department of Education will pay (subsidize) the interest that accrues on Subsidized Stafford loans during certain periods. · FinancialneedisnotarequirementtoobtainanUnsubsidizedStaffordLoan. · FederalStaffordLoansandFederalDirectStaffordLoansmustberepaid. · Studentsbeginrepaymentofloanssixmonthsafterceasingtobeenrolledasat least a half-time student. Monthly payments are based on aggregate borrowing with a minimum amount of $50. · Repaymentisusuallycompletedwithin10yearsorlessbutmaybeextendedifa student chooses to consolidate their loans.

Federal Perkins Loans (FPERKINS)

· The Perkins Loan program is administered by participating schools to full-time or part-time undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree students who demonstrate financial need. · Thisloanisrepaidbythestudenttotheawardingschool. · Repayment begins 9 months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. · Theminimummonthlypaymentis$40andthetotaldebtmustberepaidwithin 10 years. · FederalPerkinsfundsareawardedaccordingtoinstitutionalneed-basedcriteria. · Thesefundsareextremelylimited.

Federal PLuS Loans (FFEL PLuS) and Federal Direct PLuS Loans, Graduate PLuS Loans

· PLUSloansareloansparentscanobtaintohelppaythecostofeducationfortheir dependent, undergraduate children. · GraduateandprofessionaldegreestudentsmayobtainPLUSLoanstohelppayfor their own education. · PLUSloansarecredit-basedloans.

Return of Title Iv Funds Policy

Students earn Title IV assistance in proportion to their attendance in school, up until they attend beyond the 60% point of the semester. If a student withdraws from the University at or before the 60% point, he, she will have earned financial aid in direct proportion to the percentage of days attended in the semester. After 60%, the student has earned 100% of his, her financial aid awards for that enrollment period. The Return of Title IV Funds regulation does not dictate the institutional refund policy, but prescribes the amount of Title IV funds a student has earned at the time of withdrawal. The amount of Title IV funds earned or unearned has no relationship to the student's institutional charges. The institutional charges are determined by the institutional refund policy. The Return to Title IV regulation, coupled with the institution's refund policy, can result in a student with a balance owed to the university and, or the Title IV programs if the student withdraws from school. (Exception: if the school is not obligated by law to take attendance and the student does not provide notification of his, her withdrawal, the withdrawal date is the midpoint of the payment period unless it can be shown that the student was in attendance in an academically related event after the midpoint of the payment period, in which case the date of that event will become the withdrawal date).

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The formula in brief is as follows: 1. 2. determine the date of withdrawal and the percentage of the payment period attended by the student. determine the amount of Title IV aid earned by the student by multiplying the total Title IV aid for which the student was eligible by the percentage of the payment period attended by the student.

grant provides a one-time $500 HOPE award that can be used towards tuition, books, and other educational costs at an eligible public technical college or public or private college or university in a degree, diploma, or certificate program. · Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant (GTEG): This grant is available to full-time undergraduate georgia residents. The grant is given to encourage georgia residents to attend eligible private colleges in georgia by providing grant assistance. More information on these programs is available from the Financial Aid Office.

3. Compare the amount earned to the amount disbursed. If the amount earned is greater than the amount disbursed, then a post-withdrawal disbursement may be made. If the amount disbursed exceeds the amount earned, Title IV aid must be returned. 4. Allocate the responsibility for returning unearned aid between the University and the student according to the portion of disbursed aid that could have been used to cover institutional charges and the portion that could have been disbursed directly to the student once institutional charges were covered. 5. distribute the unearned Title IV aid back to the Title IV programs in the following order: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans Subsidized Federal Stafford loans Unsubsidized Federal direct Stafford loans (other than PlUS loans) Subsidized Federal direct Stafford loans Federal Perkins loans Federal PlUS loans direct PlUS loans Federal Pell grant for which a return of funds is required Academic Competitiveness grants for which a return of funds is required national SMART grants for which a return of funds is required Federal Supplement Educational Opportunity grants (SEOg) for which a return of funds is required.

STATE STuDENT AID PROGRAMS--BIRMINGHAM

· Grantprogram:TheStateofAlabamaprovidesfinancialassistancetoAlabama residents through a state assistance program. · Alabama Student Assistance Program: This is a grant program that provides need-based assistance to Alabama residents who are undergraduate students attending an eligible school at least half-time. The funds for this program are limited based on the allocation to the school from the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. More information on this program is available from the Financial Aid Office.

STATE STuDENT AID PROGRAMS--MINNEAPOLIS

The Office of Higher Education administers several financial aid programs that provide grants, loans, and work opportunities for qualified Minnesota resident students. The state of Minnesota aid programs include the following: · · · · · · · · MinnesotaStateGrantProgram SELFLoanProgram MinnesotaStateWorkStudyProgram PostsecondaryChildCareGrantProgram MinnesotaAchieveScholarshipProgram MinnesotaIndianScholarshipProgram MinnesotaGIBillProgram PublicSafetyOfficer'sSurvivorGrant

STATE STuDENT AID PROGRAMS--ATLANTA

· Grant program: The State of Georgia provides financial assistance to Georgia residents through a state grant program. · HOPE Scholarship:This scholarship is available to Georgia residents who have demonstrated academic achievement at the high school and, or college level. The scholarship provides funds to address many of the costs associated with tuition, fees, and books for students who are pursuing an Associate or bachelor degree in georgia's public and private colleges and universities. · HOPE GED Grant: This grant is available to residents of Georgia who earned a general Education development (gEd, high school equivalency) diploma awarded by the Technical College System of georgia after June 30, 1993. The

More information on these programs is available from the Financial Aid Office.

STATE STuDENT AID PROGRAMS--OMAHA

· GrantProgram:ThestateofNebraskaprovidesfinancialassistancetoNebraska residents through the state grant program.

OTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

· HerzingUniversityTuitionPaymentPlan · EmployerReimbursementPlans · ScholarshipPrograms · InstitutionalGrantProgram

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Herzing university Tuition Payment Plan

Rather than requiring that tuition and fees be paid in full prior to the start of each semester, Herzing University may allow a student an interest-free payment plan that provides affordable monthly payments worked out in accordance with individual family circumstances as reflected in the financial information submitted to Herzing University. Students must have paid for each semester's tuition in full through cash payments, federal student aid programs, or other financial assistance prior to sitting for final examinations.

3. Submit a qualifying essay of 150 to 300 words as to why he, she is pursuing the field of study being applied for and why he, she chose Herzing University. To apply for a Henry g. Herzing Scholarship, interested high school seniors can obtain an application from an Admissions Advisor at Herzing University. This application should be completed and submitted to the University by April 15th. Scholarship winners will be notified by May 15th. Adult Learner Scholarship An Adult learner Scholarship is available at each campus each semester. The scholarship amount and the awarding of the scholarship for any semester will be determined by the Scholarship Selection Committee. The scholarship will be for an amount not exceeding $500 per semester of full-time study for two semesters. An applicant must meet the following criteria: 1. does not qualify for the Herzing High School Merit Scholarship or the Henry g. Herzing Scholarship. 2. demonstrates the need for financial assistance. 3. Receives two written recommendations from employers or educators. 4. Submits a qualifying essay of 150 to 300 words as to why he, she is pursuing the field of study being applied for and why he, she chose Herzing University. Applicants must complete the application and submit it along with the recommendations and qualifying essay no later than two weeks prior to the start of the first semester to qualify for the Adult learner Scholarship for that semester start. Students who miss that deadline may submit an application prior to the start of their second semester but, after that time, this scholarship is no longer available to them. Academic Award Students with a cumulative grade point average in the upper 5% of the student body after their second or subsequent semester (completion of at least 24 credits at Herzing University) will receive an academic award of $150. The award is a credit to the next semester's tuition if the student is carrying a course load of at least 12 credit hours. no application is required. The award will be determined by the Financial Aid department, and the student will be notified if they are an eligible recipient. Academic Persistence Award This award is made available to students who initially enroll at Herzing University in an associate's degree or bachelor's degree program and continue through to completion of a bachelor's degree on a full-time basis with no interruption in their education. To qualify for this award, transfer students must complete 75% of the credits required for the completion of their bachelor degree at Herzing University. The award is a $400 credit to the tuition account of the student during their last semester of study. Students who believe they qualify for the award must obtain an application from the Financial Aid department and submit it to that department prior to starting their last semester of study at Herzing University.

Employer Reimbursement Plans

Students may be eligible for employer tuition reimbursement benefits. Students should contact their supervisor at work or their benefits office to determine if tuition reimbursement is available. Tuition reimbursement does not eliminate the student's responsibility to pay tuition before the commencement of classes or according to school approved payment plan.

Scholarships and Awards

To remain eligible for all scholarships and awards, the student must maintain a minimum of 2.0 CgPA and be enrolled full-time. Herzing High School Merit Scholarship (does not apply to Online campus) High school seniors whose Herzing University entrance scores are in the upper one-tenth of the scores of students accepted by Herzing University in the prior year may qualify for a $500 Herzing High School Merit Scholarship, ($250 to be awarded per semester of full time study for the first two semesters of the student's attendance at Herzing University.) The student must have applied to Herzing University and for the scholarship by August 1st of the year in which the student graduates from high school. Another stipulation is that the student must also start full-time studies at Herzing University in the same year of his, her graduation from high school. An application for a Herzing High School Merit Scholarship can be obtained from the Admissions or Financial Aid Office. Students will be informed of the results within two weeks of making application for the scholarship, but not prior to January 15th of their year of graduation. Henry G. Herzing Scholarship (does not apply to Online campus) A Henry g. Herzing Scholarship, if available, is awarded at each Herzing University campus to a current high school graduate who commences full-time studies at Herzing University in the same year the student graduates from high school. The scholarship consists of $500 per semester for four semesters of full-time study. This scholarship is not awarded in addition to the High School Merit Scholarship. An applicant must meet the following criteria in order to be considered for this scholarship: 1. demonstrate a need for financial assistance. 2. Receive a recommendation from two references of the applicant's high school teaching or counseling staff.

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Institutional Scholarship for Completion of Second Degree, Major A student who is in the process of completing a second degree program (major), second minor, or concentration within a bachelor's degree program will be entitled to receive an institutional scholarship for a course of his, her choice during their final semester of study. Institutional Grants based upon extraordinary student need and, or unusual conditions or change of circumstances, students may be awarded an institutional grant. Such determination is made by the Institutional grant Committee composed of the Campus President, director of Financial Services, and one other staff member. The standard application for financial aid can also be used as the application for this grant. The deadline for submission of the application for this grant is prior to the end of the add, drop period of each semester. Awards will be made based upon the number of students with extraordinary need and the degree of the need. The amount of the award is normally between $200 and $700 per semester. The average award is typically $300.

WITHDRAWAL FROM uNIvERSITy

If a student withdraws from the University, that student will be obligated for tuition as follows:

Prior to the beginning of classes: Akron Institute, Atlanta, Birmingham, Brookfield, Kenosha, Madison, New Orleans, Online, Omaha School of Massage Therapy, Orlando, and Toledo

1. All monies paid by an applicant will be refunded if requested within three days after the applicant signs an enrollment agreement if the applicant makes an initial down payment. If the student begins class during the three-day period, all monies paid will be returned less the cost of the unreturned books and equipment. 2. An applicant who subsequently requests cancellation shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid to Herzing or its representatives in excess of $100.

REFuND POLICy

Federal Return Policy

A calculation of both the Return of Title IV Funds and the institutional refund policy will take place upon a student's official withdrawal. In the case of an unofficial withdrawal, the institution will perform the calculations when Herzing University makes the determination the student has withdrawn. Please contact the business, Fiscal Office to receive a copy of these calculations. Any Title IV-eligible student (applies to any student receiving any federal financial aid at this institution except Federal Work-Study) who withdraws is subject to a prorated return of Federal Financial Aid, Title IV funds. Any calculated return of funds must be distributed back to the federal programs and may leave the student owing the college a tuition balance according to the refund policy below. If a student withdraws without attempting a course he, she has enrolled in and does not return textbooks and other course materials he, she received for the course, the student will be charged for the cost of the books and materials.

Prior to the beginning of classes: Minneapolis

1. If a student gives written notice of cancellation after five business days of the execution of the contract, but before the start of the program, then all tuition, fees, and other charges, except 15% of the total cost of the program (15% not to exceed $50) shall be refunded to the student.

After classes start: Toledo and Akron Institute

State refund policy for program organized on a credit hour basis. 1. A student who starts class and withdraws during the first calendar week of the quarter or semester shall be obligated for 25% of the tuition and refundable fees for that academic term plus the registration fee. 2. A student who withdraws during the second full calendar week of the academic term shall be obligated for 50% of the tuition and refundable fees for that period plus the registration fee. 3. A student who withdraws during the third full calendar week of the academic term shall be obligated for 75% of the tuition and refundable fees for that period plus the registration fee. 4. A student who withdraws beginning with the fourth full calendar week of the academic term will not be entitled to a refund of any portion of the tuition and fees.

Non-Federal Refund Policy

Refunds for state aid programs and non-state aid programs are outlined below. note: any state aid refund will be calculated on a proportional basis using the state-mandated or institutional refund policy. If a student does not return textbooks and other course materials when the student withdraws from or does not attempt a course he, she has enrolled in, the student will be charged for the cost of the books and materials. If a student withdraws from a course(s) after the course(s) have been attempted, but the student is not a complete program withdrawal, there will be no refund of tuition or fees for the dropped course(s).

After classes start: Brookfield, Kenosha, Madison, and Online

1. When a student has completed less than 60% of the term, the amount due will be prorated and rounded up to the nearest 10%. That portion of the tuition and fees will be due as well as a one-time administrative fee of $75 (for all first

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time students) and 15% of the tuition and fees, or $400, whichever is less (for continuing students). 2. When a student has completed more than 60% of the term, the entire term's tuition and fees are due.

After classes start: Atlanta

1. When a student has completed 5% or less of the term, the amount due will be 5% of the tuition and fees plus an administrative fee of $150. 2. When a student has completed more than 5% but no more than 10% of the term, the amount due will be 10% of the tuition and fees plus an administrative fee of $150. 3. When a student has completed more than 10% but no more than 25% of the term, the amount due will be 25% of the tuition and fees plus an administrative fee of $150. 4. When a student has completed more than 25% but no more than 50% of the term, the amount due will be 50% of the tuition and fees plus an administrative fee of $150. 5. When a student has completed more than 50% of the term, the entire term's tuition and fees are due.

5. during the third and fourth 25% of the course, Herzing University shall retain 100% of the stated course price. Percentages of course completion are computed on the basis of credit hours. For programs longer than one year (12 calendar months) in length, 100% of the stated course price attributable to the period beyond the first year will be refunded when the student withdraws during the prior period.

After classes start: Minneapolis

1. If a student gives written notice of cancellation after the start of instruction but before completion of 75% of the period of instruction, then the student is assessed a pro rata portion of tuition, fees, and all other charges plus 25% of the total program cost (25% not to exceed $100). 2. Any notice of cancellation shall be acknowledged in writing within 10 days of receipt of such notice, and all refunds shall be forwarded to the student within 30 business days of receipt of such notice.

After classes start: Omaha School of Massage Therapy

1. When a student has completed 60% or less of the term, a prorated calculation will occur using the number of days in attendance over the number of total days in the term to determine the percentage of tuition and fees earned. The number of days in attendance is calculated using the first day of the enrollment period through the student's last day of attendance. 2. If a student's last day of attendance is past the 60% point of the term, all of the tuition and fees for that period are earned and due. This refund policy is not linked to any student conduct policy, and any promissory instrument shall not be negotiated prior to the completion of 50 percent of the course. Written notice of cancellation shall take place on the date the letter of cancellation is postmarked or, in the case where the notice is hand-carried, it shall occur on the date the notice is delivered to the University. The date of execution of the enrollment agreement shall be presumed to be the date of delivery of the notice of acceptance and, if delivered by mail, the postmark date of the letter of acceptance.

After classes start: Birmingham and Orlando

1. When a student has completed less than 25% of the term, the amount due will be 25% of the tuition and fees plus an administrative fee of $150. 2. When a student has completed 25% but no more than 50% of the term, the amount due will be 50% of the tuition and fees plus an administrative fee of $150. 3. When a student has completed more than 50% of the term, the entire term's tuition and fees are due.

After classes start: New Orleans

1. during the first week of classes, Herzing University shall refund at least 90% of the tuition, less the registration fee. 2. during the next three weeks of classes, Herzing University shall refund at least 75% of the tuition, less the registration fee. 3. during the first 25% of the course, Herzing University shall refund at least 55% of the tuition, less the registration fee. 4. during the second 25% of the course, Herzing University shall refund at least 30% of the tuition, less the registration fee.

REFuND PROCEDuRES

Refund procedures are uniformly applied to all students. The school will make any refunds owed within 45 days of official withdrawal (student notification) or within 45 days of the date of determination of withdrawal (at a maximum, within 45 days of the end of the academic period). The 45-day refund deadline is a U.S. department of Education requirement; if the state in which the campus resides has a different requirement, this deadline may be less than 45 days.

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In Atlanta, birmingham, Orlando, and new Orleans, the date of determination for a student's withdrawal will be the date the student notifies the campus, either verbally or in writing, of his, her intent to withdraw from the school. If a student does not provide notification of his, her withdrawal, the withdrawal date will be the midpoint of the payment period unless it can be shown that the student was in attendance at an academically related event after the midpoint of the payment period. In that case, the date of that event will become the withdrawal date. Refunds are calculated from the student's withdrawal date. All other campus refunds are computed from the student's last date of attendance..

STuDENT SERvICES INFORMATION

Atlanta

APPEAL, GRIEvANCE, AND ARBITRATION PROCEDuRES

APPEAL PROCEDuRES

If a student is dissatisfied with a decision or action of a member of the University's faculty or staff, they may appeal that decision using the procedures outlined in this section. Appeals fall into the following areas: grade appeals, academic termination (dismissal) appeals, and adverse action appeals. If, after attempting to follow the steps below, a student believes he or she did not receive the appropriate due process or if the matter in dispute does not fall into one of these three areas, the student may file a grievance or complaint in accordance with the provisions in the following section.

Grade Appeal Procedure

A student who has a dispute with an instructor's grading on a test, assignment or the final grade in a course must follow the steps outlined below. 1. The student must first try to resolve the difference with the instructor involved. If the instructor agrees to the student's request, the instructor will make the appropriate change in the grade book or submit a grade change through the Academic dean. If the student agrees with the instructor's decision, the matter is dropped.

Minneapolis

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2. If a satisfactory solution cannot be reached between the student and the instructor, the student may submit a written grade appeal to the Academic dean. A grade appeal must be made within two weeks for an exam and within 30 days of grade issuance for a course. The Academic dean will investigate the facts of the case and make a decision in writing regarding the grade within seven days of receiving the appeal. 3. normally, the decision of the Academic dean regarding a grade appeal is final. However, if the student still feels a satisfactory solution has not been reached, the student may submit a further written appeal to the Campus President. Appeals to the Campus President must be submitted within 30 days of the Academic dean's decision. The Campus President's decision will be made in writing within seven days of receiving the appeal and will be final.

Adverse Action Appeal Procedures

Adverse actions are disciplinary actions due to a student violating student conduct policies or academic honesty standards. These can include termination, suspension, probation, or other academic penalty. An example of "other academic penalties" could be the awarding of a zero on a test or assignment or assignment of an "F" (failure) in a course. All adverse actions take effect immediately when imposed by the appropriate instructor or campus administrator, but they are subject to appeal. If the student disputes the basis for an adverse action, the student may appeal the action with the following procedure. 1. A student appealing an adverse action must submit a written statement with supporting evidence (if any) disputing the basis of the adverse action to the Campus President. The Campus President will investigate the facts of the case and render a final decision in writing within seven days. 2. If dissatisfied with the decision of the Campus President, or if the adverse action was taken by the Campus President, the student may appeal to an Appeal board. Any such appeal must be made in writing within 30 days for suspensions, probations, or other academic penalties and within three months for terminations. A request to be heard before the Appeal board must be in writing to the Campus President, and it must set forth, in significant detail, the basis for the appeal. An Appeal board hearing will be held within a reasonable period of time, usually two weeks. The board will be comprised of three faculty or staff members, none of whom have been instructors of the student, two of whom will be appointed by the Campus President, and one of whom can be selected by the student. The appealing student may call witnesses and provide other evidence to support his, her case. The decision of the Appeal board will be by majority vote, will be made within two days of the board's meeting, and will be final and binding upon the University and the student. 3. If a suspension has already taken place and the course(s) is, are still ongoing and, upon appeal, is reversed by the Campus President or an Appeal board, the University will provide reasonable assistance and time for the student to make up missed material, tests, or projects, all of this being on the basis that such extra time or instruction is practical in the sole judgment of the University. In the event a student has already been terminated or suspended and the course(s) has, have ended, the student will be allowed to retake, at no cost, any courses that were interrupted by a termination or suspension that was reversed upon appeal.

Academic Termination Appeal Procedures

If a student is terminated (i.e., dismissed) from the University for lack of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), the student may appeal by following the steps below: 1. The student may submit a written petition to the Satisfactory Progress Committee through the Academic dean's office. The written petition of appeal must contain verifiable documentation of mitigating circumstances that contributed to poor academic performance and a realistic plan for improvement. The written petition must be submitted prior to the beginning of the following term if the student wishes to continue without interruption. However, the student must appeal within 12 months of dismissal or all rights of appeal expire. The Committee will meet within two weeks of receiving an appeal and will attempt to accommodate more urgent schedules. 2. The Satisfactory Progress Committee will be comprised of the Campus Academic dean, the Campus director of Financial Aid, and at least one additional member appointed by the Campus President. The Satisfactory Progress Committee will consider all the facts of the appeal and will provide a recommendation to the Campus President within two days. 3. The Campus President will consider the recommendation of the Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee and will render the final decision on the petition in writing within two days. If the petition of appeal is approved, the student will be reinstated on academic probation, and provisions of the University's academic probation policy will apply. Note: A student who withdraws while in good standing with the University or is withdrawn for administrative reasons while in good standing with the University (such as for having missed excessive classes) may be readmitted normally and is not required to appeal under these provisions.

GRIEvANCE AND COMPLAINT PROCEDuRES

Every student has the right to file a grievance, complaint about any procedure at the University, any action taken by an official of the University, any failure by officials of the University to properly follow the appeals procedures outlined above, or any perceived

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discrimination on the basis of sex, religion, color, creed, national origin, disability, age, marital status, or sexual orientation. grievances, Complaints may be filed orally or in writing, unless to the Campus President or to the Vice President of Operations, in which cases the grievance, complaint must be in writing following the procedure below. 1. grievances, Complaints may be addressed to the senior person in the office to which the matter pertains (i.e., to the director of Financial Services for financial aid matters or to the Academic dean for education matters), or they may be presented to the Campus President. 2. grievances, Complaints should be filed within 15 calendar days of the occurrence of the matter about which the grievance, complaint is being made. grievances, Complaints, whether oral or written, should describe briefly, but completely, the nature of the grievance, complaint and the solution sought. 3. grievances, Complaints addressed to an official of the University other than the Campus President may be resubmitted to the Campus President if the complainant is not satisfied with the resolution. In such case it must be in writing. The Campus President will attempt to render a decision within seven days of receipt of the complaint, and the decision will be in writing. 4. If not satisfied with the decision of the Campus President or if the grievance or complaint is in regards to the Campus President, the student may send a written appeal to the Vice President of Operations or the University President at the University's central office in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the respective officer in the central office will attempt to render a decision within seven days. The decision will be in writing. 5. While all students are encouraged to seek resolution of grievances, complaints with university officials, any student may communicate a grievance, complaint directly to either the state organization that oversees private post-secondary education in his or her state or the institutional accrediting body. 6. Any unresolved dispute or claim that a student wishes to pursue further will be handled with binding arbitration, as outlined in the following section.

The arbitration proceeding shall be conducted by the single arbitrator using the most current commercial rules for small cases promulgated by the American Arbitration Association (AAA). While the AAA rules shall be utilized by the arbitrator, the proceeding shall not be administered by the AAA, absent written agreement by both the undersigned student and an authorized representative of Herzing University. Further, absent written agreement by both parties, the selection of the arbitrator shall be made by the parties consensually and shall not be made by AAA, absent the prior written agreement by both the undersigned student and an authorized representative of Herzing University. The parties to this Agreement agree to act promptly in the selection of the arbitrator and further agree that the arbitrator shall have legal training and experience in the field of higher, post-high school education. The location of the arbitration proceedings and final hearing shall be conducted at a location to be selected by the arbitrator within the County and State where the student is enrolled for Herzing University coursework (for either in-person classes, onsite classes, or online classes) or, if both sides agree, at such other location as may be mutually agreed to by the parties. Any dispute regarding the selection of said arbitrator shall be handled in accordance with either the Federal Arbitration Act or the Wisconsin Arbitration Act, as appropriate to the student's enrollment as specified in the first paragraph above. neither party shall have the right to conduct written discovery against the other or conduct depositions against the other or third parties except to the extent specifically authorized by statute under the Federal Arbitration Act or the Wisconsin Arbitration Act, as appropriate to the student's enrollment as specified in the first paragraph above. All determinations as to the scope, enforceability, and effect of this Arbitration Agreement shall be determined by the arbitrator and not by a court. The final award rendered by the arbitrator may be entered and enforced in any court having jurisdiction. The arbitrator shall have authority to award in favor of the substantially prevailing party reimbursement of its actual reasonable attorney fees and costs of the arbitration from the losing party. The arbitrator shall not have authority to award punitive damages against either side.

ARBITRATION

Any unresolved dispute or claim by or between a student and Herzing University (or any of the University's employees, officers, directors, or staff ) arising from or pertaining to enrollment in and, or participation in any educational program offered by Herzing University shall be resolved by binding arbitration by a single arbitrator conducted pursuant to the substantive and procedural requirements of the Federal Arbitration Act, 9 U.S.C. § 1 et seq. OR the Wisconsin Arbitration Act found at Wis. Stat. Chapter 788. All students enrolled by the Madison Campus or the Online division in Milwaukee shall be governed by the Wisconsin Arbitration Act. All other students will be governed by the Federal Arbitration Act.

HOuSING ASSISTANCE

Although the University does not provide dormitory facilities, the University's director of Career Services or other staff will assist non-commuting students with housing problems in finding suitable living accommodations.

COMMuNITy AFFAIRS

One of the functions of the University is to promote involvement in community affairs. by being sensitive to community needs, the University is a contributing agency in community improvements. Herzing University emphasizes community service as an institution, encouraging its staff and student body to participate in community activities.

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STuDENT ADvISING

Students are encouraged to consult the Campus director of Career Services about matters related to career plans, professional services, and even leisure activities. Students are encouraged to consult first with faculty if they are having problems with coursework and then, if necessary, with the appropriate department Head or Academic dean. Some Herzing University campuses also have a professional counselor on staff that is available daily to assist students who are experiencing difficulty in most aspects of college or personal life. Prior to acceptance to the University, applicants can seek advice through the Admissions Office.

4. Forced physical activity that could adversely affect the physical health or safety of the student. 5. Forced activity that would subject the student to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation. 6. Forced exclusion from social contact. 7. Forced conduct that could result in extreme embarrassment. 8. Any other forced activity that could adversely affect the mental health or dignity of the student. It can be unlawful under some state laws for any student to engage in what is known as hazing, or to aid or abet any other student in the commission of this offense. Any violation could result in civil or criminal penalties that may include the imposition of a fine. Herzing University's actions against violators can include the imposition of probation, suspension, or dismissal.

CAREER SERvICES

From the time a student enrolls at Herzing University, one of the University's primary goals is to see that the student is successfully employed upon graduation. This can best be achieved if the student takes an active role in his, her employment efforts. In addition, the Career Services office plays an important role in helping the student. Although the securing of positions cannot be guaranteed, diligent effort is made by the career services personnel to help the graduate obtain suitable employment. The services of this office are also available to presently enrolled students seeking part-time employment through the University's Job location and development Program. The Federal Work-Study Program is coordinated through this office to complement parttime employment opportunities.

STATE ORGANIzATIONS

ALABAMA Alabama State department of Education gordon Persons building 50 north Ripley Street Montgomery, Alabama 36130-3901 (334) 242-9700 FLORIDA Commission for Independent Education Florida department of Education 325 West gaines Street, Suite 1414 Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400 (850) 245-3200 GEORGIA georgia nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission 2189 northlake Parkway, bldg. 10, Suite 100 Tucker, georgia 30084-4113 (770) 414-3300 LOuISIANA State of louisiana board of Regents 1201 north Third Street, Suite 6-200 baton Rouge, louisiana 70801 (225) 342-4253

CRIME AWARENESS

Herzing University is in compliance with Title II of Public law 101542, the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990. Upon enrollment, students are provided with the University's policies on crime awareness, prevention, and the reporting of crimes that might be observed. Crime statistics are tabulated and distributed annually to all students. Crime awareness seminars are held periodically.

ANTI-HAzING POLICy

Any action or situation, which recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of initiation or admission into or affiliation with any organization operating under the sanction of the University, is considered hazing, regardless of the willingness of the participant. Such prohibited actions, situations, and activities include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. Any brutality of a physical nature, such as whipping, beating, branding, or forced calisthenics. 2. Excessive exposure to the elements. 3. Forced or required consumption of any food, alcohol, drug, or other substance.

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MINNESOTA Minnesota Office of Higher Education 1450 Energy Park drive, Suite 350 St. Paul, Minnesota 55108 (651) 642-0533 NEBRASKA Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education 140 north 8th Street, Suite 300 lincoln, nebraska 68508 (402) 471-2847 OHIO Ohio State board of Career Colleges and Schools Registration #: 04-01-1704T (Akron) Registration #: 08-09-1874b (Toledo) 39 East gay Street, Suite 403 Columbus, Ohio 43215-3138 (614) 466-2752 or (877) 275-4219 WISCONSIN State of Wisconsin Educational Approval board 131 West Wilson, Suite 904 Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (608) 266-1996 INSTITuTIONAL ACCREDITING BODy The Higher learning Commission north Central Association of Colleges and Schools 30 north laSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504 (312) 263-0456 www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org

PROGRAMS OF STuDy

Program Offerings

Atlanta

Birmingham

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Program Offerings 2009-2010

Akron Bachelor of Science Degrees accounting (BSa) Business administration With a Concentration in Business Management (BSBaBM) Business administration With no declared Minor or Concentration (BSBanM) Computer Science With a Concentration in Software engineering (BSCSSe) Computer Science With a Concentration in Computer networking and Security Technology (BSCSCnST) Criminal Justice With a Concentration in Homeland Security (BSCJHS) Criminal Justice With no Minor or Concentration (BSCJnM) entrepreneurial Studies (BSeS) game development (BSgad) graphic design (BSgrd) Health Care Management (BSHCM) Health Care Management--dental Hygiene emphasis (BSHCMdH) Health information Management (BSHiM) Homeland Security and Public Safety With a Concentration in Criminal Justice (BSHSPSC) Homeland Security and Public Safety With a Concentration in emergency Medical Technology (BSHSPSe) Atlanta Birmingham Brookfield Kenosha Madison Minneapolis New Orleans Omaha Online Orlando Toledo

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Herzing UniVerSiTY CaTalog MaY 2009­2010 128

Please call your local campus for the most current course offerings.

PrograMS of STUdY

Akron Homeland Security and Public Safety With no Minor or Concentration (BSHSPSn) Human resources Management (BSHrM) international Business (BSiB) legal Studies (BSlS) Marketing (BSM) nursing (BSn/BSnMn) nursing--Bridge (BSnB) Technology Management With a Minor in Computer/electronics/and Telecommunications Technology (BSTMCeT) Technology Management With a Minor in Computer networking and Security Technology (BSTMCnST) Technology Management With a Minor in Computer Science (BSTMCS) Technology Management With a Minor in drafting and design Technology (BSTMddT) Technology Management With a Minor in electronics engineering Technology (BSTMeeT) Technology Management With no declared Minor or Concentration (BSTMnM)

Atlanta

Birmingham

Brookfield

Kenosha

Madison

Minneapolis

New Orleans

Omaha

Online

Orlando

Toledo

C/o C/o C/o C o C/o o o C/o o C o C o

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C/o o C/o o C/o C o o o C/o C/o C C/o

o o o o o o

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C C/o C C

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o

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o

o

C/o

Associate and Associate of Applied Science Degrees (Akron/Minneapolis and Toledo are Associate of Applied Science Degrees) accounting (aaSaoH/aSa) Business administration (aaSBa/aaSBaMPl/aSBa) Biomedical engineering Technology (aSBeT) Clinical laboratory Technician (aaSClT)

C C/o

C C/o

C C/o C/o C/o C/o C o

C C/o o

C o

C C/o

C=Program offered on campus O=Program offered online

Herzing UniVerSiTY CaTalog MaY 2009­2010 129

Please call your local campus for the most current course offerings.

PrograMS of STUdY

Akron Computer/electronics/and Telecommunications Technology (aSCeTT) Computer networking and Security Technology (aaSCnST/aSCnST) Computer Science (aaSCSMPl/aaSCSoH/aSCS) Criminal Justice (aaSCJ/aSCJ) dental assisting (aaSdaM/aaSdaoH) dental Hygiene (aaSdH) drafting and design Technology (aSddT) electronics engineering Technology (aSeeT) fire Science (aSfS) graphic design (aaSgrdoH/aSgrd) Health information Management (aaSHiMoH/aSHiM) legal assisting/Paralegal (aaSlaPM/ aaSlaPoH/aSlaP) Medical assisting (aaSMaM/ aaSMaoH/aSMa) Medical Billing and insurance Coding (aaSMBiCM/aaSMiBiCo/aSMBiC) Medical office administration (aaSMoa/aaSMoaoH/aSMoa) nursing (aaSnSoH/aaSnoH/aSn/ aSnal/aSnWi nursing--lPn to rn Bridge (aaSnBoH/aSnB) occupational Therapy assisting (aaSoTa) Physical Therapist assistant (aSPTa) radiologic Technology (aSrT) C=Program offered on campus O=Program offered online

Herzing UniVerSiTY CaTalog MaY 2009­2010

Atlanta

Birmingham

Brookfield

Kenosha

Madison

Minneapolis

New Orleans

Omaha

Online

Orlando

Toledo

C C o o C C C/o C/o o C C/o C/o C C/o C/o C C/o C/o C C C C C o o o C/o C/o o C C C C/o C o o o o o C/o o C/o o o o C/o o o C/o C/o o C/o o o C/o o o C o C/o C/o C/o o o C C/o C/o C/o o C/o o o o o o o o C C o o o o C/o o o C/o C/o C C/o C/o o o o C o o

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Please call your local campus for the most current course offerings.

130 PrograMS of STUdY

Akron Surgical Technology (aaSST/aSST) Therapeutic Massage (aSTMne) Diploma and Certificate Programs Bookkeeping and Payroll accounting (dBPa) Cisco networking (CCn/dCn) Computed Tomography (CCT) dental assisting (ddaM/ddaoH) electronics Technology (deT) emergency Medical Technician--Basic (CeMTB) emergency Medical Technician-- Paramedic (deMTP) Magnetic resonance imaging (CMri) Medical assisting (dMa) Medical Billing and insurance Coding (dMBiC) Medical office administration (dMoa) Microsoft networking (CMn/dMn) network Systems (dnS) Practical nursing (dPnal/dPnWi) Therapeutic Massage (dTMne)

Atlanta

Birmingham

Brookfield

Kenosha

Madison

Minneapolis

New Orleans

Omaha

Online

Orlando

Toledo

C

C C

C

C

o C C C C C C C C

C/o C

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C/o C

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C C/o C/o o C C C C C C C C C C/o o o C/o o o C C C C C/o C/o C/o C/o o C/o o C/o o o o C C C C o o C/o o

C=Program offered on campus O=Program offered online

Herzing UniVerSiTY CaTalog MaY 2009­2010 131

Please call your local campus for the most current course offerings.

PrograMS of STUdY

uNDERGRADuATE

GENERAL EDuCATION

general education is a highly valued and integral part of all the associate and bachelor degrees at Herzing University. The value of a sound general education for a wellrounded college graduate, including those in highly technical fields, is articulated in the University's general education philosophy statement below. The requirements suggested below apply to all associate degrees unless specified differently in a specific program outline. HerzinG COLLeGe GenerAL eDuCATiOn PHiLOsOPHy sTATemenT The purpose of the General Education requirements is to ensure that every graduate of Herzing University acquires an essential core of an undergraduate education that establishes the foundations for living a productive life, appreciating the liberal arts, and engaging in life-long learning in a continually changing world. For this reason, these core requirements provide for breadth across technical and non-technical courses, which include science, mathematics, computer literacy, communications, critical thinking, and cultural diversity. A graduate of Herzing University is expected to be able to apply analytical skills appropriate for a university-educated person and to be able to investigate issues that arise while living in a culturally diverse society.

PROGRAMS OF STuDy

General Education Requirements

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREES

Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines: 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications * 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) * 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

Minneapolis

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic. SuGGESTED HERzING uNIvERSITy COuRSES FOR MEETING ASSOCIATE DEGREE GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS The Herzing University courses listed below meet the requirements in each of the general education categories. Courses transferred from other accredited colleges may also be used to meet these requirements. Orlando

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 133

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name En 106 Information literacy and Research Writing

Prerequisite none

Credit Hours 1.0

3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name Prerequisite En 104 English Composition I none 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name En 116 Speech

3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus Suggested Herzing courses: Course Course Credit number name Prerequisite Hours HU 101 Critical Thinking none 3.0 SC 165 general Microbiology Corequisite SC 165l 2.0 SC 165l general Microbiology lab Corequisite SC 165 1.0

Credit Hours 3.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR DEGREES

Students enrolled in bachelor's degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications *¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives¿ * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

Prerequisite none

Credit Hours 3.0

4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications (word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software) Suggested Herzing course: Course Course Credit number name Prerequisite Hours IS 102 Computers and Application Software none 4.0 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name Prerequisite MA 107 College Algebra none 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science Suggested Herzing course options: Course Course number name Prerequisite SS 120 Introduction to Sociology none SS 350 Social Issues and Technology none PS 101 Psychology none

Credit Hours 4.0

**

¿

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0

SuGGESTED HERzING uNIvERSITy COuRSES FOR MEETING BACHELOR DEGREE GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS The Herzing University courses listed below meet the requirements in each of the general education categories. Courses transferred from other accredited colleges may also be used to meet these requirements.

134

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 135

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name En 106 Information literacy and Research Writing

SC 245l Credit Hours 1.0 SC 370 SC 370l SC 358 SC 358l

Anatomy and Physiology II lab Physics Physics lab Environmental Science Environmental Science lab

Corequisite SC 245

1.0

Prerequisite none

MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358l 3.0 MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358 En104, MA107, Corequisite SC 370l Corequisite SC 370 1.0 3.0 1.0

6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature Suggested Herzing courses: Course Course number name Prerequisite En 104 English Composition I none En 250 English Composition II En 104 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name En 116 Speech

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science Suggested Herzing courses: Course number PS 101 SS 120 SS 350 Course name Psychology Introduction to Sociology Social Issues and Technology Prerequisite none none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0

Prerequisite none

Credit Hours 3.0

4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications Suggested Herzing course: Course Course number name Prerequisite IS 102 Computers and Application Software none 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) Suggested Herzing course options: Course Course number name Prerequisite MA 107 College Algebra none MA 204 Trigonometry MA 107 MA 320 Statistics MA 107 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component Suggested Herzing course options: Course Course number name Prerequisite SC 145 Anatomy and Physiology I Corequisite SC 145l SC 145l Anatomy and Physiology I lab Corequisite SC 145 SC 242 Anatomy for Artists Corequisite SC 242l SC 242l Anatomy for Artists lab Corequisite SC 242 SC 245 Anatomy and Physiology II Corequisite SC 245l

3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus Suggested Herzing courses: Credit Hours 4.0 Course number HU 101 SC 165 SC 165l Course name Critical Thinking general Microbiology general Microbiology lab Prerequisite none Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 Credit Hours 3.0 2.0 1.0

Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 3.0

3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity Suggested Herzing course: Course number SS 310 Course name Cultural diversity Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0

3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives This requirement may be satisfied by choosing any course not already taken from the following course areas, provided that nine hours of general education courses are at the 300- to 400-level: EC Economics En English HU Humanities MA Mathematics PS Psychology SC natural Science SS Social Science

136

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 137

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOuNTING (BSA)

uNDERGRADuATE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bSA program prepares students for challenging careers and positions of leadership in both private and public sectors. It offers upper-level courses in financial accounting, auditing, taxation and cost accounting and introduces students to multiple functional aspects of business in general. Upon completion of this program, students are able to apply computer, communication, and decision-making skills to management accounting techniques to support accounting activities. These activities include maintenance of accounting records, the preparation of financial statements, inventory tracking, and valuation and the preparation of tax returns. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize industry standard accounting principles, accounting-based software, and accounting principles to analyze financial information to support and evaluate managerial decision-making. demonstrate mastery of industry standard spreadsheets, databases, and accounting systems.

PROGRAMS OF STuDy

Bachelor of Science Programs

2.

3. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, operational, ethical, legal, and managerial issues impacting the student's major area of study. 4. Birmingham 5. 6. demonstrate analytical skills needed to solve problems and make decisions based on available financial information. demonstrate the ability to engage in effective written, oral, and persuasive communications. demonstrate the understanding of the importance of a global business perspective and the role cultural diversity plays in the development of global business. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

7.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level and management training position titles include accountant, accounting clerk, accounts receivable clerk, accounts payable clerk, general ledger accountant, account representative, tax preparer, office manager, and general manager.

Atlanta

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 139

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

Course number AC 335 AC 413 AC 416 AC 418 AC 426 bU 310 bU 421

Course name Computerized Accounting Advanced Financial Accounting I governmental and non-profit Accounting Auditing Advanced Financial Accounting II business law II Operations Management

Prerequisite AC 216 AC 330 AC 330 AC 330 AC 413 bU 206 AC 330

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours of open electives is required. * Students in the state of Alabama must complete 3 additional semester credit hours in a special-topics course in advanced auditing and 3 semester credit hours in a specialtopics course in advanced taxation. AC 221 Taxation II satisfies the advanced taxation requirement. Students in the state of Alabama must take AC 435 Advanced Auditing to satisfy the advanced auditing requirement.

REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN ACCOuNTING All courses, 42 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 110 AC 212 AC 216 AC 221* AC 306 AC 313 AC 330 Course name Payroll Accounting Taxation I Accounting II Taxation II Managerial Cost Accounting Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Prerequisite AC 107 AC 216 AC 107 AC 212 AC 216 AC 216 AC 313 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor of science degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300- to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 141

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BuSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BuSINESS MANAGEMENT (BSBABM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level or management training positions in various business enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as accounting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, business administration, sales, marketing, human resources, legal office administration, or health care management. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize industry standard accounting principles, accounting-based software, databases, and principles to analyze financial information in order to support and evaluate managerial decision-making. 2. demonstrate the ability to formulate strategic and operational business solutions typically encountered during normal operation of a small- or mid-sized entity utilizing a range of management tools within an ethical environment. 3. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, operational, ethical, legal, and managerial issues impacting his/her major area of study. 4. demonstrate the ability to implement a strategic marketing plan within the organization. 5. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 Potential entry-level and management training position titles include account representative, accounting assistant, marketing representative, human resources representative, client services representative, and office manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 10 semesters (40 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities.

Students must take HU 210 Ethics, Values, and Professional Responsibility as a general education elective to satisfy a requirement for the CPA exam.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none

142

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 143

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

REquIRED COuRSES IN BuSINESS MANAGEMENT A minimum of 21 semester credit hours is required. Course number AC 216 bU 247 bU 307 bU 331 bU 406 bU 461 bU 482 Course name Accounting II Advertising and Public Relations Organizational Change Managing Information Systems International business Human Resource Management Strategic Management Prerequisite AC 107 bU 220 bU 106 IS 102 bU 106 bU 106 bU 220 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities.

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 24 semester credit hours of open electives is required. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345

144

Course name Project Management

Prerequisite none

Credit Hours 3.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 145

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BuSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH NO DECLARED MINOR OR CONCENTRATION (BSBANM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level or management training positions in various business enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as accounting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, business administration, sales, marketing, human resources, legal office administration, or health care management. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize industry standard accounting principles, accounting-based software, databases, and principles to analyze financial information in order to support and evaluate managerial decision-making. demonstrate the ability to formulate strategic and operational business solutions typically encountered during normal operation of a small- or mid-sized entity utilizing a range of management tools within an ethical environment. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, operational, ethical, legal, and managerial issues impacting his/her major area of study. demonstrate the ability to implement a strategic marketing plan within the organization. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

2.

3. 4. 5.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level and management training position titles include account representative, accounting assistant, marketing representative, human resources representative, client services representative, and office manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 10 semesters (40 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

146

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 147

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 45 semester credit hours of open electives is required. A minimum of 12 semester credit hours must be at the 300- to 400-level. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214.

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214

Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation

Prerequisite none none none none none

Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

148

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 149

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPuTER SCIENCE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (BSCSSE)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science Program employs an integrated and coherent approach that prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies required for a range of positions. The curriculum is focused on designing, implementing, or supporting solutions to business problems in the general categories of information technology, information management, and business communications. Coursework is designed to enhance and build upon the knowledge and skills of students with associate's degrees, completed coursework, or practical experience in either networking or programming applications. Career opportunities include, but are not limited to, such areas as systems analysis, application programming, web design, and network design or administration. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. Show mastery of the software engineering or networking knowledge and skills, and professional issues necessary to begin practice in a related field. 2. Work as an individual and as part of a team to develop and deliver quality software or networking artifacts. 3. Reconcile conflicting project objectives, finding acceptable compromises within limitations of cost, time, knowledge, existing systems, and organizations. 4. design appropriate solutions in one or more application domains using software engineering or networking approaches that integrate ethical, social, legal, and economic concerns. 5. demonstrate an understanding of and apply current theories, models, and techniques that provide a basis for problem identification and analysis, software design or network design, development, implementation, verification, and documentation. 6. demonstrate an understanding and appreciation for the importance of negotiation, effective work habits, leadership, and good communication, orally and in writing, with stakeholders in a typical software development or networking environment. 7. learn new models, techniques, and technologies as they emerge and appreciate the necessity of such continuing professional development. 8. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include computer software engineer, computer software application developer, computer software systems engineer, network systems administrator, computer systems administrator, network systems and data communications analyst, database administrator, and computer systems analyst. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is nine semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 138 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN COMPuTER SCIENCE All courses, 19 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Prerequisite IS 103 IS 112 IS 185 IS 481 bU 435 Programming logic Computer networks Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting IT Strategic Management Project Management none IS 102 IS 102 4.0 Senior year Senior year 4.0 3.0 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN COMPuTER SCIENCE A minimum of 12 semester credit hours is required. Students may take any accounting, business management, human resources, criminal justice, health information management, or homeland security course. At least 3 semester credit hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. REquIRED COuRSES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 108 IS 109 IS 180 IS 207 IS 212 Course name Internet Foundation Object-Oriented Programming 1 database Concepts and Applications I Object-Oriented Programming 2 database Concepts and Applications II Prerequisite IS 102 IS 103 IS 103 IS 109 IS 180 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

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IS 327 IS 340 IS 357 IS 390

Software Engineering I business Systems Analysis Software Engineering II Advanced Web development

IS 340 IS 112 IS 327 IS 108 and (IS 180 or IS 217)

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

nT 180 nT 215

network and Server Operating Systems Routers and Switches

IS 112 IS 112

4.0 4.0

Note: Students may substitute NT 180 for NT 160 and NT 170. REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT 4 credit hours are required. Course number IS 490 IS 494 Course name Capstone Project or Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING A minimum of 28 semester credit hours is required. Eight semester hours of 300 or 400 level courses are required. Course number IS 119 IS 165 IS 170 IS 191 IS 211 IS 213 IS 218 IS 258 IS 282 IS 311 IS 312 IS 313 IS 316 IS 320 IS 330 IS 360 IS 415 IS 425 IS 485 nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 Course name Current and Emerging Trends in Technology Programming in Java I Visual basic I linux Administration legacy Systems Introduction C++ Programming Web graphics Web Scripting network Security XMl Programming C# Programming C++ Project Programming in linux Client-Side Web Site development data Warehousing Web Commerce Server-Side Web development Advanced Specialization database Administration Emerging Operating Systems network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems Prerequisite IS 102 IS 103 IS 103 IS 112 IS 103 IS 207 IS 102 IS 108 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 108 IS 207 IS 213 IS 103 IS 108 IS 212 bU 195 IS 390 gPA of 3.0 IS 212 IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. 1 Semester Credit Hour of Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications *¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives¿ * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

**

¿

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 153

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the IS 494 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPuTER SCIENCE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy (BSCSCNST)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science Program employs an integrated and coherent approach that prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies required for a range of positions. The curriculum is focused on designing, implementing, or supporting solutions to business problems in the general categories of information technology, information management, and business communications. Coursework is designed to enhance and build upon the knowledge and skills of students with associate's degrees, completed coursework, or practical experience in either networking or programming applications. Career opportunities include, but are not limited to, such areas as systems analysis, application programming, web design, and network design or administration. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. Show mastery of the software engineering or networking knowledge and skills, and professional issues necessary to begin practice in a related field. 2. Work as an individual and as part of a team to develop and deliver quality software or networking artifacts. 3. Reconcile conflicting project objectives, finding acceptable compromises within limitations of cost, time, knowledge, existing systems, and organizations. 4. design appropriate solutions in one or more application domains using software engineering or networking approaches that integrate ethical, social, legal, and economic concerns. 5. demonstrate an understanding of and apply current theories, models, and techniques that provide a basis for problem identification and analysis, software design or network design, development, implementation, verification, and documentation. 6. demonstrate an understanding and appreciation for the importance of negotiation, effective work habits, leadership, and good communication, orally and in writing, with stakeholders in a typical software development or networking environment. 7. learn new models, techniques, and technologies as they emerge and appreciate the necessity of such continuing professional development. 8. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer

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applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include computer software engineer, computer software application developer, computer software systems engineer, network systems administrator, computer systems administrator, network systems and data communications analyst, database administrator, and computer systems analyst. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is nine semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 134 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN COMPuTER SCIENCE All courses, 19 semester credit hours, are required. Course number bU 435 IS 103 IS 112 IS 185 IS 481 Course name Project Management Programming logic Computer networks Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting IT Strategic Management Prerequisite Senior year none IS 102 IS 102 4.0 Senior year 4.0 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0

IS 421 nT 180 nT 200

Firewall Security network and Server Operating Systems network Infrastructure Administration directory Services Administration Routers and Switches Routers and Switches I System Administration Scripting Mail Servers

nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 112 nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 112 IS 112 IS 103 IS 191 and nT 210

4.0 4.0

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

nT 210 nT 215 OR IS 284 nT 325 nT 341

Notes: Students who take IS 284 Routers and Switches must take IS 286 Routers and Switches II as an elective. Students may substitute NT 160 Network Operating Systems and NT 170 Server Operating Systems for NT 180. ELECTIvE COuRSES IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy A minimum of 24 semester credit hours is required. 8 semester hours of 300- or 400-level courses are required. Course number CJ 430 IS 108 IS 119 IS 144 IS 170 IS 180 IS 186 IS 209 IS 212 Course name Financial Crimes Internet Foundation Current and Emerging Trends in Technology Introduction to WAn and Telecommunications Visual basic I database Concepts and Applications I Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II novell network Administration database Concepts and Applications II Prerequisite CJ 310 IS 102 IS 102 IS 102 IS 103 IS 103 IS 185 IS 112 IS 180 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN COMPuTER SCIENCE A minimum of 12 semester credit hours is required. Students may take any accounting, business management, human resources, criminal justice, health information management, or homeland security course. At least 3 semester credit hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. REquIRED COuRSES IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 191 IS 282 Course name linux Administration network Security Prerequisite IS 112 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 157

IS 214 IS 218 IS 239 IS 286 IS 292 IS 310 IS 330 IS 340 nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 nT 230 nT 305 nT 315 nT 320 nT 343 nT 350 nT 353 nT 355 nT 360 nT 370 nT 381 nT 382 nT 400 nT 401

SQl Server Administration Web graphics TCP, IP Routers and Switches II linux Application Server Unix Shell Programming data Warehousing business Systems Analysis Emerging Operating Systems network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems building Scalable Internetworks Virtualization designing network Security Computer and network Forensics designing network Infrastructure network defense Platform Integration Supporting Enterprise Applications Web Server Installation and Administration Remote Access Multilayer Switching Internetwork Troubleshooting Voice-Over IP

nT 180 (or nT 160 & nT 170) IS 102 IS 112 IS 284 IS 112 IS 103 IS 212 IS 112 IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 nT 215 or IS 286 IS 112 nT 200 IS 282 nT 200 IS 282 IS 191 and (nT 180 or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 200 nT 200 IS 112 IS 112 IS 112 IS 112

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications *¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives¿ * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

Wireless networking Fundamentals IS 112

**

¿

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the IS 494 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT 4 credit hours are required. Course number IS 490 IS 494 Course name Capstone Project or Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 159

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN HOMELAND SECuRITy (BSCJHS)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry and advancement in various law enforcement, fire service, and industrial security enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as law enforcement, public safety, private security, homeland security, government agency, diplomatic security, and border patrol. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate an extensive knowledge of law enforcement practices and the legal basis for decision making. 2. demonstrate a basic knowledge of fire service and the basics of fire safety. 3. demonstrate proficiency in understanding criminalistics and evidence forensics. 4. gain knowledge of public safety issues created by acts of both international and domestic terrorism and natural disasters including public preparedness and response. 5. demonstrate knowledge of the American Criminal Justice System including the interaction between its parts and the impact (role) of each in addressing Public Safety in a complex and culturally diverse society. 6. differentiate among the different types of criminal offensives and investigative techniques regarding narcotics, financial crimes, street crimes, and other forms of criminal activity and compare the legal ramifications and penalties. 7. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, social, and ethical issues impacting law enforcement and the fire service. 8. Examine and differentiate between the different levels of trauma and the management of stress for public safety responders. 9. Utilize and analyze financial information for fiscal budgeting and budget preparation. 10. Students should: think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles for which this program provides advancement opportunities include public safety officer; industrial security specialist; utility security specialist; safety and security officers in businesses, airports, home building associations, and stadiums; police officers; port authority agents; and various government agents: Secret Service agent, state police officer, U.S. marshal, special agent, customs

investigator, diplomatic security officer, emergency management agency official, transportation security administration official, homeland security special agent, and border patrol agent. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). Credits from other accredited institutions will be reviewed for transferability. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 125 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE All courses, 54 semester credit hours, are required. Course number CJ 105 CJ 115 CJ 120 CJ 130 CJ 140 CJ 200 CJ 210 CJ 220 CJ 230 CJ 240 CJ 250 CJ 300 CJ 310 CJ 320 CJ 400 CJ 420 CJ 430 Course name Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal law Introduction to Criminology Introduction to law and Judicial Process Report Writing and Communications Introduction to Corrections law Enforcement Security Ethics in law Enforcement Evidence Forensics Patrol Procedures Juvenile Justice Criminalistics Criminal Investigation Civil liability Criminal Psychology narcotics and drug Abuse Financial Crimes Prerequisite none none none none CJ 105 none CJ 130 CJ 105 CJ 130 CJ 105 none CJ 230 CJ 105 CJ 115 PS 101 none CJ 310 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN HOMELAND SECuRITy A minimum of 13 semester credit hours is required. Course number FS 100 HS 205 HS 320 HS 400 Course name Introduction to Fire Service domestic and International Terrorism Critical Incident Stress Management Industrial Security Prerequisite none none PS 101 CJ 210 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 161

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 15 semester credit hours of open electives is required. REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT Four credit hours are required. Course number HS 490 HS 494 Course name Capstone Project or Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements.* 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives¿ * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

¿

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

162

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 163

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE WITH NO MINOR OR CONCENTRATION (BSCJNM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry and advancement in various law enforcement, fire service, and industrial security enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as law enforcement, public safety, private security, homeland security, government agency, diplomatic security, and border patrol. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate an extensive knowledge of law enforcement practices and the legal basis for decision making. 2. demonstrate a basic knowledge of fire service and the basics of fire safety. 3. demonstrate proficiency in understanding criminalistics and evidence forensics. 4. gain knowledge of public safety issues created by acts of both international and domestic terrorism and natural disasters including public preparedness and response. 5. demonstrate knowledge of the American Criminal Justice System including the interaction between its parts and the impact (role) of each in addressing Public Safety in a complex and culturally diverse society. 6. differentiate among the different types of criminal offensives and investigative techniques regarding narcotics, financial crimes, street crimes, and other forms of criminal activity and compare the legal ramifications and penalties. 7. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, social, and ethical issues impacting law enforcement and the fire service. 8. Examine and differentiate between the different levels of trauma and the management of stress for public safety responders. 9. Utilize and analyze financial information for fiscal budgeting and budget preparation. 10. Students should: think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles for which this program provides advancement opportunities include public safety officer; industrial security specialist; utility security specialist; safety and security officers in businesses, airports, home building associations, and stadiums; police officers; port authority agents; and various government agents: Secret Service agent, state police officer, U.S. marshal, special agent, customs

investigator, diplomatic security officer, emergency management agency official, transportation security administration official, homeland security special agent, and border patrol agent. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). Credits from other accredited institutions will be reviewed for transferability. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 125 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE All courses, 54 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 115 Criminal law CJ 120 Introduction to Criminology CJ 130 Introduction to law and Judicial Process CJ 140 Report Writing and Communications CJ 200 Introduction to Corrections CJ 210 law Enforcement Security CJ 220 Ethics in law Enforcement CJ 230 Evidence Forensics CJ 240 Patrol Procedures CJ 250 Juvenile Justice CJ 300 Criminalistics CJ 310 Criminal Investigation CJ 320 Civil liability CJ 400 Criminal Psychology CJ 420 narcotics and drug Abuse CJ 430 Financial Crimes

Prerequisite none none none none CJ 105 none CJ 130 CJ 105 CJ 130 CJ 105 none CJ 230 CJ 105 CJ 115 PS 101 none CJ 310

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 28 semester credit hours of open electives is required. At least 14 semester credit hours must be at the 300-400 level. REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT 4 credit hours are required. Course Course number name HS 490 Capstone Project OR HS 494 Internship

Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 165

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives¿ * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENTREPRENEuRIAL STuDIES (BSES)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurial Studies degree (bSES) is designed to provide an understanding of the roles and responsibilities, functions, and challenges of today's entrepreneurs. bSES students will take classes to increase their knowledge and understanding of the importance of entrepreneurial law, social responsibility, product development, and innovation. The goal of the program is to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to start a small business or develop an existing business upon graduation. by the end of the program, students should be able to develop a comprehensive business plan, which includes a well-constructed financial and marketing component. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. demonstrate effective sales and negotiation skills. gain an understanding of the importance of social responsibility, values, and ethics in today's business world. Understand the importance of federal law, regulations, meeting compliance, and its impact on small businesses. gain a working knowledge of how to overcome economical constraints. demonstrate a basic working knowledge of human resource functions and its impact on small businesses. Perform an internal and external SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of business ownership. Examine various ways to obtain capital and financing for a business. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

¿

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential job position titles for which this program provides opportunities include venture capitalist, E-business consultant for small firms, small business owner, or franchise owner. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months).

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 167

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

Course number bU 406 bU 447 bU 450

Course name International business Marketing Research Marketing Strategy

Prerequisite bU 106 bU 220, MA 320 bU 220

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 9 semester credit hours of open electives are required. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN ENTREPRENEuRSHIP All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 216 AC 306 bU 216 bU 235 bU 247 bU 310 bU 328 bU 332 bU 336 Course name Accounting II Managerial Cost Accounting Social Media Entrepreneurship Advertising and Public Relations business law II Product development and Innovation Small business development and Planning The Art of negotiation Prerequisite AC 107 AC 216 none bU 106 bU 220 bU 206 bU 220 bU 220 bU 220 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor of science degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300- to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 169

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GAME DEvELOPMENT (BSGAD)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science degree in game development employs an integrated and coherent approach that prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies required for a wide range of positions in the gaming and graphic arts industry. The curriculum is focused on designing and producing work for print, the World Wide Web, television, cinema, multimedia, and digital entertainment. The degree enables students to specialize in topics appropriate for an entry-level position in a variety of interactive and graphic arts fields. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. design and develop solutions to everyday business related interactive and graphic challenges encountered during normal business operation using appropriate technologies and techniques.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. Students in the BSES program must take MA 320 Statistics.

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education

is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

2. design and produce game development solutions to address business challenges using appropriate software technologies and techniques. 3. Continuous additions to a game development, design portfolio appropriate for an entry-level position in game, interactive graphic development. 4. Integrate appropriate and meaningful game creation and design solutions to design problems. 5. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing. 6. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include graphic designer, game developer, desktop publishing specialist, illustrator, graphic designer, web designer, publication designer, multimedia author, concept artist, level designer, visual effects artist, and document specialist. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 138 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

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REquIRED COuRSES IN GRAPHIC DESIGN All courses, 24 semester credit hours, are required. Course number gA 101 gA 102 gA 105 gA 201 gA 205 gA 220 gA 225 HU 320 Course name graphic design Fundamentals Introduction to digital design Applications digital Photography: Introduction Color Theory in design diagrammatic design Pixel-based Images Advanced Illustration Techniques Art History Prerequisite none none gA 102 gA 101 gA 102 gA 102 gA 101 none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 8 semester credit hours of open electives is required. REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT Four credit hours are required. Course number gd 490 gd 494 Course name Capstone Project OR Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component *** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives ¿ * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. SC 358 SC 358l Physics Physics lab Prerequisite: MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358l Prerequisite: MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358

REquIRED COuRSES IN GAME DEvELOPMENT All courses, 63 semester credit hours, are required. Course number gd 210 gd 220 gd 250 gd 260 gd 300 gd 310 gd 350 gd 360 gd 380 gd 400 gd 420 gd 430 IS 103 IS 245 IS 346 IS 447 Course name level design I game Modeling I Serious gaming Script Writing and Storyboarding game development I Animation I game Modeling II game development Production Cinematography game development II Advanced Topics in game development games business Programming logic game Programming I game Programming II game Programming III Prerequisite none none none En 104 IS 245 gd 350 gd 220 gd 300 none gd 300 gd 400 gd 300 none IS 103 IS 245 IS 346 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

**

*** Students must take the following Herzing University courses to satisfy this requirement: 3.0 1.0

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¿

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GRAPHIC DESIGN (BSGRD)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science degree in graphic design employs an integrated and coherent approach that prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies required for a wide range of positions in graphic arts. The curriculum is focused on designing and producing work for print, the World Wide Web, television, cinema, multimedia, and digital entertainment. The degree enables students to specialize in topics appropriate for an entry-level position in interactive and graphic arts. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. demonstrate the use of type, imagery, and appropriate technologies and techniques to design socially appropriate solutions to interactive and graphic design problems. demonstrate a working knowledge of design production tools and interactive and graphic arts systems. Create and maintain a portfolio appropriate for an entry-level position in interactive and graphic arts. demonstrate the entire creative design and production process from research to delivery of final product to client. demonstrate appropriate uses of different color modes, including Rgb, CMYK, and spot colors. demonstrate the principles and elements of design as they relate in 2d, 3d, and interactive design. list and describe features of the five families of type and demonstrate using the appropriate font in 2d, 3d, and interactive design. Identify artists, techniques, and works of art from different periods of history. Identify career opportunities in graphic design. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, visually, orally, and in writing.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Students taking the gd 494 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 0.0

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

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POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include graphic designer, game developer, desktop publishing specialist, graphic designer, web designer, art director, publication designer, multimedia author, desktop publishing specialist, and document specialist. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is nine semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 124 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN GRAPHIC DESIGN All courses, 66 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 105 gA 101 gA 102 gA 104 gA 105 gA 201 gA 205 gA 212 gA 215 gA 220 gA 225 gA 235 gA 245 gA 255 gA 265 gA 310 gA 315 gA 325 Course name business Principles and Management graphic design Fundamentals Prerequisite none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

gA 345 gA 410 gA 420 HU 320

Vector graphic design Portfolio in Print design Online Portfolio design Art History

gA 205 gA 325 gA 315 none

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 15 semester credit hours of open electives is required. REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT Four credit hours are required. Course number gA 490 gA 494 Course name Capstone Project or Internship Senior year, Pd 214 4.0 Prerequisite Senior year Credit Hours 4.0

Introduction to digital design Applications none Illustration Fundamentals digital Photography: Introduction Color Theory in design diagrammatic design Introduction to Typography Web design Fundamentals Pixel based Images Advanced Illustration Techniques Corporate Identity design Web in Motion Fundamentals of 3-d design Exhibition design Print Production Advanced dynamic Web Sites Corporate Campaigns none gA 102 gA 101 gA 102 gA 101, gA 102 gA 105 gA 102 gA 104 gA 201 gA 215 gA 205 gA 255 gA 201 gA 245 gA 235

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 semester credit hour in Information literacy 6 semester credit hours in English Composition or literature 3 semester credit hours in Speech 4 semester credit hours in Computer Applications 7 semester credit hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or above) 4 semester credit hours of natural Science With a lab Component *** 3 semester credit hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 semester credit hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 semester credit hours in Cultural diversity 3 semester credit hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general Education may be made up with general Education Electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic.

**

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*** Students must take the following Herzing University courses to satisfy this requirement: SC 242 SC 242l Anatomy for Artists Anatomy for Artists lab Corequisite SC 242l Corequisite SC 242 3.0 1.0

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (BSHCM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the foundational skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level management positions in health care. It is structured as a "two-plus-two" degree, where students who have already completed an associate's degree in a healthcare-related field can advance that degree with a baccalaureate management curriculum. Combined, this gives the graduate both the technical grounding in a health care field (from their associate-level studies) and the business and management skills to manage within the health care industry. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES

In the state of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general Education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the college's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the state of Minnesota, the general education electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 0.0

Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. Understand the principles and practices of health care regarding management, law, finance, information systems, epidemiology, and statistics. Apply management principles toward team building and collaborative decision-making. Identify current and future trends in the health care industry for operational and strategic planning. Effectively manage human resources in a health care setting.

5. Apply knowledge of quality management and performance improvement techniques. 6. Formulate strategic and operational business solutions typically encountered in the health care environment.

7. Uphold the professional, ethical, and legal standards of health care management. 8. 9. 10. Apply project management techniques in the implementation of health care information systems. Utilize industry standard accounting principles to analyze financial information for operational and strategic objectives. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS Potential entry-level management positions for graduates of this program depend on the discipline of the associate degree used as the foundation for the degree but might include areas such as medical office manager, human resources representative,

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patient care services, nursing administration, planning and development, medical staff representative, finance, government relations, information systems, and materials management. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 121 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 30 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 bU 106 bU 204 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 HC 310 HI 305 Course name Accounting I Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Medical law and Ethics Health Care Finance Prerequisite IS 102 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none AC 107 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

Course number HI 300 HI 450

Course name Epidemiology and Applied Health Care Statistics Health Care Information Systems

Prerequisite MA 107 HC 311 or HI 320

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

TRANSFER CREDITS FROM ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN HEALTH CARE AND OPEN ELECTIvES A minimum of 37 semester credit hours is required from a combination of open electives and credits transferred from the core (non-general education) courses of a healthcare-related associate of science degree. · Transfer Credits in Health Care Up to 37 semester credit hours from core courses (non-general education courses) may be transferred from a healthcare-related associate of science degree. Applicable associate-degree disciplines include, but are not limited to, laboratory technology, medical assisting, dental assisting, medical billing, medical coding, medical office administration, nursing, surgical technology, radiological technology, physical therapy assisting, and therapeutic massage. Note: General education transfer credits are applied under general education. · Open Elective Courses Student not transferring 37 semester credits hours in health care core courses may make up the difference with open electives. REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP A minimum of 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number HC 490 HC 492 Course name Health Care Management Internship Capstone Project Prerequisite Senior year, Pd 214 Senior year Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT All courses, 12 semester credit hours, are required. Course number HC 305 HC 311 HC 405 Course name Health Care Human Resource Management Management of Patient Records Health Care Quality Prerequisite none HC 310 HI 300 Credit Hours 2.0 1.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor of science degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300- to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hours in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech

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4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours in natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours in general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT--DENTAL HyGIENE EMPHASIS (BSHCMDH)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in health care management with an emphasis on dental hygiene. It is structured as a "three-plus-one" degree where students who have already completed a typically lengthy associate's degree in dental hygiene (in the range of 90 semester credit hours) can top off that degree with an advanced management curriculum. Combined, this gives the graduate both the technical grounding in a dental hygiene program (from earlier training in dental hygiene from their associate's level studies) and the business and management skills to effectively manage within the dental hygiene profession. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Understand and be able to apply the skills and techniques needed by health care professionals in either an administrative or clinical setting (based on prior associate level health care studies). 2. demonstrate knowledge of the effective business practices and office administration techniques used in the offices of health care providers. 3. Communicate professionally with patients, co-workers and medical providers. 4. demonstrate the ability to utilize industry standard accounting principles, accounting based software, and principles to analyze financial information in order to support and evaluate managerial decision-making. 5. demonstrate knowledge of the unique aspects of managing human resources in a health care setting. 6. Comprehend the current trends in the health care industry. 7. demonstrate the ability to formulate strategic and operational business solutions typically encountered during normal operation of a small or mid-sized entity utilizing a range of management tools within an ethical environment. 8. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, operational, ethical, legal, and managerial issues impacting his, her major area of study. 9. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level management positions for graduates of this program include dental office manager, dental practice manager, dental care coordinator, and clinical services supervisor.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor of science degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the HC 490 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

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PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is three semesters (12 months) after completing an applicable associate's degree. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 130 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN BuSINESS All courses, 19 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 103 bU 105 bU 155 bU 355 bU 426 bU 435 Course name Accounting I business Principles and Management Team development and group Management leadership Theory and Practice Organizational behavior Project Management Prerequisite IS 102* none PS 101 bU 105, PS 101 bU 105 Senior Year Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES Students enrolled in this bachelor degree must complete a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education--including the general education coursework completed for their associate degree in dental hygiene. These credits must be distributed among the following disciplines and the minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be from upper level (300-400 level) courses. Refer to the General Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. 7 Semester Credit Hours in English or Communications 8 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science 6 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities 9 Semester Credits in Social Science 3 Semester Credits in Cultural diversity PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of two semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

* IS 102 prerequisite is waived for this program REquIRED COuRSES IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT All courses, 12 semester credit hours, are required. Course number HC 315 HC 401 HI 305 HI 480 Course name Medical Personnel Management Current Issues in Health Care Management Health Care Finance Research Methodologies Prerequisite bU 105 none AC 107 HI 300, HI 320 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

TRANSFER CREDITS IN DENTAL HyGIENE A minimum of 64 semester credit hours are required. Up to 64 semester credit hours of program core and support courses may be transferred from a completed associate degree in dental hygiene from Herzing University or another nationally or regionally accredited college or university. A minimum of 10 Semester credit hours must be from upper level (300-400 level) courses. If less than 64 semester credit hours of core or support courses are included in the completed dental hygiene associate degree, the balance may be made up with open electives.

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 185

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (BSHIM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This CAHIIM-accredited program prepares students with the necessary skills and knowledge in the health information management field for management positions in a variety of health-related settings including hospitals, clinics, long-term care settings, consulting firms, government agencies, insurance companies and software vendors. A health information management professional is responsible for the management of health information systems consistent with medical, administrative, ethical and legal requirements of the health-care delivery system. They are experts in coding and classification systems, managing patient health information, and administrating computer information systems. Individuals with interests in computer science, business administration, health science and health care administration are well-suited for a career in health information management. Upon completion of this degree, students are eligible to take the Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA) certification examination. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Manage patient health records including data structure, content, and standards. 2. Maintain organizational compliance with regulations, accreditation, licensure, and certification standards. 3. Implement and manage software applications and processes for all areas relating to health information management. 4. Understand the national health information initiatives that impact health care delivery systems, clinical classification systems, and reimbursement methodologies. 5. Organize and coordinate facility-wide quality management and performance improvement programs. 6. develop and implement organization-wide confidentiality and privacy policies and procedures. 7. Implement process engineering and project management techniques to ensure efficient workflow and appropriate outcomes. 8. Effectively manage human resources to facilitate staff recruitment, retention, and supervision while ensuring compliance with employment laws. 9. Apply principles of research methodologies. 10. demonstrate knowledge of health care statistics, financial management, and accounting principles.

11. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential job titles might include, but are not limited to, HIM director, coding supervisor, data quality manager, consultant, patient information coordinator, project manager, HIM college instructor, HIM manager, privacy officer, and compliance director. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 30 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 bU 106 bU 204 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 HC 310 HI 305 Course name Accounting I Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Medical law and Ethics Health Care Finance Prerequisite IS 102 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none AC 107 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 187

REquIRED COuRSES IN HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT All courses, 46 semester credit hours, are required. Course number HC 115 HC 405 HI 210 HI 300 HI 320 HI 450 HI 480 HI 490 MC 171 MC 172 MC 173 MC 174 MO 146 SC 145 SC 145 l SC 245 SC 245 l Course name Medical Terminology for Health Care Professionals Health Care Quality Principles of Health Information Management Epidemiology and Applied Health Care Statistics Health Care data Advanced Health Care Information Systems Research Methodologies HIM Internship/Capstone basic diagnosis Coding basic Procedure Coding Intermediate diagnosis Coding Intermediate Procedure Coding Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Prerequisite none HI 300 none MA 107 HI 210 HC 311 or HI 320 HI 300, HI 320 HI 305, HI 450, HI 480, Pd 213 MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MC 171 MC 172 Corequisite SC 245 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in the bSHIM degree must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300 to 400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hours in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours in natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours in general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the College's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 213. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 213 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Health Information Management Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 8 semester credit hours are required. Students may take any Health Care Management, business Management, or Human Resources course. At least 3 credit hours must be at the upper level (300- or 400-level).

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 189

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOMELAND SECuRITy AND PuBLIC SAFETy WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE (BSHSPSC)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in either law enforcement, fire service, or private security enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as public safety, private and public security, homeland security, transportation security administration, emergency, government, diplomatic security, law enforcement and border patrol. The program focus is intended to address the broad variety of disciplines under the department of Homeland Security. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate a basic knowledge of law enforcement practices and the legal basis for decision making. 2. demonstrate a basic knowledge of emergency response including the national Incident Management System (nIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) managed by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) under the department of Homeland Security (dHS). 3. demonstrate proficiency in identifying and developing coordinated responses to all risks and hazards. 4. Exhibit a detailed understanding of coordinated emergency response to all acts of terrorism and natural disasters and the role of both public and private responders to such incidents. 5. Analyze, define, and articulate organizational, social, and ethical issues impacting law enforcement, the fire service, and private security. 6. Examine and differentiate between the different levels of trauma and the management of stress for public safety responders. 7. Utilize and analyze financial information for fiscal budgeting and budget preparation. 8. differentiate between the distinguishing elements of Homeland Security and Public Safety by demonstrating knowledge of emergency preparedness, planning, and response as applied in both the public and private sector. 9. demonstrate proficiency in understanding criminalistics and evidence forensics. 10. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles for which this program provides advancement opportunities include: public safety officer; industrial security specialist; utility security specialist; safety and security officers in businesses, airports, home building associations, and stadiums; police officers; port authority agents; and various government agents: secret service agent, state police officer, U.S. marshal, special agent, customs investigator, diplomatic security officer, emergency management agency official, transportation security administration official, homeland security special agent, and border patrol agent. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). Credits from other accredited institutions will be reviewed for transferability. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 125 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN HOMELAND SECuRITy AND PuBLIC SAFETy All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required. Course number CJ 105 CJ 115 CJ 120 CJ 130 CJ 140 CJ 200 CJ 210 CJ 220 CJ 230 CJ 250 FS 100 HS 205 HS 320 Course name Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal law Introduction to Criminology Introduction to law and Judicial Process Report Writing and Communications Introduction to Corrections law Enforcement Security Ethics in law Enforcement Evidence Forensics Juvenile Justice Introduction to Fire Service domestic and International Terrorism Critical Incident Stress Management Prerequisite none none none none CJ 105 none CJ 130 CJ 105 CJ 130 none none none PS 101 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 191

REquIRED COuRSES IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE All courses, 23 semester credit hours, are required. Course number CJ 300 CJ 310 CJ 320 CJ 400 CJ 420 CJ 430 HS 400 Course name Criminalistics Criminal Investigation Civil liability Criminal Psychology narcotics and drug Abuse Financial Crimes Industrial Security Prerequisite CJ 230 CJ 105 CJ 115 PS 101 none CJ 310 CJ 210 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives ¿ * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE A minimum of 18 credit hours is required. Course number bU 105 bU 155 CJ 240 CJ 410 FS 200 FS 205 HS 330 IS 112 MA 175 PH 100 PH 200 Course name business Principles and Management Team development and group Management Patrol Procedures Fiscal budgeting in Criminal Justice Agencies Fire Prevention Fire Investigator I Cybercrime Computer networks business Mathematics Public Event Planning and Emergency Management Community Health Prerequisite none PS 101 CJ 105 MA 107 FS 100 FS 200 IS 112 IS 102 none none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

¿

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the HS 494 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT 4 credit hours are required. Course number HS 490 HS 494

192

Course name Capstone Project OR Internship

Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

Pd 200 Pd 214

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 193

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOMELAND SECuRITy AND PuBLIC SAFETy WITH A CONCENTRATION IN EMERGENCy MEDICAL TECHNOLOGy (BSHSPSE)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in either law enforcement, fire service, or private security enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as public safety, private and public security, homeland security, transportation security administration, emergency, government, diplomatic security, law enforcement and border patrol. The program focus is intended to address the broad variety of disciplines under the department of Homeland Security. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate a basic knowledge of law enforcement practices and the legal basis for decision making. 2. demonstrate a basic knowledge of emergency response including the national Incident Management System (nIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) managed by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) under the department of Homeland Security (dHS). 3. demonstrate proficiency in identifying and developing coordinated responses to all risks and hazards. 4. Exhibit a detailed understanding of coordinated emergency response to all acts of terrorism and natural disasters and the role of both public and private responders to such incidents. 5. Analyze, define, and articulate organizational, social, and ethical issues impacting law enforcement, the fire service, and private security. 6. Examine and differentiate between the different levels of trauma and the management of stress for public safety responders. 7. Utilize and analyze financial information for fiscal budgeting and budget preparation. 8. differentiate between the distinguishing elements of Homeland Security and Public Safety by demonstrating knowledge of emergency preparedness, planning, and response as applied in both the public and private sector. 9. demonstrate proficiency in understanding criminalistics and evidence forensics. 10. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles for which this program provides advancement opportunities include: public safety officer; industrial security specialist; utility security specialist; safety and security officers in businesses, airports, home building associations, and stadiums; police officers; port authority agents; and various government agents: secret service agent, state police officer, U.S. marshal, special agent, customs investigator, diplomatic security officer, emergency management agency official, transportation security administration official, homeland security special agent, and border patrol agent. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). Credits from other accredited institutions will be reviewed for transferability. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 125 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN HOMELAND SECuRITy AND PuBLIC SAFETy All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required. Course number CJ 105 CJ 115 CJ 120 CJ 130 CJ 140 CJ 200 CJ 210 CJ 220 CJ 230 CJ 250 FS 100 HS 205 HS 320 Course name Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal law Introduction to Criminology Introduction to law and Judicial Process Report Writing and Communications Introduction to Corrections law Enforcement Security Ethics in law Enforcement Evidence Forensics Juvenile Justice Introduction to Fire Service domestic and International Terrorism Critical Incident Stress Management none CJ 105 none CJ 130 CJ 105 CJ 130 none none none PS 101 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 Prerequisite none none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0

194

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 195

REquIRED COuRSES IN EMT All courses, 17 semester credit hours, are required. Course number EM 116 EM 117 FS 200 HS 210 Course name EMT basic Theory and lab EMT basic Clinical Fire Prevention First Responder Introduction to Hazardous Materials Prerequisite Corequisite EM 117 Corequisite EM 116 FS 100 none Credit Hours 9.0 1.0 3.0 4.0

EM 196 EM 197 EM 200 EM 203 EM 204 EM 205 EM 206 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 6.0 EM 207 FS 205 none PS 101 CJ 105 PS 101 MA 107 none CJ 310 Corequiste EM 189l Corequisite EM 189 Corequisites EM 189, EM 189l Corequisites EM 189, EM 189l EM 189, EM 189l, EM 191, EM 192; Corequisite EM 194 Corequisite EM 193 EM 194 HC 310 HS 330 IS 112 MA 175 PH 100 PH 200

Cardiovascular Electrophysiology Medical Patient Management Medical Patient Management II Cardiovascular Patient Management Transition to Paramedic Practice Paramedic Terminal Competencies Paramedic Team leadership Preceptorship Fire Investigator I Medical law and Ethics Cybercrime Computer networks business Mathematics Public Event Planning and Emergency Management Community Health

EM 195; Corequisite EM 203 EM 195, EM 196 EM 195, EM 197 Corequisite EM 196 EM 200, EM 203 EM 200, EM 203

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 6.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN EMT A minimum of 24 semester credit hours is required. Course number bU 105 bU 155 CJ 240 CJ 400 CJ 410 CJ 420 CJ 430 EM 189 EM 189l EM 191 EM 192 EM 193 EM 194 EM 195 Course name business Principles and Management Team development and group Management Patrol Procedures Criminal Psychology Fiscal budgeting in Criminal Justice Agencies narcotics and drug Abuse Financial Crimes Paramedic Anatomy and Physiology Paramedic Anatomy and Physiology lab Paramedic Preparation Paramedic Operations Patient Assessment and Management Paramedic general Pharmacology Advanced Trauma Management Prerequisite

Paramedic Field Preceptorship EM 200, EM 203 EM 200, EM 203 FS 200 none IS 112 IS 102 none none none

REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT Four credit hours are required. Course number HS 490 HS 494 Course name Capstone Project OR Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

196

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 197

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives ¿ * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOMELAND SECuRITy AND PuBLIC SAFETy WITH NO MINOR OR CONCENTRATION (BSHSPSN)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in either law enforcement, fire service, or private security enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as public safety, private and public security, homeland security, transportation security administration, emergency, government, diplomatic security, law enforcement and border patrol. The program focus is intended to address the broad variety of disciplines under the department of Homeland Security. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate a basic knowledge of law enforcement practices and the legal basis for decision making. 2. demonstrate a basic knowledge of emergency response including the national Incident Management System (nIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) managed by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) under the department of Homeland Security (dHS). 3. demonstrate proficiency in identifying and developing coordinated responses to all risks and hazards. 4. Exhibit a detailed understanding of coordinated emergency response to all acts of terrorism and natural disasters and the role of both public and private responders to such incidents. 5. Analyze, define, and articulate organizational, social, and ethical issues impacting law enforcement, the fire service, and private security. 6. Examine and differentiate between the different levels of trauma and the management of stress for public safety responders. 7. Utilize and analyze financial information for fiscal budgeting and budget preparation. 8. differentiate between the distinguishing elements of Homeland Security and Public Safety by demonstrating knowledge of emergency preparedness, planning, and response as applied in both the public and private sector. 9. demonstrate proficiency in understanding criminalistics and evidence forensics. 10. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

¿

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students must also take Pd 214 in preparation for the HS 494 Internship. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

198

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 199

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles for which this program provides advancement opportunities include: public safety officer; industrial security specialist; utility security specialist; safety and security officers in businesses, airports, home building associations, and stadiums; police officers; port authority agents; and various government agents: secret service agent, state police officer, U.S. marshal, special agent, customs investigator, diplomatic security officer, emergency management agency official, transportation security administration official, homeland security special agent, and border patrol agent. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). Credits from other accredited institutions will be reviewed for transferability. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 125 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN HOMELAND SECuRITy AND PuBLIC SAFETy All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required. Course number CJ 105 CJ 115 CJ 120 CJ 130 CJ 140 CJ 200 CJ 210 CJ 220 CJ 230 CJ 250 FS 100 HS 205 HS 320 Course name Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal law Introduction to Criminology Introduction to law and Judicial Process Report Writing and Communications Introduction to Corrections law Enforcement Security Ethics in law Enforcement Evidence Forensics Juvenile Justice Introduction to Fire Service domestic and International Terrorism Critical Incident Stress Management Prerequisite none none none none CJ 105 none CJ 130 CJ 105 CJ 130 none none none PS 101 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0

REquIRED SENIOR PROJECT 4 credit hours are required. Course Course number name HS 490 Capstone Project or HS 494 Internship

Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300- to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives ¿ * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

**

¿

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 41 semester credit hours of open electives is required. At least 12 semester credit hours must be at the upper level (300- or 400-level courses).

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course Course Credit number name Prerequisite Hours Pd 100 Student Success Skills none 1.0 Pd 120 Personal Financial Management none 1.0 Pd 155 Customer Services none 1.0 Pd 200 Career development Seminar none 1.0 Pd 214 AS, AAS, bS Internship Internship none 0.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 201

200

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HuMAN RESOuRCES MANAGEMENT (BSHRM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science in Human Resources Management degree (bSHRM) is designed to provide an understanding of the role of human resources management and its relationship to employee productivity while building a solid base of general business knowledge. The program prepares the students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level human resource management positions. These career opportunities may be in the areas of employee staffing, recruitment and selection, compensation and benefits, training, or employee relations. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate knowledge of human resources professional certifications: Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR). 2. demonstrate knowledge of employment law. 3. demonstrate the ability to apply mathematical, statistical, and research techniques to analyze contemporary business practices and functions to conduct research. 4. Utilize human resources information technology and explain the impact on today's businesses. 5. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level and management training titles include director of human resources, recruiter, employee relations representative, compensation manager/ specialist, benefits manager/specialist representative, and training specialists. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN HuMAN RESOuRCES MANAGEMENT A minimum of 36 semester credit hours is required. Course number AC 216 bU 307 bU 350 bU 406 bU 461 HR 100 HR 220 HR 230 HR 310 HR 320 Course name Accounting II Organizational Change Psychometrics International business Human Resource Management Introduction to Human Resource Management Human Resource Information Systems Employment law and labor Relations Compensation and benefits Training and development Prerequisite AC 107 bU 106 bU 220 bU 106 bU 106 none HR 100, IS 102 bU 206, HR 100 HR 100 or HR 230 HR 100 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

202

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 203

Course number HR 330 HR 410

Course name Risk Management Strategic Staffing

Prerequisite HR 100 HR 230, HR 310, HR 320

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 9 semester credit hours of open electives is required. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives

204

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 205

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERNATIONAL BuSINESS (BSIB)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science in International business degree is designed to provide an understanding of businesses in a global environment. This program equips students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in international companies. Areas of focus in international business include marketing, banking, finance, economics, exporting, importing, cultural protocol, and foreign language. Students will learn the social, cultural, legal, political, and technological barriers to international business and understand international trade and investment opportunities while demonstrating how to manage international business affairs. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to manage international business affairs and implement effective business decisions in a global environment. 2. demonstrate an understanding of the legal and political systems' impact on international trade, including country risk assessment. 3. demonstrate knowledge of research methods for examining cultural, geographical, technological, and socioeconomic obstacles to international business. 4. demonstrate knowledge of marketing decisions and management processes required in export operations development. 5. demonstrate an understanding of the international banking practices and the impact of international financial markets complexities on competitive international markets. 6. Analyze various foreign entry modes and the international business relationships between countries. 7. Think critically at a conceptual level by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively, use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level and management training titles include international sales manager, export sales representative, international business development manager, and international marketing representative.

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN INTERNATIONAL BuSINESS All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 216 bU 226 bU 307 bU 310 bU 331 bU 337 Course name Accounting II Export Management and International business Strategy Organizational Change business law II Managing Information Systems International banking and Finance Prerequisite AC 107 bU 106 bU 106 bU 206 IS 102 AC 220 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

206

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 207

Course number bU 361 bU 406 bU 421 bU 440 bU 482

Course name Cross-Cultural Management dimensions International business Operations Management International Marketing Strategic Management

Prerequisite bU 106, SS 310 bU 106 AC 330 bU 220 bU 220

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 12 semester credit hours are required. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education

is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor of science degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300- to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science

208

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 209

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LEGAL STuDIES (BSLS)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program is designed to provide in-depth understanding of the legal system as it relates to the law, the courts, clients, and lawyers. The core curriculum provides a solid foundation of legal, ethical, technical, and communication skills. Students will be prepared for entry-level or management training positions in office administration or other business enterprises requiring a legal studies background. SPECIAL ADMISSIONS AND TRANSFER REquIREMENTS Students at the Atlanta and new Orleans campuses must complete all paralegal courses at the campus in a traditional classroom format. Transfer students at the Atlanta and new Orleans campuses must complete at least 10 semester credit hours of paralegal core courses in a traditional classroom format at the campus. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize industry standard accounting principles, accounting-based software, and principles to analyze financial information in order to support and evaluate managerial decision-making. 2. demonstrate the ability to formulate strategic and operational business solutions typically encountered during normal operation of a small- or mid-sized entity utilizing a range of management tools within an ethical environment. 3. demonstrate mastery of industry standard spreadsheets, databases, and accounting systems. 4. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, operations, ethical, legal, and managerial issues impacting the student's major area of study. 5. Think critically at a conceptual level and using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the content of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level and management training position titles include account representative, human resource representative, client services representative, office manager, law office administrator, or paralegal manager.

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 126 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 30 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED LEGAL STuDIES COuRSES All courses, 16 semester credit hours, are required. Course number bU 406 IS 102 * OR IS 108* Pl 300 Pl 425 Pl 450 Course name International business Computers and Application Software OR Internet Foundation legal Office Administration business Organizations Advanced legal Research Prerequisite bU 106 none IS 102 Pl 106, Pl 180 Pl 100, Pl 106, bU 206 Pl 100, Pl 106 Pl 250 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

* IS 102: The American Bar Association does not consider this a general education course.

210 HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010 PROgRAMS OF STUdY 211

TRANSFER CREDITS FROM ASSOCIATE OR ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN LEGAL ASSISTING/PARALEGAL PROGRAMS A minimum of 39 semester credit hours may be transferred from a combination of the required courses or the elective courses of the Associate of Science/Applied Science in legal Assisting/Paralegal (ASlAP, AASlAPM or AASlAPOH) programs. Students not transferring in 39 credits must make up the difference with courses from the required courses or elective courses of these associate-degree programs. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. In PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010 PROgRAMS OF STUdY 213

212

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MARKETING (BSM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The bachelor of Science in Marketing is designed to prepare students with an understanding of the complex relationship between markets and customers and the practical and theoretical skills needed to market a product in a competitive business environment. The core components of the marketing program concentration are advertising, marketing on the internet, consumer behavior, marketing research, marketing strategy, new product development, international marketing, professional selling, and sales management. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate knowledge of consumer behavior concepts and principles. 2. demonstrate knowledge of professional selling activities and sales management. 3. demonstrate an application of the marketing mix to marketing practices. 4. develop an understanding of innovative product development. 5. demonstrate knowledge of secondary, qualitative, and quantitative marketing research methods, skills, and techniques. 6. Recognize and manage the differences stemming from the application of the principles and the techniques of marketing across national boundaries. 7. demonstrate the ability to formulate strategic marketing decisions. 8. develop a strategic marketing plan. 9. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level and marketing training position titles include advertising agents, sales representatives, promotions or sales managers, marketing managers, marketing consultants, and marketing campaigns project coordinator. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months).

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 123 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN MARKETING All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 216 bU 215 bU 216 bU 230 bU 247 bU 275 bU 328 bU 375 Course name Accounting II Marketing on the Internet Social Media Customer Relationship Management Advertising and Public Relations Consumer behavior Product development and Innovation Professional Selling and Sales Management Prerequisite AC 107 bU 220 none bU 220 bU 220 bU 220 bU 220 bU 220 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

214

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 215

Course number bU 440 bU 447 bU 450

Course name International Marketing Marketing Research Marketing Strategy

Prerequisite bU 220 bU 220, MA 320 bU 220

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 12 semester credit hours of open electives is required. At least 3 semester credit hours must be 300- to 400-level courses. REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science or logic. In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor of science degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. Students in the bSM program must take MA 320 Statistics. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214.

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214

Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation

Prerequisite none none none none none

Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor of science degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300- to 400-level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hours in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours in natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours in general Education Electives

216

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 217

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING (BSN)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Herzing University offers a comprehensive four-year bachelor of Science degree in nursing. The curriculum focuses on health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, illness, and disease management and includes information about health care technologies using evidence-based practice. The liberal arts education core provides a strong foundation for developing clinical judgment and critical thinking skills required in professional nursing. This bachelor of Science in nursing degree Program is approved by the State boards of nursing in the states where it is currently offered and prepares students to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses (nClEX-Rn) upon completion of the program. graduates who successfully pass this national examination will be qualified to practice as registered nurses in the state in which they took the examination and will also be qualified to apply for licensure in all 50 states. This innovative program will be completed by students in 9 consecutive semesters. Students will begin the program by taking general education courses the first semester. The following semesters, the general education and core nursing courses will build on each other and will be integrated throughout the program. Theoretical instruction is integrated with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and reality-based understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Practice in roles appropriate for a baccalaureate graduate encompassing delivery of care, patient teaching, and designing and managing care, all within the context of ethical patient-focused care. Utilize critical thinking skills and excellent communication skills in delivering safe, quality patient care. Provide holistic care to patients, utilizing assessment skills that encompass physical, emotional, and spiritual assessment. Utilize evidence-based practice in providing patient care. differentiate the uniqueness of nursing practice from other disciplines and actualize this practice in an interdisciplinary environment.

admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills [TEAS]). The best-qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternate list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C+" (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the nursing program. Anatomy and Physiology With lab (or body Structure and Function With lab) Microbiology (if required) College Math (if required) Chemistry (bSn Only) All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of "d" or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS graduates will be eligible to take the national Council licensing Examination for registered nurses and will be prepared for entry-level positions as a baccalaureateprepared generalist registered nurse. Utilizing The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework, graduates will be primary providers of direct and indirect care in many different settings, including acute care, chronic care, and public health. In providing care, nurses will also serve as patient advocates and educators. The focus of care may be an individual, a group, or a specific population. graduates will also be prepared to assume first-line management positions. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 121 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

2. 3. 4. 5.

SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is a selective admissions program, which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors, including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing

218

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 219

REquIRED COuRSES IN NuRSING All courses, 70 semester credit hours, are required. Course number nb 105 nb 115 nb 125 nb 135 nb 145 nb 245 nb 255 nb 310 Course name Introduction to Clinical nursing Introduction to Professional nursing basic Health Assessment Pharmacology Adult Health I Adult Health II Mental Health nursing Pathophysiology Prerequisite none nb 105 nb 115 nb 115 nb 125, nb 345 nb 145 nb 245 SC 145, SC 145l, SC 245, SC 245l (all need grade of C+ or better) none none nb 245 nb 245 nb 245 nb 245 IS 102, nb 310, nb 330, nb 345 MA 320, nb 420 nb 310, nb 330, nb 345 nb 440 Corequisite nb 471 Corequisite nb 460 Final term Credit Hours 3.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 6.0 7.0 3.0 3.0

NuRSING SuPPORT COuRSES All courses, 14 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 102 SC 150 SC 145 * SC 145l * SC 245 * SC 245l * Course name Computers and Application Software Principles of nutrition Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Prerequisite none none Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 4.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

* The student must receive a grade of C+ (76%) or better in these courses. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 35 semester credit hours, are required. Course number En 104 En 106 En 116 En 250 HU 101 HU 320 MA 107 MA 320 3.0 3.0 2.0 5.0 PS 101 SC 185 SC 185l SC 165 SC 165l SS 310 Course name English Composition I Information literacy and Research Writing Speech English Composition II Critical Thinking Art History College Algebra Statistics Psychology general Chemistry general Chemistry lab general Microbiology general Microbiology lab Cultural diversity Prerequisite none none none En 104 none none none MA 107 none Corequisite SC 185l Corequisite SC 185 Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 none Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 3.0

nb 330 nb 345 nb 350 nb 355 nb 405 nb 415 nb 420 nb 430 nb 440 nb 450 nb 460 nb 471 nb 475

legal and Ethical Issues in nursing Health Assessment and Promotion Across the lifespan Family nursing Adult Health III gerontological nursing designing and Managing nursing Care nursing Informatics Evidence-based nursing Practice national and global Health and Policy Issues nursing leadership and Management Community nursing Community nursing Practice nursing Preceptorship

3.0 3.0 5.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

220

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 221

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING--MINNESOTA (BSNMN)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Herzing University offers a comprehensive four-year bachelor of science degree in nursing. The curriculum focuses on health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, illness, and disease management and includes information about health care technologies using evidence-based practice. The liberal arts education core provides a strong foundation for developing clinical judgment and critical thinking skills required in professional nursing. This bachelor of science in nursing degree program is approved by the Minnesota State board of nursing and prepares students to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses (nClEX-Rn) upon completion of the program. graduates who successfully pass this national examination will be qualified to practice as registered nurses in the state in which they took the examination and will also be qualified to apply for licensure in all 50 states. This innovative program will be completed by students in 9 consecutive semesters. Students will begin the program by taking general education courses the first semester. The following semesters, the general education and core nursing courses will build on each other and will be integrated throughout the program. Theoretical instruction is integrated with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and reality-based understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program, students will be able to: 1. Practice in roles appropriate for a baccalaureate graduate encompassing delivery of care, patient teaching, designing and managing care, all within the context of ethical patient focused care. Utilize critical thinking skills and excellent communication skills in delivering safe quality patient care. Provide holistic care to patients, utilizing assessment skills that encompass physical, emotional, and spiritual assessment Utilize evidence-based practice in providing patient care. differentiate the uniqueness of nursing practice from other disciplines and actualize this practice in an interdisciplinary environment.

Distribution of Contact Hours by Course Lecture nb 105 nb 115 nb 125 nb 135 nb 145 nb 245 nb 255 nb 310 nb 330 nb 345 nb 350 nb 355 nb 405 nb 415 nb 420 nb 430 nb 440 nb 450 nb 460 nb 471 nb 475 2 2 1 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 Lab 1 0 1 0 1 1* 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Clinical 0 0 0 0 2 3* 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 Total Hours 3 2 2 3 6 7 3 3 3 3 5 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 Credits 3.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 6.0 7.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 5.0

2. 3. 4. 5.

* denotes on-campus laboratory, clinical hours.

222

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 223

SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is a selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills-TEAS). The best qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C+" (76%) for a student to be continued in the nursing program. · Anatomy and Physiology with lab (or body Structure and Function with lab) · Microbiology (if required) · College Math (if required) · Chemistry (bSn Only) All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of "d" or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS graduates will be eligible to take the national Council licensing Examination for registered nurses and will be prepared for entry-level positions as a baccalaureateprepared generalist registered nurse. Utilizing The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework, graduates will be primary providers of direct and indirect care in many different settings, including acute care, chronic care, and public health. In providing care, nurses will also serve as patient advocates and educators. The focus of care may be an individual, a group or a specific population. graduates will also be prepared to assume first line management positions. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 Months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 120 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

REquIRED COuRSES IN NuRSING All courses, 70 semester credit hours, are required. Course number nM 121l nM 125 nM 130 nM 130l nM 135 nM 220 Course name Introduction to Professional nursing The Professional nurse of the Future Adult Health I Clinical nursing Pharmacology Adult Health II Prerequisite Corequisite nM 125 Corequisite nM 121l nM 121l Corequisite nM 130l nM 121l Corequisite nM 130 nM 121l nM 130, nM 130l, nM 135, nM 250 Corequisite nM 220l nM 130, nM 130l, nM 135, nM 250 Corequisite nM 220 nM 220, nM 220l nM 220, nM 220l nM 121l Credit Hours 6.0 2.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 4.0

nM 220l

Clinical nursing II

4.0

nM 230l nM 245 nM 250 nM 335l nM 341l

Psychiatric nursing: Contemporary Practice Cultural diversity in nursing Applied Pathophysiology

4.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 4.0

designing and Managing nursing Care nM 125 Family nursing I nM 135, nM 220, nM 220l, nM 250 Corequisite nM 346l nM 135, nM 220, nM 220l, nM 250 Corequisite nM 341l nM 460l nM 125 nM 220, nM 220l nM 220, nM 220l none

nM 346l

Family nursing II

4.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 3.0

nM 350l nM 410 nM 420 nM 460l nM 465

Public Health nursing Ethics in nursing gerontological nursing Clinical nursing III nursing Research

224

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 225

nM 470 nM 480 nM 485l

Preceptorship Seminar leadership and Issues in nursing nursing Preceptorship With nClex Review

none nM 335l nM 470

1.0 2.0 6.0

SC 165l SS 350

general Microbiology lab Social Issues in Technology

Corequisite SC 165 none

1.0 3.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

NuRSING SuPPORT COuRSES All courses, 14 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 102 SC 150 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l Course name Computers and Application Software Principles of nutrition Anatomy & Physiology I Anatomy & Physiology I lab Anatomy & Physiology II Anatomy & Physiology II lab Prerequisite none none Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 4.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

Pd 100 Pd 200

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 34 semester credit hours, are required. Course number En 104 En 116 En 250 HU 101 HU 320 MA 107 MA 320 PS 101 SC 185 SC 185l SC 165 Course name English Composition I Speech English Composition II Critical Thinking Art History College Algebra Statistics Psychology general Chemistry general Chemistry lab general Microbiology Prerequisite none none En 104 none none none MA 107 none Corequisite SC 185l Corequisite SC 185 Corequisite SC 165l Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 2.0

226

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 227

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING--BRIDGE (BSNB)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This Registered nurse (Rn) to bachelor of Science in nursing (bSn) completion program is open to licensed, registered nurses who have completed an associate degree in nursing or a diploma in nursing from a nationally or regionally accredited college or university. The program supports nurses desiring to advance their education and increase their career opportunities. The curriculum offers advanced nursing concepts that prepare nurse leaders, managers, critical thinkers, and change-agents and provides a strong foundation for entry into graduate level nursing programs. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Apply principles of critical thinking to everyday problem solving in health care issues and dilemmas. 2. demonstrate and apply principles of ethical decision making in health care situations. 3. Assess the effect of diverse populations on society, public policy issues, individuals & families, communities and society as a whole. 4. Explore the effects of health care issues facing the community, nation and the world. 5. Utilize available computer and electronic technologies to enhance the varied roles of professional nursing practice. 6. Evaluate research findings for application to nursing standards of practice in a variety of health care settings. 7. Apply and evaluate effective leadership and management concepts in everyday management situations. 8. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS: To enroll in the Rn-bSn Program, perspective students must possess an: 1. Unrestricted, active registered nurse (Rn) license to practice nursing. 2. Associate degree or diploma in nursing. 3. Overall minimum gPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. 4. Completion of required prerequisite courses.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level positions are available in a wide variety of health care opportunities. A bachelor's degree in nursing represents the entry level for most administrative positions in nursing and health care, advancement in career opportunities and greater earning potential. The Rn to bSn program offers registered nurses the pathway to graduate education. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is six semesters (24 months) after completing an applicable associate's degree. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 130 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES IN NuRSING All courses, 32 semester credit hours, are required. Course number nb 305 nb 310 Course name Professional Role Transition Pathophysiology Prerequisite none SC 145, SC 145l, SC 245, SC 245l (all need grade of C+ or better) none none nb 305, nb 310, nb 330, nb 345 IS 102, nb 310, nb 330, nb 345 MA 320, nb 420 nb 310, nb 330, nb 345 nb 440 Corequisite nb 471 Corequisite nb 460 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

nb 330 nb 345 nb 410 nb 420 nb 430 nb 440 nb 450 nb 460 nb 471

legal and Ethical Issues in nursing Health Assessment and Promotion Across the lifespan Conceptual Models of nursing Practice nursing Informatics Evidence-based nursing Practice national and global Health and Policy Issues nursing leadership and Management Community nursing Community nursing Practice

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0

228

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 229

REquIRED COuRSES IN BuSINESS AND FINANCE All courses, 10 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 103 bU 307 HI 305 Course name Accounting I Organizational Change Health Care Finance Prerequisite IS 102 bU 106 AC 107 Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 3.0

¿

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the General Education Electives must be in the humanities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 1 semester credit hour is required. Course number Pd 200 Course name Career development Seminar Prerequisite none Credit Hours 1.0

TRANSFER CREDITS IN NuRSING AND OPEN ELECTIvES · TransferCreditsinNursing Up to 50 semester credit hours from nursing core courses (non-general education courses) may be transferred from an associate degree or diploma in nursing. note: general education transfer credits are applied under general education. · OpenElectiveCourses Student not transferring 50 semester credits hours in nursing core courses may make-up the difference with open electives.

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications ¿ 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives ¿ * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

230

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 231

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN TECHNOLOGy MANAGEMENT WITH A MINOR IN COMPuTER, ELECTRONICS, AND TELECOMMuNICATIONS TECHNOLOGy (BSTMCET)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program of study is designed to provide students with foundation skills and knowledge in various technical areas (e.g., computer science, computer-aided drafting, or electronics). In addition, this program is further designed to teach the student the necessary business skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in a technical environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Solve problems in an information technology business environment. Integrate technological solutions into the business management environment. Manage the creation of high-level language programs in support of organizational needs. Supervise the design, maintenance, and recovery of relational database systems. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing, using industry standard software. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 131 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN COMPuTER, ELECTRONICS, AND TELECOMMuNICATIONS TECHNOLOGy All courses, 44 semester credit hours, are required. Course number ET 106 ET 107 ET 119 ET 208 ET 209 ET 232 ET 236 Course name basic dC Electricity AC Electrical Components Electronics Fabrication laboratory Transistor and Microchip Technology Advanced Transistor and Microchip Technology digital Electronics Modulations and Propagation for Communications Prerequisite MA 090 ET 106 none ET 106 ET 208 ET 209 ET 209 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include a wide range of entry-level management positions related to the technical discipline elected in the minor or transferred into the program from a technical associate of science degree. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months).

232

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 233

Course number ET 237 ET 238 IS 112 IS 185

Course name Applied Telecommunications and Fiber Optics Industrial Controls and Motors Computer networks Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting

Prerequisite ET 236 ET 209 or ET 272 IS 102 IS 102

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN COMPuTER, ELECTRONICS, AND TELECOMMuNICATIONS TECHNOLOGy A minimum of 12 semester credit hours is required. Course number ET 272 ET 352 ET 363 ET 365 IS 186 IS 191 IS 282 nT 160 nT 170 nT 180 nT 200 nT 210 nT 341 nT 401 Course name Microprocessors Certification Preparation Industrial Controls: PlCs, Robotics and lasers HTI+ - Home networking+ Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II linux Administration network Security network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems network and Server Operating Systems network Infrastructure Administration directory Services Administration Mail Servers Voice-Over IP Prerequisite ET 232 ET 236 ET 238 ET 236, IS 112 IS 185 IS 112 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 185 nT 160 IS 112 nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 191, nT 210 IS 112 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general In education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities.

234

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 235

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN TECHNOLOGy MANAGEMENT WITH A MINOR IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy (BSTMCNST)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program of study is designed to provide students with foundation skills and knowledge in various technical areas (e.g., information technology, computer-aided drafting, or electronics). In addition, this program is further designed to teach the student the necessary business skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in a technical environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. 2. 3. Solve problems in an information technology business environment. Integrate technological solutions into the business management environment. Manage the creation of high-level language programs in support of organizational needs.

4. Supervise the design, maintenance, and recovery of relational database systems. 5. 6. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing, using industry standard software. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include a wide range of entry level management positions related to the technical discipline elected in the minor or transferred into the program from a technical associate of science degree. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 131 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

236

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 237

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

Course number nT 215 OR IS 284 nT 320

Course name Routers and Switches OR Routers and Switches I Wireless networking Fundamentals

Prerequisite IS 112 IS 112

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

Note: Students taking IS 284 Routers and Switches I must take IS 286 Routers and Switches II as an elective. Students may substitute NT 160 and NT 170 for NT 180. ELECTIvE COuRSES IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy A minimum of 16 semester credit hours is required. A minimum of 4 semester credit hours must be at the 300-level. Course number CJ 430 HS 330 IS 103 IS 108 IS 144 IS 180* IS 186 IS 209 IS 212 IS 214 IS 218 Course name Financial Crimes Cybercrime Programming logic Internet Foundation Introduction to WAn and Telecommunications database Concepts and Applications Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II novell network Administration database Concepts and Applications II SQl Server Administration Web graphics TCP/IP Routers and Switches II Emerging Operating Systems network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems building Scalable networks Virtualization System Administration Scripting Prerequisite CJ 310 IS 112 none IS 102 IS 102 IS 103 IS 185 IS 112 IS 180 nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 102 IS 112 IS 284 IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 nT 215 or IS 286 IS 112 IS 103 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy All courses, 40 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 112 IS 185 IS 191 IS 282 IS 421 nT 180 nT 200 nT 210 Course name Computer networks Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting linux Administration networking Security Firewall Security network and Server Operating Systems network Infrastructure Administration directory Services Administration Prerequisite IS 102 IS 102 IS 112 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 112 nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

IS 239 IS 286 nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 nT 230 nT 305 nT 325

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 239

Course number nT 341 nT 343 nT 350 nT 353 nT 355

Course name Mail Servers Computer and network Forensics designing network Infrastructure network defense Platform Integration

Prerequisite IS 191, nT 210 IS 282 nT 200 IS 282 IS 191 and (nT 180 or nT 160 and nT 170)

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general In education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES

*Note: Students in the state of Ohio must take IS 180. REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

240

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 241

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGy MANAGEMENT WITH A MINOR IN COMPuTER SCIENCE (BSTMCS)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program of study is designed to provide students with foundation skills and knowledge in various technical areas (e.g., computer science, computer-aided drafting, or electronics). In addition, this program is further designed to teach the student the necessary business skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in a technical environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. Solve problems in an information technology business environment. 2. Integrate technological solutions into the business management environment. 3. Manage the creation of high-level language programs in support of organizational needs. 4. Supervise the design, maintenance, and recovery of relational database systems. 5. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing, using industry standard software. 6. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include a wide range of entry level management positions related to the technical discipline elected in the minor or transferred into the program from a technical associate of science degree. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 131 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN COMPuTER SCIENCE All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course Number IS 103 IS 108 IS 109 IS 112 IS 180 IS 185 IS 207 IS 212 IS 340 Course Name Programming logic Internet Foundation Object-Oriented Programming 1 Computer networks database Concepts and Applications I Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting Object-Oriented Programming 2 database Concepts and Applications II business Systems Analysis Prerequisite none IS 102 IS 103 IS 102 IS 103 IS 102 IS 109 IS 180 IS 112 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

242

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 243

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN COMPuTER SCIENCE A minimum of 20 semester credit hours is required. Course Number HS 330 IS 165 IS 170 IS 186 IS 191 IS 211 IS 213 IS 218 IS 282 IS 311 IS 312 IS 313 IS 320 IS 390 IS 415 IS 425 nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 nT 180 Course Name Cybercrime Programming in Java I Visual basic I Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II linux Administration legacy Systems Introduction C++ Programming Web graphics network Security XMl Programming C# Programming C++ Project Client-Side Web Site development Advanced Web development Server-Side Web development Advanced Specialization Emerging Operating Systems network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems network and Server Operating Systems Prerequisite IS 112 IS 103 IS 103 IS 185 IS 112 IS 103 IS 207 IS 102 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 108 IS 207 IS 213 IS 108 IS 108 and (IS 180 or IS 217) IS 390 gPA of 3.0 IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 IS 112 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general In education is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 245

Note: Students may substitute NT 180 for NT 160 and NT 170 REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

244

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGy MANAGEMENT WITH A MINOR IN DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGy (BSTMDDT)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program of study is designed to provide students with foundation skills and knowledge in various technical areas (e.g., computer science, computer-aided drafting, or electronics). In addition, this program is further designed to teach the student the necessary business skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in a technical environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. Solve problems in an information technology business environment. 2. Integrate technological solutions into the business management environment. 3. Manage the creation of high-level language programs in support of organizational needs. 4. Supervise the design, maintenance, and recovery of relational database systems. 5. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing, using industry standard software. 6. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include a wide range of entry level management positions related to the technical discipline elected in the minor or transferred into the program from a technical associate of science degree. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 131 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGy All courses, 56 semester credit hours, are required. Course number dT 150 dT 202 dT 220 dT 225 dT 235 dT 245 dT 250 dT 285 dT 300 dT 311 dT 350 Course name AutoCAd I Civil drafting Architectural drafting I Architectural drafting II drafting Standards and Conventions I drafting Standards and Conventions II AutoCAd II Mechanical and Electrical drafting geometric dimensioning and Tolerancing 3d Modeling I Structural drafting Prerequisite none dT 150 dT 150 dT 220 dT 150 dT 235 dT 150 dT 220 dT 245 dT 250 dT 225 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

246

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 247

Course number dT 357 dT 461 dT 462

Course name 3d Modeling II design and drafting Project I design and drafting Project II

Prerequisite dT 311 dT 245, dT 285 Corequisite dT 461

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0

the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education In is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

248

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 249

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGy MANAGEMENT WITH A MINOR IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGy (BSTMEET)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program of study is designed to provide students with foundation skills and knowledge in various technical areas (e.g., computer science, computer-aided drafting, or electronics). In addition, this program is further designed to teach the student the necessary business skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in a technical environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. Solve problems in an information technology business environment. 2. Integrate technological solutions into the business management environment. 3. Manage the creation of high-level language programs in support of organizational needs. 4. Supervise the design, maintenance, and recovery of relational database systems. 5. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing, using industry standard software. 6. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include a wide range of entry level management positions related to the technical discipline elected in the minor or transferred into the program from a technical associate of science degree. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 131 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING All courses, 44 semester credit hours, are required. Course number EE 100 EE 110 EE 120 EE 130 EE 200 EE 210 EE 220 EE 300 EE 310 EE 320 EE 330 EE 340 Course name Electronic Fabrication Electricity and Test Equipment dC Circuits AC Circuits digital Electronics Solid State Electronics I Solid State Electronics II Microprocessors Industrial Controls I Telecommunications I Computers and networks Telecommunications II Prerequisite none none EE 110 EE 120 EE 110 EE 130 EE 130 EE 200 EE 200 EE 220 EE 300 EE 320 Credit Hours 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

250

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 251

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING A minimum of 4 semester credit hours is required. Course number EE 335 EE 345 EE 350 Course name Programming for Electronics Home Technology FCC license Preparation Prerequisite EE 300 EE 330 EE 320 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0

In the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education is required not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities. Students enrolled in the Electronics Engineering Program are required to complete the following additional eight hours of general education courses. Course number MA 225 Course name Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus Physics * Physics lab * Prerequisite MA 107 with grade of C or better MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358l MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358 Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 1.0

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

SC 358 SC 358l

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

252

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 253

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGy MANAGEMENT WITH NO DECLARED MINOR OR CONCENTRATION (BSTMNM)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program of study is designed to provide students with foundation skills and knowledge in various technical areas (e.g., computer science, computer-aided drafting, or electronics). In addition, this program is further designed to teach the student the necessary business skills and academic knowledge for entry-level management positions in a technical environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. Solve problems in an information technology business environment. 2. Integrate technological solutions into the business management environment. 3. Manage the creation of high-level language programs in support of organizational needs. 4. Supervise the design, maintenance, and recovery of relational database systems. 5. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, orally and in writing, using industry standard software. 6. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include a wide range of entry level management positions related to the technical discipline elected in the minor or transferred into the program from a technical associate of science degree. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 9 semesters (36 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 131 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

REquIRED MANAGEMENT CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 220 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 bU 301 bU 407 EC 111 EC 121 Course name Accounting I Finance Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Organizational behavior and Human Relations Quantitative decision Making Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 bU 106 MA 204 or MA 225 or MA 320 none none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

REquIRED TECHNICAL COuRSES A minimum of 30 semester credit hours of technical courses is required. The 30 hours of technical courses must come from either:

The technical courses in the bSTMCET, bSTMCnST, bSTMCS, bSTMddT, or bSTMEET minors (refer to the individual program outlines for those minors) OR

by transferring a coherent sequence of courses in a recognized field of technology (e.g., civil engineering technology, mechanical design technician, industrial engineering technician, biomedical electronics technology, computer electronics technology, electronic engineering technology, architectural technology, mechanical and computer, drafting, computer information systems (information technology), telecommunications technology, or aviation/ aeronautics technology) from an accredited institution.

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 26 semester credit hours of open electives is required. At least 4 semester credit hours must be 300- to 400-level courses.

254

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 255

REquIRED CAPSTONE OR INTERNSHIP 3 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 491 bU 495 Course name Capstone Project Internship Prerequisite Senior year Senior year, Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 495 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in bachelor degrees must complete a minimum of 37 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be upper level (300-400 level courses). Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 6 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 4 Semester Credit Hours of natural Science With a lab Component 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Cultural diversity 3 Semester Credit Hours of general Education Electives * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 37 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. the State of Minnesota, a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in general education In is required, not counting computer applications. However, 4 semester credits hours of computer applications must be completed by all students to complete the University's requirement for graduation from all bachelor degree programs. In the State of Minnesota, the general Education Electives must be in the humanities.

256

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 257

PROGRAMS OF STuDy

Associate of Applied Science Associate of Science

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN ACCOuNTING (ASA)

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This accounting program provides students with a solid accounting background. The curriculum includes academic core courses, business courses, and education in computer skills related to accounting such as computerized accounting software, spreadsheets, and payroll systems. This program provides career opportunities in accounting areas such as payables, receivables, bookkeeping, payroll, and taxation. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize industry standard accounting principles and accounting-based software. 2. demonstrate advanced mastery of industry standard word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. 3. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate accounting, payroll, and ethical and legal issues impacting contemporary business practices. 4. demonstrate the ability to engage in effective written, oral, and persuasive communications. 5. demonstrate mastery of industry standard spreadsheets, databases, enterprise resource planning systems, and accounting systems. 6. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include account specialist, accounting clerk, accounts payable/receivable clerk, cost accountant, bookkeeper, payroll clerk, payroll accountant, and tax preparer. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months).

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN ACCOuNTING (AASAOH)

Akron Institute

Minneapolis

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 259

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 62 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED CORE COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 110 AC 212 AC 216 AC 221 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 EC 111 Course name Accounting I Payroll Accounting Taxation I Accounting II Taxation II Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Principles of Microeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 AC 216 AC 107 AC 212 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 265 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

REquIRED INTERNSHIP OR RESEARCH PROJECT 3 credit hours are required. Course number bU 265 bU 270 Course name Internship Research Project Prerequisite Sophomore year, Pd 214 Sophomore year Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

260

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 261

(Offered in the State of Minnesota Only)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN BuSINESS ADMINISTRATION (AASBAMPL)

Course number bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 EC 111

Course name Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Principles of Microeconomics

Prerequisite none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 none

Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

The program prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in various business enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as accounting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, business administration, sales, marketing, and human resources. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Utilize industry standard accounting principles and accounting-based software. 2. 3. 4. define and articulate organizational, marketing, and ethical and legal issues impacting contemporary business practices. demonstrate mastery of industry-standard word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

REquIRED INTERNSHIP OR RESEARCH PROJECT 3 credit hours are required. Course number bU 265 bU 270 Course name Internship, Pd 214 Research Project Prerequisite Sophomore year Sophomore year Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include account representative, accounting clerk, accounts payable/receivable clerk, marketing representative, human resources representative, client services representative, office manager, and restaurant manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 62 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED CORE COuRSES All courses, 24 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 216 Course name Accounting I Accounting II Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 9 semester credit hours of open electives is required. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * Note: In the State of Minnesota, 4 semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replaces Computer Applications in the general education requirements, recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science

262

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 263

3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN BuSINESS ADMINISTRATION (ASBA) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN BuSINESS ADMINISTRATION (AASBA)

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 265 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

The program prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in various business enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as accounting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, business administration, sales, marketing, and human resources. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Utilize industry standard accounting principles and accounting-based software. 2. 3. 4. define and articulate organizational, marketing, and ethical and legal issues impacting contemporary business practices. demonstrate mastery of industry-standard word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include account representative, accounting clerk, accounts payable/receivable clerk, marketing representative, human resources representative, client services representative, office manager, and restaurant manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 62 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

264

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 265

REquIRED CORE COuRSES All courses, 24 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 107 AC 216 bU 106 bU 204 bU 206 bU 209 bU 220 EC 111 Course name Accounting I Accounting II Introduction to Management The digital Firm and business Communications business law I leadership and Team dynamics Principles of Marketing Principles of Microeconomics Prerequisite IS 102 AC 107 none bU 106 none bU 106 bU 106 none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES

REquIRED PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 credit hours are required. Course number bU 345 Course name Project Management Prerequisite none Credit Hours 3.0

A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students taking the bU 265 Internship must also take Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED INTERNSHIP OR RESEARCH PROJECT 3 credit hours are required. Course number bU 265 bU 270 Course name Internship Research Project Prerequisite Sophomore year, Pd 214 Sophomore year Credit Hours 3.0 3.0

OPEN ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 9 semester credit hours of open electives is required. Note: Students in the state of Ohio must take 4 credits of natural science/natural science with lab courses as electives to satisfy a natural science requirement. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy

266

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 267

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGy (ASBET)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program will develop a strong foundation in the knowledge and skills needed by the graduates to qualify them for entry into an exciting, dynamic career in the biomedical electronic technology fields at the associate of science degree level. The sequence of the electronics courses will provide a strong core of fundamental electronics leading into areas of computers, industrial electronics, and biomedical electronics. The electronics courses are also sequenced with "hands-on" labs to connect the theory to practical applications. The program contains general education courses to enhance critical thinking and verbal and written communications skills, providing a well-rounded biomedical engineering technology graduate ready to enter an exciting biomedical electronics technology career. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the graduate should be able to: 1. 2. 3. demonstrate the ability to use principles and tools of electronic technology to build, test, and troubleshoot electronic circuits and systems. demonstrate the ability to solder using proper techniques used in the electronics fields. demonstrate the ability to describe and apply fundamental concepts of electronics theory and measurements to identify, analyze, and solve electronic technology problems. demonstrate the ability to properly use standard test equipment used in the electronics fields. demonstrate the ability to describe the operation of biomedical electronic equipment and the terminology used in the health care fields. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 79 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 44 semester credit hours, are required. Course number EE 100 EE 110 EE 120 EE 130 EE 200 EE 210 EE 220 EE 300 EE 305 EE 310 EE 315 EE 330 Course name Electronic Fabrication Electricity and Test Equipment dC Circuits AC Circuits digital Electronics Solid State Electronics I Solid State Electronics II Microprocessors Anatomy and Medical Terminology for Technicians Industrial Controls I biomedical Electronics Equipment Computers and networks Prerequisite none none EE 110 EE 120 EE 110 EE 130 EE 130 EE 200 none EE 200 EE 300, EE 305 EE 300 Credit Hours 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 4 semester credit hours is required. Course number EE 294 Course name Career Internship Prerequisite Pd 214; 4th or 5th semester with gPA of 2.5 EE 315 Credit Hours 4.0

4. 5. 6.

EE 355

Certified biomedical Equipment Technician (CbET) Preparation

4.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: biomedical electronics technician, robotic and industrial control technician, computer service technician, electronics technician, field service technician, technical representative, electronic maintenance technician, network technician, electronics bench technician, technical support technician, and industrial electronics technician. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full load is 5 semesters (20 months).

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech

268

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 269

4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** Students must also take the following 3 courses, 8 semester credit hours, to fulfill the general education requirements in the Electronics Engineering Program: Course number MA 225 SC 358 SC 358l Course name Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus Physics* Physics lab* Prerequisite MA 107 (with grade of C or better) MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358l MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358 Credit Hours 4.0

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CLINICAL LABORATORy TECHNICIAN (AASCLT)

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only) (Pending State Approval) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to function in the medical, hospital lab setting. laboratory tests play an important part in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Clinical laboratory technicians perform a wide variety of tests and laboratory procedures that require a high level of skill. The clinical laboratory technician analyzes the blood, tissues, and fluids in the human body by using precision instruments such as microscopes and automated analyzers. Technicians assist in performing complicated chemical, microscopic and bacteriological tests including: blood cholesterol level; microscopic examination of the blood to detect the presence of diseases; and cultures of body fluid or tissue samples to determine the presence of bacteria, parasites, or other microorganisms. Technicians may also type and crossmatch blood samples. Each student will be prepared for entry-level clinical laboratory positions in the medical lab and hospital setting. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of the AASClT program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize universal safety precautions in the lab setting. 2. Perform basic laboratory analysis. 3. demonstrate laboratory principles. 4. Correlate laboratory results according to laboratory protocol.

3.0 1.0

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214 Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

5. Evaluate quality control. 6. Understand the role and responsibility of the clinical laboratory technician. 7. Communicate and interact effectively with the laboratory team. 8. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job titles include, but are not limited to: clinical laboratory technician, clinical lab clerk, and clinical laboratory assistant. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months).

270

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 271

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 70 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 47 semester credit hours, are required. Course number SC 145 SC 145l SC 165 SC 165l SC 185 SC 185l SC 245 SC 245l Cl 101 Course name Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab general Microbiology general Microbiology lab general Chemistry general Chemistry lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Clinical laboratory Techniques Clinical laboratory Techniques lab Clinical laboratory Calculations, Statistics Urinalysis and body Fluids Urinalysis and body Fluids lab Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry lab Hematology Hematology lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 Corequisite SC 185l Corequisite SC 185 SC 145; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145; Corequisite SC 245 Corequisites Cl 101l, SC 145, SC 145l Corequisites 101, SC 145, SC 145l Cl 101, Cl 101l Cl 102; Corequisite Cl 103l Corequisite Cl 103 Cl 102; Corequisites Cl 104l Cl 102; Corequisite Cl 104 Cl 104, Cl 104l; Corequisite Cl 105l Cl 104, Cl 104l; Corequisite Cl 105 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 2.0

Course number Cl 106 Cl 106l Cl 107

Course name Immunohematology Immunohematology lab Integrated Clinical laboratory Simulation

Prerequisite Cl 105, Cl 105l; Corequisite Cl 106l Cl 105, Cl 105l; Corequisite Cl 106 Cl 101, Cl 101l, Cl 102, Cl 103, Cl 103l, Cl 104, Cl 104l, Cl 105, Cl 105l, Cl 106, Cl 106l Cl 107; Corequisite Cl 202 Cl 201 Cl 202

Credit Hours 3.0 2.0 3.0

Cl 201 Cl 202 Cl 203

Clinical lab Seminar Clinical lab Practicum I Clinical lab Practicum II

2.0 4.0 4.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

Cl 101l

1.0

Cl 102 Cl 103 Cl 103l Cl 104 Cl 104l Cl 105 Cl 105l

3.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 1.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic or science.

272

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 273

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN COMPuTER, ELECTRONICS, AND TELECOMMuNICATIONS TECHNOLOGy (ASCETT)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to test, install, repair, configure, manage, and maintain a wide range of electronic devices, systems, and services. The program focuses on fundamental skills that ground their ability to broaden their knowledge of electronics in a competitive employment environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize a complete range of electrical, electronic equipment to apply industry standard tests and measurements to build, test, and troubleshoot electrical circuits and systems. 2. demonstrate the ability to describe and apply fundamental concepts of measurement and electronic theory to solve computer, communication, and electronic system problems. 3. demonstrate the ability to clearly communicate concise and reasoned lab reports delineating material needs and costs in the field of electronics. 4. demonstrate the ability to pass industry recognized certification examinations in the computer, communications, and electronics industries. 5. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include robotics and industrial control technician, TV and radio broadcast engineer, computer service technician, biomedical electronics technician, electronics technician, field technician, office automation technician, R and d technician, technical representative, network technician, bench technician, service manager, technical support administrator, plant maintenance manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 79 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

274

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 275

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 44 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name ET 106 basic dC Electricity ET 107 AC Electrical Components ET 119 Electronics Fabrication laboratory ET 208 Transistor and Microchip Technology ET 209 Advanced Transistor and Microchip Technology ET 232 digital Electronics ET 236 Modulation and Propagation for Communicatioins ET 237 Applied Telecommunications and Fiber Optics ET 238 Industrial Controls and Motors IS 112 Computer networks IS 185 Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting

nT 210 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 nT 341 nT 401

directory Services Administration Mail Servers Voice-over IP

Prerequisite MA 090 ET 106 none ET 106 ET 208 ET 209 ET 209 ET 236 ET 209 or ET 272 IS 102 IS 102

nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 191, nT 210 IS 112

4.0 4.0 4.0

Note: Electives are not offered at all campuses every term. Note: Students may substitute NT 180 for NT 160 and NT 170. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 12 semester credit hours is required. Course Course number name Prerequisite ET 272 Microprocessors ET 232 ET 294 Career Internship 4th or 5th semester with gPA of 2.5, Pd 214 ET 352 Certification Preparation ET 236 ET 363 Industrial Controls: PlCs, Robotics, and lasers ET 238 ET 365 HTI+ - Home networking+ ET 236, IS 112 IS 186 Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting IS 185 IS 191 linux Administration IS 112 IS 282 network Security IS 191, nT 180 nT 160 network Operating Systems IS 185 nT 170 Server Operating Systems nT 160 nT 180 network and Server Operating Systems IS 112 nT 200 network Infrastructure nT 180 Administration (or nT 160 and nT 170)

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

**

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of two semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course Course Credit number name Prerequisite Hours Pd 100 Student Success Skills none 1.0 Pd 120 Personal Financial Management none 1.0 Pd 155 Customer Services none 1.0 Pd 200 Career development Seminar none 1.0 Pd 214 AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation none 0.0

276

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 277

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only)

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy (ASCNST) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN COMPuTER NETWORKING AND SECuRITy TECHNOLOGy (AASCNST)

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 28 semester credit hours, are required. Course Number IS 112 IS 185 IS 191 IS 282 nT 180 nT 200 nT 215 OR IS 284 Course Name Computer networks Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting linux Administration network Security network and Server Operating Systems network Infrastructure Administration Routers and Switches OR Routers and Switches I Prerequisite IS 102 IS 102 IS 112 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 & nT 170) IS 112 nT 180 (or nT 160 & nT 170) IS 112 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies for entry-level technical positions in the computer network technology industry. These career opportunities may be in areas such as network administration, network installation, network administration, network security, and network support. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot PC computer hardware. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer and troubleshoot functional network operating systems, infrastructure services, equipment (including wireless), security, and protocols.

Note: Students taking IS 284 must also take IS 286 as an elective. Students may substitute NT 160 and NT 170 for NT 180. ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 28 semester credit hours is required. Course Number CJ 430 IS 103 IS 108 IS 144 IS 180 IS 186 IS 212 IS 214 Course Name Financial Crimes Programming logic Internet Foundation Introduction to WAn and Telecommunications database Concepts and Applications I Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II database Concepts and Applications II SQl Server Administration Web graphics TCP, IP Prerequisite CJ 310 none IS 102 IS 102 IS 103 IS 185 IS 180 nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) IS 102 IS 112 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

3. demonstrate the ability to administer client-server applications. 4. demonstrate the ability to write clear and concise technical reports and business communications in a variety of environments.

5. demonstrate knowledge of security protocols and methodologies. 6. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include junior network support specialist, network support engineer, junior network technician, network administrator, junior network acquisition coordinator, and network deployment specialist. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 79 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

IS 218 IS 239

278

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 279

Course Number IS 286 IS 294 IS 421 nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 nT 210 nT 230 nT 305 nT 320 nT 325 nT 341 nT 343 nT 350 nT 353 nT 355 SC 370 SC 370l

Course Name Routers and Switches II Career Internship Firewall Security Emerging Operating Systems network Operation Systems Server Operating Systems directory Services Administration building Scalable networks Virtualization Wireless networking Fundamentals System Administration Scripting Mail Servers Computer and network Forensics designing network Infrastructure network defense Platform Integration Environmental Science Environmental Science lab

Prerequisite IS 284 4th or 5th semester with gPA of 2.5, Pd 214 nT 180 (or nT 160 & nT 170) IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 nT 180 (or nT 160 & nT 170) nT 215 or IS 286 IS 112 IS 112 IS 103 IS 191 and nT 210 IS 282 nT 200 IS 282 IS 191 and (nT 180 or nT 160 and nT 170) En 104, MA 107 Corequisite SC 370

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 1.0

4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic. Students in the State of georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course Number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course Name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech

280

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 281

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN COMPuTER SCIENCE (AASCSMPL)

(Offered in the State of Minnesota only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies for entry-level positions in the computer information systems development industry. These career opportunities may be in areas such as computer programming, desktop and distributed application design and development, web site application design and development, database application design and development, and end-user support. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to define, evaluate, recommend and apply appropriate information solutions to a range of programming methods and languages to formulate business solutions. demonstrate proficiency in designing and developing software solutions utilizing knowledge of operating systems, programming languages, and networking systems. demonstrate the ability to write clear and concise technical reports and businesscommunications in a variety of environments. demonstrate the ability to design and implement Internet-based solutions to meet organizational needs. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course Number IS 102 IS 103 IS 108 IS 109 IS 112 IS 180 IS 185 IS 207 IS 212 Course Name Computers and Application Software Programming logic Internet Foundation Object-Oriented Programming 1 Computer networks database Concepts and Applications I Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting Object-Oriented Programming 2 database Concepts and Applications II Prerequisite none none IS 102 IS 103 IS 102 IS 103 IS 102 IS 109 IS 180 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

2. 3. 4. 5.

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 19 semester credit hours are required. Course number bU 105 HS 330 IS 165 IS 170 IS 186 IS 191 IS 211 IS 213 IS 218 IS 282 IS 294 Course name business Principles and Management Cybercrime Programming in Java I Visual basic I Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II linux Administration legacy Systems Introduction C++ Programming Web graphics network Security Career Internship Prerequisite none IS 112 IS 103 IS 103 IS 185 IS 112 IS 103 IS 207 IS 102 IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) 4th or 5th semester with gPA of 2.5 and Pd 214 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include junior programmer, software developer, internet developer, junior database developer, junior web site developer, web page coordinator, junior programmer, analyst, and junior support, help desk professional. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 78 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

282

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 283

Course number IS 311 IS 312 IS 313 IS 320 IS 330 IS 340 IS 390 IS 415 nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 nT 180

Course name XMl Programming C# Programming C++ Project Client-Side Web Site development data Warehousing business Systems Analysis Advanced Web development Server-Side Web development Emerging Operating Systems network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems network and Server Operating Systems

Prerequisite IS 108 IS 207 IS 213 IS 108 IS 212 IS 112 IS 108 and (IS 180 or IS 217) IS 390 IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 IS 112

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

**

A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES Two semester credit hours are required in addition to Pd 214. Course Number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course Name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

Note: Students may substitute NT 180 for NT 160 and NT 170. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * Note: In the State of Minnesota, four semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replace Computer Applications in the general education requirements, recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science (State of Minnesota only) * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

284

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 285

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN COMPuTER SCIENCE (ASCS) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN COMPuTER SCIENCE (AASCSOH)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies for entry-level positions in the computer information systems development industry. These career opportunities may be in areas such as computer programming, desktop and distributed application design and development, Web site application design and development, database application design and development, and end-user support. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to define, evaluate, recommend and apply appropriate information solutions to a range of programming methods and languages to formulate business solutions. demonstrate proficiency in designing and developing software solutions utilizing knowledge of operating systems, programming languages, and networking systems. demonstrate the ability to write clear and concise technical reports and business communications in a variety of environments. demonstrate the ability to design and implement Internet-based solutions to meet organizational needs. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 32 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Prerequisite IS 103 Programming logic none IS 108 Internet Foundation IS 102 IS 109 Object-Oriented Programming 1 IS 103 IS 112 Computer networks IS 102 IS 180 database Concepts IS 103 and Applications I IS 185 Computer Architecture IS 102 and Troubleshooting IS 207 Object-Oriented Programming 2 IS 109 IS 212 database Concepts and Applications II IS 180

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

2.

3. 4. 5.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include Junior Programmer, Software developer, Internet developer, Junior database developer, Junior Web Site developer, Web Page Coordinator, Junior Programmer, Analyst, and Junior Support, Help desk Professional. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is five semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 78 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 23 semester credit hours is required. Course Course Credit number name Prerequisite Hours bU 105 business Principles and Management none 3.0 HS 330 Cybercrime IS 112 4.0 IS 165 Programming in JavaTM I IS 103 4.0 IS 170 Visual basic® I IS 103 4.0 IS 186 Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II IS 185 4.0 IS 191 linux Administration IS 112 4.0 IS 211 legacy Systems Introduction IS 103 4.0 IS 213 C++ Programming IS 207 4.0 IS 218 Web graphics IS 102 4.0 IS 282 network Security IS 191, nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) 4.0 IS 294 Career Internship 4th or 5th semester with gPA of 2.5, Pd 214 4.0 IS 311 XMl Programming IS 108 4.0 IS 312 C# Programming IS 207 4.0 IS 313 C++ Project IS 213 4.0 IS 320 Client-Side Web Site development IS 108 4.0 IS 330 data Warehousing IS 212 4.0 IS 340 business Systems Analysis IS 112 4.0 IS 390 Advanced Web development IS 108 and (IS 180 or IS 217) 4.0 IS 415 Server-Side Web development IS 390 4.0

286

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 287

nT 120 nT 160 nT 170 nT 180

Emerging Operating Systems network Operating Systems Server Operating Systems network and Server Operating Systems

IS 112 IS 185 nT 160 IS 112

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE (ASCJ) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JuSTICE (AASCJ)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program introduces students to the academic knowledge and provides the necessary skills required for entry-level positions in various law enforcement and industrial security enterprises. These career opportunities may be in areas such as public safety, fire, law enforcement, private security, government agency, homeland security, diplomatic security, and border patrol. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. demonstrate a basic knowledge of law enforcement practices. demonstrate proficiency in evidence forensics. Analyze and apply an understanding of the judicial process, corrections and juvenile justice as they relate to law enforcement. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational and ethical issues affecting law enforcement.

Note: Students may substitute NT 180 for NT 160 and NT 170. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES Two semester credit hours are required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

Think critically both conceptually and using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles for which this program provides advancement opportunities include: public safety officer; industrial security specialist; utility security specialist; safety and security officers in businesses, airports, home building associations, and stadiums; police officers; port authority agents; and various government agents. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is four semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 60 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

288

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 289

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 31 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Prerequisite CJ 105 CJ 115 CJ 120 CJ 130 CJ 140 CJ 200 CJ 210 CJ 220 CJ 230 CJ 250 Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal law Introduction to Criminology Introduction to law and Judicial Process Report Writing and Communications Introduction to Corrections law Enforcement Security Ethics in law Enforcement Evidence Forensics Juvenile Justice none none none none CJ 105 none CJ 130 CJ 105 CJ 130 none

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 2 semester credit hours are required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 6 semester credit hours of open electives is required. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

**

A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement.

290

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 291

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN DENTAL ASSISTING (AASDAM)

(Offered in the State of Minnesota only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the dental assistant program is to train the student to become a productive member of the dental health team. This includes preparing the student for a variety of duties performed by the dental assistant in the contemporary dental office, including chairside assisting, laboratory procedures, administrative duties and expanded functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a dental Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Identify and prepare instruments, materials and treatment rooms for a variety of dental procedures as well as perform chair-side techniques utilizing current concepts of dental assisting. 2. demonstrate the ability to perform expanded functions and expose, process and evaluate radiographs with knowledge appropriate for an entry-level position as a registered dental assistant. 3. demonstrate the knowledge to perform laboratory procedures and operate dental equipment utilized in a laboratory setting. 4. demonstrate effective communication skills utilizing dental terminology, as it is related to patient care, and apply the knowledge required to maintain records and handle general business office procedures. 5. demonstrate the knowledge of concepts of first aid and proper management techniques as applied to medical emergencies in the dental practice. 6. demonstrate ethical conduct and moral attitudes and principles essential for gaining and maintaining trust of professional associates, the support of the community and confidence of the patient. 7. demonstrate knowledge of expanded functions, radiology health. 8. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include chairside dental assistant, dental front desk, and dental office receptionist.

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 68 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 45 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name dS 101 dS 102 dS 105 dS 107 dS 110 dS 111 Chairside Assisting I Pre-Clinical dental Assisting dental Communications dental Materials Expanded Functions I Expanded Functions II Prerequisite none none none none none dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 and CPR Clock Hours 69 63 15 70 75 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 4.0

90

4.0

dS 116

Radiology

100 98 60

5.0 4.0 3.0

dS 151 dS 206 dS 207

Chairside Assisting II dental Management dental Ethics and Jurisprudence Internship

30

2.0

dS 294

315 75

7.0 4.0

IS 102

Computers and Applications Software

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

292

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 293

Note: In the State of Minnesota, four semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replaces Computer Applications in the general education requirements recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours of Mathematics or natural Science (State of Minnesota only) SuGGESTED HERzING uNIvERSITy COuRSE Course Course number name dS 108 * dental Science Prerequisite none Clock Hours 60 Credit Hours 4.0

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN DENTAL ASSISTING (AASDAOH)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the dental assistant program is to train the student to become a productive member of the dental health team. This includes preparing the student for a variety of duties performed by the dental assistant in the contemporary dental office, including chairside assisting, laboratory procedures, administrative duties and expanded functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a dental Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Identify and prepare instruments, materials and treatment rooms for a variety of dental procedures as well as perform chairside techniques utilizing current concepts of dental assisting. demonstrate the ability to perform expanded functions and expose, process and evaluate radiographs with knowledge appropriate for an entry-level position as a registered dental assistant. demonstrate the knowledge to perform laboratory procedures and operate dental equipment utilized in a laboratory setting. demonstrate effective communication skills utilizing dental terminology, as it is related to patient care, and apply the knowledge required to maintain records and handle general business office procedures. demonstrate the knowledge of concepts of first aid and proper management techniques as applied to medical emergencies in the dental practice. demonstrate ethical conduct and moral attitudes and principles essential for gaining and maintaining trust of professional associates, the support of the community and confidence of the patient. demonstrate knowledge of expanded functions, radiology health. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

2.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analyis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

These requirements must be completed with a grade of C or better before proceeding to

3. 4.

the core courses of the program. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none Clock Hours 15 15 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

5. 6.

7. 8.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include chairside dental assistant, dental front desk, and dental office receptionist.

294

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 295

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 64 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name dS 101 dS 102 dS 107 dS 108 dS 110 dS 111 Chairside Assisting I Pre-Clinical dental Assisting dental Materials dental Science*** Expanded Functions I Expanded Functions II Prerequisite none none none none none dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 and CPR Clock Hours 69 63 70 60 75 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus *** Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. ** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. DS 108, Dental Science, satisfies the requirement for a natural science for students in the State of Ohio.

***

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Clock Hours 15 15 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

90

4.0

dS 116

Radiology

Prerequisite none none none none

100 98 60

5.0 4.0 3.0

dS 151 dS 206 dS 207

Chairside Assisting II dental Management dental Ethics and Jurisprudence Internship

30

2.0

dS 295

180

4.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

296

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 297

(Offered in the State of Minnesota Only)

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN DENTAL HyGIENE (AASDH)

a competitive basis through entrance test scores and prior academic performance as well as other criteria determined by the University. In addition, all students must have all immunizations current. GENERAL EDuCATION AND PREREquISITE COuRSES The accreditation requirements of the Commission on dental Accreditation of the American dental Association stipulate unique general education requirements for dental hygiene programs that are satisfied with the requirements shown here. A total of 30 semester credit hours of general education and prerequisite courses is required. Each course marked with a symbol () must be completed with a grade of 76% or better before a student may begin the professional, technical curriculum. Students must complete 10 semester credit hours in courses distributed among the following disciplines: 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the dental hygiene program is to prepare students with the knowledge and skills required to provide direct patient care under the supervision of a licensed dentist. This includes training in scaling and root planing, polishing teeth, application of sealants, patient assessment, pain management, and oral health education. The ultimate goal is to prepare students to gain employment as a dental hygienist. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Provide dental hygiene care based on accepted scientific theories, research, and the accepted standard of care. 2. Promote patient health using critical thinking and problem solving in the provision of evidence-based dental hygiene care. 3. Provide accurate, consistent and complete documentation for assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluations of dental hygiene care. 4. Apply a professional code of ethics; adhere to state and federal laws, recommendations, and regulations in the provision of dental hygiene care. 5. Ensure the privacy of the patient during dental hygiene treatment and counseling and the confidentiality of patient records. 6. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES The potential entry-level position title is dental hygienist. PROGRAM LENGTH The length of the program is 6 semesters, including 2 semesters of prerequisite courses. Students transferring in all the prerequisite courses can complete the dental hygiene core courses in 4 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 90 semester credit hours is required for graduation. ACCEPTANCE TO THE PROGRAM Acceptance into the dental hygiene program is on a selective basis. Students who meet the minimum criteria for admission to the University will be further evaluated on

298 HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. In addition students must complete 20 semester credit hours with the specific courses listed below. Course number dH 128 dH 228 SC 150 SC 165 Course name Anatomy and Physiology for the dental Hygienist Anatomy and Physiology for the dental Hygienist II Principles of nutrition general Microbiology general Microbiology lab Prerequisite none dH 128 none Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 Clock Hours 45 45 30 30 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0

SC 165l

15

1.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 299

Course number SC 185 SC 185l PS 101 SS 120

Course name general Chemistry general Chemistry lab Psychology Introduction to Sociology

Prerequisite Corequisite SC 185l Corequisite SC 185 none none

Clock Hours 30 30 45 45

Credit Hours 2.0 1.0 30. 3.0

Course number dH 139 dH 222

Course name Concepts in Community dental Health local Anesthesia and Pain Management dental Hygiene Seminar III

Prerequisite dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 122, dH 130, dH 134, dH 135, dH 138 dH 122, dH 130, dH 134, dH 135, dH 138 dH 122, dH 130, dH 134, dH 135, dH 138 dH 122, dH 130, dH 134, dH 135, dH 138 dH 139, dH 222, dH 223, dH 224, dH 225 dH 139, dH 222, dH 223, dH 224, dH 225 dH 139, dH 222, dH 223, dH 224, dH 225 dH 139, dH 222, dH 223, dH 224, dH 225

Clock Hours 45 45

Credit Hours 3.0 2.0

dH 223

30

2.0

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 58 semester credit hours, are required. Course number dH 120 dH 121 dH 122 dH 123 dH 124 dH 130 dH 132 dH 134 Course name Orofacial Structures Oral Histology and Embryology general and Oral Pathology dental Hygiene Seminar I Pre-Clinical lab Pharmacology for the dental Hygienist Principles of dental Radiography dental Hygiene Clinical Practice I Periodontology Prerequisite dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 120, dH 121, dH 123, dH 124, dH 132, dH 136 dH 120, dH 121, dH 123, dH 124, dH 132, dH 136 dH 228, SC 150, SC 165, SC 185 dH 120, dH 121, dH 123, dH 124, dH 132, dH 136 Clock Hours 45 15 45 30 128 30 60 128 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 2.0 4.0 2.0 3.0 4.0

dH 224

dental Hygiene Clinical Practice II dental Hygiene Materials

180

6.0

dH 225

60

3.0

dH 230

dental Hygiene Ethics and Jurisprudence dental Hygiene board Review dental Hygiene Seminar IV

30

2.0

dH 232

30

1.0

dH 333

30

2.0

dH 335

dental Hygiene Clinical Practice III

180

8.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required.

dH 135

45

3.0

Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Pd 155 Pd 200

Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Customer Services Career development Seminar

Prerequisite none none none none

Clock Hours 15 15 15 15

Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

dH 136 dH 138

Radiography Interpretation dental Hygiene Seminar II

15 60

1.0 3.0

300

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 301

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGy (ASDDT)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills in computer-aided drafting and design in order to enter into employment as a general draftsperson in the design industry. Program emphasis is on the development of requisite skills necessary to produce materials according to industry drafting conventions in the disciplines of architecture and structural, HVAC, and mechanical design. general education courses are included to prepare students to function within a competitive employment environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate knowledge of basic architectural drawing using correct symbols, scales, materials, and notation. 2. demonstrate knowledge of proper selection and use of materials and mechanical equipment. 3. demonstrate the ability to produce materials and documentation with a level of knowledge suitable for an entry-level position in architectural drafting. 4. demonstrate the ability to successfully pass appropriate industry certification. 5. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: CAd drafter, CAd designer, CAd specialist, CAd technician, drafting detailer, engineer drafter, and application designer. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 79 credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 56 semester credit hours, are required. Course number dT 150 dT 202 Course name AutoCAd I Civil drafting Prerequisite none dT 150 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

Course number dT 220 dT 225 dT 235 dT 245 dT 250 dT 285 dT 300 dT 311 dT 350 dT 357 dT 461 dT 462

Course name Architectural drafting I Architectural drafting II drafting Standards and Conventions I drafting Standards and Conventions II AutoCAd II Mechanical and Electrical drafting geometric dimensioning and Tolerancing 3d Modeling I Structural drafting 3d Modeling II design and drafting Project I design and drafting Project II

Prerequisite dT 150 dT 220 dT 150 dT 235 dT 150 dT 220 dT 245 dT 250 dT 225 dT 311 dT 245, dT 285 Corequisite dT 461

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 303

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGy (ASEET)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program will develop a strong foundation in the knowledge and skills needed by the graduate to qualify them for entry into an exciting, dynamic career in the electronic technology fields at the associate of science degree level. The sequence of the electronics courses will provide a strong core of fundamental electronics leading into areas of computers, industrial electronics, and telecommunications. The electronics courses are also sequenced with "hands-on" labs to connect the theory to practical applications. The program contains general education courses to enhance the critical thinking and verbal and written communications skills, providing a wellrounded electronic engineering technology graduate ready to enter an exciting electronics career. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the graduate should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to use principles and tools of electronic technology to build, test, and troubleshoot electronic circuits and systems. 2. demonstrate the ability to solder using proper techniques used in the electronics fields. 3. demonstrate the ability to describe and apply fundamental concepts of electronics theory and measurements to identify, analyze, and solve electronic technology problems. 4. demonstrate the ability to properly use standard test equipment used in the electronics fields. 5. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: robotic and industrial control technician, TV and radio broadcast engineer, computer service technician, biomedical electronics technician, electronics technician, field service technician, office automation technician, R and d technician, technical representative, network technician, electronics bench technician, technical support technician, industrial electronics technician, and home technology integration technician.

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 305

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 79 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 44 semester credit hours, are required. Course number EE 100 EE 110 EE 120 EE 130 EE 200 EE 210 EE 220 EE 300 EE 310 EE 320 EE 330 EE 340 Course name Electronic Fabrication Electricity and Test Equipment dC circuits AC Circuits digital Electronics Solid State Electronics I Solid State Electronics II Microprocessors Industrial Controls I Telecommunications I Computers and networks Telecommunications II Prerequisite none none EE 110 EE 120 EE 110 EE 130 EE 130 EE 200 EE 200 EE 220 EE 300 EE 320 Credit Hours 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** Students must also take the following 3 courses, 8 semester credit hours, to fulfill the general education requirements in the Electronics Engineering program: Course number MA 225 SC 358 SC 358l Course name Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus Physics * Physics lab * Prerequisite MA 107 with grade of C or better MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358l MA 204 or MA 225; Corequisite SC 358 Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 1.0

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 4 semester credit hours is required. Course number EE 294 EE 335 EE 345 EE 350 Course name Career Internship Programming for Electronics Home Technology FCC license Preparation Prerequisite Pd 214; 2nd year, sophomore EE 300 EE 330 EE 320 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS, AAS, bS internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 307

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN FIRE SCIENCE (ASFS)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Associate degree in Fire Science is designed to provide the student a solid foundation in study of fire science. Students are introduced to the essentials of building Construction for Fire Protection, Fire behavior and Combustion, Fire Prevention, Fire Protection Systems, Principles of Emergency Services and Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival. Students completing the Fire Science degree program will gain the practical working knowledge of the science of fire prevention, fire suppression and fire administration. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate a basic knowledge of the fire service and the basics of fire safety. 2. demonstrate knowledge of cultural differences in our world today and acknowledge the benefits to society of differences.

REquIRED COuRSES IN FIRE SCIENCE All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number FS 100 FS 105 FS 115 FS 125 FS 135 FS 145 FS 155 FS 200 FS 205 FS 215 FS 225 Course name Introduction to Fire Service building Construction for Fire Service national Incident Management System Introduction to Fire Suppression Fire Extinguishing Principles Hazardous Materials Awareness and Operations Fire Hydraulics and Water Supply Fire Prevention Fire Investigator I Fire Inspector I legal Aspects of Fire Service Prerequisite none FS 100 FS 100 FS 100 FS 100 FS 100 FS 100 FS 100 FS 200 FS 200 FS 200 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

3. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate organizational, marketing, and ethical issues impacting the fire service. 4. 5. 6. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups using industry standard software. describe the historical development of fire protection and response from its origins through contemporary times. Identify and differentiate the various forms of fire, their fundamental scientific principles, and their associated mitigation and response strategies.

ELECTIvE COuRSES IN FIRE SCIENCE A minimum of 6 semester credit hours is required. Course number CJ 105 EM 116 EM 117 FS 226 FS 235 FS 240 FS 245 HS 210 HS 310 Course name Introduction to Criminal Justice EMT basic Theory and lab EMT basic Clinical Fire Combat Tactics and Strategy Fire Instructor I Fire Officer I Public Fire and life Safety Educator First Responder Introduction to Hazardous Materials First Responder Communications dispatching Prerequisite none Corequisite EM 117 Corequisite EM 116 FS 200 FS 200 FS 200 FS 200 none CJ 105 Credit Hours 3.0 9.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0

7. describe the legal and regulatory duties and responsibilities of the fire department as a public organization. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Fire Fighter. graduates will be prepared for entrance into many challenging areas of fire departments and emergency services. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 62 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 309

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

(Offered in the State of Ohio only)

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN GRAPHIC DESIGN (ASGRD) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN GRAPHIC DESIGN (AASGRDOH)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Associate of Science degree in graphic design employs an integrated and coherent approach that prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies required for an entry-level position in graphic design. The curriculum is focused on designing and producing work for print, interactive web, and exhibitions. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to participate as a team member or to manage projects that: 1. demonstrate the use of type, imagery, and appropriate technologies and techniques to design socially appropriate solutions to interactive and graphic design problems. demonstrate a working knowledge of design production tools and interactive and graphic arts systems. Create and maintain a portfolio appropriate for an entry-level position in interactive and graphic arts. demonstrate the entire creative design and production process from research to delivery of final product to client. demonstrate appropriate uses of different color modes, including Rgb, CMYK, and spot colors. demonstrate the principles and elements of design as they relate in 2d, 3d, and interactive design. list and describe features of the five families of type and demonstrate using the appropriate font in 2d, 3d, and interactive design. Identify artists, techniques, and works of art from different periods of history. Identify career opportunities in graphic design. Communicate effectively to both individuals and groups, visually, orally, and in writing. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd100 Pd120 Pd150 Pd200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Client Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 311

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include junior graphic, web designer, junior production artist, and illustrator. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is five semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 67 credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course number bU 105 gA 101 gA 102 gA 104 gA 105 gA 201 gA 205 gA 212 gA 215 gA 235 gA 245 HU 320 Course name business Principles and Management graphic design Fundamentals Illustration Fundamentals digital Photography--Introduction Color Theory in design diagrammatic design Introduction to Typography Web design Fundamentals Corporate Identity design Web in Motion Art History Prerequisite none none none gA 102 gA 101 gA 102 gA 101, gA 102 gA 105 gA 201 gA 215 none Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic. Students in the State of georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

Introduction to digital design Applications none

ELECTIvES A minimum of 8 semester credit hours of open electives is required. Most students choose to take gA 294 (Career Internship) to fulfill this requirement, in which case Pd 214 is a prerequisite. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degree programs must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 313

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (ASHIM) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (AASHIMOH)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions in health information management (HIM). HIM professionals plan, collect, aggregate, analyze, and disseminate individual patient and aggregate clinical data. Students in the ASHIM program will learn entry-level skills related to those areas of the HIM profession. All of the courses in this program are offered in an online format, and some courses are also available in a traditional classroom format. Check with your local campus for availability of traditional classroom courses. nOTE: This program is not accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. Abstract, analyze, and manage health care data. Monitor and apply organization-wide health record documentation guidelines to ensure organizational compliance.

11. define and articulate organizational, operational, ethical, and legal issues impacting HIM. 12. Think critically at a conceptual level and by using mathematical analysis as well as the scientific method; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society in a culturally diverse world. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential job titles might include, but are not limited to, EMPI coordinator, information access/disclosure specialist, health data analyst, coder, charge master auditor, documentation improvement specialist, cancer registrar, and HIM technician. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters (18 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 64 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT COuRSES All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required. Course number HC 115 HC 310 HI 105 HI 210 HI 295 HI 300 HI 320 MC 171 Course name Medical Terminology for Health Care Professionals Medical law and Ethics Introduction to Health Care Information Systems Principles of Health Information Management Health Information Internship Epidemiology and Applied Health Care Statistics Health Care data basic diagnosis Coding Prerequisite none none none none HI 105, HI 210, Pd 213 MA 107 HI 210 MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l Credit Hours 2.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

3. Support data analysis and management using appropriate software applications. 4. Apply knowledge of medical terminology, disease process, anatomy and physiology, and pharmacology to select appropriate ICd and CPT diagnosis/ procedure codes. Read and understand medical documentation to ensure that documentation supports the diagnosis and/or procedure performed. Apply knowledge of payer billing and reimbursement, the prospective payment system, and fraud and abuse issues. Apply medico-legal knowledge to protected health information for authorization, disclosure, and security. demonstrate knowledge of industry-standard databases and electronic health records. Apply current laws, accreditation, licensure, and certification standards related to health information to meet organizational needs. Abstract and analyze clinical data to identify trends.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 315

Course number MC 172

Course name basic Procedure Coding

Prerequisite MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MC 171 MC 172 Corequisite SC 245 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245

Credit Hours 3.0

Students in the state of georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Students must also take Pd 213 in preparation for the HI 295 Health Information Internship. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 213 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Health Information Management Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

MC 173 MC 174 MO 146 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l *

Intermediate diagnosis Coding Intermediate Procedure Coding Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Anatomy and Physiology I* Anatomy and Physiology I lab* Anatomy and Physiology II* Anatomy and Physiology II lab*

3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

Students in the State of Ohio must take 4 credits of natural science/natural science with lab courses to satisfy a natural science requirement. These courses satisfy this requirement.

REquIRED GENERAL EDuCATION COuRSES Students enrolled in associate of science programs must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hours in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 317

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN LEGAL ASSISTING , PARALEGAL (ASLAP) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN LEGAL ASSISTING, PARALEGAL (AASLAPM, AASLAPOH)

(Offered in the States of Minnesota and Ohio only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program prepares students with the skills and academic knowledge necessary for a career as a legal assistant, paralegal working under the supervision of a licensed attorney. The American bar Association defines a paralegal as "a person qualified by education, training or work experience who is employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency or other entity and who performs specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible." These career opportunities may be in small or large firms working as a legal assistant, paralegal. The duties of a legal assistant, paralegal include assisting the lawyer with research, brief preparation, and other legal office administration, but do not include practicing law, advising clients, or setting fees since paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public except as permitted by law. SPECIAL ADMISSIONS AND TRANSFER REquIREMENTS Students at the Atlanta and new Orleans campuses must complete all paralegal courses at the campus in a traditional classroom format. Transfer students at the Atlanta and new Orleans campuses must complete at least ten (10) semester credit hours of paralegal core courses in a traditional classroom format at the campus. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. draft legal documents in areas of law studied including torts and family law, probate procedure, and contracts. 2. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate law practices in a variety of legal settings where legal assistants, paralegals work, including small and large private firms, corporations, and governmental agencies; the emerging role of the legal assistant, paralegal; and the place of the legal assistant, paralegal in expanding the delivery of legal services. 3. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate the affect of change in the delivery of legal services and corresponding needs for well-qualified legal assistants, paralegals. 4. demonstrate mastery of word-processing, Internet and legal research technologies in a typical law office environment. 5. demonstrate the ability to define and articulate alternatives to litigation including mediation, voluntary and mandatory arbitration.

318 HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

6. demonstrate the ability to articulate ethical decision-making in the legal environment. 7. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include legal assistant and paralegal. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is four semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 63 semester credit hours is required for graduation. In addition, students must demonstrate a keyboarding speed of a minimum of 40 net words per minute by the end of their program in order to qualify for the Associate of Science in legal Assisting, Paralegal degree. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 28 semester credit hours, are required. Course number bU 206 IS 102 Pl 100 Pl 106 Pl 130 Pl 140 Pl 180 Pl 215 Pl 250 Course name business law I Computers and Application Software Introduction to legal Assisting legal Research Family and Tort law Ethics and Paralegal Professionalism# law Office Procedures Civil litigation legal Writing Prerequisite none none none Pl 100 Pl 106 Pl 100 Pl 106 Pl 106 Pl 106, En 104 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 12 semester credit hours is required. At least six semester credit hours must be paralegal (Pl) courses. Course number AC 103 bU 105 Course name Accounting I business Principles and Management Prerequisite IS 102 none Credit Hours 4.0 3.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 319

bU 155 bU 195 IS 120 IS 121 IS 160 Pl 138 Pl 225 Pl 235 Pl 246 Pl 294

Team development and group Management E-business Concepts Word Processing Introduction to the Internet Spreadsheets Wills, Estates and bankruptcy Criminal law Property law and Intellectual Property law Environmental law and Administrative Agencies Career Internship

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES PS 101 none IS 102 none IS 102 Pl 106 Pl 106 Pl 106 Pl 106 4th or 5th semester and gPA of 2.5, Pd 214 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 214. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 214 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar AS/AAS/bS Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * Note: In this program, four semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replaces Computer Applications in the general education requirements recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the paralegal core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

**

Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement.

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 321

(Offered in the State of Minnesota only)

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN MEDICAL ASSISTING (AASMAM)

MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 MS 109 MS 121 MS 131 MS 141 MS 207 MS 295

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The introduction of students to the overall operation of the physician's office is the basic objective of this program. Students are trained to assist the physician in the examination room, to perform routine laboratory procedures and to handle financial records, correspondence, insurance forms and other administrative functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a Medical Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to perform clinical assisting and laboratory procedures. 2. demonstrate the ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical facilities. 3. Apply legal concepts to the medical practice. 4. Communicate professionally with patients, co-workers and providers. 5. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include Medical Office Assistant, Medical business Office, Medical Receptionist, Medical laboratory Assistant, and Phlebotomist. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 65 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 42 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 102 MO 110 MO 113 Course name Computers and Application Software Keyboarding Medical business Operations Prerequisite none none none Credit Hours 4.0 1.0 3.0

Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Clinical Assisting I Clinical Assisting II Clinical laboratory Procedures I Clinical laboratory Procedures II Program Review Externship

none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none SC 245, MO 144, MO 146, Pd 216* MS 109, Pd 216* SC 245, MO 144, MO 146; Pd 216* MS 131, Pd 216* All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, CPR, Pd 211 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145l, Corequisite SC 245

3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0

4.0 3.0 1.0

SC 245 SC 245l

Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Studentsenrolledinassociatedegreesmustcompleteaminimumof21semestercredithoursin general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * Note: In the State of Minnesota, four semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replaces Computer Applications in the general education requirements recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science (State of Minnesota only) Required Herzing university Natural Science Courses Course number SC 145 SC 145l Course name Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 323

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL ASSISTING (ASMA) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN MEDICAL ASSISTING (AASMAOH)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The introduction of students to the overall operation of the physician's office is the basic objective of this program. Students are trained to assist the physician in the examination room, to perform routine laboratory procedures and to handle financial records, correspondence, insurance forms and other administrative functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a Medical Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to perform clinical assisting and laboratory procedures. 2. demonstrate the ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical facilities. 3. Apply legal concepts to the medical practice 4. Communicate professionally with patients, co-workers and providers. 5 Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

**

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of two semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 211. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 211 Pd 216 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MA Externship Preparation Medical Assisting Proctor Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0

* Note: PD 216 is only for students taking the program online.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include Medical Office Assistant, Medical business Office, Medical Receptionist, Medical laboratory Assistant, and Phlebotomist. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 65 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 42 semester credit hours, are required. Course number MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 Course name Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Prerequisite none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 325

MO 146 MO 161 MS 109 MS 121 MS 131 MS 141 MS 207 MS 295 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l

Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Clinical Assisting I Clinical Assisting II Clinical laboratory Procedures I Clinical laboratory Procedures II Program Review Externship Anatomy and Physiology I *** Anatomy and Physiology I lab *** Anatomy and Physiology II *** Anatomy and Physiology II lab***

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none SC 245, MO 144, MO 146, Pd 216* MS 109, Pd 216* SC 245, MO 144, MO146, Pd 216* MS 131, Pd 216* All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 211 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145l, Corequisite SC 245 2.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 211 and Pd 216*. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 211 Pd 216* Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MA Externship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0

Medical Assisting Proctor Preparation none

* Note: PD 216 is only for students taking the program online.

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

**

*** SC 145 and SC 245, Anatomy and Physiology I and II and Labs, satisfy the requirement for a natural science for students in the State of Ohio.

326

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 327

(Offered in the State of Minnesota only)

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN MEDICAL BILLING AND INSuRANCE CODING (AASMBICM)

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 39 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 102 MC 171 MC 172 MC 173 MC 174 MC 207 MC 294 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 SC 245 SC 245l Course name Computers and Application Software basic diagnosis Coding basic Procedure Coding Intermediate diagnosis Coding Intermediate Procedure Coding Program Review Internship Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Prerequisite none MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MC 171 MC 172 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 212 none none none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none SC 145 Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 1.0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the medical billing and insurance coding program is to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the content of the medical record as well as extensive training in anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and medical terminology. This program will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding to analyze medical records and assign codes to classify diagnoses and procedures while applying the principles of professional and ethical conduct. The program will prepare the student for an entry-level position as a medical coder in a hospital, clinic, physician's office, or other health care facility. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical facilities. 2. Read and understand medical documentation, identify diagnoses and procedures and insure that documentation supports the diagnosis and procedures performed. 3. Apply knowledge of medical terminology, disease process, anatomy and physiology, and pharmacology. 4. Apply knowledge of ICd and CPT format, instructional notations, conventions, in-patient and out-patient guidelines. 5. Apply knowledge of payor billing and reimbursement, the prospective payment system and fraud and abuse issues. 6. Select appropriate diagnosis and procedures. 7. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: medical coding specialist, health information specialist, abstractor, and medical clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 65 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours of open electives is required. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in Associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. *

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 329

Note: In the State of Minnesota, four semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replaces Computer Applications in the general education requirements recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science (State of Minnesota only) Suggested Herzing Courses Course number SC 145 SC 145l * Course name Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL BILLING AND INSuRANCE CODING (ASMBIC) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN MEDICAL BILLING AND INSuRANCE CODING (AASMBICO)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the medical billing and insurance coding program is to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the content of the medical record as well as extensive training in anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and medical terminology. This program will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding to analyze medical records and assign codes to classify diagnoses and procedures while applying the principles of professional and ethical conduct. The program will prepare the student for an entry-level position as a medical coder in a hospital, clinic, physician's office, or other health care facility. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical facilities. 2. Read and understand medical documentation, identify diagnoses and procedures and insure that documentation supports the diagnosis and procedures performed. 3. Apply knowledge of medical terminology, disease process, anatomy and physiology, and pharmacology.

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 212. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 212 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MbIC Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

4. Apply knowledge of ICd and CPT format, instructional notations, conventions, in-patient and out-patient guidelines. 5. Apply knowledge of payor billing and reimbursement, the prospective payment system and fraud and abuse issues. 6. Select appropriate diagnosis and procedures. 7. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: Medical Coding Specialist, Health Information Specialist, Abstractor, and Medical Clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters.

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 331

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 65 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 39 semester credit hours, are required. Course number MC 171 MC 172 MC 173 MC 174 MC 207 MC 294 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l Course name basic diagnosis Coding basic Procedure Coding Intermediate diagnosis Coding Intermediate Procedure Coding Program Review Internship Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Anatomy and Physiology I *** Anatomy and Physiology I lab *** Anatomy and Physiology II *** Anatomy and Physiology II lab *** Prerequisite MO 144 or HC 115 MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MO 144 or HC 115 MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MC 171 MC 172 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 212 none none none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in Associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** *** Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. ** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

*** SC 145 and SC 245, Anatomy and Physiology I and II and Labs, satisfy the requirement for a natural science for students in the State of Ohio. Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES

2.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

A minimum of two semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 212. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 212 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MbIC Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours of open electives is required.

332

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 333

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (AASMOA)

(Offered in the State of Minnesota only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Medical Office Administration Program is designed to prepare students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level office positions in the health care industry. Career opportunities may be in areas such as the medical office, clinic, hospitals, long term care facilities, and other health care office settings. The program also includes a compressive general education curriculum preparing students for future career advancement opportunities. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical, health care facilities. 2. Apply legal concepts to medical practice. 3. Communicate professionally with patients, co-workers and providers. 4. demonstrate knowledge of billing and reimbursement. 5. Apply the knowledge from the general education curriculum in context of society as a whole. 6. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: Medical Office Assistant, Health Information Administrator, Health Information Technician, and billing Clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 60 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 33 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 102 Course name Computers and Application Software Prerequisite none Credit Hours 4.0

IS 124 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 MO 294 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l

database Applications Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Internship, Work Experience Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab

IS 102 none none none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none All didactic coursework with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 215 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, Corequisite SC 245

4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours of open electives is required. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in Associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * Note: In the State of Minnesota, 4 semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replace Computer Applications in the general education requirements recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science (State of Minnesota only) * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 335

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

**

A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (ASMOA) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (AASMOAOH)

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Medical Office Administration Program is designed to prepare students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level office positions in the health care industry. Career opportunities may be in areas such as the medical office or clinic, hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other health care office settings. The program also includes a comprehensive general education curriculum, preparing students for future career advancement opportunities. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical or health care facilities. 2. Apply legal concepts to medical practice. 3. Communicate professionally with patients, coworkers, and providers. 4. demonstrate knowledge of billing and reimbursement. 5. Apply the knowledge from the general education curriculum in context of society as a whole. 6 Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 215. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 215 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MOA Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: medical office assistant, health information administrator, health information technician, and billing clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters (18 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 60 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

336

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 337

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 29 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 124 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 MO 294 Course name database Applications Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Internship, Work Experience Prerequisite IS 102 none none none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none All didactic coursework with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 215 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

**

Students in the State of Georgia must take a science course to fulfill this requirement. PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 215. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 215 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MOA Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l

Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab

3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 7 semester credit hours of open electives is required. GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus **

338

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 339

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING (ASN) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN NuRSING (AASNSOH)

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This Associate of Science in nursing degree program is approved by the state boards of nursing in the states in which it is offered to prepare students to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses (nClEX-Rn) and to begin a professional nursing career. graduates will be prepared to integrate nursing knowledge, critical thinking, and advanced nursing skills in the health care environment when managing care for multiple clients with complex conditions. Theoretical and practical instruction is complimented with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and reality-based understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse. Students will participate in planned clinical and laboratory experiences that will complement classroom learning and will stress health promotion as well as disease processes. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate professional nursing behaviors and ongoing professional development related to legal, ethical, and scope of practice issues as defined by the state regulatory board. Utilize the nursing process to provide quality nursing care addressing self-care deficits for a diverse population of clients in a variety of health care settings. demonstrate critical thinking in the utilization of current nursing evidence to plan and implement care for a diverse population of clients across the health continuum. develop, implement, and evaluate individualized teaching plans designed to address wellness, illness, and self-care deficits for diverse clients or groups. Communicate accurately, effectively, and in a timely manner with clients, significant others, and members of the health care team. Utilize and have a working knowledge of nursing and medical-related technological equipment. Collaborate with the health care team to provide optimum care to individuals, families, and groups within a diverse community. Provide continuity of care across various health care systems by managing care for a diverse group of clients through effective use of delegation, technology, and resources.

9. 10.

Practice effective management and leadership strategies as they relate to client advocacy and change agent behaviors. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is a selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills--TEAS). The best-qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the nursing program.

2. 3.

· · · ·

Anatomy and Physiology With lab (or body Structure and Function With lab) Microbiology (if required) College Math (if required) Chemistry (bSn Only)

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES graduates are prepared for entry level positions as a Registered nurse. PROGRAM LENGTH In the State of Ohio, the average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 20 months. In all other states, the average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 22 months. PROGRAM CONTENT In the State of Ohio, a minimum of 72 semester credit hours is required for graduation. In all other states, a minimum of 75 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

340

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 341

REquIRED COuRSES IN NuRSING All courses, 38 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name nS 100 Fundamentals of nursing I With lab Prerequisite Clock Hours Credit Hours 3.0

REquIRED SuPPORT COuRSE FOR NuRSING A minimum of 1 semester credit hour is required. Course Course number name MO 144 Medical Terminology REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 Students enrolled in this associate degree must complete a minimum of 29 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. 8 Semester Credit Hours in Anatomy & Physiology 3 Semester Credit Hours Microbiology 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course Course number name Pd 100 Pd 200 Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 Prerequisite none Clock Hours 15 Credit Hours 1.0

MO 144 60 SC 165, SC 165l, SC 245, SC 245l Corequisite nS 130 nS 100 Corequisite nS 100 or nS 110 nS 100 nS 110, nS 120 nS 150 nS 120 or nS 170 75 60

nS 110 nS 120 nS 130 nS 140 nS 150 nS 160 nS 200 nS 210 nS 220 nS 230 nS 240 nS 250 nS 260

Fundamentals of nursing II With Clinical Pharmacology I With lab Health Assessment With lab Health Promotion Across the lifespan Medical Surgical nursing I With Clinical Medical Surgical nursing II With Clinical Pharmacology II

Corequisite nS 100 60 30 75 75 15 75 75 75 75 75 30

Medical Surgical nursing III With Clinical nS 160 or nS 170 Medical Surgical nursing IV With Clinical nS 210 Mental Health nursing With Clinical Obstetric nursing With Clinical Pediatric nursing With Clinical nursing leadership nS 110, PS 101 nS 160, nS 170 nS 160, nS 170 nS 220

REquIRED NuRSING PRACTICuM Students in Ohio must complete two semester credit hours (90 clock hours) of nursing practicum. Students in all other states must complete 5 semester (225 clock hours) credit hours of nursing practicum. Course Course number name nS 270 Clinical Practicum--Option A OR nS 271 Clinical Practicum--Option b (Ohio only) Completion of 90 all core nursing courses 2.0 Prerequisite Clock Hours Credit Hours 5.0

Completion of 225 all core nursing courses

342

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 343

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING--LPN TO RN BRIDGE (ASNB)

Distribution of Contact Hours by Course Lecture MO 144 nS 100 nS 110 nS 120 nS 130 nS 140 nS 150 nS 160 nS 200 nS 210 nS 220 nS 230 nS 240 nS 250 nS 260 nS 270 nS 271 15 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15 30 30 30 30 30 30 225 90 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 30 30 30 45 Lab Clinical Total Hours 15 60 75 60 60 30 75 75 15 75 75 75 75 75 30 225 90 Credits 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 5.0 2.0 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 3. 2.

(Offered in the State of Ohio Only)

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN NuRSING--LPN TO RN BRIDGE (AASNBOH)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The lPn to Rn completion program is open to licensed practical nurses (lPns) who have completed a practical nursing program approved by a state board of nursing. The program supports practical nurses desiring to advance their educational pursuits and increase career opportunities. The program prepares students to practice as an entrylevel registered nurse in a variety of healthcare settings. graduates are eligible to take the nClEX-Rn examination and apply for licensure as a registered nurse in the states where offered. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate professional nursing behaviors and ongoing professional development related to legal, ethical, and scope of practice issues as defined by the state regulatory board. Utilize the nursing process to provide quality nursing care addressing self-care deficits for a diverse population of clients in a variety of health care settings. demonstrate critical thinking in the utilization of current nursing evidence to plan and implement care for a diverse population of clients across the health continuum. develop, implement, and evaluate individualized teaching plans designed to address wellness, illness, and self-care deficits for diverse clients or groups. Communicate accurately, effectively and in a timely manner with clients, significant others and members of the healthcare team. Utilize and have a working knowledge of nursing and medical-related technological equipment. Collaborate with the health care team to provide optimum care to individuals, families, and groups within a diverse community. Provide continuity of care across various health care systems by managing care for a diverse group of clients through effective use of delegation, technology, and resources. Practice effective management and leadership strategies as they relate to client advocacy and change agent behaviors. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

9. 10.

344

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 345

SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is a selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills--TEAS). The best-qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the nursing program.

REquIRED COuRSES IN NuRSING All courses, 24 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name nS 170 nS 200 nS 210 nS 220 nS 230 nS 240 nS 250 nS 260 lPn Transition to Rn Practice With lab Pharmacology II Prerequisite SC 165, SC 165l SC 245, SC 245l nS 120 or nS 170 Clock Hours 120 15 75 75 75 75 75 30 Credit Hours 6.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0

Medical Surgical nursing III With Clinical nS 160 or nS 170 Medical Surgical nursing IV With Clinical nS 210 Mental Health nursing With Clinical Obstetric nursing With Clinical Pediatric nursing With Clinical nursing leadership nS 110, PS 101 nS 160, nS 170 nS 160, nS 170 nS 220

· · · ·

Anatomy and Physiology With lab (or body Structure and Function With lab) Microbiology (if required) College Math (if required) Chemistry (bSn Only)

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES graduates are prepared for entry-level positions as a Registered nurse. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 18 months. PROGRAM CONTENT In the State of Ohio, a minimum of 72 semester credit hours is required for graduation. In all other states, a minimum of 75 semester credit hours is required for graduation. TRANSFER CREDITS FOR LPN DIPLOMA Students who have completed a licensed Practical nursing (lPn) program approved by the state board of nursing in the state in which the program was completed and who hold a current lPn license from any state will be awarded 15 semester credit hours toward this degree.

REquIRED NuRSING PRACTICuM Students in Ohio must complete two semester credit hours (90 clock hours) of nursing practicum. Students in all other states must complete five semester (225 clock hours) credit hours of nursing practicum. Course Course number name nS 270 Clinical Practicum--Option A Prerequisite Clock Hours Credit Hours 5.0

Completion of all 225 core nursing courses

nS 271

OR Clinical Practicum--Option b (Ohio only) Completion of all 90 core nursing courses

2.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in this associate degree must complete a minimum of 29 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. 8 Semester Credit Hours in Anatomy & Physiology 3 Semester Credit Hours Microbiology 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 347

346

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course Course number name Pd 100 Pd 200 Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING--ALABAMA (ASNAL)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Associate of Science degree in nursing Program prepares students who are already licensed practical nurses to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses (nClEX). Students are provided a foundation of general education, including courses in the natural sciences, the social sciences, and mathematics, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to work in a health care environment. Theoretical instruction is complemented with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and reality-based understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse. Students will participate in planned clinical and laboratory experiences that will complement classroom learning and stress health prevention and promotion as well as disease processes. Students must have an active, unrestricted Alabama lPn license and transfer into the program a minimum of 20 credit hours, including English composition, computer skills, and anatomy and physiology to be enrolled in the program. ** PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. demonstrate the ability to work as part of a multidisciplinary health care team. Provide accurate patient assessments. Provide appropriate health care interventions as a member of a treatment team. Function as a beginning-level staff nurse in a variety of health care facilities to include hospitals, long-term care agencies, physician's offices, clinics, outpatient surgical facilities, and other community organizations. Function as a safe practitioner and, through critical thinking and communication skills, act as a patient advocate and educator, including the family and community in the total care. Understand and utilize nursing-related medical and technological equipment. demonstrate a full understanding and practice of accepted ethical and legal standards. Exhibit leadership qualities in diverse health care settings. Understand the unique needs of diverse populations in regard to socioeconomic, cultural, and lifespan issues.

Distribution of Contact Hours by Course Lecture nS 170 nS 200 nS 210 nS 220 nS 230 nS 240 nS 250 nS 260 nS 270 nS 271 60 15 30 30 30 30 30 30 225 90 45 45 45 45 45 Lab 60 Clinical Total Hours 120 15 75 75 75 75 75 30 225 90 Credits 6.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 5.0 2.0

5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Promote health and wellness in order to facilitate positive growth and development. 11. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

348 HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010 PROgRAMS OF STUdY 349

SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is a selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills--TEAS). The best-qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the nursing program.

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required. Course number nA 165 nA 165l nA 205 nA 205l nA 212 nA 220 nA 225 nA 230 nA 235 nA 240 nA 250 nA 255 nA 260 nA 261 nA 282 Course name general Microbiology for nursing general Microbiology for nursing lab Anatomy and Physiology II for nursing Anatomy and Physiology II for nursing lab Advanced Pharmacology Medical Surgical nursing I for Rns Medical Surgical nursing I for Rns Clinical nutrition Obstetrics/Pediatric nursing Clinical Obstetrics/Pediatric nursing Clinical Medical Surgical nursing II for Rns Medical Surgical nursing II for Rns Clinical Mental Health for the Rn Mental Health for the Rn Clinical nClEX Rn Review (Final Class) Role Transition: lPn to Rn Rn Clinical Internship Prerequisite Corequisite nA 165l Corequisite nA 165 Corequisite nA 205l Corequisite nA 205 none nA 212; Corequisite nA 225 Corequisite nA 220 none nA 220; Corequisite nA 240 nA 225; Corequisite nA 235 nA 220; Corequisite nA 255 nA 225 Corequisite nA 250 Corequisite nA 261 Corequisite nA 260 Final term Final term Final semester Clock Hours 45 30 45 30 30 60 45 45 60 45 45 45 45 45 60 45 135 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 4.0 3.0 3.0

· · · ·

Anatomy and Physiology With lab (or body Structure and Function With lab) Microbiology (if required) College Math (if required) Chemistry (bSn Only)

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4 semesters (16 months). REquIRED TRANSFER COuRSES A total of 20 to 52 semester credit hours must be transferred from a completed licensed practical nursing (lPn) program.* PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 48 credit hours is required for graduation.

nA 285 nA 999

350

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PROgRAMS OF STUdY 351

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 7 semester credit hours, are required. ** Course number En 106 En 116 PS 101 * Course name Information literacy and Research Writing Speech Psychology Prerequisite none none none Clock Hours 15 60 45 Credit Hours 1.0 3.0 3.0

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN NuRSING--OHIO (AASNOH)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This Associate of Science in nursing degree program is approved by the Ohio State board of nursing to prepare students to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses (nClEX-Rn) and to begin a professional nursing career. Students are provided a foundation of general education including courses in the natural sciences, the social sciences, mathematics, and humanities as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to work in a health care environment. Theoretical and practical instruction is complimented with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and reality-based understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse. Students will participate in planned clinical and laboratory experiences that will complement classroom learning and will stress health promotion as well as disease processes. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to function as a beginning level staff nurse in a variety of health care facilities to include hospitals, long-term care agencies, physician's offices, clinics, out patient surgical facilities and other community organizations and to work as part of a multidisciplinary health care team. 2. Provide accurate patient assessments and appropriate health care interventions as a member of a treatment team. 3. Function as a safe practitioner, using critical thinking and communication skills to act as a patient advocate and educator. 4. Understand and utilize nursing related medical and technological equipment. 5. Exhibit leadership qualities in diverse health care settings. 6. demonstrate a full understanding and practice of accepted ethical and legal standards. 7. Understand the unique needs of diverse populations in regard to socioeconomic, cultural, and lifespan issues while promoting health and wellness in order to facilitate positive growth and development. 8. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is a selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high

All courses from the Herzing University diploma in Practical nursing--Alabama (dPnAl) apply as transfer courses.

** Transfer courses in general education must include English composition, computer skills, and natural science (normally anatomy and physiology). If not transferred, these courses must be completed prior to graduation as part of the program at Herzing University.

352

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 353

school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills--TEAS). The best-qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the nursing program.

nO 107 nO 107l nO 108 nO 109 nO 110 nO 111 nO 111l nO 112 nO 208 nO 210 nO 211 nO 212 nO 213 nO 214 nO 215 nO 216 nO 217 nO 218 nO 219 nO 220 nO 221

Fundamentals of nursing II Fundamentals of nursing II lab Adult nursing Systems I Adult nursing Systems I Clinical Therapeutic Use of Self Therapeutic Use of Self lab Pharmacology nursing Management Adult nursing Systems II Adult nursing Systems II Clinical Adult nursing Systems III Adult nursing Systems III Clinical Maternal/newborn Self-Care Requisites Maternal/newborn Self-Care Requisites Clinical Psychosocial Self-Care Requisites Psychosocial Self-Care Requisites Clinical Health deviations in Childhood Health deviations in Childhood Clinical Health deviations in Older Adulthood Health deviations in Older Adulthood Clinical directed Clinical Practicum Anatomy and Physiology I *** general Microbiology general Microbiology lab Anatomy and Physiology II ***

nO 106, Corequisite nO 107l Corequisite nO 107 nO 107 Corequisite nO 109 PS 101, Corequisite nO 111l Corequisite nO 111 Corequisite SC 245 nO 212 nO 109 Corequisite nO 210 nO 210 Corequisite nO 212 nO 210 Corequisite nO 214 nO 111 Corequisite nO 216 nO 210 Corequisite nO 218 nO 212 Corequisite nO 220 nO 212 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l

30 30 45 45 45 15 30 30 30 30 45 30 45 15 45 30 45 15 45 30 45 90 45 30 30 30 45 30

2.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

Fundamentals of nursing II Clinical Corequisite nO 107

· · · ·

Anatomy and Physiology With lab (or body Structure and Function With lab) Microbiology (if required) College Math (if required) Chemistry (bSn Only)

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS graduates will be eligible to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses and will be prepared for entry-level positions as a Registered nurse. PROGRAM LENGTH The length of the program is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 72 credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 49 semester credit hours, are required. Course number MO 144 nO 103 nO 106 nO 106l Course name Medical Terminology Health and Illness throughout the lifespan Fundamentals of nursing I Fundamentals of nursing I lab Prerequisite none PS 101 Corequisite nO 106l Corequisite nO 106 Clock Hours 15 30 30 30 Credit Hours 1.0 2.0 2.0 1.0

nO 222 SC 145 SC 145l SC 165 SC 165l SC 245 SC 245l

Anatomy and Physiology I lab *** Corequisite SC 145

Anatomy and Physiology II lab *** Corequisite SC 245

354

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 355

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in Associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science# 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NuRSING--WISCONSIN (ASNWI)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This Associate of Science in nursing degree program is approved by the Wisconsin State board of nursing to prepare students to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses (nClEX-Rn) and to begin a professional nursing career. graduates will be prepared to integrate nursing knowledge, critical thinking, and advanced nursing skills in the health care environment when managing care for multiple clients with complex conditions. Theoretical and practical instruction is complimented with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and realitybased understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse. Students will participate in planned clinical and laboratory experiences that will complement classroom learning and will stress health promotion as well as disease processes. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students will be able to: 1. 2. 3. demonstrate nursing professional behaviors related to legal, ethical, political and scope of practice issues as defined by the state regulatory board. Communicate accurately, effectively and in a timely manner with clients, significant others, and members of the health care team. Assess clients' health care needs based on data from a variety of sources including physical findings, past medical history, client interviews and members of the health care team. Use clinical decision making skills to plan appropriate interventions using evidenced-based protocols. Provide client care for a diverse population using therapeutic interventions in a safe, caring manner in a variety of health care settings. Use teaching and learning skills to provide health promotion and illness prevention to a diverse population. Collaborate with the health care team to provide optimum care to individuals, families and groups within a diverse community. Provide continuity of care across various health care systems by managing client care. develop proficiencies in more advanced nursing skills incorporating technology when appropriate.

**

*** SC 145 and SC 245, Anatomy and Physiology I and II and Labs, satisfy the requirement for a natural science for students in the State of Ohio. # The following course is required in the Ohio nursing program to satisfy the general education requirement in social or behavioral science. Course name Psychology Prerequisite none Clock Hours 45 Credit Hours 3.0

4. 5. 6. 7.

Course number PS 101

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

8. 9.

10. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

356

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 357

SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills-TEAS). The best qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C+" (76%) for a student to be continued in the nursing program. ·AnatomyandPhysiologywithLab(orBodyStructureandFunctionwithLab) ·Microbiology(ifrequired) ·CollegeMath(ifrequired) ·Chemistry(BSNOnly) All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of "d" or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS graduates will be eligible to take the national Council licensing Examination for Registered nurses and will be prepared for entry-level positions as a Registered nurse. PROGRAM LENGTH The length of the program is 24 months. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 72 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 48 semester credit hours, are required. Course number nW 101 nW 102 Course name Fundamentals of nursing Clinical Practice I Prerequisite Corequisites nW 105, SC 142 Corequisites nW 101, nW 103 Clock Hours 105 135 Credit Hours 5.0 3.0

nW 103 nW 105 nW 201 nW 202 nW 210 nW 211 nW 214

Health and Illness Throughout the life Span Pharmacology for nurses Alterations in Adult Health Clinical Practice II Medical/Surgical nursing Clinical Practice III Mental Health and Community nursing nursing Management Ob/Pediatrics/geriatrics Clinical Practice IV Clinical Internship Anatomy and Physiology for nursing Anatomy and Physiology for nursing lab Cultural diversity

Corequisites SC 142, PS 101 Corequisite SC 142 nW 102 Corequisite nW 201 Corequisite SC 243, Prerequisite nW 202 Corequisites nW 210, nW214 Corequisite SC 243, Prerequisite nW 202 Corequisite nW 211 Corequisite nW 210 nW 231 Corequisite nW 215, Prerequisite nW 211 SC 142, Corequisite SC 243l Corequisite SC 243 none

45 30 45 180 75 180

3.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

nW 215 nW 231 nW 232 nW 252 SC 243

30 30 30 90 225

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 5.0

45 30 45

3.0 1.0 3.0

SC 243l SS 310

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 22 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 2 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications *# 7 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) * ## 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 22 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

358

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 359

**

A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science. The following course is required in the Wisconsin nursing program to satisfy the general education requirement in computer applications: Prerequisite none Clock Hours 30 Credit Hours 2.0

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN OCCuPATIONAL THERAPy ASSISTING (AASOTA)

(Offered in the State of Minnesota Only)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The primary goal of the occupational therapy assistant educational process is to produce competent and ethical occupational therapy assistant practitioners. In conjunction with Herzing University's commitment to provide a learning environment that is caring, convenient, and career-focused, this program prepares the student for entrylevel competence as an occupational therapy assistant. Students begin by learning principles of occupational therapy and perform activities that demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of the material presented. Students are then given opportunities to apply this knowledge using human occupation and activity analysis. Students then move to the next level by getting opportunities to develop and present structured groups, write new programs, and develop adaptive, assistive equipment. Herzing University's OTA Program uses developmental Theory as the program progresses from birth to old age. Each level I fieldwork observation is carefully chosen to complement the course-room lecture and the specific developmental level being studied. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Provide course work and Fieldwork level II Experience that leads to an associate of applied science degree as an occupational therapy assistant that prepares students for the successful completion of the nbCOT certification examination and employment as COTAs. Create a learning environment that is caring, convenient, and career-focused, thus allowing safe exploration of personal and professional attitudes and behaviors that value the uniqueness, dignity, and rights of each individual. Foster cultural sensitivity by incorporating culturally diverse material within the curriculum and modeling in the classroom. Employ teaching methods that foster the occupational therapy philosophy of experiential learning and use of purposeful activity to facilitate adaptation and mediate dysfunction for all age groups, disabilities, and occupational roles. Prepare occupational therapy assistants to provide quality services in a wide variety of practice environments, including new areas of practice. Collaborate with the occupational therapy community to develop Fieldwork level II Experiences that prepare practitioners for meeting the practice needs of the community. Promote the field of occupational therapy at every possible opportunity.

#

Course Course number name IS 117 Computer Applications for nursing

## The following courses are required in the Wisconsin nursing program to satisfy the general education requirement in science or mathematics: Course Course number name SC 142 SC 165 body Structure and Function general Microbiology SC 142l body Structure and Function lab SC 165l general Microbiology lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 142l Corequisite SC 142 Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 Clock Hours 45 30 30 30 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 2.0 1.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, two semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Pd 100 Pd 200 Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

360

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 361

8.

Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

Course number OT 240 OT 245 OT 250 OT 255 OT 260 OT 265 OT 270 OT 275

Course name Psychosocial dysfunction and group dynamics level 1C Fieldwork Occupational Therapy in geriatrics and Community Settings level 1d Fieldwork Occupational Therapy in Program development Assistive Technology level 2A Fieldwork level 2b Fieldwork

Prerequisite Corequisite OT 245 OT 130, OT 140; Corequisite OT 240 OT 100; Corequisite OT 255 OT 130, OT 140, OT 245 OT 110 OT 201, OT 210, OT 235 OT 130, OT 140, OT 245, OT 255 OT 130, OT 140, OT 245, OT 255

Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 5.0 5.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES The potential entry-level position title is that of occupational therapy assistant following graduation, successfully passing a national certifying examination, and obtaining licensure in the chosen state of practice. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 68 semester credit hours are required for graduation. REquIRED OCCuPATIONAL THERAPy ASSISTING CORE COuRSES All courses, 45 semester credit hours, are required. Course number MO 144 OT 100 OT 110 OT 120 OT 125 Course name Medical Terminology lifespan development Principles of Occupational Therapy Human Occupations documentation and Computer Technology in Occupational Therapy level 1A Fieldwork level 1b Fieldwork Theory of Pediatric Occupations Occupational Therapy in Physical disabilities I Functional Kinesiology Occupational Therapy in Physical disabilities II Prerequisite none Corequisite OT 130 none none none Credit Hours 1.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements.* Note: In the State of Minnesota, 4 semester credit hours of Mathematics or Natural Science replaces Computer Applications in the general education requirements, recognizing that computer literacy is a component of the core curriculum. 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 8 Semester Credit Hours in natural Science With a lab Component # * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these disciplines. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines.

OT 130 OT 140 OT 201 OT 210 OT 225 OT 235

Corequisite OT 100 OT 100, OT 110; Corequisite OT 120 OT 100, OT 120; Corequisite OT 140 OT 100, OT 110; Corequisite OT 120 SC 145, SC 145l, SC 245, SC 245l OT 210

1.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0

** A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

362

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 363

#

Students enrolled in this program must take the following courses to fulfill the general education requirements in natural science with a lab component. Course # OT 240 OT 245 OT 250 OT 255 OT 260 OT 265 OT 270 OT 275 Prerequisite none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 Lecture 45.0 7.5 45.0 7.5 15.0

Distribution of Clock Hours by Course Lab Clinical Fieldwork Total Clock Hours 45.0 37.5 45.0 45.0 37.5 30.0 30.0 225.0 225.0 45.0 45.0 30.0 225.0 225.0 Credits 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 5.0 5.0

Students enrolled in this program must take PS 101 Psychology to fulfill this general education component. Course number SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l Course name Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development

Distribution of Clock Hours by Course Course # MO 144 OT 100 OT 110 OT 120 OT 125 OT 130 OT 140 OT 201 OT 210 OT 225 OT 235 Lecture 15.0 45.0 45.0 15.0 15.0 7.5 7.5 45.0 45.0 15.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 37.5 37.5 45.0 45.0 45.0 60.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 Lab Clinical Fieldwork Total Clock Hours 15.0 45.0 45.0 45.0 45.0 45.0 Credits 1.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 1.0

364

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 365

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN PHySICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT (ASPTA)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This Associate of Science in Physical Therapist Assistant Program prepares students to take the national Physical Therapist Assistant Examination (nPTAE) and begin a professional allied health career as licensed physical therapist assistants. Students are provided a foundation of general education, including courses in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities as well as the technical education for the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to work in a health care environment. Theoretical instruction is complemented with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and reality-based understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a professional physical therapist assistant. Students will participate in planned clinical and laboratory experiences that will complement classroom learning and will stress health promotion as well as rehabilitation of the disease processes. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. graduate as an entry-level physical therapist assistant who demonstrates technical competence, makes sound clinical decisions, and provides safe and effective physical therapy in at least one inpatient and outpatient facility. 2. All physical therapist assistant graduates that choose to take their licensing exams and work as a PTA will pass the exams and be gainfully employed within 6 months of graduation. 3. demonstrate the ability to follow a plan of care developed by a physical therapist while assessing a patient's response to the treatment and contributing to the clinical decision-making process. 4. be competent in the technical skills per the PTA student skills check-offs. 5. Establish relationships with different patients and team members utilizing effective communication as well as awareness of culturally or socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. 6. graduate physical therapist assistants that demonstrate a commitment to professional growth by participating in activities that encourage lifelong learning. 7. Students should think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. 8. Use textbooks and scientific resources such as books, online databases, and journals to expand understanding of physical therapy practice and interventions.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES The most common potential entry-level job position title is physical therapist assistant. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 5 semesters (20 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 73 semester credit hours is required for graduation. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the Physical Therapist Assistant program:

· Anatomy and Physiology I and Anatomy and Physiology I lab · Anatomy and Physiology II and Anatomy and Physiology II lab · general Microbiology and general Microbiology lab

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the Physical Therapist Assistant program. A student who is dropped from the program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses, but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University, may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the Physical Therapist Assistant program in a future cycle. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 50 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name SC 245 Anatomy and Physiology II SC 245l Anatomy and Physiology II lab PT 101 PT 110 PT 115 PT 120 PT 130 Prerequisite SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245 Clock Credit Hours Hours 45 30 45 90 30 30 60 3.0 1.0 3.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 3.0

Introduction to Physical Therapy SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l Functional Kinesiology Pathophysiology for Physical Therapist Assistants Fundamentals of Physical Therapist Assistant Practice basic Patient Care SC 245, SC 245l, PT 101; Corequisites PT 115, PT 120 SC 245, SC 245l, PT 101; Corequisites PT 110, PT 120 SC 245, SC 245l, PT 101; Corequisites PT 110, PT 115 PT 110, PT 115, PT 120 Corequisites PT 140, PT 150

366

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 367

PT 140 PT 150 PT 210 PT 220 PT 230 PT 240 PT 250 PT 260 PT 270 PT 280

Therapeutic Modalities Therapeutic Exercise Clinical Practicum Preparation Orthopedic Patient Care Clinical Practicum I Patient Care for Special Populations neurological Patient Care Professional Issues Clinical Practicum II Clinical Practicum III

PT 110, PT 115 PT 120 Corequisites PT 130, PT 150 PT 110, PT 115, PT 120; Corequisities PT 130, PT 140 PT 150; Corequisites PT 220, PT 230 PT 130, PT 140, PT 150; Corequisities PT 210, PT 230 PT 130, PT 140, PT 150; Corequisites PT 210, PT 220 PT 210, PT 220, PT 230; Corequisite PT 250 PT 210, PT 220, PT 230; Corequisite PT 240 PT 230, PT 240, PT 250 PT 260 PT 270

60 45 15

3.0 2.0 1.0

*** Students enrolled in this program must take the following courses to fulfill the general education requirement in mathematics or natural science with a lab component: Course Course number name SC 145 Anatomy and Physiology I SC 145l Anatomy and Physiology I lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 Clock Credit Hours Hours 45 30 3.0 1.0

60 180 60 60 30 225 270

3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 5.0 6.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Pd 100 Pd 200 Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

REquIRED COuRSES IN GENERAL EDuCATION Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science With a lab Component *** 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use three semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

**

368

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 369

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGy (ASRT)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION A selective admission, limited enrollment program that prepares students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level positions as a radiologic technologist in a clinic or hospital setting. The program contains 76 semester hours; 22 general Education, 2 Personal development and 52 Program Core Specific courses. The courses are progressive with successive courses building on preceding one. The successful completion of each course in sequence with a gPA of 2.5 and higher, is required. Students will learn the theory and principles of radiation production, radiographic techniques, and the fundamentals of patient care through the combination of lectures, textbooks, slides, videos, hand-outs, practice in the on-campus lab, and actual clinical participation. Students completing the program will be eligible to take the national registry exam offered by the ARRT and the Florida State licensure exam. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Provide basic patient care and education concerning radiographic procedures. Understand radiographic terminology especially as it relates to radiographic procedures and reports. Ethical decision making. Understand the principles of radiation. Understand the structure and function of the human body in health and pathological states including how radiation is utilized in diagnosis and treatment of pathological conditions. Establish a basic knowledge of atoms, radiation, x-ray production, and photon interactions with matter. Understand and apply basic principles of radiation safety for radiographers, patients, and public. Understand the basic concepts of pharmacology including the basic techniques of administering diagnostic contrast agents and intravenous medications. be able to perform basic radiographic procedures including proper positioning to ensure diagnostic imaging. be able to produce, record, and analyze radiological images.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include radiologic technologist upon successful completion of the ARRT registry exam. Registered technologists have additional career opportunities in computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine (nM), ultra-sonography (US), mammography, angiography, and quality assurance. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 6 semesters (24 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 76 semester credit hours is required for graduation. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the Radiologic Technology program:

· Anatomy and Physiology I and Anatomy and Physiology I lab · Anatomy and Physiology II and Anatomy and Physiology II lab · general Microbiology and general Microbiology lab

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the Radiologic Technology program. A student who is dropped from the program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses, but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University, may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the Radiologic Technology program in a future cycle. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 52 semester credit hours, are required. Course number RT 100 RT 106 RT 110 RT 115 RT 115l RT 121 RT 131 Course name Introduction to Radiography Methods of Patient Care Principles of Radiography I Radiographic Procedures I Radiographic Procedures I lab Principles of Radiography II Radiographic Procedures II Prerequisite SC 245, SC 245l SC 245, SC 245l RT 100, RT 106 SC 245, SC 245l; Corequisite RT 115l Corequisite RT 115 RT 110 RT 100, RT 115; Corequisites RT 106, RT 131l Credit Hours 4.0 2.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 3.0

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Utilize various types of radiographic equipment including radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile, and tomographic equipment. 11. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society.

2.0

370

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 371

RT 131l RT 135 RT 146 RT 156 RT 230 RT 230l RT 255 RT 260 RT 266 RT 276 RT 286 RT 295 RT 296

Radiographic Procedures II lab Radiologic Clinical Education I Radiologic Clinical Education II Radiologic Clinical Education III Radiographic Procedures III Radiographic Procedures III l Radiologic Pathology Cross-Sectional Anatomy Radiologic Clinical Education IV Radiologic Clinical Education V Radiologic Clinical Education VI Radiography Review Radiologic Clinical Education VII

Corequisite RT 131 RT 115 RT 135 RT 146 RT 131; Corequisite RT 230l Corequisite RT 230 RT 121, RT 230 RT 100, RT 121 RT 156 RT 266 RT 276 All core courses except RT 296 RT 286

1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0

#

Students enrolled in this program must take the following courses to fulfill the General Education requirements in Natural Science With a Lab Component and in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus for a total of 22 semester credit hours in General Education. Course name Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite SC 245l Corequisite SC 245 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

Course number SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * However, the ASRT program requires 22 semester credit hours in general Education. # 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science With a lab Component # 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** # * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

**

372

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 373

(Offered in the State of Ohio only)

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN SuRGICAL TECHNOLOGy (ASST) ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN SCIENCE IN SuRGICAL TECHNOLOGy (AASST)

All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of d (60%) or better to be continued in the Surgical Technology program. A student who is dropped from the program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses, but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University, may transfer to another Herzing degree program and/or may reapply to the Surgical Technology program in a future cycle. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 39 semester credit hours, are required. Course number MO 144 SC 245 SC 245l ST 101 ST 110 ST 210 ST 220 ST 230 ST 240 ST 251 ST 261 ST 270 Course name Medical Terminology Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab Introduction to Surgical Technology Surgical Pharmacology Surgical Principles Practice Surgical Procedures I Surgical Patient Care Surgical Procedures II Clinical Practicum I Clinical Practicum II Surgical Technology Examination Preparation Prerequisite none SC 145, SC 145l; Corequisite 245l SC 145l; Corequisite 245 MO 144, SC 245, SC 245l Corequisite ST 101 ST 101 ST 101, SC 165, SC 165l ST 101 ST 220 ST 210, ST 230, ST 240 ST 251 ST 251 Credit Hours 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 6.0 3.0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Associate of Applied Science degree in Surgical Technology program is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to function in the operating room OR as an important member of the surgical team along with surgeons, nurses, and other medical personnel to ensure proper surgical care before, during, and after a surgical procedure. Each student will be prepared for entry-level surgical technology positions in the operating room or surgical setting. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to pass instruments correctly. 2. Establish a sterile environment in the operating room. 3. gown and glove the surgical team members effectively. 4. Understand the role and responsibility of a surgical technologist. 5. Communicate and interact effectively with the surgical team. 6. Think critically, both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use basic computer applications; and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job titles include surgical technologist, lead surgical technologist, travel surgical technologist, sterile processing technician, or material manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average program length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4.5 semesters (18 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 65 semester credit hours is required for graduation. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C+ (76%) or better for a student to be continued in the Surgical Technology program:

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in associate degrees must complete a minimum of 24 semester credit hours in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of the catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition or literature 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** 7 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics or natural Science With lab***

· Anatomy and Physiology I and Anatomy and Physiology I lab · Anatomy and Physiology II and Anatomy and Physiology II lab · general Microbiology and general Microbiology lab

374 HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 375

*

Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, science, or logic.

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN THERAPEuTIC MASSAGE (ASTMNE)

(Offered in the State of Nebraska only) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program provides instruction in anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, therapeutic massage theory and practice, hydrotherapy, and the appropriate health and safety issues that are required of a Massage Therapist. The program prepares students to write national Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and bodywork (nCTMb) required for licensure as a licensed Massage Therapist in the State of nebraska. The program also provides the graduate with an exposure to board general education topics as part of the curriculum. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES graduates will demonstrate competency in the following areas: 1. A knowledge and understanding of human anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology in order to understand the principles and benefits of massage, to effectively discuss massage issues with clients, and to communicate client health issues with other health care professionals when required. 2. An understanding of clinical pathology and recognition of conditions, indications, and contraindications for massage applications in order to provide safe and beneficial service to the client. 3. The theory and application of massage therapy and bodywork in order to apply appropriate methodologies in a safe and beneficial manner. 4. The ability to apply ethical and business practices and professional standards in a therapeutic massage environment. 5. Think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis; write and speak effectively; use computer applications; understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS After passing national Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and bodywork, graduates may seek employment as entry-level licensed Massage Therapists. The graduate will be qualified for entry-level work in spas, health clubs, gyms, cruise ships, and medical offices, or could become self-employed by going into private practice. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 4 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 71 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

**

*** Students must complete the following courses to satisfy the mathematics or natural science with lab requirement in this program. Course Course number name SC 145 SC 145l SC 165 SC 165l Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab general Microbiology general Microbiology lab Prerequisite Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 Corequisite SC 165l Corequisite SC 165 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 2.0 1.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of two semester credit hours is required. Course Course number name Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

376

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 377

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 45 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Tn 110 Anatomy and Physiology for the Massage Therapist I Tn 111 Anatomy and Physiology for the Massage Therapist II Tn 120 Massage Theory and Practice I Tn 121 Massage Theory and Practice II Tn 130 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid Tn 210 Pathology for the Massage Therapist Tn 220 business Principles and Health Service Management Tn 231 Kinesiology: Upper body Tn 232 Kinesiology: lower body Tn 241 Massage Therapy Clinic I Tn 242 Massage Therapy Clinic II Tn 243 Massage Therapy Clinic III Tn 250 Eastern Wellness Tn 260 Hydrotherapy ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours is required. Course Course number name Tn 141 Tn 142 Tn 143 Tn 144 Special Topic-- Integrative Reflexology Special Topic--Reiki Special Topic--The Magic of Hot Stone Massage Special Topic--neuromuscular Therapy: Headaches, Types, Triggers, and Treatment Special Topic--Shiatsu Prerequisite Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Clock Hours 15 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 Prerequisite none Tn 110 none Tn 120 none Tn 111 none Tn 111, Tn 121 Tn 111, Tn 121 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Clock Hours 60 60 60 60 7.5 60 60 60 60 67.5 67.5 67.5 60 60 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 0.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 1.5 1.5 1.5 4.0 4.0

NON-CREDIT PROJECTS All projects are required. Course Course number name Tn 091 Pathology Care Plan Project Tn 092 Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan I Tn 093 Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan II Corequisite Tn 094 Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan III Tn 095 Eastern Wellness Project Tn 096 Hydrotherapy Project

Prerequisite Corequisite Tn 210 Corequisite Tn 241 Tn 242 Corequisite Tn 243 Corequisite Tn 250 Corequisite Tn 260

Clock Hours 40 8 8 8 12 40

Credit Hours 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

GENERAL EDuCATION REquIREMENTS Students enrolled in Associate degrees must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours (315 clock hours) in general education distributed among the following disciplines. Refer to the general Education section of this catalog for Herzing University courses that would satisfy these requirements. * 1 Semester Credit Hour in Information literacy 3 Semester Credit Hours in English Composition 3 Semester Credit Hours in Speech 4 Semester Credit Hours in Computer Applications 4 Semester Credit Hours in Mathematics (College Algebra or Above) 3 Semester Credit Hours in Social or behavioral Science 3 Semester Credit Hours in Science or Humanities With a Critical Thinking Focus ** * Transfer students may use 3 semester credit hour courses transferred from other colleges to satisfy these discipline requirements. Any resulting deficiency in the total of 21 semester credit hours required in general education may be made up with general education electives from any of the listed disciplines. A course with a critical thinking focus would be a course that addresses the theories and application of critical analysis with an emphasis on developing sequential reasoning skills. Examples may be courses in critical thinking, philosophy, logic, or science.

**

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 15 15 1.0 1.0 both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

Tn 145

378

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 379

PROGRAMS OF STuDy

Diploma and Certificate Programs

DIPLOMA IN BOOKKEEPING AND PAyROLL ACCOuNTING (DBPA)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The diploma in bookkeeping and Payroll Accounting provides students with an introductory understanding of general and payroll accounting practices and the skills needed to set-up and maintain basic accounting and payroll records in typical business settings. The program is offered in the two formats below. Students may select the format that best fits their educational needs and circumstances. neither format is available at all campuses for all courses. Check with your local campus for availability. · TraditionalClassroomFormat. · OnlineFormat. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: 1. Read and understand financial statements and accounts used in business decision making. 2. Maintain basic manual and computerized accounting records. 3. Create and maintain computerized spreadsheets to assist business managers in decision making.

Orlando

4. Create and maintain payroll records in common business settings. 5. Produce financial reports, both manually and using accounting database programs. POTENTIAL JOB TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include accounting technician, bookkeeping assistant, and accounting clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 2 semesters (8 months), but the program can be completed in 1½ semesters (6 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 24 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

New Orleans

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 381

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 22 semester credit hours, are required. Course number AC 103 AC 110 AC 205 IS 102 IS 160 MA 175 Course name Accounting I Payroll Accounting Accounting II Computers and Application Software Spreadsheets business Math Prerequisite IS 102 AC 103 AC 103 none IS 102 none Credit Hours 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.0

DIPLOMA IN CISCO NETWORKING (DCN) CERTIFICATE IN CISCO NETWORKING (CCN)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM OBJECTIvE This program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge to install, configure, manage, and maintain computer systems; it also provides students with the skills to configure, manage and maintain, and secure, Cisco routers and Switches. Students will also be prepared to take the CCnA examination and the A+ certification examination. Upon completion of this program students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot PC computer hardware. 2. demonstrate the ability to configure, manage, and secure Cisco routers and switches. Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential job position titles include network Consultant, network Administrator, Systems director, network Engineer, and network Support Engineer. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 1 semester. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 16 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 16 semester credit hours, are required. Course Course number name Prerequisite IS 185 Computer Architecture* and Troubleshooting none IS 186 IS 284 IS 286 Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II* Routers and Switches I* Routers and Switches II* IS 185 IS 185 IS 284

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none

Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

note: *For ease of scheduling, 4-credit courses may be divided into two 2-credit courses with theory being covered in an online "W" (web) section and hands-on practice in an "l" (lab section (i.e., IS 185W and IS 185l). Note: Students who passed the A+ Essentials exam or already have an A+ certification (Comptia's 2006 A+ exam) have the option of bypassing the IS 185 and IS 186 courses.

382

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 383

CERTIFICATE IN COMPuTED TOMOGRAPHy (CCT)

(Pending State Approval) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The computed tomography imaging modality uses x-radiation and computers to acquire sectional images of the human body. Modern CT scanners allow images to be reconstructed into multiple planes giving physicians a more advanced way to diagnose injuries and disease than with conventional radiography. CT technologists use a detailed understanding of human anatomy, imaging protocols, and critical thinking skills to produce high-quality images for medical interpretation and diagnosis by the radiologist. CT technologists must be able to work independently in the course of their practice. A clear understanding of the physical principles governing CT image acquisition and of cross-sectional anatomy is necessary to function adeptly as a technologist. The CT technologist must exhibit excellent patient care skills and a thorough understanding of contrast administration safety at all times. CT technologists require advanced training and education and the ability to use highly specialized equipment in the course of their practice. The program is designed to cover the Content Specifications for the Advanced Registry in Computed Tomography offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). The program offers groundbased instruction by professors who are registered and experienced in the use of CT. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: 1. Perform CT scans using proper protocol selection and patient positioning. 2. Utilize venipuncture skills to obtain patient IV access for contrast administration. 3. Use computer-controlled power injection equipment. 4. Protect patients and personnel utilizing radiation safety procedures. 5. Provide excellent patient care. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position title is CT Technologist. CT technologists are frequently employed in hospitals, outpatient imaging centers, and urology offices. There are also opportunities in applications training/teaching, and the medical imaging industry. SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REquIREMENTS The Certificate in Computed Tomography Advanced Imaging Certificate Program is designed for technologists who are already registered in Radiography RT(R), Radiation Therapy RT(T), nuclear Medicine RT(nM) OR nMTCb, Ultrasound RT(US), or RdMS. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is two semesters (16 weeks).

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 16 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 16 semester credit hours, are required. Course number RT 260 RT 211 RT 216 RT 222 RT 232 Course name Cross-Sectional Anatomy Computed Tomography Theory I Computed Tomography Clinical Practice I Computed Tomography Theory II Computed Tomography Clinical Practice II Prerequisite RT 100, RT 121 none RT 260 RT 211 RT 260, RT 216 Credit Hours 2.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 4.0

384

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 385

(Offered in the State of Minnesota only)

DIPLOMA IN DENTAL ASSISTING (DDAM)

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 45 semester credit hours, are required Course number dS 101 dS 102 dS 105 dS 107 dS 108 dS 110 dS 111 Course name Chairside Assisting I Pre-Clinical dental Assisting Communications for the dental Assistant dental Materials dental Science Expanded Functions I Expanded Functions II Prerequisite none none none none none none dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 Clock Hours 69 63 15 70 60 75 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 4.0 4.0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the dental assistant program is to train the student to become a productive member of the dental health team. This includes preparing the student for a variety of duties performed by the dental assistant in the contemporary dental office, including chairside assisting, laboratory procedures, administrative duties and expanded functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a dental Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Identify and prepare instruments, materials and treatment rooms for a variety of dental procedures as well as perform chair-side techniques utilizing current concepts of dental assisting. 2. demonstrate the ability to perform expanded functions and expose, process and evaluate radiographs with knowledge appropriate for an entry-level position as a registered dental assistant. 3. demonstrate the knowledge to perform laboratory procedures and operate dental equipment utilized in a laboratory setting. 4. demonstrate effective communication skills utilizing dental terminology, as it is related to patient care, and apply the knowledge required to maintain records and handle general business office procedures. 5. demonstrate the knowledge of concepts of first aid and proper management techniques as applied to medical emergencies in the dental practice. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include chairside dental assistant, dental front desk, and dental office, reception. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 3.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 47 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

90

4.0

dS 116

Radiology

100 98 60

5.0 4.0 3.0

dS 151 dS 206 dS 207

Chairside Assisting II dental Management dental Ethics and Jurisprudence Internship, Work Experience

dS 294

dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 30 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 and CPR 315

2.0

7.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of two semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none none none Clock Hours 15 15 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

386

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 387

(Offered in the State of Ohio only)

DIPLOMA IN DENTAL ASSISTING (DDAOH)

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 41 semester credit hours, are required Course number dS 101 dS 102 dS 107 dS 108 dS 110 dS 111 Course name Chairside Assisting I Pre-Clinical dental Assisting dental Materials dental Science Expanded Functions I Expanded Functions II Prerequisite none none none none dS 101 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110, CPR dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 Clock Hours 69 63 70 60 75 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the dental assistant program is to train the student to become a productive member of the dental health team. This includes preparing the student for a variety of duties performed by the dental assistant in the contemporary dental office, including chairside assisting, laboratory procedures, administrative duties and expanded functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a dental Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. Identify and prepare instruments, materials and treatment rooms for a variety of dental procedures as well as perform chairside techniques utilizing current concepts of dental assisting. 2. demonstrate the ability to perform expanded functions and expose, process and evaluate radiographs with knowledge appropriate for an entry-level position as a registered dental assistant. 3. demonstrate the knowledge to perform laboratory procedures and operate dental equipment utilized in a laboratory setting. 4. demonstrate effective communication skills utilizing dental terminology, as it is related to patient care, and apply the knowledge required to maintain records and handle general business office procedures. 5. demonstrate the knowledge of concepts of first aid and proper management techniques as applied to medical emergencies in the dental practice. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include chairside dental assistant, dental front desk, and dental office, reception. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 3 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 43 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

90

4.0

dS 116

Radiology

100 98 60

5.0 4.0 3.0

dS 151 dS 206 dS 207

Chairside Assisting II dental Management dental Ethics and Jurisprudence Internship, Work Experience

dS 295

dS 101, dS 102, dS 108, dS 110 30 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 and CPR 180

2.0

4.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of two semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Prerequisite none none none Clock Hours 15 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0

388

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 389

DIPLOMA IN ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGy (DET)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to test, install, repair, configure, manage, and maintain a wide range of electronic devices, systems, and services. The program focuses on fundamental skills that ground their ability to broaden their knowledge of electronics in a competitive employment environment. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to utilize a complete range of electrical, electronic equipment to apply industry standard tests and measurements to build, test, and troubleshoot electrical circuits and systems. demonstrate the ability to describe and apply fundamental concepts of measurement and electronic theory to solve computer, communication, and electronic system problems. demonstrate the ability to clearly communicate concise and reasoned lab reports delineating material needs and costs in the field of electronics. demonstrate the ability to pass industry recognized certification examinations in the computer, communications, and electronics industries.

ET 107 ET 119 ET 208 ET 209 ET 232 ET 236 ET 237 ET 238 IS 102 IS 112 IS 185

AC Electrical Components Electronics Fabrication laboratory Transistor and Microchip Technology Advanced Transistor and Microchip Technology digital Electronics Modulation and Propagation for Communications Applied Telecommunications and Fiber Optics Industrial Controls and Motors Computers and Application Software Computer networks Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting

ET 106 none ET 106 ET 208 ET 209 ET 209 ET 236 ET 209 or ET 272 none IS 102 IS 102

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

2.

3. 4.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include robotics and industrial control technician, TV and radio broadcast engineer, computer service technician, biomedical electronics technician, electronics technician, field technician, office automation technician, R&d technician, technical representative, network technician, bench technician, service manager, technical support administrator, plant maintenance manager. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 3 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 50 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 48 semester credit hours, are required. Course number ET 106 Course name basic dC Electricity Prerequisite MA 090 Credit Hours 4.0

Prerequisite none none none none

390

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 391

CERTIFICATE IN EMERGENCy MEDICAL TECHNICIAN-- BASIC (CEMTB)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Emergency Medical Technician--basic is trained in basic life-support procedures. The EMT-b performs limited invasive (advanced) skills. The course emphasizes the development of student skills in patient assessment and examination, the recognition of signs and symptoms of illness or injury, and the use of proper procedures when rendering basic emergency care. general topics covered include human anatomy and physiology, bleeding and shock, emergency childbirth, airway management, splinting of fractures and dislocations, medical emergencies, and movement of patients. The intent of the program is to provide the student with the knowledge and skills to assess and manage life-threatening injury and illness and provide transport to medical facilities. Clinical experience is an integral part of the program. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. demonstrate knowledge of the health care delivery system and incorporate the role of the emergency medical technician into the system. Provide accurate patient assessments in chronic and acute settings. Identify the needs of diverse populations in regard to socioeconomic, cultural, and lifespan issues. Provide basic life support for emergencies including, but not limited to, trauma, cardiac, and other medical emergencies. Meet the academic requirements to be eligible to apply and sit for the EMT-basic licensure exam administered by the national Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians.

PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 11 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 10 semester credit hours, are required. Course number EM 116 EM 117 Course name EMT basic Theory and lab EMT basic Clinical Prerequisite none; Corequisite EM 117 Corequisite EM 116 Credit Hours 9.0 1.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of one semester credit hours is required. Course number Pd 100 Course name Student Success Skills Prerequisite none Credit Hours 1.0

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES graduates will be eligible to write the national Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians and will be prepared for entrance into many challenging areas of hospital emergency departments, fire departments, and ambulance services. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is one semester (four months).

392

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 393

DIPLOMA IN EMERGENCy MEDICAL TECHNICIAN-- PARAMEDIC (DEMTP)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Emergency Medical Technician--Paramedic program will cover the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic within an EMS system applying the basic concepts of development, pathophysiology, and pharmacology to assess and manage patients with emergency medical needs. The student will learn how to maintain a patient's airway, oxygenate, and ventilate a patient and be able to take a proper history and perform a comprehensive physical exam. Students will be able to properly administer medications and communicate effectively with other health care providers including physicians, nurses, and other allied health personnel. Students will also be able to integrate pathophysiology principles, assessment findings, and critical thinking skills to formulate a field impression and implement a treatment plan for trauma and medical patients of all ages. SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS The following must be completed before admission is final: · Valid CPR certification · Completed criminal, credit background check · Completed immunization record · Signed Essential Function Form · Verifiable liability and accident insurance PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. demonstrate knowledge of the health care delivery system and incorporate the role of the emergency medical technician into the system. Provide accurate patient assessments in chronic and acute settings. Recognize the needs of diverse populations in regard to socioeconomic, cultural, and lifespan issues. Provide basic life support for emergencies including, but not limited to, trauma, cardiac, and other medical emergencies. Apply ethical and legal concepts to the practice of the EMT-Paramedic. Promote health and wellness that facilitate positive growth and development. describe the considerations that should be given to using escorts, adverse environmental conditions, using lights and siren, proceeding through intersections, and parking at an emergency scene.

8. 9.

describe the problems that a paramedic might encounter in a hostile situation and the techniques used to manage the situation. demonstrate the use of protective equipment appropriate to the environment and scene.

10. Meet the requirements and preparation to be eligible to apply and sit for the EMT-Paramedic licensure exam administered by the national Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles: paramedic. graduates will be eligible to write the national Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians and will be prepared for entrance into many challenging areas of hospital emergency departments, fire departments, and ambulance services. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 3 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 45 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 44 semester credit hours, are required. Course number EM 189 EM 189l EM 191 EM 192 EM 193 EM 194 EM 195 EM 196 Course name Paramedic Anatomy and Physiology Paramedic Anatomy and Physiology lab Paramedic Preparation Paramedic Operations Patient Assessment and Management Paramedic general Pharmacology Advanced Trauma Management Cardiovascular Electrophysiology Prerequisite Corequisite EM 189l Corequisite EM 189 Corequisites EM 189, EM 189l Corequisites EM 189, EM 189l EM 189, EM 189l, EM 191, EM 192; Corequisite EM 194 Corequisite EM 193 EM 194 EM 195; Corequisite EM 203 Credit Hours 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 6.0 3.0

394

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 395

EM 197 EM 200 EM 203 EM 204 EM 205 EM 206 EM 207

Medical Patient Management I Medical Patient Management II Cardiovascular Patient Management Transition to Paramedic Practice Paramedic Terminal Competencies Paramedic Field Preceptorship Paramedic Team leadership Preceptorship

EM 195, EM 196 EM 195, EM 197 Corequisite EM 196 EM 200, EM 203 EM 200, EM 203 EM 200, EM 203 EM 200, EM 203

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 6.0 1.0

(Pending State Approval)

CERTIFICATE IN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (CMRI)

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES All courses, 1 semester credit hour, is required. Course number Pd 100 Course name Student Success Skills Prerequisite none Credit Hours 1.0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The magnetic resonance imaging modality uses extremely strong magnetic fields combined with oscillating radio frequency energy to produce highly-detailed, sectional images of the human body. MRI technologists use a detailed understanding of human anatomy, imaging protocols, and critical thinking skills to produce high-quality images for medical interpretation and diagnosis by the radiologist. MRI technologists must be able to work independently in the course of their practice. A clear understanding of the physical principles governing MRI and of cross-sectional anatomy is necessary to function adeptly as a technologist. The MRI technologist must exhibit excellent patient care skills and a thorough understanding of high-strength magnetic field safety at all times. MRI technologists require advanced training and education and the ability to use highly specialized equipment in the course of their practice. The program is designed to cover the Content Specifications for the Advanced Registry in Magnetic Resonance Imaging offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). The program offers ground-based instruction by professors who are registered and have experience in the MRI field. SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REquIREMENTS The Certificate in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Program is designed for technologists who are already registered in Radiography RT(R), Radiation Therapy RT(T), nuclear Medicine RT(nM) or nMTCb, OR Ultrasound RT(US) or RdMS. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: 1. Perform MRI scans using proper coil selection, protocol, and patient positioning. 2. Utilize venipuncture skills to obtain patient IV access for contrast administration. 3. 4. 5. Use computer-controlled power injection equipment. Protect patients and personnel utilizing magnetic safety procedures. Provide excellent patient care.

POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position title is MRI Technologist. MRI technologists are frequently employed in hospitals, outpatient imaging centers, and orthopedic offices. There are also opportunities in applications training/teaching, and the medical imaging industry.

396

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 397

PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 2 semesters (8 months). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 16 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 16 semester credit hours, are required. Course number RT 260 RT 212 RT 217 RT 223 RT 233 Course name Cross-Sectional Anatomy Magnetic Resonance Imaging Theory I Magnetic Resonance Clinical Practice I Magnetic Resonance Imaging Theory II Magnetic Resonance Clinical Practice II Prerequisite RT 100, RT 121 none RT 260 RT 212 RT 260, RT 217 Credit Hours 2.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 4.0

DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL ASSISTING (DMA)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The introduction of students to the overall operation of the physician's office is the basic objective of this program. Students are trained to assist the physician in the examination room, to perform routine laboratory procedures and to handle financial records, correspondence, insurance forms and other administrative functions. Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully gain entry-level employment as a Medical Assistant. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to perform clinical assisting and laboratory procedures. 2. demonstrate the ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical facilities. 3. Apply legal concepts to the medical practice. 4. Communicate professionally with patients, co-workers and providers. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include Medical Office Assistant, Medical business Office, Medical Receptionist, Medical laboratory Assistant, and Phlebotomist. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 3.0 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 48 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 46 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 102 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 Course name Computers and Applications Software Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Prerequisite none none none none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none Credit Hours 4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 399

398

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

MS 109 MS 121 MS 131 MS 141 MS 207 MS 295 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l

Clinical Assisting I Clinical Assisting II Clinical laboratory Procedures I Clinical laboratory Procedures II Program Review Externship Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab

SC 245, MO 144, MO 146; Pd 216* MS 109; Pd 216* SC 245, MO 144, MO 146, Pd 216* MS 131, Pd 216* All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 211 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, Corequisite SC 245

3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL BILLING AND INSuRANCE CODING (DMBIC)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The goal of the medical billing and insurance program is to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the content of the medical record as well as extensive training in anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and medical terminology. This program will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding to analyze medical records and assign codes to classify diagnoses and procedures while applying the principles of professional and ethical conduct. The program will prepare the student for an entry-level position as a medical coder in a hospital, clinic, physician's office, or other health care facility. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical facilities.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 211. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 211 Pd 216* Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MA Externship Preparation MA Assisting Proctor Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0

2. Read and understand medical documentation, identify diagnoses and procedures and insure that documentation supports the diagnosis and procedures performed. 3. Apply knowledge of medical terminology, disease process, anatomy and physiology, and pharmacology to analyze medical records and assign codes. 4. Apply knowledge of ICd and CPT format, instructional notations, conventions, in-patient and out-patient guidelines to assign codes and to classify diagnoses and procedures. 5. Apply knowledge of payor billing and reimbursement, the prospective payment system, and fraud and abuse issues. 6. Select appropriate diagnosis and procedure codes for billing purposes. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: Medical Coding Specialist, Health Information Specialist, Abstractor, and Medical Clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 3 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 45 semester credit hours is required for graduation.

*Note: PD 216 is only for students taking the program online.

400

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 401

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 43 semester credit hours, are required Course Course number name Prerequisite IS 102 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 MO 161 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l MC 171 MC 172 MC 173 MC 174 MC 207 MC 294 Computers and Application Software Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab basic diagnosis Coding basic Procedure Coding Intermediate diagnosis Coding Intermediate Procedure Coding Program Review Internship none none none none none

DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (DMOA)

Credit Hours 4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 4.0 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The dMOA Program is designed to prepare students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge for entry-level office positions in the health care industry. Career opportunities may be in areas such as the medical office, clinic, hospitals, long term care facilities, and other health care office settings. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of their program, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to use knowledge attained to create clerical documents used in medical, health care facilities. 2. Apply legal concepts to medical practice. 3. Communicate professionally with patients, co-workers, and providers. 4. demonstrate knowledge of billing and reimbursement. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential entry-level job position titles include: Medical Office Assistant, Health Information Administrator, Health Information Technician, and billing Clerk. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 2.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 39 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 36 semester credit hours, are required. Course number En 104 IS 102 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 IS 124 MO 110 MO 113 MO 129 MO 144 MO 146 Course name English Composition I Computers and Applications Software database Applications Keyboarding Medical business Operations Medical Office Procedures Medical Terminology Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Prerequisite none none IS 102 none none none none Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 4.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 2.0

Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Corequisites SC 245, SC 245l none Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, Corequisite SC 245 MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MO 144 or HC 115, MO 146, SC 245, SC 245l MC 171 MC 172 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0 All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 212

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 2 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 212. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 212 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MbIC Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none

402

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 403

MO 161 MO 294 SC 145 SC 145l SC 245 SC 245l

Medical billing and Insurance Procedures Internship, Work Experience Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I lab Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II lab

none All didactic course work with a gPA of 2.0, Pd 215 Corequisite SC 145l Corequisite SC 145 SC 145, Corequisite SC 245l SC 145, Corequisite SC 245

3.0 4.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 1.0

DIPLOMA IN MICROSOFT NETWORKING (DMN) CERTIFICATE IN MICROSOFT NETWORKING (CMN)

(Offered in the State of Ohio only) PROGRAM OBJECTIvE This program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge to install, configure, manage, and maintain computer network systems and to write the Microsoft Certified IT Professional MCITP Server Administrator and A+ certification examinations. Upon completion of this program students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot PC computer hardware.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours is required in addition to Pd 215. Course number Pd 100 Pd 120 Pd 155 Pd 200 Pd 215 Course name Student Success Skills Personal Financial Management Customer Services Career development Seminar MOA Internship Preparation Prerequisite none none none none none Credit Hours 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0

2. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot functional network operating systems, infrastructure services, equipment (including wireless), security, and protocols. 3. demonstrate the ability to administer client-server applications. 4. demonstrate knowledge of security protocols and methodologies. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential job position titles include network Consultant, network Administrator, Systems director, network Engineer, and network Support Engineer. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is one and one half semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 24 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 24 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 185 IS 186 nT 160 Course name Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting*+ Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II*+ network Operating Systems * Prerequisite none IS 185 IS 185 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0

404

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 405

nT 170 nT 200 nT 210

Server Operating Systems* network Infrastructure Administration* directory Services Administration

nT 160 nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170)

4.0 4.0 4.0

DIPLOMA IN NETWORK SySTEMS (DNS)

PROGRAM OBJECTIvES This program provides students with the necessary skills and academic knowledge to install, configure, manage, and maintain computer network systems and to write the Microsoft Certified IT Professional MCITP Server Administrator, CCnA and A+ certification examinations. Upon completion of this program students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot PC computer hardware. 2. demonstrate the ability to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot functional network operating systems, infrastructure services, equipment (including wireless), security, and protocols. 3. demonstrate the ability to administer client-server applications. 4. demonstrate knowledge of security protocols and methodologies. POTENTIAL JOB POSITION TITLES Potential job position titles include network Consultant, network Administrator, Systems director, network Engineer, and network Support Engineer. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 2 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 32 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 32 semester credit hours, are required. Course number IS 185 IS 186 IS 284 IS 286 nT 160 nT 170 Course name Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting*+ Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II*+ Routers and Switches I* Routers and Switches II* network Operating Systems* Server Operating Systems* Prerequisite IS 102 4.0 IS 185 IS 185 IS 284 IS 185 nT 160 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 Credit Hours

Notes: * For ease of scheduling, 4-credit courses may be divided into two 2-credit courses with theory being covered in an online "W" (web) section and hands-on practice in an "L" (lab) section (i.e., IS 185W and IS 185L). + Students who passed the A+ Essentials exam or already have an A+ certification (Comptia's 2006 A+ exam) have the option of bypassing the IS 185 and IS 186 courses.

406

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 407

nT 200 nT 210

network Infrastructure Administration* directory Services Administration

nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170) nT 180 (or nT 160 and nT 170)

4.0 4.0

DIPLOMA IN PRACTICAL NuRSING--ALABAMA (DPNAL)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The practical nurse program provides academic, theoretical and clinical instruction in medical, surgical, obstetric, pediatric, geriatric and mental health nursing. The program will introduce the basic elements of the heath care delivery system and the multidisciplines that are incorporated into the system. Concepts of disease and wellness will be presented through out the program and will bridge across the human life span. legal and ethical issues with an emphasis on confidentiality and effective communication skills will be included. The student will acquire skills in asepsis, measurement of vital signs, CPR and basic first aid and will understand the concepts of medical asepsis, infection control and Universal Precautions applicable to all areas of health care. The importance of safe practice and the use of proper body mechanics are stressed. Mental health concepts, administration of medications, body structure and function, nutrition and personal, family and community concepts are studied. Clinical experience is an integral part of the program. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students will be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. demonstrate knowledge of the health care delivery system and incorporate the role of the practical nurse into the system. Provide accurate patient assessments in chronic and acute settings. Provide appropriate health care interventions as a member of a treatment team Function as a practical nurse in a variety of health care facilities to include hospitals, longterm care agencies, physician's offices, clinics, and other community organizations. Employ critical thinking and communication skills necessary to act as a patient, family and community health care provider, and educator. Understand and utilize practical nursing as it relates to medical and technological equipment. Apply ethical and legal concepts to the practice of practical nursing. Recognize the needs of diverse populations in regard to socioeconomic, cultural, and lifespan issues. Promote health and wellness that facilitate positive growth and development.

Notes: * For ease of scheduling, 4-credit courses may be divided into two 2-credit courses with theory being covered in an online "W" (web) section and hands-on practice in an "L" (lab) section (i.e., IS 185W and IS 185L). + Students who passed the A+ Essentials exam or already have an A+ certification (Comptia's 2006 A+ exam) have the option of bypassing the IS 185 and IS 186 courses.

10. Meet the requirements for admission to the state board examinations for licensure in the United States. SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school

408

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 409

or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills-TEAS). The best qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program. GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C+" (76%) for a student to be continued in the nursing program. ·AnatomyandPhysiologywithLab(orBodyStructureandFunctionwithLab) ·Microbiology(ifrequired) ·CollegeMath(ifrequired) ·Chemistry(BSNOnly) All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of "d" or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS graduates will be eligible to write the national Council licensing Examination for Practical nurses (nClEX-Pn) and will be prepared for entrance into many challenging areas of nursing to include long-term care facilities, clinics, doctor's offices, home health care agencies, and acute care hospitals. PROGRAM LENGTH The length of the program is 12 months. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 52 credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 45 semester credit hours, are required. Course number MA 108 Pn 105 Course name Mathematics for nursing Anatomy and Physiology I for nursing Prerequisite none Corequisite Pn 105l Clock Hours 60 60 Credit Hours 4.0 4.0

Pn 105l Pn 108 Pn 109 Pn 111 Pn 112 Pn 212 Pn 213 Pn 222 Pn 223 Pn 228 Pn 229 Pn 246 Pn 247 Pn 255

Anatomy and Physiology I for nursing lab Foundations of nursing for the lPn Foundations of nursing Clinical Patient Assessment Pharmacology Medical Surgical nursing Medical Surgical nursing Clinical Maternal/Child nursing Maternal/Child nursing Clinical Adult/Child nursing Adult/Child nursing Clinical Mental Health/geriatric nursing Mental Health/geriatric nursing Clinical nClEX-Pn Review (final class)

Corequisite Pn 105

15

1.0 6.0 1.0 1.5 1.5 6.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 4.0

Pn 105, Pn 111, Pn 112 135 Corequisite Pn 108 45 Corequisite Pn 105 45 MA 108 45 Pn 108, Pn 109 90 Pn 109, Corequisite Pn 212 90 Pn 212, Pn 213 45 Pn 213, Corequisite Pn 222 45 Pn 212, Pn 213 60 Pn 213, Corequisite Pn 228 135 Pn 212, Pn 213 30 Pn 213, Corequisite Pn 246 45 Senior level 60

REquIRED GENERAL EDuCATION COuRSES both courses, 5 semester credit hours, are required. Course number En 104 IS 106 Course name English Composition I Computer Applications ­ Word Processing, Spreadsheets, and E-mail Prerequisite none Clock Hours 45 Credit Hours 3.0

none

37.5

2.0

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

410

HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 411

DIPLOMA IN PRACTICAL NuRSING--WISCONSIN (DPNWI)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This Practical nursing Program is approved by the Wisconsin State board of nursing to prepare students to take the national Council licensing Examination for Practical nurses (nClEX-Pn) and to begin a nursing career. Students are given a basic foundation of general education including courses in communications and the sciences and are prepared with the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to function as a practical nurse. Theoretical instruction is complimented with clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in order to provide a broad, holistic, and realitybased understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a practical nurse. Students will participate in planned clinical and laboratory experiences that will complement classroom learning and will stress health promotion as well as disease processes. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES Upon completion of this program students will be able to: 1. demonstrate nursing professional behaviors related to legal, ethical, political and scope of practice issues as defined by the state regulatory board. 2. Communicate accurately, effectively and in a timely manner with clients, significant others, and members of the health care team. 3. Assist with assessing clients' needs based on data from a variety of sources including physical findings, past medical history, client interviews and members of the health care team. 4. Collaborate with members of the health care team to plan appropriate interventions using evidenced-based protocols. 5. Provide client care for a diverse population using therapeutic interventions in a safe, caring manner in a variety of health care settings. 6. Manage client care under the direction of a registered nurse or other members of the health care team and delegate tasks to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) as needed. 7. Utilize appropriate informational technology to plan, provide, and communicate nursing care. 8. develop proficiencies in basic nursing skills. SPECIAL ADMISSION REquIREMENTS This nursing program is selective admissions program which means not everyone who applies is accepted. The selection is based on multiple factors including high school or college grade point average and the score on the applicable nursing admissions test (normally the national Test of Essential Academic Skills-TEAS). The best qualified applicants are offered admission into the program. Students enrolled in other Herzing degree programs may apply to be placed on an alternates list and may be offered a position in the nursing program if a nursing student drops or does not meet the requirements for continuation in the nursing program.

GENERAL EDuCATION PREREquISITES The following general education prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C+" (76%) for a student to be continued in the nursing program. · Anatomy and Physiology with Lab (or Body Structure and Function with lab) ·Microbiology(ifrequired) ·CollegeMath(ifrequired) ·Chemistry(BSNOnly) All other general education courses must be passed with a grade of "d" or better to be continued in the nursing program. A student who is dropped from the nursing program for failing to achieve the minimum grade specified in the general education courses but who otherwise meets the academic standards of the University may transfer to another Herzing degree program and, or may reapply to the nursing program in a future cycle. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS graduates will be eligible to take the national Council licensing Examination for Practical nurses and will be prepared for entrance into many challenging areas of nursing to include long-term care facilities, clinics, doctor's offices, home health agencies and hospitals. PROGRAM LENGTH The length of the program is 10 months (2.5 semesters). PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 36 semester credit hours is required for graduation. REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 34 semester credit hours, are required. Course number En 104 IS 102 nW 101 nW 102 Course name English Composition I Computer Applications and Application Software Fundamentals of nursing Clinical Practice I Prerequisite none none Corequisites nW 105, SC 142 Corequisites nW 101, nW 103 Clock Hours 45 45 105 135 Credit Hours 3.0 4.0 5.0 3.0

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 413

nW 103 nW 105 nW 201 nW 202 PS 101 SC 142 SC 142l

Health and Illness throughout the life Span Pharmacology for nurses Alterations in Adult Health Clinical Practice II Psychology body Structure and Function body Structure and Function

Corequisites SC 142, PS 101 Corequisite SC 142 nW 102 none Corequisite SC 142

45 30 45 45 30

3.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 1.0

(Offered in the State of Nebraska only)

DIPLOMA IN THERAPEuTIC MASSAGE (DTMNE)

Corequisite nW 201 180 Corequisite SC 142l 45

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program provides instruction in anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, therapeutic massage theory and practice, hydrotherapy, and the appropriate health and safety issues that are required of a Massage Therapist. The program prepares students to write national Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and bodywork (nCTMb) required for licensure as a licensed Massage Therapist in the State of nebraska. PROGRAM OBJECTIvES graduates will demonstrate competency in the following areas: 1. A knowledge and understanding of human anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology in order to understand the principles and benefits of massage, to effectively discuss massage issues with clients, and to communicate client health issues with other health care professionals when required. 2. An understanding of clinical pathology and recognition of conditions, indications, and contraindications for massage applications in order to provide safe and beneficial service to the client. 3. The theory and application of massage therapy and bodywork in order to apply appropriate methodologies in a safe and beneficial manner. 4. The ability to apply ethical and business practices and professional standards in a therapeutic massage environment. POTENTIAL JOB POSITIONS After passing national Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and bodywork, graduates may seek employment as entry-level licensed Massage Therapists. The graduate will be qualified for entry-level work in spas, health clubs, gyms, cruise ships, and medical offices, or could become self-employed by going into private practice. PROGRAM LENGTH The average length of time for a student taking a full course load is 2.5 semesters. PROGRAM CONTENT A minimum of 50 semester credit hours (1001 clock hours) is required for graduation.

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Hours 15 15 Credit Hours 1.0 1.0

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 415

REquIRED COuRSES All courses, 45 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Tn 110 Tn 111 Tn 120 Tn 121 Tn 130 Tn 210 Tn 220 Tn 231 Tn 232 Tn 241 Tn 242 Tn 243 Tn 250 Tn 260 Course name Anatomy and Physiology for the Massage Therapist I Anatomy and Physiology for the Massage Therapist II Massage Theory and Practice I Massage Theory and Practice II Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid Pathology for the Massage Therapist business Principles and Health Service Management Kinesiology: Upper body Kinesiology: lower body Massage Therapy Clinic I Massage Therapy Clinic II Massage Therapy Clinic III Eastern Wellness Hydrotherapy Prerequisite none Tn 110 none Tn 120 none Tn 111 none Tn 111, Tn 121 Tn 111, Tn 121 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Clock Credit Hours Hours 60 60 60 60 7.5 60 60 60 60 67.5 67.5 67.5 60 60 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 0.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 1.5 1.5 1.5 4.0 4.0

NON-CREDIT PROJECTS All projects are required. Course number Tn 091 Tn 092 Tn 093 Tn 094 Tn 095 Tn 096 Course name Pathology Care Plan Project Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan I Prerequisite Corequisite Tn 210 Corequisite Tn 241 Clock Credit Hours Hours 40 8 8 8 12 40 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan II Corequisite Tn 242 Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan III Corequisite Tn 243 Eastern Wellness Project Hydrotherapy Project Corequisite Tn 250 Corequisite Tn 260

PERSONAL DEvELOPMENT COuRSES both courses, 2 semester credit hours, are required. Course number Pd 100 Pd 200 Course name Student Success Skills Career development Seminar Prerequisite none none Clock Credit Hours Hours 15 15 1.0 1.0

ELECTIvE COuRSES A minimum of 3 semester credit hours is required. Course number Tn 141 Tn 142 Tn 143 Tn 144 Course name Special Topic: Integrative Reflexology Special Topic: Reiki Special Topic: The Magic of Hot Stone Massage Special Topic: neuromuscular Therapy: Headaches, Types, Triggers, and Treatments Special Topic: Shiatsu Prerequisite Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130 Clock Credit Hours Hours 15 15 15 15 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

Tn 145

Tn 111, Tn 121, Tn 130

15

1.0

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HERzIng UnIVERSITY UndERgRAdUATE CATAlOg MAY 2009­2010

PROgRAMS OF STUdY 417

Information

May 2010 Undergraduate Catalog.indd

212 pages

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