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Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Strategic Plan

February 25, 1999

prepared by the Planning and Development Division in collaboration with the Executive Branch Legislative Branch Judicial Branch

April 7, 1999: Approved by the Administration Sub-Committee April 13, 1999: Approved by the Ho-Chunk Nation Legislature

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. II.

Introduction........................................................................................................................1 Environmental Analysis ....................................................................................................4 A. Stakeholders' Analysis ..........................................................................................4 B. External Analysis ...................................................................................................7 1. Opportunities..................................................................................................7 2. Threats ............................................................................................................7 C. Internal Analysis ....................................................................................................8 1. Strengths .........................................................................................................8 2. Weaknesses .....................................................................................................8 Needs Assessment...............................................................................................................9 A. Demographics and Other Data .............................................................................9 B. Youth Input and Needs..........................................................................................9 Critical Issues ...................................................................................................................14 Vision Statement ..............................................................................................................15 Goals and Objectives .......................................................................................................18 A. Heritage Preservation..........................................................................................18 B. Social and Health Programs ...............................................................................19 C. Education and Training ......................................................................................21 D. Community Involvement.....................................................................................22 E. Governmental Services........................................................................................23 Implementation Schedule................................................................................................26

III.

IV. V. VI.

VII.

VIII. Annual Calendar of Events .............................................................................................27 IX. Evaluation Plan ................................................................................................................31

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I. Introduction

A. Purpose of the Youth Strategic Plan

Planning is the creation of a vision for the future, and today's youth are the Ho-Chunk Nation's future leaders. Therefore, it is fitting that, in the fall of 1997, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee (YSCC) recognized the importance of bringing together all of the different youthspecific initiatives, ideas, projects, and proposals into a single, coordinated effort--the Youth Strategic Plan.

B.

Youth Services Collaboration Committee

The Ho-Chunk Nation YSCC was organized in 1996 in an effort to bring about a higher level of coordination among the youth service programs of the Nation. Staff members from the Departments of Education, Health, Social Services, and Labor; the Ho-Chunk Housing Authority, and the Trial Court have met on a monthly basis to coordinate Tribal youth services, thus improving quality while reducing redundancy. Recognizing the need for a strategic plan to guide these efforts, the YSCC formed an Ad Hoc Committee to work specifically on the development of a Youth Strategic plan.

C.

The Plan Methodology

The Youth Strategic Plan Methodology should be thought of as the table of contents. It is a basic list of the general types of information or analysis which is contained within the Plan. Typically, planning methodologies are directly linked to the planning process; the first sections of the plan methodology are completed first, with the later sections building upon the information gathered earlier. The Youth Strategic Plan Methodology closely resembles a true strategic plan, since the internal and external environments are analyzed, critical issues are identified, and strategies (i.e., goals and objectives) are developed which address the critical issues. The end result is a comprehensive strategy regarding youth issues, with an established timeline, ready for comment and approval by the necessary Tribal decision-makers.

D.

The Planning Process

The planning process used to develop the Youth Strategic Plan closely paralleled the plan methodology and leaned heavily on the Ad Hoc Youth Strategic Planning Committee established by the Youth Services Collaboration Committee and composed of members of the YSCC. The Planning and Development Division facilitated regular, ongoing two-hour meetings of the Ad Hoc Committee and prepared this plan document.

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The Youth Strategic Plan is a working document. First, the Office of the President, Legislature, Executive Directors, and/or other Tribal entities were encouraged to provide their recommendations or modifications for incorporation within the Plan. Second, our world is dynamic and ever-changing. As new issues arise, strategies fail, or dates change, the plan and its timetables will need to be changed. As a working document, the Youth Strategic Plan can be periodically updated based on the Plan's successes and failures, as well as the changing world around us.

E.

Mandates

The Legislative acts establishing and organizing Tribal departments mandate the provision of services to all members of the Ho-Chunk Nation, including youth, as illustrated by the following excerpts from departmental mission statements contained within those acts: Department of Social Services: "....to heal families in a way that i) is characteristic of the Ho-Chunk Nation's inherent cultural traditions, customs, and values and ii) addresses the well-being and protection of Ho-Chunk children, families, communities, and the Nation." "...to provide excellence in educational programs while promoting language and cultural instruction in coordination with regular academic teaching.....to encourage all students, instructors, and Tribal Members to subscribe to the belief that education is a core value on which personal fulfillment, self-determination, and self-sufficiency can be based." "...to promote the individual health of the Nation's members in keeping with the Ho-Chunk philosophy of integrated wellness....." "...to provide state-of-the-art employment services in a fair and efficient manner in order to promote the selfsufficiency of Ho-Chunk Members....."

Department of Education:

Department of Health:

Department of Labor:

Department of Housing & Public Works:

"...to shelter all Tribal members by obtaining housing that meets generally accepted standards of safety, decency, and sanitation......"

The Ho-Chunk Nation Office of the President has recognized the value of the Youth Services Collaboration Committee in a late 1998 open letter to legislators and executive directors. President LoneTree's letter states:

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"Without urging, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee has undertaken the challenges poised at our youth an attempted to create a shield to protect them from those dangers and provide them with an opportunity to form a foundation of rewarding academic and extracurricular experiences which can provide them with the essential basic skills and competencies that will work to ensure future successful experiences. Linked with language and culture, such experiences are indispensable to the development of the leadership potential that will serve future generations of the Hocak Wazijaci Nation and undergird its future successful existence. In recognition of that foresight, the Youth Services Collaboration is justifiably commended for their collective efforts." President Jacob H. LoneTree -- late 1998

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II. Environmental Analysis

Conducting an environmental assessment may sound like a study of global warming, but a strategic plan's environmental assessment is actually an analysis of the internal and external environments in which, in this particular case, the youth service programs operate. A SWOT Analysis provides information on the internal Strengths and Weaknesses of the programs in relation to the external Opportunities and Threats it faces. For purposes of this analysis, the internal environment was defined as communities and programs within the Tribal realm (i.e., Branch Offices, Legislature, Judicial Branch). The external environment includes entities and groups outside the Nation (i.e., law enforcement, grant programs, school districts, Department of Public Instruction).

A.

Stakeholders' Analysis

It is critical to determine who are the youth service programs' stakeholders and what is their role, impact, and/or influence. A stakeholder is any person or group, external or internal, who can make a claim on the programs' attention, resources, or output, or is affected by the programs' output. Satisfaction of the key stakeholders is the determinant of success for any organization, whether it is public or private. The stakeholder's analysis places the organization in the shoes of its stakeholders and provides information, which provides the groundwork for the Vision Statement and the rest of the Strategic Plan. The Key Stakeholders "map" on the following page illustrates the relationship of those entities impacting Ho-Chunk youth as identified by the Ad Hoc Committee. The Ad Hoc Committee also examined the following existing Tribal programs: Social Services Youth Services AODA Independent Living Skills ICW Mental Health Community Youth Services Housing Authority Drug Elimination Labor Youth Employment Program Education Head Start JOM Study Centers Pre K-12 Higher Education - Counseling Home School Coordinators Health Health Educator

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insert Stakeholders Map

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Among all these stakeholders, the Ad Hoc Committee discussed the following entities as key stakeholders: Law Enforcement Law enforcement officials are viewed as unwilling to cooperate with the Nation because they view the Nation's youth as separate from their range of responsibilities. Even though they are mandated by Public Law 280 to serve Ho-Chunk youth, law enforcement often tries to put this responsibility on the Nation. Lack of funding is often given as a reason; but this is viewed simply as "an excuse." Local law enforcement agencies should be encouraged to hire personnel from the Native American Employment Bank. Youth Youth often face the same concerns and issues as their parents (i.e., apathy, drugs, alcohol, training, employment). Youth want challenges; positive, involved, and motivated youth often have parents who are involved in their activities. Those who are apathetic need structure and guidance which often are not provided in the home. Once a skills assessment has been conducted, mentors would be needed to guide the youth. It is likely that more sports activities are needed to capture the youth's interest. Parents Parents are often seen as crisis-oriented rather than proactive where the conduct of their children is concerned. Many parents have the belief that the Nation can fund anything and the services provided are "entitlement programs," with the children as "wards of the state," and the parents simply the "caretaker." Parents expect reimbursement rather than volunteering to help with youth activities; and if the activity is not perceived as positive, they will not allow their children to participate. Tribal Community While the Ad Hoc Committee prioritized "community" as a key stakeholder, they separated this larger entity into the "Tribal community" and the "non-Tribal community." The Tribal community was perceived as having a lack of knowledge about the purpose and resources of Tribal programs when programs often suffer because of a lack of transportation, staff, and budget. The Tribal community has criticized programs for a variety of perceived shortcomings such as failure to keep the community informed, responsiveness to the needs of youth, and inequitable allocation of services. From the viewpoint of Tribal staff, however, the community is perceived as failing to volunteer to help with youth activities, expecting reimbursement instead. Non-Tribal Community Committee members believe the perception of the Ho-Chunk Nation by the non-Tribal community is quite negative. The Nation is often perceived as unstable and under qualified, having a lack of follow through and consistency. External entities are unwilling to commit resources to the Nation when the Nation is perceived as being "rich" enough to be able to fund itself.

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Schools The analysis of schools as key stakeholders considered a variety of issues. Tribal youth are in need of support, and the entire student body needs awareness and sensitivity regarding Tribal youth. Tribal programs need to generate interest within the school and the larger non-Tribal community with regard to Ho-Chunk culture (i.e., books, Heritage Preservation). Schools also need education regarding the Ho-Chunk form of government. Tribal programs often have a lack of contact with schools; when they do, implementation of services for Tribal youth can be inadequate. Invitations should be issued both ways to increase awareness on the part of Tribal programs and the schools. The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is seen as an entity with "no teeth." Further, Chapter 31 is not implemented at the Department of Public Instruction (DPI). Even if schools wanted to hire Native American teachers, there is a limited "employment bank" of such teachers within the Ho-Chunk Nation.

B. External Analysis 1. Opportunities The Ad Hoc Committee identified the following potential External Opportunities (in no particular order): Boys/Girls Club ­ structure, evaluation and assessments, pilot program, 501(c)3 Big Sisters & Brothers American Association of Retired Persons Universities ­ summer programs, pre-college, Upward Bound, Outward Bound Schools ­ Parent Teacher Organization, lack of community education, truant officer (needs education), guidance counselor (needs education), Title IX (watch dog), Impact Aid money Private Sector/Businesses ­ youth events, coordination, sponsors, printing, fund-raising efforts, Property and Procurement, bartering, extra curricular (need transportation) 2. Threats The Ad Hoc Committee identified the following potential External Threats (in no particular order): Schools ­ lack of Native American teachers, inequity in curriculum, use of impact aids and Title IX, community education/awareness, educate (in-service), cultural sensitivity of teachers and other staff, barriers (transportation) 501(c) 3 Status ­ loss of money, ability to get non-profit grant funds Decrease of Federal Funding Casinos as "cash cow" Loss of Gaming Illicit Activities ­ gang influences (crime, violence) Change ­ (exposure, segregation, how to deal with it) Racism ­ internal/external, anger

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C. Internal Analysis 1. Strengths The Ad Hoc Committee identified the following Internal Strengths (in no particular order): Youth Services Collaboration Committee Resources within progams and links to outside resources Programs (procedures) Money available, for now Support/community, network (out to counties) Role models Have a vision Motivation by youth (language) Culture, unique, base on which to build identify Elders Choices/opportunities Service all (trying to) Support of the President Support of the Legislature (but follow through is weak) Knowledge of system among some staff Traditional (seven generations) Time Adapting to all that has come to us (i.e., technology) 2. Weaknesses The Ad Hoc Committee identified the following Internal Weaknesses (in no particular order): Lack of children codes ­ cannot adjudicate Lack of volunteerism ­ Head Start through High School Lack of acknowledgement ­ Head Start through High School Lack of communications/follow through by programs, lacking procedures, politics gets involved Lack of training/qualifications (staff) Crisis-oriented (people) Territorial/barriers Following procedures Transition time for the staff Developing/implementing vision Competing for youth; redundancy Barriers to accessibility (employment, transportation) Entitlement vs. individual responsibility Service area too broad Money can only go so far Orientation of new employees Time Youth not aware of laws which pertain to them

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III. Needs Assessment

A. Demographics and Other Data Based on information provided by the Ho-Chunk Enrollment Division, the following youth reside within the 14-county and at-large areas: Area/County/City I: Jackson/Clark/Eau Claire II: Monroe II: La Crosse/Vernon/ Crawford III: Shawano/Marathon IV: Wood IV: Columbia/Sauk/ Adams/Juneau V: Minneapolis/St. Paul (Hennepin & Ramsey) V: Madison (Dane) V: Milwaukee (Milwaukee) V: Chicago (Cook) TOTALS: Age 5 ­ 9 129 30 21 32 26 92 25 23 28 12 418 Age 10 - 14 131 41 29 23 38 93 27 10 32 21 445 Age 15 - 19 120 38 30 16 31 96 25 13 34 17 420 Total 380 109 80 71 95 281 77 46 94 50 1,283

B. Youth Input and Needs On February 14, 1998, in conjunction with the Billy Mills Walk/Run held in Black River Falls, a total of 26 youth completed surveys providing basic information about their career objectives, support system, type of household, etc. The youth and adults then formed focus groups to discuss four topics: domestic violence, recreational activities, language, and culture. The youth focus groups identified the following needs or concerns with regard to each topic: Domestic Violence may be affected by drinking requesting counseling ask for help from extended family no police/tribal security counselors use better language walk away and cool off Recreational Activities learn traditional games open gym no transportation more money needed bowling, pool, basketball family should help out indigenous games 11

address issues to the family Language have 6 learning centers everyday classes change curriculum (easier) don't have a good class schedule try to make it better

more sports equipment Culture transportation, more money better facilities (learning center, youth center) better computer network programs more computers have more information about traditional/ religious practices

The adult focus groups expressed similar concerns and often proposed specific ways of addressing the needs of their youth: Domestic Violence money for the programs more workers Tribal codes on domestic violence educate the Ho-Chunk Nation about abuse and the types of abuse have an advocate for the youth put up pictures and show the effects of abuse campaign and market the programs educate where people can go for help zero tolerance on Tribal lands for alcohol and violence a full-blown campaign (daily, weekly, monthly, annually) number of forms for data; with data, establish prevention workshops hold monthly meeting with professional psychologist promote an annual Native American meeting with celebrities safe house for the youth peer support for the youth Recreational Activities more staff lack of funds send out memos for parent support start a newsletter for student articles with new adult Ho-Chunks, promote participation to organize activities elders who know of kids who are unable to participate should enter kids' names; with numbers, prepare separate funds; organize youth groups to prepare proposals refer to youth fellowship for their interest hold more events like this one with role models they can see who have good self-esteem invite more parents ask people to help need to have all family to be a part of this Language try to make language easier for the youth to learn create interest in youth to learn the language 12

have camps where the only language spoken is Ho-Chunk; they will also learn the culture at that time staff have to be taught patience and understanding videos ­ conversations with English and Ho-Chunk captions use individuals the youth can relate to use children and have them help more support from the community; must begin at home; kids bring the language home and teach the parents; learn together Culture survival camp with male and female role models seasonal traditions staff money available pow wow at the Study Centers; have them make their own outfits more youth-oriented programs bring in Elders to speak see if you can have the public schools work on it, too Both the youth and the adults seem to perceive the same central themes and needs regarding youth: sufficient workers, money, and transportation to facilitate utilization of available services; age-appropriate services; and community involvement and support. Branch Office Coordinators were also asked to describe the needs of the youth in their areas. A summary of their responses follows: Wisconsin Dells Not all of the youth from this area are provided tribal services. Tribal workers are providing services mainly to the students who attend the Wisconsin Dells and Baraboo schools. Other students are left out, probably due to the scattered locations of the youths' homes and the distances that need to be traveled. Several concerns were expressed with regard to Tribal youth program services: 1) not enough vehicles to pick up the youth, 2) not enough funding (i.e., youth workers sometimes pay for food and other expenses out of their own pockets), and 3) not enough workers to reach all of the youth in the area. Wittenberg The needs of the youth in Wittenberg are: 1) a playground, 2) their own gym (currently, they have to pay to go to a gym), 3) role models, 4) recreation equipment (i.e., volleyball, tennis, badminton, croquet, jump ropes, kick balls, footballs), 5) a van for transportation to and from the Study Center, and 13

6)

many of the parents do not have money for recreation for their children.

Tomah The needs of the youth in the Tomah area are: 1) recreational activities, 2) sports, 3) year round Language & Culture programs, 4) positive role modeling (i.e., drug and alcohol free), 5) funding for out-of-the-area activities, and 6) a youth activity center. Chakh Hah Chee The needs of the youth in the Chakh Hah Chee area are: 1) education, 2) alcohol and drug intervention, 3) a youth center, 4) community playground facilities, and 5) cultural activities. Madison Both the children and the parents in the Madison area have expressed the following needs to the Branch Office Coordinator: 1) cultural awareness classes, 2) transportation, 3) monies for school supplies, 4) help in finding summer employment, 5) more computers, 6) more software, including instructional programs and games, 7) more group activities such as picnics or field trips "to build a sense of group identity among our youth who as you see are spread out across the country." Black River Falls Area At a meeting in Black River Falls in February of 1999, to discuss the formation of a Youth Council, concerned parents and community members discussed the following needs of area youth: 1) more recreation equipment (basketballs, volleyballs, nets, mats, etc.) 2) organized team events/activities 3) boxing 4) a gymnasium to house at least 300 youth of all ages 5) baseball diamonds (different sizes to accommodate children and adults) 6) team uniforms for our own soccer, hockey, etc. teams (Wisconsin Badger games, Indigenous Games, tournaments) 7) swimming pool/baby pool 8) walking track 9) pond for swimming/ice skating/canoeing (not too deep) 10) funding to pay for qualified/interesting speakers 11) funding for out-of-area activities 14

12) 13) 14) 15) 16) 17) 18)

adult volunteers to donate time funding for supplies for arts and crafts projects used musical instruments (piano, flutes, clarinets, trumpets, etc.) landscaping project to help people beautify their community activities that give youth a chance to be creative (paints, watercolors, brushes, canvas, etc.) auditorium with sound system for plays, movies, dance theater, etc. two major playgrounds in Sandpillow and Mission areas

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IV. Critical Issues

During a brainstorming session, the Ad Hoc Committee developed the following list of critical issues facing the Nation's youth: --alcohol --time (accessibility) barrier --culture --service area --more funds ­ more stable --volunteers ­ need more --parent involvement --emphasize positive role models (dagas) --top down support and involvement --youth acknowledge responsibility --policies/procedures/rules --make rules clear from the start --have students make up the rules --involve youth --rules need to be consistent --enforcement --in the programs --forms --tracking --recognize positive role models --grades/drop-out --recreational opportunities --transportation --language --domestic violence --personnel ­ more staff --support staff --coordination/communication between departments --spirituality --culture (attitudes, respect, elders, values) --apathy/feel unimportant --lack of respect, adults to youth --apathy/self-esteem (among males) --reading/writing --training/parents, youth, and staff --consistent scheduling --attitude of staff/positive & enthusiasm --respect ­ self/others --children/juvenile codes (i.e., family) --uncooperative schools --territorial --lack of counseling

After the brainstorming session, Ad Hoc Committee members were asked to rank the critical issues. Among those listed above, emphasizing positive role models ranked the highest. Included among the other most important critical issues were: spirituality; language; culture; respect; education; coordination and collaboration between departments; AODA; polices, procedures, and rules; and top down support and involvement.

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V. Vision Statement

The purpose of a Vision Statement is to describe, in general terms, broad aims, desired end situations, or ideals for achievement. The nature of the mission or vision is that it is typically broad and long-range. It may also change over time as knowledge grows or attitudes/values change. In order to develop a Vision Statement for the youth, the members of the Ad Hoc Committee participated in a group "visioning" exercise, answering questions regarding their concept of the future of Ho-Chunk Youth. The resulting Vision Statement, as well as the questions and answers that were part of the visioning exercise, follow.

Vision Statement

In the year 2020, the Ho-Chunk youth of today will be physically and spiritually strong, while being active leaders in their families, communities, and Nation. This strength and leadership will be nurtured through holistic and culturally appropriate Tribal programming, combined with a Tribal-wide movement towards education, mentoring, and community involvement. The HoChunk youth of today will be the positive role models of the youth of tomorrow, passing on traditions of respect, responsibility, honesty, and cultural awareness. 1. It is the year 2020. The Ho-Chunk youth from 1998 have aged 22 years. What is our vision of who they will be, where they will be, and what they will be doing? --be leaders/community/Nation --self-sufficient --alcohol and drug free --education --in a professional field --family --positive role model --responsible --accountable --committed --respectful --spiritually strong/active --healthy --sensitive to needs of elders and youth --culturally competent (Ho-Chunk)/ fluent in honest Ho-Chunk What is our vision of how the Tribal youth in the year 2020 will be different from the youth today? --goal orientated --culturally competent --spiritually strong/active --self-sufficient --"future" awareness re: planning --role model for the younger ones --security/safe --good support system --believing (hope) in the future --healthy What are the basic physical, social, educational, and economic needs of the Tribal youth that the programs of the Ho-Chunk Nation exist to fulfill? Physical Social --drug/alcohol free --youth centers --spiritual --bonding 17

2.

3.

--L & C, SS, MH Cnts) --safe/secure --housing and food --exercise --seminars Educational --tutoring --educational support (funding) --training --career planning --pre-college --seminars --self-esteem --Traditional Court

--feasts --pow wows --seminars --self-esteem --Traditional Court Economic --funding --jobs --pre-college --seminars

The group also added Per Cap --financial planning --career planning --taxes

4.

How do recognize, anticipate, and respond to the above needs or problems? --better coordination --communications --useful/productive meetings --support of management --plan activities to meet the needs --include community members --youth consideration/involvement What Tribal achievements and programmatic changes will occur by the year 2020 to achieve the vision for Tribal youth discussed in questions 1 and 2? What will make this possible? --a youth division within the Nation --ACTIVE youth involvement --parental support/support/extended family --volunteers --commitment/follow through --coordination --collaboration --communications --provide youth sports facilities --programs follow goals/objectives/mission statements What are the philosophies and core values, which will be passed on to the youth and will be inherent within our programs during the next 22 years to help achieve this vision. What philosophies and values should Tribal programs utilize when addressing youth issues? --commitment/follow through --prioritize family --respect, honest, trust, and communications --believe in themselves (faith in themselves) and others --to have balance mind body, soul, and spirit, emotions (no longer in denial) --maintain Ho-Chunk tradition --extended family, daga value, ceremonies, etc. --relationship to nature 18

5.

6.

7.

What makes the youth of the Ho-Chunk Nation unique or distinct? --being HO-CHUNK --they are survivors --geographic area (no reservation) --their spirituality --commitment of excellence --care and respect for grandparents --resilience (live in two worlds) --using extended families --cultural/traditional --language/traditional evens --have elders who care --self identity (know they are Ho-Chunk) --have and recognize extended families/duties/responsibilities

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VI. Goals and Objectives

With all of the information collected and analyzed, goals and objectives can now be developed to address the critical issues while maintaining consistency with the basic tenets of the Vision Statement. The formation of goals and objectives is one of the most important steps in the planning process. The goals and objectives are the basic policies which will be used to guide and evaluate the effectiveness of our youth services. Goals are generalized ideals or values that are in the public interest and provide an initial statement of the Youth Plan's direction. Objectives are specific policy statements which are sharply defined and stated in measurable, realistic terms in order to help determine if a specific goal is being attained. In this plan, five (5) basic goal statements have been developed ­ Heritage Preservation, Education and Training, Social and Health Programs, Community Involvement, and Governmental Services. These goals and objectives are a direct result of the critical issues defined by the Ad Hoc Youth Strategic Planning Committee, as well as those critical issues identified by the youth themselves as noted in the needs assessment. It is difficult, if not impossible, to decisively place each policy or objective into one specific goal, especially given the important role of language and culture within the Ho-Chunk Nation. In our case, we have placed each policy under a goal based upon the intent of that policy.

A.

Heritage Preservation

The Heritage Preservation Goal of the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Strategic Plan is to provide the youth with the resources necessary to enhance self-esteem through pride in their heritage, maintain their cultural identity and perpetuate the Ho-Chunk Nation's unique traditional values and cultural practices. Objective HP ­ 1: By June 30, 2000, the Department of Heritage Preservation will provide culture classes for those areas with area offices and multimedia learning resources for those youth outside of Tribal operations. By October 31, 1999, the Department of Heritage Preservation will coordinate opportunities for a large youth gathering to learn and participate in cultural practices associated with pow-wows, arts and crafts, ceremonies, the clan system, and other pertinent customs. On an ongoing basis, the Department of Heritage Preservation will encourage the youth to actively participate in arts and crafts activities sponsored by the Nation.

Objective HP ­ 2:

Objective HP ­ 3:

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Objective HP ­ 4:

By June 30, 1999, the Department of Heritage Preservation will work cooperatively with the Departments of Education, Health, and Social Services to include a culture component in all youth activities to increase the knowledge and respect the Ho-Chunk Nation youth have for the HoChunk Nation's traditions and customs by teaching Ho-Chunk youth traditional skills including the importance of respect, the various roles within the extended family structure, and the essence of the teasing/joking relationship. As facilitated by the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, all programs should work cooperatively to meet the Heritage Preservation Goal.

Objective HP ­ 5:

B.

Social and Health Programs

The Social and Health Programs Goal of the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Strategic Plan is to advocate for the psychological, social, mental, and physical well being of the youth through collaborative and proactive social and health programs. Objective SHP ­1: The Youth Services Collaboration Committee will coordinate, collaborate, and communicate a comprehensive youth services program and activities that encourage at least 50% youth participation in prevention programs, increased high school graduation rate, greater parent involvement, and reduce need through prevention.

Objective SHP ­ 2: The Youth Services Collaboration Committee will promote a working relationship between all social service and health programs dealing with youth within the Ho-Chunk Nation and will recommend and advocate for programs regarding the mental, social, physical, and psychological well being of youth including, but not limited to: AODA, AIDS Awareness, Diabetes Prevention, Domestic Violence, Gangs, Tobacco, and Teen Pregnancy. Objective SHP ­ 3: By June 30, 1999, the Departments of Social Services, Health, Education, and Justice will work cooperatively to develop a drug policy for HoChunk Nation youth. Objective SHP ­ 4: By December 31, 1999, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will advocate for the development and coordination of a cross-departmental referral system in conjunction with the Community Health Nursing program. Objective SHP ­ 5: Each quarter, the Departments of Education and Social Services will work cooperatively to provide parents, children, and staff with culturally appropriate family/parenting skills workshops. 21

Objective SHP ­ 6: By June 30, 2000, the Department of Social Services will hire a parenting counselor to provide mandatory Ho-Chunk-specific counseling to parents whose youth have become involved in the justice system. Objective SHP ­ 7: By December 31, 1999, the Department of Social Services will work cooperatively with the county courts and Trial Court to ensure that youth required to perform community service will also be required to attend the family skills workshops described in Objective SHP ­ 5. Objective SHP ­ 8: The Youth Services Collaboration Committee will advocate for the youth on issues supported by the YSCC when these issues come up at SubCommittee and Legislative meetings. Objective SHP ­ 9: The Departments of Social Services, Education, and Labor will work cooperatively to provide activities and training to develop leadership abilities among the Nation's youth. Objective SHP ­ 10: By April 1, 1999, the Department of Social Services will work to develop a Youth Council in each community. Objective SHP ­ 11 At least three times a year, the Department of Health will provide inservice training for the Youth Services Program on nutrition, STDs/AIDS/HIV, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. Objective SHP ­ 12: At least six times a year, the Nutrition Program will provide Nutrition Education at each Youth Drop-In Center. Objective SHP ­ 13: At least two times a year, the Nursing Program will provide Birth Control and Growth & Development Education at each Youth Drop-In center. Objective SHP ­ 14: At least four times a year, the Nursing Program will provide education on head lice at each Youth Drop-In Center. Objective SHP ­ 15: At least two times a year, the Health Education Program will provide education on smoking and alcohol usage at each Youth Drop-In Center. Objective SHP ­ 16: Three times a year, each Youth Study Center will provide HIV/AIDS prevention activities under the direction of the HIV/AIDS Coordinator. Objective SHP ­ 17: On a daily basis, the Youth Services Program will offer physical activity for 30 minutes. Objective SHP ­ 18: As facilitated by the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, all programs should work cooperatively to meet the Social and Health Goal.

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C.

Education and Training

The Education and Training Goal of the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Strategic Plan is to maximize the educational attainment of each youth through an individualized education service plan that incorporates Tribal, State, and local education institutions, offices, and agencies. Objective ED ­ 1: By January 1, 2000, the Department of Education will develop a reading list, updated on an ongoing basis, of age-appropriate materials (i.e., books, videos, etc.) emphasizing traditional values and customs. This reading list will be available upon request, posted at Education work sites, and available at other appropriate venues. On an ongoing basis, the Department of Education will provide Ho-Chunk language classes for youth in areas currently served by the Department of Education. By June 30, 2000, the Department of Education will provide Ho-Chunk language classes for youth outside of Tribal operations through the use of the internet, e-mail lessons, correspondence courses, and other appropriate multimedia learning resources. By June 30, 1999, the Department of Education, Language Division will ensure that a language component is included in all youth activities to increase their knowledge and respect for the Ho-Chunk Nation's traditions and customs. By January 1, 2000, the Departments of Education and Labor will work cooperatively to develop and coordinate a cross-departmental system to track the career educational attainment of the youth served by these departments. By November 30, 1999, the Departments of Education and Labor will work cooperatively to provide ongoing community development opportunities and career/job skills training to youth to facilitate their entry into the work world. By November 30, 1999, the Department of Education will develop and provide training workshops regarding Federal, State, and Tribal law regarding students' and parents' rights and responsibilities in regards to the public school system. By March 1, 1999, the Department of Education will identify twenty 7th to 9th grade students, composed of one-half high-achieving and one-half at-risk students, in the Black River Falls School District to participate in a pilot leadership/peer mentorship program. Three additional training/seminars will take place at the UW-Eau Claire campus in April, May, and June of 1999. A week-long training/seminar will occur during

Objective ED ­ 2:

Objective ED ­ 3:

Objective ED ­ 4:

Objective ED ­ 5:

Objective ED ­ 6:

Objective ED ­ 7:

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the month of July 1999 that will utilize youth in facilitating the following year's Leadership/Mentorship Program. Objective ED ­ 8: By January 1, 2000, the Department of Education will identify a customized academic plan for the students it is currently serving, regardless of academic standing, that will not inhibit participation in Tribal activities and that will allow the student to demonstrate progress in meeting the goals of the academic plan. By November 30, 1999, the MIS Division and the Departments of Education, Health, Social Services, and Labor Departments will work cooperatively to develop a youth-specific Web page on the Internet to increase awareness and promote youth services and activities.

Objective ED ­9:

Objective ED ­ 10: By January 1, 2000, and on an ongoing basis, the Departments of Education, Health, Social Services, and Labor will work cooperatively to run a campaign to encourage youth to attend school (i.e., avoid absenteeism, tardiness, and late assignments) and raise the level of the youth's academic expectations. Objective ED ­ 11: As facilitated by the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, all programs should work cooperatively to meet the Education and Training goal.

D.

Community Involvement

The Community Involvement Goal of the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Strategic Plan is to promote and empower parents, extended families, and communities to promote responsibility for youth as well as support effective parenting practices. Objective CI ­ 1: By January 1, 2000, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will encourage volunteerism by the Ho-Chunk Nation's community leaders and respected elders in youth service programs and activities. By June 30, 1999, the Departments of Education, Social Services, Health, and Labor will initiate parent involvement incentives based on the comprehensive criteria as developed in Objective GS ­ 4 by awarding parent/student participation points accumulating toward an end-of-the-year parent/student recognition ceremony and provide for academic achievement awards. By June 30, 2000, the Departments of Education and Labor will establish a mentorship program matching students with community leaders with degrees and/or working in an area of interest to the students.

Objective CI ­ 2:

Objective CI ­ 3:

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Objective CI ­ 4:

By June 30, 2000, the Departments of Social Services and Health will establish a mentorship program matching students with elders and community leadership role models. By April 1, 1999, and on an ongoing basis, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will arrange for a page of the Hocak Worak to be dedicated to youth news and Q/A the community about trivia on youths in our community. By April 1, 1999, the Department of Social Services will work to establish and "Unity Certify" a Youth Council in each community in order for each Youth Council to be able to cast an individual vote. As facilitated by the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, all programs should work cooperatively to meet the Community Involvement Goal.

Objective CI ­ 5:

Objective CI ­ 6:

Objective CI ­ 7:

E.

Governmental Services

The Governmental Services Goal of the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Strategic Plan is to maximize the efficiency, equity, and effectiveness of the Tribally supported youth programs through intergovernmental networking and cooperation facilitated by the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth Services Collaboration Committee. Objective GS ­ 1: When completed, the Ho-Chunk Youth Strategic Plan will be forwarded to the Executive Directors, Office of the President, and Legislature for comment, modification, and consideration, with the intent that such plan shall be adopted as the official youth policy statement of the Ho-Chunk Nation. The Youth Services Collaboration Committee will continue to serve as the centralized coordinating entity of Tribal youth information and will meet on a monthly basis to coordinate, review, evaluate, and make recommendations on youth activities, programmatic changes, and new initiatives. Further, the Legislative and Executive Branches will recognize the Youth Services Collaboration Committee as having comment authority on Tribal youth initiatives and policies. By October 1999, the Departments of Education, Health, Social Services, and Labor will work cooperatively, with input from the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, to develop a standardized operating plan, "code of conduct," and appropriate forms for use by all Tribal youth services programs. The operating plan and "code of conduct" will be forwarded to the appropriate decision-makers for review and consideration. The Youth Services Collaboration Committee will work with all Tribal programs 25

Objective GS ­ 2:

Objective GS ­ 3:

providing youth services to promote the equitable and uniform enforcement of programmatic criteria, policies, procedures, and code of conduct for youth activities. Objective GS ­ 4: By July 1999, the Departments of Education, Health, Social Services, and Labor will work cooperatively to establish appropriate criteria for the participation of Tribal youth and their parents in Tribal programs and activities. On an ongoing basis, the Department of Social Services will include the designee of the Youth Services Collaboration Committee on the interview panel during the hiring process of all future Youth Services Directors. On an ongoing basis, each department serving youth will ensure that background checks are performed on all employees who will be working with youth. By June 30, 1999, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will develop a Youth Event Planning Checklist of those items which should be considered and/or addressed when planning a youth event. On an ongoing basis, those programs of the Ho-Chunk Nation government which serve the Ho-Chunk Nation youth will continue to establish networks to stay abreast of local, regional, state, federal, and Tribal policy and regulatory changes, as well as innovative programmatic initiatives. This effort will be undertaken to keep community members informed, to maintain code compliance, and to provide effective youth services. When feasible, local agencies will be invited to Tribal activities so the agencies and community members become familiar with one another. By November 1999, the Departments of Administration, Health, Social Services, Education, and Labor will work cooperatively to perform a needs assessment of at-large youth to determine how existing services can be modified to serve their needs.

Objective GS ­ 5:

Objective GS ­ 6:

Objective GS ­ 7:

Objective GS ­ 8:

Objective GS ­ 9:

Objective GS ­ 10: On an ongoing basis, the Planning and Development Division will assist youth programs in their grantsmanship efforts. Objective GS ­ 11: On an ongoing basis, the Planning and Development Division will act as a central clearinghouse for data and statistics regarding youth issues. The Youth Services Collaboration Committee will encourage all Tribal programs to submit copies of data and statistical information to the Planning and Development Division.

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Objective GS ­ 12: On an ongoing basis, the Planning and Development Division will work with other Tribal departments and divisions to establish the data collection tools used to establish tracking systems. Objective GS ­ 13: Effective July 1, 2000, on a quarterly basis, the Departments of Education, Health, Social Services, and Labor will co-sponsor cross-departmental team-building exercises involving all programs serving youth in an effort to maximize the cooperative efforts between Tribal programs. Objective GS ­ 14: Each month, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will review and update the Annual Calendar of Events and/or implementation schedule discussed in the next section as a method to increase planning and coordination. Objective GS ­ 15: As facilitated by the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, all programs should work cooperatively to meet the Governmental Services Goal.

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VII. Implementation Schedule

The implementation schedule provided below lists those objectives with stated begin/end dates for addressing and completing some of the objectives contained within this Youth Strategic Plan. This implementation schedule also complements the Annual Calendar of Events provided in the following section, which will be reviewed and updated at each monthly Youth Services Collaboration Committee meeting. Alternatively, the implementation schedule is a measuring tool which the Youth Services Collaboration Committee, Executive Branch, and Legislature may use to help determine if the mission and goals stated within the Youth Strategic Plan are being attained. The dates listed in the implementation schedule are targets to strive toward, but they may be modified or extended depending upon exact circumstances. Objective SHP ­ 7 SHP ­ 10 CI ­ 5 HP ­ 4 SHP ­ 1 ED ­ 3 CI ­ 2 GS ­ 7 GS ­ 4 HP ­ 2 GS ­ 3 GS ­ 9 ED ­ 5 ED ­ 6 ED ­ 9 SHP ­ 4 SHP ­ 7 ED ­ 4 ED ­ 1 ED ­ 8 ED ­ 10 CI ­ 1 HP ­ 1 SHP ­ 6 CI ­ 3 CI ­ 4 GS ­ 13 Activity Identify students to participate in leadership program Develop Youth Council in each community Dedicate one page of the Hocak Worak to youth Include culture component in all youth activities Develop drug policy for youth Include language component in all youth activities Parent involvement incentives Develop Youth Event Planning Checklist Establish criteria for program participation Large youth gathering to learn cultural practices Develop standardized operating plan, etc. Perform needs assessment of at-large youth Provide community development opportunities Develop workshops regarding law and public schools Develop youth-specific Web page Develop and coordinate cross-departmental referral system Work with courts to require attendance at workshops Develop tracking system for career educational attainment Develop reading list Identify customized academic plan for students Run campaign encouraging school attendance, etc. Encourage community volunteerism Culture classes and multi-media learning resources Hire parenting counselor Establish mentoring program-youth/community leaders Establishing mentoring program-youth/elders Sponsor cross-departmental team-building Completed By 3/1/99 4/1/99 4/1/99 6/30/99 ongoing 6/30/99 6/30/99, ongoing 6/30/99, ongoing 6/30/99 7/1/99 10/31/99, ongoing 10/31/99 11/1/99 11/30/99, ongoing 11/30/99, ongoing 11/30/99,ongoing 12/31/99, ongoing 12/31/99, ongoing 1/1/00, ongoing 1/1/00 1/1/00, ongoing 1/1/00, ongoing 1/1/00, ongoing 6/30/00, ongoing 6/30/00 6/30/00, ongoing 6/30/00, ongoing 7/1/00, ongoing

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VII. Annual Calendar of Events

The following Annual Calendar of Events has been compiled to assist Tribal entities in planning for youth activities. While the following Calendar contains events scheduled for 1999, it is not assumed that all events will necessarily be held year after year. This Calendar is intended to be a working document; the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will review it on a monthly basis, making changes as needed. It is also anticipated that programs will look ahead to the events scheduled for upcoming months and initiate the appropriate planning and implementation activities in a timely manner.

January

Youth Study Center Grade Incentives (Department of Education)

February

Per Capita Distribution Valentine's Pow-Wow (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Services Prevention Activities with Security Patrol in Wisconsin Dells/Black River Falls (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Unity Council Family Athletic Event ­ Roller Skating at undetermined location; possibly Plover (Health Education Program)

March

Youth Services Prevention Activities with Security Patrol in Wisconsin Dells, Black River Falls, Tomah (Drug Elimination Program) Higher Education College Fairs

April

Begin second phase of Youth Video Taping Project, two Saturdays per month (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Services Prevention Activities with Security Patrol in Wisconsin Dells, Black River Falls, Tomah (Drug Elimination Program) WIEA Conference Retain Conference Spring Break Indian Awareness Week CHOICES Initiative ­ self-esteem workshops for girls at undetermined location (Health Education Program)

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May

Per Capita Distribution College Interns (Department of Education Full Youth Unity [Summit] Council College Applications Graduations High School/College Graduate Banquet (Department of Education) JOM Honor Banquets (Department of Education) Pow-Wows Youth Community Clean-up two Saturdays per month (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Video Taping Project two Saturdays per month (Drug Elimination Program) Security Patrol Safety Event during Memorial Day Pow-wow (Drug Elimination Program)

June

Youth Workshop (Department of Labor) National JOM Conference (Department of Education) Youth Study Center Graduation Incentives (YSCG) JOM ­ monthly (Department of Education) Study Center Summer Enrichment Programs (Department of Education) Youth Video Taping Project two Saturdays per month (Drug Elimination Program) Tomah Youth Day Camp at Mill Bluff State Park about 6/14 to 6/18 (Drug Elimination Program) Preparation for Application for next year's Drug Elimination Grant (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Services Prevention Activities in Wisconsin Dells and Black River Falls (Drug Elimination Program) Second Annual Family Walkathon at Crockett's Resort (Health Education Program)

July

Study Center Summer Enrichment Programs (Department of Education) Youth Workshop (Department of Labor) HYLC Summer Youth Workers July 1 ­ mid-August (Department of Labor) Black River Falls Youth Day Camp about 7/12 to 7/16 (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Services Prevention Activities in Wisconsin Dells and Tomah (Drug Elimination Program)

August

Per Capita Distribution Black River Falls Youth Day Camp about 8/9 to 8/13 (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Video Taping Project two Saturdays per month (Drug Elimination Program) Teachers' In-Service begins Study Center Summer Enrichment Programs (Department of Education) Fall Youth Unity Council Third Week ­ School Begins JOM School supporters, etc. (Department of Education) 30

September

General Council ­ Youth Meeting/event Pow-Wows/Fun Runs Head Starts in session Youth Services Prevention Activities in Blue Wing and Chakh Hah Chee (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Video Taping Project two Saturdays per month (Drug Elimination Program)

October

Back-To-School Event (Drug Elimination Program) Youth Program ­ Youth Conference NIEA National Conference Halloween Parties ­ Area & JOM Dells Indian Awareness Week

November

Per Capita Distribution WI Youth Prevention Conference (Madison) Ho-Chunk Day ­ Bingo Smoking Prevention activities at Youth Drop-In Centers (Health Education Program) National Crime Prevention Conference Deer Hunting

December

Area Christmas Parties (Branches) Winter Youth Summit Youth Christmas Vacation New Year's Eve Sobriety Pow-Wow Family Athletic Event ­ Cross-country skiing and tubing at Ft. McCoy (Health Education Program) World AIDS/HIV VIGIL at Study Centers ­ December 1 (Health Education Program)

Weekly

Physical activity at least two times per week for 30 minutes (Youth Services Program)

Monthly

Youth Council Drug Elimination Events

Two Times per Year

Nutrition education at each Youth Drop-In Center (Nutrition Program)

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Three Times per Year

In-service training for Youth Services Program staff on nutrition, STDs/AIDS/HIV, diabetes, and other chronic diseases at each Youth Drop-In Center. (Department of Health) HIV/AIDS prevention activities at the Youth Study Centers. (AIDS/HIV Coordinator)

Annually

Birth Control and Growth & Development Education at each Youth Drop-In Center (Nursing Program) Head lice education at each Youth Drop-In Center (Nursing Program) Smoking education at each Youth Drop-Center (Health Education Program)

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IX. Evaluation Plan

The Youth Strategic Plan will undergo regular periodic evaluation by both the Youth Services Collaboration Committee and the Ad Hoc Strategic Plan Committee. At its monthly meetings, the Youth Services Collaboration Committee will review the goals and objectives and implementation schedule to determine if the objectives are being met. The YSCC will also review the Youth Planning Calendar, make any necessary revisions, and distribute the calendar to all appropriate Tribal entities.

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