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COURSE TITLE:

PREVENTING READING DIFFICULTIES IN CHILDREN: Phonemic Awareness, An Essential Piece 3 QUARTER CREDITS [Semester Cr Equivalent: 2.00] WA CLOCK HRS: OREGON PDUs: CEUs: 30 30 3.0**

NO. OF CREDITS:

INSTRUCTOR:

JULIE BEDELL, M.S. 206/284-3324 [email protected]

ASSIGNMENT CHECKLIST The assignment checklist will help you plan your work. Check off completed assignments. CLOCK, CEU, PDU, 400 LEVEL, or 500 LEVEL ASSIGNMENTS A. Information Acquisition: ___#1: Keep a journal of your experience during your work on this course ___#2: Order and read The Report of the National Reading Panel: Get the video and report of the subcommittees: www.nationalreadingpanel.org Order and read Phonemic Awareness in Young Children. ___#3: Write 3-5 page paper summarizing the major ideas. ___#4: Analyze your current reading program. Summarize your findings in a 2-3 page paper. ___#5: Share, discuss, and mentor one other teacher in the methods and information from this class.

NOTE: If you are doing this course for Clock Hrs, PDUs or CEUs, then #5 is your final assignment.

400 & 500 LEVEL ASSIGNMENTS B. Learning Application: ___#6: Test some or all of your students to get a measure of phonemic awareness. Use Rosner scale or assessment in Phonemic Awareness in Young Children. During the summer, please call me so we can work out this part of the assignment. 500 LEVEL ASSIGNMENT ___#7: In addition to the 400 level assignments, do the following: · Give a presentation about the researched best practices for teaching reading. · Initiate a committee to look at your school's reading curriculum and make changes if necessary. · Write a 2-3 page paper summarizing this entire process. Include feedback and the planned improvements. OR Another assignment of your own design with the instructor's prior approval.

400 & 500 LEVEL ASSIGNMENT C. Integration Paper: ___ #8: Complete the Integration Paper by responding to the questions listed in the syllabus. NOTES: · You may work collaboratively with other teachers and submit joint assignments on all but the final Integration Paper, which must be individually authored and submitted. · Alternatives to written assignments (video, audio tape, photo collage, a collection of products, letters to editor, brochure and Web pages) may be submitted as substitute assignments with the instructor's prior approval. · To maintain privacy, please do not refer to students in your paper by their actual name, but rather use an alias or designation such as "Student A."

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COURSE TITLE:

PREVENTING READING DIFFICULTIES IN CHILDREN: Phonemic Awareness, An Essential Piece

NO. OF CREDITS:

3 QUARTER CREDITS [Semester Cr Equivalent: 2.00]

WA CLOCK HRS: OREGON PDUs: CEUs:

30 30 3.0**

INSTRUCTOR:

JULIE BEDELL, M.S. 206/284-3324 [email protected]

COURSE DESCRIPTION: "Correlational studies have identified phonemic awareness and letter knowledge as the two best school-entry predictors of how well children will learn to read during their first two years in school."--National Reading Panel, April 2000 Phonemes are the smallest unit of sound and English consists of around 41 phonemes. Phonemic awareness refers to the ability to focus on and manipulate phonemes in spoken words. Fortunately, phonemic awareness, just like letter names, can be taught. However, it is important to understand that phonemic awareness in and of itself does not constitute the sole content of reading instruction. This course if full of valuable information for those teaching beginning reading (K-2) as well for teachers who teach intermediate (3-5) and middle school (6-8) students. When an older student is having reading difficulties, it is imperative to go back and find the "bottleneck" holding the student back. This "bottleneck" is often, in part, phonemic awareness. Participants who take this course will have the opportunity to read research from the National Reading Panel on the importance of teaching phonemic awareness followed by and with systematic phonics as part of their language arts/ reading program. Participants will have the opportunity to assess their students' phonemic awareness skills and plan and implement phonemic awareness activities. Textbook fee is around $25.00.

LEARNING OUTCOMES: As a result of taking this course participants will: 1. Learn what phonemic awareness is, how to assess it, and how to teach it. 2. Critique their reading program. Does it include all the pieces the National Reading Panel explains is necessary, phonemic awareness, being one? 3. Develop a plan, if necessary, to add phonemic awareness followed by systematic phonics to their existing curriculum. 4. Understand what the "Congressional Charge" to the National Reading Panel was, how they came to their conclusions, and what that means instructionally.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Completion of all specified assignments is required for issuance of hours or credit. The Heritage Institute does not award partial credit.

HOURS EARNED: ** Completing the basic assignments (Section A. Information Acquisition) for this course automatically earns participant's their choice of 30 Washington State Clock Hours, 30 Oregon PDUs or 3 CEUs (Continuing Education Units, which translates to 30 hours). The Heritage Institute is an approved provider of Washington State Clock Hours, Oregon PDUs, and CEUs by IACET (International Association of Continuing Education and Training, an official national and international certifier of CEUs).

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UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT INFORMATION UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT OPTION 400 & 500 LEVEL Teachers may opt to register for 3 (three) Antioch University, Seattle, 400 or 500 level quarter credits, instead of hours, and will be required to: 1. Complete all assignments for clock hours/CEUs (Section A: Information Acquisition) 2. Complete the extra reading/viewing, writing and classroom application assignments specified in the syllabus for the 400 or 500 level credit option (Section B: Learning Application) 3. Complete an Integration Paper by answering 5 questions (Section C: Integration Paper)

REQUIREMENTS FOR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT Antioch University Seattle requires 75% or better for credit at the 400 level (Upper Division) and 85% or better to issue credit at the 500 level (Post-Baccalaureate). These criteria refer both to the amount of work submitted as well as the quality of work as determined by each instructor. Teachers who register for Antioch University Seattle 400 or 500 Level Credit will be required to: 1. Complete Section A :Information Acquisition assignments 30% 2. Complete Section B. Learning Application assignments appropriate for your levels 40% 3. Complete Section C: Integration Paper assignment 30%

CREDIT/NO CREDIT (No Letter Grades or Numeric Equivalents on Transcripts) Antioch University Seattle Continuing Education Quarter credit is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis; neither letter grades nor numeric equivalents will show on a transcript. At the 400 level credit granted is equal to a "C" or better, and at the 500 level credit granted is equal to a "B" or better. This information is stated on the back of the transcript.

REQUIRED TEXT: · Adams, Foorman, Lundberg, and Beeler, Phonemic Awareness in Young Children, A Classroom Curriculum, 2000, Paul H. Brooks Pub. Co.,Inc.: Baltimore, MD. ISBN 1-55766321-1 · The National Reading Panel Report · The National Reading Panel Report of the Subcommittees Special Notes: Something to note is that phonemic awareness falls under the umbrella of phonological awareness. Phonological awareness is a broader term including rhyming and word play activities and these are all great! Phonemic awareness is specifically focusing on phonemes. Remember that with older students, you will continue to strengthen phonemic awareness as you teach systematic phonics. This can be done in spelling that might be a more appropriate way to work phonemic awareness activities in with older students. Unless an older student is having trouble learning to read, his/her phonemic awareness is most likely fine. Just remember that once the symbol is introduced, you are technically teaching phonics that does strengthen phonemic awareness. There are other activities that might work better with older students (3rd and above) and might fit into your classroom scope and sequence more easily. I own two more books that I bought from the University of Washington Bookstore. One book is called: Sourcebook of Phonological Awareness Activities through Children's Classic Literature, by Candance L. Goldsworthy, Ph.D., Singular Publishing Group, Inc. It is out of print but the second edition is out and be ordered by calling the publisher 800/354-9706. This book is about $45.00. The other book I love is PAL Guides for Intervention, Reading, Writing by Virginia Wise Berninger. This book is published by The Psychological Corporation (1998) and is about $60.00. You can be ordered it the University of Washington Bookstore at 800/335-READ. MATERIAL FEE: None.

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HEADING REQUIRED FOR ALL ASSIGNMENTS A heading is required; please use the following format. Your Name: Course Number: Date: Assignment #:

Instructor Name: Course Name: Level: Clock/ PDU/ CEU/ Credit (400 or 500)

ASSIGNMENTS for CLOCK HRS/PDUs, CEUs, 400 or 500 LEVEL UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT

A.

INFORMATION ACQUISITION

Assignment #1: Keep a journal of your thoughts and ideas as you progress through the assignments. Make note of any information you encounter that you will want to reference later and where you found it. Summarize these notes and highlight main ideas for classroom implementation. After completing all assignments, submit summary to instructor.

Assignment #2: Order and read from these three sources: · Report of the National Reading Panel, Teaching Children to Read. · National Reading Panel, Teaching Children to Read, Reports of the Subgroups The above reports and video are free so ask for the video while you are ordering. To order go to www.nationalreadingpanel.org. or call 1-800-370-2943. · Phonemic Awareness in Young Children, A Classroom Curriculum by Adams, Foorman, Lundberg, and Beeler.

Assignment #3: After reading, make an outline and then write a 3-5 page paper summarizing the major ideas for the effective teaching of phonemic awareness and reading. Submit to instructor. You can read other parts of the National Reading Panel Report and include other important instructional insights you learned (or something you already knew but were reinforced) about the teaching of reading. Assignment #4: Analyze the materials and methods you currently are using to teach reading. Are you already incorporating phonemic awareness and systematic phonics instruction? Identify gaps between existing and desired practice. Do your current methods and materials need to be adjusted so you are using researched best practices? If yes, how so? What aspects of existing practice pose a barrier to implementing desired practice? Summarize your analysis of your current reading program in a 2-3 page paper. Submit to instructor.

Assignment #5: Share, discuss, and mentor one other teacher in the methods and information from this class. Write up the results. (2-3 pages, send to instructor)

This completes the assignments required for Washington Clock Hours, Oregon PDUs, or CEUs. Continue to the next section for additional assignments required for University Quarter Credit

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ADDITIONAL ASSIGNMENTS REQUIRED for 400 or 500 LEVEL UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT

B.

LEARNING APPLICATION

In this section you will have an opportunity to apply your learning to your professional situation. This course assumes that most participants are classroom teachers who have access to students. If you are not teaching in a classroom, please contact the instructor for course modifications. If you are a classroom teacher and start or need to complete this course during the summer, please try to apply your ideas when possible with youth from your neighborhood, at a local public library or parks department facility. (They will often be glad to sponsor communitybased learning.) Or with students in another teacher's summer classroom in session. Assignment #6: (Required for 400 and 500 Level) Assess some or all of your students using the Modified Rosner or the assessment included in Phonemic Awareness in Young Children. Analyze the results with what you know about your students' reading/pre-reading ability. Use the criteria provided with each assessment tool to determine ability. Select a group of students to analyze. Do some of the activities listed in the book (10 minutes a day is all it takes) and assess again. Complete one (1) of these options:

Option A) Compile your findings in a report.

OR Option B) Make a plan of how you would set up the assessment and the teaching of phonemic awareness in your classroom, including what you would use, what lessons you would teach, etc.

500 LEVEL ASSIGNMENT: Assignment #7: (500 Level only) In addition to the 400 level assignments do one (1) the following options:

Option A) Give a presentation to your school staff or a group of colleagues about the researched best practices for teaching reading. Initiate and/or facilitate a committee to look at your school's reading curriculum. Help your school make curriculum changes if necessary. Write a 2-3 page paper summarizing this entire process. Include the feedback from your staff as well as the steps your staff is taking to improve the reading instruction in your school.

There are many more instructional implications found in the National Reading Panel Report than the importance of teaching phonemic awareness. This report also includes information on phonics and the necessity of developing fluency and comprehension skills in children. · To help guide you, please order: Every Child Reading: An Action Plan, Learning First alliance, June 1998. You can get the full report at: www.learningfirst.org Or you can order by sending $3.00 to: American Federation of Teachers Order Department 555 New Jersey Ave. NW Washington, DC 20001 OR Option B) Another assignment of your own design with the instructor's prior approval.

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400 & 500 LEVEL ASSIGNMENT

C. INTEGRATION PAPER Assignment #8: (Required for 400 and 500 Level Credit) Write a 2-3 page Integration Paper answering these questions: 1. What did you learn vs. what you expected to learn from this course? 2. What aspects of the course were most helpful and why? 3. What further knowledge and skills in this general area do you feel you need? 4. How, when and where will you use what you have learned? 5. How and with what other school or community members might you share what you learned?

INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS ON YOUR WORK: Please indicate by email to the instructor, if you would like to receive comments on your assignments.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHING THE COURSE: JULIE BEDELL, M.S. holds a BS in Elementary Education and a MS in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Oregon. Her 23 year teaching career has included many different grade levels in two school districts in Oregon and two school districts in Washington. Ms. Bedell spent 11 years in three different middle schools teaching the lowest ability 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students to spell, write, and read. She also spent three years working with 1st- 5th grade students who also struggled with reading. . She used, and continues to use, Romalda Spalding's Writing Road to Reading as the foundation of her program, a method that integrates spelling, writing, speaking, listening, and reading comprehension. Direct instruction of spelling where systematic phonics is taught, is a vital part of this program. Julie Bedell is very interested in research on how children learn to read and write and reads all she can on the subject. To round out her second grade reading curriculum she runs literature circles, teaches Read Naturally, and uses a leveled library in her classroom. She has taken both Reading and Writing Workshop training through Columbia Teacher's College and implements both daily.

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PREVENTING READING DIFFICULTIES BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adams, Marilyn Jager (1990) Beginning to Read, Thinking and Learning about Print; Cambridge, Mass; MIT Press. Adams, Marilyn Jager (1990) Beginning to Read, Thinking and Learning about Print, A Summary; DOE Anderson, et al (1985) Becoming a Nation of Readers: The Report of the Commission on Reading; Washington DC; National Institute of Education. Aukerman, R.C. (1984) Approaches to Beginning Reading; New York, Wiley. Berninger, Richards (2002) Brain Literacy for Educators and Psychologists. Brunner, Michael S. (1993) Retarding America- The Imprisonment of Potential; Portland, OR ; Halcyon House. Chall, J.S. (1967) Learning to Read: The Great Debate; New York, McGraw Hill. Chall, J.S. (1996) Stages of Reading Development 2nd edition, Harcourt Brace. Covey, Stephen R. (1991) Principle-Centered Leadership; New York, Simon and Schuster. Ellis, Arthur K. and Fouts, Jeffrey T. (1996) Research on Educational Innovations; NJ, Eye On Education, Inc. Farnham-Diggory, Sylvia (1992) Cognitive Processes in Education; New York, Harper Collins. Farnham-Diggory, Sylvia (1978, 1992, 1994) The Learning-Disabled Child; Cambridge, Mass, Harvard University Press. Flesch, Rudolph (1981) Why Johnny Still Can't Read; New York; Harper and Row. Fletcher, Lyon, Fuck. Barnes (2007) Learning Disabilities: From Identification to Intervention. Groff; Dr. Patrick (1987) Preventing Reading Failure- An Examination of the Myths of Reading Instruction ;Portland, OR; Halcyon House. Hall and Moats (1999) Straight Talk About Reading; Contemporary Books, Chicago, IL. Hirsch, E.D. (1997) What Your First Grader Needs to Know; New York, Doubleday. Lukens, Rebecca J. (1995) A Critical Handbook of Children's Literature; New York, Harper Collins. Moats, Louisa Cook (1995) Spelling: Development, Disabilities, and Instruction; Timonium, Maryland,York Press. Moats, Louisa Cook (2007) Basic Facts About Dyslexia and Other Reading Problems. National Reading Panel Report (2000) NICHD. Routman, Regie (1991) Invitations, Changing as Teachers and Learners K-12; Portsmouth, NH; Heinemann. Shaywitz. Sally (2004), Overcoming Dyslexia. Slavin, Robert E. et al (1996) Every Child, Every School, Success for All, Thousand Oaks, CA; Corwin Press. Snow, Catherine et al (1998) Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children, National Research Council. Spalding, Romalda (1990) The Writing Road to Reading, Quill William Morrow, New York. International Dyslexia Conferences, 2005 (San Diego) and 2008 (Seattle)

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PREVENTING READING DIFFICULTIES IN CHILDREN MODIFIED ROSNER

NAME________________________ GRADE_________

EXAMINER___________________

DATE SCORE

1st______ 1st______

2nd_______ 2nd_______

3rd_______ 3rd_______

4th_______ 4th_______

DEMONSTRATION: A. Say cowboy. B. Say steamboat.

Now say it again, but don't say boy. Now say it again, but don't say steam.

cow boat

PROBES: 1. Say sunshine. 2. Say picnic. 3. Say cucumber. 4. Say coat. 5. Say meat. 6. Say take. 7. Say game. 8. Say wrote. 9. Say please. 10. Say clap. 11. Say play. 12. Say stale. 13. Say smack.

Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say Now say

it again, but don't say shine. it again, but don't say pic. it again, but don't say cu. it again, but don't say /k/. it again, but don't say /m/. it again, but don't say /t/. it again, but don't say /m/. it again, but don't say /t/. it again, but don't say /z/. it again, but don't say /k/. it again, but don't say /p/. it again, but don't say /t/. it again, but don't say /m/.

sun nic cumber oat eat ache gay row plea lap lay sale sack

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MODIFIED ROSNER TAAS/ EXPECTED SCORES BY GRADE

SCORE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Expected for Children in: K K K Grade 1 Grade 1 Grade 1 Grade 1 Grade 1 Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 3

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