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EOCT Preparation Workbook

Ninth Grade Literature and Composition

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Table of Contents

To the Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv EOCT Reading Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Test-Taking Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Reading Selections with Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 EOCT Conventions Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Language Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT Practice Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Answer Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

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To the Student

This test preparation workbook helps you master the Georgia Performance Standards and prepare for success on the Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT. This workbook gives you the opportunity to review and practice the strategies and skills essential for success on the EOCT, as outlined in the Georgia Performance Standards and Content Descriptions. This EOCT workbook is organized in three sections: · EOCT Reading Practice provides test-taking strategies for answering reading questions. It also includes sample literary and informational passages as well as multiple-choice items similar to those you will find on the Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT. · EOCT Conventions Practice includes sample editing and revising passages as well as multiple-choice items similar to those you will find on the Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT. · Ninth Grade Literature and Composition Practice Test provides you with a fulllength practice test and the opportunity to practice for the Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT in a simulated testing situation.

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EOCT Reading Practice

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Section I: Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT

In grade 9, you will take Georgia's Ninth Grade Literature and Composition End-of-Course Test. This exam assesses your knowledge of skills in four content domains: I. Reading and Literature II. Reading Across the Curriculum/Listening, Speaking, and Viewing III. Writing IV. Conventions The first section of the EOCT will cover Content Domains I and II. You will answer multiple-choice questions about literary and informational passages.

EOCT Reading Practice

On the following pages, you will find test-taking strategies followed by several selections and items similar to those you will encounter on the Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT. These items address the skills and standards that you are expected to master in ninth grade.

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Test-Taking Strategies: Reading

Strategies for Answering Multiple-Choice Questions

Here are some suggestions for taking any standardized reading test:

· First, read the passage as if you were not even taking a test. Do this to get a

general overview of both the topic and the tone of a passage.

· Look at the big picture. In other words, examine the most obvious features of the

passage. To do this, ask yourself the following questions as you read: What is the title? What do you believe is the main idea of a piece of nonfiction or the theme of a piece of fiction? What do you think is the author's purpose? to inform? to entertain? to show how to do something?

· Next, read the questions. This will help you to know what information to look for

when you re-read.

· Re-read the passage. Underline information that relates to the questions. This will

help you when filling in the answers.

· Go back to the questions. Try to answer each one in your mind before looking at

the answer choices.

· Finally, read all the answer choices and eliminate those that are obviously

incorrect. After this process, mark the best answer.

Types of Multiple-Choice Questions

Many multiple-choice questions fall into categories. The following are the most common categories. 1. Main idea: The most important point expressed in a reading passage is the main idea. The main idea must relate to the entire passage, not just to a portion of it. After reading a passage, locate and underline the main idea. 2. Significant details: You will most probably be asked to recall specific details from a reading passage. You will know what details to look for if you read the questions before re-reading the passage. Underline these details as you re-read. Remember that correct answers do not always use the precise phrases or words that appear in the passage.

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3. Vocabulary: Standardized tests will often ask you to define a word within the context of the passage. In many instances, the answer choice will include an actual meaning of the word that does not fit the context in which the word appears. Reading the answer choices and then plugging them into the sentence help to determine which answer fits the context of the passage. 4. Conclusion and inference: Standardized tests often want you to draw conclusions or make inferences. There is often some idea within a passage that the author is trying to convey but does not state directly. Sometimes, you must consider various parts of the passage together in order to determine what the author is implying. An answer choice that refers to only one or two sentences or details within the passage is probably not the correct answer.

Other Tips

If you do not understand a passage at first, keep reading. Many times you will find that you know more answers than you first thought. Once you understand the main idea of a passage, you can go from there to figure out the specific information. As mentioned before, be sure to read all of the answer choices before choosing one. Students often make the mistake of rushing through the multiple-choice questions and marking the first answer choice that seems correct. Also, keep in mind that the people who write standardized tests often create incorrect answer choices that are designed to distract you from the right answer. Such "distractors" include answer choices that are true but not relevant to the question, answer choices that relate to the wrong part of the passage, and answer choices that are too broad or too narrow. Finally, read the questions and the answers as carefully as you would read the passage, and you should succeed on the reading sections of standardized tests.

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Strategies for Comprehension

Understanding Main Ideas and Supporting Details

When taking a reading test, you will often be asked to identify a reading selection's main idea. In order to tackle this type of question, follow these steps: Step 1: Read the selection and determine the topic. Step 2: Look at what all the details have in common. The details should point to the main idea. Hint: Pay attention to the first and last sentences. Sometimes you may find a sentence that states the main idea. Step 3: State the main idea in your own words. Then, look for an answer that closely matches your own. Be careful not to select a detail that merely supports the main idea as your answer. Step 4: Check to make sure that the details in the selection support your answer.

Identifying Author's Purpose

Reading comprehension tests frequently ask you to identify the author's purpose. While the responses may be specific to the text, each response will usually tie to one of the four general purposes for writing. Use the steps below for help in answering questions about purpose: Step 1: Look in the text for clues such as the ones below and decide toward which purpose most clues point.

· illustrations, diagrams, maps, charts, headings, and bulleted or numbered items

(to inform)

· words like should and must, and words that assign value such as worst and best

(to influence)

· frequent use of the word I and emotional words (to express) · use of vivid descriptions, dialogue, rhymes, drama, or humor (to entertain)

Step 2: Look for the response that most closely matches the general purpose you have identified.

Using Context Clues

As you read a selection in a reading test, you may discover that the author uses unfamiliar words. One way to determine the meaning of an unfamiliar word is to use context clues. A word's context is made up of the words and sentences around it. Use the following steps to answer questions about context clues in a selection: Step 1: Look at the context of the unfamiliar word. See if the words and sentences around it provide clues to the word's meaning. Step 2: Use the context clues to make a guess at the unfamiliar word's meaning. Step 3: Check your definition by inserting it in the passage in place of the unfamiliar word.

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Identifying Point of View or Bias

When you read a selection on a reading test, you may be asked to identify the author's point of view or identify any bias. Follow these steps to answer such questions: Step 1: Determine whether the writer uses more positive words or more negative words. Step 2: Try to answer the question in your own words. Step 3: Look for the choice that best matches your own answer.

Summarizing a Text

Standardized reading tests often ask you to identify the best summary of a reading passage. Follow these steps to choose the best answer to a summary question: Step 1: Look for the main idea and the most important supporting details as you read the passage slowly and carefully. Step 2: Consider every answer choice, eliminating those that restate a single detail from the passage, make a general statement about the passage but include no important details, or have little or nothing to do with the passage. Step 3: Be sure that the answer you choose covers the entire passage by including the main idea and major supporting details.

Making Inferences

Reading tests often include questions that check your ability to make inferences from a reading passage. Use the following steps to answer inference questions: Step 1: Skim the passage once for a general understanding; then, re-read it carefully. Keep in mind that most test questions are designed to measure your reading comprehension, not your reading speed. Step 2: Locate key words and phrases in the answer choices that match similar words and phrases in the reading passage. You may be able to eliminate some answers right away. Step 3: Confirm your answer by considering your prior knowledge about the subject of the passage.

Predicting Outcomes

Sometimes a reading test will ask you the outcome of events in a narrative passage. Use the following process to determine the most likely outcome: Step 1: Read the passage carefully. Everything you need to know is there. The correct answer must follow easily from the information in the passage--it should never depend on a change in a person or an unlikely turn of events. Step 2: Using the information in the passage, make a prediction about what will most likely happen next. Ask yourself what will result from the events in the passage. Step 3: For this kind of question, you will need to read all of the answers before you choose one. Eliminate answers by matching them against what you know from the passage and what you have predicted.

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Drawing Conclusions

On a reading test, you may be asked questions that begin like this, "Why do you think . . ." or "Based on the information in the passage, . . ." Questions like these require you to draw a conclusion. Use the steps below to respond to these types of questions: Step 1: Read the question or stem to identify the topic of the question. Step 2: Study the answer choices, ruling out those choices that are clearly wrong. Step 3: Re-read the passage and look for evidence that supports which of the remaining answer choices is correct.

Strategies for Analyzing an Author's Style and Technique

Analyzing Elements of Character, Theme, or Setting

Tests on literature often ask about literary elements such as character, theme, or setting. Step 1: Be sure you understand the three basic literary elements listed above. Step 2: As with any reading test, read the questions before you read the passage so you know exactly what to look for in the passage. Step 3: Look for information in the passage that relates to the literary element you are asked to find. Step 4: Choose the answer that most correctly relates to the details in the passage.

Analyzing Tone

An author's tone is his or her attitude, conveyed largely through word choice. Use the following steps to respond to reading-test questions about author's tone: Step 1: Look at the writer's diction (word choice). In particular, identify any connotative words the writer uses. Determine what the connotations suggest about the writer's attitude toward the subject. Step 2: Read all the answer choices, and eliminate those that are clearly inconsistent with what the diction suggests about the writer's tone. Step 3: Examine the remaining answer choices, and choose the one that best describes the tone of the passage. (Beware of answer choices that exaggerate the writer's attitude.)

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Analyzing Style

Some reading test questions will ask you to analyze the author's style. Style refers to the author's unique manner of expression. In addition to tone (see above), mood is a critical element of style. Mood is the feeling that the literature creates. As in tone, the author's diction (word choice) is a major component of mood. Another way to analyze style is to classify it as formal or informal. To answer questions about style, follow the steps below: Step 1: Look at the answer choices.

· Words like admiring, bitter, and comic suggest that the question is focusing on tone

or mood.

· Words like slangy, lofty, or elevated suggest that the question is more focused on

formality or informality. Step 2: Eliminate answer choices that are clearly inconsistent with the diction, tone, or mood of the selection. Step 3: Select the remaining choice that seems most consistent with the diction, tone, or mood of the selection.

Evaluating Rhetorical Strategies

Some tests will test your ability to evaluate rhetorical strategies, including strategies that are not based on solid evidence. One flawed strategy is the use of overgeneralization. Use the following steps to evaluate generalizations you find in your reading: Step 1: Look for general statements. Words like no one, never, every, and always may signal a general statement. An example of a general statement that sounds like an overgeneralization is "All dogs love to play in the water." Step 2: Identify the details that support the statement. If there is no support the statement is probably an overgeneralization. Step 3: Evaluate the support. Does it really support the broad generalization or only a qualified version of the generalization? An example of an overgeneralization that has been qualified is "Some dogs love to play in the water."

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Analyzing Literary Devices

Many tests on literature will ask you to identify literary devices. The chart below reviews some of the major literary devices. Device and Definition An allusion is a reference to a person, place, or event from history, literature, religion, mythology, politics, sport, science, or pop culture. Figurative language describes one thing in terms of another and is not meant to be taken literally. A metaphor compares one thing to something quite unlike it. A simile compares two things using like or as. Personification describes an inanimate object giving it human characteristics. Imagery is language that appeals to any of the five senses: sight, touch, smell, hearing, and taste. Irony is the contrast between expectation and reality: between what is said and what is meant (verbal); between what is expected to happen and what really happens (situational); between what a character thinks is true and what the audience knows to be true (dramatic). Example The George M. Cohan song "The Yankee Doodle Boy" alludes to the eighteenthcentury tune "Yankee Doodle." metaphor: The wind is a rake. simile: The thick woods were like prison walls. personification: The flower turned its gaze toward the sun. At the pond, a rustling of dry reeds revealed the brown head of a grackle, who watched the cool, gleaming water with a beady eye. verbal irony: "Oh, I absolutely love that hat. Are those real grapes?" situational irony: A soldier survives many grueling battles abroad only to be run over by an ice cream truck back home. dramatic irony: A play's hero thinks her son is dead, but the audience knows that her son is alive. A symbol is an object, event, person, or animal to which extraordinary meaning is attached. A skull and crossbones symbolizes danger; red roses symbolize love. These are symbols that everyone uses. Writers try to create fresh symbols.

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

The Railroad Excursion

1 In 1881, one of the most adventurous ways to travel was by railroad. In that year Ben Travis, age fifteen, took his first long train ride. Ben had ridden aboard trains many times but just for short distances. On this trip Ben traveled with his father from Omaha, Nebraska, to Sacramento, California. They rode the Pacific Express, covering a distance of almost 2,000 miles! The Express had been in service for a dozen years. Its operation was made possible on that famous date, May 15, 1869, when the rail line was linked up at Promontory, Utah. When the railroad was opened, travel from the Midwest to California was transformed. Instead of taking six months by wagon train, it became possible to get there in less than a week. The train route also affected the number of people making the trip. In the first full year that the line operated, almost 150,000 people rode the train to California. In 1881, nearly a million people made the same trip! Ben's school semester had just ended, and his father was taking him to spend part of his summer with his grandparents, who lived in San Francisco. When the day came to start their trip, Ben eagerly boarded the train. He made sure he was one of the first passengers to board so he would have a window seat. He didn't want to miss any of the interesting sights along the way. As they crossed the Great Plains, Ben watched intently for herds of buffalo. Although he sometimes saw a few small herds off in the distance, he never saw the enormous numbers that he had read about in stories. Since the train did not have any dining facilities, it stopped at stations along the way for meals. After several of these stops, Ben and his father were grateful that the trip would last only a few days. The meals, whether breakfast, lunch, or supper, always seemed the same: usually beefsteak, fried potatoes, and fried eggs. Occasionally, there might be an alternative dish, such as the breakfast that some passengers thought was chicken stew but was actually prairie dog. After crossing the plains, the train began climbing into the higher elevations of the Rocky Mountains. Ben had never seen anything like these mountains. He could look at their endless variety of features and imagine them to be shaped like profiles, stairs, or even castles. There were also any number of small streams, formed from melting snow, flowing down the mountainsides and cascading into waterfalls as they flowed into the larger streams of the valleys. Ben enjoyed traveling through the mountains more than any other part of the trip, but soon they were in California, nearing the end of the line. After a few more hours they finally arrived at their last stop, Sacramento. Ben found his grandparents waiting on the station platform.

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The Railroad Excursion

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What was the author's MAIN purpose for writing this passage? A to describe a train trip long ago B to tell about an important event in history C to convince people to learn more about railroads D to explain why people traveled west in the 1800s

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Which statement BEST supports the idea that the population of California probably grew in the late 1800s? A Ben had never seen anything like these mountains. B They rode the Pacific Express, covering a distance of almost 2,000 miles! C When the railroad was opened, travel from the Midwest to California was transformed. D In 1881, nearly a million people made the same trip!

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How does the second paragraph contribute to the story? A It gives the price of tickets. B It provides railroad history. C It discusses the scenery along the way. D It introduces Ben's family.

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The Railroad Excursion

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Based on his actions in the story, which statement is MOST likely true of Ben? A Food is not important to him. B He is quite prone to motion sickness. C He appreciates nature.

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Based on the context of the second paragraph, what does the word service mean? A use B army C dishes D ceremony

D He thinks prairie dog is delicious.

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Based on the context of the second paragraph, what does the word transformed mean? A difficult B powered C delayed D changed

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

A Country Cottage

by Anton Chekhov 1 Two young people who had not long been married were walking up and down the platform of a little country station. His arm was round her waist, her head was almost on his shoulder, and both were happy. The moon peeped up from the drifting cloudlets and frowned, as it seemed, envying their happiness. The still air was heavy with the fragrance of lilac and wild cherry. Somewhere in the distance beyond the line a corncrake was calling. "How beautiful it is, Sasha, how beautiful!" murmured the young wife. "It all seems like a dream. See, how sweet and inviting that little copse looks! How nice those solid, silent telegraph posts are! They add a special note to the landscape, suggesting humanity, civilization in the distance. . . . Don't you think it's lovely when the wind brings the rushing sound of a train?" "Yes. . . . But . . . What have you got for our supper to-night?" "Chicken and salad. . . . It's a chicken just big enough for two. . . . Then there is the salmon and sardines that were sent from town." The moon hid her face behind a cloud. Human happiness reminded her of her own loneliness, of her solitary couch beyond the hills and dales. "The train is coming!" said Varya, "how jolly!" Three eyes of fire could be seen in the distance. The stationmaster came out on the platform. Signal lights flashed here and there on the line. "Let's see the train in and go home," said Sasha, yawning. "What a splendid time we are having together, Varya, it's so splendid, one can hardly believe it's true!" The dark monster crept noiselessly alongside the platform and came to a standstill. They caught glimpses of sleepy faces, of hats and shoulders at the dimly lighted windows. "Look! look!" they heard from one of the carriages. "Varya and Sasha have come to meet us! There they are! . . . Varya! . . . Varya. . . . Look!" Two little girls skipped out of the train and hung on Varya's neck. They were followed by a stout, middle-aged lady, and a tall, lanky gentleman with grey whiskers; behind them came two schoolboys, laden with bags, and after the schoolboys, the governess, after the governess the grandmother. "Here we are, here we are, dear boy!" began the whiskered gentleman, squeezing Sasha's hand. "Sick of waiting for us, I expect! You have been pitching into your old uncle for not coming down all this time, I daresay! Kolya, Kostya, Nina, Fifa . . . children! Kiss your cousin Sasha! We're all here, the whole troop of us, just for three or four days. . . . I hope we shan't be too many for you? You mustn't let us put you out!"

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At the sight of their uncle and his family, the young couple were horrorstricken. While his uncle talked and kissed them, Sasha had a vision of their little cottage: he and Varya giving up their three little rooms, all the pillows and bedding to their guests; the salmon, the sardines, the chicken all devoured in a single instant; the cousins plucking the flowers in their little garden, spilling the ink, filling the cottage with noise and confusion; his aunt talking continually about her ailments and her papa's having been Baron von Fintich. . . . And Sasha looked almost with hatred at his young wife, and whispered: "It's you they've come to see!" "No, it's you," answered Varya, pale with anger. "They're your relations! They're not mine!" And turning to her visitors, she said with a smile of welcome: "Welcome to the cottage!" The moon came out again. She seemed to smile, as though she were glad she had no relations. Sasha, turning his head away to hide his angry despairing face, struggled to give a note of cordial welcome to his voice as he said: "It is jolly of you! Welcome to the cottage!"

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A Country Cottage

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Which terms BEST describe how Sasha and Varya feel at the beginning of the story? A realistic and practical B insecure and lonely C quiet and peaceful D blissful and romantic

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Which of the following foreshadows the approaching conflict? A "The still air was heavy with the fragrance of lilac and wild cherry." B "The dark monster crept noiselessly alongside the platform. . . ." C "The stationmaster came out on the platform." D "They caught glimpses of sleepy faces, of hats and shoulders at the dimly lighted windows."

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Read this sentence from paragraph 2. The moon peeped up from the drifting cloudlets and frowned, as it seemed, envying their happiness. What literary device does the author use in this excerpt? A allusion B simile C personification D alliteration

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A Country Cottage

10 Which characteristic BEST describes the visiting relatives' understanding of Sasha and Varya's feelings about having guests? A oblivious B angry C embarrassed D appalled

12 In the context of the third paragraph, what does the word copse MOST likely mean? A comfortable stuffed chair B group of small trees C gathering of teenagers D dish of shrimp and rice

13 With which theme of the story would the moon agree? 11 Based on the last few paragraphs, what will MOST likely happen next? A Sasha will leave Varya to entertain the guests. B Varya will refuse to entertain the guest. C Sasha and Varya will go out to eat and give their guests some privacy. D Sasha and Varya will do everything possible to make their guests feel welcome. A The sweetness of a couple in love can turn bitter when relatives arrive. B It is more important to honor one's relatives than to strive for romantic love. C It never pays to hang around out of doors after dark. D Flexibility is the main key to success in marriage.

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

from

My Ántonia, Book I, Part VI

Willa Cather

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Much as I liked Ántonia, I hated a superior tone that she sometimes took with me. She was four years older than I, to be sure, and had seen more of the world; but I was a boy and she was a girl, and I resented her protecting manner. Before the autumn was over, she began to treat me more like an equal and to defer to me in other things than reading lessons. This change came about from an adventure we had together. One day when I rode over to the Shimerdas' I found Ántonia starting off on foot for Russian Peter's house, to borrow a spade Ambrosch needed. . . . We found Russian Peter digging his potatoes. We were glad to go in and get warm by his kitchen stove and to see his squashes and Christmas melons, heaped in the storeroom for winter. As we rode away with the spade, Ántonia suggested that we stop at the prairie-dog town1 and dig into one of the holes. We could find out whether they ran straight down, or were horizontal, like mole holes; whether they had underground connections; whether the owls had nests down there, lined with feathers. We might get some puppies, or owl eggs, or snake skins. The dog town was spread out over perhaps ten acres. The grass had been nibbled short and even, so this stretch was not shaggy and red like the surrounding country, but gray and velvety. The holes were several yards apart, and were disposed2 with a good deal of regularity, almost as if the town had been laid out in streets and avenues. One always felt that an orderly and very sociable kind of life was going on there. . . . .We went wandering about, looking for a hole that would be easy to dig. The dogs were out, as usual, dozens of them, sitting up on their hind legs over the doors of their houses. As we approached, they barked, shook their tails at us, and scurried underground. . . . We were examining a big hole with two entrances. The burrow sloped into the ground at a gentle angle, so that we could see where the two corridors united, and the floor was dusty from use, like a little highway over which much travel went. I was walking backward, in a crouching position, when I heard Ántonia scream. She was standing opposite me, pointing behind me and shouting something in Bohemian. I whirled round, and there . . . was the biggest snake I had ever seen. He was sunning himself, after the cold night, and he must have been asleep when Ántonia screamed. When I turned, he was lying in long loose waves, like a letter "W." He twitched and began to coil slowly. He was not merely a big snake, I thought--he was a circus monstrosity. His abominable3 muscularity, his loathsome, fluid motion, somehow made me sick. He was as thick as my leg, and looked as if

1. prairie-dog town: Prairie dogs are not dogs but burrowing rodents who make their underground homes, called towns, all over the Great Plains of North America. 2. disposed: positioned. 3. abominable: causing disgust or hatred.

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millstones couldn't crush the disgusting vitality out of him. He lifted his hideous little head, and rattled. I didn't run because I didn't think of it--if my back had been against a stone wall I couldn't have felt more cornered. I saw his coils tighten--now he would spring, spring his length, I remembered. I ran up and drove at his head with my spade, struck him fairly across the neck, and in a minute he was all about my feet in wavy loops. I struck now from hate. Ántonia, barefooted as she was, ran up behind me. Even after I had pounded his ugly head flat, his body kept on coiling and winding, doubling and falling back on itself. I walked away and turned my back. I felt seasick. Ántonia came after me, crying, "O Jimmy, he not bite you? You sure? Why you not run when I say?" "What did you jabber Bohunk4 for? You might have told me there was a snake behind me!" I said petulantly. "I know I am just awful, Jim, I was so scared." She took my handkerchief from my pocket and tried to wipe my face with it, but I snatched it away from her. I suppose I looked as sick as I felt. "I never know you was so brave, Jim," she went on comfortingly. "You is just like big mans; you wait for him lift his head and then you go for him. Ain't you feel scared a bit? Now we take that snake home and show everybody. Nobody ain't seen in this kawntree so big snake like you kill." She went on in this strain5 until I began to think that I had longed for this opportunity, and had hailed it with joy. Cautiously we went back to the snake; he was still groping with his tail, turning up his ugly belly in the light. A faint, fetid6 smell came from him, and a thread of green liquid oozed from his crushed head. "Look, Tony, that's his poison," I said. . . . The sun had set when we reached our garden and went down the draw7 toward the house. Otto Fuchs was the first one we met. He was sitting on the edge of the cattle-pond, having a quiet pipe before supper. Ántonia called him to come quick and look. He did not say anything for a minute, but scratched his head and turned the snake over with his boot. "Where did you run onto that beauty, Jim?" "Up at the dog-town," I answered laconically8. "Kill him yourself? How come you to have a weapon?" "We'd been up to Russian Peter's, to borrow a spade for Ambrosch." Otto shook the ashes out of his pipe and squatted down to count the rattles. "It was just luck you had a tool," he said cautiously. "Gosh! I wouldn't want to do any business with that fellow myself, unless I had a fence-post along. Your grandmother's snake-cane wouldn't more than tickle him. He could stand right up and talk to you, he could. Did he fight hard?" Ántonia broke in: "He fight something awful! He is all over Jimmy's boots. I scream for him to run, but he just hit and hit that snake like he was crazy." Otto winked at me. After Ántonia rode on he said: "Got him in the head first crack, didn't you? That was just as well."

4. bohunk: slang for Bohemian, a dialect of the Czech language. 5. she went on in this strain: she kept talking this way. 6. fetid: bad-smelling. 7. draw: shallow area. 8. laconically: using few words.

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We hung him up to the windmill, and when I went down to the kitchen, I found Ántonia standing in the middle of the floor, telling the story with a great deal of color. Subsequent experiences with rattlesnakes taught me that my first encounter was fortunate in circumstance. My big rattler was old, and had led too easy a life; there was not much fight in him. He had probably lived there for years, with a fat prairiedog for breakfast whenever he felt like it, a sheltered home, even an owl-feather bed, perhaps, and he had forgot that the world doesn't owe rattlers a living. A snake of his size, in fighting trim, would be more than any boy could handle. So in reality it was a mock adventure; the game was fixed for me by chance, as it probably was for many a dragon-slayer. I had been adequately armed by Russian Peter; the snake was old and lazy; and I had Ántonia beside me, to appreciate and admire. That snake hung on our corral fence for several days; some of the neighbors came to see it and agreed that it was the biggest rattler ever killed in those parts. This was enough for Ántonia. She liked me better from that time on, and she never took a supercilious9 air with me again. I had killed a big snake--I was now a big fellow.

9. supercilious: acting superior, haughty.

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from My Ántonia, Book I, Part VI

14 Which of these statements from the fourth paragraph is an example of simile? A The dog town was spread out over perhaps ten acres. B The holes were several yards apart, and were disposed with a good deal of regularity, almost as if the town had been laid out in streets and avenues. C One always felt that an orderly and very sociable kind of life was going on there. D As we approached, they barked, shook their tails at us, and scurried underground.

16 How does Jim come to regard the conflict with the snake? A as a gift given to him by fate B as proof of his manhood C as a shameful incident of senseless killing D as another opportunity for Ántonia to act superior

15 What is the MOST likely reason that Ántonia wipes Jim's face with a handkerchief? A The snake has bitten his face. B He has thrown up on himself. C He is sweating and possibly tearful. D He accidentally struck his nose with the spade.

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from My Ántonia, Book I, Part VI

17 How does the fact that the snake was extremely large contribute to the story? A Ántonia could have handled the snake herself if it had been small. B No one is afraid of small snakes, so it had to be large to create suspense. C Small snakes run from people so there would not have been a conflict. D The size made Jim's feat both more frightening and impressive.

19 What is the effect of the use of first person in this selection? A It shows that Jim knew more about the situation than Ántonia knew. B It allows the author to use more descriptive language. C It shows that the author did some research before writing. D It helps the reader understand the narrator's feelings and thoughts.

18 Which of the following describes one method the author uses in this excerpt to hint at characters' backgrounds and help illustrate the story's setting? A She includes details about clothes. B She reproduces the characters' dialects. C She has the characters talk about their backgrounds. D She includes all characters' inner thoughts.

20 In the context of the seventh paragraph, what does petulantly mean? A relieved B jokingly C irritably D happily

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

The Old Knight's Treasure

1 The wind moaned mournfully through the forest trees and round the grim old castle, standing high on a hill, from which the distant Rhine was just visible. At the back of the castle, the forest extended almost to the wall; but in front, there was nothing to obstruct the view down to the beautiful river. It was a grand, lonely place; grand in its site, and lonely, cut off as it was from all the world by the seemingly limitless forest. The nature of the place was indicative of the character of its owner--the knight Sir John. He was isolated from all mankind by an impenetrable forest of reserve. That he was proud and stern was the verdict of all who had ever seen him. But there had been days when old Sir John was very different. The servants could remember the time when he had been a kind and jovial master, never passing them without a word of encouragement--when he had been happy in the love of a gentle wife and a bright-eyed little son. Those days had long been over. All the light-heartedness was changed into gloom, and stern commands came in place of kind words. People thought that he had already outlived his usefulness. His heirs, especially, were longing for his death. For did he not own lands enough to make them all rich? And what good did luxuries do him? He was a soured, discontented old man, they thought, and did not deserve all his good things. But little did poor old Sir John care for the silver that shone on his tables or for the elegant furnishings of his rooms. They could give him little comfort since he had lost all that he loved in the world. He sat in his own room brooding over the fire. Who could tell what his thoughts might be? The servants said that he was thinking of his hoarded treasures because he was constantly looking at a huge chest standing by his bed, and everyone knew that this chest contained the most valuable of all the old knight's possessions. What it held exactly was the greatest of the many mysteries of his life. No one knew more than what was whispered by the servants. They encouraged the idea that it contained gold and priceless jewels because on its cover were inscribed these words: "Remember all, whatever happens, save this even if all else is lost." Rising from his chair one evening, Sir John walked to the window, and as he looked up at the stars, he wished that he might feel as calm and untroubled as they looked. He prayed that he might soon be released from this great loneliness he felt. As fate would have it, it was not long that he waited. A week from that night, after a cold and cheerless day, he lay on his huge bed for the last time. This time, though, he was as calm as the stars. His heirs seemed hardly able to refrain themselves. It was all they could do to let the last prayer be said. All waited with the greatest eagerness for the mysterious chest to be opened. Hurrying into the room where it was kept, everyone crossed around it while nail after nail was loosened. At last the cover was lifted off, and each

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tried to catch the first glimpse of the riches within. Suddenly they drew back, staring in each other's faces in speechless amazement and anger. The chest contained only the toys of a boy--a top, a ball, a kite--all placed tenderly side by side by the father who had been called harsh, cold, and heartless. So had the lonely man cherished, all these years, the memory of the bright little boy who had promised so much and half left his father so early.

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The Old Knight's Treasure

21 Read this sentence from paragraph 1. The wind moaned mournfully through the forest trees and round the grim old castle, standing high on a hill, from which the distant Rhine was just visible. Why does the author begin the story with this sentence? A to frighten readers B to establish a forlorn mood C to show that the setting was in a location with bad weather D to focus readers' attention on the forest

23 Based on the selection, which words BEST describe the true character of Sir John? A kind and jovial B angry and unhappy C proud and stern D sad and lonely

24 Read this sentence from paragraph 2. The servants could remember the time when he had been a kind and jovial master, never passing them without a word of encouragement--when he had been happy in the love of a gentle wife and a bright-eyed little son. What does this use of flashback accomplish? A It gives the readers insight into the ending of the story. B It makes the story less depressing. C It shows that the servants were not always critical of Sir John. D It shows why Sir John had outlived his usefulness in later years.

22 What is the effect produced by the author's use of a third-person limited point of view? A It lets the reader know the thoughts of some characters, but not all. B It lets the reader only know what the main character thinks. C It helps the reader follow the events of the story more easily. D It reveals the present, but not the past to the reader.

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The Old Knight's Treasure

25 Based on the selection, which is the MOST likely reason Sir John kept the treasure chest nailed shut? A to keep the painful memories out of sight B to keep the dust out C to keep others from stealing his treasures D to keep his memories to himself

27 The phrase impenetrable forest of reserve used in paragraph 2 is an example of A simile B acronym C metaphor D alliteration

28 Read this sentence from paragraph 8. His heirs seemed hardly able to refrain themselves. It was all they could do to let the last prayer be said. All waited with the greatest eagerness for the mysterious chest to be opened. Which of the heirs' characteristics is MOST emphasized in this excerpt? A insensitivity A nervous B determination B depressed C greediness C like spoiled milk D enthusiasm D ill-tempered

26 Read this sentence from paragraph 3. He was a soured, discontented old man, they thought, and did not deserve all his good things. The author uses the word soured to describe Sir John to suggest that he is

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

To a Locomotive In Winter

by Walt Whitman Thee for my recitative1, Thee in the driving storm even as now, the snow, the winter-day declining, Thee in thy panoply2, thy measur'd dual throbbing and thy beat convulsive, Thy black cylindric body, golden brass and silvery steel, Thy ponderous side-bars, parallel and connecting rods, gyrating, shuttling at thy sides, Thy metrical, now swelling pant and roar, now tapering in the distance, Thy great protruding headlight fix'd in front, Thy long, pale, floating vapor-pennants, tinged with delicate purple, The dense and murky clouds out-belching from thy smoke-stack. Thy knitted frame, thy springs and valves, the tremulous twinkle of thy wheels, Thy train of cars behind, obedient, merrily following, Through gale or calm, now swift, now slack, yet steadily careening3; Type of the modern - emblem of motion and power - pulse of the continent, For once come serve the Muse and merge in verse, even as here I see thee, With storm and buffeting gusts of wind and falling snow, By day thy warning ringing bell to sound its notes, By night thy silent signal lamps to swing. Fierce-throated beauty! Roll through my chant with all thy lawless music, thy swinging lamps at night, Thy piercing, madly-whistled laughter, thy echoes, rumbling like an earthquake, rousing all, Law of thyself complete, thine old track firmly holding, (No sweetness debonair4 of tearful harp or glib5 piano thine,) Thy trills and shrieks by rocks and hills return'd, Launch'd o'er the prairies wide, across the lakes, To the free skies unpent and glad and strong.

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1. recitative: piece for public performance 2. panoply: splendid display 3. careening: rushing 4. debonair: carefree 5. glib: easy

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To a Locomotive In Winter

29 Why does the poet say that the train's "law of itself" is complete? A to show that there were many legal problems with the locomotive B to show that the locomotive was a self-powered C to show that, after years of work, the locomotive was ready to run D to emphasize its miraculous technology

31 Why do you suppose Whitman focuses on the train during winter rather than another season? A to show that the train had a heater that worked well B to show that the train could operate only in the winter C to show the train's ability to operate in bad weather D to show that spring and summer were lesser seasons

30 Why does Whitman call the locomotive the "pulse of the continent?" A He knew the train vibrated the earth as it moved along. B He saw it as a symbol of the technological progress of the country. C He believed everyone was fascinated by trains. D He thought it would be the downfall of the young country.

32 In what ways does Whitman present the locomotive as a symbol of the industrial United States of the 1800s? A He shows that it was loud and noisy. B He shows that the train was a financial success. C He explains how the locomotive was built. D He depicts it as an emblem of motion and power.

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To a Locomotive In Winter

33 In the context of the poem, what does the term fierce-throated mean at the beginning of the second stanza? A sickly and sore B loud and powerful C choking D frightening

35 What effect is achieved by using second person in the selection? A It involves the reader in the poem. B It gives the reader a clear idea of who the speaker is. C It makes the train seem like a living, breathing entity. D It makes the poem easier to understand.

34 What is the meaning of the suffix ­less ("thy lawless music")? A with B without C before D after

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer

Walt Whitman When I heard the learn'd astronomer, When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me, When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them, When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture room, How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick, Till rising and gliding out I wandered off by myself, In the mystical moist night air, and from time to time, Looked up in perfect silence at the stars.

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When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer

36 In line 7, why does Whitman MOST likely choose the word mystical instead of the closelyrelated adjective mysterious? A Mysterious has too many syllables. B He wants to convey a sense of the universe being a puzzle. C He wants to create alliteration with moist. D Mystical has connotations of spirituality.

38 What is the combined effect of the repetition of When in lines 1­4 and the increasing length of these four lines? A It helps create a sense of how the astronomer's talk got longer and longer. B It helps the reader feel the excitement the poem's speaker felt. C It creates suspense about what will happen next. D It shows how the poem's speaker was worried about the time.

37 Which line from the poem contains alliteration? A "How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick," B "When I heard the learn'd astronomer" , C "In the mystical moist night air, and from time to time," D "When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me," 39 What causes the speaker of the poem to leave the lecture hall? A interest in astronomy B desire to meet the astronomer C disappointment with the astronomer D surprise at the astronomer's message

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When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer

40 Which of these would you expect to be the BEST source of biographical information about Walt Whitman? A Kummings, Donald D., ed. Approaches to Teaching Whitman's Leaves of Grass B Miller, Edwin Haviland, ed. A Century of Whitman Criticism C Gardner, Thomas. Discovering Ourselves in Whitman D Zweig, Paul. Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

from

Second Inaugural Address

Saturday, March 4, 1865 Abraham Lincoln

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Fellow-Countrymen: At this second appearing to take the oath of the Presidential office there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then a statement somewhat in detail of a course to be pursued seemed fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented. The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured. On the occasion corresponding to this four years ago all thoughts were anxiously directed to an impending civil war. All dreaded it, all sought to avert it. While the inaugural address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, urgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it without war--seeking to dissolve the Union and divide effects by negotiation. Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and the war came. One-eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was somehow the cause of the war. To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war, while the Government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the territorial enlargement of it. Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said "the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether." With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.

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from Second Inaugural Address

41 In paragraph 2 of his second inaugural speech, Lincoln contrasts A the pros and cons of slavery

43 The arguments in paragraph 2 are MOST likely to appeal to A Northerners B Southerners

B feelings about the Union C all U.S. citizens C pacifists and warmongers D foreigners D the causes of the Civil War

42 Read this line from paragraph 1. ...during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on ever point and phrase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention and engrosses the energies of the nation,... What is the general meaning of this line? A The public has been invited to make a general statement. B The public should pay more attention to contests. C There has been too much energy poured into the Civil War. D There has been a lot of news about the Civil War.

44 A philosophical belief found in paragraph 4 is that A people have been paying for slavery for 250 years B slavery began three thousand years ago C the evils of war may be retribution for the evils of slavery D lashes and swords are both used to draw blood

45 In the last paragraph, Lincoln appeals to all Americans by A stressing that his policies are the best policies B suggesting punishment for those who started the war C developing peace treaties with other nations D arguing for peace and justice for all citizens

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from Second Inaugural Address

46 The word from the speech that comes from the Latin prefix meaning "out" and root meaning "breath" is A expiration B negotiation C insurgents D perpetuate

48 What does the word peculiar mean as it is used in paragraph 3? A odd or curious B new or original C divisive D distinctive

47 Context clues reveal that the word malice in paragraph 5 means A equality B revenge C ill will D bad luck

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Pangaea

1 As explorers such as Columbus and Magellan sailed the oceans of the world, they brought back information about new continents and their coastlines. Mapmakers used the information to make the first reliable world maps. As people studied the maps, they were impressed by the similarity of the continental shorelines on either side of the Atlantic Ocean. The continents looked as though they would fit together, like the parts of a giant jigsaw puzzle. Were the continents once part of the same huge landmass? If so, what caused this landmass to break apart? What caused the continents to move to their present locations? These questions eventually led to the formulation of hypotheses. In 1912, a German scientist, Alfred Wegener, proposed a hypothesis called continental drift, which stated that the continents had moved. Wegener hypothesized that the continents once formed part of a single giant landmass, which he named Pangaea, meaning "all lands." In addition to the similarities in the coastlines of the continents, Wegener soon found other evidence to support his hypothesis. If the continents had once been joined, research should uncover fossils of the same plants and animals in areas that had been adjoining parts of Pangaea. Wegener knew that identical fossil remains had already been found in both eastern South America and western Africa. The age and type of rocks in coastal regions of widely separated areas, such as western Africa and eastern Brazil, matched closely. Despite the evidence supporting the hypothesis of continental drift, Wegener's ideas met with strong opposition. The conclusive evidence that Wegener sought to support his hypothesis was finally discovered in 1947. As scientists examined rock samples that they brought up from the ocean floor, they made a startling discovery. None of the oceanic rocks were more than 150 million years old. The oldest continental rocks are about 4 billion years old. Here, at last, were the discoveries that Wegener had sought. They provided the scientific evidence he needed to formulate the theory of continental drift.

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Pangaea

49 What is the MAIN purpose of this selection? A to persuade readers that continental drift is a reasonable theory B to explain how continental drift occurs C to explain how the theory of continental drift was developed D to point to the need for further research on the topic of continental drift

51 Which of the following pieces of evidence does NOT support the theory of continental drift? A the similarities of the coastlines on either side of the Atlantic B the vastly different plant and animal species on different continents C the age of rocks on the ocean floor D the identical fossil remains found in eastern South America and western Africa

50 Which statement BEST supports the theory of continental drift? A Since the oceanic rocks are younger than continental rock, they must have formed after the continents drifted apart. B Since the oceanic rocks are older than the continental rock, they must have been submerged until Pangaea broke up. C Since the oceanic rocks are older than the continental rock, a meteorite must have deposited them there. D Heat released from the formation of oceanic rock must have caused the continents to split apart.

52 Which of the following words shares a common root meaning "all" with the word Pangaea? A geology B panorama C geopolitics D all of the above

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Pangaea

53 Which addition would MOST likely make this article easier to understand? A an Earth geologic timeline B a flat map of the earth C a graphic illustration of the break-up of Pangaea D a photograph of Alfred Wegener

55 The most current information supporting Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift would MOST likely be found in A a collection of science fiction stories with Wegener's theory as their basis B a collection of maps illustrating the theory of continental drift C a history of Alfred Wegener's life and work D a recent article in a geology journal on the topic of Continental Drift Theory and plate tectonics

54 In order to learn more about the break-up of Pangaea, which of these research topics would be the MOST helpful? A geology and what a geologist does B reconstruction of Pangaea: the breakup and dispersion of continents C the formation of fossils D ocean crustal rocks: their formation and composition

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

From Dream to Disaster

1 On a calm, starry night in 1912, the largest ship that had ever been built struck an iceberg. In less than three hours the ship plunged to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. The first voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic had ended, and more than 1,500 people lost their lives. When the Titanic began the voyage from England to New York, many people on board believed the massive ship was unsinkable. Passengers thought they were sailing on the safest ship afloat, a masterpiece of technology. Strong and sleek, the Titanic was constructed of forty-six thousand tons of steel. It had a hull with a double bottom, unlike most ships. For extra safety the hull was divided into sixteen watertight compartments, which were separated by locked doors. Water could flood four of the compartments, and the ship would still float. The ship's designers thought the worst collision would only damage two compartments. What series of events could have doomed the mighty Titanic? The Titanic set sail on April 10, 1912. Four days later, the ship's radio operators received seven warnings from other ships about icebergs in the area. The Titanic had no procedure for relaying messages from the radio operators to the captain. The warning messages were received by several different radio operators. Not all of the messages reached Captain Smith. The night of April 14, the Titanic steamed ahead almost at full speed. Late that evening, the Titanic arrived in the radio range of Canada. For the first time, passengers could send messages to their families in the United States. The last, most important iceberg warning came at 10:55 p.m., but the radio operator was busy sending passengers' personal messages. He never reported the iceberg warning to the captain. Lookouts were posted in the crow's-nest high above the ship. Usually they had binoculars, but that night they did not. They strained their eyes searching the cold, moonless dark. The sea was calm and silent. In a rougher sea, they might have spotted waves splashing against the enormous, white iceberg and called out a warning in time. At around 11:40 p.m., a lookout rang the alarm bell and telephoned the officers on the bridge. "Iceberg right ahead!" he yelled. The first officer ordered the crew to turn the ship away from the iceberg, and then he switched the doors closed in the watertight compartments. If the ship had turned away at full speed, it might have missed the iceberg. Instead, the first officer sent a signal to stop and reverse the engines, which slowed the ship down. The right side of the Titanic scraped against the iceberg. The jolt was slight, but the damage was serious. Ice rammed against the seams of the hull where rivets held together the steel plates. The rivets loosened and popped out. The plates separated, and water began pouring into the hull. The engineers turned on the pumps right away, but the sea flooded in too fast for the pumps to keep up. The doors of the watertight compartments were truly

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watertight, but the walls between the compartments were open at the tops. When one compartment flooded, water spilled over into the next one. The compartments resembled an ice cube tray tilted into a sink of water. It was only a matter of time before all the compartments flooded, and the ship nose-dived into the deep. The Titanic carried more than 2,200 passengers but only enough lifeboats for 1,178 people. Even with the lifeboats, only around 700 people survived the disaster. The crew sent out distress signals by radio and fired white rockets into the night sky. The one ship close enough to help, the Californian, sat less than twenty miles away. Unfortunately, its operator had turned off the radio for the night and had gone to sleep. The sinking of the Titanic horrified the world. In 1913, the first International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea created new rules. The rules required ships to carry enough lifeboats for every person on board and to hold lifeboat drills on every voyage. Ships had to keep a radio watch twenty-four hours a day, every day. The legacy of the Titanic became one not only of death and loss, but of life and safety for all who sail.

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From Dream to Disaster

56 What is the MAIN purpose of this selection? A to tell a Titanic survivor's version of events B to persuade readers to think twice before getting on a ship C to describe the sinking of the Titanic and its consequences D to express the author's sense of sorrow

58 What is the effect of including the direct quotation in paragraph 5? A to emphasize the truthfulness of the author's account B to show that the author has conducted serious research C to build suspense for the readers D to suggest that the lookout had not done his job properly

57 How do the first five words help set the mood for the first part of the selection? A The words create a strong contrast with the impending tragedy. B The words describe both the night and the people's attitudes about the Titanic. C The words show that the story is just a fairy tale with fairy tale characters. D The words show that the weather is nice so the passengers are in a good mood.

59 According to the selection, which statement about the sinking of Titanic is MOST likely true? A The sinking was the most important event in the twentieth century. B The sinking made many people choose air travel rather than ocean travel. C The sinking actually helped make ocean travel safer. D The sinking caused ocean travelers to use routes where they would not see icebergs.

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From Dream to Disaster

60 The author uses the word unsinkable in paragraph 2 to show that people felt the Titanic was A substandard B invincible C powerful D cold

62 Which addition would MOST likely make this article easier to understand? A a timeline of events once the Titanic struck the iceberg until the ship sank B a map of the Titanic's route marking where it encountered the iceberg C a photograph of the Titanic D a diagram of the ship illustrating where it was damaged and how flooding occurred

61 Where could a reader look to get a thorough understanding of exactly what the word iceberg encompasses? A a dictionary B a glossary C the Internet D a friend

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Liming Streams

1 In 1987, Dr. Ken Simmons tested some rainbow trout in the waters of northcentral Massachusetts' Whetstone Brook. He placed the trout in cages in the brook so that their behavior and survival could be monitored. Three days later, they were all dead. Acid rain had lowered the pH level of the water to a point at which the trout could not survive. Acid rain begins with the fossil fuels we burn to power our cars and factories. The fumes released by those fuels contain sulfur dioxides and nitrous oxides that combine with the water vapor in the atmosphere and turn it acidic. While normal rainwater has a pH level around 5.7, acid rain's pH can be less than 4.2. The year that the brown trout refused to spawn, the pH level of Whetstone Brook averaged about 5.97. The population of all trout dropped dangerously low, and in 1989, Dr. Simmons and other researchers instituted an experiment to decrease the acidity of the stream. They created a system to constantly add calcium carbonate, or limestone, in measured amounts to part of the brook. The limestone, ground into a powder, dissolved instantly and acted as a buffer against the acid, raising the pH level of the water. The experiment lasted three years and managed to raise the average pH level of the stream from 5.97 to 6.94, meeting the scientists' goal. At the same time, the amount of toxic aluminum in the limited area decreased while it increased in other parts of the brook. The success of the project was most convincingly demonstrated by the stream's residents. The population of brook trout increased, the mortality rate of brown trout decreased, and for the first time in years, fish actually began to move into the stream from its source, the Miller River. In 1991, Dr. Simmons again tested rainbow trout in the waters of the Whetstone. This time, they all survived. "We clearly don't view it as a solution," says Dr. Simmons. "It's a band-aid approach, but we need data to make intelligent management decisions as to how useful or harmful liming could be. And I think that this is the key thing this study has shown. It has provided us with information that we can use."

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Liming Streams

63 What is the MAIN idea of this selection? A Fish in the U.S. are in serious trouble due to acid rain. B Researchers are trying to find a way to protect the fish in Massachusetts' Whetstone Brook from acid rain. C Dr. Simmons likes to fish in Whetstone Brook, and he wants to find a way to increase the fish population. D The Miller River has acid rain problems that are causing a problem for Whetstone Brook.

65 When talking about the liming process, Dr. Simmons is quoted as saying, "It's a band-aid approach." Why did Dr. Simmons use the word band-aid ? A to show that the fish need medical attention B to show that the problem has been temporarily fixed, but not solved C to show a disagreement with the liming process D to show that liming materials can be bought in a typical drug store

64 Which statement about acid rain is an opinion? A The experiment lasted three years and managed to raise the average pH level of the stream from 5.97 to 6.94, meeting the scientists' goal. B They created a system to constantly add calcium carbonate, or limestone, in measured amounts to part of the brook. C "We clearly don't view it as a solution," says Dr. Simmons. D The year that the brown trout refused to spawn, the pH level of Whetstone Brook averaged about 5.97.

66 Based on the context of paragraph two, what does the word fumes mean? A smoke B shows resentment C fluffy feathers D vapors

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Liming Streams

67 Which conclusion is BEST supported by this selection? A Acid rain has only emerged as a problem in the past few decades. B Dr. Simmons' idea will be adopted by ecologists nationwide. C In order for trout to survive and thrive, the pH level of water needs to be 6.94. D The amount of pollution in the atmosphere decreased between 1987 and 1991.

68 In order to learn more about the causes of acid rain, which of these research topics would be the MOST helpful? A effects of acid-producing gases on the environment B the global distribution of acid rain C emissions of chemicals that lead to acid-producing gases D the Industrial Revolution and acid rain

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Schoolwork Employment Agency

1 Quality Employees Looking for someone to help with cleaning or to finish that project you started? Want it done right by people you can trust? The Schoolwork Employment Agency (SEA) can provide skilled workers for just about any job around your home. From baby-sitting to yardwork, we've got talented, eager, service-oriented young men and women who can get the job done. SEA has been in business nationwide for five years. Our local-area office manager, Jesse Garcia, joined SEA when he was a senior in high school. Now he has a four-year college degree and is taking evening courses to earn a master's degree in business administration. Doesn't this sound like the kind of goal-oriented person you want working at your home? All of our employees are part-time workers like Jesse, balancing their jobs with their education. What's more, they are all good students. We don't hire everyone we interview--only the candidates who impress us with their grades and their attitudes. As an employee of SEA, anyone we send to your home will be fully insured and bonded, so you don't need to worry about accidents or other problems associated with having strangers working in your home. Competitive Rates In addition to providing extremely competent employees, our rates are the most reasonable in town. Compare and see how much you can save. Convenient Service To inquire about hiring an SEA employee, call Liz Banks at our local number, or call our toll-free 800 number for our corporate headquarters. A worker can be at your door within 24 hours. Our staff includes day students, evening students, and students on flexible schedules, so you don't have to wait for weekends or summer vacation to hire a hard-working student. We accept cash, major credit cards, and checks drawn on local banks. Employment Opportunities Looking for a job yourself? Are you enrolled as a student in high school, a two-year college, a four-year college, or a technical school? Do you have a good academic average and some spare time? Are you a reliable person who isn't afraid of hard work? If you answered "Yes" to all of these questions, we would like to talk to you. Call our local number and ask to speak with Carol Brown or Hal Rizzuto to schedule an interview. Be sure to bring a copy of your latest report card or college transcript.

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Schoolwork Employment Agency* Yardwork $9.75/hour Housework $10.25/hour Baby-sitting $6.00/hour

Other Agencies** $11.00/hour $11.50/hour $7.50/hour

* Prices apply to most yardwork, housework, and baby-sitting jobs. Baby-sitting rate is based on one child. Rates for additional children and other yard or housework services are higher. ** Based on the average of advertised rates at three different local employment agencies. Actual rates for each service vary from agency to agency.

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Schoolwork Employment Agency

69 Which section of the passage does NOT serve the purpose of convincing people to use the Schoolwork Employment Agency? A Competitive Rates B Quality Employees C Employment Opportunities D Convenient Service

72 Based on the information in the table, which job would you expect to cost $9.75 per hour? A mowing a lawn B vacuuming a room C caring for two children D scrubbing a kitchen floor

70 Why should someone applying for a job bring a report card or college transcript? A for identification B because the agency hires only good students C as proof of citizenship D to get a student discount on the fees the agency charges

73 What is the author saying about the employees in the section titled "Quality Employees"? A They are well paid. B They are reliable workers. C They are creative thinkers. D They are career service employees.

74 For what audience was the selection MOST likely written? 71 Which word BEST describes the information in the last two rows of the table? A indexes B price lists C disclaimers D safety warnings A corporations B individual adults C small offices D temp agencies

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Schoolwork Employment Agency

75 What is the MOST important effect of using a table for some of the information? A to fill extra space B to try to make the flyer look professional C to make up for the lack of a picture D to make key information stand out

76 Based on the context of paragraph 4, what does insured and bonded mean? A confident and well-to-do B talented and energetic C experienced in buying and selling insurance D covered for any financial loss they might cause

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Editorial to the City

Dear Ms. James: 1 Our city's parks need help. Imagine a large dog running straight at you as you peacefully stroll through your neighborhood park. The dog is not on a leash, and the owner is somewhere else in the park. This scene occurs every day in the park near my house so it probably happens in other parks, too. Dogs that are allowed to run loose in the parks threaten people and other animals. The city must pass a law that requires all dogs to be controlled on a leash in public parks. The city needs a leash law because dogs that run loose can injure children and leashed dogs. Children play in the park, and they should not have to worry that they will encounter an out-of-control dog. You can never be sure if a loose dog is friendly. Yesterday, a small dog and its' owner, who had her dog on a leash, were chased all the way through the park by an unleashed dog. Our parks would be safer and more fun for everyone, especially children, if dogs were required to be on leashes. A leash law would also protect the dogs. Dogs that run loose are in danger of getting hurt if they wander into the street. In fact, Dr. Winston, a veterinarian whose office is near Elmwood Park, says that in the last four months he has treated six dogs that were hit by cars near the park. Dog owners act irresponsibly when they do not use leashes, and dogs would be safer if they were under control. Keeping children and other dogs safe from unleashed dogs and protecting all dogs from harm are important reasons for passing a strict leash law. Please support a law that requires all dogs in our parks to be leashed. Then enforce this law by having park police patrol the parks. The officers should issue citations to dog owners who violate the law. Make the parks safe for people and animals alike. Sincerely, Sandra Kim

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Editorial to the City

77 With which statement would the writer of the letter disagree? A People should love all animals. B All animals were meant to roam free. C Veterinarians care about the safety of animals. D Children deserve to feel safe in city parks.

79 Which question could be answered by doing fact-based research? A In general, how do dog owners feel about strict leash laws? B Where are the best places to take a dog for a walk? C What type of dog seems the least threatening to people? D What are the leash laws in my state?

78 Where would this letter MOST likely be found? A in a literary magazine B in the editorial section of a newspaper C in a veterinarian magazine D on a Web site with information about dog training 80 What does the word citation mean as used in the fourth paragraph? A an order to appear in court B the act of citing or quoting

C an award for praiseworthy action D a passage or expression that is quoted or cited

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Directions: Read the play below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

LOVE IN '76

Oliver Bell Bunce (1828-1890) The setting of this drama takes place during the American Revolution against Britain. Rose: You're quite right! He never should have got his appointment until he had served a campaign in the drawing-room. If I were the Congress, I'd appoint none who could not bring diplomas from their dancing-masters. Elsworth: Ha? 'pon my word! Very extraordinary news. (All coming forward.) Rose: What is it, papa? Elsworth: There has been a battle. Rose: Is it possible? Oh, where, sir? Elsworth: On Long Island. (Reading letter) Washington has been defeated--has evacuated the city--is retiring northward. (Speaking) I feel, my daughters, that our situation is becoming here unsafe. We shall be continually exposed to the assaults of marauders. It would be wiser, in the present aspect of affairs, for us to seek a securer residence in New York, now so fortunately in possession of Sir William Howe. . . . . . . . . (Enter Mr. Apollo Metcalf) Metcalf: Good day, Mr. Elsworth. Good day, young ladies. "Good day" all, I may say. Elsworth: Have you any news of the war, Mr. Metcalf? Metcalf: News--plenty of it, and mad. The country is depopulated. There isn't a youth with the first hope of a beard upon his chin, who hasn't gone . . . to join the army.

ACT I

Scene: The drawing-room in the residence of Mr. Edward Elsworth. Garden seen through doors. Rose Elsworth occupied at a small table, stitching. Kate Elsworth stretched languidly upon a sofa, with a book in hand. Mr. Edward Elsworth in an easy chair, with newspaper in his lap. Writing materials on table. Kate: Oh, dullness! dullness! I do wish Harry was at home, or Sir William would march some of his troops this way! What's the use of an army in the country, if one can't have a dance once in a while? Rose: What, indeed! All I desire is, sister, that they should be left to the dance! That much they do very well. (Enter Servant with letters for Mr. Elsworth.) Kate: I'm sure, Rose, I can't see what you find in these rebels to admire. As far as my observation has gone, they are only so many boors. There was Captain Arthur. Was there ever such a dunce? He had no manner whatever. He attempted once to walk a minuet with me, and I really thought he was a bear accidentally stumbled into coat and slippers.

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LOVE IN '76

81 The description of the scene at the beginning of the drama A helps create the idea that the characters live comfortably B shows that most people living in New York were wealthy C predicts that something bad was about to happen in the drama D illustrates the physical appearance of all the characters

83 The conversation between Rose and Kate illustrate that they A worry about their father going to war B both fear losing their home C are anxious to find a husband D both like to dance with good dancers

84 Read this comment made by Kate. 82 Read this sentence from the stage directions. Kate Elsworth stretched languidly upon a sofa, with a book in hand. Based on the excerpt, the connotative meaning of languidly is A lazily B defiantly C uncomfortably D beautifully I really thought he was a bear accidentally stumbled into coat and slippers. Kate uses this sentence to illustrate that Captain Arthur was A uneducated B awkward C lovable D clever

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LOVE IN '76

85 Read this comment by Rose. If I were the Congress, I'd appoint none who could not bring diplomas from their dancing-masters. What political view is implied by this character and her dialogue? A Women should have been allowed to vote so that they could learn about politics. B Women have always understood the value of social graces. C In that time period, many people assumed that women did not understand what was really important in a political leader. D During the revolution, the average person did not understand the political significance of what was going on.

87 How does Elsworth's interpretation of the letter affect his daughters? A It gives them the confidence to learn more about the current situation. B It explains the importance of fighting the war. C It suggests that their lives will change dramatically. D It means that they can no longer take dancing lessons.

88 Based on the end of the excerpt, you can conclude that A many of the soldiers were very young men B most people in New York did not believe in fighting C women wanted to join the army to help out

86 The mention that a battle had begun in Long Island, New York suggests that the drama will A incorporate the effect of war on U.S. citizens B focus on life in New York before the war C explain the reasons why women did not join the army D provide historical background about New York

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D people living in New York valued men in beards

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Directions: The following questions are not based on a passage. Read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers. 89 Entrance is to exit as A tunnel is to mountain B door is to yard C inhale is to expire D prologue is to epilogue 92 Soothe is to aggravate as A reprimanded is to scold B replenish is to restore C laconic is to mute D facilitate is to hamper

90 The words adventurous, enterprising, daring, and rash all have similar meanings. Which word would a writer use to express criticism of a character's behavior? A adventurous B enterprising C daring D rash

93 Which of these statements is a fact rather than an opinion? A We enjoyed the art exhibit, which opened at our local museum yesterday. B The artist is talented and has a broad range of styles. C The sculpture of the child playing badminton appears lifelike. D We returned to the exhibit today to see more of his work.

91 In which type of writing would the writer's purpose be primarily to instruct? A letter to manufacturer complaining of defective merchandise B handout to team trainers on new method of taping weak ankles C memo asking for volunteers to work at the fundraiser car wash D review of school orchestra concert

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94 Which statement is the WEAK EST support for the following sentence? Within their framework of Renaissance settings and plots, Shakespeare's characters illustrate aspects of the universal human condition, still relevant to today's world. A Macbeth surrenders to his ambition to rule Scotland, only to find that by killing the king, he destroys himself. B Romeo's impulsiveness leads him to experience both great bliss and great tragedy. C Shakespeare's historical plays bring important kings and events in British history to life. D In the play A Midsummer Night's Dream, the lovers' experiences in the forest force them to analyze the basis of their attraction to each other.

95 Which would be the BEST method for reading a recipe for bread? A read the ingredient list only B read the ingredient list and all the directions C skim the recipe to find the oven temperature D look for the nutritional information

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EOCT Conventions Practice

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Section II: Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT

In grade 9, you will take Georgia's Ninth Grade Literature and Composition End-of-Course Test. This exam assesses your knowledge of skills in four content domains: I. Reading and Literature II. Reading Across the Curriculum/Listening, Speaking, and Viewing III. Writing IV. Conventions The second section of the EOCT will cover Content Domains III and IV. You will answer multiple-choice questions about research, composition, grammar, and word usage.

EOCT Conventions Practice

On the following pages, you will find several revising and editing passages and items similar to those you will encounter on the Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT. These items address the skills and standards that you are expected to master in ninth grade.

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Directions: Read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

1

Which source would provide the MOST information about the life of Robert Frost? A A Collection of American Poetry B The Life and Times of Robert Frost C The Complete Works of Robert Frost D Famous American Poets

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Where should Brian look to find a definition of the word critique in his speech book? A the title page B the index C the glossary D the appendix

4 2 Gail plans to write a research paper for her geography class about Germany. Which problem exists with her topic selection? A It will be hard for her to find English-language resources about the topic. B It is not an appropriate topic for a geography class. C It is too narrow. 5 D It is too broad.

Which of these would NOT be included on a bibliography card for a magazine article? A the name of the author(s) B the name of the magazine C the date of publication D the word count of the article

The prefix contra- means A good B opposite C in favor of D away

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Mario is writing a report about the influence of Mohandas Gandhi's early life on the formation of his civil rights philosophy of civil disobedience and nonviolent protest. Which of the following research procedures, in the MOST efficient chronological order, should he use to develop his report? A Survey people to find out what they know about Mohandas Gandhi; locate biographies of Gandhi; check an encyclopedia for information about Gandhi; scan the Internet and print out everything related to the life of Gandhi. B Read an overview of Mohandas Gandhi's life in an encyclopedia; outline areas that you need to research further; obtain material from relevant and credible Internet sources and library books. C Take notes from a detailed book about Mohandas Gandhi; add information from as many people as you can interview; write your paper from your notes. D Find magazine articles that feature Mohandas Gandhi; interview your history teacher about what he or she knows on the subject of Gandhi; take notes from an encyclopedia.

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How should the sentence below be changed to correct the problem of capitalization? It's confusing because Pisa's nickname is peesh and her dog's name is Peenie. A use a lowercase p in Peenie B use a capital P in Peesh C use a lowercase p in Pisa's D use a capital d in dog

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Which of these sentences is correctly written? A Drink a warm drink, you will warm up. B If you snuggle under the blanket. C If you snuggle under a blanket and drink a warm drink, you will warm up. D If you snuggle under a blanket and drink a warm drink, warm up.

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How is the sentence below correctly punctuated? Yao said "Let's leave for the wedding at 10:00." A delete the apostrophe in Let's B add a comma after said C replace the period with a question mark D The sentence is punctuated correctly.

11 How is the sentence below BEST written? Don't forget to give bus passes. A Sharon and him B Sharon and he C Sharon and his D Sharon and himself the new

12 How is the sentence below BEST written? 10 How should the sentences below be changed to correct the problem of capitalization? Hannah lives in the East. Her home is just south of New York city. A use a capital c in city B use a lowercase e in East C use a capital s in south D use a lowercase y in York 13 Which word, or words, will correctly fill in the blank? If you ask a teacher, will tell you that grades will matter some day. A he or she B they C who D them We were all so board that we actually went out and played in the sandbox like small children. A change were to was B change actually to actual C change played to play D change board to bored

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Use the paragraph below to answer questions 14 and 15. (1) Could you sleep standing up if you had a good grip on a tree limb? (2) If not, you would not make a very good owl! (3) Of course, human beings can't really be owls anyhow. (4) If you ever happen upon an owl roosting on a tree limb during the daytime, take note of its claws. (5) They will be tightly gripped around the tree limb so the owl does not fall. (6) Even in its sleeping state, an owl can maintain this safety grip.

16 How is the sentence below BEST written? Jaxey met Mitchell and I at my house, and then we went to the 2:00 movie. A change met to meet B change I to me C change we to us D change went to go

17 What is the BEST way to combine these two sentences? 14 Which sentence in the paragraph is off topic? A sentence 2 B sentence 3 C sentence 4 D sentence 5 She wore red mittens with her navy blue coat. She wore a red scarf with her navy blue coat. A She wore red mittens with her navy blue coat and also a red scarf. B She wore red mittens with her navy blue coat, and she wore a red scarf. C She wore a navy blue coat and wore red mittens and a red scarf. D She wore a red scarf and red mittens with her navy blue coat.

15 Which title BEST reflects the main topic of this paragraph? A The Nesting Habits of Owls B The Wing Span of Owls C The Sleeping Habits of Owls D The Habitat of Owls

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18 Which of these sentences is written correctly? A The tee shirt slogen said, "Cavman, Martian, or Super Hero? Yes!" B The tee shirt slogan said, "Caveman, Marshen, or Super Hero? Yes!" C The tee shirt slogan said, "Caveman, Martian, or Super Hero? Yes!" D The tee shirt slogan said, "Caveman, Martian, or Super Heero? Yes!"

Use the paragraph below to answer questions 19 and 20. 1) Jon was looking for a new pair of binoculars. 2) The high bid was $16.00. 3) He put in a bid of $17.00, and then he watched. 4) The online auction had 10 minutes left. 5) Nothing happened for the next 9 minutes. 6) Then, at 1 minute, someone bid $18.00. 7) At 30 seconds, someone bid $20.00. 8) Jon watched. 9) At 10 seconds, Jon entered $21.00, and then he watched again. 10) His auction window flicked . . . . had someone beat his bid? 11) No! 12) On the screen, he saw, "You are the winning bidder."

19 Which sentence could BEST be added after sentence 1? A He looked at the department store near his house. B He had dropped his old pair of binoculars, and they weren't working very well. C He asked his friends if they knew of a good deal on binoculars. D He went online and discovered a pair was being sold at auction.

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20 Which sentence would BEST conclude the paragraph? A Jon cheered. B Jon started packing for his camping trip. C Jon turned off his computer. D Jon remembered that his friend had an extra pair of binoculars.

Use the paragraph below to answer questions 22 and 23. Some small parrots are good talkers, and some large parrots are poor talkers. However, typically, the larger parrots are the best talkers. Therefore, if you want a parrot that talks clearly, look at the bigger parrots. A good example is the African Gray parrot, which some parrot enthusiasts say is the best talker of all parrots.

21 For what reason might a person write a short fiction story? A to entertain

22 This paragraph is an example of what kind of writing? A expository

B to inform B narrative C to persuade C persuasive D to apologize D descriptive

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23 Choose the set of notes that MOST accurately reflects the information in the passage. A Talking Parrots --small parrots are good talkers --large parrots are poor talkers --African Gray parrots are the best talkers B Talking Parrots --parrots are good talkers --bigger parrots talk clearly --African Gray parrots are the best talkers C Talking Parrots --some large parrots are poor talkers --parrot enthusiasts prefer African Gray parrots --African Gray parrots are the best talkers D Talking Parrots --some parrots are good talkers and others are not --larger parrots are generally the best talkers --African Gray parrots are the best talkers

24 Which of the following sentences uses the underlined word in a similar context to the sentence below? You must depress the pedal before the vehicle will move. A The thought of all the work she had to do depressed her. B The depressed stock market caused financial problems for many businesses. C New businesses are now thriving in the once depressed downtown area. D The coffee flows freely when the lever is depressed.

25 Which word in the following sentence is NOT correctly spelled? Clara got lost in the neighborhood because she could not read her brother's righting and passed the exit. A neighborhood B righting C passed D exit

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26 Which of the following is the MOST appropriate closing for a business letter? A Fondly, B Sincerely, C Yours truly,

28 How is the sentence below correctly punctuated? Many Japanese soldiers spoke fluent English and they were very successful at intercepting and decoding American military messages. A add a comma after English

D Love, B add a comma after intercepting C add a semicolon after English 27 How is the sentence below BEST revised? When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States, he promised many things, lower taxes, economic recovery, and a balanced budget. A When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States, he promised many things: lower taxes, economic recovery, and a balanced budget. B When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States, he promised many things--lower taxes and economic recovery and a balanced budget. C When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States, he promised many things, such as lower taxes, and economic recovery, and a balanced budget. D When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States, he promised many things; lower taxes, economic recovery, and a balanced budget.

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D change the period to an exclamation point

29 How should the run-on sentence below BEST be revised? Loss of income meant the farmers had to borrow money then if they could not pay their loans back they sometimes lost their farms altogether. A Loss of income meant: the farmers had to borrow money, and if they could not pay their loans back, they sometimes lost their farms altogether. B Loss of income meant the farmers had to borrow money; then if they could not pay their loans back--they sometimes lost their farms altogether. C Loss of income meant the farmers had to borrow money; however, if they could not pay their loans back, they sometimes lost their farms altogether. D Loss of income meant the farmers had to borrow money, so they sometimes lost their farms altogether and then they could not pay their loans back.

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30 How is the sentence below BEST written? The last story you told about your fishing trip was more funnier than the first one. A change your to you're B change more funnier to funnier C change was to were D change than to then

Read the letter below to answer question 32 through 37. (1) Dear Grandma, (2) I have been thinking about the saying, "When the going gets tough, the tough get going." (3) When I think about this. (4) I think of you. (5) I know that you have saw hard times. (6) You lost your house and your belongings, but still you did not give up. (6) Didn't you not ever want to just quit? (7) What advice would you give someone else facing hard times. (8) Is it ever okay to just throw in the towel? (9) Tell me your thoughts about this saying. (10) Write your thoughts about what happened to you, too. (12) Write back soon. (13) Love, (14) Your grandson

31 Which sentence is too informal to include in a literary analysis? A The simile helps readers picture the scene. B The tone of the poem was serious. C The use of figurative language hooked me in. D The first stanza focused on the speaker's grief.

32 Which of these is a fragment? A I think of you. B Write back soon. C Is it ever okay to just throw in the towel? D When I think about this.

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33 The author of the letter would like to add the sentence below to the first paragraph. For example, I know that you had a fire on your farm when you were young. Where would the sentence BEST fit? A after sentence 2 B after sentence 4 C after sentence 5 D after sentence 6

35 How is sentence 7 BEST written? What advice would you give someone else facing hard times. A change someone to some one B add a comma after you C change the period to a question mark D The sentence is correct as is.

36 Read sentences 9 and 10. (9) Tell me your thoughts about this saying. (10) Write your thoughts about what happened to you, too. What is the BEST way to combine the two sentences so that the new sentence does not repeat ideas. A Tell me your thoughts about this saying, and write your thoughts about what happened to you. B Tell me your thoughts about this saying and about what happened to you. C Tell me what you think about this saying, and write to me about what you think about what happened to you, too. D Tell me your thoughts about this saying, and also, write your thoughts about what happened to you and what you think about it.

34 How is sentence 5 BEST written? I know that you have saw hard times. A change have saw to had saw B change have saw to have seen C change have saw to seen D change have saw to will see

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37 How is sentence 2 BEST written? Didn't you not ever want to just quit? A Didn't you ever just want to not quit? B Did you ever just not want to quit. C Didn't you ever want to just quit? D Didn't you never want to just quit?

Read the paragraph below to answer question 38 through 40. (1) Think of a time you have swatted a fly or picked a flower. (2) Do these actions have any longterm consequences. (3) What about a time when you went to a friend's house? (4) If you could see into the future, you might be surprised by the answer. (5) James, the main character in this story, gets the opportunity to see unexpected outcomes of his actions. (6) When he travels back in time, he learns that killing a single butterfly has enormous consequences for the future.

38 Which sentence in the paragraph is off topic? A sentence 1 B sentence 3 C sentence 4 D sentence 6

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39 The author of the report would like to add the sentence below to the report. James is never the same after this trip. Where would the sentence BEST fit? A before sentence 1 B after sentence 4 C after sentence 5 D after sentence 6

40 How is sentence 2 BEST written? (2) Do these actions have any long-term consequences. A Does these actions have any long-term consequences. B Does this action have any longterm consequences. C Do these actions have any long-term consequences? D Do these actions has any longterm consequences.

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Ninth Grade Literature and Composition EOCT Practice test

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S ECTION I: N INTH G RADE L ITERATURE

AND

C OMPOSITION EOCT

Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Into the Ice Blue Sky

1 Imagine flying at 25,000 feet in an airplane that is forty degrees below zero inside. It is so cold you have to wear a heated suit that plugs in like an electric blanket. To protect your hands from frostbite you wear three pairs of gloves that are also heated--silk inside of wool inside of leather. You will have nothing to eat or drink during the ten-hour flight. To top it all off, your plane is being shot at because you are on a dangerous mission during wartime. You have a death-defying job to do as a crew member in a B-17G, a plane so large and powerful that it is called a "Flying Fortress." My father had this experience in 1945 toward the end of World War II in Europe. He was Sgt. Herbert S. Moreland, a tail gunner in a B-17G bomber. He was eighteen years old, fresh out of high school, and the youngest member of his ten-man flight crew. In the last months of the war, he flew thirty-three bombing missions over Germany and France. I grew up hearing my dad's stories about World War II. Sometimes I didn't really listen, though, and I regretted what I missed. He is in his seventies now and has a heart condition. One day I read a newspaper article about the National World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C. It said that even the youngest veterans of the war are now over seventy years old, and every month around 30,000 of them pass away. To honor my father, I joined the World War II Memorial Society. His name has now been entered into a book of remembrances at the memorial so future generations can honor him also. The Web site of the Memorial Society describes World War II as "the defining event of the twentieth century in American history." I wanted to know more about my father's role in this important historical event. I already knew some facts about the terrible war fought in Europe between 1939 and 1945. I knew the United States joined the war against Hitler in December 1941. I knew my father was in the U.S. Eighth Air Force, 306th bombardment group, stationed in England. I also knew most of the men my father served with were barely out of their teens. I wanted to find out how it felt to fly on dangerous combat missions in a B-17. What did airmen do to prepare for a mission? What special clothing or equipment did they need? What dangers and hazards did these young men face? The first thing I found out was just how dangerous it was to fly in the U.S. Eighth Air Force during World War II. My father explained that the air force and submarines were considered the most hazardous types of duty. As a result they were voluntary and received 50 percent more pay. The number of men who flew combat missions in "the Mighty Eighth" was 210,000. The number killed in action was 26,000. At the beginning of the war airmen had to fly 25 missions. Only 35 percent of the flight crews survived long enough to do it. Toward the end of the war in 1945, there was less danger because the power of the German air force had been broken. Crews flew 35 missions and the survival rate had improved. Most of my father's missions were called "milk runs"--they weren't under attack and nothing happened to the crew or plane.

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Crews faced many dangers in the air, aside from actual combat. "You always worried about bad weather, you always worried about mid-air collisions, and your worst worry was flak," my father explained. Flak was heavy shells shot from the ground. The shells exploded in the air, shooting large pieces of steel in all directions. Flak could wound or kill crew members and damage or destroy planes. "You would see puffs of black smoke all around. You were helpless against it. You couldn't squeeze any trigger and stop it." If a plane was going to crash, the pilot ordered the crew to bail out. "You snapped on your parachute and pulled open a small escape hatch. You hoped the plane was flying level, or else you wouldn't be able to push yourself out the door against the air pressure. Then, if you could bail out, there was a chance you would get hit by flak or broken parts of planes twisting and turning through the air." When a plane was going down, crews in other planes would watch and start counting the parachutes popping out. They almost never saw all ten men make it out of a plane. The amount of clothing and equipment airmen needed to survive was astonishing. Protection against the bitter cold was a serious concern. Sometimes a gunner ripped all three pairs of gloves off in a panic during combat to fix something, and his hands would freeze to the metal of the guns. The men wore thick layers of clothes and other gear: first, a shirt and trousers; then, a heated suit with wires running through it; next, a leather and sheepskin flying suit; over that went a life vest, called a "Mae West"; and finally a parachute harness. They wore electric booties on their feet that slipped inside leather, sheepskin-lined boots. On their head they wore a leather helmet with ear phones, but frostbitten ears were still common. Sometimes they wore heated goggles. The whole outfit weighed thirty to forty pounds. Over all this, they sometimes put on a flak helmet and a flak suit made of canvas and metal plates, which added about thirty more pounds. These missions were an extreme test of physical and emotional endurance. Once the plane reached an altitude of 10,000 feet, crew members had to start taking oxygen. They wore an oxygen mask that snapped onto their helmet and often cut into their face. If they had to leave their post, they hooked up to a portable oxygen bottle. Every fifteen minutes, the pilot did an oxygen check with each man, beginning with the tail gunner. The gunner would say, "Tail okay!" and the pilot would continue checking. If a crew member didn't answer, he had probably passed out from lack of oxygen. During long hours the crew sat in cramped positions in freezing cold. They had nothing to do except watch for the enemy, and they were uncomfortable all the time. According to historian Stephen Ambrose, once a man was at his post he "could scarcely shift his weight, stretch, scratch, or otherwise give physical release to his pent-up energy. Nor could he close his eyes, or otherwise rest." The gunners especially had to fight off boredom. They were the most isolated crew members on the plane. To get to his position, the tail gunner crawled on his hands and knees down the length of the plane's tail. There he sat on a little stool behind two machine guns with an ammunition case on each side of him. "Back there it was very glum," my father explained. "You heard the steady drone of the engines and didn't think of much at all. What you did most of the time was nothing. You were sitting out the war at 25,000 feet. Then, all of a sudden, something would happen. There would be a few moments of excitement, and your adrenaline would start pumping. It seemed everything in the air force happened in terms of seconds." Another veteran airmen described it this way: "The only memories that I have now of combat missions are hours and hours of boredom interrupted by moments of sheer terror."

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Into the Ice Blue Sky

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The author begins the selection with a description of flight conditions on board a B-17G bomber to A portray the experiences of a war hero B frighten the reader about airplane flight C appeal to the reader's senses D reveal exaggeration in a veteran's stories about World War II

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What is the effect of using quotations from veteran airmen in this selection? A to show that the author did a lot of research B to add emphasis to the ideas expressed C to take the place of original ideas D to prove that the author's father really did participate in the war

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What personal connection does the writer have to World War II? A He wanted know more about his father's role in World War II. B He is a well-known historian. C He was a tail gunner in a G-17G bomber. D He visited the National World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.

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Read the following sentence: Because of the B-17 bomber's ability to return home despite extensive battle damage, its durability became legendary. Based on the context of the sentence, what does the word durability mean? A unbreakable B ability to fly long distances C toughness and strength D importance

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

from

Three Soldiers

by John Dos Passos

In his novel Three Soldiers, Dos Passos describes the experiences of three fictional U.S. soldiers fighting in Europe during World War I. This excerpt introduces two of these soldiers, Chrisfield and John Andrews. Chrisfield-- "Where's the artillery? That's what I want to know," cried the lieutenant, suddenly stopping in his tracks and running a hand through his red hair. "Where's the artillery?" He looked at Chrisfield savagely out of green eyes. "No use advancing without artillery." He started walking faster than ever. All at once they saw sunlight ahead of them and olive-drab uniforms. Machine guns started firing all around them in a sudden gust. Chrisfield found himself running forward across a field full of stubble and sprouting clover among a group of men he did not know. The whip-like sound of rifles had chimed in with the stuttering of the machine guns. Little white clouds sailed above him in a blue sky, and in front of him was a group of houses that had the same color, white with lavendergrey shadows, as the clouds. He was in a house, with a grenade like a tin pineapple in each hand. The sudden loneliness frightened him again. Outside the house was a sound of machine-gun firing, broken by the occasional bursting of a shell. . . . He was in a small kitchen. . . . At the other end of the kitchen, beyond two broken chairs, was a door. . . . Holding in his breath, he stood a long time looking at the door. Then he pulled it open recklessly. A young man with fair hair was sitting at a table, his head resting on his hands. Chrisfield felt a spurt of joy when he saw that the man's uniform was green [German]. Very coolly he pressed the spring, held the grenade a second and then threw it, throwing himself backwards into the middle of the kitchen. Andrews-- There were tiny green frogs in one of the putty-colored puddles by the roadside. John Andrews fell out of the slowly advancing column a moment to look at them. The frogs' triangular heads stuck out of the water in the middle of the puddle. He leaned over, his hands on his knees, easing the weight of the equipment on his back. That way he could see their tiny jewelled eyes, topaz-colored. . . . Something was telling him that he must run forward and fall into line again, that he must shamble1 on through the mud, but he remained staring at the puddle, watching the frogs. Then he noticed his reflection in the puddle. He looked at it curiously. He could barely see the outlines of a stained grimacing mask, and the silhouette of the gun barrel slanting behind it. So this was what they had made of him. . . .

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Absently, as if he had no connection with all that went on about him, he heard the twang of bursting shrapnel down the road. He had straightened himself wearily and taken a step forward, when he found himself sinking into the puddle. A feeling of relief came over him. His legs sunk in the puddle; he lay without moving against the muddy bank. The frogs had gone, but from somewhere a little stream of red was creeping out slowly into the putty-colored water. He watched the irregular files of men in olive-drab shambling by. . . . He felt triumphantly separated from them, as if he were in a window somewhere watching soldiers pass, or in a box of a theater watching some dreary monotonous play.

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from Three Soldiers

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The effect of having Chrisfield notice white clouds and Andrews watch frogs is to show A that neither of them is paying attention to what they are doing B their craving for normalcy C that neither of them are good soldiers D that Chrisfield is creative and Andrews is sensitive

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Which statement BEST supports the idea that Dos Passos views war as causing an absence of normal human responses? A He shows the lieutenant as frustrated when he realizes they have no artillery. B He writes that Chrisfield felt joy upon seeing and planning to kill an enemy soldier. C He portrays Andrews as finding frog eyes interesting. D He describes Chrisfield as running when the machine guns start blasting.

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What is the phrase like a tin pineapple an example of? A analogy B hyperbole C simile D personification

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Which statement is the WEAKEST support for the following paragraph? The English department is instituting an honors program. All students who wish to be considered for the honors course must maintain an average of 90 or higher in their current English course, submit two recommendations from teachers outside the discipline of English, and write a statement of intent. A The deadline for submitting an application and required materials is December 15. B In high schools with honors programs, the number of students who end up attending college is higher than in high schools lacking such programs. C No matter which English course students take, they will cover similar types of literature and fulfill the same objectives. D Some teachers are better at writing recommendations than others.

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Which of the following sentences uses the underlined word in the sentence below in a similar context? She tends to be ruled by her heart, not her head. A After his heart surgery, he was able to walk greater distances without tiring. B His action of saving the puppy won her heart. C The tree surgeon said the rot had reached the heart of the tree. D The soldier placed his hand over his heart during the singing of the national anthem.

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Emily Dickinson A narrow fellow in the grass Occasionally rides; You may have met him--did you not? His notice sudden is. 5 The grass divides as with a comb, A spotted shaft is seen; And then it closes at your feet And opens further on. He likes a boggy acre, A floor too cool for corn. Yet when a boy, and barefoot, I more than once, at noon, Have passed, I thought, a whip-lash Unbraiding in the sun-- When, stooping to secure it, It wrinkled, and was gone. Several of nature's people I know, and they know me; I feel for them a transport1 Of cordiality; But never met this fellow, Attended or alone, Without a tighter breathing, And zero at the bone.

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

10 The term narrow fellow is an example of a(n) A analogy B hyperbole C simile D personification

13 What is the point of view in this poem? A second person B first person C third person limited D third person omniscient

11 What is the "narrow fellow in the grass"? A a worm B a toad C a snake D a mouse

14 Which of the following would you expect to be the BEST source of biographical information about the author of this poem? A The Manuscript Books of Emily Dickinson. Ed. R.W. Franklin. B A Treasury of the World's Best Loved Poems C Leyda, Jay. The Years and Hours of Emily Dickinson

12 Based on the author's voice and word choice, it is MOST likely that the author's purpose was to A create a clever, enjoyable poetic riddle B confuse the reader C describe a familiar animal in a vague manner D use familiar language in an unusual manner

D Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Nature: An Essay and Lectures on the Times (1844)

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Choosing the Right Backpack

1 Years ago backpacks were used almost exclusively by soldiers. The only other people likely to use backpacks were serious mountain climbers. Today backpacks are used by just about everyone, from students to professional workers. Because backpacks are designed so the weight of the contents is distributed over one's back and shoulders, they can be less stressful physically and more convenient than bags carried in one hand or on one shoulder. Due to their popularity, many backpacks are currently available to consumers. Prices vary greatly, and the quality and features do not always correspond with the cost. Even putting the issue of style aside and judging packs solely on utilitarian qualities such as durability, water repellency, design, and fit, there is a wide range of options. How Can You Choose the Right Pack? Knowing your needs and what to look for in a backpack can make the selection process much easier. It is a good idea to take a backpack you are seriously considering for a test run. If the store owner will allow it, load the pack with about the same weight you would normally carry and wear it around the store for 10­15 minutes to get an idea of how it will feel during actual use. Construction Criteria Look at each backpack with the following three construction criteria in mind: · Seams and stitching. Single-row stitching is far less durable than multiple rows or zigzag stitching. The seams in a pack endure a lot of stress, so good stitching is important. · Shoulder straps. Again, great stress is put on the shoulder straps. Securely attached shoulder straps are an excellent indicator of a pack's durability. Check the stress points. Stitching that pulls away from the fabric is a bad sign. · Zipper flaps. Flaps that cover a pack's zippers can make a big difference if you ever get caught in the rain. Wide flaps are highly recommended, but any flap is better than none at all. Features That Can Help Narrow Your Choices Take a close look at how you plan to use your pack to help decide which features are important to you. Buying a pack with features you don't need will cost more and may mean losing some features that you want. Zippered Compartments, Pockets, and Organizer Panels. Just about anyone can use more pockets. Compartments and pockets make finding things quick and easy. Organizer panels have built-in holders in various sizes for pens, note pads, calculators, etc. Waist Belts. These extra straps attach across your waist and redistribute some of the load from your back and shoulders to your hips. These belts are a nice feature if you will be hiking or carrying heavy loads.

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Shoulder Straps. For added comfort, look for shoulder straps shaped like a "C" or an "S." Also, check the adjustable webbed strap. If the webbing continues up over the padded part of the strap, it will help distribute the load better and make the straps less likely to cut into your shoulders. Proper Fit. The top of the pack should sit on or just below your shoulders, and the bottom should rest on your hips. This area is known as your torso. A well-fitted pack will be roughly the same length as your torso. The best test for proper fit is to try on each pack to make sure it is comfortable. With so many backpacks available today, an educated consumer enters the process with a distinct advantage. Using this information should make selecting the best pack a lot easier.

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Choosing the Right Backpack

15 Under which subheading is information about protecting backpackers from sore shoulders? A How Can You Choose the Right Pack? B Zipper Flaps C Proper Fit D Shoulder Straps

17 Which statement about backpacks is an opinion? A Many backpacks are currently available to consumers. B The weight of the contents in a pack is distributed over one's back and shoulders. C A well-fitted pack will be roughly the same length as your torso. D Backpacks are more convenient than bags carried in one hand or on one shoulder.

16 How are these two backpack features related: zipper flaps and multiple rows of stitching? A They are two features that make a backpack more desirable. B They are two features that help to distribute a backpack's weight. C They are two features that make a backpack more expensive. D They are two features that are included for style, not functionality.

18 Where would this passage MOST likely not be found? A a recreation and travel magazine B the health and fitness section of a newspaper C an entertainment magazine D a Web site focusing on outdoor activities

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Choosing the Right Backpack

19 The writer uses very concrete nouns in boldface type to focus readers' attention on A the most important features of the backpack B the options that manufacturers add or omit from backpacks C the most stylish features of backpacks D the backpack features needed by hikers or those with heavy loads

21 One main purpose to analyze a print advertisement is to A explain how visual elements and words are used to persuade viewers B persuade classmates to purchase the product C entertain friends with a personal anecdote about the product D describe how the product works

20 Mask is to hide as A surf is to shoreline B money is to coin C helmet is to protect D pedal is to bicycle

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

from

The Open Window

by Saki

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"My aunt will be down presently, Mr. Nuttel," said a very self-possessed young lady of fifteen; "in the meantime you must try and put up with me. Framton Nuttel endeavored to say the correct something which should duly flatter the niece of the moment without unduly discounting the aunt that was to come. Privately he doubted more than ever whether these formal visits on a succession of total strangers would do much toward helping the nerve cure which he was supposed to be undergoing. "I know how it will be," his sister had said when he was preparing to migrate to this rural retreat; "you will bury yourself down there and not speak to a living soul, and your nerves will be worse than ever from moping. I shall just give you letters of introduction to all the people I know there. Some of them, as far as I can remember, were quite nice." Framton wondered whether Mrs. Sappleton, the lady to whom he was presenting one of the letters of introduction, came into the nice division. "Do you know many of the people round here?" asked the niece, when she judged that they had had sufficient silent communion. "Hardly a soul," said Framton. "My sister was staying here, at the rectory, you know, some four years ago, and she gave me letters of introduction to some of the people here." He made the last statement in a tone of distinct regret. "Then you know practically nothing about my aunt?" pursued the self-possessed young lady. "Only her name and address," admitted the caller. He was wondering whether Mrs. Sappleton was in the married or widowed state. An undefinable something about the room seemed to suggest masculine habitation. "Her great tragedy happened just three years ago," said the child; "that would be since your sister's time." "Her tragedy?" asked Framton; somehow, in this restful country spot, tragedies seemed out of place. "You may wonder why we keep that window wide open on an October afternoon," said the niece, indicating a large French window that opened onto a lawn. "It is quite warm for the time of the year," said Framton, "but has that window got anything to do with the tragedy?" "Out through that window, three years ago to a day, her husband and her two young brothers went off for their day's shooting. They never came back. In crossing the moor to their favorite snipe-shooting ground, they were all three engulfed in a treacherous piece of bog. It had been that dreadful wet summer, you know, and places that were safe in other years gave way suddenly without warning. The bodies were never recovered. That was the dreadful part of it." Here the child's voice lost its self-possessed note and became falteringly human. "Poor aunt always thinks they will come back someday, they and the little brown spaniel that was lost with

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them, and walk in at that window just as they used to do. That is why the window is kept open every evening till it is quite dusk. Poor dear aunt, she has often told me how they went out, her husband with his white waterproof coat over his arm, and Ronnie, her youngest brother, singing `Bertie, why do you bound?' as he always did to tease her. Do you know, sometimes on still, quiet evenings like this, I almost get a creepy feeling that they will all walk through that window--" She broke off with a little shudder. It was a relief to Framton when the aunt bustled into the room with a whirl of apologies for being late in making her appearance. . . .

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from The Open Window

22 What is MOST ironic about Framton Nuttel's situation at the beginning of the story? A Framton came to speak to Mrs. Sappleton, but is talking to a child. B Framton's sister values meeting the neighbors, but he is the one awkwardly doing it. C Mrs. Sappleton's niece was quite self-possessed. D Framton wanted to be make a good impression with Mrs. Sappleton.

24 Based on the information in the selection, which of the following relationships is MOST similar to the relationship below? the niece : Framton Nuttel A self-possessed : nervous B lovely : ugly C shy : outgoing D resentful : grateful

25 How does the flashback in the third paragraph contribute to the story? 23 The effect of the author's use of a third-person-limited point of view is to A let the reader learn the thoughts and feelings of one character B make the story seem more realistic C help the reader to follow the events of the story better D allow the reader to picture the scene better A It introduces an important character. B It provides background information. C It explains an important mystery. D It introduces a universal theme.

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

from

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

by William Shakespeare

Characters Flavius: a tribune (official appointed to administer the law) Marullus: a tribune Carpenter Cobbler: (a shoemaker)

ACT 1, Scene 1

(A street in Rome.) Enter Flavius, Marullus, and certain Commoners over the stage. Flavius: Hence! Home, you idle creatures, get you home! Is this a holiday? What, know you not, Being mechanical,3 you ought not walk Upon a laboring day without the Sign of your profession?5 Speak, what trade art thou?

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Carpenter: Why, sir, a carpenter. Marullus: Where is thy leather apron and thy rule? What dost thou with thy best apparel on? You, sir, what trade are you? Cobbler:

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Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman,10 I am but, as you would say, a cobbler.11

Marullus: But what trade art thou? Answer me directly.

3. mechanical: working class. 5. sign of your profession: your work clothes and tools. 10. in respect of a fine workman: in comparison with a skilled laborer. 11. cobbler: In Shakespeare's day the word meant both "shoemaker" and "bungler."

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Cobbler: A trade, sir, that, I hope, I may use with a safe conscience, which is indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles. Flavius:

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What trade, thou knave? Thou naughty15 knave, what trade?

Cobbler: Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me: yet, if you be out, sir, I can mend you. Marullus: What mean'st thou by that? Mend me, thou saucy fellow? Cobbler: Why, sir, cobble you. Flavius:

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Flavius: But wherefore art not in thy shop today? Why dost thou lead these men about the streets? Cobbler: Truly, sir, to wear out their shoes, to get myself into more work. But indeed, sir, we make holiday to see Caesar and to rejoice in his triumph.

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Marullus: Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home? What tributaries32 follow him to Rome, To grace in captive bonds his chariot wheels? You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!

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You hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome, Knew you not Pompey?36 Many a time and oft Have you climbed up to walls and battlements, To tow'rs and windows, yea, to chimney tops, Your infants in your arms, and there have sat The livelong day, with patient expectation, To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome. And when you saw his chariot but appear, Have you not made an universal shout, That Tiber trembled underneath her banks To hear the replication45 of your sounds Made in her concave shores?46 And do you now put on your best attire? And do you now cull out a holiday? And do you now strew flowers in his way That comes in triumph over Pompey's blood? Be gone! Run to your houses, fall upon your knees Pray to the gods to intermit53 the plague That needs must light on this ingratitude.

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Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault, Assemble all the poor men of your sort; Draw them to Tiber banks and weep your tears Into the channel, till the lowest stream Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.

Exeunt all the commoners.

36. Pompey: Roman politician and general who was defeated by Caesar in 48 b.c. and later murdered. 45. replication: echo; copy. 46. concave shores: carved-out banks of the river. 53. intermit: hold back.

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See, whe'r their basest mettle60 be not moved; They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness. Go you down that way towards the Capitol; This way will I. Disrobe the images,63 If you do find them decked with ceremonies.

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May we do so? You know it is the feast of Lupercal.66

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So do you too, where you perceive them thick. These growing feathers plucked from Caesar's wing Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,72 Who else would soar above the view of men And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

Exeunt.

60. basest mettle: basic substance; their "stuff." 63. images: statues. 66. Lupercal: old Roman fertility festival celebrated on February 15. 69. vulgar: common people. 72. an ordinary pitch: at an ordinary height.

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from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

26 An appropriate set design for this scene would MOST likely include a A large arena B furnished room C speaker's platform D row of shops

28 In lines 13­14, the cobbler describes his work by saying that he is "a mender of bad soles." This line contains a pun that suggests the cobbler A fixes people's shoes B helps people who find themselves all alone C helps people with spiritual issues D is lying about what he does for a living

27 The metaphor at the end of the scene comparing Caesar to a bird shows how A the commoners love Caesar B Caesar has grown too powerful C Caesar acts like a coward D Caesar moves gracefully

29 Which of these would you expect to be the BEST source of biographical information about William Shakespeare? A Kummings, Donald D., ed. Understanding Shakespearian Tragedies B Miller, Edwin Haviland, ed. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare C Gardner, Thomas. Discovering Ourselves in the Works of Shakespeare D Zweig, Paul. William Shakespeare: The Man and the Playwright

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Directions: Read the next two selections. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Tax Form/Warranty

Tax Form

Worksheet for Dependents who checked "Yes" on line 5 (Keep a copy for your records.) Use this worksheet to figure the amount to enter on line 5 if someone can claim you (or your spouse if married) as a dependent, even if that person chooses not to do so. To find out if someone can claim you as a dependent, use TeleTax topic 354 (see page 6).

A. Amount, if any, from line 1 on front + 250.00

Enter total A.

B. Minimum standard deduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B. C. Enter the LARGER of line A or line B here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C. D. Maximum standard deduction. If single, enter 4,300.00; if married, enter 7,200.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D. E. Enter the SMALLER of line C or line D here. This is your standard deduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E. F. Exemption amount: If single, enter 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F. If married and-- --both you and your spouse can be claimed as dependents, enter 0. --only one of you can be claimed as a dependent, enter 2,750.00.

G. Add lines E and F. Enter the total here and on line 5 on the front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.

If you checked "no" on line 5 because no one can claim you (or your spouse if married) as a dependent, enter on line 5 the amount shown below that applies to you.

If single, enter 7,050.00. This is the total of your standard deduction (4,300.00) and your exemption. If married, enter 12,700.00. This is the total of your standard deduction (7,200.00), your exemption (2,750.00), and your spouse's exemption (2,750.00).

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Warranty

VENOX PORTABLE DISHWASHER LIMITED WARRANTY

Obligations In order to obtain warranty service, the product must be delivered and picked up from an authorized Venox Service Center at the user's expense unless specifically stated otherwise in this warranty. First, an Authorized Repair Number (ARN) must be issued by our Service Center. Call (toll free) 1-800-555-4786 to receive a number. Write the number on the mail packaging. The names and addresses of Authorized Venox Service Centers are listed below. Service centers are unable to accept items for repair without an ARN. Such items will be returned to sender at the sender's expense. Nevada Office 315 Red River Road Middleton, NV 76381 Michigan Office 8892 Maple Drive Taft, MI 96430 Alabama Office 501 Century Blvd. Vaughn, AL 29588 Maryland Office 6114 Nuens Street Perryvale, MD 85209

THIS WARRANTY IS VALID ONLY ON VENOX PRODUCTS PURCHASED OR RENTED AND USED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EXCLUDING HAWAII AND ALL U.S. TERRITORIES AND PROTECTORATES. This warranty applies only to the original retail user, and does not apply to products used for any industrial, professional, or commercial purpose. The original dated bill of sale, sales slip, or rental agreement must be submitted to the authored Venox Service Center at the time warranty service is requested. Subject to the OBLIGATIONS above and EXCLUSIONS below, Venox Kendall (USA) Corporation (VKC) warrants this Venox product against defects in materials and workmanship for the periods of LABOR and PARTS specified below. VKC will repair or replace (at its option) the product and any of its parts which fail to conform to this warranty. The warranty period commences on the date the product was first purchased or rented at a retail outlet.

Labor 1 year

Parts 1 year

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Tax Form/Warranty

30 According to the Tax Form, what should people do if they are unsure whether or not they can be claimed as a dependent? A Fill in the larger amount on line C. B Use TeleTax topic 354. C Enter the maximum standard deduction. D Total lines E and F into line G.

32 Which of the following would cause a Venox Service Center to return a product unfixed? A The owner did not receive an ARN before sending it. B The dishwasher was six months old. C The product was being rented. D The dishwasher was purchased in Ohio.

31 In the Tax Form, how are the square bullets used? A They indicate lines for dependents. B They indicate categories for itemized lines. C They indicate where the filer must add. D They indicate where errors can occur.

33 In the Venox Portable Dishwasher Limited Warranty, why is the first sentence after the addresses printed in capital letters? A This distinguishes the warranty from the addresses. B It contains the initials U.S. and initials are always in capital letters. C It is a very important sentence about the warranty. D It tells what needs to be submitted to the service center in order for the warranty to be valid.

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Tax Form/Warranty

34 In the Venox Portable Dishwasher Limited Warranty, what is the MOST important effect of placing information in a table at the bottom of the page? A to add information that was not included in the text B to make the warranty look more like a legal document C to make the layout of the warranty more visually interesting D to specify important details of the warranty as referred to in the paragraph above

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Omar's Challenge

1 Both of Omar's parents were poets. His father taught literature and poetry at the local community college. Occasionally he would publish a poem in a literary magazine, and the family would go out to dinner to celebrate. Although Omar's mother worked at a bank, she wrote poetry in her spare time. For as long as Omar could remember, his parents spent at least one evening each week at a poetry reading. Sometimes the poetry readings were at the college where Omar's father taught, and sometimes they were at larger, more prestigious places such as the city civic center. However, most readings took place at a small coffeehouse. Omar had very fond memories of the coffeehouse on Sixth Street where the people's personalities were as colorful as the coffee mugs. He loved going to early evening poetry readings at Cody's Coffee Shop. He would sit in the audience next to his parents, the smell of coffee wafting over the room, the dim lights adding to the atmosphere and making him sleepy, and the gentle voices of the poets soothing his childish worries away with the meter of their poems. As he grew older, he learned not only to appreciate the atmosphere but to love the people as well. He would sit at a table for hours and watch the audience while his parents listened to the poetry of the authors. There was one woman who came to Cody's every week just as his parents did. Her name was Mrs. Abboud. She never read, but she always had a bright smile for everyone, and she would clap loudly after each reading. Omar came to know all the regulars at Cody's. He began not only watching the people but also listening to the poetry. He liked the melodic quality of the sounds of the words. Sometimes his parents read, and sometimes they just listened. Eventually, Omar began writing his own poetry. It was crude at first, but with practice he became quite accomplished. Mrs. Francis, Omar's English teacher, urged him to enter a citywide poetry contest. At first Omar was proud and excited. However, when he read the contest rules, he became concerned. The contest was an oral reading. Omar had no doubt that he could write high-quality poetry, but he was a very shy young man. He doubted that he could stand in front of a large group to recite his poems without losing his composure. "It would make me very proud," his father said, and Omar knew that he had to go through with it somehow. Although Omar had a terrible fear of speaking in public, on the day of the contest he selected his favorite poem, put on his best suit, and appeared at the auditorium. Butterflies were dancing in his stomach. As he waited for his turn, Omar recalled reading a book report in front of his class and becoming so nervous with all those eyes focused on him that his hands shook until he couldn't read it at all. He remembered the embarrassment and felt the anxiety settling into his spine.

2

3

4

5

6

7

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8

9

When he stepped onto the stage, though, something wonderful happened! There in the audience, in the front row right beside his parents, was Mrs. Abboud. Omar could almost smell the coffee at Cody's Coffee Shop. He focused on his parents and Mrs. Abboud and tuned out everyone and everything else. Now it was easy to read his poem in a clear, steady voice. When he finished, even though everyone in the auditorium applauded, Omar heard only his parents and Mrs. Abboud. After it was all over, receiving the first-prize ribbon from Troy Stevens, a wellknown poet, seemed almost unimportant to Omar. What really made him proud was pleasing his parents and Mrs. Abboud and overcoming his own fears.

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Omar's Challenge

35 Which word BEST describes Mrs. Abboud? A patient B creative C supportive D clever

37 Read the following sentence: Poetry appears among the earliest records of most literate cultures, with ancient poetic fragments found carved into boulders, bedrock, and stone slabs. Based on the context of the sentence, what does the word literate mean? A knowledgeable

36 What can you infer about Omar's family from the details in the selection? A They are literary. B They are conceited. C They are shy. D They are not close.

B skillfully written C well-read D able to read and write

38 Which of the following means a feeling or state of being painfully self-conscious? A embarrass B embarrassment C embarrassing D embarrassed

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Directions: Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Canada's History and Culture

1 As in the United States, Native American societies were once found across Canada. The first Europeans to sail to Canada's eastern shores were Viking adventurers. They visited between A.D. 1000 and as late as the mid-1300s. However, the Vikings left no permanent settlements. More extensive exploration by Europeans began in 1497. In that year John Cabot explored the coasts of Newfoundland and other islands for the English. The first great European explorer of Canada's interior was Jacques Cartier (zhahk kahr-TYAY) of France. In the 1530s he traveled up the St. Lawrence River as far as present-day Montreal. This was nearly a century before the English established colonies in New England. The French had three main goals in Canada. First, they wanted to find a northwest water passage across North America to Asia. Second, they wanted to exploit nearby fishing waters and to develop a trade for animal furs from North America. Third, they wanted to convert Canadian Indians to Roman Catholicism. By 1608 the French established a permanent settlement at what became Quebec City on the St. Lawrence River. Soon, French settlers were farming along the St. Lawrence and in nearby Nova Scotia to the east. In 1713 Great Britain took over Nova Scotia. Eventually, the British forced many French settlers there to leave. After a long war, Britain had won control of all of French Canada by 1763. The British organized Canada into several governmental districts called provinces. Today Canada has 10 provinces and three special territories. British settlement in Canada increased during the American Revolution. Many colonists left the United States so they could stay under British rule. Canada's population continued to grow in the first half of the 1800s. Immigration from abroad increased. In 1867 the British government created the self-governing Dominion of Canada. The dominion included the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick. Manitoba, British Columbia, and Prince Edward Island joined them in the 1870s. Alberta and Saskatchewan did not become provinces until 1905. Newfoundland became part of Canada in 1949.

2

3

4

5

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Canada's History and Culture

39 Which statement supports the idea that England was NOT power hungry? A In 1867 the British government created the self-governing Dominion of Canada. B Eventually, the British forced many French settlers there to leave. C British settlement in Canada increased during the American Revolution. D This was nearly a century before the English established colonies in New England.

40 To learn more about the earliest exploration of Canada, which general topic should be researched? A Vikings and the Age of Exploration B Search for the Northwest Passage C Interaction between the first Europeans and Native American societies D Hardships faced by European explorers

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S ECTION II: N INTH G RADE L ITERATURE

AND

C OMPOSITION EOCT

Directions: Read each question and choose the best answer. Use the provided answer sheet at the end of the workbook to record your answers.

Use the paragraphs below to answer questions 41 through 45. (1) Admiral Richard Byrd one of America's greatest explorers, opened the vast unknown continent of Antarctica to science and modern exploration. (2) Byrd set out on an Antarctic expedition, which lasted from 1928 to 1930. (3) He took four ships carrying 3 planes, 95 dogs, 650 tons of supplies, and 42 men. (4) The expedition was based at a site known as Little america, located on the Ross Ice Shelf at the Bay of Whales. (5) On that expedition, Byrd and his chief pilot, Bernt Balchen, flew from their base camp on November 28 and 29, 1929. (6) They became the first men to fly over the South Pole. (7) Byrd carried out a second Antarctic expedition from 1933 to 1935. (8) Many people read his book about this adventure. (9) This expedition group built a new base camp. (10) However, with three months to go, Byrd became ill from carbon monoxide fumes, and he had to be rescued. (11) Afterward, he wrote a best-selling book titled "Alone," describing his experiences. (12) Byrd did more stuff in a third expedition from 1939 to 1941, but that expedition stopped short because of World War II.

41 How should sentence 1 BEST be revised? A Admiral Richard Byrd, one of America's greatest explorers, opened the vast unknown continent of Antarctica to science and modern exploration. B Admiral Richard Byrd one of America's greatest explorers, opened the vast unknown continent: of Antarctica: to science and modern exploration. C Admiral Richard Byrd, one of America's greatest explorers opened the vast unknown continent of Antarctica to science and modern exploration. D Leave as is.

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42 How should sentence 4 be changed to correct the problem of capitalization? A change expedition to Expedition B change Little america to Little America C change Ross Ice Shelf to Ross ice Shelf D change Bay of Whales to Bay Of Whales

44 How is sentence 11 BEST be revised? A change Afterward to Consequently B change wrote to writes C change "Alone," to Alone, D change experiences to exeperiences

45 Which sentence is too informal for this passage? 43 Which sentence does NOT belong in the third paragraph? A sentence 7 B sentence 8 C sentence 9 D sentence 10 A sentence 6 B sentence 9 C sentence 11 D sentence 12

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Use the paragraphs below to answer questions 46 through 50. (1) The orangutan is one of the great apes of the world. (2) It is the only ape to come from Asia rather than Africa. (3) Mail orangutans can weigh over 200 pounds. (4) An orangutan's arms are very strange. (5) Sometimes an orangutans arms can reach down to its ankle's! (6) Orangutans are the largest mammal that lives in trees. (7) Other great apes may build there sleeping nests in trees, but mainly they live on the ground. (8) Orangutans make nests high in the air out of leaves and branches. (9) Orangutan mothers take good care of the little ones. (10) They carry their babies through the trees on their backs. (11) The mothers teach them many things. (12) Orangutans need to learn what foods are good to eat and when they are ripe. (13) They must learn how to get sharp spines and shells off good things to eat. (14) Would you like to eat orangutan food? (15) They must learn what is good and what is not. (16) Orangutangs are interesting animals.

47 Which sentence below should be added after sentence 3? A Female orangutans like to brush their hair. B Female orangutans take care of the babies. C Males and females do not get along with one another. D Female orangutans can often weigh up to 110 pounds.

48 In sentence 3, which word is misspelled? A mail B orangutans C weigh D pounds

46 Which sentence does NOT belong in the passage? A sentence 9 B sentence 11 C sentence 12 D sentence 14

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49 How should sentence 5 BEST be revised? A Sometimes an orangutan's arms can reach down to its ankles! B Sometimes an orangutans arms can reach down to its ankle's? C Sometimes an orangutans arms, can reach down to its ankle's! D Sometimes an orangutans arm's can reach down to its ankle's!

50 Which of these sentences contains a misspelled word? A sentence 6 B sentence 7 C sentence 8 D sentence 9

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51 Jonathon wants to write a report about the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Which source would provide Jonathon with the MOST information about his topic? A a book about the history of the space program B a collection of personal narratives of famous astronauts C a NASA website about the Mars Exploration Rover Mission D an interview with an engineer who worked on the mission

53 Read this bibliographic entry for a book. George, Lee P. "The Life and Times of Mark Twain." Boston: Harcourt, 2002. What error does the entry contain? A The name of the author is in the wrong place. B The title is incorrectly punctuated. C The date of publication should not be included. D The page count is missing.

52 Where should Miguel look to find a chapter about the Great Depression in a history textbook? A the title page B the glossary C the acknowledgements page D the table of contents

54 How is the sentence below BEST written? The pilot couldn't hardly see the runway because it was obscured by thick fog. A change couldn't to could B change hardly to barely C change it to he D change see to saw

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55 How is the sentence below BEST written? It was the best movie that her or I had ever seen. A change I to me B change her to she C change her or I to us D change I to myself

Use the paragraph below to answer questions 56 through 59. (1) Last night the temperature fell to 20 degrees below zero in the middle of the night we heard water gushing from the area of the kitchen. (2) Wearing only a nightshirt, the sound caused my father to leap out of bed and race downstairs. (3) Their he found Niagara Falls pouring out from under the sink. (4) The pipes had busted because of the extreme cold.

56 How should sentence 1 BEST be revised? A Last night the temperature fell to 20 degrees. Below zero in the middle of the night. We heard water gushing from the area of the kitchen. B Last night the temperature fell to 20 degrees below zero in the middle of the night, we heard water gushing from the area of the kitchen. C Last night the temperature fell to 20 degrees below zero. In the middle of the night, we heard water gushing from the area of the kitchen. D Last night the temperature fell; to 20 degrees below zero in the middle of the night. We heard water gushing from the area of the kitchen.

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57 Which of these sentences shows the correct placement of the phrase wearing only a nightshirt? A The sound, wearing only a nightshirt, caused my father to leap out of bed and race downstairs. B The sound caused my father, wearing only a nightshirt, to leap out of bed and race downstairs. C The sound caused my father to leap, out of bed, wearing only a nightshirt, and race downstairs. D The sound caused my father to leap out of bed and race, wearing only a nightshirt, downstairs.

59 How should sentence 4 BEST be revised? A The pipes had bursted because of the extreme cold. B The pipes busted because of the extreme cold. C The pipes had been busted because of the extremely cold. D The pipes had burst because of the extreme cold.

Use the paragraph below to answer questions 60 through 62. (1) The boys done gone to the zoo last week without telling no one. (2) They're parents was real distressed when they found out and grounded them boys for two weeks. (3) In truth the boys felt badly about their impulsive action.

58 How should sentence 3 be changed to correct the error in spelling? A change Their to They're B change pouring to pooring C change Their to There D change Niagara to Niagra

60 How should sentence 1 BEST be revised? A The boys had went to the zoo last week without telling someone. B The boys went to the zoo last week without telling anyone. C The boys were gone to the zoo last week with telling no one. D No one knew the boys had went to the zoo last week.

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61 How should sentence 2 BEST be revised? A Their parents were real distressed when they found out and grounded them boys for two weeks. B There parents was really distressed when they found out and grounded the boys for two weeks. C Their parents were really distressed when they found out and grounded the boys for two weeks. D They're parents was really distressed when they find out and ground the boys for two weeks.

63 Which of these sentences is MOST precise in wording? A Her stomach was tied in knots as she approached the podium from which she was to make the speech that would change her life, one way or another. B Her stomach was tied in knots as she approached the podium--the podium from which she would give her speech--the speech that would change her life one way or another. C Her stomach was tied in knots as she slowly and deliberately approached the podium where she would make the speech that would, in one way or another, change her life for better or worse. D Her stomach was tied in knots as she approached the podium to give her speech, a speech that would change her life one way or another.

62 How should sentence 3 be revised? A change boys to boy's B change badly to bad C change impulsive to impulsively D Leave as is.

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64 How is the sentence below correctly punctuated? "Will you go with me" she pleaded. A add a comma after me. B add a question mark after me. C change the period to a question mark D The sentence is punctuated correctly.

66 Which of these sentences shows correct capitalization? A The title of Daryl's paper was The sunniest little town in the sunshine state. B The title of Daryl's paper was The Sunniest Little Town In The Sunshine State. C The title of Daryl's paper was The sunniest little town in the Sunshine State. D The title of Daryl's paper was The Sunniest Little Town in the Sunshine State.

65 Which of these sentences shows the correct spelling of all words. A Ella watered the plants and straitened the magazines before she left for rehearsal this morning. B Ella watered the plants and straightened the magazines before she left for rehearsal this morning. C Ella watered the plants and straightened the magazines before she left for rehersal this morning. D Ella watered the plants and straightened the magasines before she left for rehearsal this morning. 67 Which of these sentences is correctly punctuated? A To get in shape, Dino has been running, lifting weights, and swimming. B To get in shape Dino has been running, lifting weights, and swimming. C To get in shape, Dino has been running lifting weights and swimming. D To get in shape Dino has been running lifting weights and swimming.

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68 Which of these sentences is correctly written? A Before becoming president of the U.S. in 1913, Woodrow Wilson was governor of New Jersey. B Before becoming President of the U.S. in 1913, Woodrow Wilson was governor of New Jersey. C Before becoming President of the U.S. in, 1913, Woodrow Wilson was Governor of New Jersey. D Before becoming president of the US in 1913, Woodrow Wilson was governor of New Jersey.

70 Which word, or words, will correctly fill in the blank? The lawn needs A mowed B be mowed C to be mowed D be mowing .

71 Which word, or words, will correctly fill in the blank? Jenna feels family. A luck B luckily C lucks to have a large

69 Which of these sentences is correctly written? A Angela's friends were standing near the car on Saturday. B Angela's friends near the car on Saturday. C Were standing near the car on Saturday. D Angela and her friends all four near the car on Saturday morning.

D lucky

72 How is the sentence below BEST written? If it rains tomorrow let's go bowling. A change tomorrow to tommorrow B change go to going C remove the apostrophe in let's D add a comma after tomorrow

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73 How is the sentence below BEST written? Minnie is 5'2" tall has long hair, and weighs about 110 lbs. A change weighs to weighing B change 5'2" to five feet, two inches C remove the comma after hair

75 Which word, or words, will correctly fill in the blank? Either Paul or Andrew will drop off notes by 4:00. A his B their C its D they

D add a comma after tall

74 How is the sentence below BEST written? Kanishas bright red shoes made her banana-yellow pants look even more flamboyant than I remembered. A change flamboyant to flamboiant B change remembered to remmembered C remove the hyphen from banana-yellow D change Kanishas to Kanisha's

Use the paragraph below to answer questions 76 and 77. (1) The balls are kept in the large brown box to the left of the playground door. (2) Four-square is an old playground game with simple rules. (3) Begin by using chalk or duct tape to make a 2 × 2 grid on cement. (4) One player stands in each square of the grid. (5) The ball is bounced back and fourth between players and cannot be hit out of bounds, caught, nor bounced twice without being touched.

76 Which sentence does NOT belong in the paragraph? A sentence 1 B sentence 2 C sentence 4 D sentence 5

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77 Which heading would be appropriate for this paragraph? A The History of Four-Square B Improving Your Four-Square Game C Basics of Four-Square D Simple Playground Games

Use the paragraph below to answer question 78. The little town in southwest Maine has a population just under 2200 people. Twelve ponds and lakes exist around and in the town. Simple math clarifies that there is one lake or pond for every 180 people. Given that people are busy with many activities, it is reasonable to think that, on any given day, only 10 or 20 people would have to share any given body of water. Since these 10 or 20 people could spread out over the entire body of water, there really isn't a big need for sharing water space in Acton, Maine.

78 Which sentence would be the BEST topic sentence for this paragraph? A Acton, Maine, is not very far from Massachusetts. B Acton, Maine is a great place to live if you like to swim. C Everyone in Acton, Maine, owns at least one boat. D Water enthusiasts in Acton, Maine, don't have to learn to share.

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Use the paragraph below to answer questions 79 and 80. (1) The well pump was new to Andrea. (2) At her house, they had an outside water source, but it was just a faucet on the side of the house. (3) She often drank directly out of the faucet even though it annoyed her mother. (4) She was excited as she reached for the large curved handle that was curved to see if she could actually get some water out by pumping. (5) Andrea started raising the heavy handle with all her might, but she was caught off guard when it suddenly sprang a few inches on its own. (6) With blood running down her face, she went running to the house for some sympathy and ice.

80 What information does NOT belong in the paragraph? A sentence 1 B sentence 3 C sentence 5 D sentence 6

79 How should sentence 4 BEST be revised? A She was excited as she reached for the large curved handle. She wanted to see if she could actually get some water out by pumping. B She was excited as she reached for the large curved handle; that was curved to see if she could actually get some water out by pumping. C She was excited as she reached for the large curved handle to see if she could actually get some water out of the large curved handle by pumping the large curved handle. D She was excited. As she reached for the large curved handle, she could actually get some water out by pumping.

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Name

Class

Date

Score

A NSWER S HEET

EOCT READING PRACTICE Circle the correct answer.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

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A NSWER S HEET

EOCT READING PRACTICE (cont.) Circle the correct answer.

61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

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A NSWER S HEET

EOCT CONVENTIONS PRACTICE Circle the correct answer.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

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Score

A NSWER S HEET

NINTH GRADE LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION EOCT PRACTICE TEST Circle the correct answer.

Section I, number 1-40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 40 A B C D

Section II, number 41-80 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

119

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Score

A NSWER S HEET

NINTH GRADE LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION EOCT PRACTICE TEST (cont.) Circle the correct answer.

59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 79 80 A A B B C C D D

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

120

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