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Grade 7

The Language of Literature

Unit Four Part 1

"The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes

Social Studies TEKS: 7.21B, 7.21C, 7.22C, 7.22D Language Arts TEKS: 5B, 8D, 13C, 13D, 13E, 13F, 13G, 13I, 15C, 15F

p. 564, narrative poetry

Suggested Activities Preparing to Read

Connect to Your Life Have students name and discuss legendary figures from their local communities. Alternative Option: Have students discuss legendary figures in small groups. Students in each group should select one of the figures they talked about to share with the rest of the class.

Choices & Challenges

Writing Options--Police Report, p. 571 Students will imagine that they are the officer in charge of the redcoat

brigade that brings down the highwayman, and will write a report of the incident for their superior officer. Encourage students to include their reactions to characters like Tim, the innkeeper, Bess, and the highwayman himself. In their reports, students also should provide details from the poem and their own made-up details. (Use Writing Transparencies, p. 14, for additional support.)

Suggested Assessment The completed police report serves as the assessment. Activities & Explorations--Illustrated Map, p. 571 Have students create an imaginary map of the countryside in which "The Highwayman" is set. Students can illustrate the map with episodes from the poem. You might want to show students pictures of English moors and inns, and have them imagine how the countryside would have looked a century or two ago. If students have access to a computer, they might wish to use a graphics program to design the map and illustrations. Suggested Assessment The completed map serves as the assessment. Inquiry & Research--Social Studies: Highwaymen, p. 571 Have students use encyclopedias, other reference books, and the Internet to research the problem of highwaymen on the roads of Great Britain during the 18th century. Students can write a report and present their information to the class. (Use Writing Transparencies, pp. 47­48, for additional support.) Suggested Assessment The completed report and presentation serves as the assessment.

Grade 7

The Language of Literature

Unit Four Part 2

from Growing Up by Russell Baker

Social Studies TEKS: 7.22A, 7.22B, 7.22C, 7.22D Language Arts TEKS: 4A, 13F, 13I, 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 20E, 20F

p. 621, autobiography

Suggested Activities

Preparing to Read--Connect to Your Life, p. 621 Students should write in their Reader's Notebook about what they already know or have heard about the Great Depression. Have students discuss with the class whether they know of any family members who lived through the Depression, and what their experiences were like. Cross Curricular Link--Social Studies, teacher's edition, p. 626 Read aloud to students "The Year 1932," the cross

curricular link found at the bottom of page 626 in your teacher's edition. As an extension activity, you may wish to have students use the Internet or encyclopedias to learn more about the state of the U.S. economy in 1932. After gathering information, students might discuss in greater depth why the economy was experiencing such difficulties then.

Activities & Explorations--Oral History, p. 630 Have each student interview a family or community member who

lived through the Depression. Each student might ask his or her interview subject about life at that time, the hardships, and what the family did to survive. Students should write questions in advance and tape record the interview if possible. After conducting the interviews, students should present oral reports to the class, making sure to supply some direct quotes from their subjects. (Use Communications Transparencies and Copymasters, p. 9, for additional support.)

Suggested Assessment For assistance with scoring the presentations, see Teacher's Guide to Assessment and Portfolio Use, pp. 21­28, "Product and Performance Assessment: Looking at Final Results." Inquiry & Research--Social Studies: The WPA, p. 630 Students should research the Works Projects

Administration (WPA) and the art and photography the organization produced. You may wish to have students present reports on a particular WPA artist or photographer.

Suggested Assessment For assistance with scoring the presentations, see Teacher's Guide to Assessment and Portfolio Use, pp. 21­28, "Product and Performance Assessment: Looking at Final Results."

Grade 7

The Language of Literature

Unit Four Part 2

from Growing Up by Russell Baker

Social Studies TEKS: 7.13B, 7.21A, 7.21H, 7.22A, 7.22B, 7.22C, 7.22D Language Arts TEKS: 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 20E, 24A

Interdisciplinary Project

p. 651c­651d, teacher's edition

Suggested Activity Illustrated History of the Great Depression

Have students work as a class or in small groups to write and illustrate a history of the Great Depression. The history should be divided into four main chapters that address the following questions: What were the causes of the Great Depression? What effect did the Depression have on Americans? What was the Dust Bowl and how did it relate to the Depression? Within the history, students should also calculate percentages representing money lost in the 1929 stock market crash. If working as a class, have students display their history in the classroom. Invite other students, families, and community members to borrow and read it. If working in small groups, have each group present its book to the class. Students may wish to produce multiple copies of the history so that every class member can have a copy.

Team Teaching Assignments--Connect to Social Studies Students may also choose to add to the book a chapter on oral histories of the Great Depression. Students may interview older relatives who remember it, or refer back to the interviews they previously conducted as part of the Activities & Explorations activity on page 630. Students may also read oral histories in books like Hard Times by Studs Terkel and Making Do: How Women Survived the '30s by Jeane Westin. Students should then create a montage of quotations from published oral histories (being careful to credit their sources) that shows how the Depression affected people in all regions of the United States, including Texas. This section could be illustrated with photocopies of photographs by Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and other photographers employed by the Farm Security Administration during the Great Depression.

Suggested Assessment

For scoring rubrics for oral presentations, product/performance, and self-assessment, see Teacher's Guide to Assessment and Portfolio Use, pp. 21­28, "Product and Performance Assessment: Looking at Final Results."

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