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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 ****************** SECONDARY PROGRAM OPERATIONS ****************** SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN In order to implement the district's goals and to comply with TEC §11.251 and §11.253, each individual school, including program charter schools and community-based vendor schools, will develop a School Improvement Plan. The School Improvement Plan must: assess the academic achievement for each student in the school using the AEIS as described by Section §39.051 of the TEC; include use of the analysis of information related to dropout prevention completed by the district and campus-level decision-making committees for secondary campuses as required by TEC §11.255. set the campus performance objectives based on the AEIS, including objectives for special needs populations, including students in special education programs; identify how the campus goals will be met for each student; determine the resources needed to implement the plan; identify staff needed to implement the plan; set timelines for reaching the goals; measure progress toward the performance objectives periodically to ensure that the plan is resulting in academic improvement; include goals and methods for violence prevention and intervention on campus; provide for a program to encourage parental involvement at the campus; STATE COMPENSATORY EDUATION AND THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN The state compensatory education program must be described in the campus improvement plan if the program is implemented at the campus level or be described in the district improvement plan if the state compensatory education program is implemented district wide. Law requires the district/campus improvement plan; it is the primary record supporting expenditures attributed to the state compensatory education program. In determining the appropriate accelerated, intensive compensatory programs and/or services, districts must use student performance data form the TAKS and other appropriate assessment instruments and achievement tests administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39 of the Texas Education Code. The district must design the state compensatory education program based on the identified needs of students at risk of dropping out of school.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

In addressing the needs of students at risk of dropping out of school, the district and/or campus improvement plan, as appropriate, must include the following:

· · · · · · · ·

Total amount of state compensatory education funds allocated for resources and staff Comprehensive needs assessment Identified strategies Supplemental financial resources for state compensat5ory education Supplemental FTEs for state compensatory education Measurable performance objectives Timelines for monitoring strategies Formative and summative evaluation criteria

State compensatory education resources must be redirected when evaluations indicate that programs and/or services are unsuccessful in producing desired results for students at risk of dropping out of school.

COMMITTEES The primary committee at each school is the Shared Decision-Making Committee (SDMC); however, federal, state, and local regulations mandate additional committees to be established at each school. The principal is responsible for establishing each of the committees listed below, as well as reviewing their responsibilities, and monitoring their procedures, progress, and actions. These committees are to be established in the first month of school. Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC) (unless waiver approved) Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) Parent Advisory Committee (PAC)/Parent Community Participation Team (PCPT) (unless waiver approved) Grade Placement Committee (GPC) (Elementary and Middle Schools) Campus Referral Committee (CRC) Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) Safety/Security/ and Emergency Preparedness Council Student Advisory Committee Student Attendance Committee Placement Review Committee Discipline Committee Entrance/Exit Committee for Advanced Academics 504 Committee Student Retention Committee (Dropout Prevention)

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations SHARED DECISION-MAKING COMMITTEE (SDMC) Board Policy establishes SDMC at every school in the district. SDMC must meet the district's guidelines established in the policy. Each school year, the SDMC shall assist the principal in developing, reviewing, and revising the School Improvement Plan for the purpose of improving student performance for all student populations. The SDMC shall be involved in decisions in the area of planning, budgeting, curriculum, staffing patterns, staff development, and school organization. The SDMC must approve the portions of the School Improvement Plan addressing campus staff development needs. A principal shall regularly consult the SDMC in the planning, operation, supervision, and evaluation of the campus educational program. Each campus level committee shall hold at least one public meeting per year. The required meeting shall be held after receipt of the annual campus rating from the agency to discuss the performance of the campus and the campus performance objectives. The SDMC should meet regularly, approximately once a month. FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE A Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC) shall be established and maintained in every school to facilitate communications on matters of common professional concern and to allow schools the flexibility to solve problems unique to a school setting. The FAC provides a means whereby teachers may petition or make recommendations to the principal regarding the establishment and application of school policies affecting the growth of students and school climate, understanding that the principal has final responsibility and authority for the success of the school program. The FAC shall not consider personal grievances of individual teachers. Membership: The FAC shall be chaired by the principal. Membership of the committee shall consist of one representative for each ten teachers on the faculty, or a major fraction thereof, provided there is a minimum of five members. The committee shall elect a vice-chairperson and secretary from within the committee membership. The selection of committee members shall be made at a faculty meeting in each school no later than the second week of September of each year. Nominations will be made by the faculty according to procedures, developed by its membership, which ensure ethnic and racial representation proportionate to the ethnic and racial composition of the faculty. The selection of members of the FAC shall be made by secret ballot. Meetings: The FAC shall meet as often as necessary but not less than once during each grading period provided the first meeting of the school year occurs prior to the fourth week of school. Meetings may be called by the principal or by a petition of one-third of the teacher members of the FAC. The FAC in each school shall set the time and place of and procedures for its meetings. Waiver: A school may ask for a waiver of board policy to use the Shared Decision-Making Committee or a subcommittee in place of the FAC. Submission of the waiver must meet the established waiver timelines. Waivers must be approved by the Houston Independent School District Board of Education before they are implemented.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations PARENT-COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION TEAM Each school shall have a Parent-Community Participation Team (PCPT) of three to five teachers and parents whose membership is representative of a cross section of the school's enrollment. The committee shall meet to discuss educational programs, school procedures, and school-related community problems and may offer advice to the principal on these matters. These meetings serve as an excellent sounding board for the principal to keep him or her aware of the tenor of his or her school community. The team's purpose is to give special attention to programs for parents who typically have not been involved in their children's education due to a feeling of discomfort in the school environment or a lack of experience in civic or political matters. The team designs activities that organize, support, and supervise parental participation in all levels of school life. The parent-community team is responsible for: Helping parents understand their role in supporting the work of the school and the roles of the principal, teachers, and other school-based personnel; Helping parents choose their representatives on the shared decision-making committee; Reviewing the school improvement plan; Working with the general parent-teacher membership in line with the overall school plan; Supporting the school's efforts to advance students' overall development; and Encouraging new parents to become involved in school activities. See Reference (b). Principals may elect to have the Shared Decision Making Committee function as the PCPT PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT ­ TITLE I, PART A SCHOOLS On HISD campuses, partnerships between parents and the school will help children learn and achieve academic success. In accordance with the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" (Public Law 107-110 [HR 1] Section 1118), parents of children enrolled in federally funded programs shall be given opportunities to become involved in the development, operation, and evaluation of campus-based programs and activities. Such programs and activities include those designed to improve student academic achievement and school performance. Every Title I, Part A school must develop (jointly with parents of children enrolled in the school) a written parental involvement policy. This policy shall be distributed to parents and also made available to the local community. It shall address the expectations and support for parental involvement on the campus, describe how the parents will be involved in the review and improvement of campus programs, and explain the school's role in providing a quality curriculum in an environment conducive to learning. This policy shall also explain assessments and evaluation tools used to measure student achievement and list flexible regular meetings which parents can attend to receive feedback to suggestions. The policy shall also specify how the school can use federal funds to provide childcare and other assistance to allow parents to attend these meetings. Another component of the policy shall include information on how the Parents Right to Know will be implemented on the campus (Public Law 107-110, Section 1111).

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations An annual review will take place to allow all parents the opportunity to make suggestions and revisions to the policy as well as to determine the effectiveness of the policy. This meeting should be held at a convenient time for parents to participate. If the policy is unsatisfactory to a parent, the school shall submit any parent comments to the supervisor of the Title I Parental Involvement Program in the Department of External Funding. If a school already has a plan that involves parents, it may amend it to meet the standards for federally funded programs. Title I, Part A schools must have a school-parent compact. School-parent compacts are designed to promote shared responsibility for high-student academic achievement. For examples of schoolparent compacts, new parental involvement funding guidelines, and additional information on parental involvement, please refer to the Title I, Part A Parental Involvement Documentation Guide that is disseminated to all Title I, Part A campuses.

CHARACTER EDUCATION PROGRAM TEC §29.906 allows school districts to implement character education programs after consulting with educators, parents, and other members of the community, including community leaders: 1. Stress positive traits such as: Courage Trustworthiness, including honesty, reliability, punctuality, and loyalty Integrity Respect and courtesy Responsibility, including accountability, diligence, perseverance, and self-control Fairness, including justice and freedom from prejudice Caring, including kindness, empathy, compassion, consideration, patience, generosity, and charity Good citizenship including patriotism, concern for the common good and the community, and respect for authority and the law School pride 2. Use integrated teaching strategies 3. Must be age appropriate The legislation requires TEA to maintain a list of character education programs and to review and evaluate the impact of character education programs on student discipline and academic achievement. The legislation also allows TEA to accept money from federal government and private sources to use in assisting school districts in implementing character education programs that meet the criteria prescribed. HISD's character education plan, adopted by the Board of Education in March 1989, calls for all schools to implement a K-12 values program with instruction provided weekly and reinforced throughout the school on a daily basis. HISD's Character Education Program is the largest program in the nation and received the first ever national award for large urban school districts, the Character Education Partnership (CEP) National Lighthouse Award, 2004.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Rationale: The latest brain-based research confirms emotional intelligence versus academic intelligence is a better indicator of student success. Character building involves nurturing self-esteem/self-concept, which instills in students the concept that they can learn. This is a critical component in a student's ability to achieve and be successful. Teaching students the value of being honest, self-disciplined, self-reliant, trustworthy and responsible reflects high expectations of behavior and provides a school climate that is safe, supportive, and caring. Addressing issues of building healthy relationships and respecting others provide students an opportunity to learn problem-solving skills and conflict resolution skills. Purpose and Scope: To be effective, instruction in character education is consistently implemented and appropriate to the developmental level of the students. At the elementary level, students are introduced to different concepts of personal and social responsibility each month. The program focuses on active involvement and demonstration of these concepts so that children learn that these concepts are essential to academic success, as well as lifelong success. The next level of the character education program includes the involvement in school and community projects and work with role models from the community. This program enlists the support of the entire community. Parents must be informed and encouraged to support their children's involvement and be reassured that the program focuses on character traits and civic values, not on religious concepts. The program is multi-faceted in response to the diverse needs of the learning community. The components of HISD's Character Education program include the following trainings and workshops. Passport for Success ­ HISD's three-hour workshop designed to demonstrate the concepts of character education and the implementation process. Participants are provided an opportunity to experience and internalize strategies and techniques applicable to the classroom and the learning community. Six Step Character Infusion Process - a three-hour workshop where content specialists guide teachers through the process of learning how to utilize a six-step process to infuse their curriculum with the nine core values. 40 Developmental Assets training, a three-hour highly interactive workshop designed to support teachers in creating supportive classroom conditions that help young people thrive. Campus Climate Transformation, a three-hour workshop where participants learn tools specifically focused on teaching students the value of being honest, self disciplined, selfreliant, trustworthy and responsible. This reflects high expectations of behavior and provides a school climate that is safe, supportive, and caring. Teachers develop an action plan designed to transform their campus. The awarding of grants to Middle Schools that attend the No Place for Hate Summit, sponsored by the Anti-Defamation League, facilitates the ability of students to plan activities for their school to address prejudice. The Character Education Department offers a $100 scholarship to schools that develop and implement activities that involve the entire student body. IV - 6

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations A website that presents a description of the value of the month, helps integrate each core value with the district's philosophy of education, and communicates successful applications of character education employed within HISD. The website offers reading recommendations for administrators, teachers, and parents. DISTRICTWIDE ADOPTED VALUES September Self-Esteem October Honesty November Respect December Trust January Loyalty February Justice March Commitment April Self-Discipline May Self-Reliance Resources: Character Education Monthly Newsletter Training and Workshops Model Character Infused Lessons Random Acts of Kindness Program Passport for Success Lessons and Activities Kids At Hope DISCIPLINE While a challenging and demanding academic program is the foundation for a positive school climate and good discipline, HISD also expects responsible behavior from all students. When imposing discipline, district personnel shall adhere to the following general guidelines: Discipline shall be administered when necessary to protect students, school employees, or property and maintain essential order and discipline. Students shall be treated fairly and equitably. Discipline shall be based on a careful assessment of the circumstances of each case. Factors to consider shall include: The seriousness of the offense. The student's age. The frequency of misconduct. Behavior history (Chancery Report) The student's attitude. The potential effect of the misconduct on the school environment. State law requirements Self-Defense as a mitigating factor

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Upon Board adoption of the Code of Student Conduct required by Chapter 37 of the Texas Education Code, the guidelines provided in the Code shall be in effect. Campus personnel should also refer to appropriate HISD Board Policy for guidance in handling specific aspects of discipline. Each school should develop procedures and guidelines for student behavior, consistent with the HISD Code of Student Conduct, which include clear and concise rules and regulations that are communicated to all members of the school community. Involvement of all members of the school community in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the school's disciplinary system is recommended. The development of a school-based discipline system may be coordinated by a School Discipline Committee appointed by the principal. (Optional) The School Discipline Committee should be composed of: three teachers, two parents (PTA/PTO representatives), one counselor (ancillary staff if no counselor assigned), two students (high school only), and one administrator (principal or designee). The School Discipline Committee will: Review all existing rules and regulations on discipline, both district wide and school-based, and establish a checklist to determine which are effective and which can be improved. Survey the school community (teachers, counselors, recommendations on how to improve discipline in the school. Research current literature on effective systems. Develop a discipline system for the school based on current research, school community input, and the needs of the student population. The system must incorporate existing School Board policy but should be flexible enough to permit teacher and administrator judgment. On the other hand, it should be structured enough to establish consistency and a strong level of student accountability. Specific rules and procedures for the implementation of the discipline system should also be clearly stated. Communicate the discipline system to all members of the school community and submit a copy to the district office. parents, and students) for

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Requirements of State Law The HISD Board of Education has approved a Code of Student Conduct, and it must be prominently displayed at each campus and distributed to each student at the beginning of the school year or at the time of enrollment. TEC §37.018 requires that each school district provide each teacher and administrator with a copy of Chapter 37 of the TEC and a copy of the local policy relating to Chapter 37. Copies of the Code of Student Conduct are available from HISD Procurement, Materials Management. The Code of Criminal Procedure §15.27 requires a law enforcement agency to notify the superintendent of a school district when a student is arrested or referred to juvenile court for certain offenses. Information received by a school district may not be attached to the permanent academic file of the student who is the subject of the report. The school district shall destroy the information at the end of the school year in which the report is filed. A teacher may remove a child from a classroom if that student repeatedly interferes with the teacher's ability to effectively communicate with the students. The child may not be returned to the class over the teacher's objection unless a Placement Review Committee determines that it is the best or only alternative available. Detailed documentation for each infraction must accompany the teacher's request for student removal. The Texas Family Code §41.001 makes the parent or other person liable for any property damage caused by the malicious conduct of a child who is younger than 10. Under current law, the parent or other person is liable as described above for a child younger than 12. TEC §37.008(l) requires a district to offer a student in a DAEP an opportunity to complete coursework before the beginning of the next school year through any method available, including correspondence courses, distance learning or summer school. The district may not charge students for these courses. TEC §37.021 requires that if a district removes a student from the regular classroom and places the student in in-school suspension or another setting other than a DAEP to offer the student with the opportunity to complete before the beginning of the next school year each course in which the student was enrolled at the time of removal through any method available including correspondence courses, distance learning or summer school. TEC §37.015 requires a principal to notify the appropriate law enforcement agency if a student commits a criminal offense for which a student may be expelled. A school district shall inform each teacher of the conduct of a student who has engaged in any Chapter 37 violation. A teacher shall keep the information received in this subsection confidential. A superintendent or principal is required to notify all instructional and support staff that have responsibility for supervision of a student who has been arrested or referred to the juvenile court under Chapter 52, Family Code, of that student's arrest or referral. The person who is notified must keep this information confidential.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations An out-of-school suspension may not exceed three (3) school days per offense. A suspension cannot be made for longer than three days on the basis of multiple offenses that occur during the same time period. An in-school suspension may not exceed five (5) school days per offense. Discipline for students with disabilities must be followed as outlined in the district's Code of Student Conduct. The federal regulation that states that school personnel may remove a child with a disability for up to ten school days refers to removal to a different educational setting or environment and not suspension. Details concerning this are included in the Code of Student Conduct. For students with disabilities who are referred to a DAEP, all assessments, the ARD/IEP report, and the 504 Accommodation Plan must be up-to-date before students are placed. TEC §37.0021 prohibits a school district employee or volunteer from placing any student in a locked room of less than 50 square ft. that is designed for seclusion. An exception is made for emergency situations where a student possesses a weapon. The Chapter 37 report will be submitted through the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) data collection and reporting process. The Commissioner may now consider compliance with the PEIMS data reporting requirements, including discipline, as an additional criterion for evaluating accountability. A campus must report to the TEA information about students expelled for bringing a firearm to school. Information includes: the number of students the schools from which expelled the type of weapon racially motivated incidents the school to which expelled Section §37.020 of the TEC requires that districts annually report student-level information concerning placements of students in disciplinary alternative education programs, expulsions, and placements in juvenile justice alternative education programs. With regard to placements in alternative education programs, the law requires that districts report student-level information indicating whether the placement was based on: (1) violation of the student code of conduct, (2) conduct for which a teacher may remove a student from class under Section §37.002, (3) conduct for which placement in an alternative education program is required by Section 37.006, or (4) conduct occurring while a student was enrolled in another school district. The data must also indicate the number of days the student was assigned to the alternative education program and the actual number of days the student was in attendance in the program.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations With regard to expulsions, the law requires that districts report student-level information indicating whether: (1) the expulsion was mandated by Section §37.007, (2) the conduct issue involved a firearm, (3) the expulsion was based on conduct for which expulsion is permissible based on local policy, or (4) such conduct constituted serious or persistent misbehavior occurring while a student was assigned to an alternative education program. The data must also indicate the number of days the student was expelled and whether the expelled student: (1) was placed in an alternative education program, (2) was placed in a juvenile justice alternative education program, or (3) was not placed in a program. TEC §37.008 defines a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) as having the following characteristics: Is provided in setting other than a student's regular classroom; Is located on or off of a regular school campus; Provides for students who are assigned to the alternative education program to be separated from students who are not assigned to the program; Focuses on English language arts, mathematics, science, history, and self-discipline; Provides for students' education and behavioral needs; and Provides supervision and counseling. Disciplinary alternative education programs operating at alternative campuses will no longer be eligible to participate in the agency's alternative accountability procedures since the home school is responsible for monitoring the progress of the student, even after referral to the DAEP. The locally-assigned regular campus (usually the campus of residence) of a student placed in a disciplinary alternative education program will be held accountable for the performance of that student for purposes of ratings. Alternative campuses providing other types of programs, e.g., dropout recovery programs, will continue to be eligible to register under the alternative procedures even if a disciplinary alternative education program is a component of the campus. Students attending such a campus for a disciplinary reason will be distinguished from other students at that campus for accountability purposes and must remain physically separated from other students at the campus. DAEP's registered with TEA for HISD are:

DAEP Campus Campus Number Grades Served

Community Education Partners SW Community Education Partners SE North Alternative Middle North Alternative Elementary South Alternative Elementary Westside High School (Westside Students only)

101-912-303 101-912-316 101-912-339 101-912-366 101-912-387 101-912-036

6-12 6-12 6-8 KG-5 2-6 9-12

The JJAEP for HISD is Harris County JJAEP at 2525 Murworth (campus number 101-912-320), which serves grades 4-12.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations SIS Discipline Reporting School staff must enter data required to be reported to the Texas Education Agency on the "Student Behavior" discipline screen in SIS. Administrative personnel must provide information on appropriate coding to the clerical staff responsible for entering the data. The principal should assign a professional employee familiar with TEC Chapter 37 and the HISD Code of Student Conduct to review and verify the completeness and accuracy of all discipline data entered into SIS. This should be done on a monthly basis and at the end of the school year prior to PEIMS submission, using reports available through SIS queries and PEIMS Edit Plus reports, as appropriate. Computer data should match manual records in the school and reflect why and how each student was disciplined. After all errors are corrected and the PEIMS extracts are run, the discipline data from SIS will be reported to PEIMS. TEA staff will use this data in audits and in responding to legislative queries. The following chart outlines the steps to be taken in discipline management and reporting. Steps in Discipline Management and Reporting Action

Teacher completes discipline card for any student with a HISD Code of Student Conduct Level I ­ IV offense and sends student to office. Principal or assistant principal disciplines student in accordance with HISD Code of Student Conduct and Chapter 37 of the Texas Education Code. Principal or assistant principal notifies attendance clerk of students in the office at the time attendance is taken. Principal or assistant principal calls HISD Police if there has been a violation of the law. Principal or assistant principal makes notation of PEIMS Action Reason Code and PEIMS Action Code on the discipline card. Gives card to Data Entry Clerk, with administrative signature and date of code assignment. All infractions must be coded when student is removed for any part of school day for placement in in-school or out-ofschool suspension, or referral to a DAEP or JJAEP. Data Entry Clerk enters data into SIS discipline fields in accordance with coding determined by principal or assistant principal. Data Entry Clerk prints SIS queries and Edit+ reports.

Resources

HISD Code of Student Conduct

Documentation

Discipline Card

HISD Code of Student Conduct Chapter 37, Texas Education Code

SIS Documentation

Discipline Card Suspension Letter, DAEP Placement Letter or Expulsion Order, listing infraction, action, and dates. Computer File

Texas Education Code Ordinances of City of Houston (Bellaire, etc.) SIS Documentation

HISD Police Incident Report

Notation on Discipline Code Written Instructions (including date and signature) to Data Entry Clerk

SIS Documentation

Notation on Discipline Code Written Instructions (including date and signature) to Data Entry Clerk Computer File

SIS Documentation

SIS Documentation

Computer File

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Steps in Discipline Management and Reporting (cont.)

Action

Data Entry Clerk delivers SIS queries and Edit+ reports to principal or assistant principal who will verify that discipline reports are complete and accurate. Principal or assistant principal verifies accuracy of reports ­ signs and dates to indicate approval. Maintain all pertinent discipline documentation to support SIS coding for 5 years as required by state law.

Resources

SIS Documentation

Documentation

Computer File

SIS Documentation

Computer File

HISD Records Management Plan for Schools

Process infractions resulting in student's recommendation for placement in DAEP or JJAEP, which includes parent conferences, expulsion hearings, appeals, etc. Submit referrals and orders of expulsion to DAEP/JJAEP HISD office for review and approval of placement. Inform parent(s) and students of DAEP or JJAEP referral status and bus schedule. Update or add coding for DAEP or JJAEP referrals after placement and at end of school year. Principal or assistant principal notifies attendance clerk of students suspended out of school or placed in in-school suspension. Principal or assistant principal serves as administrative liaison for 120-day review at DAEP. School personnel inform each teacher who has scheduled contact with a student when the student has committed an infraction that may result in expulsion.

SIS Documentation HISD Code of Student Conduct

SIS Documentation HISD Code of Student Conduct SIS Documentation HISD Code of Student Conduct SIS Documentation HISD Code of Student Conduct SIS Documentation

Discipline Card Suspension Letter Notice of Proposed Hearing Expulsion Letter Placement Letter for DAEP or JJAEP Discipline Card Suspension Letter Notice of Proposed Hearing Expulsion Letter Placement Letter for DAEP or JJAEP Computer File

Computer File

Computer File

Computer File

SIS Documentation HISD Code of Student Conduct SIS Documentation HISD Code of Student Conduct

Computer File

Computer File

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Truancy Reporting Requirements Based on legislative action taken by the 79th Texas Legislature, the PEIMS Data Standards were amended in 2003 to require that truancy be reported through the PEIMS 425 Discipline Record. Four Disciplinary Action Reason Codes were added to the Data Standards: 42 43 44 45 Truancy (failure to attend school) - Parent contributing to truancy TEC §25.093(a) Truancy (failure to attend school) - Student with at least 3 unexcused absences - TEC §25.094 Truancy (failure to attend school) - Student with 10 unexcused absences - TEC §25.094 Truancy (failure to attend school) - Student failure to enroll in school - TEC §25.085

Two new Disciplinary Action Codes were also added, requiring that school personnel have good communication with the courts: 16 17 Truancy (failure to attend school) charges filed in Juvenile Municipal or Justice of the Peace court and a fine was assessed Truancy (failure to attend school) charges filed in Juvenile Municipal or Justice of the Peace court and no fine was assessed

This coding cannot be entered before receipt of the disposition of the court cases.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations GUN-FREE SCHOOLS ACT (GFSA) The GFSA of 1994 was reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In order for the local educational agencies (LEAs) to continue to receive federal funds under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended by the Improving America's Schools Act of October 1994 (IASA), the GFSA places on the LEAs the following requirments: Gun-Free Schools Act Requirements [PL 103-227, as amended by PL 103-382, Section 14601] have an expulsion policy consistent with the required state law to be eligible to receive ESEA funds. LEAs must have a policy requiring referral to the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system of any student who brings a firearm to a school under the control and supervision of an LEA. In accordance with the GFSA, no ESEA funds may be made available to an LEA unless that LEA has the required referral policy. handle incidents involving students with disabilities in a manner consistent with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act using the case-by-case exception, as appropriate, provide to the state education agency (SEA) an assurance of compliance with the state law requiring a one-year expulsion, provide descriptive information to the SEA annually concerning the LEA's expulsions for bringing a weapon to school, including the name of the school concerned, the number of students expelled from the school, and the type of firearms concerned, and implement a policy requiring referral to the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system of any student who brings a weapon to school. Weapons are to be defined as firearms including handguns, rifles, or shotguns; and: any weapon (including starter gun) which will, or is designed to, or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of any explosive; the frame or receiver of any weapon described above; any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; any destructive device, which includes: any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas bomb, grenade, rocket having a propellant charge of more than four ounces, having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, mine, or similar device; IV - 15

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations any weapon which will or which may be readily converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive or other propellant and which has any barrel with a bore of more than one-half inch in diameter; any combination or parts either designed or intended for use in converting any device into any destructive device described in the two immediately preceding examples and from which a destructive device may be readily assembled. An important consideration for receiving funds under this law is the accurate reporting of this data to the appropriate state agency. Since the data is maintained on SIS in the discipline module and at the HISD Police Department, it is very important that these three sources of data agree. For example, if the student brings a gun to school, it should be reported to the HISD Police; the student should be expelled and a record of this expulsion must be placed on SIS in the Behavior file; and finally, the same incident must be reported on the GFSA Report Form. ZERO TOLERANCE One of the numerous steps taken by the HISD School Board to improve safety and security on all its campuses ­ elementary, middle, and high - has been to approve a Zero Tolerance Policy. This Zero Tolerance Policy, through an aggressive informational and promotional campaign, clearly informs students, staff, and the public that there are serious consequences resulting from weapons possession, violent behavior, and criminal activity on HISD property. In every case where students in middle or high school commit serious violation of the Code of Student Conduct, Education Code, or Penal Code, the school district will pursue charges, arrests, and removal to a juvenile detention facility or county jail. The following charts indicate those offenses for which expulsion or placement in a DAEP is mandatory or discretionary:

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Chart for Determining Mandatory Placement and Expulsion Codes for 425 Record

Disciplinary Action Reason Codes (C165) Code and Translation Disciplinary Action Codes Mandatory Mandatory DAEP Expulsion Placement JJAEP

Do NOT Use to send student to CEP or JJAEP

01 02 04 05 06 07 08 09

Permanent removal by a teacher from class (Teacher has removed the student from classroom and denied the student the right to return. TEC §37.003 has been invoked.) ­ TEC §37.002(b) Conduct punishable as a felony-TEC §37.006(a)(2)(A) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Possessed, sold, or used marihuana or other controlled substance. TEC §37.006 (a)(2)(C) and 37.007(b) for under the influence. Requires Police Report ARM # Possessed, sold, used, or was under the influence of an alcoholic beverage-TEC §37.006(a)(2)(D) and 37.007(b) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Abuse of a volatile chemical-TEC §37.006(a)(2)(E) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Public lewdness or indecent exposure-TEC §37.006(a)(2)(F) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Retaliation against school employee-TEC §37.006(b) and 37.007(d) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Based on conduct occurring off campus and while the student is not in attendance at a school-sponsored or school-related activity for felony offenses in Title 5, Penal Code-TEC §37.006(c), TEC §37.007(b)(4) and TEC §37.0081.- Requires Police Report ARM # Based on conduct occurring off campus and while the student is not in attendance at a school-sponsored or school-related activity for felony offenses not in Title 5, Penal Code -TEC §37.006(d) and TEC §37.007(b)(4) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Used, exhibited, or possessed a firearm-TEC §37.007(a)(1)(A) and/or brought a firearm to school­TEC §37.007(e). (See also #51) Requires Police Report ARM # Used exhibited, or possessed an illegal knife (blade longer than 5.5 inches)TEC §37.007(a)(1)(B) (See also #50) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Used exhibited, or possessed a club-TEC §37.007(a)(1)(C) ­ Requires Police Report ARMS # Used exhibited, or possessed a prohibited weapon under Penal Code §46.05TEC §37.007(a)(1)(D) (See also #52) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Arson -TEC §37.007(a)(2)(B) ­ Requires Fire Marshall Verification and Police Report ARM # Murder, capital murder, criminal attempt to commit murder, or capital murderTEC §37.007(a)(2)(C) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # and Violent Crime Victim Letter (for attempt to commit murder). Indecency with a child-TEC §37.007(a)(2)(D) ­Requires Police Report ARM # and Violent Crime Victim Letter Aggravated kidnapping-TEC §37.007(a)(2)(E) Requires Police Report ARM # and Violent Crime Victim Letter Serious or persistent misconduct violating the student code of conduct while placed in alternative education program-TEC §37.007(c) Violation of student code of conduct not included under TEC §37.002 (b), 37.006, or 37.007 (does not include violations covered in reason codes 33 and 34) Criminal mischief-TEC §37.007(f) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Emergency Placement/Expulsion-TEC §37.019

X X X X X X X X* (if Felony)

10

Discretionary

Do NOT use

11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

X X X X X X X X

For DAEP/JJAEP Use Only Discretionary Do NOT use

Discretionary if greater than $1,500

For temporary use only

* Retaliation against school employee or volunteer coupled with an offense in TEC 37.007 (a) or (d).

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Disciplinary Action Reason Codes (C165) Code and Translation

Disciplinary Action Codes Mandatory Mandatory DAEP Expulsion Placement JJAEP X X X

26 27 28

Terroristic threat-TEC §37.006(a)(1) or 37.007(b) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Assault under Penal Code §22.01(a)(1) against a school district employee or volunteer-TEC §37.007(b)(2)(C) ­ Requires bodily injury. Requires Police Report ARM # Assault under Penal Code §22.01(a)(1) against someone other than a school district employee or volunteer-TEC §37.006(a)(2)(B) ­ Requires bodily injury. Requires Police Report ARM # and Violent Crime Victim Letter Aggravated assault under Penal Code §22.02 against a school district employee or volunteer-TEC §37.007(d) - Requires Police Report ARM # Aggravated assault under Penal Code §22.02 against someone other than a school district employee or volunteer-TEC §37.007(d) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # and Violent Crime Victim Letter

29 30 31

X X X

32

Sexual assault under Penal Code §22.011 or aggravated sexual assault under Penal Code §22.021 against a school district employee or volunteer-TEC §37.007(d) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Sexual assault under Penal Code §22.011 or aggravated sexual assault under Penal Code §22.021 against someone other than a school district employee or volunteer-TEC §37.007(a)(2)(A) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # and Violent Crime Victim Letter

Possessed, purchased, used or accepted a cigarette or tobacco product as defined in the Health and Safety Code, Section 3.01, Chapter 161.252 School-related gang violence ­ Action by three or more persons having a common identifying sign or symbol or an identifiable sign or symbol or an identifiable leadership who associate in the sommission of criminal activities under Penal Code §71.01 ­ Require Police Report ARM # False alarm/false report-TEC §37.006(a)(1) and 37.007(b) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Felony controlled substance violation-TEC §37.007(a)(3) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Felony alcohol violation-TEC §37.007(a)(3) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Fighting/Mutual Combat-Excludes all offenses under Penal Code §22.01 Truancy (failure to attend school) ­ Parent contributing to truancy - TEC §25.093(a) Truancy (failure to attend school) ­ Student with at least 3 unexcused absences - TEC §25.094 Truancy (failure to attend school) ­ Student with 10 unexcused absences - TEC §25.094 Truancy (failure to attend school) ­ Student failure to enroll in school - TEC §25.085 Aggravated robbery - TEC §37.007(a)(2)(F) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Manslaughter - TEC §37.007(a)(2)(G) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Criminally negligent homicide - TEC §37.007(a)(2)(H) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Engages in deadly conduct - TEC §37.007(b)(3) - Requires Police Report ARM # Used, exhibited, or possessed a non-illegal knife as defined by student code of conduct and as allowed under TEC §37.007. (Knife blade equal to or less than 5.5 inches.) ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Discretionary

X

33 34

Do NOT use

X X X X

Discretionary Do NOT use

35 36 37 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

TEC Chapter 37 does not permit placement in DAEP/JJAEP

X X X X

Discretionary

Discretionary

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Disciplinary Action Reason Codes (C165) Code and Translation

Disciplinary Action Codes Mandatory Mandatory DAEP Expulsion Placement JJAEP

Discretionary Discretionary

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

Firearm (Off Campus 300 ft Zone) Used, exhibited or possessed a firearm specified in TEC §37.007(a)(1)(A) [as defined by 18 USC Section 921 or Penal Code §46.01(3)] off-campus but within 300 feet of school property as specified in TEC §37.007(b)(3). ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Illegal Knife, Club, or Prohibited Weapon (Off Campus 300 ft Zone) Used, exhibited or possessed an illegal knife, club, or prohibited weapon specified in TEC §37.007(a)(1)(B-D) off campus but within 300 feet of school property as specified in TEC §37.007(b)(3). ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Serious Offense Conduct (Off Campus 300 ft Zone) Engaged in conduct that contains the elements of the offenses specified by TEC §37.007(a)(2)(A-H) occurring off-campus but within 300 feet of school property. This includes criminal conduct specified in TEC §37.007(b)(3) of aggravated assault, sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, arson, murder, capital murder, criminal attempted murder or capital murder, indecency with a child, aggravated kidnapping, aggravated robbery, manslaughter, or criminally negligent homicide. ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Felony Marihuana, Controlled Substance, Dangerous Drug, or Alcoholic Beverage (Off Campus 300 ft Zone) Engages in conduct punishable as a felony as specified by TEC §37.006(a)(2)(C) or (D) of selling, giving, or delivering to another person, or the possession, or use, or being under the influence of: marihuana, a controlled substance, a dangerous drug, or alcoholic beverage; or committing a serious offense while under the influence of alcohol, off-campus but within 300 feet of school property. ­ Requires Police Report ARM # Student is required to register as a sex offender under Chapter 62 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and is under court supervision - TEC §37.304. The offense(s) for which the student is required to register as a sex offender must have occurred on or after Sept. 1, 2007. ­ Student is required to register as a sex offender under Chapter 62 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and is not under court supervision - TEC §37.305. The offense(s) for which the student is required to register as a sex offender must have occurred on or after Sept. 1, 2007. ­ Continuous sexual abuse of young child or children under Penal Code §21.02, occurring on school property or while attending a school-sponsored or schoolrelated activity on or off school property ­ TEC §37.007(a)(2)(I). ­

Discretionary

Discretionary

Discretionary

Discretionary

Discretionary

Discretionary

X Minimum of 1 semester Discretionary Maximum of 1 semester Discretionary Maximum of 1 semester

X

While a school may find it necessary to temporarily remove a student for safety reasons using in-school or out-of-school suspension, the mandatory actions taken against a student for a particular offense should include at least one (1) 425 record that matches this chart.

IV - 19

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE (LPAC) (TEC §29.063) The State Board of Education (SBOE) requires that every campus establish an LPAC. The LPAC allows professional education personnel and parents to be legally responsible for recommendations regarding the identification, program placement, and reclassification of limited English proficient (LEP) students. The LPAC must be composed of, but not limited to, the following: a campus administrator, such as principal or assistant principal; one appropriately certified teacher assigned to a bilingual education program; one appropriately certified teacher assigned to an English as a Second Language program; and a parent of a LEP student (not employed by the school district). In cases where the suggested appropriately certified teacher does not exist, a teacher who is knowledgeable in linguistics may be included in the committee. At the secondary level, a counselor may replace the certified ESL or bilingual teacher. The committee may designate alternate members to minimize the committee members' time away from regular duties. All members of the LPAC, including parents, shall be acting for the school district and shall observe all laws and rules governing confidentiality of information concerning individual students. LPAC Formation The LPAC shall be formed before the beginning of the school year or during the first week of school. By the end of the second week of school, the committee shall submit to the regional superintendent an LPAC Operation Report. It includes the names of the LPAC members and alternate members, and tentative dates and times of the meetings. LPAC Training All LPAC members, including all school administrators who will participate in the LPAC, shall be trained annually prior to September 1 of that school year. Training must include committee functions, identification, placement, appropriate interventions, exit procedures, and documentation. Principals should contact their respective Bilingual/ESL Title III Specialist to assist/conduct such training. LPAC Meetings The committee may meet, as necessary, throughout the school year ensuring that all new students are identified and placed within four (4) weeks of their initial enrollment. The 4-week period begins on the student's initial enrollment and ends on either the LPAC review date or the date of parent permission, whichever is last. The number of meetings will vary from school to school depending on the number of new students who enroll, the number of LEP students in the school, the number of students who are eligible for exit, and the number of LEP students in the school whose progress must be monitored after having been exited formally from the program. Timely scheduling of LPAC meetings is crucial in placing LEP students within the required four (4) week period and in determining eligibility for state funding.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations LPAC Responsibilities The LPAC committee shall conduct specific meetings throughout the school year to review all pertinent data on all LEP students, particularly upon the student's initial enrollment and at the end of each school year. It is imperative and required by state law and local policy that the school LPAC committee function and meet as a group with the necessary members present, when making decisions that impact LEP students. The committee will be responsible for the following: 1. Review LEP data-Reviewing all pertinent information on all students in grades PK-12 who have a language other than English for the purpose of initial identification, initial and continued program placement, re-classification (existing), and monitoring. Initial Identification-Identifying students as LEP using specific criteria. ESL Levels-Determining the level of language proficiency and level of academic achievement of each LEP student. Program Placement-Recommending program placement ensuring that all LEP students are assigned to a bilingual or ESL program, and making any other instructional modifications and/or interventions based on student's language/academic needs, including referrals for GT or special education testing. Advocacy/Participation in ARD/IEP-Participating in the ARD/IEP meetings as an active advocate for LEP students who also require special education services and/or related services in order to recommend language appropriate modifications and/or interventions as necessary. Parent Permission/Denial-Obtaining written parent approval/denial for the recommended program. Progress Review (Monitoring)-Monitoring for two years the progress of students who have exited formally from bilingual or ESL programs. Spring Assessment Review-Reviewing pertinent student data to determine eligibility for district-wide testing, or possible exemption/postponement from such (i.e., TAKS) as per state and district guidelines, and documenting accordingly. Progress Review (Parent Denials...W-H)-Maintain an annual "Administrative Log of LEP Students with Parent Denials/Wavers" to include documentation including reason for parent denial, details of parent conference, instructional interventions, etc. Progress Review (Promotion)-Review extenuating circumstances that may be prohibiting student from meeting district or state promotion standards and make recommendations to the campus Grade Placement Committee. End-of-Year Review-In late spring, reviewing pertinent information concerning each LEP student to determine appropriate placement for the next school year. These decisions must be entered into the NYL LEP file no later than June 30th (before district transfer). Renewal of Parent Denials-Annually, at the end of the school year, meet with parents of waived LEP students to review progress and end-of-year assessment results and to determine program placement options for the following school year. Documentation (LPAC Minutes)-Maintain all LPAC meeting records/minutes and lists of students reviewed in an LPAC file/binder, which is easily accessible for audits. Documentation (LEP Folder & SIS)-Documenting in the students permanent folder, and on SIS , all actions impacting the students with a home language other than English.

2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

IV - 21

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Relation of LPAC to the ARD/IEP Committee The referral process as outlined in the Child Study, Special Education, and Multilingual Department guidelines must be followed when any LEP student is referred for special education. The time between the initial referral and possible testing for subsequent eligibility for special education services will vary from student to student depending on the decision of the Referral Committee. For those LEP students being considered for placement in special education, Section 77.357 of the Texas Education Code requires schools to ensure that each campus LPAC committee coordinates with the campus ARD/IEP committee in determining an appropriate placement of LEP students with disabilities. Of critical concern is the individual student whose educational needs may be the jurisdiction of both committees. A professional member of the LPAC must participate in the initial and annual ARD/IEP committee meetings when the ARD/IEP committee reviews LEP students. The LPAC representative must be familiar with the student's instructional needs. A preconference meeting prior to the ARD/IEP committee meeting is encouraged. The signature page of the ARD/IEP forms must clearly indicate (with signature and title) participation of the LPAC member. Relation of LPAC to the G/T Vanguard/ Neighborhood G/T Program The HISD criteria for determining eligibility for gifted and talented (G/T Vanguard) programs have changed over the past few years to allow LEP students greater opportunities to participate. Assessment for eligibility includes assessment in the student's native language and the use of a nonverbal abilities test. In accordance with state law, schools in HISD are required to provide bilingual education programs for LEP students whose home language is Spanish. For LEP students who speak other languages, schools are required to provide ESL programs. Any G/T Vanguard services, which are modified in depth, complexity and pacing of the general school program, should be provided in addition to or in conjunction with these required language support programs. With careful planning and/or scheduling, LEP students may receive both the required bilingual or ESL program and appropriate G/T Vanguard programming. Ideally, a bilingually certified teacher who obtains the required GT training could deliver the bilingual program. The same applies for the ESL program - an ESL certified teacher who has the required GT training, or a GT teacher who obtains ESL certification could deliver it. For those LEP students being considered for placement in G/T Vanguard classes, Section 77.357 of the Texas Education Code requires schools to ensure that each campus LPAC committee coordinate with other instructional programs in determining the most appropriate placement of LEP students in other programs. For additional information regarding the LPAC Committee, refer to the Bilingual/ESL Program Guidelines on the Multilingual Department website: http://www.houstonisd.org/portal/site/Multilingual IV - 22

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations OPTIONS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSISTING STUDENTS EXPERIENCING LEARNING DIFFICULTIES If a child is experiencing learning difficulties, the child's parent may contact the school principal to learn about the district's overall general education screening or referral system for support services. This links students to a variety of support options, including possible referral for an evaluation to determine the need for special education services. Students experiencing difficulty in the general education classroom should be considered for tutorial, compensatory, and other support services that are available to all students. A parent is entitled to request a full and individual evaluation to determine options for educational services. Within a reasonable amount of time, the district must decide if an evaluation is needed. If evaluation is needed, the parent will be notified and asked to provide consent for the evaluation. The district must complete the evaluation and the written report within 60 calendar days of the date that the district receives the written consent for the evaluation. The district must give a copy of the written report to the parent along with an explanation of its contents. Documentation of this process should be placed in the student's cumulative folder. If the district determines that the evaluation is not needed, the district will provide the parent with a written notice that explains why the child will not be evaluated. This written notice will include a statement that informs the parent of his/her rights if he/she disagrees with the district. Additionally, a copy of the Notice of Procedural Safeguards ­ Rights of Parents of Students with Disabilities must be given to the parent(s). A campus may utilize the Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) process or the Campus Referral Committee (CRC) process.

INTERVENTION ASSISTANCE TEAM An Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) is a team of professional educators with diverse training and experience who convene weekly to discuss and initiate referrals on students in need of assistance and individualized services. It is a problem-solving group whose purpose is to assist teachers, parents, and others with intervention strategies for dealing with the learning needs and behavior problems of students prior to referral for evaluation. The primary focus of the Intervention Process is the identification and consideration of educational opportunities in the general classroom setting that may resolve students' academic, social, emotional, communication and/or behavioral problems. The IAT should consider all support services available, such as tutorial, remedial, compensatory and other services. The IAT may help the teacher with instructional strategies, or may make program and/or placement recommendations.

IV - 23

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Intervention Assistance Team Goals 1. To look at individual students and assess how best to meet their needs. 2. To raise the level of understanding among all staff about student needs and their effects on learning and teaching. 3. To support the teaching staff in its goals of helping each student be academically/behaviorally successful. 4. To provide a systematic vehicle for school staff to refer students experiencing behavioral or academic difficulties. 5. to bring all student services and programs together and promote uniform and consistent efforts in addressing the needs of all students. The IAT should establish regularly scheduled meetings to ensure that assistance and recommendations are provided to the teacher, student, and parent prior to referral for evaluation and they may meet for any combination of reasons for intervention: academic, social, behavioral, and emotional. The student's "Response to Intervention (RTI)" must be reviewed before a referral for assessment is made. RTI is the practice of providing high-quality instruction and intervention matched to student needs, monitoring progress frequently to make decisions about change in instruction and goals, and applying the student's response data to important educational decisions. The IAT consists of campus staff members who have been trained in the intervention assistance process. The evaluation specialist can provide valuable information regarding possible intervention for students when invited to participate in the IAT. The IAT usually consists of the following personnel: Campus administrator or designee, Evaluation Specialist or Licensed Specialist in Psychology if behavioral issues are a concern, Classroom teacher, and Parent, nurse, counselor, social worker, and campus instructional coordinator. The intervention process includes three tiers: Tier 1 ­ Universal interventions: Whole class, general education curriculum Effective instruction/environment Early intervention Effective for most students Tier 2 ­ Selected interventions: Supplements core curriculum Use of data to develop interventions Problem-solving team Individual/small group Progress monitoring Tier 3 ­ Intensive interventions: Interventions are more intensive and individualized Function is to find successful intervention May be required before looking at services for students with disabilities Small percentage of student population

IV - 24

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations CAMPUS REFERRAL COMMITTEE The referral process for evaluation is part of the state-mandated general education referral and Child Find System. In HISD, the Campus Referral Committee (CRC) handles this process. The referral committee process is detailed in the Child Study Handbook for Evaluation Specialist. The Campus Referral Committee must meet as soon as possible after the initiation of a referral, whether by a teacher, a parent, or an outside agency. The Campus Referral Committee Report, (available on the HISD portal) must be completed and all the referral data gathered. A CRC recommendation for an instructional evaluation under Section 504 is appropriate when the committee suspects that the student has a disability but may only need accommodations in the general education classroom. A referral for a full and individual evaluation is appropriate when the committee suspects that the student has a disability requiring services offered only in special education. The student need not be enrolled in school for a referral to be initiated, nor does a specific program need to be available at the specific campus to begin the referral process. These referrals should be completed on the Campus Referral Committee Report ­ Student Not Enrolled in School form (located on the HISD website). If the committee determines not to refer the student for evaluation, the committee must give the parent or other referral source written notice of the reason for not testing. The written notice of refusal must contain the following: A full explanation of all procedural safeguards available to the parent; A description of the action refused by the agency, an explanation of why the agency refuses to take the action, and a description of any options considered and the reason why those options were rejected; A description of each evaluation procedure, assessment record, or report that the agency uses as a basis for the refusal; A description of any other factors relevant to the agency's refusal. Please Note: The CRC may recommend referral for an evaluation for Section 504 or special education services.

IV - 25

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations (ARD/IEP) COMMITTEE ADMISSION, REVIEW, DISMISSAL/INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM ARD/IEP Committee Membership The ARD/IEP Committee shall be formed before the first day of school. The ARD/IEP Committee Membership Report shall be forwarded to the regional superintendent and the regional special education director by the end of the first week of school. This report shall include the names of the committee members, the name of the chairperson, the name of the administrator, and the name of the administrative designee and his/her position. The ARD/IEP Committee shall include the following participants (general composition): a representative from the school district who is qualified to supervise the provision of specially designed instruction to meet the unique needs of children with disabilities, is knowledgeable about the general education curriculum, and is knowledgeable about the availability of resources of the school district. a representative from instruction shall always be included: the student's receiving or current special education teacher or special education provider who must be appropriately certified or licensed. the appropriate general education teacher(s) who is responsible for implementing a portion of the student's IEP for those students who are receiving, or who are expected to receive, instruction in general education; the student, as appropriate, the student's parent(s), and/or a designated representative under the following conditions: when appropriate, a student 18 years of age or older who has not been judged by a court of law to be incompetent to manage personal affairs or who has not relinquished rights to parents in writing will participate in the student's own ARD/IEP meeting if the student is under 18 years of age or if the student is 18 years of age or older and has been judged by an appropriate court of law to be incompetent to manage personal affairs or has relinquished rights to parent(s) in writing. the parent must notify the district of the name of the parent's representative. a representative from the evaluation team for initial evaluations, reevaluations, triennials and other times when necessary. professional certified specialists as required: a speech therapist when students with speech impairments are being considered. a professional certified in the education of students with auditory impairments when students with auditory impairments are being considered; a professional certified in the education of the visually impaired when students with visual impairments are being considered; the Career and Technical Education (CTE) teacher who will instruct the student shall be a member when the committee is considering placement in a CTE program; the Vocational Adjustment Coordinator (VAC) when special education career and technology classes are being considered; IV - 26

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

the Employment Specialist when Community Based Vocational Instruction (CBVI) is being considered; the appropriate related services personnel (occupational and physical therapists, inhome trainer, etc.); and a professional representing the LPAC when a student with disabilities and limited English proficiency is being considered.

Duties of the ARD/IEP Committee The ARD/IEP Committee makes decisions concerning the educational program for students who are eligible to receive special education services. Among other responsibilities, the ARD/IEP Committee performs the following functions: reviews data from the assessment of the student. establishes eligibility for special education services. develops and reviews the IEP and the Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior Support Plan (FBA/BSP), reviews input forms, completes transition information section of the ARD/IEP committee report document and incorporates information in the ARD/IEP Supplement: Personal Graduation Plan Addressing Needed Transition Services. provides an audiotaped copy of the child's ARD/IEP meeting in the parent's native language, if the parent does not speak and understand English. provides for educational placement in the least restrictive environment appropriate to meet the needs of the student. makes decisions regarding promotion or retention of students with disabilities receiving special education services. does not award grades or credits. makes decisions about student participation in local and state assessments. An ARD/IEP committee member is not required to attend an ARD/IEP committee meeting in whole or in part, if the parent and campus agree in writing that the attendance of the member is not necessary because the member's area of the curriculum or related service is not being modified or discussed in the meeting. A member of the ARD/IEP committee may be excused from attending an ARD/IEP meeting, in whole or in part, when the meeting involves a modification to or discussion of the member's area of the curriculum or related services, if the parent in writing and the campus consent to the excusal, and the member submits, in writing to the parent and ARD/IEP committee, input for the development of the IEP prior to the meeting. NOTE: For initial placement of students with disabilities, the representative from instruction shall be an appropriate special education teacher if school is in session, or an appropriate special education coordinator/director if school is not in session in the summer. IV - 27

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Duties of the ARD/IEP Chairperson Coordinate scheduling of ARD/IEP committee meetings at a time mutually acceptable to the parent/adult student and other members. Provide the parent/adult student with written notice of ARD/IEP committee meetings at least 5 school days prior to the meeting. Ensure the Notice of Procedural Safeguards Booklet is provided to parent/adult student, or guardian, with the Notice of ARD/IEP committee meeting for initial, evaluation ARD/IEP committee meetings, and at least annually thereafter. Record the Notice of the ARD/IEP committee meeting and Notice of Procedural Safeguards booklet on the Record of Communication. Identify a person who will serve as case manager for each student to ensure the implementation of instructional and related services. Conduct the ARD/IEP committee meeting and appoint a recorder to take the minutes. Provide an audio taped translation of the ARD/IEP committee meeting to the parents and maintain a copy of the tape at the campus, if the parent's native language is not English. The tape is used in place of a written translation of the ARD/IEP committee meeting. Facilitate resolution of problematic ARD/IEP committee meetings. Monitor the input of information in ARD/IEP data management system. Encourage parents to resolve concerns at the campus level, regional office, or central office. Ensure that proceedings of the ARD/IEP meetings are recorded. For additional information about the duties of the ARD/IEP Chairperson, see the Special Education Department Chairperson Reference Manual. Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) The federal law, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004, mandates general education as the primary location for instructional and related services for students with disabilities. For the majority of students with disabilities general education with non-disabled peers is the least restrictive environment. Students with disabilities should receive instructional and related services to the maximum extent appropriate with their non-disabled peers, and removed from general education only if the student is unable to make progress in general education with supplementary aids and services. Special education services for students with disabilities are provided on a continuum as indicated: general education with consultation services from special education general education with instructional modifications and/or accommodations from special education, general education with supplementary aids and services from special education, special education instructional services less than 21 percent of the school day; or special education instructional services at least 21 percent of the school day and less than 50 percent of the school day; or special education instructional services at least 50 percent and no more than 60 percent of the school day; or special education instructional services more than 60 percent of the school day. IV - 28

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Note: Throughout a six-week period, campus personnel should monitor the state required 125% ratio addressing the placement of students with disabilities in self-contained classes to the placement of students with disabilities in general education classes. Monitoring of this data can be facilitated by using the 125% placement spreadsheet that is located on the HISD web portal. ARD/IEP Committee Training All ARD/IEP committee members, including all administrators who will participate on the committee, shall be trained annually. Training will include information on new federal, state, and local guidelines related to the implementation of special education services. A representative of the regional or central special education support staff shall provide training. Documentation of training must be submitted to the Office of Special Education Services by the end of November. Transition Planning Requirements Transition planning is completed during the ARD/IEP meeting process and focuses on assisting students with disabilities to become independent within the community, to the greatest extent possible. For students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, IEP goals and objectives must address the skills necessary to function in current and future environments. Therefore, transition (or futures) planning for students with ASD, at any age includes ARD/IEP committee determination of need, and establishment of a plan, if appropriate, to support the student's successful transition from current to next environment(s). Such Support might also include assisting students to transition from elementary to middle school level, from middle to high school, and/or across instructional settings. For all students with disabilities, the procedures below must be completed for effective postsecondary transition planning in the four areas: Employment Education Independent Living Recreation, Social and Leisure Activities By age 14, or younger per ARD committee decision, the ARD/IEP committee must complete the Post Secondary Education Goals section of the ARD/IEP Supplement: Personal Graduation Plan Addressing Needed Transition Services. By age 15, or younger per ARD committee decision, the ARD/IEP committee must complete the Post Secondary Education Goals section of the ARD/IEP Supplement: Personal Graduation Plan Addressing Needed Transition Services. By age 17, inform student/parent of transfer of rights to student when students reach age 18 and complete the transfer of rights statement in the ARD/IEP Supplement personal Graduation Plan Addressing Needed Transition Services. If a student's goal is to be employed after graduation from high school, the appropriate courses should be included in the IEP and addressed on the Graduation Options supplement. This begins documentation of the student's goals after graduation. IV - 29

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Adult service providers should be included at the transition meeting prior to graduation, as needed. Information data related to transition must be entered in Chancery SIS on the ARD panel under "Other Date Tracking."

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations DYSLEXIA SERVICES IN MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOLS Requirements Overview To comply with TEC §7.028(b), TEC §38.003 and TAC §74.28 the HISD Board has ensured that HISD has implemented procedures for assessing, identifying and providing appropriate instructional services for students with dyslexia and related disorders. TEC §38.003 requires that students enrolling in Texas public schools be tested for dyslexia and related disorders at the appropriate times and that each school district provide for the instruction of any student determined to have dyslexia or a related disorder. Each school must provide identified students access to the services of a teacher on their campus trained in dyslexia and related disorders. The school district may offer, with the approval of each student's parents or guardians, additional services at a centralized location. Such centralized services shall not preclude each student from receiving services at his or her campus during the normal school day. Due-process procedures are available under the provisions of Section 504 Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). CHARACTERISTICS OF DYSLEXIA 1. As defined in TEC §38.003(d): · "Dyslexia" means a disorder of constitutional origin manifested by a difficulty in learning to read, write, or spell, despite conventional instruction, adequate intelligence, and socio-cultural opportunity. · "Related disorders" includes disorders similar to or related to dyslexia such as developmental auditory imperception, dysphasia, specific developmental dyslexia, developmental dysgraphia, and developmental spelling disability. 2. Primary Reading/Spelling Characteristics of Dyslexia: · Difficulty reading real words in isolation · Difficulty accurately decoding nonsense words · Slow, inaccurate, or labored oral reading (lack of reading fluency) · Difficulty with learning to spell 3. The reading/spelling characteristics are the result of difficulty with the following: · The development of phonological awareness, including segmenting, blending, and manipulating sounds in words · Learning the names of letters and their associated sounds · Phonological memory (holding information about sounds and words in memory) · Rapid naming of familiar objects, colors, or letters of the alphabet 4. Secondary consequences of dyslexia may include the following: · Variable difficulty with aspects of reading comprehension · Variable difficulty with aspects of written composition · A limited amount of time spent in reading activities These difficulties are unexpected for the student's age, educational level, or cognitive abilities. Additionally, there is often a family history of similar difficulties. IV - 31

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations SECONDARY SCHOOL INTERVENTION SERVICES 1. Reading Assessment In accordance with Texas Reading Initiative, the H ISD is committed to helping every child acquire the skill of reading, beginning as early as possible. If a child is identified by a state approved diagnostic assessment instrument (i.e., TAKS, Stanford) or by teacher observation to be a struggling reader, the school must place the child in an accelerated (intensive) reading program and notify the parents/guardians. The accelerated reading program should be designed to remediate the students' deficiencies, target their specific instructional needs, and enable them to "catch up" with their typically performing peers. Should students continue to struggle with reading, writing, and spelling during the intensive reading instruction, the HISD will initiate procedures to consider these students for further assessment, including the assessment for dyslexia. 2. Support for Students Not Making Adequate Progress Students not making adequate progress with classroom accommodations, may be placed in an appropriate remedial or compensatory program* such as bilingual, small group instruction (ARI), other tutorial, summer school, etc. Needed support actions may also include, but are not limited to, obtaining vision or hearing correction, retention, rearrangement of class assignments, supportive counseling, English as a second language, speech therapy, or other appropriate program modifications. * All remedial reading and compensatory teachers should have training in instructional practices and performance monitoring that may be used with students who demonstrate some characteristics of dyslexia but have not been identified as dyslexic. The campus Individual Assistance Team (IAT) should be consulted for instructional, program or intervention recommendations. If a student fails to respond to scientifically based reading instruction and does not make appropriate progress during the preliminary intervention(s) and/or after using sufficient interventions based on No Child Left Behind Education Act (NCLB), a referral may be made for services in the Dyslexia Instructional Support Program or for Special Education services. Consideration of a recommendation for the assessment of dyslexia for students in grades 3 ­ 12 may include, but is not limited to, performance on state mandated test(s), a student's grades/performance in reading, writing and spelling, and teachers' observations of the characteristics of dyslexia. If it is thus determined that a student who has been identified as having primary difficulties in reading, writing, and spelling is not progressing academically with teacher intervention or is not progressing in the intensive reading program, and all other causes have been eliminated, referral for the dyslexia instructional program under Section 504 or referral for testing under IDEA may be appropriate. This evaluation can be requested through the Campus Referral Committee using forms contained in the HISD Section 504 Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Handbook and the HISD Dyslexia Procedures Manual-Revised 2007. Notice of the proposal to identify the child must be issued in accordance with federal regulations. Written parental consent is required before any evaluation.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations PROCEDURES FOR THE INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF DYSLEXIA 1. Data Gathering At any time (K-12) that a student continues to struggle with one or more components of reading, additional information must be collected about the student. This information should be used to evaluate the student's academic progress and determine what actions are needed to ensure the student's improved academic performance. Some of the information that the campus collects is in the student's cumulative folder; other information is available from teachers and parents or guardians. To ensure that underachievement in a student suspected of having dyslexia (a specific learning disability) is not due to lack of appropriate instruction in reading, other information should be considered. This information should include data that demonstrates the student was provided appropriate instruction and documentation of repeated assessments of achievement at reasonable intervals that reflects formal assessment of student progress during instruction. Additional information to be considered includes the results from some or all of the following: · Vision screening; · Hearing screening; · Teacher reports of classroom concerns; · Adopted Textbook reading assessment; · Accommodations provided by classroom teachers; · Academic progress reports (report cards); · Samples of school work; · Parent conferences; · Testing for limited English proficiency; · Speech and language screening through a referral process; · State student assessment program as described in TEC §39.022. The campus recommends assessment for dyslexia if the student demonstrates the following: · Poor performance in one or more areas of reading and/or the related area of spelling that is unexpected for the student's age/grade; · Characteristics of dyslexia. 2. Formal Assessment Students shall be assessed for dyslexia and related disorders based upon multiple factors including the student's reading performance; reading difficulties; poor response to supplemental, scientifically based reading instruction; teachers' input; and input from the parents or guardians. The appropriate time for assessing is early in a student's school career. However, students should be recommended for assessment for dyslexia even if the reading difficulties appear later in a student's school career. These procedures must be followed: · Notify parents or guardians of proposal to assess student for dyslexia · Inform parents or guardians of their rights under §504 · Obtain permission from the parent or guardian to assess the student for dyslexia · Assess student, being sure that individuals/professionals who administer assessments have training in the evaluation of students for dyslexia and related disorders IV - 33

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations The notices and consents must be provided in the native language of the parent or guardian or other mode of communication used by the parent or guardian, unless it is clearly not feasible to do so. 3. Domains to Assess The district administers measures that are related to the student's educational needs. Depending upon the student's age and stage of reading development, the following are the areas related to reading that should be assessed: · Reading real and nonsense words in isolation (decoding) · Phonological awareness · Letter Knowledge (name and associated sound) · Rapid naming · Fluency/rate and accuracy · Reading comprehension and/or · Spelling Based on the student's academic difficulties and characteristics, additional areas that can be assessed include vocabulary, written expression, handwriting, and mathematics. For non-English speakers who struggle to read in their native language, similar measures in the student's native language would be used as appropriate. Refer to the `English Language Learners' section for additional assessment information. 4. Timelines for Assessment Day 1 Parent Written Consent received (Notice to Parents and Consent for Evaluation under Section 504 Form) 60 Calendar days from referral to Section 504 Assessment Report beginning with Day 1 30 Calendar days from Assessment Report to Committee Meeting of Knowledgeable persons These procedures follow the requirements of TEC §38.003, 19 TAC §74.28(a) and The Dyslexia Handbook-Revised 2007: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders (TEA, February 2007); Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, §104.35. Additionally, Section 504 has Child Find provisions for identifying and serving children with disabilities. In HISD, evaluation specialists are primarily responsible for the assessment of dyslexia. Students are referred for an individual assessment of dyslexia through the Campus Referral Committee and follow the District's established referral process. It is expected that evaluation specialists attend appropriate staff development to maintain and build capacity in the assessment of dyslexia. Based on testing results, evaluation specialists would recommend an effective intervention plan to include: · Effective instructional strategies, approaches, materials · Congruence between the instruction and the identified factors causing the reading/other difficulty, e.g., poor phonological awareness, confusion with letters, or sound/symbol associations, sequencing, auditory processing, and comprehension. · Improvement of the instructional program and an appropriate set of accommodations

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations 5. English Language Learners: (This refers to students served in bilingual and ESL programs as well as students designated limited English proficient (LEP) whose parents have denied services.) Much diversity exists among English Language Learners (ELL). The identification and service delivery process for dyslexia must be in step with the student's linguistic environment and educational background. Involvement of the Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) is recommended. Data Gathering in addition to information listed under `Data Gathering' (LPAC) documentation to include the following: · Home Language Survey · Assessment related to identification for limited English proficiency (oral language proficiency tests and norm-referenced tests) · TAKS documentation when available · Texas English Language Proficiency System (TELPAS) domains of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing · Type of language programming provided and language of instruction · Linguistic environment and second-language acquisition development · Previous schooling in and outside of the United States. Assessment in addition to information listed under `Domains to Assess': · Comprehensive oral language proficiency testing to be completed in English and the student's native language whenever possible. · If the student has received academic instruction in his/her native language, as well as English, then the `Domains to Assess' need to be completed in both languages to the appropriate extent. Personnel involved in the evaluation process of ELLs for dyslexia need to be trained in bilingual assessment and interpretation procedures. 6. Flow Chart The process for assessment, identification, and instruction for students with dyslexia is represented in the following visual for ease of use. The chart does not represent every aspect of the HISD dyslexia process, but gives a general overview of the district procedure.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Referral Process for the Evaluation of Dyslexia and Related Disorders

Teacher Data Gathering and Pre-Referral

Referred to Campus Interventions/Program Option I

IAT Intervention

Campus Referral Committee

Option II

Referral for Section 504 Dyslexia Assessment

Referral for Special Education Dyslexia Evaluation

Notice and Consent

Notice and Consent

Dyslexia, et al Assessment

Evaluation of Dyslexia, et al

504 MDT

MDT

DNQ

504 Campus Meeting

DNQ*

ARD/IEP Meeting

DNQ

Section 504 Dyslexia Services** MDT - Multidisciplinary Team DNQ - Did Not Qualify ARD/IEP - Admission, Review, and Dismissal

Special Education Dyslexia Services**

*According to Child Study Guidelines **Student has characteristics of dyslexia; direct, systematic, and intensive reading instruction is provided. The need for accommodations is considered, including TAKS accommodations for students with dyslexia. The 504 dyslexia student is provided more intensive intervention in addition to the core reading instruction.

+

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations IDENTIFICATION AND PLACEMENT OF STUDENTS WITH DYSLEXIA 1. In HISD the principal designates a committee of knowledgeable persons on the campus level who will determine whether the student has dyslexia. The committee will include at least three of the following: the referring teacher, evaluation specialist or other evaluator, administrator, dyslexia instructional support teacher, reading specialist, speech therapist, counselor, nurse, 504 coordinator or other certified personnel. The committee must be knowledgeable about: · The student being assessed, · The reading process, · Dyslexia and related disorders, · Dyslexia instruction, · District, state, federal guidelines for assessment, · The assessments used, and · The meaning of the collected data. 2. After reviewing all accumulated data the committee determines the identification of dyslexia. · The observations of the teacher, school staff, and/or parent/guardian; · Data gathered from the classroom and information found in the student's cumulative folder; · Data-based documentation of student progress during instruction/intervention; · The results of administered assessments; · Language Assessment Proficiency Committee (LPAC) documentation, when applicable; · All other accumulated data regarding the student's educational needs. 3. As authorized by TEC §38.003 and 19 TAC §74.28 the committee incorporates the following guidelines: · The student has received conventional (appropriate) instruction; · The student has an unexpected lack of appropriate academic progress in the areas of reading and spelling; · The student has adequate intelligence (an average ability to learn in the absence of print or in other academic areas); · The student exhibits characteristics associated with dyslexia; · The student's lack of progress is not due to socio-cultural factors such as language differences, irregular attendance, or lack of experiential background. The committee then determines whether the student has a disability under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, §504. Not all students with dyslexia are automatically eligible for §504. A student is considered to have a disability under §504 if the condition substantially limits the student's learning. Once a students is identified as having dyslexia or a related disorder and meets placement requirements, an appropriate instructional program is to be provided. Students determined to require dyslexia instructional support, are to be served in a remedial setting, utilizing individualized, intensive, multi-sensory methods containing reading, writing and spelling components and supplementing the general education reading and language arts instruction as appropriate. IV - 37

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Students with additional factors that complicate their dyslexia may require additional support or referral to special education. The Dyslexia Handbook ­ Revised 2007: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Chapter II, pp. 5-9. 4. English Language Learners (ELL) Dyslexia Placement Considerations When a 504 Committee or Special Education ARD/IEP Committee is considering a Limited English Proficient (LEP) student for placement, include a representative who is a member of the student's LPAC committee to ensure that issues related to both the 504 or special education and language proficiency needs are carefully considered. Refer to HISD Dyslexia and Related Disorders Procedures Handbook for further information. 5. Annual 504 Meeting A meeting is held at least annually to review students' progress, or more often if warranted. Refer to the HISD Section 504 Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Handbook for additional information. 6. Grade Placement Decisions (Grade Promotions) In accordance with TEC §101.2003(g) and with TEC §28.02(1)(b), the committee making decisions regarding a student who is identified as having dyslexia and is eligible under this section, shall consider the student's potential for achievement or proficiency in the tested subject. The Grade Placement Committee (GPC) must ensure that · promotion decisions are made on an individual basis, · all the facts and circumstances regarding the student's grade level academic achievement are considered, · dyslexia be considered in this review, and · dyslexia be considered in the development of accelerated instruction plans. The Grade Placement Committee (GPC) is to review the TAKS test history of the dyslexic student and take in consideration the student's individual needs in making decisions regarding the Accelerated Instruction Plan (AIP).

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations SECONDARY DYSLEXIA INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING AND SERVICES Instruction for students identified as having dyslexia is to include the components of instruction and instructional approaches as indicated in The Dyslexia Handbook-Revised 2007: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders, TEA, February 2007. Dyslexia intervention program services are offered in a small class setting that includes reading, writing, and spelling as appropriate to the needs of the student for 45-60 minutes, 4 to 5 times per week by a teacher trained in appropriate programs and strategies for students having dyslexia. The committee of knowledgeable persons determines the duration and frequency of services. Students may also receive accommodations in the general education classroom setting. The provision of dyslexia services in middle and high schools should be included in the planning of courses in the school master schedule. The appropriate course(s) and teacher(s) should be in place and the necessary teacher training provided to meet Texas' dyslexia requirements. Campus level administrators are responsible for implementing the program and its instructional components. Every school should offer reading to students whose diagnostic assessment indicates need. The Reading/and or Enrichment Elective courses are recommended for middle school students at-risk for low reading achievement and possible dyslexia. Reading I, Reading II, Reading III, and Reading Application and Study Skills (0.5 credit) are recommended to meet this requirement in high schools. Reading IV, a local credit course, may also be considered. Appropriate courses should also be offered for ESL and students with disabilities identified as having dyslexia or a related disorder. Schools should consult the HISD Master Course Catalogue and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) objectives in finalizing decisions for their campus. Other appropriate courses may be used as they become available. TEXAS ASSESSMENT PROGRAM ACCOMMODATIONS 1. Dyslexia Accommodations ­ State Reading Assessment Eligibility Requirements A student who meets the following criteria is eligible to receive the set of three bundled accommodations on the English and Spanish TAKS reading tests at grades 3, 4, 5, and 6, and in English at grades 7 and 8. · A student not receiving services for students with disabilities must be identified with dyslexia; or · A student receiving services for students with disabilities must either be identified with dyslexia or have a severe reading disability that exhibits the characteristics of dyslexia, causing the student to lack word-identification skills and to have difficulty reading words in isolation; and · The student must routinely receive accommodations in classroom instruction and testing that address the difficulties he/she has reading words in isolation. The above criteria apply to Section 504 and IDEA identified students having dyslexia and the student with disabilities not identified as having dyslexia but demonstrates the characteristics nonetheless.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Other students that may be eligible to receive the set of three bundled accommodations on the English and Spanish TAKS reading tests at grades 3, 4, 5, and 6, and in English at grades 7 and 8 include the following: · A student formally assessed through the district referral/assessment process and identified as having dyslexia under 504 but is only receiving accommodations in the general education classroom. · A student formally assessed through the district referral/assessment process and identified as having dyslexia but not under 504 or IDEA and is routinely receiving accommodations in the general education classroom. Only students who have been formally assessed may be considered for the Dyslexia Accommodations on State Reading Assessment. 2. Authority for Decision For a student with dyslexia not receiving services for students with disabilities who meets both criteria listed, the decision to provide the bundled accommodations must be made either by the student's placement committee as required by §504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and documented by the school in the student's Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP) or by the committee of knowledgeable persons as outlined in The Dyslexia Handbook ­ Revised 2007. In the latter case, the committee's decision must be documented in writing in appropriate school records. (Refer to HISD Dyslexia and Related Disorders Procedures Handbook for additional information.) For a student receiving services for students with disabilities who meets both criteria listed, the decision to provide the bundled accommodations must be made by the student's Admission, Review, and Dismissal/Individualized Education Program (ARD/IEP) Committee and documented in the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP). For students identified as having dyslexia but not under Section 504 or IDEA and are routinely receiving accommodations in the general education classroom, the Campus Referral Committee is the committee of authority. The committee's decision must be documented in writing in appropriate school records. Administration instructions can be found in the TAKS District and Campus Coordinator Manual and in the relevant test administration manuals. For additional information about the bundled accommodations, contact the Texas Education Agency, Student Assessment Division at 512-4639536; www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment. 3. Oral Administration An oral administration is allowable only for the state assessments in mathematics, science, and social studies. It is not allowed for the reading, writing, or English language arts tests. Only examinees served by special education or §504 or who have been identified as having dyslexia may receive an oral administration of TAKS.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations REFERRAL TO SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR ASSESSMENT OF DYSLEXIA 1. At any time during the identification process and assessment for dyslexia, , students may be referred for evaluation for services for students with disabilities based on additional factors complicating their dyslexia and requiring more support than what is available through dyslexia instruction. In such cases, referral to special education for evaluation and possible identification as a child with a disability will be within the definitions of the Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Act (IDEA). 2. If the student with dyslexia is found eligible for services for students with disabilities, the Admission, Review, and Dismissal/Individual Educational Plan (ARD/IEP) Committee must include appropriate reading instruction on the student's Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Appropriate reading instruction includes the descriptors listed in Chapter IV of The Dyslexia Handbook-Revised 2007. 3. A student with dyslexia that is referred for services for students with disabilities comes under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. In IDEIA dyslexia is considered one of a variety of etiological foundations for "specific learning disability." The term includes such conditions as perceptual disability, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not apply to children who have learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities; of mental retardation; of emotional disturbance; or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage. The Dyslexia Handbook ­ Revised 2007: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Section III, p. 10. Students who were first identified as having dyslexia under Section 504 and then become eligible for Special Education are not identified as being both 504 and Special Education. 4. A special education evaluation should be conducted whenever it appears to be appropriate. Some students will NOT proceed through all steps [of Tier I-III] before referral for a Full Individual Evaluation (FIE). A dyslexia evaluation may be incorporated into the FIE completed through the evaluation process. The Dyslexia Handbook ­ Revised 2007: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Chapter III, p. 17. Please refer to the Special Education section of these guidelines for additional information. 5. Students who are eligible for services for students with disabilities who also meet the Texas identification criteria for dyslexia and related disorders: · Must have an IEP that provides access to instructional programs in reading and written language that comply with the SBOE rules and procedures concerning dyslexia and related disorders; · May not be denied access to the district's programs for students with dyslexia, unless the ARD/IEP Committee determines such a program would deny the student a free appropriate public education (FAPE) and educational benefit; · The ARD/IEP Committee must consider the range of services available for students with dyslexia in determining the least restrictive educational placement for the student. The Dyslexia Handbook ­ Revised 2007: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Chapter III, p. 38.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

REEVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS IDENTIFIED AS HAVING DYSLEXIA

Eligible students with disabilities shall be reevaluated every three years or more frequently if conditions warrant. The principal will designate a staff member to track students with dyslexia. This individual, usually the campus 504 coordinator for students identified under 504 or Special Education Chairperson for students identified under IDEA, will notify the assigned Evaluation Specialist and the Dyslexia Instructional Support Teacher of students in need of a three-year reevaluation. 1. Students Identified as Having Dyslexia under Section 504 A committee of knowledgeable persons will determine the reevaluation procedure and scope and include input from the parents, if available. Forms given to parent prior to formal testing · The Notice to Parents of Re-Evaluation Under Section 504 · Notice of Parent and Student Rights Under Section 504 · Consent for testing Additional information includes: · Adaptive behavior addressed · Sociological Data Form · Vision/hearing (health) screening · Language and behavior scale or other (Parents) · Language and behavior scale (School Staff) A 504 Committee meeting of knowledgeable persons will be convened when the reevaluation is complete to determine appropriate eligibility, programming, and placement. Parental input and participation are considered critical to the success of the reevaluation process and dyslexia intervention program. 2. Students Identified as Having Dyslexia under IDEA A committee of knowledgeable persons will review the existing evaluation data (REED). The REED considers the existing data to recommend either continued eligibility or a formal reevaluation. This meeting of a committee of knowledgeable persons is not an ARD/IEP meeting; however, an ARD/ IEP committee meeting will convene subsequent to the decisions and actions of the REED. An ARD/IEP Committee Meeting will be convened when the reevaluation is completed to consider appropriate eligibility, programming, and placement decisions. Parental input and participation are considered critical to the success of the reevaluation process and dyslexia intervention program. For a student with disabilities, appropriate staff should be notified and invited to participate in the reevaluation ARD/IEP committee meeting. Please refer to the Child Study Department Handbook for more information.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations 3. Significant Change in Placement Section 504 requires a re-evaluation before any significant change in placement. The committee of knowledgeable persons determines the scope of the reevaluation. Examples of significant changes in placement that require re-evaluation: · Expulsion · Serial suspensions or other removals which exceeds 10 days in a school year · Transferring a student to home instruction · Graduation from high school · Significantly changing the composition of the student's academic program (e.g., moving the student from regular education to the resource room) Refer to the HISD Section 504 Handbook for current procedures. 4. Students Referred for Services for Students with Disabilities Who Do Not Qualify (DNQ): Students with disabilities who do not qualify after an initial referral or after a re-evaluation for assessment in reading, writing, spelling or other language arts area, should receive consideration under Section 504. 5. Procedures for Graduating Seniors Since Graduation is considered a significant change in placement under Section 504, students are to be considered for a formal re-evaluation. As a best practice, it is expected that students identified as having dyslexia or a related disorder will be reevaluated prior to or during their senior year of high school. At the senior-year Section 504 committee meeting, the following may be discussed: · Summary of the student's academic achievement and functional performance · Placement (as a 504 student) for college or workplace · Necessary testing and accommodations · Any transitional services needed · Services available in college or the workplace · Differences in services in higher education

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations DYSLEXIA TEACHER REQUIREMENTS Each principal must assign a dyslexia instructional support teacher. Teachers of students with dyslexia and related disorders must have valid teaching certificates. The identified campus dyslexia instructional support teacher receives training in the components and instructional approaches appropriate for students having dyslexia or a related disorder and programs to meet students' needs. (Refer to HISD Dyslexia Procedures Handbook-Revised 2007 for additional information.) Documentation of training is required for audit purposes. Training for teachers of students with dyslexia involves study beyond that required of a classroom teacher and may be provided by various service providers. Training should include: · Understanding the reading process · Knowledge of the structure of language, including knowledge of ­ English speech sound system and its production, ­ Oral language development, ­ Stages of spelling development and orthography (spelling patterns) and its relationship to sounds and meaning, and ­ Grammatical structure. Teachers need to know how to pinpoint specific areas of weakness in reading performance and have expertise using structured language methods and techniques (explicit, direct, systematic, sequential, cumulative, process oriented, multi-sensory) to address the needs of and teach children with dyslexia and/or a related disorder. It is expected that teachers would have the knowledge and assessment tools, (i.e., TPRI/Tejas LEE, reading inventories, Running Records, or other) to monitor and evaluate student progress. PROCEDURES FOR TRANSFERRING STUDENTS 1. Transferring Students Identified as Having Dyslexia under Section 504 Students who transfer within the District will follow the program determined by the committee of knowledgeable persons/504 Committee from the sending school. All effort should be made for continuous service in the appropriate setting and classes on the receiving campus. A committee meeting is necessary only if a program change is needed, testing is out of date or the student's annual meeting is due. The sending school has the responsibility of notifying the receiving school of the student's eligibility, related aids, services and accommodations under Section 504 (or under IDEA) in completing withdrawal or transfer papers. The 504 Campus Coordinator is notified by the receiving school's office enrollment staff. The 504 Campus Coordinator, in turn, notifies the student's teachers of the student's dyslexia or related disorder diagnosis individual educational plan. There should be no interruption in services for Section 504 students who transfer from out-ofdistrict or out-of-state. Upon enrollment, the school should verify participation in 504 dyslexia services by documentation, verbal communication with the parent, or telephone call to the previous district. If previously enrolled in Section 504 dyslexia services, we honor the previous district's educational plan as a starting point until the records arrive. If records are not received within 30 days, then referral and assessment procedures are initiated. IV - 44

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

Explain and provide the parent the Notice of Parent and Student Rights under Section 504, The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, regarding the services and options available. Explain and obtain signature on the following: · Request for student records · Consent for Evaluation Under Section 504 with receipt of Notice of Parent and Student Rights Under Section 504, The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 acknowledged · Sociological Data Upon receipt of records, notify the assessment specialist for review, additional testing if necessary, or Multi-Disciplinary Team review (MDT). Upon receipt of MDT, conduct a Section 504 Meeting by the committee of knowledgeable persons. 2. Transferring Student Identified as Having Dyslexia under IDEA Follow Special Education transfer procedures. DATA ACCOUNTABILITY 1. Entering Dyslexia Information in Student Information System (SIS) Information related to all students involved in the referral, evaluation, identification, and placement process for dyslexia and related disorders must be entered in the SIS. This includes Section 504 identified students having dyslexia or related disorders; students who qualify for special education dyslexia services, students identified as dyslexic but are not receiving services, and students evaluated for Section 504 but who did not qualify. Identified dyslexic students who transfer from out of district must also be entered in SIS. Currently, dyslexia action tabs are under "Special Services". As new data fields are created, updated procedures will be provided. 2. Dyslexia Program Financial Support Relative to district compliance, campuses, departments, and district offices are required to identify the financial support for the dyslexia program and related services (as appropriate) in order for the district to account effectively for the monies spent on the dyslexia program within HISD. Financial accountability is monitored through the district's Budget and Financial Planning Office. HISD is required to comply with any TEA or school board request for documentation related to funding of the district's dyslexia program. 3. Program Evaluation The Research and Accountability Department will conduct a program evaluation of the district and campus dyslexia services. Each campus should monitor and review its dyslexia program services for effectiveness and review students' progress as a part of the campus evaluation of the program. Documentation of program compliance is required.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations PARENT ENGAGEMENT Parents' rights are maintained under Section 504, IDEA 2004 and TEC Chapter 26. Parent confidentiality entitlements are also included in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Further, Houston ISD will provide a parent education program for the parents/guardians of students with dyslexia and related disorders on services and options. The program will include: · Characteristics of dyslexia and related disorders · Information on assessment and diagnosis of dyslexia · Information on effective strategies for teaching students with dyslexia · Awareness of information on classroom modifications and especially of modifications allowed on standardized testing (19 TAC §74.28) Information regarding dyslexia, related disorders, being at-risk for low reading achievement, the referral process for dyslexia and tips for parents may be included in school handbooks and newsletters that are sent to parents as well as included at PTO or other parent meetings. Dyslexia Program Support Services has additional information on HISD dyslexia services and procedures for students in general education. The HISD Special Education Department has information on dyslexia procedures for students with learning disabilities in reading. For more information contact: A. Nell Williams, Coordinator Dyslexia Program Support Services Office of Special Populations 4400 West 18th Street Houston, Texas 77092-8501 713-556-6906 [email protected]

SECTION 504 COMMITTEE The Section 504 Committee that makes placement decisions must be a group of persons (at least two) who are knowledgeable about the child, the meaning of the evaluation data, the placement options, the least restrictive environment requirements, and issues related to comparable facilities. Decisions about Section 504 eligibility and services should be documented in the student's file and reviewed periodically. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. Its enabling regulations often mirror the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and may be a source of confusion in the schools. If a student is disabled under the IDEA, he/she is also protected from discrimination under Section 504. The law prohibits discrimination against disabled students and requires that school districts take affirmative actions (making buildings and programs accessible) when necessary to accommodate students and other persons with disabilities.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations Students who are disabled under Section 504 only are usually served with accommodations in the general education program. Each case must be reviewed and needs determined on an individual basis. Section 504 disabled students must always be served in the least restrictive environment (LRE). The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) has generally held that if a child's needs cannot be met in general education with accommodations, the student may be referred for evaluation to determine special education eligibility. Section 504 defines a disabled person as any person (1) who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, (2) has a record of such impairment, or (3) is regarded as having such impairment. The second and third components of this definition cannot be used to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE) to a student. A physical or mental impairment is defined as (1) any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological, musculo-skeletal, special sense organs; respiratory, including speech organs, cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic, and lymphanic, skin, and endocrine; or (2) any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities. Major life activities include "functions such as caring for one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working". In the school setting, we are concerned with learning or with substantial limitations to other major life activities that impact upon the learning process. Even though a student has a physical or mental impairment, he/she is not entitled to special treatment under Section 504 (i.e. general or special education and related aids and services designed to meet the individual educational needs) unless there is an "educational need". The test for determining if a student is disabled under Section 504 requires the district to answer the following questions: (1) (2) Does the student have a mental or physical impairment? Does the impairment substantially limit one or more major life activities?

"Substantially limits" is defined as "unable to perform a major life activity that the average student in the general population can perform". The next question that the 504 Committee must answer is the question of educational need. Educational need is determined on a case-by-case basis. The Office of Civil Rights has stated that educational need is not limited to academic problems stemming from the student's disability. Educational need encompasses behavior problems that are linked to the disability; even if the student's academic performance is within an acceptable range. A student who has no learning or behavior problems but who requires insulin shots, asthma treatments, a wheelchair ramp, or similar requirements, which must be addressed at school, may have an educational need.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations All referrals for students that are suspected of having disabilities are made through the Campus Referral Committee using the Campus Referral Committee Report form. The usual referral source is the classroom teacher via the Intervention Assistance Team (IAT), but other individuals including parents, physicians, or representatives of other agencies may refer a student to the Campus Referral Committee. Students suspected of having a disability and in need of accommodations, must be given a pre-placement evaluation and prior to any significant change of placement. The campus §504 committee must convene annually to review and /or reevaluate the accommodation plan and determine continued eligibility. Formal reevaluation should occur every three years if not previously requested by the teacher or parent/adult student and prior to any significant change of placement. Written parent consent is required prior to formal evaluation. Tests and other evaluation materials must be validated for the specific purpose, administered by trained personnel according to standardized procedures, tailored to assess specific areas of educational need, and may not be limited to a single IQ score. Assessment of adaptive behavior is required. Placement decisions must be made by a group of persons (at least two) who are knowledgeable about the child, the meaning of the evaluation data, the placement options, the least restrictive environment requirements, nonacademic services and extracurricular activities, discipline and issues related to comparable facilities. Decisions about Section 504 eligibility and services should be documented in the student's file and reviewed periodically. Parents are given notice of the time and place of the meeting utilizing the appropriate form. Section 504 students are not exempt from state and district mandated testing (TAKS, Stanford 9, etc.). Allowable test modifications may be used for 504 disabled students if the students require the modifications in the classroom. Section 504 mandates specific legal obligations, the first of which is the obligation for nondiscrimination. Compliance requires that the district provide both initial and continuing notice of nondiscrimination on the basis of disability. The notice must also include the district's 504 Coordinator's name, title, address, and telephone number. In addition, Section 504 requires that school districts have a procedure for addressing grievances. The student and parent have certain due process rights. When the district takes action concerning the identification, evaluation, or placement of a student under 504, it must: 1. provide notice (before evaluation and placement); 2. provide an opportunity for the parents or guardians to examine relevant records; 3. provide an impartial hearing when requested, with opportunity for participation by the parent or guardian and representation by counsel; and 4. provide an annual review procedure. Discipline of 504 students with disabilities is a potentially troublesome component of the law. It is imperative that a "manifestation determination" (and inquiry into whether a disability-misbehavior link exists) be made by the Campus 504 Committee before a 504 only student is expelled or disciplined in a manner which may constitute a significant change in placement. If a link exists, the student cannot be expelled. However, placement within a more restrictive environment that has been designed to correct the behavior is permissible. If there is no link, the student may be expelled but services may not be eliminated. IV - 48

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations The single exception to this procedure relates to substance abusers. A student currently using drugs can be disciplined in a manner similar to any other student for infractions of the rules concerning drugs and alcohol on campus. Specifically, a 504 student may be expelled for drug or alcohol infractions without a manifestation determination.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations The 504 Coordinator for Houston Independent School District is: Frances Goodbeer Child Study Department 1615 Rutland Houston, Texas 77008 (713) 867-5220 SECTION 504 RECORDS Section 504 folders are general education folders and should be kept separate from special education folders. It is recommended these records be included in the student's cumulative folder. The principal will maintain the confidentiality of the Section 504 records are kept separate from the cumulative folder, a reference to the records and their location will be placed in the cumulative folder to ensure that the campus with responsibility for the student is aware of Section 504 obligations to the eligible student and that personnel and third-party contractors who have a duty to implement the plan have access to necessary records including the plan itself. The parents must be allowed to review the folders upon request. The Section 504 folder should be transferred when a student is promoted or transfers to another school. The Section 504 folder will include: Notice to Parents of Evaluation under Section 504 Notice of Section 504 Committee Meeting Section 504 Assessment Team Report Section 504 Accommodation Plan Possible Modifications/Accommodations Section 504 Accommodations Section 504 Behavior Management Plan Section 504 Accommodations Report Notice to Parents of Reevaluation under Section 504 Notice of Section 504 Eligibility or Non-eligibility

GRADE PLACEMENT COMMITTEE In order to comply with the provisions of TEC §28.0211 and the HISD promotion standards, each middle school campus will be required to have a Grade Placement Committee (GPC). Committee membership must include at least the principal or the principal's designee and a teacher of a subject on which the student failed to perform satisfactorily. The student's parent or guardian should be notified of the committee meeting and given the option of attending. The function of the GPC is, after the close of summer school, to address the promotion status of those students who still have not satisfied all promotion standards. Under some circumstances, the GPC could review a student's promotion status at the end of the regular school year and make a decision at that time. If a student who has not satisfied all three promotion standards cannot attend summer school because of extenuating circumstances, the student's parent may request that the IV - 50

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations GPC assess the student's potential for success at the next grade level and render a decision on promotion status at the end of the regular school year. The rationale for not attending summer school and the committee decision should be documented.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations

ADMISSION, REVIEW, DISMISSAL/INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PROGAM COMMITTEE

The ARD/IEP committee makes promotion decisions for students with disabilities as follows: The ARD/IEP committee reviews mastery of IEP goals to make grade placement decisions. If the ARD/IEP committee recommends that a student with disabilities take an alternative assessment, performance on the alternative assessment does not determine promotion status. If the ARD/IEP committee recommends that a student with disabilities take TAKS/TAKSAccommodated on grade level and the student fails TAKS/TAKS-Accommodated, the ARD/IEP committee must meet to review the student's TAKS/TAKS-Accommodated test results, IEP, TAKS remediation options, and grade placement. The ARD/IEP committee has the authority to "promote" rather than place. There are no longer any provisions for the "placement" of students based on previous retentions ­ even those students identified as students with disabilities. The Grade Placement Committee makes promotion decisions for LEP students in consultation with a member of the student's LPAC. The GPC has the authority to "promote" rather than "place" a student who has satisfied the grade requirement, Standard (A), but has not satisfied one or both of the testing Standards (B and/or C). Additional information on the GPC is presented in the section on Student Classification. ENTRANCE/EXIT COMMITTEE FOR GIFTED/TALENTED ADVANCED ACADEMICS The Entrance/Exit Committee consists of three members who are trained in the nature and needs of gifted and talented students and have had experience with Advanced Placement and/or International Baccalaureate curriculum. Refer to the section on Advanced Academics for additional information. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEE The School Attendance Committee has responsibility for reviewing absences of students who have excessive unexcused absences according to HISD Attendance Guidelines. The committee may grant or refuse credit for subjects the student is passing based on the extenuating circumstances. The School Attendance Committee shall be appointed by the principal. The majority of the committee must be comprised of classroom teachers. More detailed information regarding the School Attendance Committee can be found in the sections on Grade Reporting and Attendance Accounting.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations PLACEMENT REVIEW COMMITTEE TEC §37.002 allows a teacher to remove a child from a classroom if that student repeatedly interferes with the teacher's ability to effectively communicate with the students. TEC §37.003 requires each school to establish a three-member Placement Review Committee to determine placement of a student when a teacher refuses the return of the student to the teacher's class and make recommendations to the district regarding re-admission of expelled students. Members of the committee shall be appointed as follows: (1) the campus faculty shall choose two teachers to serve as members and one teacher to serve as an alternate member, (2) the principal shall choose one member from the professional staff of a campus, and The teacher refusing to re-admit the student may not serve on the committee. TEC §37.003(c) clarifies that the committee's placement determination regarding a student with a disability who receives special education services under Subchapter A, Chapter 29, is subject to the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and other laws relating to special education. DROPOUT PREVENTION PROGRAM Reducing the dropout rate is a major district initiative. Recognizing that early intervention is critical, the district has structured prevention and intervention efforts in grades pre-kindergarten through twelve. As the district strives to become Houston's educational system of choice, efforts to prevent dropouts and recapture those students who have left the district have been revitalized. School Improvement Plans (SIPs) have incorporated best practices into strategies which address dropout prevention and intervention. The following list exemplifies some strategies which the district and schools have identified as having a positive impact on students. These strategies are integral components of the district's initiative and are indicative of the strategies found in the SIPs: Professional development Early childhood education Instructional technologies Service learning Conflict resolution Out of School experiences Community Collaboration Family involvement Reading and writing programs Individualized instruction Mentoring and tutoring Learning styles Career education and workforce readiness IV - 53

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations The Office of Student Engagement has been created to focus and direct the district's dropout prevention and intervention programs and strategies. It facilitates a coordinated effort to improve the district's graduation rate, to reduce both district-wide and campus dropout rates, and to strengthen our dropout recovery initiatives. High schools are responsible for their dropout population and must make diligent efforts to reclaim their dropouts by offering viable options for these students along with access to all services available to any student on the campus. Each school should designate a dropout coordinator to coordinate dropout prevention and recovery efforts, with the five-member dropout team established by the principal. Accountability and equity are priorities. High schools have several options to address their dropout population but each school must develop a plan of action to serve this student population. All school personnel must make every effort to identify the reasons students leave school. At withdrawal, parents are requested to sign indicating their intent to enroll their child in another school. This information is coded into the student software system as a leaver record, indicating the specific reason that student left the school. In the early fall, Technology runs a DOS Leaver Report for each school listing all students who were coded as leaving with the intent to enroll in another HISD school but who did not actually enroll in another HISD school. If these students' records are not corrected, they will be reported to PEIMS as dropouts. School personnel should attempt to contact these students' families to determine the student's current school status. After several attempts to locate the student, a referral should be made to the Dropout Prevention Specialist assigned to work wit the school. Under the directions of the Director, Student Engagement, the Dropout Prevention Specialists visit students at school and at home, advocate for students to return to school, and facilitate enrollment in alternative schools, if necessary. Information on required documentation is available in the section on Admission/Withdrawal of these Guidelines, in the HISD Data Quality Manual, and in the PEIMS Data Standards available at the TEA Website at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/peims. Each school should designate a dropout coordinator to coordinate dropout prevention and recovery efforts, with the five-member dropout team established by the principal.

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Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations CAMPUS SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS COUNCIL The Campus Safety, Security, and Emergency Preparedness Council ("the council") will Assist in the establishment, review and/or revision of campus safety/security policies and procedures; Help supervise policies, student conduct, safe job performance, and campus compliance to federal, state, and local regulations affecting safe and secure campus operations; Maintain a system of reporting and evaluation of campus safety and security programs; Assist in documenting violence prevention strategies and implementing corrective safety actions necessary to improve the safety and security of students, staff, and the protection of district properties; and Conduct monthly council meetings, keep minutes of meetings, and store minutes in the Fire Marshal's Folder or a separate folder labeled "Safety and Security Council" to be located in the main office for accessibility by Risk Management safety staff, and/or fire or other designated emergency response persons upon request. Council membership should include the principal and/or assistant principal, the school business manager (if applicable), a counselor, the school nurse, and representatives of clerical support, teachers, custodial staff, HISD police, food service staff, PTO, and the student council (HS only). The council should assist in preparation of an individualized campus fire safety plan, campus security plan, and the Emergency Preparedness "Individualized Campus Emergency Plan" with annual training for staff and primary responders referencing The Emergency Preparedness Plan Manual (Red Book), The Guidelines for Preparing Effective Campus Safety, Security and Emergency Preparedness Councils, The Campus Safety Manual (Blue Book), and the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Needs Assessment. Manuals are available on the Risk Management portal. REQUIRED SAFETY/SECURITY PLANS Fire Safety Plans The principal of each school shall prepare a Fire Safety Plan with an evacuation plan map of the building that is to be approved by the City Fire Marshal, or his designated representative. The evacuation plan map, indicating primary and secondary evacuation routes and location of fire extinguishers and/or pull stations, is to be followed in the event of a real fire (or other evacuation) emergency. The evacuation plan map should be posted in every classroom where it is clearly visible. The principal is to ascertain that every teacher and student occupying the school is trained in evacuation procedures. If applicable, each school shall also prepare a Modified Fire Safety Plan to accommodate persons with disabilities and/or special needs. Designated team responders will assist persons with special needs to a designated fire safety refuge area and/or throughout a complete evacuation process. Team responders will remain and be accounted with the person(s) with disabilities. Team responders must be able to demonstrate effectively, upon request by the Fire Marshall and/or his designee, the ability to demonstrate a complete (simulated) full evacuation of a transported person down the stairs, to the outside. IV - 55

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations The City of Houston Fire Code requires, at minimum, one fire exit drill to be conducted every month that the building is occupied, in all grade levels, at all schools. A disaster drill is to be conducted each semester. One disaster drill is to be conducted during the first week of school in conjunction with the monthly fire exit drill. Exit drills are to simulate "walk-through" drills, per the established procedures from the campus emergency evacuation plan which is based on all the Risk Management manuals and forms referenced in the above paragraphs. Schools are strongly encouraged to practice Shelter in Place Drills early in the school year simulating: a hazardous chemical emergency, inclement weather emergency, and/or a Lockdown emergency. These drills are to be conducted at least once per semester. Contact Risk Management/Safety and Loss Control for additional information and assistance in coordinating Emergency Preparedness/SIP Drills. A permanent copy of the monthly fire exit/disaster drill report forms and fire exit drill (yellow) record keeping cards should be kept in the Fire Marshal's Folder, located in the campus main office. In accordance with state law, schools are required to maintain safety records on campus, including fire safety documents, for a minimum of 3 years. The Fire Marshal's folder should contain copies of the following documents: Boiler Certificates (annual or semiannual) Building Certificate of Occupancy (300 or more per location) Occupancy Permits (50 or more per assembly room) Combustible Solid Waste Storage Permit Fire Prevention Permits (annual, City of Houston) Flammable Storage Permit Fire-Exit Drill Records Test Results of Fire-Exit Drills Test Results of Fire Sprinkler or Standpipe Systems (annual) Most Recent Gas Test (must be done every two years unless a school has a Pre-kindergarten or Head Start program; then it must be done annually) Certification of Flame Resistance for Campus Auditorium and Classroom Window Curtains Swimming Pool Permit (if applicable) Daycare Facility Permit (if applicable) Pre-kindergarten Permit (if applicable) Campus Safety/Security Plan "Safety Above All Else" is first of HISD's Core Values of Operation. Each school should develop a plan to maintain the safety and security of students, staff, and school property. The Campus Safety/Security Plan should address: Entry and egress to-and-from the campus, Procedures for sign-in and identification of all visitors including: parents, volunteers, patrons, contractors and/or vendors, Procedures for removal of access intruders, Security of administrative offices, Security of files, Security of classrooms, and Routine facilities/grounds (general and specific) safety inspections. IV - 56

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations The Campus Safety/Security Plan should include: A list of members of the Safety, Security, and Emergency Preparedness Council, Names of individuals on campus trained in CPR/Standard First Aid and location of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs), Location of the ambulance loading zone, Name of the individual responsible for unlocking pedestrian/perimeter gates during emergencies/evacuation, Bus pick-up location during bus evacuation, Evacuation site plan specifying pre-designated relocation sites north, south, east, and west of the campus, during emergency evacuation, Procedures for activating fire/emergency alarms during fire or other disaster notification, Directive to teachers to carry, on their person, the class roster/grade book during fire exit/disaster drills and/or real emergencies, An employee fan-out system, Specified emergency points to be used by parents during emergencies if/when perimeter gates are locked, Specified date/time when teachers will be trained on the locations and use of fire extinguishers, Campus map with a key/legend that identifies the location of parking lots, sidewalks, gates, flagpole, driveways, ambulance loading, and emergency entrance/exits, Items specified in the HISD Emergency Preparedness Plan Manual Section 5, pages 1-2. Emergency Preparedness ­ Individualized Campus Emergency Plan Items specified in the HISD Emergency Preparedness Plan Manual (Red Book), Section 5, pages 1-2, are to be included in the Individualized Campus Emergency Plan and placed in Section 5 of the HISD Emergency Preparedness Plan Manual (Red Book). Personnel who will serve as NIMS/Incident Command System responders for the crises described in Section 3 of the HISD Emergency Preparedness Manual should be identified and trained in advance on the Red Book guidelines and the Emergency Operations Plan procedure (EOP), and thereafter be retrained annually or as conditions affecting campus safety and/or security change. Reference: Risk Management Forms and Manuals Child Abuse All staff should be trained annually on the HISD policies pertinent to reporting suspected child abuse as required by TEC 38.004, the Family Code, Chapter 261, and TAC 61.1051. State law provides that any school employee, agent, or contractor who suspects child abuse or neglect submit a written or oral report to at least one of the following authorities within 48 hours or less: local or state law enforcement (HISD Police ­ 713/ 892-7777); The Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Service, Child Protective Services (1-800-252-5400); a local office of Child Protective Services (Harris County Children's Protective Services, 5110 Southwest Freeway, Houston, Texas 77056), where available, or the state agency that operates, licenses, certifies, or registers the facility in which the alleged child abuse or neglect occurred. IV - 57

Secondary School Guidelines, 2009-2010 Secondary Program Operations HISD SCHOOL CALENDAR COMMITTEE The official HISD school calendar is devised in the winter of the previous school year by a Calendar Committee, which is composed of representatives from HISD, parents, the general public, and professional organizations. The committee accepts input from outside sources during this period. The committee must work with the basic requirements of the law, which include 180 instructional days, 187 teacher workdays, two inclement weather makeup days, and the option of five professional development days. If school must be canceled due to inclement weather or other circumstances beyond our control, the designated makeup days must be used to makeup the lost days of instruction. If additional circumstances require the closing of school(s), the district may exclude those days from the official calendar for funding purposes. If the attendance at a campus declines 10 percent or more compared to the attendance rate for the previous year for any reason pertaining to the safety of students, the district may apply for a waiver to exclude those days from the affected campus calendar for funding purposes. Such an event would be triggered by a circumstance that merits the notifying of local authorities: law enforcement, fire department, gas company or any other entity appropriate to the safety concern. The school calendar for alternative education programs must follow the same regulations as those stated for the regular school, unless a waiver is received which alters this agreement or it is written into their contract. If the district applies for and receives approval, five days of professional development days may be substituted for five days of instruction in the official HISD calendar. Any change from the district calendar for any campus must be approved through the waiver process. A campus may not arbitrarily change an instructional day for a designated professional development day. A school may not use the HISD Designated Make-up Days as release days for teachers in exchange for staff development days completed during the summer or on Saturdays. IMPORTANT DATES The Six Week/Nine Week Grading Periods Calendar in a PDF version is now located on the Federal & State Compliance on the Forms Channel. HOUSTON INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT CALENDAR 2007-2008 The HISD School Calendar highlights first and last days of school, school holidays, report card dates, teacher preparation days, and other school-related events. A PDF version may be accessed on the HISD Web Portal under Calendars.

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