Read Peregrinations of a Pastoral Parson: text version

Peregrinations of a Pastoral Parson:

Journals of the Rev Alfred Glennie, transcribed & annotated by Ann & Malcolm Glennie Holmes from the Facsimile Edition

held by the Muswellbrook Central Library

This document records the entries in the Reverend Alfred Glennie's1 journals for the period between his translation to the parish of Lochinvar in July 1863 and the cessation of his diaries in September 1870 shortly before his death. The journals written between 1855 and June 1863, which detail his life while he was the minister of Brisbane Waters Parish, centred on Christ Church Gosford, were transcribed and published by the Central Coast Family History Study Group in 1988. These occupied Volumes I, II & the first part of Volume III of the photocopied and bound originals. The present transcriptions cover the second part of Volume III, the entire Volume IV, and the first part of Volume V. The second part of Volume V covers his detailed daily meteorological observations for the years 1855 ­ 1870 and have not been transcribed.

Volume IIIb: 27 July 1863 ­ 12th April 1864.

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Lochinvar, 27th July 1863

I shall not attempt to detail all that we have gone through since the last entry on the other side, but must content myself with a brief outline of our proceedings. The month of June was spent in winding up everything as well as I could, preparatory to our leaving the District, & on Sunday the 28th June I ministered for the last time, & preached my farewell sermon to my flock, & very painful a task I found it; - such a trial, in short, as I hope I shall never have to go through again. On Tuesday my Parishioners kindly presented me with an address2, together with a purse containing 54-4-0.3 Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday in that week were taken up with leavetaking & finishing off our packing as far as we were able, & on Thursday, the second of this month we all started about ½ p 5 AM by the light of a brilliant full moon, & a

Alfred Glennie was born in Dulwich, Surrey in 1811, the eleventh son of Rev Dr William Glennie & Mary Gardiner, emigrated to Australia in 1826, married Anne Ferris in 1836, took up farming at East Gresford until 1850, was ordained and spent 13 years in Gosford. Translated to Lochinvar in 1863. Their children were Marianne, born in 1845, and Lucy Emily, born in 1848. Alfred died in 1870. Great, great grandfather of Malcolm Glennie Holmes (and lots of others!) 2 Double "ss" was always written with the first letter as a long s, i.e. "addrefs", which has not been followed in this transcription. 3 Nearly half his yearly stipend.

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keen frosty air, bidding adieu to the beautiful spot that had been our home for more than 13 years; & if I may judge from the demonstrations of sorrow evinced almost universally by all those we left behind, our departure was sincerely lamented by them: & I may truly say the feeling was fully reciprocated by us all. ­ We could not have been more highly favoured, as regards the weather, as we were on that day. It was a complete specimen of a perfect Australian Winter's day. Cloudless sky, & calm; The roads being bad from recent rains, our travelling pace was slow, & though our only halt was ¾ of an hour at Reedy Flat, it was quite dark before we reached Mount Vincent. The girls were very tired, & quite faint when they got in, but Anne4 stood the journey wonderfully well. Mrs Child kindly assented to my request to leave them all in her charge, while I came on to take my first Sunday duties, & to see what arrangements I could make to bring them on to Lochinvar. I came on by myself therefore - & took up my residence at the "Village Inn". On Saturday I rode up to Branxton & back again viâ Dalwood, to announce my arrival, & prepare them for the Sunday services; & on Sunday the 5th I commenced my public duties & went through the three services ­ Lochinvar, Branxton & Mr Holmes'.5 As an appropriate subject for my first sermon, I chose that from the text "I have a message from God unto thee". I slept at Mr Holmes' that night, where I met Mr & Mrs Baggot, - on Monday I rode to Morpeth, & stayed with the Bishop that night. Tuesday to Mount Vincent, to bring them on from thence. On Wednesday we rode down to East Maitland, where I quartered the girls at the Parsonage, while Anne accompanied me to the Parsonage at Morpeth. On Thursday the 9 I attended, for the first time, a Quarterly6 Meeting of the Clergy at Morpeth, where I met Goodly number of my fellow labourers. On Friday Anne rode up with me to Lochinvar, where we remained the night at the "Red Lion". On Saturday morning we returned to Maitland, & as it was very uncertain when our goods might arrive, we decided that they had better all go up to Singleton7, & there await the arrival of our things. ­ I returned to my quarters here that evening, & performed my Sunday duties again on the 12th returning to East Maitland in the evening in time to assist Mr Tyrrell with his service8. On Monday afternoon I sent a telegram to Newcastle to inquire whether Mr Loutit had arrived from Bris: Water, & on Tuesday morning received a reply announcing the arrival of the vessel that morning. ­ It was Thursday, however, before they came up by train from Newcastle & having put John9 & Mary Ann in possession of the house, I started off to Singleton by the evening train, & brought them all down next day. Last week we were chiefly engaged unpacking & getting things to rights, & are now beginning to feel somewhat more settled & I am now beginning to go out among the people & visit them & find out my own sheep among them ­ Several of the neighbours have called upon us, & today we have received visits from Mr Holmes, Mr & Mrs Wyndham,10 & some of the young Wyndhams. 28. This morning I rode out as far as Oswald, to call upon Mr McLeod, the National Schoolmaster there, whose daughter has been playing the Harmonium in the Church for some time. On the way back I made several

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Alfred very occasionally referred to his wife as Ann or Annie, but usually as Anne. Joseph Broadbent Holmes, (1817-97) & his wife Harriet Pawsey Philips (1813-89), had eight children. The eldest, Maxwell, and Alfred's elder daughter Marianne, are my great grandparents. Joseph & Harriet were first cousins once removed. 6 Using the old form of the capital Q ­ looks like a big, florid 2, not a large printed Q. 7 To "Flowerbank", the home of Alfred's brother Dr Henry Glennie and his wife Elizabeth, sister to Anne, & however many of their decade of children were still at home. 8 In this case, Rev Lovick Tyrrell, nephew of the Bishop. Unfortunately, references to "Mr Tyrrell" could be to either this reverend gentleman, or to Mr Tyrrell of the wine-making family, however, the vignerons (with whom the Holmeses are also connected) appear to have been recorded with their Christian names. 9 John & Mary Ann Byrne were the Glennie's longest employed servants ­ four years less two days - despite difficulties over John's drinking. 10 George & Margaret Wyndham, vignerons of Dalwood. Their son Charles was to marry Lucy Emily Glennie in 1866. Two of their sons also married two of Alfred's nieces.

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calls at the cottages along the roadside, & got home to dinner.11 In the afternoon we had quite a levee of Wyndhams calling on us, first John & Lucy12, with their 3 little ones, & then Alward & his family came in ­ After they had gone we went & called on the Hungerfords. This morning I made one or two calls in the lane close to home, & then pruned a few vines until interrupted by a call from Guy & Wad Wyndham on their return home from the cricket match at Paterson. In the afternoon we all walked out & called on the Doyles at Kaluda,13 & were much pleased with their beautiful place. On the way out we met Mr Tyrrell14. John & Mary Ann went by train to Maitland today : the latter having been troubled with toothache for 2 or 3 days, determined on going to have it out. John brought Nelly15 back from Mr Tyrrell's. A good part of this day was occupied in cleaning the Harmonium in the Church. Miss McLeod telling me she was about leaving the district, I have decided upon Marianne16 becoming Organist, & have moved the instrument into the Chancel behind the reading desk. ­ I found it very full of cockroaches &c. ­ Mr & Mrs & Miss Green called in the morning. Towards evening we did a little bit of gardening. ­ put in some of the cuttings & the plants we brought from Brisbane Water in a bed John dug for the purpose. The Girls & myself17 have had a nice ride to Dalwood today. Our starting was delayed a little by my having to copy out a petition to the Leg: Assembly which I received by this morning's post from the Bishop ­ Subject, Education Bill - & to which I obtained the signatures of Mr Wyndham & his son Alward. A change of weather seems at hand, in short, rain has commenced this evening.

August 1863.

1. Rode out to Oswald this morning to see Mr McLeod, & get him to sign the Petition, on the Education question, but he was not visible. My visit was not very opportune, as I found a wedding had just taken place in the family ­ Returning from thence I called at Mr Doyle's, & being near their dinner hour accepted Mrs Doyle's invitation to remain, that I might get Mr D's signature. He declined, however, to sign the Petition, approving of the Education Bill as it stands.18 I then returned, intending to call at Mr Green's by the way, but my inflamed eye was getting painful from the cold W. wind, & I returned home ­ eye very bad all the evening. Sunday. A very high & cold wind, which I think kept people away from Church. I administered the Holy Communion to 15 Communicants, which I am told is a large number for Lochinvar. Had a very windy ride to Branxton, where was [sic] a good congregation & a baptism also. Nelly carried me well from thence to Mr Holmes's, where I arrived in pretty good time ­ smart shower by the way. Met Mr Everett there from New England. Mr Holmes kindly accompanied me this morning as far as Mr McDonald's on Black Creek, showing me introducing me to all the little settlers in that quarter. After dinner I returned home. Weather squally ­

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Midday dinner, not evening. Whom Alfred had married in 1858. Lucy (Lucy Ellen) was his niece, being one of Henry's daughters. 13 Alfred spells this name Kaludah, Kaloudah, Kaloundah and Kalouda as well as Kaluda. 14 Rev Lovick Tyrrell, rector of East Maitland ­ had been Alfred's immediate predecessor at Lochinvar. 15 One of Alfred's horses ­ Mettle, Farmer, Comet & Eclipse were others. 16 Alfred's elder daughter was baptised Mary Anne, but was always called Marianne. 17 A definite Alfredism ­ an absolutely characteristic grammatical error. 18 This Bill was one of the measures to break the hold the Church of England had on education in NSW.

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Spent this day visiting & making more acquaintances, both in the village & along the railway lane. In the evening I went to visit a poor dying man at Windermere19 named Yule. He is a Presbyterian, but expressed himself very thankful for my visit. Had my first day's visiting at Branxton but did not go all through the village & must have another day at it next week. Remained at home today with the exception of a visit I paid to the sick man Yule, at Windermere. Found him worse than I found him before, evidently sinking into his grave. Mr Holmes & two of his girls came & called this morning, & stayed to dinner with us. Mr & Mrs Chapman also called in the afternoon. The rest of the day I spent pruning the vines - & got them all done.20 ­ John got the grindstone fixed up today after clearing up all the packing-cases in the back yard. Anne & I took a ride to Dalwood today to call on the good folks there, & especially to bid adieu to Mr & Mrs Alward [Wyndham], who are quitting their present home for the Far North, or N. West. The day has been exceedingly beautiful, which made our ride very enjoyable. ­ I was going to ride Nelly, but found she was not well, so I had her unsaddled, & took Farmer instead. I fear Nelly is attacked with the "prevailing epidemic" Influenza. It has been among the horses very much of late. Spent this day visiting about home, making new acquaintances. In the morning at the South side of the road, in the afternoon at the North side. On coming home in the evening, I found Mr Alward & all his family here ­ They had been to Maitland, & had a breakdown on the road, which threw them very late, so we quartered them all for the night.21 Sunday. Good congregations both at Branxton & Lochinvar, especially at the latter. Had my first funeral here this evening after the service. The old man Yule at Windermere died on Thursday evening22. This morning I rode out to call on the Harpurs [sic], at Oswald ­ was very much pleased with the old lady. Saw her poor afflicted son, who has been bed-ridden for some years from paralysis. Just as I arrived at the house, Comet shied me off, but I escaped unhurt. Wet day, which kept me within doors. ...do....do...not quite so rainy as yesterday, but occasional showers, with some distant thunder to the eastward in the evening. A few light showers flying over during he day. I remained at home & was chiefly employed pruning trees in the garden. In the afternoon a man named Metham [or Mettam?] came to report the death of his son at Branxton, & begging me to go up & bury him on Saturday. Between 3 & 4 this morning I was called up by Mr Winder to go & see Mr Hungerford, who was very ill ­ I found him in an alarming state, & as he begged me to administer the Holy Com: to him, I did so, his brother-in-law Mr Winder joining us. ­ I called to see him this evening & was sorry to find his mind was affected ­ in fact he is evidently under an attack a delirium tremens"[sic] ­ one of his brothers & his sister, Mrs Swires, from Maitland, are with him.

Property & vineyard owned by the Green family. So there were grape-vines at the Parsonage when they arrived, but Alfred must have planted a lot more, for these he pruned in less than a day, whereas in 1868, 69 & 70 it was taking several days to finish the pruning. 21 Although Alward and Annette Wyndham ended up with eight children, by 1863 only Alward, William, Margaret & Egbert had arrived, so only about five beds would have been required. 22 Alfred was prepared to offer the consolations of the Anglican religion to Presbyterians ­ was this because his own grandfather had been a Presbyterian minister in Scotland?

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Went to Branxton to bury the young man Metham. After the funeral I lunched with Dr Hartigan, & then called on the Teacher of the National School, Mr Johnstone. Came home viâ Dalwood, Dr Hartigan accompanying me thither. Sunday, Services as usual ­ at Branxton I baptized two infants before service. This threw me out a little & caused me to be about 10 minutes behind time at Mr Holmes'. I intended going to Cessnock today, but the weather proving rainy, I postponed it, & came home. Went to see Mr Hungerford this morning, but saw his daughter only who said her Papa was worse & did not wish to see me. In the evening I rode out to Doyle's to see how they all fared there ­ found them all well. While preparing to go to Gosforth this morning, I received a letter from the Bishop asking me to ride over some morning & consult with him about Brisbane Water affairs. I thought it best to go at once, & did so. On my way home this evening I made a few calls at the cottages by the roadside ­ Neal's &c &c. Had a nice ride up to Belford today, calling in at Branxton to see Mrs Mettam the mother of the young man I buried there last Saturday. Among the few residents at Belford I found an old Brisbane Water family by the name of Hunt. They keep a little store there. I also found an old acquaintance in the village ­ Innkeeper S. Snape, formerly a stockman at Glendon23. The day was lovely ­ quite Springified. Spent this day visiting at Gosforth, & received a hearty welcome at every house. Among others I called on Robert Kay, brother of James M. Kay at Torigal24. Most of the people I visited were acquainted with the Wilsons, who formerly in that neighbourhood. As I was riding along homeward, after visiting the most distant of my flock (Clark Orman) I was suddenly arrested by a man's voice calling out "Stop a bit, Mr Alfred". & whom should this be but my old Dulwich25 friend Thomas Goodfellow, the "Harmonious Blacksmith". He lives by the roadside there at Anambah, Mr Cobb's farm, but from what I learnt from the neighbours, he has given himself up very much to drinking, indeed the marks of it were too visible upon him to be denied. Remained at home today, with the exception of a walk we all took towards evening to Windermere & which we found rather longer than we expected. Received a letter from Townshend this morning, sent through his son George, which I must endeavour to answer by next Mail. Sunday. A very satisfactory day, the congregation at Lochinvar numbered 106. Anne accompanied me today to call at Mr Holmes, leaving her there, I made a few calls in the neighbourhood, first calling at Mrs Blick's, but found she was away in Sydney. ­ Went on as far as Mr Chick's & one or two others. To Branxton today, visited several families living in tents across the line & then finished off the village. Today I went out to the Coal mines near Branxton, & after visiting the people there, went to call on Mrs Smith (widow of the late Capt. Smith) & from thence, on the way home, visited the Harpurs, & Mrs Smith's daughter, Mrs Dawson. On coming home I found that Cousin John had been here with Jessie & Mary26, & gone away again to Singleton. I walked out to see Mrs

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Robert Scott's 10,000 acre property ­ Alfred stayed there when he first arrived in Australia. Now Terrigal. 25 Property of Alfred's brother, James Glennie, between 1824 and 1840. Alfred had lived there during the 1830's until his marriage. 26 John Glennie, first cousin once removed of Alfred, and either his second wife-to-be Mary nee Townshend, or ­ more likely - Alfred's youngest niece, Mary, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth, and John's daughter Jessie Candia,

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Gurd after coming home, & when I returned found Wmn Boydell27 here, with Sarah, Anne & Jack. The girls & myself walked with the Boydells up to the station this morning & saw them off by the Midday train. Towards evening I paid a few visits in the village. Anne & I went to Maitland today to do a little shopping, & after completing our purchases called on the Chapmans28, & took dinner with them. On returning home I found about half a dozen little pupils waiting to begin our singing class & we made a very good beginning. At home today preparing for tomorrow's services, & writing a letter to Ben: Davis at Kincumbar, [sic] in answer to his note on the Clergy Stipend Fund. Towards evening I paid a few visits at the back of the house. Sunday. Rather more windy than was agreeable. Congregations good. That at Mr Holmes' more than usual. The days are now lengthening out so they can now better attend from a distance. Mr Holmes went with me this morning to show me the way to Cessnock. I found there are some 8 or 10 families in that neighbourhood, & as it will not add much to my labours if I visit them once a fortnight (for it is only about 4 miles from Mr Holmes'), I think I can attend to them mush more easily than Mr Greaves, & have written to the Bishop to tell him of doing so with his approbation.29 ­ I returned to dinner at Mr Holmes' & then rode home in the evening. ­ Found that old Capt Hungerford had called today with his daughter Mrs Swires.

September 1863

1. Celebrated my first Lochinvar Wedding this morning, a young couple from Gosforth & Anambah ­ John Nash & Eliza Dann. The day being thus broken into, I did not go out, but spent it writing. In the afternoon Miss Green called & invited us to tea on Friday evening ­ towards evening we strolled out into the paddock at the back & were charmed with the beautiful view from the top of the hill we ascended.30 On the way back we called to see Mrs Gurd & her young baby, looked in at Howard's also. 2. Had Comet got in this morning with the intention of going to Branxton, but the rain began after breakfast & caused me to alter my purpose. Spent the day letter writing. 3. Remained at home today & wrote a long letter to Mr Edward Walmsley31 on the subject of the Clergy Stipend &c. 4. Crossed the river today for the first time to Luskintyre. Ever since my arrival here the river has been impassable from Floods, but I managed to get over today pretty well, the water being nearly half way up the saddle flaps.32 I called on several residents on the other side, namely Mr Paterson (Presbyterian) Mr Davis,

born 1858, daughter of Christina, nee Smith. The adults lived at Orindinna, while Jessie divided her time between "Flowerbank" in Singleton and the Lochinvar Parsonage. 27 The Boydell family in 1837 sold Alfred and Anne a piece of property at East Gresford that became Glenthorne, which Alfred farmed until entering the ministry in 1850 and moving to Gosford. 28 Anglican Minister in Maitland. 29 This is an interesting bit of "poaching" ­ Alfred was normally punctilious about not trespassing into neighbouring parishes. However, Alfred later found he wasn't in Cessnock but Pokolbin, so he was probably still within the bounds of his parish after all. 30 By the middle of the century the full-scale Victorian "picturesque" must have taken over from the first settlers' prejudice about the beauty or otherwise of the Australian bush. 31 Walmsley was one of Alfred's parishioners in Brisbane Waters Parish ­ the parishioners there still owed money for Alfred's salary. 32 This sounds pretty dangerous.

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Mills, Nott, Way & Mrs Cooper, a widow. Came home about ½ p 2 to dinner33, so as to be ready for the singing class. The Doyles called in just as we were going to dinner, which delayed us a little, - Nine children came to sing, & got on very tolerably. I took the girls to spend the evening34 at Windermere. 5. Very busy all day moving my books &c out of the dining room into the little verandah room, which is now my study. 6. Sunday. Very rainy. Rode up to Branxton for morning service, but not one individual attended. ­ Had a bad headache to add to the disagreeables of the day. My only congregation at home was the Sexton, & Parker, beside ourselves. 7. Weather cleared up again. I was busy all day finishing the arrangements in my study. 8. Had a nice walk today & made a few more acquaintances at Windermere, namely, Walker, Houston & Bellamy. In the afternoon we made a few calls about home. 9. Very unwell all today ­ a kind of bilious attack, I think. It commenced during the night, & prevented me sleeping after 2 o'clock this morning. 10. Rather better this morning. I thought I would try Emily's35 infallible remedy all ailments, a ride on horseback, so took the girls to the Wilderness to see the Holmes'. The day was very fine, & they enjoyed the ride much. Don't feel at all well tonight. 11. Still far from well ­ did not go out anywhere ­ wrote several letters. 12. Sundry little jobs & looking out sermons occupied the morning. After dinner we all took a delightful walk across the paddock towards Windermere, to visit a sick lad there (son of Houston) & then came home along the river bank & by the Kaludah lane. 13. Sunday. Baptized Mr W. F. Wyndham's child before morning service.36 Had two more children to baptize at Branxton, which then threw me back nearly half an hour. Not so good a congregation at Mr Holmes' this time as last. 14. Rode over to Cessnock again this morning, & arranged to have service there this day fortnight at ½ p 10. On my was back I called at Mr McDonald's, & all the families between that & Mr Holmes', & then rode home in the evening. 15. Went immediately after breakfast to see the lad Arthur Houston at Windermere, intending on my return to take the girls down to Mr Chapman's Sunday School examination at West Maitland, but when I came back I found Fanny Holden & Miss Davidson here, come by train from Maitland to spend the day with us, so our ride was stopped.37 In the evening we all accompanied them to the station to see them off & then called on Mrs Wagstaff, & made several more calls on the way home. 16. Took the girls down with the intention of joining the School Feast at West Maitland but we were too late. They had all gone out somewhere Campbell's Hill way. We therefore rode on to East Maitland & called on Mr Tyrrell. Did a little shopping besides, & had a very disagreeable, dusty, windy, ride home. 17. Went to Branxton, & putting my horse into Dr Hartigan's stable, spent the day visiting through the village ­ dined at Mr Lindsay's 38- & got home between 7 & 8. 18. Remained at home today writing &c ­ Mr Hungerford looked in in the morning, & took me into his paddock to show me where I could get some good soil for the garden. In the afternoon Mr Campbell of St Clair called.

Dinner at 2.30 ­ This seems to have been a little later than the usual time for the major meal in the Glennie household, and it is interesting that the Doyles must have eaten earlier in the day. It is likely that each family of immigrants continued the habits of eating at the times that their forefathers ate back in the Old Country. 34 The "evening" would appear to be what we would call late afternoon, rather than the time after dark. 35 Alfred's younger daughter Lucy Emily was always referred to as Emily. 36 Cannot identify this child ­ all W. Wyndhams in our data base are too young to be fathers in 1863. 37 Visitors took precedence over religious instruction and examination? 38 Lindsay was the miller in Branxton.

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19. Marianne & I took a trip up to Singleton39 this morning, both of us wishing to get a little medical advice from Henry. Marianne has an eruption on her neck, something of the St Anthony's Fire kind40 & my ailment turns out to be Sciatica, we each got some medicine & returned by the evening train. 20. Sunday. Although it threatened very much for rain in the morning, it cleared away again without coming to anything. I had two very good congregations, that at Lochinvar being very nearly 100. There was also an increase in the Sunday School of nine children, which brings the number up to 45. 21. Expecting Mr Tyrrell up this morning, I did not go out, but he disappointed us & did not come. In the afternoon I paid a few visits in the village. Received a note from the Bishop asking me to go down some morning & have a talk with him about Brisbane Water. I purpose going down tomorrow morning. 22. Went to Morpeth to see the Bishop. Anne accompanied me, & we made a few calls at East Maitland on our return. Very high wind, which made it disagreeable. 23. Went to Dalwood in the evening, for the purpose of having a long day tomorrow ­ visiting across the river at Stanhope &c. Emily went with me, & we rode to the top of Harpur's Hill.41 It was a perfect evening, & the view ­ most beautiful. 24. Had a capital day up the river, crossing it at Judge's at Dalwood, & going through Stanhope up to Elderslie. Here I recrossed the river & came down the south side of it, making Dalwood after sunset. 25. Emily & I returned after breakfast from Dalwood.42 Spent the day writing &c. 26. Today we all (except Anne) made a little excursion with the Hungerfords to the top of Summer Hill from which we has a beautiful view of the rich valley of the Hunter, &c &c. 27. Sunday. Some light rain seemed to frighten some of my people from coming to Church. As I neared Branxton in the afternoon it rained pretty smartly so that none came to Church there. Got to Mr Holmes' in very good time. 28. Had my first service at Cessnock, which turned out beyond my expectations, I found a nice congregation of 41 assembled at Mr Birmingham's, & they expressed themselves very thankful for my visit. I reached home by 4PM. 29. Took the girls to Mr Holmes' & left them to spend a few days there. I went on by Mrs Blick's to Branxton, calling on all by the way, & got home in the dusk. 30. Remained at home today, preparing my sermons for Brisbane Water, to which place I shall have to go next month, & spend a Sunday there. Mrs Chambers & Miss Arnold came up by the midday train & spent a short time with us, & in the evening George & Kate Townshend43 popped in & spent the night here.

October 1863

1. Went out after breakfast intending to have a good day's visiting over the river, following up from Luskintyre towards Stanhope. I found the water in the river deeper than I expected, & when I reached the house of Burgess, opposite Dalwood, they seemed to think the river was rising, so I thought it prudent to make my way back again, lest I might be caught at the other side44. 2. Rainy day. Remained at home sermon writing, preparing for Brisbane Water.

Where Alfred's brother, Dr Henry & wife Elizabeth, lived. St Anthony's fire is ergotism, caused by eating bread contaminated with ergot fungus. It causes hallucinations, blood vessel constriction and intense itching. Bad cases lead to gangrene and death. 41 Latterly spelt Harper's Hill, as is the family name also. AP Elkin gives Harper's Hill as an alternative name for Lochinvar in the index of "The Diocese of Newcastle", MPA, 1955. 42 Alfred & Emily were already connected to the Wyndham family of Dalwood, as Alfred's niece, Lucy Ellen Glennie having been married ­ by Alfred ­ to John Wyndham in 1858. Alfred's daughter Emily (Lucy Emily, born 1848) was to marry Charles Wyndham of Dalwood in 1866. 43 George Kenneth Townshend and his wife Katherine Mary Glennie, Alfred's niece, very recently married. 44 If not drowned. There are many references to drownings throughout the diaries.

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3. Rode out to Mr Holmes' this morning & brought the girls home.45 4. Sunday. Being rather showery, my congregations were smaller than usual. 5. Rode out this morning in the direction of Bishop's Bridge to see a young man named Thorp, who applied to me to publish the Banns of Marriage between himself & a young woman there, which I did on the last two Sundays, but finding that they both lived in Mr Thackeray's district, I referred the young man to him ­ This evening we all walked out to call on the Doyle's & take tea with them. 27. This blank in my journal was occasioned by absence from home, having been down to Brisbane Water since the last date. I left home on Tuesday the 13th & stopped at Mount Vincent that night46, & then proceeded the following day to B: Water. The object of my mission was chiefly to try & explain to the people the reasonableness & justice of the requirement made by the Bishop that they should pay up the 55 due the 30th June last to the Stipend Fund, before he could send them another Clergyman & I think I succeeded in doing so.47 As for myself I received a welcome reception from all my old friends & they attended numerously at the several churches on Sunday the 18th ­ I administered the sacrament to 27 at Gosford & altogether baptized 17 infants. On Tuesday I went up to Mangrove Creek, & on Wednesday, after service at the Upper Church, rode out to Wollombi, where I rested all Thursday with Mr Greaves, & I came home on Friday afternoon. Saturday, remained at home. Sunday, services as usual. Monday (yesterday) had a nice congregation of 43 at Cessnock. This morning went to see Arthur Houston who seems a little better. ­ Very cold high wind today so did not go out. 28. Emily & I took a ride this morning down to Gosforth as far as Clark Arman's & returned to dinner. ­ John Wyndham called on his way from Maitland. Towards evening Anne accompanied me to call on Mrs Winder ­ also Dann's, Goldings, Clarks & Hungerford's.48 29. Rode down to Morpeth today to see the Bishop & talk over Brisbane Water affairs. I took Marianne with me to make sundry calls, leaving her at the Parsonage while I was with the Bishop ­ We afterwards called at the Close's, & dined with them, & then on the way home called on the Chambers' ­ We spent the evening with the Lees. 30. I remained at home today, to write letters to Brisbane Water &c. Paid Mrs Clarke a visit & found her somewhat better, but apparently very weak. ­ I left there three nice tracts with her to read.49 31. Busy all the morning writing & preparing for tomorrow's services. Towards evening we all went out for a little walk, & bent our steps towards Clarke's cottage in the first place to see how poor Mrs Clarke was. Anne entered the cottage with me, when we were shocked to see the poor old woman apparently in a dying condition, with her husband & Mrs Roland attending her. After a few minutes had elapsed, I proposed to offer up a prayer with her & for her, to which she had barely strength to nod assent. Scarcely had I commenced the Office for the Visitation of the Sick, when I had to turn hastily to the "commendatory prayer" at the point of departure, & her soul took its flight, as I believe, while I was in the act of repeating that most solemn prayer. ­ She passed away so quietly we could not discern the exact moment, so entirely free was she, apparently, from any

This is the first time the girls, aged 18 & 15, stayed with the Holmes' and only the second time either of them stayed away overnight, and this occasion was for nearly a week. At Dalwood several of the younger Wyndham men were still in residence, while at the Wilderness the attractions would have been the oldest boys, Maxwell, aged 21 & Spencer, aged 19, with several sisters to act as chaperones. The other Holmes boys would have been too young to warrant regard. 46 What happened to the period between the 6th & 12th of October? 47 Pay up or you don't get another minister! 48 An unusually high number of visits for Anne to accomplish. 49 Alfred certainly depended on the written word in his ministry.

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pain or struggling. ­ I felt very thankful that the Providence of God led me to her bedside just at the critical moment,50 & I cannot but think that the same guiding hand of Providence directed me in selecting the three tracts which I left with her yesterday, they were exactly suited to her need ­ namely ­ "God's Message to the Sick", "Another Home" & "The Cleansing Blood". I humbly & sincerely hope that she read them, & derived profit from their perusal.51

November 1863

1. Sunday. Very good attendance, both at Branxton & Lochinvar. At the former I administered the Holy Communion, but only two remained besides 4 of the Wyndham family. Paid a visit to poor old Clarke in the evening ­ Quite a gale of wind from the NW. 2. Very cold wind & still very strong. Did not go out but spent the day writing. 3. Went to Windermere to visit he sick youth Houston, whom I found no better. Called on Bellamy, Yeo & Mr Green, & on my return called & saw Mrs Smith. In the afternoon the funeral of Mrs Clarke took place, & just as I had finished the entry in the Register, I received a note from Mrs Harper Junr acquainting me with the death of Frank Harper, & begging me to ride up & see them, which I did, & agreed to go up tomorrow & bury him in their family vault. 4. Went to Oswald this morning & performed the Funeral Service over the remains of poor Frank Harper, much to the satisfaction of his aged & widowed mother, (now a widow of about four score years) who seemed very grateful for my poor service. ­ In officiating thus on private ground I am conscious that I acted contrary to rule, but under all the peculiar circumstances of this case, it would have been very unkind, I think, to have denied their request & certainly not visiting the Widow in her affliction, "according to the Scripture sense of that injunction.52 This evening we all had a delightful stroll out in the paddock at the back, calling as we went on Mrs New, James, Smith & Brown. 5. Mr George Lee of Maitland called on me this morning to go & visit an old dying man some 2 or 3 miles from this ­ named Clift. I went accordingly, but found that he lived at Bishop's Bridge, in Mr Thackery's district, so I told them their mistake in sending for me, & wrote a note to Mr Thackery explaining matters.53 6. Went to Branxton, where I found a little child dead, of the family of Gibbs, & arranged to go up for the funeral tomorrow afternoon, This evening a man brought me a letter from Mr Lee announcing the death of Mr James Clift, & wishing to have him buried here tomorrow, I arranged therefore for 12 o'clock54. 7. Instead of 12 o'clock as I had appointed, they did not come with Jas Clift's funeral till about 2, which made my me late at Branxton. The day was very hot, the thermor being 90 in the shade. All this was rather a bad preparation for tomorrow's work. 8. Sunday. Services well attended. At Branxton a man named Hoad came to me after the service to beg my attendance tomorrow for the funeral of a little child, who died of diphtheria. I appointed to be there by 3 o'clock. 9. Spent the morning visiting some of the neighbours of Mr Holmes, & after dinner rode into Branxton for the funeral of Hoad's child.55

Devil's Advocate ­ what about all those parishioners he didn't get to in time? Devil's Advocate again ­ the latter is unlikely. One wonders what Marianne & Emily did during this terminal episode ­ stand outside waiting? 52 In the UK, bodies may be buried on any private land, whereas in Australia this is no longer permitted ­ presumably the regulations changed about this time. 53 As mentioned above, Alfred was normally punctilious in not encroaching on neighbouring parishes ­ at least when it suited him. 54 So if he wouldn't attend his sickbed, he had to attend his grave. 55 Dinner would have had to be earlier than 2.30 for Alfred to be in Branxton at 3.

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10. At home, letter writing &c. 11. Went to Branxton, taking the girls with me to Dalwood, where I picked them up on my way back. Commenced visiting the School, & Singing Class. 12. Went by train to Newcastle, to attend the Clerical meeting at Xt. [Christ] Church Parsonage. Not having been there for about ten years, of course I saw great changes. In the evening Mr Edward Hely from Rathmines came in. 13. At home all day, with the exception of a call or two in the village. 14. Went to Branxton in the afternoon for another funeral, calling at Dalwood by the way to see young Nepham, who was seriously hurt the other day by a fall from his horse. On my return home found Elizabeth here with Mary & Jessie56. 15. Sunday. Services as usual. 16. At home all the morning. Walked to Kaluda with Elizabeth in the evening. 17. Had a very hot day's visiting up the other side of the river as far as Stanhope. I called on all the people (of my own flock) as I went along, & arranged to have divine service on Monday the 30th instant. On my way home I called at Dalwood. 18. Went to Branxton, & after visiting the Hoad family, went to the National School for an hour, & from thence to my singing class at the Church. 19. Remained home to receive Henry [Alfred's brother Dr Glennie from Singleton] who came down by the midday train. In the morning I was sent for to visit a poor old sick woman Mrs Glass, a Sawyer's wife who is very ill. In the afternoon we strolled down to the river & Henry caught 3 nice perch. I took him to see the sick lad Arthur Houston, for whom he left a prescription. 20. Walked to Kaluda with Henry this morning. On the way I got him to see old Mrs Glass, whom I had been called to visit in the morning, & he prescribed some remedy for her. Mrs Davidson & her daughter came up from Maitland to spend the day with us, & Henry returned to Singleton by the evening train. 21. At home preparing for tomorrow's services. I visited Mrs Glass twice, she seems getting better. 22. Sunday. A very hot day. Congregations tolerable. 23. Service at Pokolbin (not Cessnock as I called it before) in the morning. Some parties being busy harvesting, & sheep shearing, my congregation there was smaller than before, 25 only. Made a few calls on the way home, & got in between 4 & 5. 24. In the morning, the weather being cool, I took Anne to call on Mr Harper. Cousin John made his appearance soon after breakfast & remained the day with us57. 25. Having received a pressing invitation from Mrs Scott at Newcastle to go & pay them a visit, they all went off by the early train this morning, intending to stay the night there & then spend tomorrow with the Davidsons at E: Maitland. I went up to Branxton, being my School day there. I got away before 9 o'clock, & went across the river to Elderslie, & visited all my flock in that quarter. Cousin John rode with me to Branxton. When I came home this evening I found that Mr Bode had been to call & left a note for me. Young Mr Doyle had also called to say they had a cow ready to lend to us for milking. 26. John went early this morning & brought the cow from Mr Doyle's, & has been busy putting up a milking bail today. I spent the day visiting at Luskintyre, where I made several new acquaintances, beginning at Hall's & then on to Peck's, Fairall, Russells, & so round by Mills & Davis ­ found them all returned from Newcastle when I came home. 27. Stayed at home today & wrote letters &c. 28. Walked up to the station with Elizabeth & the two little girls & saw them safe off per train to Singleton. Paid a visit to Mrs Glass in the forenoon & read a little with

Elizabeth Glennie nee Ferris, Alfred's double sister in law, her youngest daughter Mary, aged about 6, and John Glennie's (Elizabeth's cousin-once-removed by marriage) only child, Jessie, aged about 5. 57 The first of many unannounced visits.

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her & her husband. ­ In the evening called on Mrs James, the Filmers & Mrs New. John is now busy putting up a stockyard for our milking cow.58 29. Sunday. Small congregation at Branxton, 98 at Lochinvar. 30. Went by appointment to Stanhope, where I had service in our old Church building there, & baptized three children. Only about 15 attended, but I may hope for more next time. On my way home I called at Fern Hill & at Dalwood.

December 1863

1. Went to Morpeth to attend a Committee meeting appointed at our Clerical meeting on the 12th November, to prepare an amended scale of fees. We met at the Parsonage ­ Mr Walsh, Fletcher, Chapman, Tyrrell, Blomfield & myself. I had half an hour's chat with the Bishop on Brisb: Water affairs previous to the opening of our Committee meeting ­ made a few purchases at the Book Depôt & also did a little shopping in Maitland. I there learned from a man I met in the street, that poor Mrs Avis died this morning. 2. Went up to Branxton today. Being a cool, pleasantly cloudy day I took Marianne with me to call on Mrs Lindsay. We went the short way by Windermere to Dalwood, where we lunched & then proceeded to Dalwood. I called to see poor old Avis, & tried to speak a word of comfort to the old man. It is arranged for the funeral to take place tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock. I also called upon another very old man named Samuel Thatcher, whom I only discovered the other day. He is 80 years of age, & very infirm. Too old and59 tottery to get to Church. 3. After spending the morning in my study looking out suitable sermons for Sunday next, I rode up to Branxton in the afternoon for the funeral of poor old Mrs Avis60. Having been for so many years a resident there, & so generally respected, the funeral was very well attended. Weather delightfully cool, almost cold & threatening rain. 4. At home today, occupied chiefly in writing letters to Brisbane Water about Stipend matters, & making out Baptismal Returns for last month. In the evening I went to visit Mrs Eli King, who has a child to baptize. 5. Busy among sermons today, preparing for tomorrow's services. 6. Sunday. Attendance at Lochinvar good, Branxton not so. Wilderness good. 7. Spent the morning visiting. Boughton, Campbell, McCormick, Patten & at last I made the acquaintance of Mrs Blick. ­ Dined with the Holmeses & returned in the evening calling first at Crane's, where I had some conversation with them on the subject of the Holy Communion61 & left them some tracts to read on the subject ­ made my usual calls as I rode home. 8. Spent the day with Mr Smith, going about collecting for the Stipend Fund, & got on pretty well.62 In the morning I received a letter from Mr Coulter ­ Gosford ­ conveying the sad news of the sudden & untimely end of poor William Muddle. His death was caused by his running against the limb of a tree, which must have ruptured some of the intestines. 9. Went to Branxton & spent the day as usual, visiting, School & Singing Class. 10. Had a very hot ride today as far as Jesse Judge's. Having learnt from Dr Hartigan yesterday that his boy was still very unwell, also that Mrs Nepham at Dalwood was very ill, I went to see them both, & was glad to find them on the improving scale. Made a few calls on my way about Windermere.

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I wondered how they were going to keep her out of the garden. One of his very rare uses of the word "and" rather than an ampersand. 60 "Poor old" ­ as regular a cliché as Homer's "wine-dark sea". 61 I think Alfred suggesting "having a little chat about..." would be the prelude to a pretty savage castigation 62 Unusual ­ was Mr Smith very large and very forceful?

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11. Took a ride down to Anambah today & called on Mr Cobb, as well as the members of my flock in that neighbourhood. On my way out went first to see Mrs Greedy Snr, who has been very ill since Monday night, & from thence to Kings, & so across by the lane passing Mr Winder's. 12. At home all day resting, & preparing for tomorrow's work. 13. Sunday. Good congregations both at Branxton & Lochinvar. The wind increased very much in the afternoon, so that I fear that at Lochinvar the greater part of the congregation could not hear, for the noise of the wind in the roof. 14. Weather still very windy & squally. A great squall of wind & rain came on early in the morning, John Wyndham called after breakfast on his way to Maitland. In the morning I went to see Mr Smith on Church business ­ called on Mrs McDermot also. After dinner went to see Mrs Greedy who is still very poorly. We spent the evening with the Hungerford's. 15. Anne & I rode down to Maitland to do a little shopping & make sundry calls which we have been owing for a long while, namely on Mrs Solling, Chapman, & Captn Hungerford. We had a very windy ride, but it was cool. I brought home a bad headache with me. 16. Went to Branxton where I spent the day visiting ­ School & Singing Class. 17. Went up to Belford today, & found 2 or 3 families that I had not seen before. Must arrange to give them a service there occasionally. 18. After breakfast I went to visit Mrs Naseby, whom I found very poorly, though better when I saw her this day week. On my return went to see old Mrs Greedy, who is better, but far from well. Singing class this afternoon. 19. At home all day, not very well. Did a few little jobs about the house, fixing wire screens to some of the windows. Spencer Holmes called this afternoon. 20. Sunday. Services as usual. Lochinvar, Branxton &Wilderness. Congregation at the last place better than any previous one ­ found Maxwell Holmes there ­ home for the Xmas holidays. 21. Went to Pokolbin, where I found a congregation of 25. Since my last visit, they had prepared a list of subscribers to an intended School, also the number of children promised to attend, namely 56, of whom 30 are Roman Catholics. The amount of subscriptions promised is 22-2-6. I rode home after the service with a terrible headache ­ found Mr James Doyle here. 22. Remained at home until towards evening, when we all went to Windermere, & drank tea there. 23. At home all the morning. In the afternoon I took the girls to call on Mrs Harper. 24. Went to Branxton to attend a School Feast for the Children of the National School, to which Mr Johns had kindly invited me. 25. Morning service at Branxton, 7 Communicants only, but among them I was glad to see three who had not attended before. ­ Small congregation in the afternoon at Lochinvar. Mr James Doyle remained & spent the evening with us.63 26. Gave our servants a holiday. Remained at home all day. 27. Sunday. Being a little rainy in the morning, had but a small attendance at at [sic] Branxton. A very small congregation also at Lochinvar, but from what cause I know not, the afternoon being cool & pleasant.64 Gave notice for the Holy Communion next Sunday morning. 28. Went to Stanhope this morning, where I had a small congregation of 16. Baptized Mr George Yeo's baby. I took Emily with me, & left her at Dalwood, while I went on to Stanhope. 29. Sick today ­ an attack of Diarrhoea : unable to apply myself to anything. Mr Holmes & his son Maxwell called in the morning; in the afternoon I had a visit from Mr Jackson, from Windermere.

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No mention of it being Christmas Day. It was the day after Boxing Day.

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30. Still unwell this morning, but about 10 o'clock I took one of my infallible antidiarrhoea powders, which had the effect of putting me to rights at once. I called on Mr Smith this morning, & he handed over to me the sum of 45, which he had collected for the Stipend Fund, & I posted it this evening to the Bank of Australasia, E: Maitland. That, with 62, paid in by John Wyndham, makes 107, so that their remains 13 to be collected. This evening I had a funeral. Mr James Palmer, brother of the Storekeeper, died early yesterday morning, of consumption. Great numbers followed him to the grave.65 Mrs Doyle, & her son James, & little Florence, came & took tea with us this evening. ­ Weather close & threatening rain. 31. My complaint returned upon me this morning, but after taking another powder similar to that of yesterday, I felt much better the remainder of the day, though still far from well & my only nourishment since Monday last being a basin of beef tea at noon each day, I need not wonder that I do not feel quite so strong as usual.66 Mr Hungerford called in this evening to enquire after me, having heard I was unwell. On leaving, he said that ever since the Church here was built, it was the custom to "ring the old year out & the new year in" & if I would leave the key in the door of the Church he & his son Walter would come & act as Bell-ringers. I yielded to his request, & allowed him to gratify his desire & thus ended, with us, the memorable & eventful year 1863. Both these terms may with great propriety be applied to the by-gone year. To ourselves it will ever be memorable as the year we quitted Brisbane Water, after a residence of more than 13 years there & in addition to that important event in our own personal history, the unusual number of deaths which have occurred among our old Brisbane Water friends has marked the year from beginning to end, as an eventful one to that district.

January 1864

1. The seeming improvement in my bodily health yesterday proved to be but a temporary lull, for I got up this morning as bad as ever, if not worse. ­ I went out & got a little Calomel & Opium, & mixed up some of the same powders I took before, but finding them of non effect & by the afternoon feeling very weak, faint & ill, I thought it would not do to delay seeking medical advice any longer, so sent John up to Singleton to whether Henry could come down to prescribe for me. Thus I entered upon the year 1864. 2. Had a very disturbed night all the night. Suffering a good deal from headache & diarrhoea still upon me. John arrived about eleven AM with some powders from Henry67 who could not leave to come himself. I took one immediately & it seemed to have the desired effect at once.68 Henry himself came down by the afternoon train, & remains with us tonight. I hope to be well enough for the home service at Lochinvar tomorrow morning, but have sent word to Branxton that there will be no service there. ­ Messrs Doyle, Green, Hungerford & brother Henry all called this evening to enquire after me. Mr Lee also looked in this morning. 3. Much better this morning. Henry left us by the early train. Had a very satisfactory service at Church, & administered the Sacrament to 18 Communicants, among whom were four of Mr Holmes' family. I have cause to be, & I hope am very thankful that I was enabled to go through the service with so much ease & comfort. I gave them an appropriate sermon from I Peter IV:3 " the time past of our life" which the congregation seemed to listen to with much attention, & I hope

"His" rather than "the", I think. Not surprisingly ­ four days on beef tea would prostrate anyone. 67 So John was away all night to get medicine from Henry - I know Henry is Alfred's brother, but he was a good way away, so why didn't he get a Doctor from nearby Maitland or Branxton? 68 On top of a different powder, plus calomel and opium!

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with profit also. ­ I was glad to see two new Communicants among the number69, & I hope with God's help to see the number still more increased ere long.70 Towards evening, hearing a step in the verandah, I opened the door to see who was there, & who should it happen to be but Mr Molster, on his way home, from spending his Xmas holidays at Singleton. I prevailed on him to turn out his horse, & remain the night with us. 1. Monday & Tuesday were intensely hot, the thermometer reaching 102 on Monday & 100 on Tuesday. I remained quietly indoors, reading as well as I could, but did not feel equal to any great amount of study. On Wednesday I went out for the first time, as far as the Post Office, & made a call or two in the village. Yesterday I rode down to Morpeth to attend a Quarterly Meeting of the Committee of our Church Society, & met 8 of the Clergy. ­ Made a small purchase of books at the Depôt, & got home in good time, a little tired, but having made out the ride better than I expected. Today, beside writing a few letters, I have finished a ladder which I began on Wednesday ­ a batten ladder, similar to that I made at Gosford, -71 28. I have allowed myself nearly three weeks to pass unnoticed & must now call upon my memory to do its best to enable me to fill up the gap. On Sunday the 10th Geo: Wyndham brought his child to be baptized. At Branxton before the service, which I did, but rather to my annoyance at the conclusion of the service I had to go a second time through the service for a second infant. Not being over strong, I felt a little fatigued with the extra work. Had a very hot ride home from Branxton, but a heavy thunderstorm in the afternoon while we were in Church, cooled the air nicely. I was driven from the Reading Desk by the rain coming down upon me, & had to preach from the Chancel floor. On Monday the 11th I went by appointment to Belford, where I had Divine service in the house of Mrs Carpenter, whose child I baptized with 2 others. Another heavy thunderstorm came on while I was there. On coming home I found Elizabeth & Bessy72 here, they came down hoping to meet Uncle Ferris73, but were disappointed. Tuesday the 12th was a rainy day ­ stayed at home. Wednesday Henry came down by the Midday train. We strolled out in the paddock in the evening74. Thursday they returned to Singleton. The girls & myself accompanied them to the Station. Mr Yeatman called in the forenoon on his way to Singleton. On Friday the 15th the girls & myself again repaired to the station, where we had the pleasure of meeting Uncle Ferris & the Miss Donnesons75. Spent the day enjoying long talks with them. Saturday occupied in preparing for Sunday's services. Sunday 17th ­ a very large congregation at Lochinvar ­ 110. Warm ride rather to Branxton & the Wilderness. At Branxton I received a message from Alfred Goodwin, begging me to go & see him at once, for he was dangerously ill. I did not think it right to disappoint the congregation at the Wilderness, so went onto Holmes' for the usual service. Monday morning wrote a note to Mr Birmingham putting off the service at his house for a fortnight, & than rode to Alfred Goodwin's. Found him better than I was led to expect. Made a long day of it, calling on several of the Branxton people on my way home. Uncle Ferris went up to Singleton by the morning train. Tuesday 19th Mr & Mrs Walsh & little boy came & spent the day with us. We expected some of the young Holmes's also, but were grieved at

So there were only 12 regulars. A "satisfactory" congregation at Lochinvar seemed to be around the hundred mark, but few "remained for the Sacrament" if 20 or 22 was "a goodly number" of Communicants. 71 "Gosford" is only used for temporal matters, otherwise it is "Brisbane Water". He refers to the latter as a "district" rather than a parish. 72 Sister-in-law & niece respectively. 73 Anne's brother. 74 Some of Alfred's emphases are incomprehensible. 75 Always referred to as the "Miss Donnesons" rather than the "Misses Donneson".

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receiving a message in the morning informing us that poor Maxwell had met with a frightful accident & got his leg broken by his horse running away with him & taking him against a tree. In the evening I went out to see him, & found him very patient under his affliction. Rode home by Moonlight, one of the most sultry nights I ever experienced. Wednesday was another very hot day. In the afternoon I rode up to see Alfred Goodwin & found him apparently better. Read to him the 116th Psalm, & commented upon it, applying ut to himself.76 Came home by Moonlight. Received a note from the Bishop, asking me to ride down & see him about Brisbane Water matters. Mrs Solling & one of her boys came & spent the day with us. ­ Thursday I took the Miss Donnesons to Maitland, & left them with Mrs Solling77, while I rode on to the Bishop's. Had a very satisfactory interview with his lordship, who, by putting me in the possession of the sum of 25, thereby enabled me (at his suggestion) to advance the balance of 15-17-6 due to the Brisbane Water folks so that the 55 is now fully paid up, & thus there no longer exists any obstacle in the way of appointment of a Clergyman. The remaining 92-6 I begged the Bishop to retain in part payment of my debt to him. ­ Friday the Miss Donnesons & our two girls went up to Singleton. Anne intended going with them, but remained behind, thinking it better to go with me to Mr Holmes', but heavy rain came out & stopped us. Spencer came in the afternoon & reported favourably of Maxwell. On Saturday I rode out to see Maxwell, & was delighted to find him progressing so very well. Called at the Station by the way and visited young Mr Cooke, the Station-Master's brother, lately come from Newcastle for change of air. Sunday 24th ­ Morning service at Branxton, The afternoon was very hot, which I think was the cause of me having a small congregation. 25th ­ the Miss Donnesons left us to return to Sydney. I could not see them off by the train, as I had an appointed service at Stanhope. After crossing the river twice, at Windermere & Dalwood, I was not a little surprised, on reaching Fangorin, to find a broad, muddy stream, to deep to cross. I left my horse at Taylor's, & got over in the boat, a little girl from the opposite side came & very good-naturedly ferried me across. I returned by the same way to Taylor's after service, & Mrs Taylor showed me over their nice garden. Called at Mark Putter's on my way home, & also at Dalwood. I found the other two crossings fordable, & came home the same way. On Tuesday Mr Walsh came up from Morpeth & I rode with him to Dalwood, where we inspected both vineyard & wine cellars. The afternoon was excessively hot, but a nice SE wind met us on our way back. John Wyndham put us a nearer way home by crossing the river at Fairhall's. Wednesday morning Spencer Holmes called & gave us a very good report of his brother. In the afternoon I rode out to visit the settlers across the Railway78 line behind Harper's Hill & made the acquaintance of several families I had not seen before. I think that the nearest & prettiest ride to the Wilderness is by that way. ­ Today we had our Quarterly meeting of our Clerical Society here, but only 5 of the Clergy came, namely Mr Fletcher, Blomfield, Bode, Dodd & Chapman. Tyrrell & Walsh sent notes expressing their desire of retiring from the Society. 29. Remained at home today, with the exception of a call or two in the village. I obtained from Mr Smith the remainder of the contributions to the Clergy Stipend fund (15) which closes the account, making a total of 125-9-6 from the whole district. Spent the day chiefly letter writing. 30. Walked up to the station this morning to meet Uncle Ferris, who came by the midday train from Singleton. Made a few calls in the lane by the way.

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116th Psalm ­ "I am well pleased: that the Lord has heard the voice of my prayer ...the snares of death compassed me round about: and the pains of hell gat hold upon me..." 77 Both Mrs Solling & the Misses Donneson came originally from Gosford. 78 Railway and Station are two of the words most inconsistently capitalised by Alfred.

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31. Sunday. I felt the heat today more, I think, than on any previous day this summer. The ride up to Branxton was dreadful, in the face of a hot wind. My congregations were not large at any of the places, but I think it was excusable on such a day.79 At the Wilderness I was glad to find Maxwell Holmes continuing to improve.

February 1864.

1. Went from Mr Holmes' to Pokolbin after breakfast & had my accustomed service there but a very small attendance. After the service I produced my plan of the proposed Schoolhouse, & issued notices for tenders. I went then to see Mrs Jones, who is ill, something apparently, of a paralytic affliction. Came home a new way viâ Harper's Hill, but found it was rather a longer road than by the station. 2. Started early this morning, to attend the Preliminary meeting of our Church Society. There were eleven Clergymen present besides the Bishop. The day was hot, & I got home very late & very tired. 3. Felt quite unequal to another journey to Morpeth, to attend a meeting of the Clergy to be held there today, especially with the prospect of tomorrows meeting at E: Maitland. I remained at home therefore & took a day's rest. 4. It was our intention, all of us, to go down to the Annual Meeting of our Church Society today, as Mrs Chambers had kindly invited us all to abide at her home for the night: but Emily did not feel well enough, so she & Mama stayed at home, while Marianne & I took the early train for East Maitland. The weather wore a threatening aspect in the morning, & before the time appointed for the commencement of the service, a smart shower of rain fell, & I fear had the effect of preventing some from coming to the Church. The attendance was tolerable, notwithstanding ­ Mr Coles Child was the preacher for the day, & gave us an appropriate sermon from Deut: XII:19 (or VII:19?). Unfortunately the rain increased in the afternoon, but the meeting proved a highly satisfactory one. The most interesting topic was the Bishop's proposed scheme for the endowment of the Diocese, which I hope may be successfully carried out. 5. The rain continued during the night & at times very heavy until near 12 o'clock today. By the midday train Marianne & I returned, & found John waiting for us with a carriage borrowed from Mr Smith. The weather brightened towards evening. 6. Stayed at home today, prepairing [sic] for tomorrow's duties. Helenus Scott took us by surprise in the afternoon, coming by the evening train & remained the night with us. 7. Very hot afternoon, exceedingly melting, which I suppose was the cause of my having so small a congregation here ­ only 58. Great thunderstorm seemed to be passing away to the SW of us ­ vivid lightning & rumbling thunder in that direction all the evening, but not a drop of rain fell here. 8. My day for service at Belford. Had but a small congregation ­ only 15. After service I rode down the creek to visit some of the families by the River ­ Goodwins &c. The first house I came to, that of Wm Want, I found a poor sick child about 10 years old, sick with lock-jaw.80 The poor parents seemed much distressed, as the doctor could give them but very slender hope of his recovery. ­ I put up a prayer with them for the little sufferer & then went on to Goodwin's. I found Alfred Goodwin walking about, gradually but slowly recovering, & apparently grateful for his recovery, & resolving better things for the future. ­ Reached home very late, having ridden about 30 miles in the day.

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It must have been hellishly hot to cause Alfred to mellow so. Tetanus ­ before immunisation it was almost invariably fatal following convulsions and agonising pain.

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9. Anne & I took advantage of a nice cool day & rode out to the Wilderness to visit the Holmeses, Maxwell is getting on surprisingly well with his broken limb ­ Just as we were starting to come home, a little sprinkling of rain began, which rather increased as we drew nearer home & it seemed gathering in for a settled rain. ­ Rain hard all night, or nearly so. 10. Ash-Wednesday. A very rainy day. My congregation consisted of the Sexton only, besides ourselves. In the afternoon I had a funeral, a little child of 8 months old only one of a family named Eldridge, with whom I am not acquainted ­ must go & visit them. 11. Rainy day again, very heavy at times but not one continuous pour. Occupied all the morning looking into my account with the Book Depôt, which has been going on for more than two years, & I find I am much more in debt than I thought I was, & must endeavour to reduce the amount as speedily as possible.81 12. The weather has taken up again today, only an occasional light shower has fallen though it was very threatening at times. It is to be hoped that no more rain will fall, for we hear that Singleton is flooded, & the River very high down here. ­ No mail arrived from Sydney today, & I believe some damage has befallen the railway between this & Singleton. ­ This evening I went to see Mrs Howard, who is very poorly. ­ Called also at Wiltons. Busy all the morning making up my Return for the S.P.G. ­ to be ready for next Mail. 13. Went this morning to visit Eldridge's family & condole with them on the loss of their infant. From that I went on to Mrs McDermott's82; but found she was away from home. Hearing that the river was very much flooded, I had all the horses got up, & took the girls a ride to the top of Summer Hill, to get a full view of it. I never witnessed such a flood before. At Windermere, all the huts by the Boiling Down establishment83 were submerged, the roofs only being seen above the water. The country down about Morpeth appeared to be all under water. I hear that in Maitland today the water has reached to within 18 inches of the height of the Great August flood of '57. After dinner I took Anne to the top of Summer Hill also, to see the valley of water. In the morning, on the way out with the girls, I called to see Mrs Howard, whom I was glad to find a little better. Read Hebrews XII with her.84 14. The light drizzly rain, & unsettled state of the weather, was the cause, I suppose, of the thin attendance at the Church here this morning, there being 39 only present. On arriving at Branxton I found the Church in possession of flooded-out families, where cottages had been partially submerged, & so they had been driven to take refuge in the Church. I had no congregation there, as they hardly expected me up. I therefore mounted my horse again & rode quietly to the Wilderness. Rain came on again before I reached the house, so I had scarcely any congregation there, beside their own family. Found Maxwell getting on very satisfactorily with his broken leg. The subject of my sermon there was on the trial of Abraham's faith in the offering up of his own Son. ­ In the morning I made the deliverance of Lot from Sodom, the theme of my discourse.85 15. Rose in the morning with that uncomfortable feeling with which I am unhappily too well acquainted, & may be expressed by the few plain words "Booked for a headache". Nor were my fears groundless, for as the day advanced, the symptoms gradually increased until by the time I had finished my sermon at Pokolbin, at 12 o'clock, I was suffering from about as bad a headache as has ever troubled me, & it continued raging with more or less violence until I reached

It was to take a year to the day for Alfred to do anything about this debt. Sometimes spelt with only one "t". 83 Eucalyptus oil extraction works. 84 "An exhortation to constant faith, patience & godliness..." sayeth the note above this chapter in my 1862 King James Bible. 85 These choices would seem to indicate a true fire-&-brimstone approach to religion.

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home, when a glass of hot brandy & water almost instantaneously relieved me. An object of my visiting Pokolbin today was for the purpose of receiving Tenders for the erection of a Schoolhouse there. Only one tender was put in, by a man named Daniel Henry : but the sum specified 78-14 is far beyond the reach of our scanty means. I called at Jones's after the service & found both Jones & his wife still poorly.86 From thence I came straight home. 16. Went to see Mrs Howard after breakfast, & stayed some time with her, reading &c. Towards evening rode over to visit the Houston family at Windermere, called at Bellamy's also. His damaged corn crop presented a dismal appearance.87 17. Remained at home today, getting on with my Report for the S.P.G. 18. Rode up to Branxton & on as far as Want's, & the Goodwins. found the invalids there somewhat better. Had a small singing class at Branxton in the Afternoon. 19. At home all day finishing my Report for the S.P.G, which I posted in the evening to catch the English mail tomorrow. 20. Being Saturday, I remained at home. ­ Went through the vineyard, marking the different varieties of grapes. 21. Sunday, Fine day, but very poor congregation at Branxton. The river being impassable, kept the Elderslie folk away. Much better attendance at Lochinvar in the afternoon. My morning's sermon was on the subject of Esau's rejection; & in the afternoon, the Prodigal Son.88 22. Went to Stanhope for my monthly service there, but it seems they hardly expected me, & only 4 attended, beside 2 or 3 infants. Called at Dalwood on my way home, & had a funeral in the evening: James Yeo's little infant. ­ I omitted a little Incident that occurred on Saturday evening, Our vineyard having been visited the two previous nights, John determined to sit up & watch for the thieves, when, between 9 & 10 o'clock, two men made their appearance, he gave them a bit of a fright by firing the gun at them, loaded with powder only.89 They ran off in different directions, but he followed one & ran him down in Small's Public House. He turned out to be John Houston, son of Mr Houston of Windermere. Hoping the fright he received would prove a salutary warning to him, I declined taking any further steps in the matter. 23. Went to Morpeth to see the Bishop on Pokolbin matters & had a very hot ride. Dined at Mr Walsh's where I met Mrs Greaves & Dr & Mrs Bolton. 24. Went to Branxton today & did a little visiting, besides attending the School & singing class. 25. At home this morning. Baptized 3 children of a family named Donovan, just come down the country from the Culgoa River, a distance of 400 miles or more, where the mother told me she has passed the last 6 years without seeing a Clergyman. In the afternoon we all went to Kaloudah, where we spent the evening. 26. With the exception of a call I made on Mr Hungerford this morning, I have not been out today. Occupied for the most part in drawing out90 a plan for the Schoolhouse at Pokolbin. 27. Made one or two calls in the village, spent the day preparing for tomorrows services &c &c. 28. A showery day kept many from Church, administered the Holy Communion to 10 at Lochinvar. Being a little behind time at Branxton, & having besides a Baptism

86 Just like Alfred ­ I think anyone else suffering as he was would have gone straight home. Clare, my migrainesuffering daughter, tells me that both alcohol and caffeine, taken early enough in an attack, relieve symptoms in some people. 87 In February, this would have been maize, not wheat, which used to be called corn. 88 Talk about a contrast ­ the rejection of Esau has to be as arbitrary an act as the rejection of Cain, whereas the parable of the Prodigal son is all about acceptance & forgiveness. Admittedly, I don't like ­ or understand - the attitude of the father of the Prodigal to his other, well-behaved, son. 89 Did Alfred still have a musket, or did he mean a blank rifle cartridge? 90 Not "drawing up" a plan.

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there, it was getting on for 6 o'clock when I reached Mr Holmes', & by that time they had quite given me up, as with them it had been raining the greater part of the day. The rain continued all night. 29. Steady rain nearly all the morning, so I gladly acted on Mrs Holmes' suggestion of remaining there till after dinner, & by so doing I got home with very little rain towards evening.

March 1864

1. Rainy day again. Not a continual rain, but succession of showers from the N:E: as they used so frequently to come upon us at Brisbane Water, though these are not the heavy tropical showers that fell there, so much nearer the seacoast. I did not venture out anywhere, but found occupation indoors, writing &c. Charles Wyndham called in the morning on his way to Maitland, but the rain prevented him from going on. In the Afternoon I made an attempt at tuning the piano.91 2. Steady rain in the morning, which prevented me from Going [sic] to Branxton. In the afternoon I went to visit young Cook at the Station. He seems gradually improving in bodily health.92 I called also at Humphrey's on my way back. 3. Rain again, very smartly at times. I fear we shall have another flood if it does not soon clear up. The river is rising I believe up above. Our little creek has been running very strong the last day or two. This wet & dirty weather stops me from going abroad, but I have always plenty of indoor work to occupy me on these occasions. Today, besides planning for the Pokolbin Schoolhouse, I have been doing a little upholstery work, after which I put Emily's cot together again, for it has remained till today as it was packed up at Gosford93. 4. Made a few calls in the morning ­ Mrs Taylor, Pring & Rowland ­ singing class as usual in aftn. 5. Mr Molster looked in early in the morning & breakfasted with us. Charles Wyndham also came down by the early train, & after spending the morning94 went on by midday train to Maitland. 6. Sunday. The rainy weather continuing, I had poor congregations today. At Branxton I had the Sacrament, but only the Wyndhams were present, with their ?? friend Mr Wilson. 7. Service at Belford this morning, only 10 present. After visiting one or two families there & baptizing an infant for Mrs Wellstead, who was too ill to come to the service, I rode straight home, again the roads were very bad in places, particularly over Harper's Hill, where old Farmer tipped over on his knees & nose. 8. Still showery weather, which kept me at home. In the afternoon I went to see poor Mr Smith, & found him very weak & ill. He is labouring under consumption & I cannot help fearing for him ­ I read a little with him &c. 9. To Branxton today. Comet was very troublesome this morning at first mounting, so I paid him off with a good long ride ­ went to Want's & Goodwin's & was very glad to find the little boy very much better. Alfd Goodwin also is getting on well. I met him & his wife riding in to Branxton. On the way back I took the School & singing class at Branxton. 10. At home today to receive a visit from Mr & Mrs Tyrrell, who came to spend the day with us. The first day without rain for some time.

91 92

What piano? But not spiritual condition? 93 As remarked, some of Alfred's underlinings are incomprehensible. 94 With Emily?

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11. Paid Mr Smith a visit this morning, & made a few other calls in the village, among others I called on Mrs Jos: Greedy who is confined to her bed with a bad knee. Singing class afternoon. 12. At home, preparing for tomorrows services &c. Made a few calls in the evening at the back. Mr Holmes called. 13. Sunday. Fine weather again seems to have set in, which gave me good congregations at all three places. 14. Went to Pokolbin in the morning for service there. Only 17 attended. Left with Mr Birmingham plans for the proposed Schoolhouse, & wrote out notices for tenders. Returned viâ McDonald, Wills & Campbells & after looking in at Mr Holmes's, rode home late in the evening ­ a Beautiful day. 15. Rather warm day. Went to Maitland in the afternoon to do a little shopping. A shower cooled the air about sunset. 16. Rainy morning. which prevented me going to Branxton. ­ wrote a long letter to Mr Greenway, in reply to one which the morning's post brought me. 17. We had engaged (the girls & myself) to spend this day with the Holmes's, but were deterred by a drizzly morning from setting out. The afternoon proved finer, & I rode over to Windermere to make a few calls in that quarter. 18. Today I took John down with me to Anambah to show him the way to Goodfellow's Smithy, for the village blacksmith here seems to be a very indifferent shoer of horses & I fear is ruining my horses' feet. ­ We took Farmer & had his shoes removed. I called on Mr Cobb, as well as all the good folks in that neighbourhood who frequent my Church. 19. A rainy, boisterous day kept me within doors. Preparing for tomorrow's services. 20. Sunday ­ still showery weather. The congregation at Branxton better than I anticipated. Small attendance here in afternoon. 21. My day for Service at Stanhope. I rode up to Taylor's, but found the river so high that I would not venture over ­ called at Judge's, & then dined at Fern Hill, & so home viâ Dalwood. 22. Paid Mr Smith a visit this morning. He does not seem to improve & I fear never will, but will rather gradually decline away. In the afternoon, I visited most of the folks in the Lane, including the Cook's at the Station. 23. Spent the day at Branxton, visiting, School, & Singing Class. 24. Took Emily a ride to the Wilderness. ­ I went from thence to see Mrs Geo: Chick & her two little chicks (twins) & called at Crane's also 25. Good Friday. Service here in the morning, with a tolerable congregation of 57. The day was very fine. After calling to see Mr Smith in the afternoon, we all took a walk in the paddock away at the back. 26. Rain again & I fear we are doomed for a wet Easter. The morning was fine & promising, but soon after noon it blacked up from the SE & a great storm of wind & rain came upon us, with some thunder, & it continued showery all the afternoon. Came on again heavily at dusk. 27. A very unfavourable Easter Day. The heavy rain of yesterday set the water running over the bridge, so no foot passengers could come to Church from the other side. Only 25 attended Church here. Charles Wyndham, who called here on his return from cricketing at Maitland last evening, remained the night on account of the rain, & accompanied me to Branxton for afternoon service. I found the country between Branxton & the Wilderness had been almost deluged with Saturday's rain, & that caused any congregation there to be small also. 28. Went to Pokolbin to receive tenders for the School building there, but not one was offered. Returned to Mr Holmes' to dinner, & then went onto Chick's to baptize his twin babies, Mrs Jones also brought her infant for baptism. Got home late, & rather tired. 29. Easter Tuesday, therefore the day for electing Churchwardens. It seems the people here are quite as apathetic as regards this part of their duty, as I used to Page No: 21

find them at Gosford.95 Not a soul attended, so having remained in the Church an hour after the appointed time (11 o'clock) I performed my part by re-electing Mr Smith. He, poor man, is too ill to leave his house at present.96 I went to visit him in the afternoon. 30. Tremendous rain before daylight this morning, which found its way rather plentifully through the lead into our hall & made a sad uncomfortable mess of it. Showery morning, but seemed disposed to clear off at night. Did not go out today, but spent the day reading & sermon-writing. 31. Rain again, with heavy showers at intervals. In the morning I called to visit a man at Greedy's in the lane, named Peter Slader. He is evidently going off in a consumption & threw up a quantity of blood this morning. On questioning him I was glad to find that he knew the one only foundation on which to build his hopes for futurity. He was very weak, from loss of blood, therefore I avoided making him speak more than was necessary. I saw him again in the afternoon as I went to the station expecting to meet Marianne Boydell. She did not come, however, though her trunk was there. No doubt the heavy rains have risen the Alleyn River & so prevented Wmn Boydell, (who was to bring her) from starting. Many hundreds have been disappointed today by the non-arrival of the All-England Eleven at Maitland, where the Cricket Match was to have commenced today.

April 1864

1. Some very heavy showers of rain fell today & the river, I am told, is rising fast. In the morning I went to visit Peter Slader again, & found him rather better than he was yesterday. The creek being very high I could not walk across to see Mr Smith & having to lend Farmer to John to go to Maitland, I was thus prevented from riding over. Received a letter from Mr Moore today, from Gosford, where he sojourns at present. 2. Great hopes of fine weather at last, the rain has ceased, & the clouds have been gradually dispersing all day, so that now, it is a fine starlight night. About eleven o'clock I set out to visit Peter again, but on the way was surprised to learn that he was dead. He seems to have gone off very suddenly about 10 o'clock. He had been up some little time & walking about. I certainly did not think yesterday that his time would be so short. ­ At my visit yesterday I read him the 15th of Luke97, & the 51st Psalm,98 & trust that what I then said to him was not spoken in vain. ­ This afternoon I paid Mr Smith a visit, & was glad to find him a bit better, apparently. I then paid a few visits from McDermot's along to King's, & called at Chicks on the way back, & then on Mrs James in her new house. 3. Sunday, & a fine one at last, but my congregations were not overwhelming. I administered the Holy Communion in the morning at Branxton, & in the evening had a funeral here ­ Peter Slader ­ which was very numerously attended. 4. Started this morning for my service at Belford, but was balked [sic] at Black Creek, which I found impassable from a deep channel which had been washed across the road at the descent into the creek. I turned back therefore, & after making a few calls in Branxton, & dining at Mr Lindsay's, I rode down to the river to visit the Winsor family. The weather settling down fine : 5. At home all the morning, Towards evening took Marianne for a ride to the top of Summer Hill, where we were well repaid by the sight of a glorious Sunset. I

Almost the only time "Gosford" is used in an ecclesiastical context rather than "Brisbane Water". Alfred must have been desperate to re-elect a man dying of consumption. 97 Luke XV: Christ heals a dropsy on the Sabbath, confusing the Pharisees, then tells stories espousing humility and the parable of the rich man who gave a feast & nobody would come. 98 Psalm 51: "Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving kindness..." The famous & infamous "neck verse" ­ if you could read it you were presumed to be of the Clergy & could not be tried by the civil courts.

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looked in upon Mr Smith in the morning, but finding he had business to attend to, I did not stay long with him.99 6. Anne & I rode to Dalwood, to spend the day there & were fortunate in the weather, which was bright & sunny though rather warm. On our return in the evening we found Marianne Boydell here. 7. Should have gone to Morpeth today to join the Quarterly Committee meeting, but an attack of lumbago which came on me yesterday kept me at home. Charles Wyndham & his sister came & spent the day with us. 8. Showery weather again with every appearance of settled rain. I went to see Mr Smith this morning, & found him in bed, apparently much worse. Unfortunately he still seems to think he will recover, though he is evidently sinking fast. I begged Mrs Smith to ask the doctor, next time he comes, to tell him plainly & candidly his opinion as to the chance of his recovery, for I think it is the height of cruelty to encourage any false hopes when it is plain there can be no hope at all. 9. Paid Mr Smith another visit this morning, & found him somewhat better than yesterday. In the evening called on Mr Hungerford & the Rowlands. 10. Sunday. Poor congregation here in the morning, very good at Branxton, where I had a child to baptize, which made me late at Mr Holmes's. 11. Went out to Pokolbin after breakfast and had a fair attendance there, but no person appeared with tenders for the School building. On my way home I called at Kays, & then at the Station. Found that Thos Cook had gone down to Newcastle. 12. This morning I went up to the station & saw Harry & his bride100 on their way to Singleton. Willy also was with them. In the afternoon I took Marianne Boydell & Marianne to Maitland for a little shopping. ­ Met William Boydell in the street.

Volume IV: 13 April 1864 ­ 30th November 1868.

th

April 1864

13. Went to Branxton today, & after making a few calls, made my accustomed visit to the School, & then had my singing class. I saw John Wyndham & family off per train to Singleton. The day was very fine & enjoyable. 14. Another delightful day. We commenced by walking up to the station to meet Uncle Ferris, who came by the early train101 from Sydney. I then walked out by myself, & visited the Howards, Gurds & Wiltons. After dinner I went to visit poor Mr Smith, whom I found very low & weak. I was glad to find that the doctor has at last told him plainly that there is no hope whatever of his recovery. 15. Change of weather again: Heavy rain; in showers, during the day. The girls being invited to a dance at Singleton this evening, in honour of Harry & his bride, I took them up to the Station in John's cart & sent them off by the midday train. 16. Still rainy. Very heavy in the morning but held up in the afternoon. I went up to meet the girls, who came down from Singleton per Midday train, & brought them home again in John's cart. In the afternoon I paid a visit to Mr Smith & found him, I thought, in better spirits, but apparently weaker. 17. Though a tolerably fine Sunday, I had but poor congregations at both churches. 18. Rain again prevented me from going to Stanhope. I had arranged for Mr A: Boydell & Marianne, with Uncle Ferris, to accompany me to Dalwood, but the

99

This entry is at the bottom of the page. The next page, the last in the Volume, has ink splashed all over it from a spillage at the top of the page. 100 Henry Glennie, third son of Dr Henry Glennie, married Kate Francis Styles in 1864 in Goulburn. 101 6.30am. Trains were frequent ­ 9am, midday, 5pm & evening at least.

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19. 20. 21.

22. 23.

24. 25.

26.

27.

28.

29.

showery weather, & sloppy roads, quite upset our plans. Charles Wyndham102 came in the afternoon & spent the evening with us. Ferris & I took a ride to Dalwood today, We found the roads so sloppy that we were obliged to walk our horses the greater part of the way. Mrs Wyndham was recovering from an attack of Influenza, Mr Wyndham was in Maitland.103 Went to Branxton, as usual on Wednesdays. Did a little visiting, with School & singing class. Anne, Uncle Ferris & myself took the early train for Singleton this morning. Finding that Harry & Kate are to return to Sydney tomorrow, we determined to go up & see them today. We were fortunate in having a fine day: but the rummage was too much for Anne, who is quite upset this evening, as much as if she had had a sea voyage. Went to see Mr Smith this morning, not having seen him since Monday. He is now quite confined to his bed, being to weak to rise & dress himself. He seems thankful for my visits, & I only hope & pray that they not be altogether valueless. Visited Mr Smith again this morning, & spent some time with him, first, by a selection of various passages in the Scriptures, I hope I succeeded in removing from his mind an erroneous impression which he seemed to entertain, or rather a fear of his having been at some former period of his life guilty of an unpardonable sin. I then, by his own desire, read through the Office for the Holy Communion, of which he expressed a wish to partake, & which I promised to administer to him next Monday morning. This afternoon Charles Wyndham & his sister came, & being a fine afternoon they all took a ride out together. A fine day, but congregations not as good as they should have been. ­ Bad cold upon me which made the reading a little more difficult. I returned from Mr Holmes's at night by the light of a brilliant moon.104 Anne accompanied me to Mr Smith's this morning where, according to appointment I administered the Holy Communion to him. He is getting very weak, & as he cannot take much nourishment to support life, he must sink, ere long, under his lingering disorder. ­ In the evening John & Charles Wyndham called on their way back from Maitland & took tea with us. Our arrangement for today was to ride out & spend the day at the Wilderness. But Marianne Boydell was very poorly this morning, & unable to go, so after paying Mr Smith a visit Marianne & I rode out by ourselves. It was a beautiful day but rather cold west wind, which I thought not very favourable for my cold. We returned by Harper's Hill in the evening, & enjoyed the sight of the beautiful distant blue hills. Charles Wyndham came by appointment this morning & took all three girls to Dalwood to spend a few days there. I was too unwell to accompany them, as I had intended. My cold has, I fear, turned to Influenza. ­ I had a very bad night last night. ­ Obliged to get up, my head was so troublesome. ­ Visited Mr Smith again this morning. Most delightful day, but though my cold was much better, I thought it prudent to remain at home & nurse it, so only went to visit poor Mr Smith in the morning. In the afternoon, Anne & I walked to see David James, who is on the sick list at present, & extended our walk as far as Houston's. Visited Mr Smith again in the morning. He grows weaker & weaker from gradual exhaustion but may linger some days yet. ­ I have great hopes, however, that his mind is well attuned, & that his peace is made with his Maker so that he is ready to depart when called to do so. In the afternoon I paid my first visit to the National

Charles at first ­ later Charlie, after he had married Lucy Emily... Maitland was second only to Sydney in population at the time. 104 The Wilderness, 2060 acres on Black Creek, home of Joseph Broadbent Holmes, my gggrandfather ­ Church services were held in the homestead until the construction of Rothbury Church on Wilderness land deeded to the Church.

103

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School which has lately been re-opened here & commenced a class for Scripture Reading, which I purpose continuing every Friday afternoon. On returning from the School I found the girls at home again, having been escorted by Charles & Guy Wyndham. They just got in as the rain began, & it has been pouring all the evening. Guy returned home, but Charles remained here. 30. Pouring rain again the greater part of the day & I fear another flood. We have an addition to our party in Uncle Ferris, Isabella & Bessy105, who much to our astonishment came down from Singleton per Midday train. It seems that they had not the rain there that we have had.

May 1864

1. Sunday. Rode to Branxton for morning service though I did not expect a congregation owing to the heavy rains & bad roads. I found one small boy only in attendance, so I just rode leisurely home again, & had a very small congregation here. 2. Went up to the station expecting to meet Kate Townshend by the midday train from Branxton, but she did not come. Visited Mr Smith in the afternoon, & found him much the same. Took Isabella & Bessy up to the station to go home by the morning train. 3. Visited Mr Smith again in the morning. Went to the Station at noon where I met Katie & brought her home upon Nelly. Ferris left us for Sydney this morning. 4. Spent the day at Kaludah, Mr Doyle having invited us all to come & witness the ploughing match &c which took place there today. Anne, not feeling very well, remained at home to keep house ­ All the rest of us went. Paid Mr Smith a visit before going. 5. Being Ascension Day, we had service in the morning but very few attended. Saw Mr Smith after dinner, & then I took Katie & Marianne Boydell to the top of Summer Hill. 6. Visited Mr Smith after breakfast & then drove Katie, Marianne & Mar: Boydell to the train, & saw them off to Singleton by the Midday train. After dinner went to the School, from which I was called away by a young man, Mr J.H. Cobb, who wished to see me on some important business. After despatching his business I went to see David James, who seems to be very ill ­ inflammation of the lungs, or something of the kind. 7. Went to Morpeth per early train, had an interview with the Bishop, & a long talk with Mr Walsh, & then returned comfortably to dinner by midday train. In the afternoon I visited Mr Smith & D. James. 8. Sunday, & a very fine one it turned out, though it seemed very threatening in the morning. Services as usual ­ Lochinvar, Branxton & the Wilderness ­ attendances tolerable. 9. Service at Pokolbin, but only 16 attended. After service I rode over to Cessnock with Mr Birmingham to see a property which is advertised for sale there, belonging to one Jacob Clark. The Bishop wished me to enquire, & report upon it. I made several calls on the way home, & got in just after dark. 10. Visited Mr Smith & D: James this morning. After dinner, having finished a little writing business, did some gardening, by way of a change. 11. Prepared this morning for a wedding which I expected to take place, but Mr Cobb, the bridegroom, called & said they were coming tomorrow instead.106 Visited Mr Smith & James again. This afternoon we walked up to the Station to meet

105

Anne Isabella & Elizabeth Glennie, daughters of Henry & Elizabeth Glennie. Bessy's name sometimes spelt Bessie. 106 A somewhat casual attitude!

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Marianne Boydell & Marianne who returned from Singleton by the 4 o'clock train. Henry, Isabella & Bessy were also there on their way to a Ball in Maitland. 12. The morning occupied chiefly with the marriage of Mr J.H. Cobb. After that ceremony was over I went to pay another visit to poor Mr Smith. ­ In the afternoon I took a walk with Marianne Boydell & Marianne, through the paddocks between this & the Railway Station. A beautiful day for a ramble. 13. Visited Mr Smith again, & D James who seems very poorly still. Went to the Natn School in afternoon, but found no class, the children for the most part having bad colds & coughs. 14. Went to Morpeth today to meet the Bishop of Brisbane, with whom I was much pleased. M: B: & Marianne accompanied me, to visit the Closes ­ sorry to find Mrs Close very ill. 15. Sunday. Had collections at both churches for the S.P.G., being Whitsunday, & Sacrament at Branxton. The two collections together amounted to only 3/3/2. 16. Went to Stanhope for service, but the few who had assembled had dispersed before I arrived, for I was late, & their time an hour too fast. Emily went with me to Dalwood. In the evening I was called to go up to Mr Smith's, as he appeared to be drawing to his end, at about 8 o'clock he breathed his last, & was then, as I firmly believe, happily released from the painful sufferings, which he has so patiently endured for so many weeks. 17. Taking advantage of the fine weather, having first paid a visit to poor Mrs Smith, I took Marianne Boydell & Marianne to call on the Holmes's at the Wilderness. The day was very fine, but rather too high a wind. We returned by way of Harper's Hill. 18. Went to Branxton today, & being another glorious day (calmer than yesterday) Anne went with me to return Mrs Lindsay's call. We paid a few more visits in the village, calling at Avis's, Mrs Pine, Mrs Cox, & the Johnstone's. We knocked at Dr Hartigan's door, but no one answered. 19. After breakfast this morning I rode down to visit the Neal's, who are in great affliction from the loss of one of their children, a girl of 4 yrs old, who was burnt to death from her clothes catching fire on Tuesday. On my way to their house, I heard of another death, an old man named Miller, a little further on from Neal's. When I came back I went to see Mrs Smith again, to see that everything was in readiness for the funeral. I then went & administered private baptism to a weakly little infant of Mrs Brand's, in the Lane. At 2 o'clock the funeral of poor Mr Smith took place, & was very numerously attended. While that was going on, Anne & the girls walked over to Kaloudah paddock, to try a little Sketching, & I afterwards went & escorted them home again. 20. Went up to Mrs Smith's again to see how she was, & to post a letter which at her request I had written to Mr Smith's father, in England. In the afternoon I had two funerals, 1st Neal's little girl, & then the old man Miller. Unfortunately the rain set in just as the first funeral arrived, & it rained very hard through both of them. I omitted to note before, that a letter from John David came by the English mail this time (on Sunday) telling us of the purchase of our new Piano, & that it was shipped on board the Jason, in February, so it ought soon to be here. 21. Engaged the greater part of the day preparing a funeral sermon for tomorrow. In the evening I walked out in search of John, who had been out all day for firewood, but was so late that I feared some accident had happened to him ­ I found him coming home all right, having had much difficulty from the softness of the ground. 22. Sunday ­ a little rain in the morning seemed to scare many from the church so that my congregation was small, & only 9 communicants. I had the addition of a baptism, which threw me out of time & I had to set out to Branxton without dinner & got there after time.107

107

What happened to the funeral?

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23. Spent the morning visiting around Mr Holmes's, going first to Matthew's & Stuckey & then round by Chick's, Mrs Blick's, & Crane's. Dined with the Holmeses & then came home. 24. This morning I marked out a drain for John to dig leading down the garden from the well. After that I went to call on Mrs Smith & Mrs James, & in the afternoon, walked down the road to visit the Neal's & Mrs Miller. 25. Went to Branxton, where I visited a few families, then spent an hour at the School, & then had a small singing class. Quite dark when I got home. 26. Took Marianne & M:A: Boydell to Maitland for a little shopping. & I also got my likeness taken by Mr Hart, the photographic Artist. We rode on to E: Maitland Parsonage, where we got some lunch from Mr Tyrrell108. Mrs Tyrrell was not at home. Met W: Boydell in West Maitland on our way back, & found Sarah & Jack here when we came home. Most delightful day. 27. Chiefly occupied today arranging some new seats in the Church which the Bishop has sent us from the little church at Port Maitland. Not being the same length as the others, it gave us some little trouble to arrange them nicely. I have also altered the position of the reading desk, placing it down on the floor of the Church instead of the Chancel. Took a little walk out with the girls this evening. 28. This morning I took Marianne Boydell to Maitland, & handed her over to her uncle W:B. On my return I called at the Hospital & saw David James, who seemed a little better. I also called at Neal's & Mrs Winder's. Afternoon, I went to see Mrs James & Howard, who is rather poorly. 29. Sunday, weather threatening but only an attempt at rain only once or twice. Congregations tolerably good at both churches. Mr Hugh Wyndham was at Branxton, having just come down the country with his family. 30. Went to Belford for service this morning, where I had a poor congregation. I took the girls & Sarah Boydell with me en route for Dalwood. Hugh & his sister met us at Harper's Hill & I delivered them into their charge, & in the evening returned viâ Dalwood & brought them home. 31. An unexpected application was made to me this morning to marry a couple from Branxton, by Licence, Henry Brayshaw & Catherine Wall. As there appeared no valid objection to marrying them here, although the more strictly regular way wd have been to marry them at Branxton, I consented to do so, & married them accordingly. Spencer Holmes & his sisters Elizth & Minnie came & spent the day with us ­ In the evening I took the three girls a walk to Kaloundah. A perfect evening.

June 1864

1. Went to Branxton today, but sundry hindrances prevented me starting before 12 o'clock so that I had no time for much visiting. I had my usual class at the School, & then a singing class of three. 2. Anne & I set off by early train this morning for Maitland, intending to fill up the morning there shopping &c, & then proceed to Morpeth by midday train: but about 12 o'clock it began raining, so we just seated ourselves in the down train & came home again, & well we did, for the rain increased in the afternoon & now threatens a continuance. Towards evening I went & visited Mrs West, who is ill. Mr Hungerford came & called me last night between 10 & 11 to go & see her, thinking she was dying, but she seems better today. I also went to see Mrs Greedy, having heard that she was very ill again, but found it was a mistake.

108

This would be the Rev Lovick Tyrrell, nephew of the Bishop. Unfortunately, Alfred does not use the honorific Rev. before the names of any of the Clergy, and there were Tyrrells also involved in local vineyards. However, he seems to have consistently referred to the latter by including their Christian names.

Page No: 27

3. Last night was the stormiest we have experienced since we came to Lochinvar. The rain poured down in torrents & the wind roared out its fury all night. On getting up this morning we found a great flood in our little creek, the highest, they say, that has been seen since the great flood of '57. It washed away a great deal of fencing down along the banks of the creek ­ The storm has continued with unabated fury the greater part of the day. Visited Mrs West & found her better. 4. One of Mr Saxby's bad days, but with us a very fine one.109 The weather has cleared up very suddenly. Busy all day sermon writing. 5. Beautiful day, got through all three services very comfortably, but congregations small: owing to flooded creeks & rivers. 6. Went to Pokolbin from the Wilderness, but found only a small congregation for they hardly expected me after the recent high flood. Preached to them from the text "Faint, yet pursuing". After service I visited the Joneses. Old Mrs Jones was very poorly. On my way home, when I reached the Railway lane, I found that a child of Humphreys' had just died, from a very singular cause. On Saturday afternoon the little fellow was playing & had a bean (white French bean) in his mouth, & fell down & somehow the bean was drawn down his wind-pipe. They tell me his agonies were fearful before death happily released him from his suffering. 7. Suffering from a bad cold which I managed to pick up on Sunday somewhere. ­ Visited Mrs West in the morning, Towards evening the funeral of Humphreys' child took place. A keen westerly wind blowing on my bare head, is not, I should say, a good cure for a cold. 8. Cold worse this morning. Very high westerly wind. Kept indoors as much as possible, but in the afternoon thought I ought to go & see poor Mrs Humphreys, which I did ­ Called on Mrs West & found her better. We had an unexpected visit this morning from Thomas Scott, of Brisbane Water. ­ He is staying at Anambah with two of his sisters, Sarah & Ellen. 9. Got up this morning with downright Influenza. Pains in the head & very troublesome cold, with some cough &c &c. It was a fine calm mild day & therefore I did not think a quiet walk to the station to see Sarah Boydell off to Maitland, would do me much harm. Looked in to see Mrs West on my way back. She seems slowly recovering. Thomas Scott called again this morning, & we gave him directions to find his way to Ratigan. 10. Rain again set in this morning & has continued gently & steadily all day but no wind as yet ­ perfectly calm. My cold still troublesome, but I think it is now beginning to get better. Spent the greater part of today letter writing. 11. Rainy day again. River rising fast. Occupied writing & preparing for tomorrow's services. 12. Sunday. River very high. No Wyndhams at Branxton, but small congregations at both churches. 13. Still rainy. Influenza bad, did not go out anywhere. 14. River very high today. In the afternoon, Sarah Emily & I rode to the top of Summer Hill to see the flood. It was not quite so high as in February last. 15. This afternoon I went as far as Neal's to enquire after him, & found he was recovering fast from the effects of the burn in his hands. Called on Mr Winder also, & asked him to come on Friday & meet Mr James Doyle here, that I might hand them over the Churchwardens' books. 16. Today I rode up past Dalwood & visited Mrs Hinton, having been told on Sunday at Branxton that she has been seriously injured by the wheel of a dray passing over her head. I was glad to find her recovering. I read the 103rd Psalm to her, & had some conversation, hoping to impress her with a proper feeling of gratitude for her providential escape.

109

Saxby's predictions do not appear too accurate.

Page No: 28

17. Weather threatening rain again. In the morning I went to Windermere, to see Mr Green, but he was out. Called at Houston's, & Bellamy's on my way back also at James's. He has returned from Hospital & I fear still very ill. In the afternoon I was engaged with Messrs James Doyle & Winder, looking over the Church accounts. 18. Occupied today chiefly writing English letters, for next week's mail. Wrote to John David, Isabella & Aunt Catherine, & enclosed a photograph of myself in each. Spencer Holmes & Mr Edwd Tyrrell called. 19. Sunday ­ fine day & fair congregations at all three places. My cold & cough rather worse towards night. 20. Very unwell when I got up in the morning. Influenza pains in the head again. This made me return home direct from Mr Holmes's instead of going to Cessnock as I intended. Called on Mr Cook by the way. 21. Paid a few visits in the village in the morning. Afternoon rain again. 22. Went to Branxton & paid a few visits, but did not go to the School or singing class. 23. Visiting about home both morng & afternoon. Cousin John came from Singleton by the evening train, bringing Freddy & Charley with him. 24. Walked to the station with Cousin John at noon, & saw him & the boys off to Singleton. Hugh Wyndham & Fishy110 came in from Maitland & took dinner with us. 25. Sarah Boydell & I took a trip to Morpeth per midday train today. I wished to see the Bishop on a few little matters, & she wanted to visit the Closes. 26. Sunday. A bright glorious day, passing as it did over the snows of New England. Willy Boydell, who came up last evening, accompanied me to Branxton where I administered the Holy Communion to 9. Among them were 3 Germans, whom I had not seen at Church before, Mrs Hemreck & her parents. In the afternoon I had a nice congregation of 118 at Lochinvar. 27. Went to Belford for service this morning. Only 10 attended, & that was all that could attend. On my return I paid several visits in Branxton. 28. This morning I called on Mrs Alfred Walters, Mrs King, & Mrs Smith. Having heard that poor Mr Cook at the station had met with an accident, I rode up to see him & found him laid up with a broken kneecap. When I came back, Anne & I set off to Anambah to call on Mrs Cobb. The day was very beautiful & we enjoyed the ride very much. 29. Went to Branxton today, where I paid a few visits, & then had my class at the School & singing class. On coming home I found Willy Boydell here with a message from his papa for Sarah to return home with him tomorrow. 30. This morning I took Sarah to Maitland & handed her over to her papa, & after doing a little in the shopping way returned home to dinner, calling on Mrs Cadell by the way. After dinner I went to see Mr Cook at the station & found him getting on very well.

July 1864

1. This day I have entered my second year as incumbent of this Parish. I ought by this time to be pretty well acquainted with all my parishioners, & to feel myself quite at home in my new Parish. But it is not so : for with the exception of a few weeks before & after last Xmas, the river has almost always been impassable, so that I have seen very little of the people over the river. I hope & trust that we shall not have a repetition of the rains of the last 12 mos , so that I, as well as others, might not be so hindered in my work. This morning Anne accompanied me to Oswald, to call on Mrs Harper. I felt quite ashamed that I had allowed so long a time to pass without visiting her & must not do so again. After dinner I rode up to

110

Always with a Wyndham (probably a brother) but never identified ­ possibly Francis, born 1835.

Page No: 29

the Station to send a sack up to Mr Lindsay for more flour & also to see whether our piano had arrived, as we are now daily expecting it, but it was not there. 2. Received a letter from Willy this morning advising me of the shipment of the Piano by a steamer to sail last night, so I went up to the station at 1 o'clock, & I took John with the dray but was disappointed, for no Piano came. In the forenoon I did a little carpentering, refixing the catch of the lock on our bedroom door. This afternoon, I looked out my sermons for tomorrow, & as I was packing my valise, Mr Molster made his appearance & had half an hour chat with us. 3. Sunday. Had the satisfaction of administering the Holy Commn to 20 of my Lochinvar congregatn this morning. I trust that I may be permitted to see the number still further increased in time. Had no time to get anything to eat before starting for Branxton, & felt somewhat exhausted by the time my third service was over. Had only 30 at Branxton & the same number at The Wilderness. 4. Went to Pokolbin from Mr Holmes' & had but a small congregatn , it seems that some of the people thought I had a wedding at Lochinvar this morng & therefore did not expect me. On my way back I called at McDonald's. He is very ill with Rheumatic Gout, but I did not see him. Called on Mrs Wills also. On my way home I was overtaken by Mr Greaves who came home with me. I found Goodfellow here also, in the kitchen, & the new Piano had arrived by the midday train but I did not attempt to unpack it. 5. Had a wedding this morning ­ Samuel Moore of Cessnock & just as they had taken their departure we had a visit from Mr Duguid, whom I had not seen, I suppose, for 20 years or more. At last, after he left, I was able to begin unpacking the Piano, & got it out of its case in the afternoon, & set it up in its place. It is a very nice instrument111, but unfortunately has had some rough usage by the way. The lock was wrenched off, & two of the notes refuse to act. It is very much out of tune also : but the tone is very fine. ­ The plumbers came this morning to repair the lead guttering in the roof of the house. 6. Branxton day & I went through the usual routine of Branxton work except that I had no singing class ­ not a soul came. 7. Went per train to Morpeth for the Quarterly Committee Meeting. Returned in eveng. 8. Spent this morning visiting in the lane ­ afternoon to the National School. 9. At home all day sermon writing for tomorrow. Mr Doyle & his two sons, James & William called in the afternoon. 10. Sunday. A glorious bright day, weather perfection. Had a congregation of 44 at Branxton, among them 4 of the Kelman112 family. In the afternoon there were 126 at Lochinvar. Baptized 1 child at Branxton & 3 at Lochinvar. 11. Went to Stanhope for service this morning & took the girls with me to Dalwood. I had a very small congregation of 8 only. Picked the girls up on the way back. Sky overcast in the afternoon. 12. Had a wedding this morning ­ James Roland & Jane Ledger. Not a very cheerful day for a wedding for it has been raining gently a good part of the day ­ a N:West rain. This afternoon I walked up to the station to see how Mr Cook is getting on, & found him doing well. Called on Mr Clift at the same time. He & his family have come to reside at the "big house". 13. Being a rainy day I did not go to Branxton. Among other home occupations I held another examination of the Piano & succeeded in rectifying the refractory notes.

111 112

A Broadwood ship-type piano, now one of only six left in the world. The Kelman family were to become connected to the Holmeses through the marriage of Lewis Chalmers Kelman to Edith Ellen Holmes, eldest daughter of Joseph & Harriet, in 1872. The Kelmans were connected multipicitally to the Busby vigneron family.

Page No: 30

14. Went to Roland's in the morning & got a slab from him to make a carpenter's bench, which I have determined on fixing in the little back verandah room. Busy the rest of the day at that job. Rainy day again. 15. Getting on with my Carpenter's bench. In the morning I went to see Lowe, the shoemaker, who came to me last evening complaining of being distressed. 16. Did a little more to my bench today, beside which I assisted John to cut down a dead tree for firewood. 17. Sunday. A most piercing cold & high wind from N.W. which, combined with the wet state of roads, occasioned my having small congregations at all three places. 18. Went to Cessnock from Mr Holmes's & had a good day's visiting in that neighbourhood. Called at 12 houses which I had not visited before. Did not get home till near 8 o'clock when I found George Swadling here, having brought Miss Donneson's horses to Dalwood. 19. Went to see Mrs Smith this morning, called on Mrs King also, & afterwards on Mrs Bellinger. In the afternoon just as we were preparing to walk to Kaloudah, Alick Wyndham & his sister came in. After they had gone, I went to see David James ­ he seems not quite so well again. 20. Went to Branxton today. Found the School there shut up, Mr Johnston having removed to Morpeth. Just as I was going up to the Church for the singing class Dr Hartigan's boy came with a message requesting me to go at once to his house. I found there a woman from Oswald, Mrs Samuels, with a young baby, very ill, which she wished to have baptized. I, of course, administered private baptism, & then after a few minutes chat with the Dr., came home. 21. Today I took the girls to the Wilderness to spend the day with the Holmeses. The weather was perfection. 22. Another splendid Australian winter's day. I remained at home, & began pruning the vineyard. 23. Went to Morpeth per midday train to see the Bishop. Called on the Walsh's also. 24. Sunday. Beautiful weather still, & large congregations at both churches, 51 at Branxton & 112 at Lochinvar. Baptized three children in the afternoon. 25. Started early for Belford, where I had service in the morning with a very small congregation of 7 only. ­ Snape's family have left Belford & returned to their farm on the Wollombi. After the service I went to Kirkton to call on Mrs Kelman, whom I had not seen, I suppose, for nearly 20 years. She appeared glad to see me, & I remained to dinner with them & then took a wrong road home, which lengthened my road a little. Before reaching home I fancied that I felt the beginning of another cold coming on. 26. Went up to the train this morning to receive Mr Moore, whom I expected to come from Newcastle. Singularly enough I met Mr Osborne on the way come to our house, having come down from Singleton by the early train. Mr Moore came according to appointment, so here two of our old Brisbane Water parishioners, met accidentally from very distant & opposite quarters. I went out as far as Peck's this morning, Mrs Peck having called during my absence yesterday to beg me to come & baptize a sick child at her house. On arriving at the house I found that the child was dead, & had died unbaptized. 27. Cold very bad today. Paid a few visits in the village in the morning. 28. Still suffering from cold & cough, which indisposed me from going abroad much. Mr Moore is also affected in like manner, as well as all the rest of us. I never knew such a prevalence, & repetition of colds as we have had all this winter. 29. Being a little better today, I took Mr Moore a ride to Dalwood, to introduce him to the vineyard &c, as well as the people there. We had a nice calm day for our ride, which made it more enjoyable after the very windy weather we have lately had. I stepped over to Mrs Rowland's this evening to pay (2) for the timber which John has been drawing from the sawpits there for the last 3 (or 8) days.

Page No: 31

30. I took Mr Moore up to Singleton today per early train, by way of a little excursion. We very happily met Miss Walkden in the train, also bound for Singleton, with one of her little pupils. They came back to Lochinvar by the midday train & spent the afternoon here, while Mr Moore & I came down by the evening train. It has been a nice calm day, partially cloudy, & I fear it is preparing for more rain. 31. Beautiful day again, & good congregations at all three places. At Branxton I gave notice for the Holy Communion on Sunday week, with collection for the Maitland Flood Relief Fund.

August 1864

1. Service at Pokolbin this morning with a congregation of about 30. On my way home called on Mrs Clift ­ also found out the hut of a man named Watson, in the Dunnering paddock. 2. As the season is advancing, & hitherto I have not found time to prune my vines, I determined to delay no longer, & set to work upon them today, but some time was occupied in saving cuttings for one or two persons. Weather rather gloomy & threatening, calm, N.W. wind. 3. Spent the day in my vineyard again, & I think I should have finished had we not been interrupted by visitors. Mr Kelman, with his sister & Miss Moore, came in about 1 o'clock & dined with us. This has been quite a delightful spring day. Mr Brown finished his work of plastering the dining room ceiling today. 4. Remained at home today to finish pruning the vines, & got through them all except those at each side the walk at the lower end of the garden. Had a funeral this afternoon, a little child of a man named Watson living in the Dunnering paddock. ­ I rode over to Mr Doyle's this morning, to see him on a little church business, & met Mr Cadell there. 5. This morning I paid a few visits in the neighbourhood, calling on David James, who seems getting better, then on Glass, Mrs Bellinger, & Mrs Brand, whose husband arrived last night from Bukkulla. This afternoon we all went to call on the Greens at Windermere. 6. Intended to have gone to Dalwood today, but a change of weather stopped me, for rain has come again to us. It has fallen only in showers, however, & may pass off without another flood. I have spent the day chiefly in sermon writing &c, for tomorrow's services. An unpleasant ending of the week tonight ­ John coming in drunk, between 9 & 10 o'clock. 7. Sunday. Rain again gave me small congregations today. At Branxton today only 19 attended. & seeing so few in church I announced to them that the collection for the Maitland Flood Relief Fund would be postponed. 8. Heavy rain again in the morning, which prevented me going to Stanhope. Went to see Mrs Bellinger, & called on all in the lane except at Bristow & Hoyle's. ­ Called on Mr Lee also. 9. Still raining, in heavy rain at intervals. Did not go anywhere. 10. Showery again. Towards evening I went to call on Mrs Rowland, to speak to her about coming to the Sacrament. Called also on King's & on young Brooks. 11. Steady rain all day from N.W. Remained at home reading & writing. 12. Wrote some letters in the morning & in the afternoon rode into Maitland to pay Mr Young for repairing the Parsonage Roof & make a few purchases. Found the people in Maitland busy with their embankment in High Street, keeping the water from breaking over into the town: for the river was bank high. ­ John has been engaged the last 3 days white washing & colouring the walls of the dining room. 13. Paid Mr Doyle a visit this morning. In the afternoon took a walk as far as Wilton's, calling at Gurd's & Howard's also. River still very high.

Page No: 32

14. Sunday. Sacrament at Lochinvar this morning, 15 Comts & among them two new ones. 15. Spent the morning visiting about Mr Holmes's, Got back to the Station in time to see the girls off to Singleton. 16. Took a ride out with Anne in the afternoon round by Dalgetty. Found some new families lately come to live there. 17. Anne accompanied me to Dalwood today. We went on as far as Fern Hill, to call on Mrs George Wyndham. 18. This morning I took horses up to the station, hoping to find Mrs John Osborne & wife there, but they did not come. I afterwards rode into Maitland to meet some of my fellow Clergy at the Chapman's. Was very glad to find Mr Addams among the number. Called on Mrs Jackson also. 19. Set to work today to remove the Cypress Pine to its new bed, & managed it, with John's help. Maxwell Holmes called, & dined with us. 20. Went to Branxton by morning train, to visit Mr Rae, who, I heard, was very ill. Found him in bed & sat some time with him. Was glad to meet with a favourable reception from him. The girls came down by the midday train, bringing Willie Nunn with them, & we all came down together. Shortly after reaching home the Osbornes arrived, from Maitland. 21. Willie Nunn accompanied me to Branxton this morning, where we had a good congregation. The weather was perfection, therefore the afternoon service was also well attended. 22. Went per train to Belford for my service there this morning. ­ Baptized two infants & then walked back to Branxton. My object was to visit a few huts by the way, at the other side of the line, but found that they were chiefly Rom: Catholics.- The Osbornes went this morning, so with Willie Nunn also, we formed a nice little party in the train. 23. Spent the day visiting at Gosforth. Went as far as the National School there, & returned by Nash's. 24. Went to Elderslie this morning & spent the day visiting among the people there. Left my horse at Windsor's & crossed in Thrift's boat. Some summer showers fell in the afternoon. 25. Anne & I rode down to Maitland today to do a little shopping. Called on the Chapman's & also on Mrs Smith. 26. Stayed at home today, with the exception of calling on Mrs Read in the morning & then going to see Mrs Bellinger. Wrote to Mr White at B: Wales, & also to Mr James, - also copied off the letter of Rev Canon Fletcher to Mr Coles Child. 27. Sermon writing in the morning. In the afternoon I visited the following cottagers ­ New, Filmer, Nott, James & Smith. 28. Sunday, A most delightful day ­ large congregations at both churches, 23 at Wilderness. 29. Had a congregation of 20 at Pokolbin, on my way home called on Mrs Clift, & Cooks. 30. Had a walk today around Luskintyre; the river being much too deep yet even to ride across, I went over in Bouling's boat, & then called on Davis, Mills, Cooper, Grant, Stacy, the three families of Russell, & Prior, & by that time it was approaching sunset. As I went from house to house I made a note of the number of children that would attend a school, in the event of our being able to start one there. I have got the number up to 23, & I purpose going again tomorrow to finish off with the families that I could not reach today. 31. Had another day's walk over at Luskintyre ­ crossing the river in Hall's boat, & then calling on James Yeo, Neally, Peck, Fairhall, Hickey, Mrs Cloudy, Paterson, & Way. This concluded the whole of my portion of the residents of Luskintyre, with the exception of one family I only heard of today, & that, singularly enough, an old Mangrove parishioner, Alfred Pratt. I found him ploughing in Mr Green's Page No: 33

orchard, but his house is near Mr Davis's. I have now got my list of children up to 45.

September 1864.

1. On reaching home last evening, I found George Townshend here, with Elizabeth & the two little girls. George started homeward this morning & Elizabeth remains with us for a few days. I remained home today. 2. This morning I rode out to see old Mrs Harper, & visit some of her neighbours. I made the acquaintance of some new families I had not visited before, namely Mrs Puddy (where the Dawson's lived on Harper's Hill) her husband a carrier up the country. Samuels (black man) Toose, & McDonald. In the afternoon we all went to Kaloudah, & stayed to tea. 3. Per midday train, Elizabeth, Anne & myself went to Morpeth, to get a few books at the Depôt [sic]113, see the Bishop, &c &c. 4. Capital congregations again at both Churches, Gave notice for the Sacrament here next Sunday. 5. Went to Stanhope, but no congregation. Spent the day walking around among them. Elizabeth & Mary & Jessie left for Singleton this evening. 6. Took the girls to the Wilderness today & left them there to spend the week. On the way home I called at Crane's, King's & Peck's. 7. This morning I went to see Frank Smith (at the request of his wife) & had a little conversation with him prior to his starting on his journey up the country & I hope what I said to him was not spoken in vain. I went to Branxton today & spent the day visiting among the people there. 8. Called on Mrs H: King in the morning, & visited Mrs Roland also, Thunderstorm kept me at home afternoon. 9. Went to Mrs Harper's this morning, by appointment, & baptized two children of her servants, who seemed to be unable to bring them to Church. From thence I went on to Mrs Smith's, but she was not at home. I then visited all the people at the adjoining coal-pits of Mr Farthing & found Six additional Church of England families therein. 10. Rode out to Mr Holmes's after breakfast & brought the girls home to dinner. Maxwell & Edwd Tyrrell came with us, & dined here & then went on to Maitland. Mr Jas: Doyle called in the afternoon. Arthur came down from Singleton by the 4 o'clock train, & the return train from Maitland brought the Rev. Mr White, my successor at Brisbane Water. 11. Sunday. A large congregation this morng at Lochinvar (113) & I administered the Holy Communion to 26 Communicants : being a considerable increase. I observed 7 new ones who had not attended before. Mr White preached for me, an excellent sermon, subject, the Rich Young Man (Mark X), He accompanied me to Branxton & the Wilderness, preaching for me at each place, & we had a nice moonlight ride home. 12. Went with Mr White to the Station, & saw him off by the early train to Maitland. I then rode up to Branxton to bury a little child of Mr Wyndham's cooper, Müller, & after visiting poor old Sam Thatcher, who is very poorly, I returned home viâ Dalwood, making a few calls about that neighbourhood. 13. Howard came this morning about a job we have be [sic] contemplating for sometime, vizt. [sic], making a gravel road & new entrance to the Church. Mr J Doyle came also to consult about it, & we agreed to give him 7-10-0 for the job. This evening Marianne went with me to Windermere, & we stayed to tea there. I wished to see Mr Green about granting a site for a School at Luskintyre & was

113

However, Alfred did not always use the circumflex.

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glad to find him favourably disposed to aid the good work. I have agreed to go over with him on Friday Morng to Select a situation for the School. 14. Went to Branxton this morning, & after making a few calls there, went on to the Wilderness, to call on Mr Tyrrell, who is staying there. By the way I called on Elson's & Jones's on Black Creek where I found some more candidates for Confirmation. On reaching the Wilderness I found Mrs Holmes quite alone, Mr H: having gone as far as Singleton with Maxwell, while Spencer & Mr Tyrrell had ridden in here. The girls were out in the vineyard. 15. A very boisterous wind today from W. or N.W., with a slight attempt at rain. Remained at home today - & paid one or two visits in the village. 16. Took a long walk today up in the Lamb's Valley direction, where I visited two families for the first time, Chick & Drayton. Mr Green crossed the River with me to Luskintyre to point out a site for our School house there, & we selected what I think a very suitable & central spot. On my way home I went around by Russell's, & had the good fortune to catch Mr & Mrs Christian at their farm. He kindly expressed his willingness to assist in building the school. I was very tired by the time I reached home having walked, I should think, at least 20 miles. 17. Spent the morning in preparing for tomorrow's services. In the afternoon Anne & I took a ride into Maitland to do a little shopping. 18. Sunday. Sacrament at Branxton, where I also baptized 3 infants. 19. Service at Belford this morning. On my return home I came by Dalwood & arranged for Anne & Emily to go up by tomorrow's train to spend a few day's there. 20. Marianne & I made an early start this morning for Trevallyn, & went round by Maitland, crossing the river by the punt at the falls. We rested a while at Mr Addams' parsonage & then proceeded to Trevallyn, where we arrived soon after sunset. 21. John Glennie accompanied me around among my old friends today, we worked our way up the Allyn as far as Caergurle, & then crossed by Bishop's Road to the Patterson. 22. We (the Trevallyn party), spent the day at Lewin's brook. Nice thundershower in afternoon, 23. I rode homeward today through Lamb's Valley, & with the exception of a little adventure in the quicksands, crossing the river at Dalwood, had a nice journey. I found them all well at Dalwood & remained the night there. 24. Came home directly after breakfast, Emily riding Comet with me, & John drove Anne in his buggy. On reaching home I was startled by the news that poor Mrs Nash had been killed by the overturning of a dray on Thursday afternoon, & that the funeral was to take place at 12. I had just time to get ready & the poor people appeared. 25. Sunday. Large congregation, & among them a very loud singer from Bishop's Bridge, 26. My usual service at Pokolbin, after which I had a pleasant ride home, calling on Mrs McDonald by the way, & others nearer home. 27. Went to visit poor old Nash this morning, called also at Beer's, Naseby's & Birds. In the afternoon I went to Windermere & Luskintyre, where I obtained leave from Mr Paterson to call a meeting at his house for Friday afternoon next. 28. Had a long walk today all around Luskintyre, to invite people to the meeting on Friday. Crossed at Boland's in the morning & recrossed at the Boiling Down in the evening. 29. Went by early train to Branxton this morning, to see how matters are going on there, &, among other things, to ask Mr Lindsay's permission for the Luskintyre School, on Pritchett's land, which he rents, - a request with which he readily complied. I found old Sam pretty well, & read a chapter with him, & then after paying a few other visits, took the Midday train & went straight to Morpeth, being Page No: 35

desirous to see the Bishop again on the subject of the Luskintyre School, before tomorrow's meeting. I had a very favourable interview with his Lordship, who very kindly authorized me to tell the people that if they would raise 75 towards the building of their School house, he would meet it with another 75. Thus I returned home well satisfied with my day's work. Willy Nunn came down to us today from Singleton. 30. Busy all morning drawing out plans for the Luskintyre School. After dinner, went over according to appointment & had our meeting at Mr Paterson's. Eight persons only attended, in consequence, I presume, of the rain, which came on steadily towards the hour appointed. There were quite enough, however, for our purpose, & we appointed a Committee to commence collecting subscriptions &c. I agreed to go over next Saturday afternoon & receive the report of the Committee as to the progress they are enabled to make during the week. ­ A very stormy night with great gale & wind, terminated this otherwise very "mild September".

October 1864

1. A rainy morning. Stayed at home today, for the first time this week. Spent the day reading newspapers (which I have not been able to look at before) & preparing for tomorrow's services. 2. Willie Nunn accompanied me to Branxton this morning, where we had but a small congregation, only 30. ­ At Lochinvar, in the afternoon, there were 96. 3. Went to Stanhope this morning for divine service, where I had a congregation of 4 adults & 2 children. ­ Called at Dalwood on my return. 4. Spent the day visiting all the people at the rear of Harper's Hill, commencing with Mrs Peck, & her neighbours the Hawkinses (Wesleyans). I went around the circle, namely, Clark, King, Squire, Shinar, Brooks & Redgrove, & then, on the way home, made the acquaintance of another Wesleyan family (Hawkins)114 at this side the railway line. I called on David James also before I went out, & found him a little better, but I fear he will never be right well again. ­ I found old Glass, too, ill in bed. 5. To Branxton today, called first to pay my flour bill to Mr Lindsay, & obtained from him a subscription of 1 to the Luskintyre School. Paid several other visits, & among others, made the acquaintance of Mr & Mrs Davis, the new National School teachers. 6. Quarterly meeting of our Committee at Morpeth today. I rode down on horseback, as I wished to do a little business in Maitland. Had rather a windy day for my ride. 7. Remained at home today. Went to the National School in the morning & paid a few visits in the village. In the afternoon Anne & I called on Mrs Reid, also on the Lees. We were going to walk to Kaludah after dinner, but a shower of rain prevented us. 8. Mr James Doyle called this morning to consult about a few Church matters, & stayed to dine with us. ­ In the afternoon I went across to Luskintyre to meet my Committee, & see what they had done during the week. I had two lists presented to me, & with my own & Mr Lindsay's subscription the amount reached is 26-11. 9. Administered the Holy Communion to 17. Had a baptism also before the service ­ very good attendance at all three places. Unfortunately I had a bad headache throughout the day, which increased very much at night, & quite deprived me of my night's rest.

114

Has Homer nodded?

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10. Spent the morning visiting, called on Boughton, Campbell, Wills, Mrs Piper, Matthews & Stuckey. Dined at Mr Holmes's & rode home in the cool of the evening, rather shaky from my yesterday's headache. 11. Remained at home today to rest myself, feeling that I wanted it. Spent the morning letter writing. In the evening Anne & I called on Mrs Smith in the lane. 12. Went to Branxton, visited the School ­ made a few calls ­ resumed our singing class & came home late. The Lees spent the evening with us. Not very well tonight. 13. Not feeling quite equal to a day's visiting, I stayed at home this morning. Rearranged some of the cards on the Church seats, & did a little writing. Had a visit from Mrs Joseph Smith in the morning. In the evening we strolled out & called at Howard's, Gurd's & Wilton's. 14. Had a very nice walk down the river at the other side where I made several new acquaintances. I went straight to Horn's, crossed in his boat, & then went a good 2 miles further down, calling at three new places, 1st a man called Killing, whose wife told me that they were intimately acquainted with the Wilson's & Birmingham's at Cessnock. The next place I came to was Mrs Hudson's (the homestead) leased to a respectable Scotchman named Paterson (presbyterian). They received me very kindly, & I found they knew Henry very well, having lived formerly at Singleton. The next family I visited were named Hedges. A very large family of 10 children.115 Here I found I was no stranger, the father telling me he recollected Mr James Glennie, & Alfred, when he lived at Dr Bowman's some 35 years ago. I was much pleased with the country about there. Mrs Hudson's is a very pretty place. I returned viâ Peck's & through Luskintyre, crossing at Boland's ­ Inspected the new punt, now being built at this side of the river. 15. Spent this morning visiting in the village, called at Chick's, King's, Phillips', McDermot, A. Walters', Mrs Martin, Gellatly, Mrs Jones, Cameron, Lever & Glass. 16. S[unday]. Delightfully cool but very windy. Congregation at Branxton good, here less than usual. 17. Went to Belford, where I had my usual small congregation. Went from thence to Kirkton, & then called on Want & Goodwins. 18. Made a few calls this morning. Among others I visited Mrs Bowman, a Wesleyan, who has been at Church 3 Sundays running & seems disposed to continue her attendance. Spent the afternoon writing a long letter to Benny. 19. To Branxton, where in addition to my School & singing class, I visited the following ­ vizt., Ellis, Lanham, Atkins, Rae, Gibbs, Alderman, Coldrake, Gordon & Parsons. 20. In the forenoon I rode out to make a call I have been procrastinating ever since I have been here, & that is, to a family named Brown, living beside the railway in the cowshed paddock. ­ I found Mrs Brown only at home, with one little child, her husband being at work in Maitland. He is a nominal Churchman, but she a Wesleyan. She promises, however, to come to Church. In the afternoon, or towards evening rather (for the day was very hot) we all took a ride down to see poor old Nash, & his daughter Mary. 21. We have had a glorious shower of rain today, - a gentle thundershower ­ or rather two such showers, fine, steady soaking rain without wind. Some very heavy thunder. 22. At home all the morning. In the afternoon I visited all the cottagers in the Railway lane. 23. S[unday]. Being a wet morning, only 7 came to Church beside ourselves. At Branxton also I had only 10, - & at Mr Holmes's not more than 13. ­ The people hereabouts seem to have a great aversion to a little rain.

115

Pots & kettles! Alfred was one of thirteen, his father one of ten, as was his mother, while his grandmother was one of sixteen.

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24. Went to Pokolbin, where I had a small congregation of 18. Found old Mrs Jones very poorly & unable to attend Church, so I went to see her after service. Two nice thundershowers in the afternoon. I waited at Mr Holmes' until they were over & rode home in the evening. 25. Intended going to Elderslie today, but it began raining in the morning & threatened a continuance, so I thought it better to stay at home. Occupied myself sermon writing & reading a bit. 26. Branxton day, spent as usual between the School, singing class & visiting. 27. We all started soon after 10 this morning to ride to the Holmes's but before we reached the Station it began thundering, & the clouds were evidently gathering for a storm, so we beat a retreat & just got in as the rain was beginning. It continued to rain at intervals during the day, with a little hail in the afternoon, after which it became very cold. 28. Today we accomplished our ride to the Wilderness, where we spent a very pleasant day with the Holmeses. ­ The weather was delightful ­ almost cold again. 29. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services &c, In the evening we walked as far as Howard's. 30. S[unday]. Two very good congregations today, notwithstanding the showery, unsettled weather. 31. Stanhope day. But for Tom's & his wife bringing their child for Baptism, I should not have any service, for all the rest were taken up with a funeral of an old Rom: Cath: woman. On my return I was held up at Taylor's while a heavy thundershower passed over & thus made it too late for me to call at Fern Hill & Dalwood as I had intended doing.

November 1864

1. Started soon after 8 this morning riding Farmer & leading Nelly, to bring Marianne home from Trevallyn. With the exception of a little mishap which befell me on the road, I had a pleasant ride, for the day was cool : but while trotting along a smooth & level piece of road, halfway between Maitland & Paterson, Farmer fell right down & my right leg under him. Providentially, I was not hurt at all, beyond a trifling wrench of the knee & ancle, which, tho' causing me to limp a little at first, soon passed off. I rested about 3 hours at the Parsonage with Mr Addams, & then rode on leisurely to Trevallyn, where I found the house empty, but towards 8 o'clock Kate & Marianne returned from Cawarra, bringing with them Mona Brown, Marianne Boydell, Sarah B., Nugent Brown, young A. Lindeman & his two sisters. ­ Freddy from Singleton was also there with Geo: Cox, a schoolfellow. 2. Tried to start by 7 this morning, but could not get away before ½ p 8, thus losing 1½ hours off a nice cool morning, which obliged us to submit to that much of the hottest part of the hottest day we have had as yet this summer. We only looked in for a few minutes to get a drink of water at the Parsonage [at] Paterson & the pushed on, hoping to get home by 2 o'clock or soon after, but another mishap was in store for us. When we reached "Cobb's Flat", we went off the road to get some shade among the trees, & while cantering along there down came Nelly head foremost, & threw poor Marianne over her head. She fell upon her nose, but beyond making that member bleed a good deal, no further damage was done. A water-hole was nearby, where we washed away the blood, & after a while, remounted & walked our horses home. 3. Glad of a day's rest after my journey to the Paterson. Began writing out a sermon for next Sunday & otherwise occupied indoors. 4. Went to the train this morning, to meet Mona Brown, who came from Morpeth to spend the day with us, bringing little Charlie Walsh with her. In the afternoon the

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Misses Lindsay's called, & came in just in time to escape a smart thundershower. I took Mona Brown back to the station at 4 o'clock, & saw her & Charlie safe off again by the train. After this the Misses Lindsay had a fine evening for their homeward ride. 5. At home all day sermon writing &c. 6. S[unday]. A nice day with congregations at all three places. 7. My intention was to spend this day visiting the people at Pokolbin, but I got up with a headache & fearing it was going to be a bad one, I merely called at Boughton's, Campbell's & Crane's & then came home. 8. This morning I called at Bowman's, Dunn's & Mr Winder's, On my return found Mr & Mrs Geo: Wyndham here, with "Fishy", come to spend the day with us. 9. Went to Branxton for my usual Wednesday work there. 10. Spent this day walking about Luskintyre, I find nothing more has been done in the way of collecting for our School, & I fear it must fall to the ground without assistance elsewhere. 11. Having heard last night that Mr Cook the Stationmaster was very ill, I went up to pay him a visit this morning, & found him confined to the sofa, - but, apparently better. On my way back I called in at the Hungerford's. This afternoon we reopened our singing class, which has been lying dormant so long, & had a very satisfactory beginning, There were 21 in all, including Miss Middleton, who came with Louisa Doyle. 12. Very hot day again. At home, preparing Sunday School sermon, for tomorrow. Willie Boydell came up per evening train to spend Sunday with us. 13. The hottest day this summer as yet, Thermotr 92. Willie went with me to Branxton where I had a congregation of 67. Very hot ride home, & I fear the great heat caused many to stay away from Afternoon service, there being only 84. Had a collection to purchase books for the Sunday School, 1-12-6 was the whole amount including my own 10/-. 14. Had a visit from the Bishop this morning. He came in about 9 o'clock, having left Singleton at 5. He seemed very well, in excellent spirits, being well satisfied with the results of his visitation. He remained about an hour with us. In the afternoon I went to visit Mr Cooke, & found him better. From there I walked across to Kaludah, & then home again. The Hungerford's came & spent the evening with us. 15. The girls & I had a nice ride to Kirkton today to visit the Kelmans; It was a cool & cloudy morning, Smart thunderstorm came on about 3 PM, but it hardly reached Branxton & Lochinvar. We had a little rain on the way home. 16. Went to Branxton today for my usual Wednesday work. 17. Started this morning with the intention of going to Elderslie, viâ Hall's, Hinton's &c. but on reaching the ford I did not fancy crossing the river, the water having risen, & being unacquainted with the crossing. Moreover it was past two o'clock, so my visits to the several families would have been but hurried ones. I thought it prudent therefore not to venture across but came straight home again. 18. At home all day writing a long letter to Isabella, in reply to one I received from her last post. Had our singing class again in the afternoon. 19. At home sermon-writing, & finishing my letter to Isabella, which I posted this evening. 20. S[unday]. Rather a hard day's work today, being kept on the full stretch from 9 AM to past 6 PM. Had a good Sunday School to begin with ­ upwards of 40, then a congregation of 115, & Holy Comn with 19 Communicants, - At Branxton there were 60, but a small attendance at the Wilderness, Did not feel very well towards evening but got better afterwards. 21. Morning service at Pokolbin ­ only a small congregn Headache came on after the service, so I came straight home, calling only on Mrs Clift & on Mr Cook.

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22. Awfully hot day ­ did not venture out anywhere. Expected a couple from Cessnock to be married, but they did not come. 23. Started before 8 for Branxton, having appointed to go & administer the Sacrament to poor old Mrs Goodwin at 10 o'clock. Her husband, with her son Alfred & his wife, joined, & I trust will continue to be henceforth regular Communicants. Rain came on just as I was leaving Goodwin's, & continued for about an hour. Visited the School, & had singing class afterwards as usual. 24. Started about 8 this morning with the girls, intending to spend the day at Dalwood, but about half way met Guy Wyndham driving Isabella & Bessy down to Lochinvar. We turned back therefore & came home again. All took a stroll in the paddock this evening. 25. Made a few calls in the morning, among them on Mrs Payne, Mrs Greedy's sister, just arrived from England. ­ Good singing class in afternoon. Guy Wyndham came in & spent the evening. 26. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's services &c &c. Walked to the station in the morning with Isabella & Bessy who went to do a little shopping in Maitland. 27. S[unday]. Quite a cold winter's day. Thermtr down at 48 in the morning. Had very good congregtn at Branxton, & very fair at Lochinvar. Preached Advent sermons at each church. 28. Went to Stanhope today, where I had better congregations than usual. On my way back I called at Judge's, G: Wyndham's & at Dalwood. Found Cousin John at the latter place. 29. Paid them a visit at Elderslie today, where they all seemed very glad to see me. I hope the river will now remain fordable, so that I shall not be cut off from that place any more, as has been the case all this past year. 30. Branxton day, had a little detention in the morning, first walking with Isabella & Bessy to the Station, & seeing them off to Singleton, & then issuing a Marriage Licence to Cousin John, - had my accustomed classes at the school & the singing, both of which I think are improving.

December 1864.

1. Stayed at home today, reading & writing a few letters. Very hot day Thermr 93. 2. Went to Kaludah in the morning, wishing to see Mr James Doyle about Church matters but he was not at home. He came however this evening & took tea with us. I wanted to consult him about calling a meeting & appointing a few collectors for the Stipend subscription, a proposition to which he readily assented & we fixed on Friday morning next. 3. At home today chiefly writing & a little reading. Went to see Mrs Bellinger & her husband who at last has made his appearance. 4. S[unday]. Being a threatening & slightly drizzly day, small congregations at all places. I gave notice this morning for a public meeting next Friday here at Lochinvar for the purpose of forming a Parochial Association in connexion [sic] with the Newcastle Church Society. 5. Rode on from Mr Holmes's this morning to Pokolbin, where I visited most of the residents. Came home rather late. 6. Called on Mr Winder in the morning to invite him to the meeting. Went onto Neal's also & Bates. In the afternoon I rode across to river [sic] to ask Mr Davies to come, but he said he could not leave his hay-making. He very kindly consented, however, to act as Collector at Luskintyre. 7. At home all day preparing for tomorrow's meeting &c &c. Went to Branxton where I performed my accustomed day's work at the School & &c. 8. At home all day preparing for tomorrow's meeting. Called on Mr Bellinger & Mr Beavis.

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9. Our meeting was something like our Church meetings at Gosford used to be. 5 persons attended ­ Messrs Hungerford, Winder, Jas: Doyle, Nash & Neal. We managed the business, however, & appointed four collectors for the Stipend Fund, namely, Jas: Doyle, Mr Winder, Mr Davies for Luskintyre, & Mr Nash. Singing class finished the day. 10. Today I have been chiefly employed writing out lists for the several collectors, giving them the names & the whereabouts of the residents in their respective localities. A great thunderstorm came on about 6 o'clock this evening, with splendid shower of rain. Charlie Wyndham arrived just in time, before it commenced. One very excellent job we have accomplished this week is, having all the church windows made to open. 11. S[unday]. Two very good congregations. At Branxton, in the morning I gave notice to the people that they would be shortly called upon for their yearly subscription to the Stipend Fund. 12. Went by early train to Belford, where I had my accustomed small congregation, which I think will probably be the last, as Mrs Carpenter thinks of leaving that place. I returned by the evening train & in the evening I took the girls to Maitland for a little shopping. On returning home I found John very ill, he had been seized with a sudden acute116 pain about his heart. 13. We had arranged to go to Dalwood today, that is the girls & myself with Charlie Wyndham, who has been our guest since Saturday; but finding John still very unwell, I urged him to go to Maitland by the early train to seek medical aid, & we induced Mary Ann117 to accompany him. Thus I had to remain at home, but the girls had their ride, notwithstanding, accompanied by Charlie, who brought them home in good time, just before a slight thunderstorm came on & afterward he returned to Dalwood. 14. This morning as I was preparing to go to Branxton, Mr Buist made his appearance to tune our Piano, & wishing him to examine the harmonium in the church, I thought it better to remain at home. He has put both instruments in capital tune, & the girls this moment enjoying some duetts [sic]. Thunderstorms on & off or rather a prolonged storm all the afternoon ­ fine rain, without wind. 15. Weather still thundery & unsettled. After breakfast I paid a visit to Gurd, & Wilton's & then to David James who does not seem to gain strength at all. 16. Spent the morning at Mr Lee's, examining some of his pupils. After dinner I went to see Mr Cameron, who has removed to the former National School building, Mr Smith's cottage. 17. This morning early, one of the young Thrift's of Elderslie came to report the melancholy tidings of his father's death, which occurred last night. He was killed by his threshing machine. While feeding the machine, his arms were drawn in & some part of the machinery struck him violently on the head, & broke his scull [sic]. He lingered a few hours, in an unconscious state. I remained at home all day, sermon writing for tomorrow. 18. S[unday]. A very hot day. I had to hurry off immediately after morning service to reach the Burial ground at Branxton by 2 o'clock, the hour appointed for Mr Thrift's funeral. ­ It was the most numerously attended funeral I have ever had. I am told that 312 persons were counted. Had very good congregations at both churches. At Branxton, having given notice for the Sacrament next Sunday (being Xmas day) I preached a sermon on the subject, & hope to see an increased number of Communicants in consequence. 19. Had a fair congregation at Pokolbin. After the service I addressed them on the subject of the support of the Clergy & appointed Mr Birmingham collector for that

116 117

Tautology ­ acute means sudden, as opposed to chronic. John & Mary Ann Byrne were the servants. It must have been confusing with a Mary Ann & a Marianne in the house.

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neighbourhood. On my way back I called on Mrs McDonald, Mrs Wills, & Mrs Campbell. Great thunderstorm in the afternoon with terrific wind, but not much rain here. I had none of it where I was. 20. Went to Branxton & Elderslie to visit poor Mrs Thrift. Had my class at the School today instead of tomorrow. 21. Remained at home today to receive Mrs Wyndham who came to spend the day with us. In the morning we had an unexpected visit from Vin: Dowling & Mr Cobb. In the evening we all took a walk to Mr Winder's. 22. Being a nice cool day, I took the girls for a ride to the Holmeses, to spend the day. 23. Went out this morning to pay a visit to old Mrs Harper, & some of her neighbours ­ Samuels, Tooze & McDonald. 24. This morning I rode over to Kaluda [sic] to ask for some green boughs of English oak, &c, to decorate the Church for tomorrow, & sent John with the dray for them in the afternoon, when, with Charlie Wyndham's help, we got the Church all dressed before dusk. 25. Had a very satisfactory morning service at Branxton. It was the largest congregation I have ever had there (about 65), nor was I disappointed of my hope expressed there on Sunday last, of seeing an increased number of Communicants, for I was happy to observe 5 additional members, who had never communicated before. Unfortunately rain set in, during the service & although it held up & allowed me to get home dry. Smart showers came on again in the afternoon, preventing the people from attending here. 26. Wet all the morning. John & Mary Ann took holiday, or rather John went into Maitland for medical advice for his neuralgic pain, which continue to trouble him almost every night. I spent the greater part of the day over a few little carpentering jobs, & then we finished Miss Young's delightful book "Dinevor Terrace". 27. While sitting at dinner today a message came for me to go & see Mrs Rice, who was said to be dying. I set off at once, but before reaching her house learned that she was dead. It seems that she was well enough until two days since when she first fell unwell. The poor woma, it is to be feared was ill-prepared for so sudden & awful a change, But ready or unready, she's gone. 28. Began this day with a Wedding, Donald Campbell & Mary Ann Crane, a very nice respectable couple. Finished the day with the funeral with the funeral of poor Mrs Rice. So varied are the duties we sometimes have to perform on the same day. 29. Went to Branxton per train this morning & spent 2 or 3 hours there, chiefly with old Avis, who seems gradually recovering his strength. But I cannot help fearing that there is no hope of making an impression for good upon his heart. With the most deplorable ignorance on Spiritual matters, he expressed perfect confidence of dying quite happy, & professes no fear whatever at the approach of death. May the Lord yet have mercy on him, & open his eyes before it is too late! ­ I returned home by the midday train, & towards evening Anne & I went to Maitland to do a little shopping. 30. This morning I was called to see poor Mrs Glass, who is very ill again. I then went to ask Mr Winder to bring his child to the Church for Baptism this afternoon. Called to see Dunn also, who is laid up with a bad leg, caused by his dray wheel passing over it. I went onto Neal's & called on Mrs Tuckey also. In the afternoon both Mr Winder & Mr Cameron brought their children to be baptized. 31. I visited Mrs Glass this morning & found her a little better. ­ After finishing off one or two bits of writing, I spent the afternoon bottling off a quarter cask of wine which Mr Wyndham very kindly sent me as a Xmas box. And now we have come to the end of the year 1864.

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1865 January

1. S[unday]. A nice bright day, though a very hot one to begin the new year with. Had a very large congregation here, & administered the Ho: Com: to 20 Communicants. I preached an appropriate sermon from Ps. 71-5: "Through thee have I been holden up ever since I was born". I gave them the same both at Branxton & the Wilderness, & then rode home in the cool of the evening, by the light of a young crescent moon. 2. We have all been very busy today preparing for our visit to the Paterson tomorrow, as we hope, weather & all things permitting, to make an early start in the morning. I had several letters to write, among them one to the Bishop. 3. Had a most delightful day for our journey to the Upper Paterson. I drove Anne & the luggage in Mr Doyle's "Sociable" which he kindly lent us, & the girls rode on horseback accompanied by G: Wyndham. ­ They rode on to Trevallyn while we rested old Farmer for more than 3 hours at Mr Addams's. ­ The day was very cloudy & cool, which made it very pleasant for travelling, & we all reached Orindinna safely. 4. Anne, Marianne & myself all drove to Camyrallyn in the morning to visit the Boydell's. In the evening we all walked across to the Lindeman's. 5. Not quite so bright a wedding day as we could have wished for Cousin John & Mary. A little gentle rain in the morning rather damped the outer world, but every thing went off very well. I assisted Mr Addams at the Marriage service, after which we all repaired to Trevallyn to the breakfast, except Mr Addams, who drove away home. The happy pair set off between 1 & 2 for Paterson, & then the party broke up & dispersed. Had a swim in the river at Orindinna in the afternoon. About 15 years since I last bathed.118 6. Started directly after breakfast for Trevallyn, & at about 11 o'clock the girls set off on horseback for Dalwood, escorted by C: & Guy Wyndham. Anne & I started after snack, & drove quietly down to Paterson where we were housed for the night by Mr Addams. 7. Had a very nice drive from Paterson to Maitland, where I handed over Anne & the luggage to the Midday train, bound for Singleton. The girls joined her at Branxton. I drove straight home from Maitland. I found John & Mary quite well, & quite at home in the Parsonage. I was sorry, however, to find John (Byrne) very ill, in bed, so much so that I deemed it necessary to get medical advice, & after getting something to eat, I saddled Comet & set off for Maitland. About half way I met Dr McKenzie coming up this way, so returned with him. He pronounced John to be suffering inflammation of the liver, & prescribed leeches &c, which I had to send to Maitland for. I then took Mr Doyle's vehicle home, & remained to tea with them. 8. S[unday]. Hot day again. Good attendance at Branxton, but I think the great heat deterred many from coming to Lochinvar. Several had to leave the church. 9. Morning service at Belford, after which I rode on to join them at Singleton. 10. Called on Mr Blackwood &c in the morning. Towards evening we all went to see the works at the new bridge, with which we were much pleased. 11. I came home today, visiting by the way around Belford & Branxton. On reaching home, found a letter from John Wyndham enclosing a cheque for 63-19, the amount of collections for Branxton ­ very satisfactory! 12. Busy all day letter writing, & make up accounts &c, Rode up to see Mr Winder in the morning & intended crossing the river to Luskintyre in the afternoon but rain

118

An easily-misconstrued comment!

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came on again. John & Mary came down to Maitland to do a little shopping. Dr McKenzie called to see John, who is much better today. 13. Great rain during the night, so that the creek was flooded this morning. Remained at home in consequence of the rainy weather. Letter writing &c. 14. John & Mary started by early train for Newcastle, & their buggy brought Anne & Marianne down from to spend the day with me119. Weather very cold & stormy: very glad of a fire at night.120 15. S[unday]. A slight drizzle frightened the people from Church this morning, & gave me but a poor congregation. At Branxton the attendance was very good ­ at the Wilderness very few, owing to the showery weather. 16. Service at Pokolbin as usual. After the service I commenced my Confirmation class there with three pupils, who acquitted themselves very well. Found Jones & his wife very ill. After visiting them, I came home, calling at Willis's, Campbell's &c, & got home late & found an empty house, Anne & Marianne having left in the afternoon, the former for Singleton & the latter for Dalwood. A note from Cousin John saying they were to return tomorrow.121 17. At home all the morning ­ baptized three children who were brought to the Church. In the afternoon, I crossed the River to Luskintyre, to ascertain from Mr Davies the amount of his collections. He was not at home, but Mrs Davies showed me his list ­ a small one. 18. To Branxton today, where I began my Confirmation class, as notified on Sunday last. Eleven pupils attended. I then baptized an infant, - then repaired to the School as usual, after which I paid a few visits, & then went to Dalwood for a night's lodging. Found the girls very well, & enjoying themselves. 19. Got up with symptoms of headache, which increased as the day advanced. After visiting Mrs Mapham, & Müller, &c, I started, intending to visit the coal mines, but by the time I had called on Mrs McKenzie & at Kimmorley's, my head was so bad, & the day so intensely hot, that I got home as fast as I could. 20. This morning John & Mary went per early train to Singleton. ­ I finished a letter to Townshend & posted it, & in the afternoon rode down to Windermere, & visited all in that quarter. 21. John & Mary took their departure homeward this morning.122 In the afternoon Charlie brought the girls home from Dalwood. Occupied in reading & preparing for tomorrow's services. 22. S[unday]. Very good attendance again (as usual now) at Branxton, where I preached from Matt:20/23 ­ "ye shall drink indeed" &c &c. In the afternoon I suppose the great heat was the cause of a rather small congren at Lochinvar, where my sermon was on the right observance of the Sabbath taking my text from the 1st Lesson, Isa:50/2. 23. Being the appointed day for Stanhope, I went up as usual, but had no congregation. Johnstone alone came. My monthly service there & at Belford I think I shall have to discontinue. On my way home I called in at Dalwood to see how poor little George McKenzie was getting on, after his frightful accident. On Friday last he was returning from Fern Hill on horseback, when his powder flask, which he had thoughtlessly put in his pocket, with two loose matches, exploded & made a frightful wound in his thigh. As yet all seems to be going on favourably. From Dalwood I worked my was home by Oswald, calling at McDonald & Toose, Samuels & Harpers. On reaching home I found Anne here, come from Singleton per early train. John went off to Sydney this morning to see if change of air would benefit him.

119 120

Emily gets little mention ­ it is not until the 18th that we find she is at Dalwood. In January? 121 First use of "Cousin John"? 122 Some honeymoon.

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24. Paid a few visits in the village this morning & in the afternoon rode down as far as Neal's &c. 25. Rather a hard day's work today. Started early for Elderslie, where I found the river high & rising. Went across in the boat, & had an hour or two's talk with three Confirmation pupils at Mrs Thrifts. I then returned to Branxton, where I spent an hour in the school, & then repaired to the Church for my Confirmation class there. Got home late & very tired. 26. Being the anniversary day, & a general holiday, I took holiday also. In fact, whether it was from overwork yesterday, or the peculiar oppressiveness of the atmosphere, or both combined, I felt totally unfit for anything, but downright lounging. 27. Rode out to Kaluda this morning to see if Henry & Louisa were coming in the afternoon to the Confirmation class. Made a few more calls during the forenoon, with the same object in view. Had my first class here in the afternoon, & made a good start with 27. 28. Busy today writing &c &c preparing for tomorrow's work. 29. S[unday]. Good congregation here, but a thunderstorm came on as I was riding to Branxton, which prevented most of the folks from attending there. Only 20 were present. At the Wilderness no service. 30. I had to return to Branxton to bury a little child (of John Hughes) which died on Saturday. Called as I went at Crane's, Guy's, Mrs Blick's, & Chicks. 31. Today I intended going to the Coalpits & that quarter, but a thunderstorm came on soon after breakfast, & stopped me. A succession of thundershowers fell during the day. In the morng I went to see Howard, who is ill, also called on Gurd.

February 1865

1. Started this morning for Elderslie, where I had my three pupils. From thence I returned to Branxton, to my two classes. The young people seem generally to be very backward in their religious knowledge, & appear to have been sadly neglected. 2. Anne & I had a quiet ride to Dalwood today, to see how little George McKenzie was getting on. & found him progressing very favourably. The day was very pleasant, but unfortunately Anne picked up a very bad headache, which made our homeward ride very tedious, & proved a disagreeable finale to the day. 3. Remained at home today, & had my Confirmation class in the afternoon. Visited in the lane in evening. 4. Went up to the train early this morning, expecting to meet the Miss Davidsons there, but was disappointed. They came, however, by the Midday train. In the forenoon John Battley & Chas: Hely from Lake Macquarie came in to spend a day or two with us, & a letter from Uncle Ferris announced his approach, probably tomorrow morning per early train, so that we shall have a good housefull [sic]. 5. S[unday]. J Battley & his cousin Charles accompanied me to Branxton Church in the morning. On our return we found Uncle Ferris here. He is looking well, but still complaining a little of bronchitis. Avery pleasant day today, with fair congregations. 6. Went to Belford by train this morning, but finding that Mrs Carpenter & her family had removed to Singleton, I had no service there. In short there are not enough now to form a congregation, so I must discontinue that service. I returned by the midday train & after dinner took John Battley & Charles to Dalwood, to introduce them to the vineyard & cellars there. 7. Too hot to venture out today. The thermtr rose to 98 in the verandah. Towards evening a terrible gale of wind came on from S.W. with a thunderstorm. Not much

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rain here. Louis123 Kelman called & stayed to tea. J: Battley & Charles left us this morning for Lake Macquarie. 8. My Branxton day. Started early for Elderslie, where I had my three pupils, & then returned to my accustomed Branxton duties. 9. Pursuant to Notice given on Sunday last we held our meeting today for the election of a Lay Representative to attend the approaching Church Conference at Morpeth. Only 8 members attended, & I was glad that they put the right man in the right place by choosing Mr Holmes as their Representative. 10. At home today, reading &c in the morning. & in the afternoon had my Confirmation class. Uncle Ferris & the girls rode to Dalwood today ­ nice cool day. 11. Went to Morpeth by early train this morning to see the Bishop on one or two little matters, & among other things arranged for the payment of my debt at the Book Depôt, amounting to 21-1-3. The Bishop is to retain that amount from the portion of Stipend money that will be coming to me from the contributions of my district for last year.124 I also ordered some books for the Sunday School, & called upon Mr Walsh, by which time the starting of the midday train had arrived & I came home. Uncle Ferris also took the girls down to West Maitland to get their Photographs taken by Mr Hart. 12. S[unday]. Rainy day ­ only 31 at Church. I administered the Ho: Comm: to 9. Had a wet ride to Branxton & the Wilderness, with no congregation at either place. 13. Went from Mr Holmes's to Pokolbin, where I had only 11, owing to the wet weather. Had 3 Confirmation pupils after the service, & then had an uncomfortable wet ride home. ­ I should have mentioned that John came home on Saturday evening, apparently quite well again. 14. At home all the morning, writing letters &c, towards evening I rode over to Windermere, calling by the way to see Mrs Bellamy, & at Houston's. ­ Observed the river much swollen from the late rains. 15. Went through my usual Branxton day's work, going first to Elderslie, to my 3 pupils there, then to the School, & then my Confirmation class at the Church. 16. Set out this morning with the intention of going to Dalgetty, but on passing Mr Hungerford's door, he called out to me, & informed of a sad occurrence by which another of my flock, Mr Peck, has been suddenly snatched away from us, having been drowned in the river on Tuesday night. This melancholy intelligence made me alter my plan, & I at once set off with the intention of visiting poor Mrs Peck. I found her at Mr Green's house, so had no occasion to cross the river. It seems that Mr Peck had gone to Maitland on Tuesday, the river being fordable when he left home, but in the afternoon it suddenly rose very rapidly, & was very high by the time Mr Peck returned at night, & he must have plunged into deep water at once. On Wednesday morning, his dead horse, saddled & bridled, was stopped by the Morpeth Puntman as it floated down the stream ­ a distance, I should think, of not less than 40 miles from Windermere. ­ There is no saying where the body may be, but a few days may bring it to the surface. I remained some time with Mrs Peck at Mr Green's & then returned to dinner. Thunder all round in the evening & a little rain. 17. Rode out to Dalgetty this morning, & found that the Brooks family have given up their farm there, & departed, so that Redgrove & Shiner are the only two now living there. Had my Confirmation class in the afternoon & then called on the Lees. 18. Went to the station in the morning to meet Isabella & Bessy who came per early train from Singleton. Mrs Jackson came in the morning to be Churched.

123 124

Properly Lewis ­ Alfred uses both spellings. A lot of money ­ a little later Alfred offered a new servant "12 & found" per annum, and another 8/- per week.

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Employed the rest of the day preparing for tomorrow's services, making up my Stipend Fund Accounts &c &c. 19. S[unday]. Large congregations at both churches. Smart shower came on just as I reached home, but soon cleared off again. 20. Rainy morning early, so I did not go to Stanhope, but it held up after breakfast, therefore I got my horse & rode up to Dalwood, to baptize Lucy's baby125. Isabella & Bessy went to Branxton per midday train & thence per buggy to Dalwood. Uncle Ferris went on to Singleton by the same train. On coming home I met Mrs Tuckey126 at the Post Office, who told me that Neal's boy was evidently in a dying state, so I got another horse & went immediately to see him. 21. Went to visit Neal's boy the first thing after breakfast, & then walked to Windermere & crossed the river in Mr Green's boat ­ called first at Hall's, & then went to visit the Peck family. I found them all away at the river continuing to search for the remains of Mr Peck.127 From thence I walked around by Hickey's, Russell's, & Davis's & home by Kaluda lane. 22. Went as usual to Elderslie, & Branxton, where I had my classes. 23. Annual Meeting of our Church Society. Mrs Chambers having kindly invited us all to their house, Anne & the girls went down to E: Maitland by train, while I followed on horseback. The report was a very favourable one, & the sermon preached by the Rev Mr White of Muswell Brook [sic], in E: Maitland Church, an excellent one. I rode home again at night. 24. Went by early to Morpeth to attend the Conference, the business of which was satisfactorily concluded in the afternoon. I then returned & joined them at Mr Chambers's. 25. Left E: Maitland by early train. They for W: Maitland to pay another visit to Mr Hart, & I went to Morpeth to purchase books for prizes for the Sunday School children & then we all returned home by the evening train. 26. S[unday]. Very nice sort of day. Not the dangerous weather predicted by Saxby. Fair congregations. 27. Went to Pokolbin in the morning & had 2 Confirmation pupils there. Called at Campbell's on the way home & had an introductory lesson with their daughter. 28. Went to Neal's in the morning to visit the sick boy. Too hot to go out after dinner.

March 1865

1. Ash Wednesday. Morning service here, at which only 16 attended. In the afternoon I went across the river to Russell's at Luskintyre, to see his young folks about their Confirmation, & arranged to visit them again next Thursday (tomorrow week). 2. Took the girls to the Wilderness to spend the day with the Holmes's. 3. Went to visit Neal's boy, who keeps about the same, & then to Kaluda to see poor old Mr Doyle, who has just been afflicted with the death of his daughter, Mrs Williams. Confirmation class in afternoon. 4. Went to Morpeth to see the Bishop, & learn from him his intentions regarding Brisbane Water, as they are unhappily left again as sheep having no shepherd. Mr White, it appears, has left them altogether. The Bishop proposed to me that until another Clergyman is appointed, I should pay them a quarterly visit, for which additional work his lordship kindly said I should receive an additional 50 p. annum. ­ Uncle Ferris came down by early train from Singleton this morning bringing Isabella, Bessy, Miss Larnach, & Miss Dorah Mayne. ­ they all returned again in the evening.

125 126

Ethel Wyndham, born 25th December 1864. Alfred records both Tuckey & Stuckey families. 127 Alfred does not record their discovery.

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5. S[unday]. Excessively hot again today, especially in the afternoon. ­ Administered the Holy Communion at Branxton to 14, among whom were 3 new communicants, Mrs Thrift & two sons. Mr & Mrs Frank Wyndham & Miss Fletcher were also there. 6. After dinner, I went, by appointment, & administered the Ho: Comm: to poor old Mrs Goodwin, who gets very feeble, & suffers greatly from pains in her head. 7. Emily & I rode into Maitland today to do a little shopping128. I required to make a few purchases prior to my journey to B: Water & among other things bought a nice second hand saddle, almost new, for 4. 8. Branxton day. Went through my usual class work there & at Elderslie. 9. After breakfast rode across to Luskintyre & after an hour's Confirmation lecture with Russell's young people, went on to visit Mrs Peck, & worked my way home by the homestead &c, Uncle Ferris came down 10. Remained at home today, occupied chiefly in looking out sermons for Brisbane Water. Uncle Ferris came down from Singleton this morning. 11. Went to visit Neal's boy this morning after breakfast, & found him much worse than when I last saw him. Busy all day finishing my preparations & packing up for my journey which I commence tomorrow.

April 1865

1. Saturday. The long pauses in my journal have been caused by my fortnight's absence at Brisbane Water, of which journey I will now endeavour to record a brief account. ­ Monday the 13th being my Cessnock day, I determined on going from thence to Wollombi, & then take Mangrove Creek by the way. Accordingly I made the Parsonage at Wollombi that night, - found that Mr Greaves was away from home on sick leave, & Mrs Greaves had a lady friend ­ Mrs Thornton ­ staying with her, with her four children. On Tuesday the 14th had a hot ride into Mangrove Creek, where I found quarters at Douglass's. I remained there all Wednesday, having morning service at the Upper Church , & afternoon at the lower. The people all seemed very glad to see me again, & assembled very well at both churches. On Thursday, the 16th I made an early start, & reached the Sawmill by about one o'clock. I was rather disappointed at finding all the men, almost, away at a Cricket Match at Currambong, for I had written to appoint service at the little Church at Blue Gum Flat, at 3 o'clock. On reaching Mr Walmsley's, I found he also was away with the others, So I had to put up with a congregation of women, chiefly, & baptized two infants. I then rode on to Gosford, calling by the way at Wyoming, where I found Mrs Hely Snr, - was sorry to find Mr Hely's affairs had come to a crisis, & he felt compelled to go into the Insolvency Court. ­ I put up at Mr Battley's, where I was very kindly received & entertained, having left my two horses, Farmer & Comet, in charge of old Mr Walmsley.129 The first thing on Friday morning I went to see poor Keene, whom I found in a dying state. He had heard of my intended visit & was anxiously looking out for me, almost fearing he might not live to see me. Never did I visit any person who seemed so glad to see me. I found him very weak & low, & suffering great bodily pain, but was very much gratified at finding him in so hopeful a frame of mind. After reading & praying with him, at my suggestion he expressed a desire to receive the Holy Communion, & I appointed 3 o'clock in the afternoon for that purpose, being doubtful whether he would survive the night. ­ I finished out the morning visiting out among the people & then returned & administered the Sacrament to Keene, his wife, his brother & his wife, & son. When I left him, he told me that he felt perfectly happy, & all he wanted was to "go to his Saviour". On

128 129

One of the few times he took his younger daughter anywhere by herself. Another easily misconstrued statement.

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Saturday morning I found him much the same. ­ After visiting him I started for Erina, making a few calls in E: Gosford by the way. ­ Dined with the Miss Donnesons, & then went on to Kincumbar. The people all gave me a most hearty greeting whenever I went, & were, I believe, really glad to see me. After service I repaired to Green Point for the night. Monday I spent visiting all the good folks at Davis Town, beginning with Dr Auld, & ending with Dunlop, & then sought my comfortable quarters at Green Point again. On Tuesday morning, by appointment, I attended the church at E: Gosford to Baptize, where 7 infants were brought to me, & Mr Hely's among them. I dined with the Benson's that day, & after making a few other calls, went to visit Keene again. On Wednesday, after seeing Keene, (which proved to be the last time) I went again to Erina, & from thence, after dining with the Miss Donnesons, rode on to Torigal, calling on the Chapmans by the way. I found Mr Kay confined to bed with a broken leg, but doing very well. On Thursday morning I went again to Keene's after breakfast, & found he had expired a few minutes before I reached the house. ­ It was indeed a great relief to all his friends that his great sufferings were at an end, for I verily believe that he died a penitent believer in Js: Xst, in which case his departure may truly be called a happy release. ­ I expressed my regret to Mrs Keene that I could not remain to bury her husband, but she was quite satisfied & expressed herself as only too thankful that I was to hand to perform the more important office of ministering to his soul before its departure from the body. ­ I packed up my traps & bid adieu to the Battley's after dinner, & then worked my way as far as Blue Gum Flat, where I took up my quarters with Mr E. Warmsley's. On Friday had a rather warm ride to Mount Vincent, accompanied most of the way by George & Henry Swadling, & on Saturday the 25th reached home again about 5 PM, having called to see the Bishop by the way to give him a report of my visitation tour, which on the whole he seemed to think satisfactory. It was truly a trip of pleasure to me, being so warmly greeted on all occasions by so many old friends. The weather also highly favoured me, not having one spot of rain the whole time. I found the people in a very depressed state, in consequence of the very low price of timber, but I think that they will endeavour, notwithstanding, to do what they can to raise the required portion of their minister's Stipend. ­ On Sunday last I went through my usual round of duties, with good congregations. On Monday I went to Pokolbin to meet my small class of Confirmation pupils there & did not get home till late at night, Nelly having fallen lame with me. Tuesday I spent at home, making my Stipend account - (list of subscribers) for Mr Walsh, & writing other letters. Wednesday I went as usual to Elderslie & Branxton for my different classes ­ (out 12 hours) ­ Thursday went by appointment to Luskintyre to Russell's, & from thence to Mrs Peck's & then home by Windermere. Yesterday I walked to Kaluda to visits the Doyles & had my Confirmation class in the afternoon & today I have remained at home, & after looking out sermons for tomorrow, spent the day in letter writing &c &c. 2. Sunday. Services as usual. Excellent congregations both at Branxton & here at Lochinvar. 3. Rode up to Belford chiefly to see Emily Hunt about Confirmation but found she had gone to Singleton. Visited several of people at Branxton, whom I have never time to visit on the Wednesdays, my time then being fully taken up with my classes. ­ On the way I visited Mrs Coulton, the Toll-keeper's wife, who has been very seriously ill for about 10 days with a bad throat, but I hope is now beginning to mend. Also called to see poor old Mrs Goodwin, who continues a great sufferer, & can get no relief from her pains. Found Katie Townshend here on my return in the evening. 4. Took Katie up to the Station, & saw her off to Maitland by the Midday train. After dinner I set off with the intention of visiting Nash & his neighbours, but after

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calling at Beer's, & riding to the top of the hill, I found it getting too late, so I returned & called at Wilton's & Gurds. 5. My Branxton & Elderslie day, went through the usual routine. 6. Went to Morpeth by early train by train, to attend, first the Quarterly Committee Meeting of our Church Society, & then in the afternoon the Conference Committee Meeting. The latter, a little before 4 o'c adjourned till half past 9 tomorrow morning. 7. Went again to Morpeth by early train, where we completed our business in time to allow me to return by the Midday train. Had my Confirmation class as usual in the afternoon. 8. Remained at home today, preparing for tomorrow's duties, & reading &c. Called at David James' in the evening. 9. S[unday]. A very long morning service, little short of 3 hours: having the 26th & 27th Chs of Matthew as second Lesson & Gospel, & having, moreover, to administer the Holy Comm: to 21.130 This threw me rather late at both Branxton & the Wilderness. At the latter place I found Mr Tyrrell & his family, he being away from duty on sick leave. Had a little talk in the evening with John Boughton about Confirmation. 10. Went to Pokolbin for my usual monthly service there, & made a great mistake, as I discovered afterwards, of preaching the same sermon that I gave them last month ­ "Deliver thyself, O Zion". Had my young Confirmation pupils both there & at Campbell's & then came home ­ late, of course. 11. Visited about Gosforth & Anambah today, making the acquaintance of Mrs Dell, called on Goodfellow among the rest, & gave him a copy of the "British Workman". 12. Went through my usual Elderslie & Branxton class-work, & in addition, baptized an infant at the Church. 13. Went up to Branxton after breakfast to Mary [sic] James Judd, & Catherine Brayshaw (by Licence), A thunderstorm came on just after the ceremony, & a heavy shower of rain about Harper's Hill, but hardly any here. I came home after tasting the Bride Cake, & drinking the health of the young couple.131 14. Good Friday. Morning service at Branxton & Evng here ­ about 45 at each church. 15. At home all day. After preparing for tomorrow's services, spent the day making a Register of Sermons as I have long threatened to do. ­ Beginning from my debut at Lochinvar (July 5/63) I found it rather tedious work, entering all that I have preached since then. 16. Easter Sunday. Congregations good, but a very poor number of Communicants at Branxton, only eleven ­ a fact that went far to prove the existence of the prevailing blemish of our Church which formed the subject of my sermon " want of sincerity & truth" my text being 1Cor: V-8, " The unleavened bread of sincerity & truth". 17. Went to Stanhope today with the purpose of visiting the people there, & seeing whether it was worthwhile to resume my monthly service among them. I arranged that I would do so, & fixed for this day four weeks. I took Marianne with me, & left her to spend a day or two at Dalwood. The River being quite low now we took the short way through Luskintyre & I crossed the river again at Judge's. 18. Being Easter Tuesday, I was at my post, according to Notice duly given, for the election of Churchwardens for the ensuing year; but not a single parishioner attended, so I could only re-elect my Churchwarden, - Mr James Doyle ­ leaving

130

Palm Sunday - Matthew 27 & 28 are the chapters describing the Last Supper, Jesus's betrayal, trial, crucifixion and burial, taking four closely-printed pages in the Bible I have, Even so, nearly three hours seems an excessive length! 131 Surprising that Alfred was prepared to carry out a wedding on Maundy Thursday.

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to the Bishop to nominate other two [sic]. ­ In the afternoon, Anne, Emily & myself walked over to Windermere to call on the Green's, & as a matter of course, Anne is now on the sofa with a bad headache. 19. Went to Elderslie for my Confirmation class, then back to Branxton as usual, thence to Dalwood where I remained the night. Delightful shower of rain in the evening. 20. In the morning I visited Müller's, Kimmorley's, & Mapham's & in the afternoon Marianne & I returned home viâ Luskintyre, calling on Mrs Peck, Hickey & Russell. Cyrus & Henry Doyle called in evening. 21. At home today ­ busy reading & writing. Confirmation class in evening ­ a poor one. 22. Anne & I went to Morpeth per train to get a few books. Among others I selected some for Mrs G. Davis's Sunday School at Kincumbar. We returned per midday train & I spent the rest of the day writing letters & preparing for tomorrow. 23. Sunday. My three congregations but middling. 24. Went to Pokolbin for my Confirmation class & called at Campbell's for the same purpose. It was quite dark before I got home. I found a stranger here a Mr Eugene F. O'Bierne, on his way to Scone seeking employment in the scholastic line. Among several testimonials is one from Benny, speaking very favourably of him. 25. Mr O'Bierne took his departure on foot (as he came) for Singleton. I gave him a note to Mr Blackwood & one to Henry. Spent this day visiting Mrs Smith, & the people at the Coal mines. 26. Went to Elderslie & Branxton, where I had my classes as usual. 27. Went across to Luskintyre after breakfast to catechize the Russells, but finding that they were not expecting me, & had gone to work, I did not disturb them but after calling on Mrs Davis, came home again. Kate Green came this morning to spend a few days with us. 28. This morning, after going to the post, & calling at O'Brien's, to urge the attendance of Mary Jane Gurr at the Confirmation class this afternoon, I went up to call on Mrs Clift & Mr Cook. The latter I was sorry to find still very unwell, lying on the sofa, but feeling better than he was yesterday. Had a pretty good class this afternoon ­ 20 in all. ­ I addressed them this afternoon on the one subject of the Holy Communion, explaining to them as clearly the nature of that Sacrament, & pointing out their obligation to partake of it as soon as Confirmed. After dismissing my class, I went to call on Mrs Troubridge, but found the house all shut up. I then went to see Mrs Filmer. 29. At home today, spent a good part of the morning with Kate Green, over Sinclair's Catechism, & in the afternoon her brother Walter came & their servant Caroline, to be catechized. Commenced by see [sic] the Danns. Called at Lees by the way & at Nash's coming home. 30. Sunday. the weather being gloomy & threatening in the morning, I suppose was the cause of my missing some 10 or 12 faces at Branxton, but they made up for it at Lochinvar, where I had 122.

May 1865

1. It was my intention to have gone to Belford this morning, but rain came on & it had every appearance of a wet day, so I remained at home, & busied myself about nothing. John Lethbridge came in by midday train, & dined with us. 2. Called on the Hungerfords this morning, to see about Emily, who has not attended the Confirmation class very frequently, & ask them to let her come some morning & let me have a little talk with her. In the afternoon I went to visit the Gurds & Wiltons.

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3. Had my last class with the classes at Elderslie & Branxton, & gave them their tickets. On the way home I looked in at Goodwin's, & heard his daughter Ann go through her Catechism. 4. Went off to Luskintyre this morning & finished off my small class at Russell's. On the way back I called at Mr Davies's, & then at Houston's & Bellamy's. In the evening Wilton came to have a little talk with me about Confirmation. Tom Battley & Arabella arrived in the evening accompanied by Carl Solling as a guide. 5. Paid a few visits in the village in the morning. Had a fine large class of Candidates in the afternoon, & after 2 hours of a finishing lecture, I gave them their tickets & dismissed them. 6. At home today, with the exception of a ride to Oswald in the morning to visit the Harper's. ­ Met Mr Purvis Marshall there. ­ Dudley is to come to me next week to see about his Confirmation. Sowed my little plot of ground with Prairie Grass this afternoon. 7. Sunday. A very bright & satisfactory day. Large congregations throughout. Preached at all 3 places my Confirmation Sermon, from Eccles: V 4&5 ­ "When though vowest a vow" &c. & they all appear to have listened attentively to it. The day was a perfect May day. 8. Having my usual service at Pokolbin, & preached the same sermon as yesterday, after which I spent a two-hour lesson with my young friends there, & gave them their tickets for the Confirmation. Did the same at Campbell's & then rode home by moonlight. 9. Married a couple this morning ­ Balcombe & Greedy ­ spent the rest of the day writing a letter & visiting a little. Carl Solling brought his sister & Alice Harrison up to spend the day with us, & the young folks all rode to Summer Hill in the afternoon. 10. Remained at home today getting everything ready for the Confirmation tomorrow ... Paid one or two visits in the village & also called at Kaludah in the morning. 11. Splendid day for the Confirmation. I started for Branxton in good time, & found the Bishop there before me, he having gone up by train. There was a nice congregation [.....]132 & [...] young persons were confirmed. Here, in the afternoon we had a most delightful [...] 44 candidates were confirmed & the Church was fuller than I ever saw it at both churches. [...] 134 altogether. The Bishop gave us a most admirable sermon from I Timothy [...] fight the good fight of faith". & must have deeply impressed all who had taken [...] 12. Arabella went to spend the day with the Sollings. I paid a few visits in the village, [...] & after dinner I went to see Mrs Clift, who is very ill. 13. [...] I went to see Mrs Clift again, & found her somewhat better. In the afternoon I rode down [...] to see the Danns. Called at Neil's by the way & at Nash's on coming home. 14. Sunday, & a very disagreeable one. Blew a gale from the N.W., & very cold, so I had only half congregations. Part of the chancel window here was blown out during the service. ­ Fearful gale during the night. 15. Went to Stanhope this morning for service. The road in places was strewed with trees, & branches of trees, the effect of last night's gale. Very windy again today. I went to Fangorm, but from Taylor's account of the crossing place there I would not attempt the crossing, but went down to Judge's in preference. Had a small congregation of eleven. 16. Busy today writing letters to Brisbane Water, giving notice, & arranging for my intended visit the end of next month. I went up to visit Mrs Clift, & found her a little better, but one of the children, the youngest, ill with Scarletina.

132

The photocopies here are unreadable in patches.

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17. Went to Branxton today to bury a little child of Pritchard's that died of croop on Sunday last. I took Marianne with me, to spend a few hours with the Lindsay's, while I attended to my other duties. 18. Anne & I rode into Maitland today to do a little shopping. We met several Paterson friends there namely, Mr Addams, John Glennie, & Ar: Lindeman, beside some other acquaintances. After finishing our shopping we called on Mrs Jackson, & Mrs Cadell, & join scampered home [sic]. 19. I began this morning with an attempt to get my Report ready for the S.P.G., but was soon interrupted by a visit from Mr John Moore, & Richard Thrift, of Elderslie, who came upon a little matrimonial affair. As soon as they were gone, I had just time to run up & see Mrs Clift before dinner. I was glad to find her better, & sitting up. But the little child was not so well. In the afternoon Mr Doyle, his son James, & Mr Winder came to consult about doing something to the Church to strengthen it, so as to render it proof against such high winds as we had on Sunday last. We sent for Mr Greedy, & arranged for him to put two iron rods across through the wall plates, & screw the building together. 20. At home today, with the exception of a visit to Mrs Clift in the afternoon. I found her better, & I hope the little child was better too. ­ Occupied chiefly sermon writing, after doing a few little jobs around the Church. 21. S[unday]. A large congregation at Branxton in the afternoon, where I gave notice of the Holy Comn on Sunday next, & preached a sermon on the subject of the Sacrament, from the text 11th1stCor: `Thus do, in remembrance of me". I anxiously hope to see an increased number of Communicants next Sunday. ­ At Lochinvar, the congregation was a fair one, but very few at the Wilderness. 22. Spent this day visiting among the residents between Mr Holmes's & McDonald's, namely Boughton, Campbell, Wills, McDonald, Mrs Piper, Job Noon, Lambkin, Joass, Matthews & Stuckey. I tried to find two other families, Chick & Drayton, but missed them, & went all astray. My cold, which had been some days upon me, was rather troublesome today. Came home late, bringing a mare with me which the Holmes's were kind enough to lend for the girls to ride. 23. This morning I walked up to see Mrs Clift, & her child, & was glad to find them both much better. Remained at home all the rest of the day, nursing my cold. 24. Went to Branxton, where I began my day's work by marrying a very nice young couple, Rich: Thrift & Rachel Moore. I then baptized a child of Henry Braysham & spent the rest of the day visiting some of the families, chiefly about the Station. 25. Ascension Day. Had morning service here in the Church, with a Congregation of 18 only, while a large number congregated at the Rom: Cath: chapel across the road. Busy sermon writing in afternoon. 26. I was going to take the girls to Dalwood today, but thought it prudent to try Mr Holmes's nag first myself, & had my saddle put on her accordingly, but when I went to mount her, she threw me off before I could seat myself in the saddle. This sample of her behaviour quite satisfied me, & I had her turned out again, & Emily & I went without Marianne, who was thus done out of her ride. We had a perfect day, but I should have enjoyed it more without any troublesome cold. The chief purpose of my visit was to see Mr Wyndham about Wad: & to let him know that I cannot admit him to the Communion, as he has declined the rite of Confirmation. This he was quite prepared for. ­ I paid a few visits among the people on the farm, & on the way back we called at Willah & at Kimmorley's. 27. This morning I rode down to Maitland to swear to an affidavit sent me from Sydney the other day in the matter of Dennis Stacy's Will: having nothing more to detain me in Maitland I was home again by ½ p. 12. All the afternoon I felt very uncomfortable from my cold & headache, which prevented me going out & to make a few calls I had in prospect. 28. S[unday]. One of my specially bright, encouraging days. Administered the Holy Communion at Branxton to 29 Communicants, among whom were 10 of the Page No: 53

young people confirmed on the 11th, together with some of their parents who had never been before. Most sincerely & heartily did I share in John Wyndham's exclamation as he turned round & shook my hand at the Church door, saying "Thank God for this day". I humbly hope the same gratification may be vouchsafed to me here on Sunday next. 29. This morning I went first of all up the village, calling at O'Brian's & Walters, & then paid Mrs Chick a visit, wishing to have a little talk with her about a matter which she mentioned to me on Friday last, namely, that her present husband, is the brother of her first husband. She became quite angry with me because I endeavoured to open her eyes to the incestuous condition in which she is living, declaring her conviction that she is not wrong, & therefore her intention of remaining as she is. When I asked for a Bible to point out from Gods [sic] own word the sin of which she & her so-called husband are guilty, she declined getting it, intimating that she knew the Bible quite as well as I did, & that she did not desire any further word from me about it. ­ I therefore left her, & walked across the paddock to Mr Clift's, to the Station, calling by the way on two families I had never met before, namely Castledon & Fuller. I found both Mrs Clift & the child better. In the afternoon I called on Mrs Small, Mrs Roland, New, Agnes Young, Mrs Howard & Mrs Phillips. 30. Being very windy & cold, I did not go out anywhere, but remained at home to take care of my cold, which is still troublesome. ­ Greedy came this morning & put the iron rods through the Church & so braced it together. In the evening Wm: & Mrs Boydell came by the train, with Willie also. Mrs B: unfortunately brought a bad cold with her. 31. Went to Branxton today, & returned by Midday train. Too much of a cold yet to enable me to resume the singing class. Sermon writing after dinner. W: Boydell & Willie went to Maitland by early train, & drove up again in the evening in their buggy.

June 1865

1. Had a little excursion to Dalwood today. W: Boydell drove his wife in their buggy & Mr Small kindly lent me his buggy in which I drove Anne. The day was very fine, & we all enjoyed the drive much.133 On our way back we called on Mrs McKenzie. 2. My cold being still troublesome, I determined to remain indoors today, & not expose myself to the cold westerly wind. Spent the day reading & writing. In the afternoon they all walked to Kaloudah, while I kept house. W: Boydell started for home this morning, leaving Mrs B: here. 3. Took Mrs W: Boydell & Marianne an excursion to Singleton today. Could not have had a finer day, unless perhaps a little less of the keen W: wind, but it was hardly sufficient to complain of. We all enjoyed the trip very much. 4. Whit Sunday. Administered the Holy Communion to 33 at Lochinvar, among whom were eleven of the young folks lately confirmed. I did certainly hope to see more of them, but must be thankful for this increase in the number of Communicants. The long service threw me late at Branxton, where I had a large congregation. I had collections at both churches for the S.P.G. amounting in all to 5-5. Being a fine moonlight night I had a goodly number also at Mr Holmes's. I found a good houseful there ­ Mr & Mrs Nott with their family were on a visit from Sydney. 5. Service at Pokolbin this morning, with a fair congregation. Found poor Mrs Birmingham very ill in bed. ­ I fear this winter will try her sorely. Came straight

133

An arcane expression, which Alfred used as often as "very much".

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home from thence, only calling at the Railway Gate & also enquired after Mrs Clift, who is very ill again. 6. Baptized a child of Mr John Hall's this morning, after which I went with Mrs Boydell & Ann to Morpeth per Midday train, they to call at the Close's, & I to see the Bishop. ­ We also did a little in the book way at the Depôt. I was delighted to learn from the Bishop that there is a hope of Brisbane being ere long supplied with a Clergyman. Another Mr Shaw, brother of the two already out here of that name, is now on his passage from England, & the Bishop hopes to fix him at Brisbane Water. 7. Went to Branxton today. Called first to see poor old Mrs Goodwin, then made out the day visiting among the good folks of Branxton, & passed half an hour or so at the School. This morning we had the severest frost I have known for many years. The thermometer, being on the fence away from the house, fell to 25. It was 32 under the verandah. 8. Went to Elderslie to visit some of the good folks there, whom I had not called upon for some time. I took Marianne with me, & she seemed to enjoy the ride much, thought the day was not very favourable, for it clouded over gloomily soon after 12 & began raining a little. We called first, on Mrs Thrift, then on Mat: Moore, John Moore, Mrs Smith, James, & John Thrift. By the time we had completed that round, it was ½ p. 3, so we had barely time to get home before dark. 9. Rainy day rather, so I remained at home all the morning, sermon writing. After dinner I walked up to see how Mrs Clift is getting on, & was very glad to find her much better, & gradually regaining her strength. Read the 103rd Psalm134 to her. ­ Towards evening the rain came down pretty smartly & it seems to be setting in for the night. Greedy has got our new Church gate put up today, which is another great improvement to the place. 10. Rainy day. At home sermon writing, & otherwise employed indoors. 11. Sunday. Being rather showery & roads very dirty from the rain of the last two days, I had but small congregations at both churches, only 25. 12. Went to Stanhope today, being my appointed day for service there. Only two came, so with the old couple (Bollands) my congregation amounted to 4. 13. Weather still showery, did not go out anywhere, but employed myself indoors preparing sermons for Brisbane Water, & reading a little. 14. Went to Branxton per train this morning: the roads being so very bad after the rain that I thought I would spare my horse, for Comet is getting a little the worse for wear & came down with me last Sunday on the way to Branxton. I baptized two infants there today, one for Mrs Alderman at the Church & afterwards privately baptized Mr Davis's child, who is sick. ­ That, & paying a few visits, made up my day's work. 15. At home again today, writing my Report to the S.P.G. In the morning went to enquire after Mrs Lee, who has been suffering from a severe cold, & found her a good deal better. Learnt from the Lees that their neighbour Mrs Roland was very ill, so went in to see her also, & found her confined to her bed. 16. Went to visit Mrs Roland again after breakfast, still very poorly but I hope a little better. After dinner I went to call on Mr Cameron at his school, & learnt from him that Mr Hungerford was very ill. Called in to see him on the way back, but Miss H: seemed to think I had better not see her Father as it might excite him. Finished & closed my report this afternoon. Charlie Wyndham came by the 4 o'clock train, having travelled from Scone today. 17. Preparing for tomorrow's services & getting everything ready for my Brisbane Water journey which I commence tomorrow.

134

"An exhortation to bless God for his many mercies, & the continuance thereof" ­ Note at beginning of the psalm in the King James Bible.

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18. Sunday. Thick fog early in the morning, & it seemed doubtful how it was going to turn out, but just as I was stating out for the Branxton service, the sky began to brighten in the westward, & the day finished with a glorious sunset, which I thought predicted favourable weather for my journey. On arriving as the Wilderness, I found the measles had broken out there, one of Mrs Nott's children being laid up with that complaint. 19. Rode to Wollombi, calling by the way at Birmingham's, & one or two other places. Found Mr Greaves at home again, & looking very well. ­ The weather very fine. 20. Another delightful bright sunny day, rather warm at midday. Rode from Wollombi into Mangrove Creek, going down the new track to Douglass's Snr, who has selected a piece of land at the head of the creek. Was grieved to find that his wife had been sent away to the Lunatic Asylum at Tarban Creek. ­ Reached Douglass' Jnr about dusk, & found that Mrs D: had gone away for medical advice. ­ Stayed there the night. 21. Had Divine Service, morning at Upper Church, & afternoon at Lower, good attendance at both places & all seemed glad to see me. James Watkin's having shifted his quarters & gone higher up, I repaired to Pemberton's for a night's lodging. At the lower Church I baptized a child from the Hawksbury (Seymour's) & I also privately baptized a new born infant of Mrs Atkins. 22. Started after breakfast for Gosford, accompanied by Pemberton, as far as the blood tree. I rode down to the Sawmill, but found that Mr Scott was away in Sydney. The servant got me dome luncheon, after which I rode on to Gosford, calling by the way on as many as I could. Reached Mr Battlley's just at dark. 23. Spent the day visiting all the folks in Gosford, as well as Mrs Cotrill, Capper &c &c. 24. Had a troublesome eye, occasioned by a stye, which made me curtail my day's work. After making a few calls in E: Gosford, I rode out to Erina to see the Miss Donnesons & then returned to my quarters at Mr Battley's. 25. Sunday. Happily my eye was much better this morning, otherwise I should have had some difficulty in getting thro' my day's work. The day was calm & beautiful, as all the previous week had been, & both churches were well filled. At E: Gosford I preached from Acts: "Almost thou persuadest me to be a Xtian". I administered the Holy Communion to 27. ­ After the service at Kincumber, I repaired to Green Point, where I met with a kind welcome from our old friends the Nunns. 26. Spent the day visiting about Davis Town, commencing at Dr Auld's, & finishing at Dunlop's. 27. After breakfast I left Green Point, & came to the church at E: Gosford, for the purpose of baptizing any infants that might be brought to me. I had appointed 11 o'clock, but it was past 12 before they all assembled, & I then baptized eleven infants. It was a most lovely day again & the Broadwater never appeared more beautiful. After dinner we borrowed Coulter's boat, in which Tom Battley, Emily, Harriett & myself crossed the water to Point Clare. Found the Scotts all well, & very busy with their new house, which promises to be a very nice one. 28. Spent the day at Erina, going as far as James Fletcher's, where I baptized a little infant 3 days old. 29. After saying good bye to the good folks at Gosford, I started about one o'clock for Blue Gum Flat, where I had a nice congregation at 3 PM, Stayed at E: Walmsley's that night. At all parts of the district, collectors had been processing lists of promised subscriptions to the Clergy Stipend Fund, & I was much pleased to find Mr Walmsley had so good a list, amounting to upwards of 30. This makes a total of about 85, & I think 25 more may yet be obtained. 30. Started from Mr Walmsley's about 8 o'clock, a cold frosty morning with ice on the puddles in the road. Reached Cooranbong about one o'clock, where I found a congregation (unexpected) awaiting me. Mr F: Hely was among them. They Page No: 56

assembled at the house of William Deeves, where I baptized two infants & preached them a sermon from the text "What shall it profit a man to gain the whole world & lose his own soul?" After a cup of tea, I remounted my horse, & finished my journey very comfortably, reaching Mr Child's about ½ p. 5.

July 1865

1. Started from Mount Vincent after breakfast, with another beautiful day & reached E: Maitland soon after 12. Leaving my horse at Mr Tyrrell's, I took the train to Morpeth & made my report to the Bishop, with which he was well pleased. ­ I then walked back to E: Maitland & rode home in comfortable time & thus completed my journey. I never had such a favourable journey as far as weather was concerned: day after day bright cloudless sky &c &c. I found Anne & Marianne only at home, they having left Emily behind them at Dalwood. 2. Sunday. Had only the two services today ­ Lochinvar & Branxton. Mr Holmes's family being laid up with the measles, they sent word for me not to come this time, so I came home again from Branxton. 3. Started at 8 o'clock for Pokolbin & reached Birmingham's soon after ten. Had a very fair congregation & found Mrs Birmingham if anything better. Called at Mrs McDonald on the way back also at Wills's, Boughton's & Campbell's & then at the Holmes's. All the girls there have the measles but the boys have not yet taken it135. ­ Got home again after dark. 4. By the midday train Anne, Marianne & myself went to Maitland to make a few calls & do some shopping.136 Called on Mrs McKenzie & then on the Davisons: home again by evening train. 5. Remained at home today writing letters &c. Marianne went to Maitland by the early train under Charley's escort, to pay a visit to Mrs McKenzie. ­ Mr Duguid called in the morning & dined with us. ­ Went to see Mrs Roland in the evening, called on Mrs Lee also. 6. Quarterly Meeting of our Committee. Went to Morpeth by the early train, & after the business was over (& the dinner too), Mr Bode & I walked back to E: Maitland. I called at Dr McKenzie's to pick up Marianne, & we came home together per evening train. Mr Jas: Doyle teaed with us. 7. Anne & I arranged to ride to the Wilderness today to see how the invalids there are getting on, but just as we were ready to start, with the horses saddled at the door, down came the rain & obliged us to give up our ride. Spent the afternoon sermon-writing. 8. Beautiful morning again, so after breakfast we had the horses saddled & set off for the Wilderness. But in the lane we met Mr Holmes coming in to look for a nurse & he begged us not to go on, as the servant girl was laid up, & everything devolved on poor Mrs Holmes. We therefore called in to see Mrs Clift, & than came home again. ­ This afternoon I sharpened my pruning knife & then tried it on a few vines. 9. Sunday. Holy Commn at Branxton, 20 Communicants only. Not a very full congregation Gave notice at Lochinvar for Communion next Sunday. 10. Started after breakfast for Stanhope, but when half-way there recollected that I had arranged on my last visit not to go there today. I therefore turned off & went to visit Charles Hughes at Branxton, who is very ill with an abscess137 on his back, & came straight home.

135 136

The girls would have been playing with the Nott child ­ not the boys. Possibly the only time they didn't do "a little shopping". 137 Give thanks that you live in a post-antibiotic time.

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11. Was going to Luskintyre today, but it blew such a cold & boisterous wind from the N.W. that I gave it up & remained home to write letters. Called on Mrs Rowland & a few others in the evening. 12. My Branxton day. Had a most disagreeable ride up against a keen cutting wind. Spent the day visiting in the village after baptizing two infants at the Church. Found poor old Hughes I hope better. 13. Spent this day at Luskintyre, visiting from Mr Christian's, round by Russel's, Fairhall's, across to Mrs Pecks, & then home by Hall's & Prior's. ­ I found the Hickey family had flitted since I was last there. An object of my visit there today was to find whether Mr Glashan's attempt to introduce National School in that quarter had met with any success, & I find that it had not; none of the members of our Church who had promised to aid our School, having joined in the movement. 14. Went to Branxton this morning to visit Hughes whom I was pleased to find, I hope, a little better. I then went on to the Wilderness to see how the Holmes's were getting on with the measles. Mrs Holmes gave me a good report of her own children, but seems to have great fears about Mrs Nott's little boy. I called on the Cranes as I went, & then came straight home from the Wilderness. 15. Went to Morpeth to consult with the Bishop about Schools; & had a very favourable interview with his lordship, I have some hope now of getting the two Schools of Luskintyre & Pokolbin established. I called on Mrs Walsh also, & during my absence Mr Walsh called here, on his way home from a 3 weeks holiday up the country. 16. Sunday. Administered138 the Holy Communion to 29 at Lochinvar, among whom were 5 new Comnts. Did not go to the Wilderness, the measles being still there. 17. Spent the day at Luskintrye, inviting the people to meet me on Thursday at Heywood's, to settle matters about the School there. 18. At home today, chiefly engaged bottling off a cask of wine. 19. Branxton day. Spent it all in visiting, going as far as Clark Orman's. Was glad to find Hughes going on very favourably. 20. At home all the morning. After dinner, I went to my appointed meeting at Luskintyre. Only 6 persons attended, & I got them to pass a resolution expressing their consent to the proposition of the Bishop, & their willingness to use every exertion to carry out the work. (The girls went to Dalwood.) 21. Went to Pokolbin, to see what Mr Birmingham had done about the school there. Was glad to find he had obtained a few more subscriptions, which brings the amount over 40; but nothing has yet been done about the 35 for next year. I arranged, therefore, to ride over early on Monday Morning & spend the day & visit as many as I can. 22. At home today (wet morning). Mr Hall called in the morning & gave me 3 he collected yesterday at Luskintyre, & otherwise reported favourably. ­ Wrote to the Bishop about the two Schools, & in the afternoon I pruned a few vines. 23. Sunday. Being a cold windy day, & dirty roads rather, my congregations were not overwhelming. I expected a funeral at Branxton today, but found it was put off till tomorrow for an inquest. 24. Went to Dalwood today with Charlie, on my way to Branxton. We crossed the river at Fairhall's, & Charlie killed I think the largest black snake I ever saw. ­ Not exactly the day one would expect to see snakes out, - a very keen & strong N.W. wind, in the month of July. After lunch I rode on to Branxton for the funeral of Mrs Hinton, & made a few calls besides. 25. According to notice given both here & at Branxton, our meeting took place today to elect a Lay Representative for our Clerical Conference, but only three voters present, namely, Mr James Doyle, Mr Nash & Mr King. They went through the form of electing Mr Holmes, but as it is stated in the Synod Bill that 6 electors at

138

"Administered", never "gave".

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least must be present before the business of the election can commence, it now rests with the Bishop to accept Mr Holmes' election or not, as he thinks proper. Mr Doyle remained to dinner with us, & after dinner the girls rode away to Dalwood with Charlie, & I finished the day pruning vines. 26. Started before 8 this morning for Pokolbin, but before I got half way, met Matthews coming for me to go & visit old Job Noon, who is supposed to be dying. I went straight to his house & found the old man evidently drawing very near his end. ­ This detention again frustrated my purpose of visiting the people around Cessnock. I went on, however, to Mr Birmingham's, & with him called on a few of the people inviting them to a meeting next Monday. 27. Went out gain this morning to visit Job Noon, but on reaching the house found that he had died about 8 o'clock this morning. ­ Arranged for the funeral to take place at Mrs Blick's, on Sunday evening, on my way from Branxton to Mr Holmes's. I came round by the Wilderness & made a short call there, & then got home to dinner at 2 o'clock. Spent the afternoon pruning vines. 28. Went out to Peck's, at the back of Harper's Hill, her daughter, Mary Jane Gurr, having called to see me last night. After visiting Mrs Peck, I called in to see her bed-ridden neighbour, old Hawkins, & left him some Tracts to read. Returned to dinner & finished the day vine pruning. 29. After breakfast went as far as Phillip's, to see whether he would take the office of Sexton in the room of Howard, who has gone away. Called on Mrs Roland also, & found her getting on pretty well. ­ Spent the day among the vines again. ­ Charlie brought Marianne home from Dalwood this afternoon, leaving Emily there. Phillips came this evening, & agrees to be Sexton. 30. Sunday. Small congregations at Lochinvar, but very good at Branxton. I had a funeral at the Burial Ground at Mrs Blick's on my way to the Wilderness (Job Noon), the first funeral I have had in that neighbourhood. Resumed my services at Mr Holmes's, but only 4 came to the home, for they still have measles in the house. 31. Service this morning at Pokolbin, where I had a very good congregation, 35. Had a meeting after the service, about the School & got those present (about 12 in number) to put their names to a subscription list to make up by the end of the year, the 35 promised by the Bishop upon loan. On my way back I called to see Mrs Noon, also Miss Eiper [Piper?].

August 1865

1. Stayed at home & finished pruning the vines today. Spencer Holmes called in the morning ­ the first time he has been over since the measles. John got a man to come & help him kill the pigs today. 2. Had a long day at Branxton today, calling on different people, including those about the Station. Got a few subscriptions towards the purchase of a Harmonium for the Church there I also arranged with Harris the Constable about getting old Isaac Farrell conveyed to the Benevolent Society in Sydney. ­ On coming home I found the Dalwood folks had been & taken Marianne home with them. 3. Went to Kaludah after breakfast to say Good Bye to Mr James Doyle who is going up to their station for a few months. Made one or two calls on the way home. I then filled up some vacancies among the vines with some cuttings of Forsyth's Seedlings from Glenthorne. In the evening Anne & I walked as far as Neal's & called on Mr Winder's on the way home. 4. Rainy day, Remained at home & spent most of the day in (for me) rather unusual manner, namely, reading English Parliamentary speeches on the subject of the extension of the franchise. ­ The rain in the afternoon was very heavy at times, & very cold, from S. & S.W.

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5. Made a few calls in the village, this morning, & that was all my out of door work today, for the roads are in a fearful state of slush from yesterday's rain, & a few light showers today. Mr Winder called this afternoon & took away a good bundle of vine cuttings with him. 6. Sunday. The rain of the last two days, & the consequent slushy roads, thinned both my congregations today. Charlie brought the girls home from Dalwood this morning. 7. This should have been my Stanhope day, but the river being up, & weather rainy, I did not go. In the afternoon I just rode up to Gurd's & Wilton's to invite them both to the meeting tomorrow morning. 8. Had our meeting this morning according to notice, by whom Mr Holmes was unanimously elected as our Lay Representative. Mr James Doyle remained & spent the day with us. He starts up the country tomorrow. In the afternoon Wilton came & helped John cut down the dead gum tree which stood against the pound fence behind the church. With the aid of wedges & a long rope, which Mr Doyle's blackfellow fastened up in the branches we made it fall clear of every thing. Charley & Emily returned to Dalwood this evening. 9. Weather still rainy, I did not therefore go to Branxton, but spent the day writing a long letter to old Townshend, in reply to one that I received from him by last mail. 10. Went to Branxton today instead of yesterday, & after paying a few visits in the village, struck across to the river to visit Hinton, & his neighbour Watts, but found no one at home at either place. Came straight home & found Cyrus Doyle here, having important business to transact with me, a Licence matter. 11. After breakfast I rode over to Windermere to see Mr Green about the Luskintyre School. He now promises if the building is begun within three months, to give 5 at its commencement, & another 5 when finished. On my way back called at Houston's & Bellamy's, & then rode home through a heavy shower of rain. 12. At home all day letter writing &c. Wrote a long letter to Isabella. 13. Sunday. In consequence, I suppose, of the muddy state of the roads, had but a small congregation here, but at Branxton a very large one, 75. At Mr Holmes's only 18. Poor Mrs Holmes was laid up with bad headache. 14. Went to Pokolbin after breakfast, & spent the day visiting about that neighbourhood. I went first to Elliott's, & from thence to both families of Moore, & then around by "Marrowbone" & so came home about dusk in the evening. One chief object of my visit was to see if I could raise a sufficient number of promises to make up the 35 to repay the Bishop in the event of his lending that amount towards the building of their School, but I find there is no hope of doing so, & therefore I fear the School must be abandoned. 15. Started early this morning to attend the Conference. Found them all in Church, where I joined them. After Service was over, we adjourned to the School of Arts, where our meeting was opened by the Bishop, who gave us a most admirable address. At the outset of it he at once dropped the word Conference, & adopted Synod instead, which seems to give universal satisfaction139. 16. 17, & 18. Attended the Synod on each of these three days. Our proceedings terminated on Friday the 18th & I may safely say that I never attended any meeting which gave me so much real satisfaction. Among the Lay Representatives were several good speakers, & foremost of the number, the Honourable Joseph Docker, M.L.C., whose services were invaluable as Chairman of Committees. His experience as a Member of Parliament enabled him to initiate all into the proper routine of the mode of conducting business.- The utmost harmony & good feeling prevailed throughout, & I could almost feel sorry when our business was brought to a close

139

Elkin states that this was the first Synod of the Church of England held in Australia.

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19. At home today finishing off English letters, & preparing for tomorrow's services. Among others I wrote a letter to Mr Greenway in answer to one I had from him the other day. Towards evening I walked up to the Station to meet Anne & the girls who came down from Singleton by the 4 o'clock train, i.e. Anne & Marianne from Singleton & Emily from Branxton. 20. Sunday. Sacrament at Branxton, 20 Communicants. 21. At home today. With John's help I fixed the wire in part of the vineyard: to train out the vines upon. I called at the Hungerford's, & on Mr Cameron also, at the National School. 22. Anne & I rode to East Maitland today to visit Mrs Chambers, having heard that she was seriously ill. We were agreeably surprised to find her well enough to be out visiting, when we got there. She came in, however, shortly after we reached her house, & seemed rather weak, though very much better than she had been. ­ Whether is was [sic] going without my dinner at the usual hour, or from what cause, I know not, but at night one of my very bad headaches came on, - the first I have had for many months. 23. Went to Branxton, but was rather late in starting, - called at the Lindsays & dined there, where I met Mr Doyle & Louisa on their was to Singleton. Visited the School & made a few other calls. 24. Marianne & I had a nice ride out to the Wilderness to see the Holmeses, Beautiful day. 25. After dinner, Marianne & rode down to Maitland to meet Sarah Boydell & bring her home. 26. At home today, sermon writing, & also assisting John a little in the vineyard, putting up the wire. 27. Sunday. Two good congregations. ­ Administered the Holy Commn to 22 at Lochinvar. Spencer & Lizzie Holmes rode in to Church ­ Found Mr Holmes very poorly in the evening. 28. Service at Pokolbin, where I baptised 2 infants. A young man, a stranger, was among the congregation, who spoke to me after the service on the subject of a Marriage Licence, about which he is coming to see me tomorrow morning. 29. Mr Reuben Simpson Lind, my new acquaintance of yesterday, came this morning, according to promise, & obtained his Licence to marry Sarah Moore, daughter of Stephenson Moore, of Cessnock. ­ they purpose coming to be married here tomorrow. ­ I have been quite disabled from doing anything the greater part of the day, from an attack of what I think must be Influenza. ­ Anne, with Sarah Boydell & Marianne, walked to Kaludah this afternoon, but I was too unwell to go with them. 30. The wedding took place today, & so prevented me from going to Branxton. ­ Towards evening I rode over to Kaludah, to enquire after Mr James Doyle (from Hawkesbury) who is very ill, & I was grieved to find him suffering such intense pain. Mr Cyrus D: called just as I was preparing to start. ­ I saw his bride at Kaludah. 31. Went to Kaloudah this morning, & I was very glad to find that Mr James Doyle was somewhat better than when I saw him last evening, though still very unwell; but I hope a favourable turn has taken place, & that a few days will see him well again. I invited Mr Cyrus & his bride to come & spend tomorrow with us, which they consented to do. After dinner Sarah & Marianne accompanied me to Maitland, to aid me in the selection of a Harmonium for the Branxton Church. I bought one for 15 which we all thought a very nice one.

September 1865

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1. Rather an idle day as regards parochial work.- Mr. Cyrus Doyle & his bride came to spend the day with us, & their brother Henry also.- I went up to the station at noon to see whether Mr Paskin had sent the Harmonium up, as agreed upon: but it did not appear in the goods train. I spoke to Martin, however, & he promised to see to it. 2. Marianne & I went to Branxton by early train, where we found the Harmonium alright, & with the assistance of Mr. R. J. Kay, got it nicely placed, & the curtain &c. fixed.- We then had about an hour's practising, with some 6 or 8 young folks who came for the purpose, & so returned home by midday train, Marianne bringing a headache with her.- In the afternoon I helped John to finish staking the vines in the garden.- William Greig made his appearance in the evening from Brisbane Water. 3. Sunday. Another warm day. Marianne went to Branxton with me to play the Harmonium there, & Sarah also accompanied us to aid in the inauguration of it. It seems to give satisfaction to all, & I trust may be the means of attracting a few more to Church. We felt the heat very much at afternoon service here. 4. Went to Stanhope today, but the people did not expect me, so I had no service. Called upon them all, as also at Dalwood, Willah, & Kimmorely's. 5. Spent this day at Luskintyre trying what I could do in the way of raising subscriptions to make up the 35, to repay the Bishop's promised loan to that amount.- Got only 5-10 towards it. 6. Went to Branxton, calling first at Kaloudah to see how Mr. James Doyle is getting on, I was glad to see him sitting in the verandah.- Had my class at the school, & the re-opened the singing class, which I now hope will get on better with the aid of the Harmonium. 7. Took the 2 girls to spend the day with the Holmeses.- Sarah went to Morpeth yesterday to the Closes. 8. Went to Luskintyre again this morning calling on Mr. Green by the way. On talking over School affairs with Mr. Hall, he said that if I could get nine others to join, he would willingly make one of ten, to promise 2-10 each towards making up the Bishops promised loan of 35.- I afterwards saw Heywood & Prior, both of whom cheerfully consented to join in the proposal. Came home to dinner, & in the afternoon visited all the families between this & Goldings. 9. Went to Luskintyre again early this morning, & had a very satisfactory day. Beginning at Parkers, & coming home by Fairhall's, &c, I got 5 more promises of 2-10 each. & thus with a promise of 10 from Mr. Green, I have at last succeeded in making up the required amount; so that I hope it will not be long before we are in a position to begin our Schoolhouse.10. Sunday. Marianne accompanied me to Branxton in the afternoon to play the Harmonium, & went on with me to the wilderness [sic]. Thunderstorm during the night with fine soaking shower. 11. Spent the day visiting, from Crane's to Pallan's & Smith's, where I baptized two infants, & visited an old man (Smith) who seems not far from his end. Came about sunset. 12. Had a long day visiting all the people at Elderslie. Very windy disagreeable ride. 13. Branxton day. Visited Hughes, who is still very poorly;- Mrs. Orman, & old Isaac Farrar, besides a few other calls, then had my singing class, & came home later. 14. Anne & I went to Oswald in the morning to call on Mrs. Harper. Found Spencer Holmes & Lizzie here on our return.- In the evening we walked to see Mrs. James. 15. At home all this morning. In the afternoon took Anne to call on Mrs. Davies at Luskintyre. 16. At home all the morning, sermon-writing for tomorrow. Mr. Birmingham & his daughter called, with a young friend from Newcastle. In the afternoon we all enjoyed a delightful walk across the fields to Kalouda.- No word of the English Page No: 62

Mail yet.- The weather has been truly enjoyable the last 4 days, but we had frost yesterday & this morning. 17. Sunday. Holy Communion at Branxton, but only 15 Communicants. Marianne went with me to play the Harmonium.- Fair attendance at both Churches. 18. Rode to Morpeth today to see the Bishop, but found that he had gone away for a week to the McDonald &c. Called at the Parsonage & dined with the Walshes, called at the Closes also, & did some shopping in Maitland. 19. Marianne & I rode to Kirkton today, where I left her to spend a few days with the Kelmans. A smart shower came on just as I started to come home. 20. Branxton day. I spent some little time examining the Harmonium, which on Sunday last would scarcely give out any sound. I think I have improved it a little. Had my class at the School, & also the singing class. 21. Spent this day visiting the people about the coalpits at "Greta", & arranged to go & have service there next Saturday fortnight, the 7th. October, at ½ past 3P.M. There are some 8 or 9 Ch: of England families there besides some Presbyterians, who all seem quite willing to attend. 22. Made a few calls in the village in the morning, & had a class for an hour at the National School. Young Mr. Kelman with his sister & Miss Gordon, brought Marianne home. In the evening I went up to call on Mrs. Cook, the Bride, at the station. 23. At home all day, looking out sermons for tomorrow &c. &c. 24. Sunday.- Holy Communion at Lochinvar.- Very windy disagreeable day. On my way from Branxton to the Wilderness I met Patton, who informed me of the death of the old man Smith, whom I visited a fortnight ago. Arranged for the funeral tomorrow at ½ past 3. 25. Morning service at Pokolbin, where I baptized 2 infants. Returned from there to Branxton for the funeral, & after waiting more than an hour, Smith Jnr. came in to say they did not get the coffin out in time, so that the funeral could not take place before tomorrow morning.. 26. Went to Branxton by early train, & after the funeral of the old man, baptized a grandchild. Returned home by Midday train, & in the afternoon made Sunday calls in the village, inviting people to the School-feast on Thursday. 27. Rode over to Nash's in the forenoon to ask him to send his children to the schoolfeast. Then called at Bird's, where I found Mrs. Bird very ill, so much so that they were purposing to send for me.- I baptized her baby, about 3 weeks old.Suffering much from toothache & face ache all day, & it became very bad at Night, but suddenly left me about midnight. 28. School-Feast for the Sunday School today. The children all assemble at the Church at ½ p 9, & I had an examination of them, which lasted about 3 hours.- I was suffering a terrible headache all the time.- On the whole the children acquitted themselves tolerably well. At one o'clock they all adjourned to the paddock at the back where ample provision awaited both young & old, & all seemed thoroughly to enjoy themselves. 29. Went in the forenoon to see Mrs. Bird whom I was glad to see much better than on Wednesday. In the afternoon Marianne & I rode in to Maitland to see about a Harmonium to exchange, [if] need be, with the Branxton one, which does not answer our expectations. On the way down we overtook Alfred Walters driving a cart towards Maitland, in which he was conveying the old Shoemaker, W. Turner, to Hospital. Just as I came up with the cart I found the poor old man to be dying, & he expired while I was there. 30. The Constable called upon me this morning to request my attendance at the Inquest upon the body of poor old Turner, at the "Spread Eagle". I was detained 2 hours waiting for the Coroner, & got home to dinner.- Afternoon preparing for tomorrow.

Page No: 63

October 1865

1. Sunday. Hot day. Clouded over towards evening, when distant thunder was heard. Began raining gently about 9 or 10, & continued all night.- Two good congregations today, & the largest attendance at the Sunday School that ever we had- 49. 2. My appointed day for Stanhope. I started about half past 8 in the rain, but after passing Mark Putter's, it came on so heavily that I felt convinced had I gone on, I should not have found any congregation, so I turned off to Branxton, where I packed up the Harmonium, to be returned to Mr. Paskins in Maitland, & then visited poor old Hughes. Came home very cold & wet. 3. Beautiful day after yesterday's rain. Went over to Luskintyre after breakfast & made a few calls, & returned to dinner. This afternoon the Sunday School children came & received their prizes, with which they were all highly delighted. 4. Went to Branxton, where I began by administering the Holy Communion to Charles Hughes. I then made a few calls in the village, & finished with an hour at the School. 5. Went to Morpeth to attend the Quarterly Committee Meeting. Dined with the Walshes, & the rode on to Paterson viâ Hinton. The object of my journey thither was to see Mrs. Henry Brooker, (formerly Elizabeth Muddle) & see whether they could render any assistance to poor William's Widow, by taking one or two of the children.140 Remained the night with Mr. Addams. 6. Called on the Brookers first thing after breakfast, but did no good thereby. Came home by way of Maitland; where I called on Mr Paskins, & made an exchange of Harmonium with him. Got home about 2 o'clock, & at the gate met the Miss Lindsays coming to call. They brought a young friend, Miss Gilbert, with them. 7. Mr Doyle called this morning to ask me to go & baptize a young child of their Groom, Beckett, which they feared was seriously ill. Being the day appointed for a service at Greta, (Anvil Creek coal mines) I started half an hour earlier, & called in at Kaloudah, & baptized the sick baby. At Greta I had a very fair beginning with a congregation of 25 or thereabouts, & baptized 2 infants. Gave notice of my intention of having service there again this day 4 weeks, at 4 P.M. 8. Sunday. Services as usual, Lochinvar, Branxton & the Wilderness. ­ very hot day. 9. Very hot again, spent the day visiting among the "Free Selecters" [sic] on McDonald's Creek &c. 10. While preparing for a good day's writing, just after breakfast a knock came at the front door, & on opening it, Mr Shaw announced himself, having left Sydney last night, & come by early train from Newcastle. The reason for not seeing his arrival in the papers was, his having come direct from to Melbourne, instead of Sydney. ­ I am delighted to find that he is pleased with the idea of going to Brisbane Water. But we must now keep him till the Bishop returns from the Clarence.141 ­ He has brought a boy servant with him from England. ­ Sarah Boydell returned to us this evening. 11. Branxton day. Went through the usual work in that quarter & returned late. 12. Took Mr Shaw to introduce him to Dalwood today. Sarah & Emily went with us, & we all enjoyed the ride much. 13. At home today with the exception of an hour at the National School. 14. Took a trip to Singleton today to show Mr Shaw that part of the country, & introduce him to Henry's family, Mr Blackwood, the Church & the Bridge, with all of which he seemed well pleased. The weather was fine & enjoyable.

140 141

William was killed by running into a tree. Alfred doesn't sound too happy about this.

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15. Sunday. Mr Shaw accompanied me to Branxton & preached for me there as well as at Lochinvar in the afternoon. Marianne went with us also to play the new Harmonium, which seemed to give satisfaction. Two very good congregations today. 16. Went to Morpeth with Mr Shaw to look for his English letters which he found at the Bishop's ­ Introduced him to Mr Walsh, & afterwards to Mr Tyrrell, at whose house we dined, & then walked to West Maitland where we had a little business to perform transact after which we came home by evening train. 17. Took Mr Shaw to the Wilderness to introduce him to the Holmeses. Rather a hot day & very windy. We took a walk while there to see the new vineyard on the hill.142 18. Branxton day. I visited Mrs Goodwin & Hughes on the way up ­ the latter seems recovering again. I also found another sick patient in Mrs Zimmerman. Had my usual class at the School, & then singing class. Emily & Sarah Boydell rode up with the Doyles as far as Mrs Lindsay's where the [sic] spent the day & we all rode home together. 19. Spencer Holmes called today, & took Mr Shaw home with him to spend a day or two. Towards evening we walked as far as Houston's, at Windermere. 20. Paid a few visits in the lane this morning, & then went to the School for an hour. In the afternoon I went to visit Mrs Bellamy, who is very ill. Found her a little better, than she was. Marianne & Sarah took a ride today with the Doyles part of the way to Singleton to start Mr Robert Doyle off on his journey up the Country, as they had done with Mr & Mrs Cyrus on Wednesday. They had a delightfully cool day for their ride. 21. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's work, paid a visit to Mrs Bellamy. 22. Sunday. Mr Shaw read the prayers, & I preached this morning at Lochinvar, & vice versa at Branxton. Mr Shaw accompanied me to the Wilderness. 23. Pokolbin day, but a small congregation. Called at Mr McDonald's on my way back, but found no one at home. Returned to dine at Mr Holmes's, & Mr Shaw returned with me in the evening. 24. Mr & Mrs Tyrrell, & Mr Walsh, came up this morning by invitation. The two gents with Mr Shaw & myself rode over to Dalwood & had a very hot ride. I visited Mrs Bellamy by the way & found her still very poorly. 25. Went to Branxton today, but was late starting, so I had not much time for visiting. Had my classes as usual ­ School & singing. 26. Paid Mrs Bellamy another visit this morning & found her suffering very much. Made one or two calls on the way back. 27. Mr Shaw & I went to Morpeth by early train hoping to find the Bishop, but he had not returned ­ came back again per Midday train. 28. At home today, Went to meet Mrs Scott & her daughter Mary, who came down from Branxton per Midday train. Received a letter from the Bishop this morning, announcing his arrival in Sydney & inviting Mr Shaw to Morpeth this evening, so he set off by the 4 o'clock train. 29. Administered the Holy Communion to 20 at Branxton this morning, including Marianne, who (being a nice cool day) went with me to play the Harmonium. It was almost a cold day : indeed I was glad of a fire in the evening. Willie Boydell came to spend the day. 30. Started for Morpeth by the early train, by invitation of the Bishop, to talk over Brisbane Water matters. Mr Shaw returned with me by Midday train, after arranging everything about our visit to Brisb: Water, for which place we are to set out on Monday next. Young Gurd came in the afternoon & agreed to carry Mr Shaw's goods to Gosford for 7. He is to come tomorrow to load & start. Towards evening Mr Shaw, Sarah Boydell, Mary Scott & myself took a ride to the top of

142

The Wilderness is flat ­ was this the vineyard on Caerphilly, which is quite hilly?

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Summer Hill. Found the wind very keen there, not exactly the thing to cure my head colds, which has been a week upon me. 31. At home today writing despatches to Brisbane Water & Mangrove Creek, announcing our intended visit thither next week. In the afternoon I drove Mrs Scott & Mary to the station in Mr Doyle's dogcart & saw them safely off in the train to Newcastle. Sarah went to Kaloudah this evening to spend a day there with the Doyles. William Gurd came about noon, & got his load for Brisbane Water & started with it. 143

November 1865

1. Had a day's visiting at Luskintyre, to collect some of the promised subscriptions for the School. Called on Yeo, Cloudy, Parker, Burgiss, Mrs Peck, & Hall. On the way home I called on Mr Green, then at Houston's, Walker's, & Bellamy's. Found Mrs Bellamy no better. Had rather a hot day of it, the thermor being 97 in the shade. 2. Very hot again today, the thermr reached 100 in the shade. Having a little indoor work to do, writing &c, I did not expose myself to the burning sun. Before 2 o'clock however, one of those sudden changes of wind from N.W to S.E. came on, which soon lowered the thermr by more than 20 degrees. Spencer called in the morning on his way to Maitland with horses to sell, & returned in the aftn & took tea with us. A grateful thundershower came on about 4 P.M. 3. Rained hard the greater part of the day, so I did not go out, till towards evening it held up, I stepped across to see old Redman, who has been laid up for a few days from a bad leg, occasioned by a kick from a horse. This rain has been most seasonable, & I hope general. It continued all night after the thunderstorm of yesterday, so that we have had nearly 24 hours of it. 4. Visited Mrs Bellamy this morning, & was glad to find her much better. I also sent an Advertisement to the Editor of the Maitland Mercury inviting tenders for the Luskintyre School house. In the evening I called on Mrs Taylor, Mrs New & the Lees. 5. Sunday. Having still a bad cold, I sent word to the Holmeses that I should not venture to the Wilderness, as I felt the two services of Lochinvar & Branxton would be quite enough for me, especially as I should have to return home late at night to be ready for a start to Brisbane Water in the morning. 21. This blank in my journal is occasioned by my absence at Brisbane Water for nearly a fortnight, having gone down with Mr Shaw to introduce him to his new parishioners. We started about ½ p 10 on Monday morning, the 6th, & just as we arrived at E: Maitland, (Mr Tyrrell) a great thunderstorm came on which kept us prisoners for more than 3 hours. About ½ p 4 we resumed our journey, which was rendered tedious by the muddy roads, so that it was quite dark when we reached Mount Vincent, where we were entertained with their wonted kind hospitality. ­ On Tuesday we made an early start under a brilliant sky, & got to Currumbong soon after ten, (found Mr F: Hely just preparing to start with his niece, Caroline, to Newcastle) Edwd Hely rode on with us to Currumbong, where we has service at Wm Davis's, & Mr Shaw baptized an infant. ­ After a cup of tea, we proceeded to Mr Solling's station, having heard that he was there very ill. Found him in bed, & with his son Carl, & Ellen nursing him. Was glad to find his disorder had taken a favourable turn. ­ We has a slow tedious ride that day, the rods [sic] being so immersed in water by the Monday's storm, & it was ½ p 8 before we reached the saw mills. Mrs Scott was away but had made provision for our accommodation ­ Wednesday the 8th we rode into Gosford, calling by the way on all the cottagers. Reached Gosford about 1 P.M. & were invited by Mr

143

What's happened to Mr Shaw's servant boy?

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Battley to his house, where I remained during my sojourn there. Thursday morning, the 9th, we married George Spears & Jane Cranse. In the afternoon tried to get a boat to cross to Point Clare but could not, so made one or two calls instead. Friday morning we rode up to Erina & called on Miss Donneson, & her Swadling neighbours, also rode out to the School, & saw the Chapmans, after which we hastened back for the arrival of the Steamer at E. Gosford & then repaired to Mr Battley's for dinner. Saturday Mr Shaw wanted at home to arrange his goods & chattels in the Parsonage, so I amused myself by going to see the Nunns, at Green Point, & then the Miss Donnesons again, also Mr Chapman. Got caught in a thunderstorm on my way home again. Sunday was not quite so fine a day as I desired, it began with a very warm & high wind from the N.W.: I think the threatening appearance of the weather kept some from Church. The congregations were, however, very fair, & Mr Shaw apparently left a very favourable impression upon them. A heavy thunderstorm came on while we were in Church at Kincumbar, but it ceased raining by the time the service was over, so that we got to Green Point without a wetting. There we remained the night & on Monday morning we returned to Gosford, Mr Shaw wishing to arrange his household affairs. ­ I paid a few visits in Gosford, & towards evening returned to Green Point. On Tuesday morning I again went to Erina, to say Good Bye to the Miss Donnesons. In the afternoon Mr Shaw, Tom Battley & myself went across the water to Point Clare, Edward Scott having by appointment brought the boat for us. I was most pleased & struck with the growth of the Orange Trees since I last saw them. Both the Orange plantation & the Apple orchard seem to be in a most thriving condition. ­ On Wednesday morning Mr Shaw & I made an early start for Mangrove Creek, & reached Pemberton's by about one o'clock: had service at the Lower Church at 3 P.M. On Thursday morning we had service at the Upper Church at 10 A.M. : at the conclusion of which Mr Shaw married John Hilman & Mrs Doel. We then repaired to Douglass's for lunch, & about one o'clock I started, with a headache, to ride 35 miles to Wollombi, while Mr Shaw started home to Gosford.144 It was a hot afternoon, & I was very tired when I reached Mr Greaves' parsonage at 8 P.M. ­ On Friday I came home from Wollombi, dining at the Wilderness & visiting there till towards the cool of the evening, & right glad was I to find myself once more at home. On Saturday I rested looking out sermons for the Sunday services. ­ On Sunday I fell into my usual routine, having morng service at Lochinvar with Holy Communion ; 26 Communicants. ­ Small congregations at Branxton & the Wilderness. ­ Yesterday, Monday, was my Pokolbin day. A very small congregation, the result I suppose, of it being harvest time. It was a hot day, & I came straight home from Mr Birmingham's. Today being the day appointed for receiving the tenders for the Luskintyre School, I remained at home, lest any persons should call. None came, however, but I received two tenders, - one from Gellatley for 197.10 & the other from a Maitland builder, Joseph Creer, for 222-10, both far beyond our means145. In the evening I rode out to see Mrs Bellamy, who was much better than when I last saw her. 22. Had terrible hot day at Branxton, where I went through my usual Wednesday work. On coming home at night I found the thermometer had been 102 in the shade. 23. Another dreadfully hot day. Thermtr same as yesterday ­ 102. I started about 7 A.M. to ride to Morpeth, where I had an hour's chat with the Bishop, on Brisbane Waters affairs & Luskintyre School, - got home soon after 12, well nigh roasted. 24. Rode to Luskintyre this morning to see the Russells about the School Building there. Found only one of them at home, & he is to consult his brother, & be

144 145

I repeat, what happened to Mr Shaw's servant boy? The planned amount was 150.

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25. 26.

27.

28. 29. 30.

prepared with an answer by Monday evening. On my return I found a letter from Mr Shaw, & some others requiring answers. Towards evening, Rosa D:, Emily B:, Marianne & myself walked over to Kaloudah. Rainy morning. Borrowed Mr Read's vehicle to drive Rosa Davidson to the Station to catch the midday train to Maitland. Sunday. Being a cool cloudy morning with S.E. winds, I took Marianne with me to Branxton to play the Harmonium. Heavy rain overtook us at Harper's Hill, & we had some showers throughout the day. But a small number attended. On returning to old Avis's we found that a pig had found its way into the kitchen during service, & upset the chair on which Marianne's wet riding coat was drying into the fire, & completely burnt it. Being Stanhope day, I took all three girls with me to Dalwood, & left them there to spend the day while I went on to attend to my work. ­ I found only 8 there to form a congregation. One family (Toms) had gone away, & the Yeo's are about to leave also, to go to Merriwa ­ I therefore told them that I should discontinue the services there, but that I would be glad to visit them occasionally. Called at Russell's on the way home to see John about the School building. I found that his brother George has some months' work on hand at Mr Green's, & John does not seem disposed to undertake the work by himself. At home today letter writing &c, Mr Buist came in the afternoon & tuned the piano. ­ The Lees came & spent the evening with us. Branxton day ­ usual work there. ­ Visited all about the Station. I took the two Emilys to the Wilderness today, while Anne & Marianne went to Maitland to do a little shopping. ­ Getting warm again.

December 1865

1. Remained at home today sermon-writing &c. very hot day. ­ Therm 98. 2. Engaged in the morning writing a letter or two. In the afternoon, being the day appointed for service at the coalmines (Greta) I rode out in due time & found one woman & 5 small children awaiting me ­ I therefore returned home again & in the face of such unwillingness to assemble, shall not renew the attempt.146 ­ Carl & Ellen Solling came & spent the day with us. 3. Sunday. Called away just after breakfast to baptize a dying infant at Nott's. Was just in time to do so before it expired. Had another baptism after service, John Nash's baby. This pretty well filled up my time, so that I was kept on the stretch the whole day. 4. Came home to dinner from the Wilderness, thinking I might be wanted to bury the little child I baptized yesterday morning, but found on reaching home that they were going to bury it at West Maitland. ­ I came by way of Dalgetty, & called on the people there. ­ In the afternoon Cousin John & Capt: Champain arrived, the latter went on to Kaloudah, - I rode over to Luskintyre to see John Russell about the School building but nothing definite yet. On my return found New here wanting his child baptized, as he wishes to start up the country early tomorrow morning. ­ I therefore baptized his child. 5. Went to Kaloudah with Cousin John, & spent the morning inspecting the vineyard &c. 6. Went to Branxton as usual. On the road met the Kelmans coming to spend the day with us, so after making a few calls in Branxton I returned to dinner. 7. The 2 Emilys & myself went by appointment to spend the day with the Sollingses in Maitland.

146

Perhaps they were all at work, even on Saturday?

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8. At home today. Went to the National School for an hour in the morning. Made an attempt to revive the singing class in the afternoon ­ but only 3 came. Hope to do better next week. Cousin John went to Singleton today 9. Cousin John left us this morning to return home. Paid a round of visits in the forenoon, calling on Bellamy, Walker, Houston, Green (not at home) Nott, Wilton & Gurd. Threatened great thunderstorm in afternoon, but came to naught. 10. Sunday. Services as usual, & well attended. Threatened storm in afternoon but ended in wind. 11. Spent the day visiting at Elderslie. H: McDonald called in the evening about Luskintyre School. 12. Went to Morpeth by early train to see the Bishop about Luskintytre School. He has arranged to come up & visit the place next Thursday week. I repaired from the Bishop's to the wharf, where the steamer was just coming in, with Uncle Ferris on board. ­ We came up by the midday train, having first visited the Book Depôt. 13. Went to Branxton in the morning. Returned by was of Dalwood to consult Mr Wyndham about getting poor old Sam147 into the Hospital. 14. Went to Maitland this morning, chiefly to see Mr Chapman about getting an order for Sam's admission into the hospital. Terrible hot day ­ thermomtr 102 in the shade. 15. Yesterday I gave John permission to go to Dalwood to see after a horse he has there, & as he did not return last night, I went in search of him, & found he had got intoxicated, which prevented his coming home. Still hotter than yesterday the thermo reached 106 in the shade. 16. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services &c. Thunderstorm in afternoon, called on Mrs James in the evening. 17. Sunday. Rather windy day. Congregations rather below the usual number. 18. Service at Pokolbin in the morning. On my way back called on Mrs Noon, & Mrs McDonald ­ a most delightful day ­ nice cool wind from W. & N.W. 19. At home all the morning. In the afternoon Ferris & I took a ride into Maitland. Tom Battley arrived just as we were preparing to start. 20. Went to Branxton today where I baptized Mrs Rue's baby. Had my usual class at the School, & paid a few visits. Also spent some little time cleaning out the Harmonium, which I found the Cockroaches had taken possession of. Very warm day. Uncle Ferris left us per Midday train for Singleton. 21. One of the most disagreeable days I ever experienced. A terrible hot wind, that sent the thermometer up to 106 in the shade. Between 4 & 5 PM, a great gale came on from the westwd, which blew down the Rom: Catholic Chapel opposite our house. I had been watching it for some time, expecting it every minute to go down, as the side was bulged in a good deal for some minutes before it went. Just as the storm commenced, Mr Thomas Shaw, from Gunnedah, made his appearance, having come down by the 4 o'clock train from Singleton. He is on his way to Brisbane Water. The Bishop was to have been here this afternoon, to go to Luskintyre, but I suppose the extreme heat kept him home. 22. The first thing after breakfast I visited a sick man in the village, named Cook (as I had also both yesterday & the day before.) He is suffering from the effects of sunstroke. A young man, who married a daughter of Graham the Blacksmith nearly 12 months ago. ­ Although he has been living here for two years, I never heard of him before. He seems very weak & ill, but I trust he will get better soon. ­ At home the rest of the day, writing &c &c. Mr Shaw went away by early train this morning. 23. Went to see Cook again this morning. Found no alteration in him. Being Saturday I kept to my rule of not going out visiting. Occupied myself at home preparing for

147

Sam Thatcher (worker on?) Dalwood.

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the services of tomorrow & the next day. Also drawing out a plan for strengthening our Church, so as to prevent it being blown down as the Chapel opposite was. 24. Sunday. Congregations not overflowing. ­ At Branxton I administered the Holy Comm: to 17.& gave notice for afternoon service tomorrow. Baptized two infants in the afternoon at Lochinvar, & gave notice of Holy Commn tomorrow morning. 25. Xmas arrived once more, a tolerably fine day, thermr 90 in the shade. ­ too hot for Marianne to go with me to Branxton. ­ I was disappointed with my congregation here in the morning, under 60, & only 18 Communicants. At Branxton I had a nice congregation of 66 in the afternoon. ­ Felt more tired than usual at night. 26. Got up with a headache this morning, but it wore off as the day advanced. I visited Cook in the morning, & was glad to find him apparently better. ­ Had a wedding today ­ Henry Brien & Clara Knight ­ John & Mary Ann took holiday today with the rest of the world, & went to Maitland, taking Mrs James with them. The day was delightfully cool & breezy ­ from SE ­ Mr James Doyle came in the afternoon, with his little sister Florence, & spent the evening. 27. Visited Cook again in the morning, he seems gradually improving, tho' still very weak. This afternoon the Bishop came by appointment about ½ p. 3 to go across & inspect the site of the School at Luskintyre. We first went to Kaloudah, & called on Mr Doyle, whom we found with Henry only at home. From thence we rode through the paddock & vineyard into the lane & so on to Luskintyre. The Bishop seemed quite to approve of the spot selected for the School. We returned by Windermere & called on Mr Green. 28. Borrowed Mr Read's cart & went up to the Station to meet Elizabeth & Uncle Ferris, who, with Mary, came down from Singleton by early train to spend a few days with us. In the forenoon I went & paid Mr Winder a visit, & found him suffering a little from a kick from a cow. ­ In the afternoon I rode up to Harper's Hill to see the man H: McDonald & consult him about cutting some posts to support the Church. He was not at home, so I left with his wife a plan of the posts I wanted, & arranged for him to come & see me on Saturday evening. Called on Samuels, & on Mrs Harper on my way home. 29. Very hot day again. Did not go out, except to visit Cook, who seems improving. 30. Drove the Singleton party back to the Station this morning. Ferris, being tired of the hot weather, has made up his mind to return to Sydney on Monday. ­ Saw G: Molster & wife, also bound for Singleton. Was grieved to hear from him that Mrs Child at Mt Vincent had been upset in their cart, returning from Church, & seriously injured. Also learnt that a destructive fire had occurred in Singleton last night. 31. Sunday. Small congregation at Lochinvar, but better at the other two places. Preached appropriate "close of the year" sermons at all three places. I also used the prayer for rain today, as the whole country is suffering greatly from the effects of drought. I found Miss Scott staying at the Wilderness with the Holmeses. ­ Poor Mrs Holmes was affected by one of her painful headaches.

January 1866

1. Here we have arrived at the commencement of another year, & it has set in warmly. [Wen]t to see old Mrs. Noon in the morning, calling at Boughton's, Campbell's, Will's, & Eiper's ...des. Found that Mrs. Noon had heard from her son at Talbragar, & I promised to write to him for her:- Returned to dinner at the Holmeses at 2 o'clock.- In the afternoon a slight thundershower passed over, which cooled the air nicely, & laid the dirt upon my homeward road. Got back in

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the cool of the evening. Found that a German (Brosi) from Fern Hill, had called to request me to go & baptize his sick child. 2. Set out for Dalwood & Fern Hill after breakfast, & found the little infant looking very sickly & delicate, therefore I at once gave it "Private Baptism". I then went to call at Jesse Judge's & from thence fell back upon Dalwood for lunch: after which I accompanied Alick & Miss Wyndham on their way to Lochinvar as far as the turn off to Mrs. Pecks, whom I went to visit.- On coming home afterwards I found they had not been here- being driven back again, I presume, by a terrible looking thundercloud, which boasted great things, but came to nothing. 3. At home today, among other things I set John to work to commence putting up a high fence in the corner of the garden near the house, & got old Glass to come & help him. Alick Wyndham & his sister called in the afternoon. 4. Went to Morpeth to attend the Quarterly Meeting there, & returned by the midday train. 5. At home again, superintending & assisting John with the fence.- Singing class in the afternoon. 6. Ditto ...ditto... preparing for tomorrow's services &c. Spencer Holmes called & dined with us. 7. Sunday. Terribly hot.- Had a Baptism in the morning at Branxton (Fairhall) & three here in the afternoon. Several persons had to leave the Church from the heat.- I had to strip off every article of clothing, to replace them with dry clothes. At ½ p. 6.P.M. the thermometer stood at 106 in the Church. At both Churches I read the Governor's Proclamation & gave notice about the day of Fasting & Humiliation next Friday. 8. Almost as hot as the 8th January 1843.- The thermometer reached 108 in our verandah, 126 suspended in the sun, & 134 resting on the grass. I was busy all day preparing my sermon for Friday. 9. Busy sermon-writing. In the evening James Parkin of Stanhope came to report the death of his child & I arranged with him to be at the Grave Yard at Branxton at 3.P.M. tomorrow. 10. Getting on with my sermon.- In the afternoon I went to Branxton to bury the little child. 11. Finished my sermon.- Helping John &c. &c. 12. Fast Day. I was much gratified at finding it so well observed. All work seemed to have been suspended, & both my churches were well attended. 101 at Lochinvar & 80 at Branxton. I preached for Joel 2: 12, 13. The collection at the two churches amounted to 5-13-8. 13. Busy today helping John, & looking out sermons for tomorrow.- Two members of the Roman Catholic Church called upon me today to ask a subscription towards the re-building of their Chapel, which I was sorry to be obliged to decline.- I tried to explain to them my motives, but I doubt if they could understand them. Mr. James Doyle came in the afternoon, & remained the evening. 14. Sunday.- 55 years have I now been in this world.- Often in my sermons do I remind my hearers of the rapid flight of time, & the near approach of the end of their pilgrimage- "Lord! So teach me to number my days, that I may apply my heart unto true wisdom."- I was forcibly struck with the appropriateness of the first psalm in the morning's service (71st), & we sang four verses of it to that beautiful tune, St. Leonard's.- My congregations were pretty fair at all three places. 15. Service at Pokolbin in the morning. Only 18 present.- Mr. Birmingham handed in the amount of his collections for the Stipend Fund which came to 2-7-6 only. Very hot day again. Therm. 101. 16. Did not feel at all equal to going out today, after yesterday's roasting: so I remained at home & tried to read a little but could not get on.- so drowsy & heavy.- Wrote one or two notes, & took them to the Post, John being unwell with Lumbago. Page No: 71

17. Another very hot day-(103) I started at 7 AM for Kirkton, where I had not been for a long time, & where I found Wm. Kelman & his motherless children.148- By the way I called at Alfred Goodwin's, & all the other intervening places in that quarter.- No appearance of rain yet. 18. Went to Anambah today, calling by the way at Naseby's, Bird's, Nash's, Dann's &c. I reached Mr. Cobb's just as Mrs. C. & her children were sitting down to dinner, & therefore I took my seat with them. Called at Wilton's & Gurd's on the way home. The day was cloudy, with a soft gentle wind from the SE & had every appearance of gathering for rain. This evening the rain began to fall gently. May it increase & continue! 19. Delightful rain all the morning (& the greater part of last night.) Held up in the afternoon & seemed inclined to clear up again. I remained indoors writing the greater part of the day. 20. Fine again this morning & no more rain fell during the day; but the weather still seems unsettled.- Sermon-writing all the morning for tomorrow. In the afternoon I wrote to my Wollombi correspondent, Mary Hibbs, in reply to a nice letter I received from her a short time ago, in which she informed me of the death of her sister, Susan. 21. Sunday. Weather rather unsettled, so congregations not large.- Used the Thanksgiving for Rain. 22. Weather still unsettled. Drizzly rain in morning. Remained at home.- Mended mousetrap, & then copied out a very interesting copy of a letter from Alexander to John David, which I received yesterday from Isabella149.- In the afternoon I went through the vineyard marking some of the varieties of grapes which were not correctly done before.- Mr. James Doyle called. 23. Marianne & I went to the Wilderness & spent the day with the Holmeses. 24. Branxton day. No singing class in consequence of a funeral of a little child in the afternoon. Spent the day visiting, beginning with the Lindsays, with whom I dined. Had the company of Mr. Doyle on my road home. 25. John being very ill, & unable to do anything this morning, I rode in to Maitland to get Dr. McKenzie to come & see him.- I found that both Dr. & Mrs. McKenzie were away in Sydney, but his partner, Dr. Waddell came up in the afternoon & pronounced his complaint to be the same as this time last year,- inflammation of the liver.150- He ordered leeches &c., for which I had to send to Maitland in the evening.- Some of the Holmeses & Doyles came & spent the day with us.- Very hot again today. 26. The seventy-eighth anniversary of the foundation of the Colony.- It has been a nice cool day for the pleasure-seekers: a cloudy sky with cool SE wind.- We took our holiday quietly at home, & had a very small singing class in the evening. John still very poorly. 27. John being no better this morning, but apparently worse, I went by early train to Maitland, to get Dr. Waddell to come & see him again.- Having done everything I had to do by about 9.35. I did not see why I should idle away between 3 & 4 hours waiting for the midday train, so I set off & walked home.- I certainly had a very hot walk, the thermor. being about 95 in the shade when I reached home at about 11.20. The doctor came in the afternoon, by which time John was a little better. Mr. Davies of Luskintyre called this afternoon & brought his collections, amounting only to about 5. I fear we shall come short this year.

148

William Kelman had married Sarah Busby in 1859, and they had four children before she died, probably in childbirth, on 2nd December 1865. 149 Of his dozen surviving siblings, these three seem to be the only ones mentioned as sending or receiving letters from Alfred. 150 Cirrhosis of that organ?

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28. Sunday. Very nice congregation here in the morning.- Administered the Holy Commun to 22. Rather a warm ride to Branxton, where I had also a fair attendance, as well at the Wilderness. 29. Spent all the morning visiting among the little "Free selectors" in the neighbourhood of McDonald's.- Returned to dine at Mr. Holmes's, & the rode home in the cool of the evening calling at Mr. Clifts by the way. Found John a little better. Mr. Solling & Ellen here. 30. At home today.- The principal work was gathering & packing three boxes of grapes to send away by the aftn. Train- One for Willie & Uncle Ferris in Sydney, & one each for Mr. Tyrrell & Mrs Davidson, East Maitland. Mr. Doyle called in the afternoon & inspected our little vineyard, with which he was much pleased. 31. Went to Branxton today viâ Dalwood. Both the girls started with me, but we had not gone many paces before we discovered that Nelly was quite lame in one of her hind legs; so we had to return & turn her out again. Marianne then went with me to Dalwood, & after lunch I rode on to Branxton, where I made one or two calls & had my singing class & then came home again by Dalwood. Found Mr. James Doyle here on our return, come to hand over his Collections for the Stipend Fund.

February 1866

1. At home today. Made up my return of Baptisms &c. for the last month &c. &c. 2. Mr. Winder called this morning with his collections, so that I have now received all for Lochinvar. The total amount I think will be some what less than last year.John Wyndham told me the other day he hopes the Branxton collection will reach 70.- John is getting much better again now. 3. At home letter writing & preparing for tomorrow's services.- Not a little astonished in the evening by the appearance of Henry from Singleton. He was called down to attend Mrs. Cooke, the station master's wife, so just walked down to tea with us. 4. Sunday. Being a nice cool day Marianne went with me to Branxton to play the Harmonium.- Congregation below the average, & only 15 Communicants. 5. Went up to the station this morning & baptized Mrs. Cooke's little baby, it being somewhat doubtful it wd. Live.- Called on Mrs. Clift also, & afterwards on Mrs Clark, Dann, & Mrs. H. King.- also on Mrs. New. In the afternoon we packed up a box of grapes & sent them off per train to the Scotts at Newcastle.- John is now able to resume work. 6. This morning I rode out as far as Mrs. Brown's beside the Railway, & on the way back called at Neal's, Bate's & Mrs. Tuckey's.- Towards evening Henry arrived again just as Anne & myself were preparing to ride to Windermere, & having his fishing tackle with him he walked with us.- We called on Mrs. Green, & then at Houston's on our return. 7. Went to Belford today, to visit the few families there, 3 in number only- Hunt, Smith & Schultz.- No singing class attended, tho' I waited in the Church more than half an hour for them. Just as I was leaving Branxton, I learnt that Ralph Kay's youngest child was dead, so I went back to see them.- The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon. Had a fine shower on my way home about Harper's Hill. 8. At home all the morning, chiefly engaged writing, & among others, write to the Savings Bank about the Conveyance of Mr. Green's 2 acres at Luskintyre for the School.- Went to Branxton afternoon for the funeral of Kay's child. 9. At home Sermon-writing. Singing class in the afternoon, but only a small one. 10. Busy today making up my Statistical Return for the SPG. Hot weather come again.

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11. Sunday. Congregations middling. Very hot day, which I suppose kept some at home. 12. Service at Pokolbin, the smallest congregation, I think, that ever I had there. Had to get home as quickly as I could, to bury Mr. Cook's little infant that died yesterday. Had a very hot ride home, found the thermometer 102 in the shade. 13. Not inclined for any active, vigorous work after my roasting of yesterday & the day before, so remained at home, & did a little indoor work, writing &c. Charlie Wyndham arrived. 14. Ash Wednesday. Had service here in the morning- 25 attended. In the afternoon I rode to Kaloudah to see about borrowing a vehicle to drive to Maitland tomorrow, & from there went across Harper's Hill to Crane's. They are in great trouble there about their Son George, who has been committed to take his trial for horse stealing. Nice thunder shower at night. 15. Rode in to Maitland today to deposit in the Bank the amount of the collections received for the Clergy Stipend Fund,- 124-8.- I also lodged 24-10. to my private account in the Bk. Australasia, East Maitland, being the amount of subscriptions received for the Luskintyre School.- I called on Mr. Tyrrell, & then rode on to Morpeth to see the Bishop. Met Mrs. Greaves at the Bishop's gate, & wished her goodbye- they sail for England on Tuesday next.- Another fine shower in the night. 16. Looking out Sermons for Sunday, & began writing my report for the SPG. 17. Anne & Emily went Singleton this morning by early train, to remain over Sunday, & leaving Marianne & myself to take care of ourselves.- Finished my Report today, & then wrote a long letter to Isabella, for the out-going English Mail.- John unwell again, & obliged to go & consult the doctor. 18. Sunday. Another very hot one.- Had a terrible vapour bath in the Church here in the afternoon. Spencer Holmes & young Wilkinson came to Church. Mr. & Mrs. Davies also from Luskintyre came for the first time. 19. Dreadfully hot again. Thermor. 102 in the shade. In the morning I paid a few visits in the village, & in the afternoon borrowed the Doyle's Sociable, & went to bring Anne & Emily down from the station.- Hardly expected to see them on such a day, but the there, almost roasted.- Found Mrs. Edmund Doyle there also, & brought her down. 20. Last night was the hottest night we have had this summer. Thermr. 78 before sunrise this morning.- Southerly wind came on early & clouded over- nice cool day.- Had a visit from John Mapham this morning to procure a Marriage License for himself & Fanny Dann, whom I am to marry tomorrow morning.151 This afternoon I rode over to Windermere, to see Mr Green about getting the Deeds of the Luskintyre land for the School.- He is going to Sydney in a few days & will see about it.- I then crossed over to Luskintyre, & called at Hall's, the Homestead, & Prior's. 21. It has happened with me today as it has on several occasions before, that I have been called upon to begin the day with a Wedding & end it with a funeral.- John Mapham & his Bride Fanny Dann attended in good time this morning, accompanied by John's Cousins, David & Emma Russell.- The morning was not so bright as one would desire for such an occasion, & rather drizzled with rain.- In the afternoon I had to bury Mrs. Taylor's little infant, which died yesterday. 22. One of our occasional levee days.- Soon after dinner two Miss Hungerfords came up from Stony Creek to spend the day with us. Shortly after their arrival, in came Charlie driving Mrs. Wyndham, also to spend the day: & next Mr. Holmes gave us a short call. Not long after he had gone, a man came from the Coalpits, to request my attendance at Branxton in the afternoon to bury his child.- I started accordingly at 3.P.M. to meet them at 5.- The man's name is Young.- I had a very

151

No month waiting period as today.

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hot ride up, but a nice cool one down again, for a smart thunder shower came on soon after I left Branxton which cooled the air nicely. Very little rain fell this side of Harper's Hill, as is usual now. 23. Fine thunderstorm today, with soaking showers of rain, but not enough yet to set the creek running.- We had thoughts of going to Maitland, but the rain drove those thoughts away.- Spent the day reading &c. 24. The Sixteenth anniversary of my Ordination. After selecting my three sermons for tomorrow, I spent the rest of the day reading the Bishop of Oxford's Address to Candidates for Ordination. I think if the book had been put into my hands previous to my ordination, it would have had the effect of frightening me out of embarking in a profession of such awful responsibility. 25. Sunday. Holy Communion here in the morning.-22.- Made me a little late at Branxton.- Good congregations at all places. 26. Spent the morning visiting about Mr. Holmes's, & rode home towards evening. Called to see Mrs. Clift, & there found Anne & the girls, who had just arrived per train from Maitland. On reaching home I found that John had been misbehaving again, that he was brought home drunk last night, & been away again all today. 27. Told John this morning that I did not require his services any longer, & that he might go.152 Went to call on Mr. Winder this morning.- Spent the day at home, making up the Acct. of Stipend Collections for last year. 28. Went to Branxton today, but could not get away till near 12 o'clock. Being without a manservant hinders me a good deal

March 1866

1. At home all the morning writing &c. Went to Maitland in the afternoon for various little matters:- among others, to pay Dr. Mackenzie the amount of John's account. 2. Went to catch the early train from Singleton, to ask the Guard to try & hunt up a missing parcel of boots from Cooks, which I fear is lost.- Hugh Wyndham came by midday return train from Maitland & dined with us.- I accompanied him back to catch the evening train. 3. This morning I rode to Windermere to see Mr. Green about the land at Luskintyre, & the went by midday train to Morpeth to see the Bishop.- Dined with Mr. Walshvery hot again in the sun. 4. Administered Holy Communion at Branxton in the morning to 21.- Baptized Humphreys' baby in the afternoon. 5. At home all the morning. In the afternoon Anne & Emily, with Charlie Wyndham & myself rode into Maitland to do some shopping. 6. Spent the day visiting at Luskintyre, calling on Wm: Nott, Jas: Yeo, Mrs. Peck, Fairhall & Russells. 7. Branxton day, but could not get away until past eleven.- Lunched with Mr. Collet at Dr. Hartigan's, where I met the Dr.'s brother, lately arrived from America. 8. Having borrowed Mr. Doyle's Sociable, I drove Anne & Emily to Kirkton,- very warm in the morning, but as usual, a thunderstorm came on in the afternoon followed by a strong SE wind. Very little rain, not enough to lay the dust. 9. At home today, with the exception of my taking Mr. Doyle's vehicle home in the morning. Charlie & his sister came to dinner, & in the afternoon they all rode out to the Holmeses. Anne & I called on Mrs. Wilkinson, who, with her family, has lately come to reside in the lane. 10. At home all today- just called on the Kings & Mrs. McDermot in the morning.- Had a visit in the afternoon from Miss McKenzie, from Maitland, also from Mr. James Doyle.

152

No mention of Mary Ann, the other servant, despite the fact that she & John Byrne were married.

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11. Sunday.- Very good attendance at all three places. 12. Service at Pokolbin this morning, very small congregation. James Moore, son of Stephenson Moore, announced to me his desire to get married here on Wednesday to Rebecca Birmingham. I received a hint a fortnight ago that this was likely to be the case, so I was prepared with the necessary affidavit for the License, & thus saved the young man a journey.- I had previously given notice of a meeting to be held at Mr. Birmingham's today to elect Trustees for the Burial Ground at Pokolbin. There were only three persons present, & they elected Mr. Birmingham, Mr. Holmes, & myself.- On coming home this evening I found John here wishing to be taken back again, & on his promising better conduct in future, I consented. 13. Went to Stanhope today, to visit all the folks in that neighbourhood.- I found some newcomers at Woodville, where George Yeo lived, & called to see who & what they are. Woodhouse is the name of the family, & singularly enough I discovered that Mrs. Woodhouse knew John David at Sandgate many years ago,- I lunched at Dalwood on the way out.- Found it very hot in the sun. 14. Remained at home to marry the young couple from Cessnock. A large party came to the Church,- about 20 I think. Charlie & Wad. Called in the morning on their way to Maitland, & again on their return. 15. Marianne went to Singleton by early train this morning, & I accompanied her as far as Branxton where I handed her over to Charlie, who went on from there to Singleton.- I then took Charlie's horse, "Byron", & spent the day visiting among my Elderslie parishioners, & got home just at dusk. 16. At home today, superintending & assisting John with the little building job which has been so long on hand.- Guy Wyndham came over from Dalwood & took dinner with us.- A Telegram was posted up at the Post Office this morning announcing the news from England, among which was the sad intelligence of the foundering of the Steamship "London" in the Bay of Biscay, by which 220 souls were drowned. 17. Both yesterday & today the folks here have been amusing themselves with horseracing.153 I continued to help John at his work.- Mr. & Mrs. Davies called this afternoon.- Charlie & Emily returned by evening train from Singleton. 18. Sunday.- Fine large congregation at Branxton, but a very small one here, owing, I suppose to the festivities of yesterday. 19. Anne, Emily, & myself went to Maitland per early train, & after an hour or two's shopping in West Maitland, walked on in the heat of the day to Mr. Tyrrell's, where we, (that is Emily & myself) dined, Anne being to much fatigued to take anything.- We afterwards paid Mr. Quick a visit, & the came home per evening train. 20. Spent the greater part of the morning writing, chiefly an English letter to John David. John getting on with the building in the corner, & I helping him now & then. 21. Went by early train to Branxton, where I spent the morning, first with poor old Avis, who is very ill, & the visiting the folks about the Station.- By the Midday train I went on to Singleton to bring Marianne home. In the afternoon I called on Mr. Blackwood, & then on the Rowlands.- staid the night at Henry's.- Guy Wyndham also went up with me. 22. Marianne & I returned from Singleton per Midday train.- did bit of building in afternoon. 23. After breakfast I walked up as far as Mr. Doyle's Lodge, to see how the little boy is getting on there. His knee is still painful so that he cannot put his foot to the ground yet. On the way thither I looked in to see Mrs. Chick, who is very ill,- an attack of Inflammation of the Lungs, which has left her so weak, that I have my doubts whether she will rise again from her sick bed.- I called also on old Mrs.

153

St Patrick's Day.

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King, & Mrs. Martin.- The rest of the day I spent at the building, until singing class time- I overheated myself, & towards evening felt that I was decidedly in for a cold. 24. Got to work again after breakfast, but soon found myself quite unequal to it, my cold being so bad, & the day so hot in the Sun. Had to knock off therefore & content myself with going out occasionally to superintend John, who is getting on well. 25. Sunday. My cold better, so that it did not hinder me in my reading.- Preached at all three places the same sermon.- one appropriate for the day, for Luke 1:38154. Very few attended at Mr. Holmes' but good congregations at both other places. 26. Did not feel very [well] when I got up this morning, so came straight home directly after breakfast,- felt myself getting worse on the way- nevertheless I called to make the acquaintance of our new Station Master, Mr. Brown.- I find that he & his wife are both members of our Church, & have come from Mr. Bode's Parish.- By the time I reached home I felt that I was in for an attack of Diarrhoea, & sent John up to Singleton with a note to Henry for medicine, but he came back without seeing him.- I then took one of my old powders, which gave me some relief. 27. Had a better night that I expected, but got worse again this morning.- A letter from Henry came by the morning post sending medicine & recommending castor oil, which I took. And am now very much better. This afternoon Charlie & I have been getting through some of the preliminaries, preparatory to the approaching event on Monday next - namely, filling up the papers for the License. 28. Got up so much better this morning that I fancied myself quite well again, & returned to my customary diet of meat, & took a little wine at dinner. But by nightfall I found out the mistake I had made, for my complaint returned upon me as bad as ever. I was driven to the medicine again, which took the desired effect. 29. Very uncomfortable all the morning, but got gradually better towards night. 30. Good Friday. Managed to get through the morning service here tolerably well, but not strong enough to go to Branxton. 31. Pretty convalescent again today, & was able to do a little work helping John to finish the little building in the corner, which, by the aid of a candle in the evening managed to render habitable. Uncle Ferris arrived from Sydney this morning.

April 1866

1. Easter Day, & a tolerably fine one. Two excellent congregations ­administered the Ho: Communion at Branxton to 18 ­ Charlie was amongst them, & rode home with me after the service. 2. A day to be specially remembered by us, being the wedding day of our dear Emily. The Bishop kindly came up to perform the marriage service, which took place at eleven o'clock. The parties present were, all the Singleton folks, George & Katy Townshend, Cousin John, with Mary & Jessie,- Mrs. Wyndham, John, Guy, Fishy, May & Amy. Nothing could exceed the splendour of the weather, which was simply "Australian Perfection", & every thing passed off very satisfactorily. The young couple set off about one o'clock for Paterson, where they will spend a couple of days, & then fall back upon Fern Hill.- The other guests dispersed by degrees, & we were left at last with Uncle Ferris only. 3. Being the day for the election of Church-Wardens, I remained at home for that purpose, but as usual not a soul came. In the afternoon, Uncle Ferris, Marianne, & I walked out towards Windermere, by Heyward's. 4. Did not feel very well this morning, nevertheless, I started on horseback to attend the Committee Meeting at Morpeth.- Met Charlie & Emily shopping in Maitland, &

154

"And Mary said, behold the handmaid of the Lord, be it unto me according to thy Word:..." ­ the Annunciation of the BVM.

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also Mr. Shaw, on his way here. I was not at all sorry of an excuse to turn back again, so I rode up leisurely with Mr. Shaw..- Charlie & Emily called & dined with us, & then went on to Fern Hill in the evening. 5. Meeting of our Church Society, at East Maitland. Mr. Shaw & I rode down together, & I learnt from him on the road that he was to be the preacher on the occasion,- a task in which he acquitted himself very well, his text being James 1:17. "Every good gift" &c. The congregation was a very poor one, but the meeting in the afternoon was better attended, & the usual routine was gone through in the usual manner. Mr. Bowyer Shaw was there among the other Clergy, & I invited him to return with his brother to Lochinvar which he consented to do: but both of them having to go first to Morpeth, it was late when they arrived. 6. The brothers Shaw took their departure this morning for their respective parishes. I sent John with Mr. B. S. to show him the way to the Holmeses, from whence he could make his way to Wollombi. Charlie & Emily returned to us today, & Spencer Holmes & his two sisters came to spend the day with us. 7. Not very well. Mr. & Mrs. Chambers, their daughter, & old Mrs. Marshall came to spend the day with us. In the afternoon the Doyles called.- Uncle Ferris went on old Farmer to Dalwood, & returned in the evening. 8. Sunday. Holy Communion.. Had to hurry away to Branxton immediately after the service, bidding adieu to Emily & Charlie, who left afterwards for Dalwood, intending to commence their journey tomorrow. 9. Cessnock day. Returned in time to see Uncle Ferris off by the evening train to Singleton, as well as to meet Mrs. Davidson & her two daughters at the Station, they having been up to spend the day. 10. Went by early train to Morpeth, to get books for Emily. 11. Went to Branxton per Midday train, & spent a couple of hours visiting there. On my return I found Kate here, Guy having driven her over from Dalwood. 12. Called on Mrs. Lee, who has been very poorly of late, & found her getting better. Towards evening Kate, Marianne, & I rode out to Summer Hill, to get some ferns. 13. Went to Luskintyre in the morning, & called on Mr. Green also. Appointed a meeting for Monday next. Kate left us this afternoon. Mr. James Doyle drove her to Maitland in their buggy, & Marianne also with little Florence, to see Mrs. Saunders' garden.- Received a note from Mrs. Rudd this evening, asking me to go to Branxton as soon as I could, to visit Mrs. Zimmerman, who is very ill. 14. Went to Branxton by early train, & was glad to find Mrs. Zimmerman much better, having had a good night's rest. Returned by Midday train & the went with Marianne to Anambah, to bring Alice Harrison over to spend Sunday with us. 15. Sunday.- Fine, warm day, two very good congregations. Baptism at both Churches. 16. Took Alice home this morning.- In the afternoon I went to attend my meeting at Luskintyre, where Mr. Hall was the only person who came.- We therefore determined to try another day & fixed upon next Thursday week, the 26th.- Fine rain at night. 17. Went to spend the day at Kaloudah. Splendid shower of rain fell while we were there. 18. At home today, writing letters, & among them my Quarterly Report to the SPG. 19. This afternoon Marianne & I rode in to Maitland to visit the Agricultural Show, with which we were very much pleased. 20. James Yeo called this morning on his way to Maitland, saying he would be back in the afternoon, & pick up Emily's packages for Bukkulla155, so we had to finish packing everything, getting a case from Mr. Palmer for the Saddle.- Yeo did not come till after dark, too late to take the things, which I promised to send to Greedy's in the morning.

155

A 100,000acre Wyndham pastoral lease on the Liverpool Plains.

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21. Went with John after breakfast to deliver Emily's 3 packages to Yeo at Greedy's.I then went to Luskintyre, & on as far as Parker's, warning the people to attend the meeting next Thursday.- Came home tired after the long & hot day's work. 22. Sunday. Another very warm day.- My three services as usual. I missed a few faces from my Branxton congregation, & fear they may have been attracted, by the novelty, to attend the opening of the Wesleyan Chapel, which took place today.- Their place, however was supplied by a few extra members of the Wyndham family, Frank & his wife, with a young friend being there, as well as Alick, Guy, & Wad..- Mrs Collett also & her family filled up a seat by themselves. 23. Went from Mr. Holmes's this morning to visit the Wilkinsons in their new abode under the mountains. Charlie H. acted as guide to show me the way.- I was much pleased with the spot they have selected. The land is excellent for the vine, & when they have cleared a little around them, the view will be very fine. On my way back I called on Mrs. Noon,- Eiper- Wills, Campbell & Boughton. 24. Went by early train to Branxton, to visit Mrs. Zimmerman, who seems getting a little better. After making a few more calls I returned by the midday train in company with H. Ferris, who was on his way down from Singleton. In the afternoon I took Marianne down to Maitland, to pay a visit to the Dentist, for she has been suffering very much from tooth ache lately. She had two teeth extracted, & another stopped, which I trust will put an end to her pain from that source. 25. At home today, entertaining Uncle Ferris, who intended leaving us by tomorrow's Steamer for Sydney, but a change in the weather this afternoon has induced him to alter his plan.- The wind is from the S.E. & raining hard, with prospect of continuance. Employed part of the day making a sketch of the 2 acre allotment at Luskintyre, given by Mr. Green, for the School there. 26. At home in the morning, reading &c. In the afternoon went over to Luskintyre to attend the Meeting I had given notice of. Seven of the residents came, & the result I think was satisfactory: for among those present I got the promise of 5-1towards the 6-6- required for the Conveyance of the land. I arranged that two of them should go round & see what they can collect to complete that item of expense, & also make up the deficiencies of unpaid subscriptions. 27. Ferris left us this morning for Sydney, after his 4 weeks sojourn between ourselves & the Singletonians. I took the opportunity of accompanying him by the early train as far as West Maitland, & after a little shopping there, I walked on to E. Maitld. to see Mr. Tyrrell, who has been laid up for some time with another attack of Inflammation of the lungs. I found him getting better, but still in bed, from the coldness of the morning. After an hour's chat with him, I walked leisurely back to W. Maitld. where I fell in with Willie Nunn, & John Osborne. I had not time to go & see Mrs. Osborne at the Northumberland, as it was approaching train time, but they purpose coming here tomorrow & I hope will spend Sunday with us. ­ Brought home a headache with me, which increased towards evening.- Mr. Ja: Doyle came in the afternoon & spent the evening with us. 28. Not quite the thing today, from the effects of my yesterday's headache. I spent the day looking out Sermons for tomorrow ­ helping John with the fence &c &c. The Osbornes did not make their appearance today ­ Weather most lovely. 29. Sunday. Another glorious day & two very good congregations ­ Baptized one child at Branxton & two here. Found the Osbornes here on my return from Branxton. 30. Spent this day at Stanhope, visiting all the folks in that quarter. The Osbornes left us this morning, & I rode with them as far as the turn-off to Dalwood, I then went by Mark Putter's & Taylor's, & returned by Judge's & Dalwood.

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May 1866

1. We all went to Dalwood today, & spent the day there, calling at Willah on the way home. ­ We took the short cut by Kimmorley's. 2. Went to Branxton today.- Visited poor old Mrs. Goodwin, & administered the Holy Commn. to her.- Called on Mrs. Collett, where I met Mr. & Mrs. McDoual.Afterwards I visited Mrs. Zimmerman, & was sorry to find one of her children, a little boy, very ill, with what seems to be rheumatic fever.- Found the Dalwood cart at Avis's, waiting for me to send off the Harmonium, which I did. On coming home I found Jas. & Wm. Doyle here, with Miss G. Champain. 3. Made holiday today, & joined a party of the Doyles in a ramble among the hills & bushes over the river between Hillsborough & Knockfin. We crossed the river just under Summer Hill, & rode about ¼ of a mile up towards Mrs. Peck's, till we came to a brush running up a ravine in the side of the hill.- Here we dismounted, & having tied up the horses, walked up through the brush, quite to the summit of the hill, from whence we had a beautiful view all around.. After lunch we descended & re-mounted our horses, & rode up round the western side of the hill, coming down into the road opposite Dalwood just beyond Burgess's, & so home through Luskintyre & Kaloudah, where we called in for half an hour. 4. Intended visiting Gosforth today, but sundry little things prevented me.- In the forenoon, after writing a letter or two, I visited Mrs. Taylor, who has been very unwell, & then called on Mrs. S... Smith & Mrs. New.- Afternoon looking out sermons, & shooting Parrots at the Millet. 5. Broke through my rule today of never going out on Saturday: But having been so long without visiting the folks about Gosforth & Anambah, I determined to do so this week. I started about 9 o'c., & visited in succession the following- John Nash, Dann, Nash Senr., Bird, Clarke, Kay, Beer, & Naseby. Got home again between 3 & 4, & then began to hang the door in the new fence, which at last John has brought to a conclusion. 6. Sunday. Services as usual- At Branxton the Congregation exceeded that of Lochinvar. Small attendance at the Wilderness. Found Mr. Tyrrell there recruiting his health. 7. Cessnock day, or rather, I should call it Pokolbin day.- Had a miserable attendance, only 12. Returned to Mr. Holmes's to dinner, & then rode home in the evening.- While at tea, a loud rap at the door announced John Wyndham, who stayed the night with us. He brought the news of the death, this morning, of old Mr. Close of Morpeth.- The funeral is to take place on Wednesday at 2. P. M. & no doubt will be very numerously attended. 8. Remained at home this morning to hang the door in the new slab fence, which took me till dinnertime.- Made a satisfactory job of it. In the afternoon I called on Mr. Hungerford after which I did a little gardening, by way of a change.- Sent John to the Wilderness with a note to Mr. Tyrrell acquainting him with Mr. Close's death, thinking he might like to attend the funeral tomorrow. 9. Went to Morpeth to attend the funeral of old Mr. Close - by far the most numerously attended that I ever witnessed.- The service was shared between the Bishop & Mr. Walsh.- Six other of the Clergy were present.- Canon Child, G. Bode, & myself being provided with surplices, joined in the ceremony. A nice shower of rain fell just before the time appointed, which laid the dust nicely in the road. 10. Ascension Day.- Had morning service in the church, which was attended by 15 only. In the afternoon I did a little gardening, until a smart shower drove me indoors again. By the evening train our old friend Mr Greenway made his appearance.- I had written to offer him a room, if he would like a quiet retreat for

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the few days he has in which to prepare for his ordination, & he gladly accepted my offer.- He seems very little altered this 10 or 12 yrs. 11. We all three went out today with the intention of calling on Mrs. Collett at Branxton. We went viâ Dalwood, where we lunched, & the rode on to Branxton, where I left them at the Lindsays, while I went to see Mrs. Zimmerman.- On my return I found they would insist upon our taking a cup of tea with them. This threw us rather late & when we got to Mrs. Colletts we found the house empty so came away leaving the chief object of our day's ride unaccomplished.- I called in to see old Mrs. Goodwin by the way, who appears to be drawing very near her end, & I fully expect to hear of her death tomorrow. 12. Employed in the morning chiefly in looking out sermons for tomorrow, finding time also to go & put a string on Mr. Hungerford's Piano. In the afternoon I made a few call in the Lane. 13. Sunday. Mr. Greenway rode with me to Branxton this morning, where I had a large congregation, & administered the Holy Communion to 17.- Good congregation also at Lochinvar. Gave notice at both churches of a collection next Sunday for the SPG,- also for the Sacrament here. 14. Got up rather unwell this morning, threatened with another attack of Diarrhoea, but not being very bad I ventured, with Anne & Marianne, to fulfil our promised visit to the Holmeses. Met Mr. Tyrrell there, still recruiting his health, & looking very well. We left Mr. Greenway at home with his lessons.- I feel none the worse, but rather better than this morning. 15. Remained at home today, i.e. I did not ride out anywhere, but having spent part of the morning visiting in the village (Greedy, Gillatly, Mrs. Martin & Walters) I filled up the remainder of the day reading, & writing letters.- Nice gentle rain began in the afternoon, & continued during the night. 16. A most delightful change in the weather- Steady rain the greater part of the day. I went to Branxton to bury old Mrs Goodwin, who, after some 10 or 12 years or more of great bodily affliction, died on Sunday last.- A long time since I rode out on so wet a day. 17. A very welcoming & gratifying sight awaited us on getting up this morning, & that was the water running over the bridge, where the creek has been empty for so many months. The rain came down very heavily during the night, & has filled most of the watercourses again all around us.- The wind has now set in from the N.W. blowing rather strong, so I suppose Winter has at last begun.- At home writing in the morning.- Called on Wilton & Gurd in the evening. 18. Rode over to Luskintyre this morning to see Hall & Heywood, & ascertain what they had done about collecting for the Conveyance deed of the School land. Saw Hall only, who said they had not been out being too busy, but having learnt that a man at Fairhall's would give 10/- they were satisfied the remaining 15/- wd. be made up.- I then called on Mr. Green on my way home, & he promises, when he returns from Sydney, whither he is going next week, to draw out a description of the land, so that I can then give instructions for the conveyance to be drawn out.Very cold N.W. wind, with squally clouds & a smart shower of rain about 2 P.M.Sermon writing in afternoon. 19. Having all my sermons prepared for tomorrow, I devoted this day to a little carpentering work, namely, the making of a screen to block up the fireplace in our bedroom, hoping that we shall then be able to burn a fire in the dining room, for hitherto the smoke from the latter manages to find its way down the chimney into the bedroom.- I found the tools all in such bad order, that it took me the whole morning grinding them, so that evening came on before I could finish my job.Cold N.W. wind, with clear sky. The rain of this week I am very happy to see by the papers has been general. This day Marianne completed her 21st. year. 20. Sunday., & a nice bright one. Holy Communion here in the morning, but only 16 Communicants. The collection for the SPG was only 2-2. Of which 1 was my Page No: 81

own.- Congregation 83.- At Branxton I had a fine congregation of 88, & collection 2-12-3. Making 4-14-3. Altogether. 21. Had a long day's visiting at Pokolbin, beginning with Mrs. Knight, & going the round of all in that quarter except Stephenson Moore, for I somehow missed the track leading to his place.- I invited them all to meet me this day fortnight, to see whether we cannot manage some way or other to get a building put up for a Church. The days being so short now, it was nearly 8 o'clock before I got home. 22. Stayed at home today to finish my job of carpentering which I left undone on Saturday, & having completed it, I finished out the day with some other little jobs. 23. Branxton day. Began by calling at Goodwins, then at Dr. Hartigans where I took lunch with Mrs. Collett, heard Miss Collett play on the Harmonium, & arranged about her undertaking to play in the Church when she has had about a week's practice. I then called on Mr. Strange Hartigan, after which I paid a few visits in the village, & returned. 24. This day being the last day of Mr. Greenway's sojourn with us, & the Queen's Birthday to boot, I thought he ought to take holiday, so having borrowed a horse from Mr. Read, we had an early dinner, & then took a nice ride across the river to the top of Knockfin peak, & then home by Mrs. Peck's.- It was a lovely afternoon, & we all enjoyed the ride very much. 25. Walked up to the station with Mr. Greenway this morning & saw him off by the early train to Morpeth, where he is to have two days examination prior to his Ordination on Sunday next. In the afternoon we all rode down to Maitland to do some shopping. I should have mentioned that yesterday we had a visit from Mr Tyrrell, on his way home from the "Wilderness", accompanied by Spencer Holmes. 26. This morning I rode out to see McDonald about the props for the Church, but had my ride for nothing, no one at home.- This evening I have learnt from his late mate, Spencer Smith, that McDonald has given up the saw & has taken a job of fencing for Mr. Lindsay; so we must look elsewhere for a Sawyer. Mr. James Doyle & W. Boydell here this evening. 27. Sunday. A smart shower came on from the N.W. just at the time for starting to Branxton; & the threatening appearance of the weather, I suppose was the cause of my having so small a congregation at Branxton ­ only 21.- It turned out a beautiful afternoon, but the attendance here was below the average number, being little over 60. 28. Set out upon a walk after breakfast, to visit the families along the road as far as Neal's & Bate's, for whose house I struck across over the hill to Mrs. Dell's.- On the way I made the acquaintance of a singular character, a rather elderly man, named Quarm, living quite alone near Mrs. Dell's. The old man professes to be a great reader, but his reading has evidently proved a serious misfortune to him, having driven all religion out of his mind & turned him into an infidel.- I visited 13 families altogether, & enjoyed my walk very much. 29. Glorious rain last night again, which set the creeks & gullies running nicely. I started for Dalwood after breakfast, & having lunched there, came home by Willah, Kimmorley's, & Oswald, calling on old Mrs. Harper, whom I had not been to see for a very long while. 30. Marianne accompanied my [sic] to Branxton today, to assist at the rehearsal of Nanny Collett's performance on the Harmonium.- She thinks she will be able to play on Sunday next. We had a nice ride, tho' the wind was very cold. 31. Remained at home today on purpose to read the book that Mr Wyndham lent me, namely, "God's purpose in the Creation."- I managed to get to the end of it with a little skipping along here & there, but should have liked to read it more leisurely, which I could not do, as he wants it back again.

Page No: 82

June 1866

1. Went up to the train this morning to meet Mr. & Mrs. Greenway & family, who came up from Newcastle to spend the day with us:- We are much pleased with Mrs. Greenway & the children; & hope to see more of them some day.- I saw them off again by the evening train.- In the afternoon we had a call from Guy Wyndham & his sister, with two Miss Scott's from Newcastle.- Beautiful weather again. 2. At home today, preparing for tomorrows duties, & when that was done, attempted to read Mr. Gladstone's speech in the House of Commons on the Reform Bill, but had not time to finish it.- Alice Harrison came over from Anambah, escorted by little George Cobb, & spent the day with us. In the afternoon I walked up to the Station to meet Elizabeth, who came from Singleton by the 4 o'clock train. Just as I was starting James & Wm: Doyle came with their sister Louisa, to invite Marianne for a ride, so they rode home with Alice. 3. Sunday. 64 only attended at Lochinvar this morning, while at Branxton I had a congregation of about 90 & only 19 at Mr. Holmes's.- The day was most beautiful. 4. Service in the morning at Pokolbin, where I had a better attendance than of late, owing to my having gone round among them a fortnight ago, & specially invited them to meet me today, to see what could be done towards building a temporary Church there.- I showed them a plan which I had drawn out, & which they all approved of, & seemed disposed to join in an effort to get it put up, agreeing that the best way would be by contract. I must see what amount of money we can raise, & try to get help elsewhere. Had another lovely day, & got home a little before sunset, calling by the way on Mrs. Besley, Mrs. Brown, & Mrs. Fuller. 5. Went to East Maitland today to see whether Mr. Tyrrell was at leisure to drive me to Largs & show me his Church there. I fortunately found him at home, & after dinner he gladly took me across in his buggy. We called in at the school in passing, where I made the acquaintance of Mr. Hughes, the Schoolmaster, son of old Hughes of Branxton. Mrs. Hughes is sister of John Hall of Luskintyre- very nice couple they seem.- I inspected the Church, which I was much pleased with, & think a similar one would suit us very well at Branxton.- On my way back I called at the Davidsons.- Another delightful day. 6. Branxton day. Rather too late in starting, which is a bad plan these short days.Spent an hour at the School, & the repaired to the Church for the singing class, where I gave Nanny Collett a little lesson at the Harmonium.- All this, with a few visits, filled up the day. 7. I remained at home today to write a few letters, while the others went to East Maitland to spend the day with the Davidsons.- Walked with them to the train in the morning, & met them again in the evening. 8. Went today, by invitation, to Mr. Nowlan's, at Elah, to inspect his sugar making experiment. He is trying to make sugar from the Imphee cane, & has Mr. Arthur Lindiman, who is an old experienced sugar manufacturer, to superintend the affair. Mr. Doyle, with his son James & a Mr. Wright went with me, & we passed a very pleasant day. Mr. Nowlan has evidently gone to great expense in preparing the necessary machinery & apparatus: but it seems doubtful whether he will succeed in producing sugar. As yet he has not gone beyond the Syrup, which somehow refuses to granulate. 9. Went this morning to see Mr. Green, who promised to measure out the land for the School this afternoon, & give me a description of it in a few days. 10. Sunday. Congregations very fair at both Churches. At Branxton I baptized two children after the service.- A. Goodwins, & James Thrift's.- Nanny Collett acquitted herself very well at the Harmonium.

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11. Some nice showers fell during last night, & rather a keen wind blowing today from the South. I paid a few visits in the village this morning, & then, after an early dinner, walked with Elizabeth up to the station, & saw her off to Singleton. On the way back I called on Mrs. Clark, Mrs. Dann, & Henry King, finishing off with a call on the Hungerfords. 12. Heavy rain again last night, & the weather being very unsettled this morning, I remained at home until after dinner, when I rode over to Luskintyre to see Mrs. Claudy, whose husband met with a frightful accident last week,- namely- had one of his arms crushed in a threshing machine, & on being removed to Maitland Hospital, had the arm amputated at once, above the elbow.- Mrs. Claudy was out, so did not see her, but left my card.- I the returned to Kaloudah, to enquire after Mr. James Doyle, who has been complaining for the last few days, & found him rather better.- Found a letter at the post from Mr. Greenway, saying he hoped to be with us about Thursday or Friday. 13. Branxton day, but being very showery in the morning I did not go. After dinner I rode in to Maitland to order a door & window for the back verandah which I am going to close in.- On my way back looked in at the Hospital to see poor Claudy. Found him apparently enjoying his supper, & doing very well. The Sawyers brought in the 4 posts for the Church this afternoon. 14. Another rainy day. The rain was not heavy, but very dull & gloomy all day, & very mild: 62 at sunrise. At home writing &c. Called on Mrs. Brown in the evening, & then waded through the mud to the Post Office. 15. Weather still gloomy, moist, & very warm.- After breakfast I rode over to Kaloudah to see how Mr. James Doyle was, & found that since I saw him, on Tuesday, he had been much worse, so that Dr. McKenzie was called in, & pronounced his illness to be gastric fever though not a very severe attack. He was much better today. I have agreed with Gellatly today to come & fix the buttress posts for the Church, & he promised to come on Monday. 16. At home today sermon writing, & reading, after preparing for tomorrow's services. 17. Sunday. Miserable congregation here, & only 9 Communicants.- I suppose the dirty roads frightened the people. At Branxton I had upwds. of 80, & at Wilderness 20.- Found Maxwell there. 18. Heavy rain this morning at the wilderness, tho' none here. That & the threatening appearances of the weather sent me home early, which prove very á propos, for I found a message awaiting me, requiring my attendance at Branxton at 3.P.M. for a funeral- a stranger at the Coal Mines, Mrs. Treadgate, who died there yesterday. This gave me an unpleasant ride in the rain, which came down heavily on my return home.- Found two English letters at the Post. 19. Very stormy night last night, blowing hard from S.E. & also raining hard. The creek was running over the bridge again this morning.- No Sydney Mail. Rain continued the greater part of the forenoon, but in the afternoon it showed signs of clearing up.- Spent the greater part of the day writing to Isabella, in answer to her letter which I received last night. 20. Showery again this morning, & seemed likely to continue so, therefore I did not venture to Branxton. Employed sermon-writing in the morning until a knock at the door stopped me, when I found Mr. Cobb was the knocker. He came to speak to me about Alice Harrison, who does not seem to suit them very well as a Governess, & they wish to terminate the engagement.156- He stayed to dinner with us, & shortly after his departure, Mr. James Doyle came in. I was just going to ride over to Kaloudah to see how he was, & was glad to find him able to come out.- Gellatly is now getting on with the propping of the Church, & I expect will make a good job of it.

156

One wonders what Alfred had to do with this appointment.

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21. Rain again today, so that I did not go out, but spent the day at home sermonwriting &c. 22. Rode up to Branxton today, to visit Mrs. Zimmerman, whom I found very poorly,much weaker than when I last saw her- evidently sinking fast.- She seems quite conscious of her dying state, & I think is resigned to it.- Saw Mr. Collett for a minute, but did not go in, Mrs. Collett being confined to her bed. 23. Another disagreeable, drizzly day kept one at home. After looking out sermons for tomorrow, spent the remainder of the day reading. 24. Sunday. Very small congregation today, owing not to bad weather, for it was fine, but to the very muddy roads, which made it a work of difficulty ­ at least for females, to reach the Churches.- At Branxton I administered the Holy Communion to 8.- No Wyndhams there, nor any from Elderslie, the river being impassable. 25. Rather a disagreeable day- Squally from the N.W. with a few showers. Remained at home , & began, with John, to put up the work he has been preparing to close in the back verandah.- Maxwell Holmes & 2 of his sisters, with Edwd. Tyrrell, came & spent the day with us. In the evening Mr Greenway arrived. 26. The roads being in such a horrid state for travelling, I persuaded Mr Greenway to remain here today to let them dry. In the forenoon we walked across to Anambah to call on Mr. Cobb, but he was away from home. On our return found that Frank Wyndham & his wife had been here, & brought a note from John asking me, if possible, to go over & baptize his baby this afternoon, so after dinner Mr. Greenway assisted me to get up Nelly & Comet, & having scraped the thickest of the mud off them we set off for Dalwood, & got there about sunset,- baptized the child ­ John Percy,157- & then returned by Moonlight. 27. Mr Greenway left us this morning for Singleton, on his way up the country. Being Branxton day, I rode with him that far, & having seen him safe over Black Creek, returned to my usual work there. Called at Clark Orman's, & his son's & then visited Mrs. Zimmerman, whom I found in bed, as the snuggest place on so windy a day. 28. At home,- employed chiefly helping John with the building. 29. Went to Morpeth by early train to see the Bishop. Had a satisfactory interview with him about Pokolbin Church, &c.- Bought Hymn Books at the Depot for Branxton Church. 30. A day of interruptions. Gellatly finished his work at the Church, & I paid him for it. He has made a very good job of it.- Assisted John with his job, which is now nearly finished. Anne & Marianne went to Maitland per Midday train to do some shopping.- I set off to meet them in the evening, & had not gone far along the lane when to my surprise I met Townshend coming to see us, having lately returned from England. Tho' he came from Maitland in the same train, he was not aware that Anne & Marianne were fellow travellers.

July 1866.

1. Sunday. Small congregation here in the morning. Townshend went to Branxton with me, where the Church was quite full.- I went as early as possible in order to baptize Mrs. Collett's little infant before the service.- Townshend returned to Dalwood with the Wyndhams. 2. Service at Pokolbin.- congregation 20.- On my way back called at Wills, Campbell, & Boughtons- found a sick house at the Campbell's- Influenza. 3. A message was brought yesterday morning by Kimmorley's boy, asking me to go to see a sick man at his fathers house, supposed to be in a dying state.- I set off immediately after breakfast this morning, but on reaching the house found that

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John Percy Wyndham, fifth child of John Wyndham & Lucy Emily Glennie, born 25th April 1866.

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the man, (Joseph Watson) died yesterday morning before the boy got home from this.- After talking awhile & reading a little with the poor afflicted people, I went on viâ .... & Dalwood where I lunched, & then came home through Luskintyre, calling at Burgess, Fairhall, who is progressing favourably with his broken leg,- Mrs. Clundy, & Hall. 4. Branxton day. The funeral of Joseph Watson was a break in my accustomed routine of work there. After singing class I visited poor Mrs. Zimmerman, who appeared much weaker I thought. She evidently has not many days to remain in this world. 5. Went to Morpeth today to attend the Quarterly Committee meeting. On the way down old Farmer thought it proper to tumble down with me, & though he rolled his heavy carcase over upon my leg,- very providentially I was not at all hurt.Returned from the meeting with Mr. Tyrrell, & dined with him.- On the way home I fell in with Mr. Doyle & his brother James & his son Andrew, at the Spread Eagle, & rode home with them. Found that J. Kelman & his sister had called during the day, also Mr. Molster. 6. At home today, the first this week.- Spent the forenoon & part of the afternoon hanging the new door in the back verandah: so now there only remains the window to fix. Towards evening I walked over to Windermere to call on the Houstons, as Margaret gave a poor account of her mother last Sunday. Found her pretty well again. Met Mr. Molster there, who walked part of the way home with me.- A man came to me this evening from the Coal Mines, Anvil Creek, asking me to marry him, his intended wife, & party of friends being in attendance. His being a presbyterian accounts for the strange request. Finding that the bride was also presbyterian, I advised him to take the early train tomorrow morning, & go to their own Minister, Mr. Purvis of East Maitland. 7. Went to Branxton by morning train to visit Mrs. Zimmerman again, who is gradually sinking into the grave.- She seems thankful for my visits, & I trust is building her hope of pardon & acceptance upon the one only foundation, Jesus Xt.- I am glad her husband is now at home where he will remain, as long as his poor wife is alive. I returned by Midday train after making a few calls round about the station house, & waited for the return train from Maitland, by which Anne & Marianne returned from Newcastle. 8. Sunday.- A most glorious day- bright, calm, & sunny. Perhaps to this cause I may attribute the two nice congregations I had.- Over 70 at Branxton, & 101 at Lochinvar. Gave notice for the Sacrament here next Sunday & preached a sermon on the subject from the text in John VI. "Will ye also go away?"- I hope to see a good attendance in consequence next Sunday. 9. Spent the morning visiting in the village, as far as King's. In the afternoon we all walked as far as Bailie's, calling at Wilton's & Gurds on our way home. 10. Remained at home today to try & get the window fixed in the back verandah, but met with too many interruptions.1st. had to repair one of my gaiter[s], by rivetting a piece of iron onto the catch at the bottom. Then I had to walk up to the station, to send a letter by the guard to Mrs. Chambers. Again, in the afternoon, all the Doyles called. Mr. James & William remained the evening with us. In the afternoon also I went up to Greedy's to visit his brother William, who I heard was ill in bed. Found him very poorly. 11. Branxton day. Weather seemed gathering for rain to the N. & N.E. all the morning, & soon after noon it began raining gently. I visit poor Mrs. Zimmerman, who gets more feeble every day.- Called also on Mrs. John Hughes, & her next door neighbour old Goodwin, who was complaining a little. Then had my singing class & came home.- Received today the telegram of English news which savours strongly of "Wars, & rumours of wars, with earthquakes in divers places." 12. Rained very hard all last night, consequently the creek was very high this morning. This has been I think by far the heaviest day's rain since we came to Page No: 86

Lochinvar. The greater part of the morning it poured down in torrents, accompanied with thunder now & then. If the same quantity has fallen in other parts we may expect great floods. It began to blow very hard from the S. & S.E. about 4 P.M., & is now blowing a great gale. (S.E.) Busy all day carpentering. Got my window fixed at last, but there is still a little titivating required. 13. Terrible gale blowing all last night, but it abated towards morning.- Still raining the greater part of the morning, but at noon the clouds broke, & the sun shone out occasionally.- No Sydney mail these two days. John brought back from the post this morning the sad news that the Cawarra Steamer was wrecked yesterday at Newcastle, & only one man saved out of the 106 on board.- I went up to Greedy this afternoon to see Wm. Greedy who is still in bed- apparently little better yet. 14. Paid another visit to Mrs Zimmerman this morning, taking the early train to Branxton, & returning by midday train. The exceeding wet & stormy weather of the last three days has been much against such invalids as Mrs. Zimn.- She was very weak, & I can perceive her getting much thinner, & gradually wearing away. This is now the third day that we have been without a Sydney mail. Martin, the Railway Guard told me this morning that two large ships are reported to have been wrecked at the Sydney Heads. We hope tomorrow will bring us news from Sydney. The river is very high today, & I hear that the Maitland people are in great fear again of the water breaking over the banks upon them. 15. Tho' the day was fine, the muddy state of the roads gave me a very small congregation here, & only 13 Communicants. At Branxton I had a good attendance, but at Mr. Holmes' only two besides their family, the creek being flooded. 16. Went to Pokolbin this morning to receive Tenders for building our proposed Church there. Two tenders were offered, one by a man named Green, for 65, & one by Philip Wertzler for 70.- I told Green I would be prepared by this day fortnight to give him a decided answer, & arranged to round among the people tomorrow, & see what I could collect.- Returned to Mr. Holmes's for the night, calling on Mrs. McDonald & Wills's by the way. 17. Had a long day's work at Cessnock & Pokolbin visiting among the folks there, & only collected 2-10.- some promising to bring their promised subscriptions to Birminghams next Monday week, others saying they could give nothing till after harvest.- I fear after all I shall not be able to get on with the building. Came home very late, rather tired, & with a cold. Found Bessy here from Singleton. 18. Had a bad night last night, & felt very like Influenza this morning. Remained at home today to nurse myself.- Cold very troublesome this evening. 19. Cold still very bad, stayed at home to nurse myself. 20. A good deal better today. After a little reading, got out into the garden & began pruning some vines. 21. Went to Branxton this morning by early train, to visit Mrs. Zimmerman, who I thought seemed rather better than last week.- Came back by Midday train, & after dinner went up to the Greedy's to see young Wm. Greedy, who is still very ill in bed. Sat some little time reading with him. I fear he is seriously ill. 22. Sunday.- Beautiful day, but a small congregation at Branxton, where I administered the Sacrament to 13. Better attendance in the afternoon here. 23. At home today. After visiting Wm. Greedy in the morning, spent the day vine pruning. 24. Went to the Wilderness today chiefly with the view of visiting Matthews, who I heard was ill, & also to call on the Wilkinsons. I found Matthews much better, & at work fencing.- The Wilkinsons were all hard at work ploughing up their ground for planting vines. I asked Mrs. Wilkinson to subscribe to the Pokolbin Church, which she expressed her willingness to do, but not this quarter. John Wilkinson returned with me to Mr. Holmes' where we both remained the night.

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25. Being my Branxton day, I went there from Mr. Holmes's, called at Crane's, & also on Mrs. Jones, at the Dairy. In Branxton I visited Mrs. Zimmerman, & old Goodwin, who is poorly with Influenza. I then had my singing class, after which, on my way home; I called on Mrs. Lindsay, the Colletts, & at Parsons' the Butcher, where one of the Barbers is lying with a broken collar bone, & other injuries which he sustained this morning by the falling in of a large piece of coal upon him in the pit. On reaching home I found Rose & Alice Scott here, the Lindsays having driven them down this morning. 26. Went to Maitland this afternoon to get books, &c. All the girls joined the Doyles in a ride to Branxton to see Willie off on his journey up the country. 27. Stayed at home to get on with my vine pruning. Bessy & the Miss Scotts left us in the afternoon, the former for Singleton, & the latter for Newcastle. 28. Went to Morpeth by early train to consult the Bishop about Pokolbin Church, & had a very satisfactory interview with his lordship. Visited poor Wm. Greedy in the afternoon. 29. Sunday. One of the most disagreeable days I ever knew. Blowing a gale from the N.W., & bitterly cold. Small congregation was the result. To make matters worse, a terrible headache came on me, which was so bad when I reached Mr. Holmes's, that I could not attempt to read service, & Mr. Holmes kindly did so for me.- A glass of hot brandy & water, followed by a strong cup of coffee, quite drove away the headache. 30. Pokolbin day, & a very satisfactory one, inasmuch as I agreed with the manThomas Green to build the Pokolbin Church, which he engages to complete by the 1st. of December for 70. 31. Went today to join a picnic party given by Mr. Cadell, at Rutherford. The day was fine, but rather cold. A large party was assembled, & we all enjoyed the party much.

August 1866

1. Branxton day, & a very beautiful one. Went through my accustomed routine, ending with singing class, & got home after dark. 2. At home pruning vines, after visiting Wm. Greedy, & making a few calls in the village. 3. Visited Greedy again this morning. No improvement in his bodily health, & he of course grows weaker from his protracted illness, & taking no nourishment.Pruned some more vines- In the afternoon we had a visit from Mrs. Doyle & Mrs. Cyrus MacDougall. 4. After visiting Greedy, went on with the vine pruning. I called on Mr. Lee today to speak to him about his teaching in the Sunday School, begging him to confine himself to the teaching of the Church, & not to introduce his own private & peculiar views, or rather, such views as are set forth in such a book as one that has lately made its appearance, written by one calling himself the Revd. Baxter, & entitled, "Louis Napoleon the destined Monarch of the World." &c. &c. In the evening Mr. James Doyle & Mrs. C. MacDougall came & Marianne accompanied them in a ride to Summer Hill. 5. Sunday. Rainy morning, but I reached Branxton dry & had a congregation of 33. At Lochinvar only 7 attended besides our own family. 6. Took a ride to Dalwood today to see how they all were there. Found that George had returned to Fern Hill- Called to see them. Called also at Willah, then at Kimmorley's, & Barber's. 7. Finished pruning my vines today.- Visited poor Wm. Greedy this morning, & found him, I fear, worse than he was. But the doctors do not pronounce his case hopeless.

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8. Word was brought to me early this morning that poor Wm: Greedy died last night.I called at the house after breakfast, & the started for my usual day's work at Branxton. Had a very disagreeable ride against a strong, cold N.W. wind. Found Mrs. Zimmerman much the same.- Heard that Mrs. Smith at Elderslie is very ill. Must go & see her on Friday. Found Anne very poorly this evening. 9. The funeral of Wm. Greedy, which took place this afternoon, kept me at home today.- Anne complained this morning of a bad pain in her side, & has kept her bed all day. Two mustard poultices have given her some relief, & I think she is better this evening. Mr. James Doyle remained after the funeral, & spent the evening. Edward Hely also came in about sunset, very tired & ill: having caught cold, he thinks from riding in the rain a few days ago. 10. Went to Elderslie today to visit all the folks there, especially Mrs. Smith, who is very ill. Rather late when I came home.- Found Anne better, & up, but Edward Hely had not left his bed all day & is still very poorly. They have applied mustard poultices to his back, & throat, which gave him some relief, & I hope he will be better tomorrow. 11. Remained at home today, & after calling first on Mrs. Joseph Greedy, & then on Mrs. Greedy Senr., & Mrs. Humphreys, spent the remainder of the day pruning fruit trees in the garden. Anne was not quite so well this morning, & kept her bed till dinner time, & now seems much better. Edward Hely is also very much better this evening, for all which I am very thankful. 12. Sunday. Another very windy day, but being very fine, I had good congregations at both Churches. At Mr. Holmes's I seldom get many now, owing, I suppose to the dark nights.- Mr. Holmes expressed to me this evening his willingness to give a portion of land as a site for a Church, & 50 towards the building. With this encouraging beginning, I must see what can be done among the neighbours there. 13. Felt great inclination to headache this morning, but it proved only a threat, & came to naught. Went to Pokolbin to see how the builders are getting on. Found them busy getting the sleepers & posts, which all appeared very good.- On the way home I called & made acquaintance with a man named Rose & his wife, a little this side of Garden Hill. Got home earlier than usual, & in the afternoon granted a Marriage License to Danl. Skinner. 14. Being told by Birmingham yesterday that Green is getting timber for the Church at Pokolbin on land belonging to Mr. Strachan of Maitland: without having asked leave to do so, I thought it right to go at once & acquaint Mr. Strachan of this, & ask his permission to continue getting the timber we require, on his land. So this afternoon Marianne & I took a ride into Maitland, having a little shopping to do besides.- I missed seeing Mr. Strachan who had just started for Sydney, but his partner (Mr. Paterson I believe) gave me permission for that purpose (Church building) to get what timber I required. On our way out we called on Mrs. Cadell, where we met Mr. Jas. Doyle, who rode home with us. 15. Branxton day. Found Mrs. Zimmerman apparently much worse.- Mrs. John Hughes also was very poorly, under the doctor's hands. A change of weather came on, & rain began about 4 P.M. 16. Went to Branxton by early train to Marry Daniel Skinner & Matilda Moore of Elderslie & was glad they had so bright a morning for their wedding, which is more than I expected yesterday afternoon, as I rode home in the rain. I called to see Mrs. Zimmerman & Mrs. Hughes, both of whom I found better than yesterday. Returned by Midday train, & spent the afternoon pruning trees in the garden. 17. At home today, occupied chiefly in the garden, after a little newspaper reading, & made a finish of my pruning. Had a visit in the afternoon from Mr. & Mrs. Chapman.

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18. Did not feel over & above well some how this morning, so made a quiet, early day of it, & had a great reading of English news, the mail having arrived in Sydney on the 16th.- Spencer Holmes called for a few minutes. 19. Sunday, & a nice bright one. Administered the Holy Comm. to 25 at Branxton, & after the service baptized 2 children. At Lochinvar I also had a baptism after the service. 20. After breakfast I set off towards Dalwood to get "Nelly" & bring her home, but when I reached Burgess's, I saw Wad, with Fish & Julia Champain coming down the opposite bank of the river- Wad leading Nelly: so I did not go any further, but returned homeward with them, & called on Fairhall & Mrs. Peck by the way. The Dalwood party came on to spend the day here, & then took Julia to Kaloudah. 21. We all went to the Wilderness today, & spent the day with the Holmeses. Had a most delightful day for our ride, & enjoyed our visit much. 22. Branxton day. Called on Clark Orman, Senr. & Junr.- & on Miss Cox besides my sick patients, Mrs. Hughes Senr. & Mrs. John Hughes & Mrs. Zimmerman.- The two former were much better, & poor Mrs. Zimmerman seemed tolerably easy. She is wasting away very much, & getting very thin & weak.- Had my singing class as usual & then came home, where I found Julia Champain. 23. This afternoon we all rode into Maitland to call on the Chapmans, where we met Mr. & Mrs. Sim. Found it very hot riding in, but nice & cool coming out again. 24. At home today- made a few calls in the village in the morning. Mr. Holmes & Arthur came & dined with us. 25. At home again. Looking out sermons for tomorrow &c. and in the afternoon did a bit of gardening.- This has been a most glorious week of weather as ever I knew.Slight frost every morning regularly since Sunday, with bright clear days, & free from winds, just a nice gentle westerly wind. In the day time the sun gets very warm now, & we begin to feel the approach of Spring. 26. Sunday. A most glorious day.- Large congregations at both places. At Lochinvar I administered Holy Communion to 23. Gave notice of a collection next Sunday, to purchase Reward books for the children of Sun. Schl. 27. Service at Pokolbin this morning, after which I marked out the position for the Church, & then made a few calls on my way back to Mr. Holmes' where I remained the night. 28. Spent the day at the Wilderness going round among the people to ask subscriptions towards building a Church in that neighbourhood. Nearly all the men were away from home, & I found their wives only, so did not make much progress with my list.- Quite dark before I reached home at night. 29. A gloomy day, threatening rain. Went to Branxton to visit Mrs. Zimmerman, & found her very poorly. As it began to rain between 3 & 4 I got my horse & came home. 30. After four days tolerably hard work abroad, I thought it time to spend a day at home, more especially as it was raining lightly, off & on, the greater part of the day. Did not feel good for much, but after paying a visit to Mr. Hungerford to enquire after his eyes, I read through the debate in Parliament on Mr. Macpherson's motion on the subject of "State-aid." 31. At home today Sermon writing. Towards evening walked up towards the Station & called on Mrs. Clift. On the way back I called at Humphreys, & Mrs. Greedy Senr.

September 1866

1. At home today, being Saturday, preparing for tomorrow's services. Mr. James Doyle came in the forenoon to consult about the painting of the Church,- a man from Maitland having called to offer his services. We agreed with him to paint the

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whole exterior of the building (2 coats) for 4-5. ­ we finding the paints &c. Planted a Laurel tree in the evening, after which I called on Mrs. Filmer. 2. Sunday.- Good congregations. At Lochinvar had a collection to buy prize books for Sunday School. 3. Rode down to Morpeth to select books at the Depot. When I returned found Townshend here, & Kate also. 4. Remained at home, with the exception of a walk across to Kaloudah with Townshend in the morning. 5. Started on horseback pretty early for Morpeth to attend the Meeting of Synod. Townshend went with me. 6. To Morpeth again by train today. At the station I met Zimmerman in the train who informed me of his wife's death (last night) & his wish for me to attend the funeral tomorrow. On my return in the evening I found a message for me to go to Mark Putter's to baptize a sick infant, so ordered old Farmer to be got up & saddled while I took a cup of tea. Had a very dark ride, & got back again near eleven o'clock. 7. Went to Branxton for the funeral of Mrs. Zimmerman, which was very largely attended. Called on Mrs. Collett on my way back. 8. At home, Sermon writing &c. Mr. Doyle called towards evening. 9. Sunday. Very large congregation here, (103) & 75 at Branxton. A most delightful day. 10. Went first to Pokolbin to inspect the Church work there. Found the men splitting some very good slabs. On the way back called at Lambkin's, Joass, Mrs. Noon, McDonald, Wells & Cambell - Did not meet with much success in the way of subscriptions for Rothbury Church. 11. Telegram of English Mail today- news Good & Bad.158- Marianne & I went to Dalwood in the morning.- Got back in good time & then walked to the Station to meet Isabella & Marianne Boydell. 12. To Branxton as usual; & after lunching at the Lindsays, where I found one of the girls only at home, made a few calls, & then had my singing class. 13. At home all the morning. In the afternoon we all walked across the paddocks to Kaloudah. 14. Having borrowed Mr. Doyle's Sociable we all went to visit the Kelmans at Kirkton. Isabella went in the carriage with us, while Marianne Boydell & Marianne, rode on horseback. The weather as on every day of late, was most delightful. 15. Stayed at home today,- preparing for tomorrow's services &c. &c. 16. Sunday.- At Branxton I administered Holy Comm. to 22.- Most lovely day- good attendance at both places. 17. Took Marianne Boydell & Isabella to Dalwood.- I went on as far as Judges, & called at Fern Hill on my way back. Mrs. Geo. W. very ill. 18. This afternoon we all walked to Mr. Cobb's- rather a long walk for Anne, who was a little tired when we came back.- Called at Nash's & Naseby's on our return. 19. Branxton day again.- Spent an hour at the School (from 3-4) then singing class. 20. Remained at home today, reading &c. In the afternoon I paid a few visits, calling at Mrs. Taylor's (whom I did not see) Mrs. New, & the Lee's. Also made the acquaintance of a new comer, Mrs. Webber. 21. Started this morning to go to Stanhope viâ Tangorin.- On the way met a boy with a note, informing me of the death of the little infant I baptized at Mark Putter's a fortnight ago. I called in at Putter's by the way & arranged for the funeral at Branxton at 10 A.M. tomorrow morning. On reaching the river at Tangorin I found the slip rails so tightly pegged up that I could not open them, so beat a retreat to Dalwood, where I lunched. Afterwards returned by Windermere, & called on Mrs. Green, the Houstons, Walker & Bellamy.

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What news?

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22. Went by early train to Branxton to bury the little child, & returned by Midday train. Spent the afternoon preparing for tomorrow's services. In the evening I walked with the three girls about through the paddocks.- Weather very dry now, rain wanted. 23. Sunday. Administered the Holy Communion to 24 at Lochinvar. From Branxton to the Wilderness I had the company of John Wilkinson. Found Edwd. Tyrrell also at Mr. Holmes'. They two took their departure after supper. 24. Service at Pokolbin, after which I rode on to Cessnock to call on Picton the publican there, & see how his school was getting on.- I found the school in operation in the building just put up by Mr. Picton.- 39 children on the books. ­ Threatened rain, but scarcely any fell. 25. Went to Stanhope today, viâ Irish Town & the mouth of Lamb's Valley. Called on all the people there & being told that Watts was very ill (on this side of the river, at Hinton's) I got young Woodhouse to show me the best crossing, & went at once to visit him: my informant leading me to suppose he was dangerously ill. On reaching his house I found him to my astonishment running about in his field, driving pigs out. ­ I then returned by way of Mark Putter's, making a new acquaintance by the way, a Mrs. Bowler, who lives where Wall used to.- Got home late, as usual. 26. Branxton day. Did not start early, being rather tired after my long day yesterday. Had my class at the School & then singing class. 27. Had a nice little excursion today to the top of "Hudson's Peak". The party consisted of Mary Ann Boydell, Isabella, Marianne, Jas., Henry, & Arthur Doyle.We had a beautiful day, rather windy, which made the view cler: & all enjoyed it exceedingly. We returned by way of Kilfoil's creek through Irish Town, & home by Windermere. 28. Started about eleven this morning for Maitland & Morpeth, wishing to consult the Bishop as to the Luskintyre School. ­ When near the "Spread Egle" [sic] I met Mr. Walsh coming up to see me with a Petition to the Legislative Assembly against the "Public Schools Bill". He turned back & we rode on together to Mr. Tyrrell's, where we dined, & then went on to Morpeth. Returned home late. 29. Visited Mrs. Phillips, who is very ill with Influenza. In the afternoon we all walked across the paddocks Stakelinn's. Received in the eveng. a draft Petition from the Bishop, to get signatures, & forward to Mr. Cowper, for presentation to Parliament. 30. Sunday. Fine day, & two good congregations. Gave notice of Meetings- here tomorrow, at ½ p. 4. & at Branxton on Tuesday at 2 P.M.: to adopt petition to the Legis. Assem. against Education Bill.

October 1866

1. Tarted early this morning for Mr. Holmes's, to get signatures in that neighbourhood to the petition. Unfortunately I met Mr. Holmes & Spencer at the Allandale Station on their way to Sydney, so I lost their signatures. I went on, & called at Boughton's Campbells Wills's, Smith, Patton, G Clinch, & Crane, thus riding upwards of 20 miles & got only 2 signatures. (Boughton & Son)- Had our meeting here in the afternoon, at which about 14 attended, & all signed the Petition. I got a few more signatures in the evening. 2. Started this morning for Dalwood, picking up a few signatures by the way. Mr. Wyndham & John signed it, & a few others. Went on to Branxton where I had a small meeting, & obtained 9 more signatures, bringing the number up to 50. I then posted the letter to Mr. Cowper, & came home- tired. 3. Branxton day. Had appointed to be at the Burial ground by 11 A. M. for the funeral of Mrs. Campbell (near Jesse Judge's) who died rather suddenly

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yesterday morning. I went to the Lindsays, & put my horse up there, & they kept me waiting more than two hours.- Went to the School & had my class there, & then a small singing class. 4. Quarterly meeting at Morpeth. Went by early train, & Marianne Boydell went with me to W. Maitland. Returned by Midday train, & found Anne & Marianne had gone to Kaloudah: so after getting my dinner, & then paying a visit to Mrs. Phillips whom I found very poorly still, I walked across to Kaloudah, & in the evening Mr. Jas. Doyle drove us all home in [the] buggy. 5. Thought it time to stop at home & rest myself but felt rather out of sorts after the racketing about of the last 4 or 5 days. Paid Mrs. Phillips a visit in the morning & was glad to find her better. 6. At home, sermon-writing &c., preparing for tomorrow. 7. Sunday. Gave notice to the Sunday School children today for an examination next Friday, bidding them all to be here by 9 o'clock.- Congregations good both here & at Branxton. Very poor at the Wilderness. 8. Went to Pokolbin to see how the building there is getting on. Found all the slabs & most of the shingles drawn in, & was much pleased with them. On my way home I called on Lodge & his family in the Wallabi scrub: then at Rose's, where I heard of two families near there whom I had never heard of before, Mears, & London.- I went & found them out, as they live not above ½ a mile or so from Rose's.- London has a wife, & some half dozen children.- The Mearses are three brothers, single men (brothers of Mrs. London)- Free selectors all of them. 9. Went to Branxton this morning, to visit Mrs. Orman, who is very ill.- From thence I rode to Dalwood where I lunched, then went to Fern Hill, hoping to see Mrs. Geo. Wyndham, but did not see her. She is very seriously ill, I fear, for they told me they were going to get Dr. McKenzie to come up from Maitland to consult with Dr. Hartigan.- On my way home I called at Windermere, to ask Mrs. Green to come to the School feast on Saturday. 10. Branxton day. Did not feel very well in the morning so remained at home, & rode up in the afternoon. Found Mrs. Orman better. 11. Spent the morning calling on all the folks between this & Neal's, getting contributions to the School feast. 12. Examination of the Sunday School children today. The attendance was very good, there being 50 present, & they all seemed very pleased & happy on the occasion, & on the whole acquitted themselves very well. We commenced work soon after 9 o'clock, & it was past 2 by the time we had finished.- On coming out from the Church we found Jas. Kelman with his sister & Miss McDouall in the house, who remained till towards sunset. 13. School Feast today, & it passed off as a decided success. The day was most favourable as regards the weather: a nice cool breeze from the S.E.- We chose the same spot as before, in the paddocks near Philmer's.- All the neighbours to whom we applied contributed cheerfully towards the feast, some with money, & others made cakes.- There was abundance for all, both young & old & plenty to spare.- All present, seemed thoroughly to enjoy the day's fun, & the proceedings closed with the distribution of books to the children, who then returned to their homes rejoicing. The day happens to be the thirtieth anniversary of our wedding day, as well as the anniversary of the girls Confirmation. 14. Sunday. Change of weather this morning- a little rain from S.E. but not much. It seemed, however, sufficient to dampen the zeal of the Churchgoers, for I know not what other cause I can attribute the s[m]all congregations. 15. Monday. Remained at home today to rest after the fatigue of Saturday, for I was very tired that night, & am barely rested yet.- A good part of the day occupied reading debate on Education Bill, the second readg. of which has passed by a majority of 36 to 14.

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16. Paid a visit to Mrs. Phillips this morning, & was glad to find her gradually regaining her strength. Looked in upon poor old Redman also, who is laid up with an attack of lumbago, or something of the kind.- I then spent the greater part of the day preparing my annual Report for the SPG intending for the future to act upon Mr. Bullock's suggestion, & make my year close with the 30th. September.In the afternoon we all walked through the Kaloudah paddock, & thence down the lane by Crauders to the river- that is Edith & Ellen Holmes, who have been staying with us since Saturday, Marianne & myself. Anne being rather poorly, remained at home. 17. Branxton day, & a very hot one. Called first at Mrs. Orman, whom I found much better. Then on Mrs. Cox. Arranged with Miss Cox for an examination of the Sunday School on Wednesday next.- Also proposed a School Feast.- Looked about afterwards for a suitable spot, but could not find one to my satisfaction. Must look again next week.- Called upon Mrs. John Hughes, Nixon & old Trigg, then went to the School & singing class. 18. At home all the morning. Was preparing, after dinner, to ride to Fern Hill, to enquire after Mrs. George Wyndham, when a note came from old Mr. Wyndham asking me to come over, as poor Bessie was evidently sinking, & needed the "Pastor's Visitation". I therefore went prepared to administer Holy Communion to her, which I did.- Eight members of the family joined us, namely, her Husband, Mother, & two sisters, Mr. & Mrs. Wyndham, Mrs. McKenzie & Fish.- She was very low & weak, but expressed herself very thankful, comforted by my visit. 19. At home all today, reading debate on the Education Bill, & sermon writing. Mr. Tyrrell called in the morning on his way home from the Wilderness.- Harry arrived about noon from Dalwood, & stayed the night. Mr. James Doyle came & spent the evening. 20. Drove Harry up to the station to catch the early train for Maitland, where George Townshend was to meet him, & drive him to Trevallyn.- All three girls went to spend the day at Kaloudah, & after dinner Anne & I took a ride to Dalwood, intending to go to Fern Hill, but from their report of Bessie, we thought it better not to go, so returned without seeing her.- One or two nice little thunder showers today. 21. Sunday. Holy Communion at Lochinvar, only 19. Hot day, rather good congregations at both Churches, but very few at the Wilderness, owing perhaps, to the threatening appearance of the weather; ... Thunderstorms in the distance. 22. Service at Pokolbin after which I inspected the progress of the building. They are now cutting the second stuff which is quite as good as the split timber, & is all excellent. I made several calls on my way back, namely Lambkin, Joass, Mrs. Noon, Wills, & Campbell,- got home between 7 & 8 when I was sorry to hear of a sad accident which happened to Gurd this afternoon.- He got his hand crushed in a threshing Machine.- After tea I went up to see him, & found him in great pain. About 9 o'clock Drs. McKenzie & Waddle arrived from Maitland & at once decided that the hand must come off, & immediately set to work to amputate it, just above the wrist.- I remained till after the operation was performed, tho' I could not stand by to witness it. Fortunately it is the left hand that he has lost.- I also found on my return this evening, a note from Mr. Wyndham announcing the death of poor Bessie (Mrs. George W.) & requesting me to attend at Fernhill tomorrow morning for the funeral. 23. After an early breakfast I made a hasty call on Mrs. Phillips (who is ill again) & on Gurd, & then rode away to Dalwood & Fernhill. The funeral, as expected, was a very quiet one, no one being present but the members of their own family, with Dr. Hartigan & two men.- I found that poor George had dug the grave himself, & he & Wad filled it in at the close of the ceremony. I returned to Dalwood to lunch, & then came home, & after an early tea we all walked up to see Gurd, & from thence round by Phillips's. Page No: 94

24. Went by early train to Branxton this morning, where I had an examination of the Sunday School children.- The number attending there is small, but I have promised them a feast shortly, which I think will have the effect of increasing the number of scholars. Came back by midday train & after dinner went to see Gurd, who appears to be getting on favourably. Called to see Mrs. Phillips also, & found her under the operation of leeches. The doctor had been to see her this morning & pronounced her to be suffering from inflammation, so ordered leeches forthwith. 25. Visited Gurd & Mrs. Phillips this morning, & was glad to find them both progressing favourably. Marianne & I were preparing for a ride to Luskintyre this afternoon, when I found it necessary to send John a message on Farmer to Mr. Holmes, about the cottage in the lane, so we put off our ride. 26. Went to see Gurd again this morning, but found him asleep after a bad night, so did not disturb him. Called on Mrs. Phillips also much better. In the afternoon Marianne & I rode over to Luskintyre & called on the Davieses. 27. Went to Morpeth today to see the Bishop, also to get books for Branxton Sunday School. 28. Sunday. A congregation of 90 at Branxton- only 80 at Lochinvar.- Delightful day. 29. Called on old Mrs. Martin this morning, & afterwards on Mrs. Phillips, whom I found very much better. I then went on to Gurd's & found the Doctor there dressing his arm. He seems to be getting on favourably. We had arranged to go out to the Holmes's this afternoon, to spend a few days there, but it looked very black & threatening to the westward so we thought it better to postpone our ride till tomorrow. 30. Made an early start this morning, & got out to Mr. Holmes's before the heat of the day. All walked up to the vineyard in the evening. 31. Accomplished our long talked of picnic in the Mountain brush, about 10 miles from Mr. Holmes's- The day was rather warm, but we found it pleasant enough in the brush. Mr. Edward Tyrrell, & two of the Wilkinsons joined our party.

November 1866

1. Rode in from the Wilderness to see how matters were getting on at home, & especially to see Gurd, whom, to my surprise & delight, I found walking about outside. Returned to Mr. Holmes's in the evening. 2. Mr. Holmes & I rode over to Pokolbin to see the progress of the Church building there. Green the builder was not there. The poor man has been sorely afflicted within the last few days in the loss of one of his children, a boy of 10 yrs. old who was drowned in a water hole the other day. 3. We had a nice cool ride home from the wilderness this morning, & got home before 10 o'clock. Went to pay Gurd a visit, & found him walking about, inspecting the threshing of his wheat which the neighbours had kindly reaped for him.Found old Mrs. Glass very ill. 4. Sunday. Did not stay away this time, but came home from the Wilderness after tea. 5. Anne & Marianne went to Singleton by early train. After seeing them off I rode up to Branxton, to arrange about our Sunday School Feast, which we have arranged to come off on Wednesday. The day was exceedingly hot, until an early seabreeze set in. After hunting about in all directions I found a suitable place for the feast in the paddock where Mettam's family used to reside. 6. At home today. Made a few calls close at home,- Phillips &c.

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7. Rode up to Branxton pretty early, & got through the School feast very well. About 40 children attended, & I suppose about 25 adults.- The weather favoured us nicely, being cloudy the greater part of the day. 8. Went to Dalwood today, & also to Fernhill, to see George. Rode through the vineyard with John, & never saw it looking more beautiful & luxuriant.- Great promise of fruit. 9. Went by early train to Singleton, & remained the night there. 10. We all returned from Singleton by early train.- I found a long letter from H. Ferris about Henry's affairs, which I answered in the afternoon. Brought home a bad cold with me from Singleton. 11. Sunday. Uncomfortable from my cold, which affected my throat a good deal, nevertheless I managed to get through the services very well.- We had a glorious shower of rain just as we went into church in the afternoon, which gave us some water in our tanks.- For the first time since we came to Lochinvar I had to get a cask of water brought to us last Friday. 12. At home today, nursing my cold. Walked up to Gurds in the morning, but found he was away at Maitland. Mr. Young came up from Maitland this morning to repair our pump for us.- Got the English telegram today. 13. We all rode to Dalwood today, to spend the day there. On the way back called at Windermere, but Mrs. Green was ill, so we did not dismount.- Anne finished the day with a bad headache. 14. Branxton day. I began by visiting Mrs. Charles Hughes, who has been very unwell for a week past, though getting better. Made a few calls, then went to the School, & singing class. 15. Visited Elderslie today, & had a good long day of it. Nine families of my flock reside there now. I found them busy with a very bad harvest, scarcely worth the labour of reaping. 16. At home today, chiefly sermon-writing- Mr. Nunn & Kate arrived in the evening. 17. At home, entertaining Mr. Nunn &c. &c. Willy Boydell came in the evening. 18. Sunday. Large congregation here in the morning- 102- Fine day- got through my work well. 19. Service at Pokolbin, after which I found my way to the Wilkinsons, & from thence to Mr. Tyrrells, back to Mr. Holmes's to tea & then home by moonlight.- tired. Past 10 o'clock. 20. At home all day resting after yesterday's toils.- James Kelman brought his sister here in the afternoon, & left her to spend a few days. 21. Went to Branxton viâ Dalwood, wishing to see John about Henry's affairs. On my return in the evening I found Mrs. Walsh & little Charlie here. She had made a mistake, & put herself in the wrong train at W. Maitland, & so found herself at Lochinvar instead of Morpeth. 22. Borrowed Mr. Doyle's Sociable to take Mrs Walsh to the station, intending in the afternoon to drive into Maitland for some shopping, but it threatened so for thunderstorms that we put off our trip till tomorrow. 23. Drove Anne & Kate Nunn in to Maitland today, to make a few purchases.- Had a warm day, or rather a very hot one, the thermometer reaching 93 in the shade.- In the evening a thunderstorm came on with [a] fine shower of rain, which put a nice supply of water into the tanks. 24. Another nice shower about 3 to 4 A.M., & again some more rain during the forenoon.- Cloudy & threatening all day. At home, sermon writing. 25. Sunday. Holy Communion at Branxton. 19 Communicants, & among them Mr. Wyndham's friend Mr. Whitestone.- Weather cool & pleasant,- threatened rain in the morning. 26. Went to Singleton today, to see Henry about his affairs. Visited the few people at Belford on the way.

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27. Returned home by way of Glendon & Kirkton. Being about 17 yrs. Since I was at Glendon, of course many alterations have taken place during that time. Scott's flat as we used to call it, is now laid out in small farms, & intersected by roads, one main Government road leading straight across the flat from White's crossing to Terrace Cottage.- I dined at Kirkton, & then called on the Rudds, & at Alfred Goodwin's, but no one was home at the latter place.- This has been a grand day with the Roman Catholics, whose Chapel opposite has been consecrated by their Bishop of Maitland, lately arrived in the Colony. 28. Went to Branxton today, after calling at Kaloudah to see Mr. Doyle, who has had a fall from his horse, which has given him a great shaking, tho' nothing more than that, I hope. Had rather a warm ride to Branxton.- No class at the school today, so many of the children being absent, witnessing the ceremony of consecrating the Rom. Cath. Chapel there. Had a good singing class & then rode home. 29. Kate Nunn wishing to go to Maitland for a little shopping, She, Marianne & myself rode in after an early breakfast, & had an exceedingly hot ride. We left Owem & Beckett's shop at ½ past ten, & reached home at 11.-15, where we found the thermr. under the verandah at a 100. It rose afterwards to 104. Some thunderstorms passed by in the afternoon, but only a few drops of rain fell. 30. St. Andrew's Day- & being observed as a general holiday159, I made it so by staying at home. One or two nice thunder-showers passed over in the course of the day, adding a good deal of water to our tanks.

December 1866

1. Made a few calls in the village this morning ­ Sermon writing & reading the rest of the day. Spencer Holmes called in the morning. ­ Light drizzling rain all day. 2. Sunday.160 Holy Commn at Lochinvar ­ 22 Commts - there would have been a few more probably, but all the Lees were away at Dalwood. The attendance at the Wilderness was better than usual ­ 31. 3. Went to Pokolbin, where I found Green at work again, getting on with the building. On my way back I called at Lodge's, London's, Rose, Bezley, Clift, Fuller & Brown. On reaching home found that Marianne & Kate had gone to spend the afternoon at Kaloundah. 4. At home letter writing the greater part of the day. All took a walk in the morning in Mr Hungerford's paddock. 5. Walked up to the station early in the morning with Kate & Marianne, to see if John Osborne was in the train, & found him there. As he said he would be back by midday train I remained at home to receive him instead of going to Branxton. Went to see Mr Doyle in the morning. Mr Osborne returned from Maitland per midday train. In the afternoon I visited Keevers, Gurds, & Wilton's. Gurd was out but I met him on my way home. 6. Marianne & I161 accompanied Kate & Mr Osborne up to the train this morning, & saw them off for their long up country journey. In the afternoon I went to visit about Gosforth, calling at Naseby, Bird's Nash's, John Nash & Skinner's, also on Bailey on the way home. 7. Spent the morning visiting at Luskintyre, - at Christian's & the three Russell's, In the afternoon we had a call from Fish & May, with 3 of the Wilkinson family. After their departure we went to Windermere, Anne on Nelly, while Marianne & I walked. Stayed there to tea. 8. I intended going to Morpeth this morning but a strange giddiness, & sickness possessed me when I got up, & I have been not quite the thing all day, so I

159 160

Why was 30th November 1866 a general holiday? From now on Alfred underlines Sunday, presumably to find it more easily. 161 Not his usual "myself".

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postponed by visit to Morpeth until next week. Spent the morning chiefly reading the report of the opening of the Sydney Diocesan Synod; & the debate in the Upper House on the Public Schools Bill. In the afternoon I walked up to the station to meet little Charlie from Singleton162. 9. Sunday. No Wyndhams at Church this morning. They had service among themselves at Dalwood some of their own ministry being there, - Mr Whitestone, & another, I believe163 ­ 10. Went to Morpeth by Midday train to see the Bishop & get some money from him for the Pokolbin Church. ­ Took Charlie with me ­ got a few books at Depôt 164­ John ill again. 11. At home all the morning, letter writing chiefly. Towards evening I walked with Charlie over to the river to see if he could catch any fish, but they would not rise ­ I called at Houston's & Walker's. ­ In the morning called on Mrs Cameron. 12. To Branxton today as usual on Wednesdays. Dined with the Lindsays. 13. Went in the morning to see Mrs Harper Senr, having heard yesterday that she had had a fall, & had broken some ribs. Anne & Charlie rode with me, & found the poor old lady sitting up in bed, better than I expected. This afternoon Marianne, Charlie & I165 rode in to Maitland to do some shopping. On the way out met Mr Edwd Tyrrell on the Long Bridge, hurrying to report to the Police that his house was broken into this morning, & he was robbed of upwards of £70 in cash, beside blankets & other things. 14. Had rather a long day at Luskintyre, calling on those who had subscribed to the proposed School there, & returning their subscriptions to them. Charlie accompanied me. 15. Began the day by walking up to the station with Charlie, & seeing him safe off to Singleton. The rest of the day occupied chiefly preparing for tomorrow's services. 16. Sunday. Rather a hot day. Congregations not overwhelming. 17. Service at Cessnock. Green has not yet finished the sawing, but what he has cut seems very good. Had a very hot ride back, viâ Matthews's to Mr Holmes's. Fine thunderstorm came on about 4PM & rained very heavily till near sunset, when I started & came home. 18. Busy all the morning altering the arrangement of our rooms ­ taking the dining room for Marianne's bedroom, & moving the dining table into the drawing room. In the afternoon I went to see Mrs Harper again, & found her somewhat better, I think. On my return I went to see Gurd, who had asked me to write up to Bukkulla & enquire whether they could give him any employment up there as a shepherd, so I have written to Charlie this evening about him.166 19. Had Comet saddled this morning for my usual Branxton visit, but did not feel very well, & as I have to go up there tomorrow morning to marry a couple, I thought it prudent to remain at home, & employ myself indoors. 20. Went to Branxton by the early train, & had a very nice wedding party ­ John Thrift & Elizabeth Skinner, After the ceremony I called on 2 or three of the residents, & among the number on poor Mr Rae, whom I found confined to his bed from an accident which happened to him last weekend, vizt, the wheel of a dray passing over him, as he tells me, right across his chest. How he escaped with his life, I cannot imagine.167 ­ Returned home by the midday train & found Mr Holmes here.

Alfred's nephew, Charles Edward Glennie, born 1852, penultimate child of Elizabeth & Henry Glennie. Were the Wyndhams actually of another denomination? On the 25th of the previous month, Mr Whitestone had attended the Branxton Church service with Mr Wyndham. 164 Sometimes crowned with the circumflex, sometimes not. 165 Got his grammar right again! 166 By the 1860's the fencing of pastoral runs was under way, displacing shepherds ­ Gurd was attempting to join a shrinking band of men ­ rather like being an apprentice buggy-whip maker in the 1920's. 167 Not by the Grace of God, Alfred?

163 162

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21. Went over Luskintyre way today, & after calling on Mrs Peck, who had some painful domestic troubles to acquaint me with, I went on to Burgess's, Parker's & old Mr Drinan's for the purpose of returning to each of them their subscriptions to the Luskintyre School. On my way home I called in on the Philmer's to console with them on the loss of their daughter at Hinton, & took the opportunity of urging upon Philmer the necessity of mending his ways, & trying to lead a better life than he is now doing. 22. At home all day, preparing for tomorrow's duties &c &c. 23. From what cause I know not, but both congregations today were below the average, - gave notice for the service on Xmas Day, with Holy Communion at Branxton. 24. At home all day. In the morning I married a couple from Cessnock, Jeans & Lamb. Phillips & John went to Summer Hill in the afternoon, & brought home a draw-load of evergreens to decorate the Church with tomorrow, Had a call in the afternoon from Mrs Jackson & her sister Kate. 25. A very nice Xmas Day as far as the weather was concerned, Moderately warm ­ morning Service at Branxton, with a congregation of 64. & administered the Holy Commn to 19. 63 attended the afternoon service at Lochinvar. 26. Thankful that I had not to go out today, for it has been one of those dreadful hot scorching days with a NW wind, although hardly amounting to a genuine hot wind. The thermometer reached 101 in the coolest part of our verandah. A most unfortunate day for excursionists & holiday makers ­ John & Mary Ann took holiday today & have been to Newcastle ­ I was occupied all the morning making a bookstand for the Harmonium in the Church ­ Wrote to Uncle Ferris in the afternoon. 27. At home today, sermon writing, & writing to Alexander, in South Carolina. 28. Went by early train to Branxton this morning to visit Mr Rae, whom I found better, having left his bed & was out on the sofa. Had a long talk with him & he made great promises of future amendment. After visiting the people around about the station, I came home by the midday train, having Mrs Collett & John Wyndham for fellow passengers. In the afternoon we all rode to Oswald to see poor Mrs Harper & on our return found Mr Townshend here. 29. Mr Greenway made his appearance this morning on his way home from his long missionary journey in the interior. He left his horse here, & took the evening train for Newcastle. 30. Sunday. Very good congregations for the last time this year. Administered the Holy Commn to 21 here & at both churches gave them an appropriate sermon for the text "My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle" Job:VII.6. 31. Came home early from the Wilderness to marry G.S. Munns & Mary Gurd. ­ that, & making up some Returns of Baptisms &c, occupied the day. Mr Winder called to announce his wife's illness, & ask me about the interment of a still-born child. Townshend went to Dalwood this morning ­ Hot day, 94.

January 1867

1. Being a general holiday, & an exceedingly hot day, I did not go out anywhere visiting, but employed myself within doors, preparing my Statistical Return of Churches & Schools for the Government ­ thermometer reached 102 in the shade ­ good beginning for the new year. 2. Terrible hot day again ­ thermtr 107 in the shade. In the morning I rode out to enquire after Mrs Winder, & was glad to find her getting on well. I went on as far as Bates's, calling at Neal's & on Mrs Tuckey. ­ Mr Townshend returned from Dalwood this morning.

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3. Went by early train to Morpeth to attend the Quarterly Meeting of the Committee of our Church Society. No one attended but Mr Walsh, Mr Bode & myself. Came back by midday train, & Mr Green drove me down from the station in his buggy. Awfully hot again - 107. 4. Nice change in the weather today, cool & cloudy with SE wind. Mr & Mrs Greenway came up from Newcastle to spend a few days with us. 5. Had to go to Branxton this morning to bury a little child there ­ Brosi. Went by train & had a very hot walk home at noon from the station. The Doyles came & spent the evening. 6. Sunday. Mr Greenway went to Branxton with me & preached for me there, as well as here also in the afternoon ­ congregations middling only. 7. Mr Greenway went to Newcastle by midday train ­ Townshend walked up with him to the station & saw him off ­ Mrs Green & her little girl came to spend the day with us. 8. Today we were all invited to spend the day at Kaloudah, - Anne did not feel quite well enough to go so we left her at home. In the morning Townshend & I went to call on Mrs Winder ­ hot day again (96) & very smokey. 9. Had a hot ride to Branxton this morning ­ Townshend went with me ­ called first on Mrs Collett, then on the Lindsays, where we dined. ­ I then went to see Mr Rae, whom I found much better ­ then passed an hour at the School ­ after that a small singing class, & then came home. Found Mr Greenway here, come back from Newcastle. 10. Marianne went with the Greenways to spend the day at Windermere, while Townshend & I took the opposite direction & rode to Anambah. Mr Cobb being in Sydney we crossed the river & went to Mr Nowland's where we dined. Called on Mr Hetherington at Melville on our way back. Nice cool day. 11. Mr Greenway left us this morning for Newcastle, viâ Morpeth & Hexham & Mrs Greenway & little Charlie went by the 4o'c train. Townshend & I walked up to the station to see them off, after which we called on Mr Clift, & walked with him to see his vineyard, & then came home. 12. At home today, sermon writing & preparing for tomorrow's services. 13. Sunday. The three services, as usual. My congregation at Mr Holmes's was a little increased by the presence of Mr & Mrs Gordon & their little boy ­ also Mr Edwd Tyrrell & Fred Wilkinson ­ for several weeks now I have been using the prayer for rain, which is greatly needed now. 14. Mr Gordon accompanied me to Pokolbin & seemed pleased with the service there ­ We had the addition of a baptism Mrs Picton brought her little one to be baptized. On our way back, we called at Wills's & Campbells. At the latter house I found one of the children, Maria, about 12 years old, very ill ­ quite delirious: brought on, they suppose, from eating unripe grapes.168 I dined at the Holmes's & then came home with Townshend, who came out in the morning to meet me.169 15. Being anxious to see how the poor girl from Campbells was getting on, I rode out there again this morning, & took Marianne with me to spend the day with the Holmeses ­ Found Dr Hartigan at Campbells applying leeches to the girl, who did not seem much better. 16. Having on Sunday last received a note from Mrs Taylor at Fangorin expressing a desire to see me, I determined to go round that way to Branxton, & started early viâ Dalwood, I found Mrs Taylor wanted me to go & see Mrs Putter [or Rutter?], who, she said, was somewhat troubled in her mind by some domestic affairs. ­ I went at once to see her, & she acquainted me with all her troubles, which I trust we shall be able to set right for her before long. ­ Seeing great thunderclouds

168 169

An unlikely cause! What happened to Mr Gordon?

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arising, I came straight home instead of going to Branxton, & was caught in the storm at the top of Harper's Hill, - Mr Greenway came again this eveng. 17. At home resting a little, Mr Greenway left us after breakfast for Newcastle on horseback, & Agnes went home by the evening train ­ Townshend, Marianne & myself170 went up to see her off, having put her in charge of the guard.171 ­ Mrs Chapman was in the train on her way home having been on a visit to her brother at the Goulburn. 18. Went out to see Campbell's daughter again. Found her quieter than before, but no appearance of her reason returning yet. ­ I dined at the Holmes's, where I found the Gordons preparing to take their departure,172 intending to take the evening boat to Sydney. ­ After calling on Mr Kiever [?] I returned by way of Dalgetty & Oswald, calling in to see old Mr Harper, - Townshend left us this morning for Maitland, - & Mr Tyrrell called & dined on his return from the Wilderness. 19. At home all the morning sermon writing. In the afternoon I rode over the river to Luskintyre where I first called at Connolly's, and returned the 7/6 they had subscribed to the School. I then called on Mrs Davies. ­ On my way out I called on Mrs Darcy, a friend of the Ferriers who has been staying with them for some time, but whom I have only lately discovered to be Church people. 20. Sunday. A nice cool cloudy day, but neither congregations so large as they might have been. Only 13 Communicants at Branxton. Willie Boydell, with Henry Doyle & a Mr Wright, remained after church & took tea with us. 21. Glorious shower of rain again in the night, or towards morning, & some slight drizzly showers in the forenoon. After dinner I mounted old Farmer & rode out to Campbells, when I found they had removed the poor girl to Branxton that she might be nearer her doctor ­ called at the Holmeses and then came home ­ found Mr Greenway here. 22. Had a long day's visiting at Stanhope & thereabouts ­ Went up this side of the river & crossed above Hinton's, & came home through Irish Town making it 8 o'clock before I got home. 23. Branxton day. Called first at the Red House to enquire after the girl "Maria Campbell". Little or no improvement had taken place. I did not see her, thinking it better not to do so. Dr Hartigan still has a hope of her recovery. Spent the day visiting, but had no class at the School, some of the children being absent. ­ Getting on towards 9 o'clock when I came in, & found Mr Doyle & Mr Wright here. 24. The last two days I rather overdid the thing, & felt the effects of it today, being good for nothing all day. In the evening we all walked up to call on Mrs Winder, on Mrs Phillips also. 25. Borrowed Mr Read's vehicle this morning, & we all went to Maitland to do some shopping. Rosa Davidson came up in the evening to spend a few days with us. 26. Being a general holiday, I spent it as I always do such days ­ at home ­ Preparing for tomorrow's services &c. Helenus Scott came in the morning & remained the night. 27. Sunday. Small congregations as I expected, after yesterday's holiday making. Only 17 Commnts at Lochinvar. 28. After breakfast I left Mr Holmes's for Pokolbin ­ called first at Boughton's & had some conversation [No further entries for January]

February 1867

1. [No entry]

170 171

Back to his normal grammar. We would now say "put the guard in charge of her". 172 So that's where the Gordons got to.

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2. At home all day, chiefly Sermon writing. 3. Sunday. Some heavy showers frightened the people from Church. ­ Small congregations at both Churches. 4. Went to Kaloundah for dinner, after which I rode through the vineyards with Mr James Doyle, & then went across to Luskintyre, to Mrs Peck's, one of her daughters being very ill. Called at Hall's on the way back to ask him to collect for the Stipend this year in lieu of Mr Davies, someone else to undertake the office this year. ­ Caught in a great shower at Windermere on my way home. 5. Went to Morpeth per midday train to get a parcel of books just arrived from England & to see the Bishop also. Fell in with Mr Greenway on my way back, in the train from Newcastle. He got out at West Maitland, & came up here in the evening on a new horse he has just bought. 6. Very heavy rain again this morning ­ I went over the river to Mrs Peck's & found her daughter I hope a little better. ­ In the evening I made a few calls in the lane. 7. Went to Maitland this morning to see Mr Chambers, & make an affidavit before him relative to Mr Dudding's assignment of the Bill of Sale of Henry's effects to H. Ferris &c.173 Returned to dinner, expecting the Greenways to be here, but they disappointed us, & not come. 8. Went over to Mrs Peck's in the morning & found her daughter, I hope, a little better. The girls, i.e. Marianne & Rosa Davidson, went to spend the day at Kaloundah. Mr Greenway & family arrived in the evening. 9. At home all day sermon-writing. Mr Greenway went to Morpeth to see the Bishop before starting on his journey, which he hopes to do on Monday next. 10. Sunday. Mr Greenway helped me by reading in the morning while I preached from the text "An enemy hath done this". At Branxton I had a large congregation, & gave warning for the Commn next Sunday, reading the 2nd Exhortation at length, & then preached on the subject from the text "And why call ye me Lord, & do not the things which I say?" ­ I hope on Sunday next to see more Commmts in consequence ­ I went round by Smith's to baptize his sick child. 11. Service at Pokolbin ­ only 6 in attendance owing, I suppose, to the fact of the people being engaged with the threshing machines174. The building is not getting on at all well, but I hope will do better now Mr Moore has retired from the job & a man named Henty [or Henry?] has taken his place & seems to understand it better than Green. Called at Campbell's on my way back & was grieved to find the poor girl as bad as ever- I fear she must go to the asylum. John Pyne met me by appointment at Mr Holmes', to see whether he could undertake the building of our Church there. I expected his offer to be a high one, but was not prepared for the preposterous one of £245. ­ I must alter the plan. 12. After breakfast I rode over to Mrs Peck's & found the poor invalid there I hope a little better. After dinner we had a long visit rather from Houston's daughter, who came to bid us farewell. Her father has taken a farm at Singleton, & they will all be leaving us shortly. The Gurds took their departure for Bukkulla on Monday morning.175 Thus will my congregation suffer some diminution. ­ I should have mentioned that Mr Greenway & family started their journey also on Monday morning. This evening we all walked as far as Mr Ferrier's to call on them & the Darcy's, their visitors. 13. Last night a headache came on about bed-time, & increased to a very bad one as the night advanced quite depriving me of rest until I fell asleep about dawn this morning. ­ After such a night I did not feel at all equal to my Branxton visit today, more especially as I foresaw a very hot day, which it turned out ­ thermr 96. I

173

No idea what this is about ­ there is a mention on the 26th November previous of Alfred going to Singleton about Henry's affairs. 174 All hands to the threshing machines? 175 Well, he got the job ­ it would be interesting to know how long he kept it.

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remained at home therefore, & employed myself partly looking over sermons for next Sunday, partly sleeping a bit - & partly calculating the timber required for the Rothbury Church. 14. Rode into Maitland this morning to transact a little business for Mr Greenway, which he was obliged to leave undone. The day was exceedingly sultry, & seeing thunderclouds gathering in the west, I rode home smartly to escape the storm, & met it just about the Black Hill, but it was only a slight one after all. In the afternoon a messenger came to announce the death of the infant I baptized last Sunday, Thomas Smith, & request my attendance at Branxton tomorrow morning for the funeral. In the evening I planted two Norfolk Island Pines in front, which Helenus Scott sent us from Newcastle, - also transplanted Henry Lee's fig tree in front of the Church door.176 15. Went to Branxton this morning for the funeral of Smith's child. From thence I went to Dalwood & Fern Hill, & returned by Luskintyre, calling at Mrs Peck's by the way. 16. Went to Wilton's the first thing after breakfast to enquire after one of their children ­ which was sick, & found it better. Engaged today chiefly planning out a new plan for Rothbury Church. This morning I received an anonymous letter from some unknown person177 which astonished me not a little.178 17. Sunday. My hope of seeing more Communicants at Branxton today was fulfilled for I administered to 25. It was so very hot in the afternoon that I was not surprised at having a small attendance at Lochinvar. 18. Very hot again, after breakfast I went to see little Emily Young who is sick ­ a sunstroke I believe. I also called on some of the neighbours thereabouts. In the afternoon I took Marianne & Rosa Davidson up to the station & saw them off per train to East Maitland. 19. Went to see little Emily Young again this morning. She seemed a little better. Too hot to go out (therm. 100) so found work indoors planning & calculating the cost of Rothbury Church &c &c. Rain in the afternoon (nice thunderstorm) followed by other showers & set in steadily at night, with change of wind to SE, Rained hard nearly all night. 20. Very rainy morning ­ creek running over the bridge so I did not go to Branxton. Went to see the little sick girl, Emily Young, & found her rather worse again. This evening she was somewhat easier, Finished & posted a letter to John David which I commenced yesterday. 21. Poor little Emily Young died this morning about ½ p. 7,179 - truly a most happy release for the child to be removed from the care of such a mother. ­ Anne accompanied me today on a visit to the Holmeses, where I left her while I paid a round of visits in the neighbourhood, beginning at Campbell's, & going round by Smiths, Patton's, G. Chick's, Mr Blick's & Cram's. Glad to find Maria Campbell very much better, Cram has been very ill, a paralytic attack,180 I fear. 22. Went to Mrs Peck's in the morning & was glad to find her daughter very much better ­ up, & out of her room. Got bogged in the river on my way back. In the afternoon the funeral of little Emily Young took place. 23. After breakfast I went to pay Mrs Taylor a visit & was not surprised to find her under the influence of drink ­ Of course in that condition I refrained from saying much to her, but only expressed a hope of having another opportunity of speaking a word in season when she may be in better condition to receive it. Spent the whole day sermon writing &c.

176 177

In February? As you do. 178 What was it about, Alfred? 179 By sunstroke does Alfred mean extreme sunburn leading to fluid loss and heart attack? 180 Stroke?

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24. Sunday. The 17th anniversary of my ordination. Holy Communion here, but only eleven attended. Fine bright day ­ warm in afternoon. Fair congregation at all places. 25. Rather fatiguing day of it. Went first to Pokolbin but found very little progress made with the Church. From thence I made my way across the bush to Pyne's, to see whether he would undertake to saw the timber for the Rothbury Church, but I got myself a little astray & found myself at Kenny's & near Mr Edwd Tyrrell's, when I thought I was close to Pyne's. I had therefore to retrace my steps, or rather strike across by Carroll's, & from thence across the ridge to Pyne's. I found him at Anderson's hard by, & he said he was quite willing to cut the timber & deliver it upon the ground for 16/- a 100ft. Moreover, he very liberally promised, that when all was cut & delivered, he would knock off 2/- a 100, as his subscription towards the building. I promised to go out one day next week & see the timber he proposed cutting, namely Blue Gum, in one of the mountain brushes near his place. "Comet" having lost a shoe yesterday, Mr Holmes kindly lent me his grey mare, so I had Comet fresh for my ride home in the evening. John Wilkinson rode with me, as he was coming to Kaloundah, we came across the hill from Allandale gate. On coming home I found that John had broken out again, having stayed away drinking yesterday evening & today he has left home about noon & has not yet returned. It is certain, therefore, that we must now part. 26. Obliged to remain at home today in consequence of John's delinquencies. He has not shown himself yet181. Had to go up to the station to meet Marianne and Annie Davidson in the evening. Borrowed Mr Read's cart for the occasion. Heavy rain came on while I was waiting for the train but it held up as we came home. 27. Intended going to Branxton today per train, but it proved rainy, so I stayed at home & found occupation within doors. 28. Started this morning to catch the early train for Branxton, but was just in time to be too late182, So came back & made a few calls by the way. I visited Mrs Taylor also, & tried to impress upon her the necessity of altering her course of life, which she promises to do ­ but I am doubtful of this. Mr Winder called & gave me the amount of his collections.

March 1867.

1. The morning was occupied for the most part in gathering & assisting to pack two boxes of grapes for Maitland, & getting up old Farmer from the paddock to be ready for a drive to the station in the afternoon, when I took Annie Davidson up, & saw her safe off to Maitland. Marianne went with us, & she & I called to see Mrs Clift while up there. 2. The first thing after breakfast was to go & pay a visit to Phillips, who is ill with dysentery. I then wrote a letter or two to take to the post (one to the Bank with remittance of £41 for Church Society) after which finished my sermon for tomorrow. ­ saw Phillips this evening & found him better. 3. Sunday. And rather a hot one. Very large congregation at Branxton (85) where I baptized 4 infants after the service. I suppose the heat in the afternoon was the cause of a small congregn here. 4. Went to visit the Phillips after breakfast & found him very poorly ­ I urged them to send for a doctor, which they did this afternoon by John & Mary Ann, who rode in to Maitland183. I also called on the Hungerfords on my way back from the post, &

181

What set John off about the 25th or 26th February in both 1866 & 1867? His birthday? Anniversary of something nasty? 182 Joking, Alfred? 183 So they had not been discharged - yet.

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found Uncle Henry there184. Mr H. had gone to Newcastle to remain a few days. Occupied partly today shooting birds, which are very troublesome now among the grapes. 5. Started soon after 6 this morning for the Wilderness where I joined them at breakfast after which I went on to Pyne's to get him to go with me & show me the fine blue gum timber which he proposes cutting for the Church. ­ He was not at home however, & I feared I was altogether balked [sic] & repaired to Mrs Atkinson's, & after resting an hour or more there Pyne made his appearance so I went back with him & he took me up through the brush where the Blue Gum grows, with which I was perfectly satisfied, Came straight away back to Mr Holmes', & after taking an unexpected cup of tea, from a party of the Campbells who were enjoying a picnic in the brush ­ got home again just about dark. It will be a month yet before Pyne will be able to begin cutting the timber, but he promises when he begins to go right through with it, & not work for anyone else till he has cut it all. He agrees to deliver at 16/- a 100ft. 6. Ash Wednesday. And a most lovely day. Only 21 attended the service in the Church ­ Went to see Phillips this afternoon & was glad to find him apparently better. 7. Went to Dalwood this morning & took Marianne with me to spend the day ­ very hot ­ On our way home called at Willah & at Kimmorley's, - Mr & Mrs Goldfinch arrived at Dalwood by midday train, on reaching home this evening found I had dropped my leggings somewhere on the road. I strapped them on outside my valise behind the saddle & they must have slipped out. 8. Started this morning in search of my leggings, & rode as far as Willah but saw nothing of them. I must have dropped them on the High road, where they were no doubt soon picked up. Rain came on while I was at Willah, so instead of going on further to visit, I returned home, calling & dining at Kaloundah. 9. Remained at home today, preparing for tomorrow's services & reading. Also, (after paying Phillips a visit, who seems a little better) made up my Monthly return of Baptisms & Burials, & posted it. 10. Sunday. Delightful day, with pleasant breeze from SE, which enabled me to get thro' the day's work without fatigue. Three very tolerable congregations. 11. Service at Pokolbin, where I baptized James Moore's little infant daughter. I was much disappointed at finding no progress made at the Church & I heard that Green was away working at the Public House instead of getting on with the building. ­ I left a note for him begging him to meet me the next Monday morning that we may come to some decided understanding about the finishing of the work. ­ Called at McDonald's & Crane's on my way home. 12. Rode down to Morpeth today to consult the Bishop about the Pokolbin Church, & a few other things. Treated myself to a new pair of riding gaiters, in place of my old ones which I lost last week. 13. Branxton day. Not having been there for the last few Wednesdays, I spent the day visiting & did not go to the School. Had my singing class as usual. 14. Rode out this morning to see old Mrs Harper & found her much as usual, still complaining of her cough, which I suppose will never leave her ­ Paid Phillips a visit in the morning he is not quite so well. 15. Had a long day visiting my Elderslie folks whom I found all well except Mr John Moore, who I fear is beginning to break up, At present he is suffering from a cold he caught at Mt Royal a few weeks ago. Some of them were busy harvesting their maize. 16. At home, preparing for tomorrow's work. After dinner I went to the Phillips whom I found much better. Looked also to see Mrs Taylor whom I found "drunk". I went from Phillips's through his paddock towards the lane to visit Mrs John Greedy

184

Ferris? ­ certainly not his brother.

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who has been very unwell lately & found her much better. ­ Called at the Hungerford's also this evening. Mr H. is down in Newcastle, getting Dr Bowker's attendance for his eyes. 17. Sunday. Very good congregation at Branxton, where I preached from the Gospel of the day ­ the Siroph? Woman. After service I had a funeral ­ a little child from the Coal Mines ­ Warby. At Lochinvar, tho' a beautiful afternoon, the congregation was below 80.185 18. Started about 7 this morning for Pokolbin, having appointed to meet Mark Green there at 11 o'clock. Had a delightful ride ­ so cool & pleasant, & everything looking so green & smiling. Found Green at work on the building, & he told me he had engaged two men, whom he expected today to help him finish the work.186 ­ I hope he will not disappoint me. ­ Returned to Mr Holmes's to dinner where I met Mr Nott & one of his little boys & rode home leisurely in the afternoon. 19. Did not feel very well this morning, having had a headache through the night, so remained at home all the morning ­ occupied myself Sermon187 writing. In the afternoon we all rode across to Luskintyre to call on the Davises. A gloomy sort of a day, and now (about 10 PM) it is raining hard. 20. Branxton day. Began by baptizing a child of Parkin's at Stanhope. ­ Called on Mrs Cox, who has been very ill, & is somewhat better, tho' still suffering from Cough. ­ Made a few other calls, then had my class at the School, & singing class. 21. Spent the day visiting at Luskintyre, beginning at the Christian's, & so on up to Parker's (except Burgess') & finishing with Mrs Peck's, by which time the sun was going down. 22. Received a letter from Mr Glue this morning enclosing agreement with a married couple, Henry Charlton & wife, who are to leave Sydney tonight, & come up by tomorrow morning's train. John & Mary Ann therefore set to & packed up their traps, & took their departure this afternoon. As they wished to take their mare to Sydney, they have gone down to Morpeth this evening, Mary Ann riding, & John in Philmer's cart, which they borrowed to carry their luggage. ­ In two more days they would have completed their four years with me, & but for John's unhappy propensity to drink, I don't think we shd have parted, perhaps for years to come. I only hope their successors will be equal to them. ­ It has been a day of many interruptions, from callers as well as other things, but I contrived amid all of them to write a letter to Mrs Crichton, in England, in reply to one the mail brought me this week. ­ Also wrote to Mr Whinfield, at Tamworth, asking him to look out for Mrs Cox's son, who, I fear, is acting the Prodigal somewhere up in that neighbourhood. George & Regy Wyndham called this afternoon, as did Spencer Holmes also. 23. Our new servants came as expected by this morning's train, & the day has been occupied a good deal in initiating them to their respective duties. Of course we cannot tell as yet how they may answer, but can only hope they will do. ­ Got all my sermons looked out for tomorrow. 24. Small congregations (Sunday) The muddy roads here, & an approaching thunderstorm, in the afternoon was I suppose the cause. On reaching Mr Holmes's gate, I made the vexing discovery that I had forgotten my surplice, & so had to go through the service without. 25. Went to Pokolbin, where I was glad to find three men at work, & the building progressing favourably. Had a long & unsatisfactory day's visiting among the people round about there, trying to collect for the Stipend Fund, but got only a few

185 186

No diatribe against the excesses of St Patrick's day. Mutatis mutandis? 187 Often, but not invariably, capitalised

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promises. It was dark when I got back to the Wilderness, so I remained the night there. 26. Came home just in time for dinner, calling by the way at Peck's, & on old Mrs Hawkins, Glad to find the new servants are getting on well. After dinner we called at the Hungerford's & on Widow King. ­ In the evening we all took a stroll in Mr Hungerford's paddock. 27. Branxton Day. Dined at the Lindsay's &c &c &c. The Chapmans called in the afternoon, accompanied by Mr & Mrs Simm, & Maud Harrison. 28. We all went to Maitland today to do a little shopping, & spend the day with the Chapmans. We were much pleased with the new Church, where we found the man putting up the font. We started from Maitland in view of a rising thunder, but by making the horses keep up a brisk pace, we just reached Neal's as the rain began, & were glad to take shelter there until the storm was over. 29. At home all day with the exception of a walk to Wiltons in the evening. Had a funeral this morning ­ an infant of Robert Palmer's, Mr Davies from Luskintyre called this morning. 30. At home chiefly Sermon writing. In the morning, after branding our two calves, I took my brand up to the blacksmith's, Graham, & made him a present of it, not intending to register it. I called to see Mrs Robert Palmer, whose little infant was buried yesterday, - also called at the Hungerford's to enquire after Emily, who is ill. ­ In the evening Mr Cadell & family called to say good bye to us prior to their departure (next week) for England. 31. Sunday. Heavy shower of rain came on when about 2 miles from Branxton, where I had a better congregation than I expected & administered the Sacrament to 16. ­ Miserable attendance here in the afternoon ­ only 18.

April 1867

1. Being a wet day, I remained at home, & after making up my monthly returns of Baptisms &c, spent the rest of the day writing a long letter to Benny, also to James, being his birthday.188 2. Another rainy day, kept me at home. Wrote a letter to Emily on the anniversary of her wedding day. The rest of the day spent in reading & writing. 3. Branxton day ­ spent much as usual ­ very late coming home due to such very bad roads. 4. Went to Morpeth to attend the Quarterly meeting of our Church Society & returned per midday train. Met our old friend Archd Bell189 in the train, going to Sydney with his two daughters. 5. Took Marianne to Singleton by first train this morning & left her to spend a week with them up there. 6. At home today sermon writing &c. We had some unusually heavy rain before daylight this morning which put the creek up & quite prevented any outdoor work in the garden, so I set Charlton to work fixing some iron tiles over the verandah at the kitchen door to try & stop the leaking of the roof. ­ Mr James Doyle & his sister Louisa called in the afternoon. 7. Sunday. Being a fine day had good congregations everywhere. Branxton taking the lead ­ 90. A stranger, a man named Mills, overtook me on my way to Mr Holmes's, & accompanied me thither to attend the service. He had evidently taken a little drop more than was good for him, & rather forgot himself. Very warm. 8. While at breakfast the rain began again very smartly, so that I began to doubt that I should go on to Pokolbin. In about an hour, however, it held up a little, so I went.

188 189

Written on, rather than to arrive on, his birthday. Archibald, not Archdeacon.

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­ Had only a congregation of 6. I was glad to find Green had got all the posts & sleepers of building fixed in their proper places. The rain continued lightly all day so I came straight home from Pokolbin. On reaching home I found that a sad catastrophe had happened here on Sunday night. ­ Haskings's Public House completely destroyed by fire with all its contents ­ it broke out, no one knows how, about midnight & the family had barely time to escape in their night dresses. They were unable to save anything except the bagatelle table & a chair or two. ­ To make matters worse, Mrs Haskins was near her confinement & the fright caused her to bring forth a still-born child today. I went to see her immediately I came home, & was glad to find everything going on well. ­ The House, which was the property of Keys, I am told was insured for £500, & Haskins goods & effects were also insured. 9. Rainy, dismal day. Went to see Mrs Haskins in the morning ­ going on very well ­ remained at home, & besides writing a little, did some carpentering. Began fitting up a wardrobe for Anne, in the piano case. 10. Rainy day again, occupied chiefly carpentering. ­ paid Mrs Haskins a visit towards evening, not quite so well. 11. Another rainy day kept me to the house, spent the most part of it carpentering. Finished Anne's wardrobe, which now only wants a pair of doors in the front, to make it a smart piece of furniture. Having finished that job, I next made a couple of small bookshelves to hang up in Marianne's room, & then towards evening I went to see Mrs Haskins, who thought she was not quite so well. No doubt this continued rain is against her. It has been raining very hard all the afternoon, & I think a flood is inevitable. 12. Fine day at last. The rain ceased rather abruptly last night between 10 & 11 o'clock otherwise we certainly should have had a flood. The river rose very rapidly & very high today, but is falling again this afternoon. I rode down the Kaloundah lane to see it, & called on Mrs D'Arcy190 & Mrs Ferrier. ­ Sermon writing all morning. 13. At home Sermon writing for tomorrow. Went to the station to meet Marianne, who came down from Singleton by the midday train.191 Mr Doyle called this evening. 14. Sunday. Although the weather was fine, I had very small congregations at both churches. The river being kept [sic] all the Elderslie folks away from Branxton, & I suppose the very dirty roads had something to do with it down here. Mrs Fred. Doyle called after Church. 15. Spent the morning visiting in the village ­ out as far as King's (the old couple) In the afternoon we all went to call on old Mrs Harper, & found her much as usual. 16. Went to Maitland this morning to do some shopping. Called at Mrs Tuckey's by the way to leave "The Old Man's Home" which I promised some time ago to lend to her father. Having completed my business in Maitland, & got a plentiful supply of dust into my eyes, I returned by way of Anambah, & called on Mrs Skinner, & then on Nash, whom I found very poorly. I was too late to extend my visits in that neighbourhood, so I came home by Balie's, where I called for a few minutes. 17. Went to Branxton, & spent the whole of my time there visiting, so I did not visit the School or have any singing class. Bid farewell to the Colletts, whom I found very busy packing up preparing for a start per early train tomorrow morning. 18. Remained at home today, & finished my Sermon for tomorrow, besides preparing for Easter Day. In the evening we all went & called on the Hungerfords. Spencer Holmes called today. 19. Good Friday. Morning service at Branxton, where about 50 attended. There would undoubtedly have been more, but the flooded river kept the Elderslie people away. ­ 45 only attended the afternoon service at Lochinvar.

190 191

First such spelling. Apparently unaccompanied.

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20. Prepared my Quarterly Report for SPG this morning, & then paid a visit to Mrs Brown. After dinner I walked as far as Mr Winder's, & on the way back called on most of the intervening houses. 21. A very nice Easter Sunday ­ 112 attended Church here, but out of that number only 18 Communicants. At Branxton I had upwards of 80 & at Mr Holmes' 29. There were two parties at Branxton with children to be baptized, but of course I could not wait to baptize them, especially as I was 20 minutes behind time. 22. Not a very favourable day for the holiday makers, as it rained the greater part of the day. I left Mr Holmes' directly after breakfast, & after calling on the Cranes, rode on to Branxton, where I baptized one of the children I was obliged to decline yesterday. Its mother, Mrs Mitchell, had come all the way from Ravensworth. The other party, living at the Coal Mines, are coming next Sunday with theirs. 23. It is worthy of note that I actually has a Vestry Meeting today, to elect Churchwardens. Three Seatholders attended, this is the first Vestry Meeting I have ever had at Lochinvar, & though a small one, it was large enough for us to transact all our business ­ being a showery day I found indoor work to fill up the rest of my time. ­ Mr Winder & Mr Jas: Doyle took their dinner with us after the Meeting was over. 24. Another rainy day kept me indoors. I spent the greater part of it carpentering, fixing up a new stand for the clock in the hall, & succeeded in making a satisfactory job of it. 25. During the cessation of rain this morning I went to see Mrs Phillips, who I heard was complaining a little last week. She was very much better, but still not quite the thing. I think she wants medical advice. In the afternoon the rain returned upon us again, but very gently, & it still continues (nearly 8pm) Did a little in the Sermon writing way today, & in the afternoon hunted up any old journal of '57, to compare that year with the present, which at present seems to resemble it very much. 26. Kept indoors again by rain, employed Sermon writing chiefly. Towards evening crept out during a lull to visit old Mrs Greedy in the lane, who has been ailing a little of late. 27. Should have gone to Morpeth today to see the Bishop, but the weather was still so threatening in the morning that I apprehended another wet day, so remained at home. In the morning I looked over & arranged my Sermons for tomorrow, &c & in the afternoon began a letter home to Isabella. Spencer Holmes called. 28. Sunday. This has been I think the wettest Sunday since we came to Lochinvar. It was very threatening when I started in the morning for Branxton, & a smart shower overtook me on the way but it began in good earnest about noon, and came down furiously on the way home. An easterly gale set in in the afternoon with pelting rain, which continued all the evening up until Bedtime, - I scarcely expected any congregations today, but I had 10 at Branxton & 8 at Lochinvar. 29. In the forenoon I went up to the station to pay my freight account there, & called on Mrs Brown & Mrs Clift also on Mrs John Greedy who has a sick child. After dinner I took advantage of the fine day & rode to Maitland, 30. Went to Morpeth to consult the Bishop on the propriety of having our Church Buildings insured, a movement in which his lordship quite concurred with us. I also went to the Book depot & settled my last year's account there, was a wet day for my journey, being the 20th wet day this month. A good deal of water covers the lands around Maitland & Morpeth.

May 1867

Page No: 109

1. Went to Branxton today, but rain came on again on the way up & continued all the time I was there, so I could not go about, except just look in at the School, & then waded home again through the mud. 2. A fine day at last, which I was not able to enjoy, being confined to the house with a bad headache. 3. Nice drying day with a fresh NW wind ­ I paid a few visits in the village, this morning, & after dinner Marianne accompanied me to Windermere to call on the Greens whom we found well, all except Kate who is suffering from neuralgia ­ We found the lane a perfect quagmire of mud from the late rains, 4. Being a fine day, I made a sure of it although Saturday, & took Marianne to the Wilderness to spend the day with the Holmeses. 5. Sunday. Very fair attendance both here & at Branxton. The wet state of the ground, the threatening aspect of the weather, & the dark night, kept several of the Wilderness people away. 6. Service in the morning at Pokolbin. I found some progress made with the building there, the whole framework is now completed. The late wet weather of course proved some hindrance. 7. Spent today visiting at the Coal Pits at Anvil Creek, where I had not been for a long time (much too long a time) I find there are now 8 Church of England families living there, & nearly as many presbyterians. Mr Farthing having purchased Mrs Smith's property there, she has just gone away & I hear has moved into Franks's old house at Branxton. 8. Branxton day. I spent the whole day visiting, & had no class at the School, nor singing Class. I called first on Mrs Bayliss (R-C) who would insist in my taking a cup of tea at her cottage, which I therefore did, I then went on to Clark Orman's, & over the creek to the German family there. On my way back I called on Mrs Coldrake to as her to bring her baby for Baptism on Sunday morning next, before the service. I next called on old Mr Bayliss, for the first time. Afterwards to the Davises & then home.192 9. Walked over to Kaloudah this morning to enquire after Flory, who has measles, & found her pretty well recovered, In the afternoon we all walked as far as Wilton's. 10. Anne & Marianne went by early train to E: Maitland, to spend the day with the Davidsons, & then go on by evening train to Morpeth, to make a long promised visit to the Walsh's. I followed them on horseback, & after doing a little shopping in Maitland, called & dined with the Tyrrell's, & then went on to Morpeth, where we found Mrs Walsh ill, & in bed, - but she rallied after a while, & got up, & we spent a very pleasant evening with them. 11. After selecting a few books at the Depot, I got my horse & rode home, getting in between 1 & 2. Took Nelly up to the station for Anne to ride home upon. It came on to rain just before the train arrived, so that we had a wet walk & ride home. 12. Sunday. Another very wet day. 21 attended at Branxton, 6 of whom remained to the Sacrament. ­ I had also the addition of the Baptismal service twice over. Once before the service, & once after. Our creek being flooded all at the other side were cut off from Church. 13. I had intended starting for the Paterson this morning, but knowing that the heavy rains of yesterday must have swollen the river, I gave it up & remained at home. Did a little carpentering among other things, prepared some bars for the front windows. 14. Made one or two calls in the village this morning & found a fine budget of letters at the post, including one from Emily, from Goonoo Goonoo193 on their way down, so we hope to see them by the end of the week. Also a letter from Benny, giving a very poor account of himself. He expresses a hope of being able to come & pay

192 193

A very short list for a whole day ­ surely drinking a cup of tea didn't take that long? Pronounced Gunna ganoo.

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us a visit after the arrival of his Bishop, & I sincerely hope he will be able to accomplish it, seeing it is now 18 years since we met.194 This afternoon I fixed the bars which I made yesterday for the front windows.195 15. I went to Branxton today in spite of a morning rainbow which warned me not to go. The rain came on before I reached Branxton, & as it seemed to be a set-in rain, I mounted my horse, after paying 2 or 3 visits, & rode home again. 16. At home all the morning, sermon writing & doing a little household work in the mattress line. In the afternoon Anne & I rode into Maitland to do a little shopping which proved to be very little indeed, for by the time we got there it was close on sunset & so time to come home again. We had therefore to postpone our shopping for another day. 17. As we got no tidings of Charlie & Emily by this morning's post, I set off about eleven o'clock intending to visit Mark Putter's & then to turn into Dalwood, but as I came in sight of Harper's Hill, I spied them in the distance coming down in their buggy, I therefore turned about & came back with them. They are both looking very well. In the afternoon Charlie rode in to Maitland on Comet. 18. At home all day, looking over my weather journal for the last 10 years, in order to supply Mr Nowlan with some information which he asked me for. 19. Sunday. A fine bright day again, but no very great attendance at Church here. At Branxton had a very nice congregation, as usual, - the same at the Wilderness. 20. Hearing that Pyne wished to see me about the timber for the Church, I went out to his place the first thing this morning, but could not find him, tho' Anderson directed me to where he was working in the bush, I missed him. On my way back I called at the several houses of Joass, Lambkin, G: Chick, Mrs Noon & Matthews. By the time I reached Mr Holmes', it was getting dark, so I accepted their invitation to stay there the night. On my way out to Pyne's I crossed the track of the whirlwind which continued its course from Maitland, last Sunday week, crossing Black Creek between Campbell's & Wills's & passing thro' Campbell's paddock, & Mr Holmes', & so on towards the mountains. I never saw a more perfect lane cleared through the bush than it has made, uprooting all the trees & laying them prostrate on the ground. 21. Leaving Mr Holmes' after breakfast, I went straight to Belmont & called on Mrs Blick, from thence I came straight home, calling in at Crane's by the way. There I found Susan just returned home (yesterday) from Warialda. Called also on Mrs Clift. ­ While there the midday train came in & I found Anne & Marianne just come back from Maitland, where they had been shopping. ­ Charlie & Emily having driven down in their buggy. 22. Being a rainy day, I did not go to Branxton, or any where else, but remained at home. Wrote a letter to Mr Crichton in the morning & then finished off my meteorological statistics for Mr Nowlan. 23. A glorious day with fine NW wind. I rode out as far as Bowler's above Rattigan, calling also at Taylor's & Mark Putter's, I found poor Mark bound up with a broken collarbone, caused by falling out of his cart. ­ though disabled for a while he seems to be doing well. Charlie rode with me to Dalwood, but I had not time to look in there, 24. Charlie, Marianne & Emily went to Singleton by early train this morning & propose returning by tomorrow's midday train. I went up to the station to bring the buggy back ­ it has been a glorious day for all the holiday folks196 as well as for the country at large. Fine clear sky with bracing NW wind. In the afternoon I walked over to Kaloundah to inquire197 after the measles patient & was astonished to find

194 195

Therefore not since Benjamin's arrival in Australia in 1848. A response to growing crime? ­ it is nearly six months since Mr Tyrrell was robbed. 196 Empire day ­ Queen Victoria's birthday. 197 Normally spelt enquire by Alfred.

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that Mr James Doyle had gone to Parramatta. His cousin John is getting on well ­ Mrs Doyle was not very well today so I did not see her. In the evening, about halfpast 6, John & Harriet Battley arrived, from Rathmines. 25. Spent the day chiefly sermon writing, &c. Took Charlie's buggy up to the Station to meet them coming from Singleton by midday train. John Battley went with me, & went on to Newcastle, returning in the evening. On my way back called in to see Mr John Greedy's poor little sick boy. This evening I went to see little George Troubridge, & found him on his legs again. 26. Sunday. John Battley accompanied me to Branxton, where I had a fair congregation, & baptised 2 infants. ­ Very good congregation here in the afternoon. 27. Went to Dalwood today, where I baptised a child for Roth, the vinedresser, his wife being unable to travel as far as Branxton. On the way I called at Kimmorley's & at Willah, & in the afternoon rode out to Fern Hill & Judge's. Charlie & John Battley went with me to Dalwood, & from thence, in the afternoon, to Branxton for some cricket practice. 28. Stayed at home today to prepare a Sermon for Ascension Day (day after tomorrow). All the young folks went to Maitland today, Charlie & the girls on horseback, John & Harriet by midday train. 29. John Battley & I took a ride to Kirkton today. Found the Kelmans all well. Only Mrs Kelman with her son & daughter, & the two little boys. 30. Ascension Day. Only 17 attended the service in the Church. Remained at home reading in afternoon. Cousin John came in the evening. 31. At home all day (sermon writing) except a drive to the station at midday with Cousin John, to bring the buggy back.

June 1867

1. After spending the day indoors, sermon writing &c for tomorrow, I drove Cousin John's buggy up to the station to meet him on his return from Maitland by the 5 o'clock train.- Charlie & John Battley also returned by the same train, from a cricket match that had down there today. 2. Sunday. Small congregation here ­ with 21 Communicants. At Branxton the Church was quite full. Gave notice for Serv Communion next Sunday. Nice little congregation also at Mr Holmes's. 3. Service at Pokolbin (15) where I baptised an infant of Fredk Ingle, - was much pleased with the progress I found at the Church. Green has got one side & one end slabbed up, & a good part of another side - & he is doing it very well. On the way back I called by appointment & baptized a child of Alfred Joass. I then called at Geo: Blick's, to order the shingles for the Rothbury Church, & after calling on Mrs McDonald, came straight home. 4. Went to Morpeth today to see the Bishop on one or two little matters, & learnt from him that he has at length ascertained that what I was always led to believe was the Ch. of England Burial Ground at Branxton, turns out to be a General Cemetery. I went to the Depot also, & got a supply of Psalm & Hymn Books for the Lochinvar Church, Called in at Mr Walsh's but he was out, - John, Harriet & Marianne rode into Maitland today, to spend the day with the Sollings. 5. Branxton day. On the way up I called on Widow Smith, who now lives in what was formerly Franks' Public House. I then called & dined at the Lindsays, after which I spent the time visiting among the people. On returning to the Lindsay's for my horse, I found I found John Battley, Harriet & Marianne there, & after partaking of a cup of tea, we all rode home together. 6. In the morning I rode to Windermere to enquire after Mr Green who I heard had been unwell. I did not see him as he was out somewhere, but was glad to find he

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was getting better. In the afternoon, Anne & I rode to Kaloundah to see how they were all getting on there. All well except Miss Doyle from the Hawkesbury, who they think is getting the measles. ­ Her Papa was there also. In the morning I called on the Hungerfords. On returning from Kaloundah, we found Mr Greenway here, just arrived per train. 7. At home all morning, making up Returns for the Synod, also Return of Baptisms for the Registrar. In the afternoon Harriet Battley & I walked up to the Station to meet Kate, who came from Singleton per 4 o'clock train. Marianne stayed at home to nurse Mamma, who has not been at all well today. John Battley is also complaining. 8. Busy all morning making out my account of Stipend Subscriptions for 1866. ­ Arranged a new set of Hymn Books in the Church in the afternoon, & then finished by pruning a few vines in the garden. 9. Sunday. (Whit.) My Branxton congregation is getting beyond that of Lochinvar now. Had a very nice one today, & administered the Holy Communion to 22. Did not feel very well ­ a slight headache troubled me. Mr Greenway read the prayers for me in the afternoon. ­ At both Churches I gave notice that there will be no Services next Sunday, my presence being required at Morpeth to take part in the Ordination. 10. Drove Kate up to the station to catch the midday train, & expected to find Charlie & Emily there, but was disappointed. John was there , & he gave me a note from Emily saying they purpose coming tomorrow evening. I pruned a few vines this afternoon & then walked up to Mr Winder's, to get his signature to the Returns of Church property, - came back by Wilton's & Horder's. 11. Went up to catch the early train to Maitland, to give a little packet to Bessy, to take to Kate. ­ John & Harriet Battley left us about 9am for Lake Macquarie. In the morning I rode up to Luskintyre for the first time since the river was flooded. Only called at the Beck's & the Hall's, & then returned, calling by the way on Mr Green, whom I found still very poorly, but I hope recovering slowly from his late severe fall. In the afternoon I pruned a vine or two, & then took Charlie's buggy to meet him & Emily at the station. Marianne went with me. 12. Branxton day ­ made a few calls & had my class at the School. Also took the measurement of the Church. Mr Greenway left by early train for Morpeth for his examination, previous to his ordination on Sunday next. Guy Wyndham called on his way to the Paterson. 13. Charley & Emily & Marianne & myself went to the Wilderness today to visit the Holmeses. & a most delightful day we had, quite a mild Spring day. 14. Took a nice walk across the paddocks today towards Anambah, & visited the two Naseby families, Nash & Bird. Found poor old Nash very ill, but getting better apparently. ­ Read a portion of Heb: 12 with him. After calling at Bird's I lengthened my walk home a little by walking to the top of a hill overhanging the River, beyond Summer Hill, from which the view was very pretty. Mr Greenway returned to us from Morpeth this evening. 15. Mr Greenway & I walked to Kaloundah this morning, where I got Mr Green's signature on the Returns of Church property. Mrs Chambers & daughter came to spend the day with us. 16. Trinity Sunday. Mr Greenway & I drove to Morpeth in Charlie's buggy, - had a nice day for the Ordination, Mr Greenway was ordained Priest, & Mr Archd Shaw & Mr Norton Deacons. Mr Tyrrell preached an excellent Sermon from 2nd Timothy II:15 "Study to show thyself approved unto God" &c, After dining with the Bishop, we took our departure, & having dropt Mr Greenway at East Maitland, to take the train for Newcastle, I came home alone. This is the first Sunday that Lochinvar has been left without Service since I came to it. 17. Went up to the station with the buggy this morning, to bring Mrs Davidson & Rosa down, who spent the day with us. Occupied the greater part of the day filling in a Page No: 113

form of application to Insure the Church & Parsonage. ­ Charlie took Emily & Marianne to Dalwood this afternoon. I walked with Mrs Davidson to the station, & on my way back called on the Greedy's & Humphrey's. John Battley came in the evening. 18. Being a rainy day I remained at home, reading & writing letters. John Battley started this morning expecting to join Mr Clark in the 9 o'clock train for Singleton, but finding he was not there, he returned, & afterwards rode in to Maitland to see him ­ Mr Greenway returned to us this evening. 19. Very rainy day again ­ at home ­ reading. In the afternoon I went to see some of the measles patients in the neighbourhood, namely Troubridge's, Taylor's & Brown's. 20. Took advantage of the rain holding up to go & see Mr Green who continues very poorly. Found him in bed, but easier today. Called at Houston's, Walker's & Bellamy's on the way back, - River very high today ­ I also called in to see Johnston the blacksmith who has hurt himself & seems very ill. 21. Such a night last night!198 Such a day we have had today!199 We cannot help dreading the accounts which are likely to reach us of wrecks at sea, & floods inland. This afternoon we could see the water down the creek, backing up from the river, & this evening we hear that Singleton is flooded as well as Branxton. It has been raining in torrents the greater part of the day. In the afternoon I went up to see Johnston, whom I found in great agony, & as yesterday "unable to talk to me" No mail now from Sydney for two days. 22. Rode up to the station this morning to see if I could get any tidings as to the state of the River at Singleton, I found that there were no trains at all today & not likely to be for some days, Mr Brown kindly telegraphed to Singleton for me, & got a Reply " The River is on the Platform". After this I was not at all surprised at a report which is afloat both here & in Maitland that "The Singleton Bridge is gone". We may still hope that the report may not be true. I went to see Johnston this morning, & found him very poorly. With regard to his Spiritual state; I fear that is as unsatisfactory as it can possibly be, & as is so frequently the case his bodily pain prevents him from giving attention to anything I say to him - In the afternoon I went to see Mr Green who seemed a little better, but told me he was very ill indeed all last night. The river presented a sad & melancholy sight this afternoon, - spreading so much ruin & devastation as it rolls along its mighty stream. It broke away Mr Doyle's embankment about 2 o'clock this morning, & this afternoon the water at Mr Ferrier's cottage was within about 3 feet of the great '57 flood. 23. Sunday. Though I felt pretty sure that I should not reach Branxton, I thought it better to ride up & see the place, & a miserable picture it was. A perfect sea of water all down the creek, & stretching up some distance above the village. The water was up to the top of the verandah in Mr Lindsay's mill, so that his nice cottage was also submerged. The water reached up to the Burial Ground at this side the creek, while on the other side it extended beyond Shepherd's Public House, the roof only of which was visible, above the water. John Battley was with me. On the ay home I looked in upon Johnston, who seemed no better. ­ A miserable congregation here in the afternoon, only 11. 24. Went to the Station this morning to see whether I could get any tidings from Singleton, but Mr Brown could get no answer at all by the wires ­ Anne & I rode to see old Mrs Harper this morning whom we found wonderfully well, with the exception of her troublesome Cough. The water is subsiding now, but rather slowly. John Battley attempted to go to Maitland today, but could not get beyond Campbell's Hill, The water was running over the Long Bridge ­ with too rapid a current to admit of traffic. ­ the only communication with Maitland is by boat ­ No

198 199

Only the fifth exclamation point in the journals. Another one!

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trains can run yet & we have had no mails since Wednesday last ­ visited Johnston & found him apparently very low & sinking. 25. Began by going to see Johnston, whom I found much better. Then went to see poor old Nash who was very poorly. Called on Nasebey's & Birds also. After dinner went to Windermere to see Mr Green but did not see him for he was out walking. No mail yet from Sydney. 26. Went with John Battley to the Station this morning to see him off again, but as before, his friends were not there, so we returned once more. ­ At last we have a mail from Sydney; exactly a week today since we had the last. Terrible amounts of floods in other parts of the country. At Windsor it is stated to have been far higher than any former flood since the foundation of the colony. I saw Mr Golding, the Singleton Station master this morning & learnt from him that the water had not been within 20 feet of the Singleton Bridge so that is all safe. I went to Branxton today, & spent the time visiting among those who had been driven out of their homes by the flood. Found Shepherd, the publican lying very ill ­ also Mr Lindsay's miller suffering dreadfully from an attach of Asthma200 - On my return I found Charlie & Emily & Marianne returned from Dalwood, also Cousin John from Singleton. 27. At home all the morning reading accounts of floods in various places, & then wrote a letter to Benny. Cousin John & Charlie rode into Maitland this morning, John with a view of ascertain [sic] whether his horse & buggy were still in existence at the Bolwarra side of the river. He found they were quite safe. In the afternoon, John & I took a walk to Kaloudah, while all the others rode to the top of Summer Hill. Called on the way to see Johnston, who continues much the same. John Battley got away at last this morning. 28. Being anxious to know how Shepherd was at Branxton, as well as the Miller, whom I found so ill on Wednesday I rode up today viâ Dalwood, where I lunched, (took John Battley's horse to Dalwood, to run for a few weeks). After inspecting Wad's steam engine, & Mr Wyndham's Flood marks. I went onto Branxton & was glad to find both patients there much better. ­ Johnston also seems getting better, & I hear Mr Green continues improving. Cousin John went to Dalwood also today with Charlie & remained there tonight. 29. At home sermon writing & preparing for tomorrow's services. Mrs Doyle called in the afternoon. Charley & Emily went away to Dalwood this evening to say Good bye to them, as they purpose starting up the country on Monday. They intend returning tomorrow morning in time for Church. 30. Sunday. Though a most brilliant day, the attendance at both Churches very scanty ­ I suppose the people have not yet recovered from the Flood.

July 1967

1. Pokolbin day. Had but a poor congregation there ­ only 13. Found the Church progressing favourably. Green was just finishing the fixing of the rafters. ­ On my way back called on Geo: Chick's, Wills' & Campbell's, - Comet having fallen lame I had a tedious ride home. ­ Charlie & Emily started this morning on their homeward journey, intending to reach Singleton today. 2. After breakfast I went to visit the Walter family, whose infant, a girl of 12 years old,201 died on Sunday, & was buried this afternoon. I also called to see Johnston whom I found improving, - Read a little to him from the Bible. I then called at the Hungerfords, where all the girls are laid up with measles, - next on the Camerons where they have measles also. On coming home, Mr Edwd Tyrrell met me just

200

Baker's asthma? ­ so dangerous and so common that apprentices can be discharged without compensation if they develop the condition. 201 An interesting definition of an infant ­ did he mean to write "12 months"?

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outside, & expressed a wish for a little conversation with me. I brought him in & he told me a sad tale about his own misdoings in Maitland for the last few days. In consequence, I rode down to E: Maitland, after he funeral, to see his brother. I stayed to tea there & got home about ½ p 8, having arranged to ride down to E: Maitland with Mr E: Tyrrell tomorrow morning. ­ Had a letter this morning by the Panama Mail. 3. Rode down to E: Maitland with Mr E: Tyrrell to meet his brother at Mr Chapman's. After inspecting the Church, & doing a little shopping, I returned home, with a very bad headache. Mr & Mrs D'Arcy called in the afternoon, with Madame Ferrier. 4. At home today, that is, I did not ride out anywhere but in the manning I called first to see Mrs Walters, then to see Johnston, but found he had gone out for a walk. I then called at the Hungerfords to enquire after the young measles patients, who are all doing well.202 Annie Davidson & Susan Hungerford came to spend the day with us, & Marianne & I walked up to the station with them this evening. 5. Did not feel very well this morning, so remained at home. Spent the day reading & sermon writing. Mrs D'Arcy came & spent the day with us, bringing her little boy with her. - In the evening, Mr Brown, the Station Master, came to ask the loan of a horse to drive some of Mr Robt: Hungerford's children home, they came on by mistake to Lochinvar, instead of getting out at Stoney Creek ­ I lent him old Farmer.203 6. This morning I visited some of the families about home, where the measles were at work. Mrs Smith has a poor little girl very ill, - Finished my sermon for tomorrow, & spent the afternoon gardening. 7. Sunday. Although the weather was fine & dry, I had very poor congregations at both Churches. This was I suppose caused, at least down here, by there being so much sickness among the people, for there is scarcely a house in the village without measles, or hooping cough, or both. 8. In the forenoon I visited some of the neighbouring families where measles prevails204, & in the afternoon went up the village to see Johnston, who, I find, has been to Newcastle to consult Dr Bowker. ­ I called on the Hungerfords also, who are getting on well with their measles. 9. Married a couple this morning ­ John A. Hickey & Rebecca Peck ­ In the afternoon Anne & I rode into Maitland to do a little shopping &c. Had a most delightful ride tho' rather warm in the afternoon sun.205 Sharp frost this morning ­ the first this winter. 10. Branxton day. I went first to visit the Jones family, at Black Creek, & then called on Mrs Elson, & her neighbours. I also went to see Zimmerman, who appears to be in a sad desponding state of mind, but I could get nothing out of him except yes & no. I found Mrs Elson with twin daughters from about 6 weeks ago. 11. In the morning Anne accompanied me through a round of calls in the village among the sick folks, & in the afternoon walked down to old Nash's to see how he was getting on. Found the poor old man getting very feeble, & I think his end is drawing nigh. 12. Sermon writing part of the day. In the afternoon I went out to visit some of the sick folks. Found Mrs Spencer Smith's youngest child very ill. ­ Also found Horder in bed with measles. 13. In the morning I visited Smith's where the poor little child seemed to be almost in a dying state. From thence I went to Horder's - found him no better ­ Measles not yet out on him. From thence I went to Philmer's, where I found Fanny in bed

202 203

It is unlikely that measles would today cause such concern. Can you imagine this happening in 2001? 204 Thus ensuring the spread of the disease? 205 In July? What were they wearing?

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with measles, as well as her little sister Louisa ­ In the afternoon I took another walk, calling at Golding's & Bowman's, where there were also patients with measles. ­ From thence I went on to Mrs Henry King's, & to the Station, to pay a little freight account. 14. Sunday. Owing, I suppose, to much sickness in the neighbourhood, we had but a poor congregation here this morning, & only 12 Communicants ­ At Branxton also, the attendance was far below the average, but at the Wilderness, more than usual, the weather being fine, & the moon at the full.206 I had the addition of a funeral at Branxton, - a little child, Canvin, who was drowned in a water-hole at the Coal mines on Friday. 15. Went to visit Mr Edwd Tyrrell this morning, & after sitting some time with him & having some serious conversation with him, went on to the Wilkinsons, from thence to Anderson's & Pyne's, found Mrs Anderson ill in bed, & then straight back to Mr Holmes's, by which time it was quite dark (or rather moonlight) so I remained there the night. 16. Returned from the Wilderness this morning ­ calling on the folks at the Allandale gate by the way. Found they had the measles there ­ also at Fuller's, where I found a young baby, to which I administered Private Baptism. ­ Called also at Mr Clift's & John Greedy's measles at both houses. ­ On reaching home I found that Spencer Smith's child was dead. ­ I buried it this afternoon. ­ On Sunday morning the English mail arrived. - & brought me a letter from Isabella, announcing the death of Anne, John David's wife. 17. Went to Morpeth today to attend the preliminary Committee Meeting of our Church Society. The Annual Meeting is to be held tomorrow at West Maitland, when St Mary's new Church is to be opened. 18. A day long to be remembered ­ the opening of the new St Mary's Church, West Maitland. As regards the weather ­ always an important matter on these occasions ­ it was perfection. We all drove down in Mr Read's dog cart, which he kindly lent us for the day. ­ there were sixteen Clergymen present beside the Bishop, Mr Chapman of course read prayers, up to the singing of the Anthem after the third Collect, when Canon Child took his place. The reading of the 3rd Lesson (Jer:3) devolved upon myself, & Mr Simm read the second Lesson. Mr Tyrrell took part in the Communion service by reading the Epistle, the Bishop reading the Gospel. ­ An admiral [sic] Sermon was preached by his Lordship, from Ephesians IV.11,12. Forty three of the Laity remained for the Communion, & with the 17 Clergy made the number to 60. ­ The Church was quite full, I suppose between 7 & 8 hundred. ­ After disposing of the very elaborate luncheon that was provided, the party adjourned to the Schoolhouse for the Annual Meeting of the Church Society. We remained until about ½ p 4, when we were obliged to come away to secure as much daylight as possible for our homeward drive. 19. Spent this morning visiting among the measles patients in the village. ­ All seem going on well except at the house of O'Brien, & John Greedy, where, at each house, there is a little child whose recovery seems doubtful. Being such a lovely afternoon, & wishing to go & visit old Nash, Anne & Marianne accompanied me, & enjoyed the ride exceedingly ­ We called at Naseby's, then at Nash's, where we found the old man enjoying the afternoon sun, watching his tall son engaged in killing a bullock. He seemed somewhat better than when I last saw him. ­ From thence we went to Bird's, where we found Mrs Bird in bed, - confined a day or two ago with a little baby. We returned home by the Summer Hill way, riding to the top of the hill just beyond that, overhanging the river. ­ the view was beautiful ­ so bright & clear overhead, & the sun getting low.

206

And the advantage of isolation?

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20. A good deal interrupted in the morning by various things, but as soon as I cd got out & visited at Eli King's, John Greedy's, Mrs Greedy Snr, Mrs New & Mrs Smith. ­ Mr John Greedy's little child still very poorly. After dinner I wrote out my Quarterly Report for the S.P.G., & then took another turn out as far as Wilton's, calling at the two Horders by the way. Horder is still far from well, though up & about. Wilton's two children that had measles are convalescent, but the rest will most likely have it yet. 21. Sunday. Congregations today better than any Sunday since the flood. ­ At Branxton I had only ten Communicants. ­ The river at Elderslie is not yet low enough for the vehicles to cross, but I hope by next Sunday to see them all at Church again from that quarter. 22. Had a good day visiting at the Coal pits today, where I distributed a good many tracts. 23. Spent the day visiting at Stanhope, but had not time to call on all, for I was late in starting, & not being able to cross the river with my horse, had to leave him at Taylor's, & cross in the boat, so all my work on the other side was on foot. It was after sunset when I re-crossed the river, which made it very late by the time I reached home. 24. Branxton day. ­ baptized three children, Mrs Elson's twins & a child of Weaver's. Spent the day visiting. 25. After paying a couple of visits in the morning, we all rode into Maitland in the afternoon to catch a view of Maria [?] Harrison before she returns home (she is staying at the Sollings's). We called on Mrs Chapman also. ­ George Townshend came by the evening train. 26. Marianne & I rode over to Dalwood today, & after lunch I went onto Judge's, having learnt from Judge, whom I met here this morning, that they were all going up to live at Bukkulla. I took them a few little books as a parting gift. ­ On our way back we called on Mrs McKenzie & at Kimmorley's, & on reaching home found the Osbornes here, all very well, considering their long journey. 27. Paid a few visits among the folks close at home, & spent the rest of the day Sermon-writing, & preparing for tomorrow's services. 28. Sunday. Small congregation here, but very good at Branxton, where I was very glad to see all my Elderslie people again ­ the weather however has changed again today. The rain came on, with thunder, while in Church at Branxton, & continued most of the evening, so I had none but their own family at the Wilderness. 29. Being a Wet morning, I did not go to Cessnock, but returned home, making a few calls by the way. Spent the afternoon letter-writing. 30. Very busy today writing English letters for the Panama Mail, I wrote to Mrs Crichton about her property at the Patterson, also to Alexander, & sent some newspapers both to Alexander & Isabella. In the morning I went to see the sick children at Smith's & made a few other calls about there. The Osbornes left us today about noon. 31. Branxton day. After calling on Mrs Rae, at the station & her neighbours, I went on across Black Creek, & visited a family named Buitt, on the Line. They have three children not Baptized yet, & I urged Mrs Buitt to bring them to Branxton next Sunday. On the way back I called on the Ormans &c.

August 1867

1. In the morning I went to see Heuston, who I was told yesterday, was very ill. Was glad to find him much better ­ up & about. In the afternoon, Anne & I went to call at Kaloudah, & there we received a terrible shock on learning that one of our oldest & dearest Paterson friends, Mrs Wilm Boydell, died on the 30th ult. We

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knew that she & all the children, had had measles, but we thought they had got better of that complaint. I accomplished a good work today, in sending off to the Sydney Insurance Co. a cheque for £6-12, being the Premium required for the insurance for the Church, Parsonage & Household Furniture. 2. Rode out to Pokolbin today to see how Green was getting on, & found him busy shingling. On the way back called on a new family Donaldson ­ near the McDonald's where Leonard used to live. The man is a Presbyterian,207 & his wife Churchwoman. ­ I also called in at Mear's, London's, Rose's & Blakely's. 3. This morning I rode into Maitland to settle a few little business matters there. ­ Among other things I purchased at Blair's, a small volume of Sermons of "Goulburn's", just come out. Called on the Chapman's also, & found the children better. In the afternoon paid a few visits in the village. 4. Sunday. A slight rise in the river cut off many of the Elderslie people from Branxton Church, & so reduced the congregation there. After the service I baptized three children all of one family Buitt. Good attendance here in the afternoon. 5. Marianne & I rode to Kirkton today, & had a most glorious day for our ride. I wanted to see how Miss Kelman was getting on with the Harmonium, & was glad to find she was quite willing to make a beginning on Sunday next. 6. Walked out to Luskintyre, crossing the river in Hall's boat. Called first at Windermere, then at Hall's & Mrs Peck's ­ came home soon after 4 ­ very tired. 7. Branxton day. Had a class at the School today, besides paying a few calls, came home feeling not very well, as if I had caught cold ­ slight toothache & face ache, went to bed early. 8. Got up better this morning ­ at home today. ­ Visited in the morning Mrs Beavis, Mrs Renham, (her tenant) & Mrs Greedy. Found a young man at Beavis's, her grandson, named Gould with a bad foot. He seemed a very respectable youth ­ lent him some books to read. In the afternoon I was busy sermon writing. 9. This morning I rode down to visit poor old Nash, whom I found much as before. Called also at Naseby's & Bird's. ­ as well as at Edwd Horder's. He has been very ill, but is much better again. In the afternoon I got to my vine pruning a little. It was high time they shd be pruned for they are getting very sappy. 10. I remained at home all day, & spent it in the garden pruning the vines. About another day should finish them. 11. Sunday. A slight shower & threatening appearance seemed to frighten the people from the Church this morning so that I had but a small congregation & only 12 Communicants. ­ Much better at Branxton ­ 72. Miss Kelman began her duties, which she has kindly undertaken at the Harmonium, & acquitted herself very well. None of the Blick family came to the service at the Wilderness, being all laid up with measles. 12. Went to Pokolbin to inspect the Church. Found Green just finishing the shingling. Called at Wills's on my way back & from thence by Mr Holmes's vineyard to Patton's & Mrs Blick's, & then called at Crane's ­ Mrs Crane is ill also ­ tho' not with measles. 13. After making a few calls in the village this morning, I spent the rest of the day vine pruning & have "only" dozen more or so to finish. The day has been most delightful ­ quite a Spring day. 14. Went to Branxton, where I found Miss Kelman at the Church, practicing the Harmonium, & gave her a little lesson, after which I had a regular cleaning of the instrument, taking it all to pieces, & brushing out cockroaches & all the dirt they had made, which improved it much. This occupied me until about ½ p 3, when I went about to summon my singing class, & we had about an hour's practice.

207

First occasion this denomination is accorded a capital letter.

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15. Marianne & I rode to Dalwood today, I wanted to see Mark Putter prior to writing to England on his account. On our way back we called on Mrs McKenzie, & at Kimmorley's. 16. Went to the train in the morning to meet Uncle Ferris, who came from Sydney last night. In the afternoon I paid a few visits, beginning at Wilton's & working my way home from there. Finished vine-pruning. 17. At home all the morning Sermon-writing. Ferris & I strolled out in the afternoon for an hour or two. 18. Sunday. Communion at Branxton ­ only 13. & among them a nephew of Mr Wyndham's, Edward Wyndham, just arrived from Adelaide. ­ Good congregation at Lochinvar ­ Headache all day & till 12 P.M. 19. We intended going to the Wilderness today, but I did not feel quite equal to it after my headache of yesterday so we put it off till tomorrow. I went in the morning to call on the Kings ­ old people ­ but neither of them were at home ­ they are about leaving the old place ­ Towards evening we strolled out at the back for an hour. 20. Uncle Ferris, Marianne & I went to the Wilderness today208. I wanted to see Mrs Drummond, wife of a man Mr Holmes has lately hired, & whom it appears have never been baptized, She is endeavouring to prepare herself, & seems anxious about it. ­ The weather has changed this evening, & we only just got in in time, before the rain began. 21. Branxton day. Called on old Mrs King on the way up, & then got to the Lindsays for dinner. After which I called at Pritchards, & Mrs Pyne's, then had my class at the School, & then finished with singing class. 22. At home all the morning. In the afternoon I went to visit poor old Nash, whom I found very feeble evidently, pining away & sinking towards the grave. I arranged to go and administer the Holy Communion to him on Saturday afternoon. Found Mr John Nash just recovering from measles. On my return home found Tom Battley here, come for John's horse. 23. Remained at home sermon writing chiefly. Sent Charlton to Dalwood to get John Battley's horse. 24. Walked with Ferris to catch the midday train to Singleton, & saw him off. In the afternoon I went by appointment to administer the Holy Communion to poor old Nash, - His two sons, John & William, & his daughter Mary, joined us, much to the old man's gratification, & I hope & trust to their own benefit, Tom Battley left us this morning to return home again. 25. Sunday. Good attendance at Branxton & Lochinvar ­ fewer than usual at the Wilderness. 26. Only 8 attended service at Pokolbin. ­ I found the work there at a stand again, & Green was away looking for a man to help him ­ On my way back from there I went to see how Pyne was getting on with his work, & found him doing well. Called on Mrs Anderson, then at Matthew's on the way to Mr Holmes's where I stayed the night. 27. Began the day by calling on the Campbells: then went to visit Mrs Drummond, called at McCormick's, Patton's Blick's & Crane's, & so on home. Lizzie & Charles Holmes came this morning & took Marianne home with them. 28. Branxton day. Found that Mr Davies had left Branxton, being suddenly removed to Morpeth. No successor yet arrived. Found Miss Kelman practicing the Harmonium & gave her a lesson. After wards paid a few visits & then singing class. 29. Went to Morpeth today hoping to see the Bishop, but found that he was away in Sydney, & not expected back until Saturday. Called at Mr Tyrrell by the way. Dined at Mr Walsh's.

208

Got his grammar right this time.

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30. At home ­ in the morning went to Mrs New's to see her sick child ­ then to the post, & called on Mrs Greedy, Spent most of the day reading the Proceedings of the Sydney Synod. ­ About 4 pm Marianne returned from the Holmes's, & then we all walked to call on Mrs Darcy [sic]. ­ Sent Charlton over to Mr Holmes's to bring over a milch cow which he has kindly lent us. Mrs Green & Kate called this morning. 31. After breakfast I went to see how Mrs New's child was & was glad to find it apparently better. ­ Walked up to the Station to meet Uncle Ferris & Bessy who came from Singleton by the midday train. In the afternoon I went to visit old Nash, whom I found out riding, taking advantage of the beautiful Spring afternoon.

September 1867

1. Sunday. The river being fordable at Elderslie, I had a good congregation at Branxton, & two Elderslie babies to Christen209 - Also a good attendance at Lochinvar. 2. Rode out to Pokolbin this morning to see what Green was about. Found he had a man to help him with the flooring boards ­ came straight home without calling any where, & was just 5 hours away. George Wyndham called in the afternoon on his way from Maitland. 3. Went to Elderslie today & visited all the good folk there. ­ Found the crossing place at the river much altered & damaged by the flood. ­ Picked up a new shingling hammer which someone must have dropped on the road, & left it with the Constable. On my return this evening, I found a letter from Benjamin, saying he has obtained leave of absence for two months, & will be down shortly. 4. Rode to Morpeth to attend a Special Meeting of our Church Society, which ended, as I think is too frequently the case with us, in postponing the business on hand to a future time. Came home very late & rather fagged. 5. Went to Morpeth per train, to attend the Synod. Ferris left us for Newcastle. Got on a little better today - & came back by the evening train. On reaching the station was surprised to find Bessy there (with Anne & Marianne) prepared to return home, her Mamma having written for her, having handed her over to Mr Blackwood's care, we had a beautiful walk home across the paddocks. 6. Went to Morpeth again ­ on horseback - & remained until sunset ­ when I got my horse & came home. 7. Went to Branxton per train this morning to marry a couple from the Coal pits (Stepney & Symes) Returned by Midday train, & spent the afternoon writing & reading a little English news per Panama mail - & thus ends a very busy week, the only portion spent at home being part of last Monday afternoon & this afternoon. 8. Sunday. The first time since we came to Lochinvar, I was prevented by pouring rain from going to Branxton, - we had a congregation of only 12 here in the morning & 6 Communicants. I had my horse saddled all ready & was just about starting for Branxton when the rain came on again so heavily that I gave up. 9. Rode out to the Wilderness to see the Holmeses, & spent an hour instructing Mrs Drummond, preparing for her Baptism, which we have arranged is to take place on Monday next. 10. After the somewhat overexcitement of last week, & feeling a little out of sorts, I determined to give myself a quiet day's rest at home, Spent the morning reading some of the late papers which I had not been able to look at before ­we got the telegram also of the English mail ­ In the evening I walked up as far as Winder's to call on them & found hem all well.

209

First use of this term rather than "baptize".

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11. Branxton day. Rather late in starting, as I waited for the post, which brought me a letter from Benny, who is now in Sydney, & I had to answer it at once. After a short music lesson with Miss Kelman, I rode out to see the Joneses, at Black Creek, & on the way back called on Mrs Elson &c. Had a nice singing class of 8 girls, then an unpleasant ride home after a smart thundershower. 12. At home in the morning, sermon writing. In the afternoon Anne accompanied me to Oswald to see old Mrs Harper, who is confined to bed with her bad cough. 13. Spent the morning in the village making a few calls, 1st on the Hungerfords in their new residence, Mrs Smith's brick cottage, then on Mrs Cameron in their new abode & lastly on the D'Arcy's, who has come to live in the house just vacated by the Hungerfords. Mrs Darcy was very busy & I did not see her, but had a long, & I hope profitable, talk with her husband. After dinner we has a short visit from Charles Lee, who has lately come down the country, after which I rode down to see poor old Nash who is now confined almost entirely to his bed, & is evidently sinking fast. 14. This morning I was called to go & see Benjn Meppen, Mrs McDermott's son, who is very ill, with a great swelling on his neck. It causes great suffering to the poor fellow, & the internal swelling prevents him from swallowing any thing. In the afternoon I rode into Maitland to see Mr Pender about the windows for Pokolbin Church, but they are not yet finished. 15. Sunday. Fine day, with fair congregations. 16. Went to Pokolbin to inspect the church. Green had gone to Maitland ­ very little progress since I was there a fortnight ago. ­ On the way back I called at Mr Holmes's vineyard, & baptized Mrs Drummond & her child. Then called on the Holmeses after which I came straight home. Anne & Marianne went to Singleton by the first train this morning, to remain till Wednesday. 17. Spent the morning chiefly in the village ­ calling among the people. Went first to see Ben: Meppen, but I found he was so far recovered to be able to drive to Maitland. After paying Mrs Martin a visit, I called on Mr D'Arcy having been told he was very ill. Found him very much better, tho' still suffering, I fear, from the effects of his own folly. Called next at Jn Greedy's where the little baby is very ill. ­ In the afternoon I went to pay Nash a visit, & from the state in which I found him, I think his words which he uttered on Friday last, when I told him I shd not be able to see him again before Tuesday, are likely to be verified, namely, "I think that will be the last you see of me". The poor old man was quite sensible, though unable to speak above a whisper, & seems free from pain. After leaving Nash's (where by the way I found his son William laid up with measles) I went on to Anambah, to pay a visit of condolence to the Cobbs, after the death of their eldest girl. From thence I returned by way of Neal's, where I found Mrs Neal not quite well, - then I called at the Winder's to see their little boy who met with a sad accident yesterday & got his thigh broken, & lastly I finished out my round of visits by calling on the Lees. 18. Branxton day. Began with a music lesson for Miss Kelman, after which I spent most of the time calling & distributing the Reports for last year. -­Clled at the School, & made the acquaintance of the new Master, Mr Ollis. Had a nice singing class of 10 girls. ­ Called at the Lindsay's & had a cup of tea, then just enquired of Mrs Smith after her daughter, Mrs Fletcher. ­ Found Anne & Marianne home again & my return. Also learnt that poor old Nash died about noon today. 19. Had to remain at home today for Nash's funeral which took place this afternoon. ­ In the morning I called to see Mr D'Arcy, who seems somewhat better. Filled my spare time sermon-writing. 20. Busy carpentering in the morning for the Reading Desk of Branxton Church, covering a kneeling stool which John made a long time ago. In the afternoon we all three rode out. First we called to see Mr Winder's little boy, who is getting on well, then we rode on to the Browns. Page No: 122

21. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services. In the evening I walked over to Kaloundah, & found them all well. 22. Sunday. A very warm day. Services well attended, especially at Mr Holmes's, where the room was crowded. Mr Edwd Tyrrell was at Branxton, & rode with me to where our roads parted ­ Hope to see him at the Communion at Branxton next Sunday. 23. Dull morning. Went to Pokolbin for service & rain began before I reached there. Small congregation only 11. ­ Baptized a child for Mrs W: King. Found Green hanging the doors of the Church, but he has not yet cut the flooring boards. As it seemed set in rain for the day, I returned straight to Mr Holmes's after service, & remained there the night. 24. After breakfast, I went with Mr Holmes & Arthur210 to fix upon the spot for the Rothbury Church, & we pegged it out. ­ I then called on the following ­ Campbell, Wills, Ormond (the Schoolmaster) Mrs McDonald, & two brothers named Stewart ­ both married men, who are clearing land for Mr McDonald ­ I then came straight home ­ got a little rain on the way home ­ Mr Emanuel [sic] Hungerford called shortly after I came in, to get some arrowroot plants ­ in the evening I baptized a sickly infant for Mrs Wright ­ lately came to Lochinvar with a party who are making bricks in Mr Hungerford's paddock. 25. Branxton day. Began with a Music lesson with Miss Kelman, then fixed the additional floor to the Reading Desk which I made for the purpose of raising myself a few inches. & after getting a cup of tea at Mrs Rudd's, went to the School where I spent an hour with the children. Had a good singing class afterwards & thence a cold ride home. 26. I intended going to Maitland today, to assist Mr Chapman in the examination of his School children, but such a terrific wind was blowing from the NW, that I did not fancy encountering it. ­ Went to see Mr D'Arcy in the morning ­ found him very poorly. 27. Had all the horses saddled this morning to ride into Maitland, at Mr Chapman's invitation to join their School Feast, but a shower of rain came on twice & prevented us starting. At length we did set out about 3 PM, but before we got very far, the clouds were rising again very black to windward, & being so late in the day we turned off & went to visit the Nashes, Bird's & Naseby's. Mary Nash was out, & we found only her little boy & girl at home, - Cold ride home against the wind. 28. Rode into Maitland this morning to inspect the windows for Pokolbin Church which are now completed. ­ Called on the Chapman's & got home for dinner. After dinner I went to see Mr D'Arcy whom I found much better. Met Mr Doyle there, on his way to the Station, leading a horse for Mr Louis Doyle, & as I was going up to Meet ­ 1st Arthur211 & little Jessie from Singleton212, & then Benny from Newcastle, I rode up with him. Arthur & Jessie came & I sent them off & waited for Benny who came by the return train. Of course, after a separation of more than 18 years, we are both a little altered. 29. Sunday. Morning at Branxton, where I had 19 Communicants ­ good congregation here, but the river being up, kept the Elderslie folks away from Branxton. 30. At home today to take care of Benny. Did one or two little jobs about the house, besides calling to see Mr D'Arcy ­ much better. & in the evening called on the

210

Arthur Broadbent Holmes, born 1855, youngest child of Joseph Broadbent Holmes ­ destined to seriously confuse my family connections by marrying Isobel Blanche Evans, while his nephew, Harry Glennie Holmes, my grandfather, was to marry her sister Leonora Marguerite Evans. 211 Alfred Arthur Glennie, born 1747, son of Henry & Elizabeth? 212 This seems to be when Jessie moved from Singleton to Lochinvar.

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Lees, where Charlie, Helen, & Emily are sick with measles. Sent Charlton with the dray to Maitland to get some ale for Benny, who requires it medicinally.213

October 1867

1. In the morning I walked up to the station, calling by the way at Eli King's, Greedy Snr & a man named Dewit, who has been settled some time up the lane, but I was informed he was a Rom: Catholic, so never called on him before. I find he is a Churchman, but his wife & children are Romans. In the afternoon I went to called [sic] on Mrs Castledene, whose husband has recently got two years to Gaol. Struck across from her house to the lane again & called at John Greedy's & Humphreys. 2. Branxton day. Late in starting as Mr Holmes came in just as I was going, & so detained me. 3. Quarterly meeting at Morpeth. ­ Benny went with me & made the acquaintance of several of the clergy besides seeing some he knew before. Dined with the Bishop, & came home by evening train. 4. Suffering a little from toothache & a sort of tic douloureux, [sic] & being still a cold wind, I thought it better not to go out, except to see Mr D'Arcy, whom I found very much better, indeed quite well again. In the afternoon Benny & I walked over to Kaloudah, where we stayed for tea, & then walked back by moonlight. 5. Having borrowed Mr Doyle's dogcart, I took Benny to introduce him to Dalwood. Little Jessie went with us to see her little cousins. ­ Whether it was the heat, or what else, I know not, but something gave Benny a bad headache. 6. Sunday. Being a very disagreeable, windy day I suppose was the cause of rather small congregations. Holy Commn at Lochinvar, but only 15 present. Among them, however, were three new ones, Mr & Mrs D'Arcy & Kate Green. ­ a good congregation at the Wilderness. 7. Had a very busy day visiting at Cessnock & Pokolbin ­ called on 17 families altogether. ­ My chief object was to see if I could raise among them the sum of £5, for procuring seats to the Church. But all that I could collect was 30/-, The day was somewhat hot, & I was somewhat tired when I got home about 8.30 PM. 8. This morning I began by going to see poor Charlie Lee, who is very ill with inflammation of the lungs after measles. I then called upon all the people about there, after which I went up the village to the Post Office, & called on Hasking's, Palmer's brother, & Greedy. In the afternoon I went again to the Lees, to hear the doctor's report, which, on the whole, seems favourable. I then went on to Winder's to see his little boy, who is getting on nicely. I then went to see John Nash, who came home ill last week. He is suffering from swelling in his feet & legs, but thinks himself better. Called at Naseby's on the way home, & found him crippled also, from a fall out of his cart last week.214 9. Branxton day. Went through my accustomed routine of visiting, School & Singing class. While engaged at the last, I was not a little surprised to see Henry walk into the Church. He had come down to see a patient for Dr Hartigan ­ Mrs Watts ­ Before starting this morning I went to see Charlie Lee, & thought him a little better. Charlie Holmes came today to say goodbye, as he leaves home tomorrow for Paradise Creek. Lizzy came with him. Miss Kelman came & spent the day while her brother went on to Maitland. In the afternoon Georgy Champain called. 10. Remained at home today, to make up my Annual Statistical Return for the SPG, but not with too many interruptions. Fishy & Wad came in the morning, the former

213 214

Oh yes ­ a whole drayfull? What's Benny been doing all this time?

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remaining here while Wad went to Maitland. Towards evening Mr Solling & Ellen came in & took tea with us ­ Charlie Lee still very ill.215 11. Took me all the morning & more, to finish my Statistical Return. While visiting Charlie Lee, a message came to me to go to Mrs Glass who is very ill. I got Dr Morson to go & see her this evening & he prescribed leeches & poultices to her side. I was glad to hear from him a favourable report of Chs Lee, & hope to find him still better in the morning. 12. Charlie Lee much better this morning, & Mrs Glass the same. ­ Delightful rain today, which was very acceptable. After calling on the sick people, I spent the day Sermon writing. 13. Sunday. Notwithstanding the threatening appearance of the weather in the morning, I had a very fair congregation at Branxton but not so here in the afternoon, tho' the weather was beautiful. 14. My cold, which I caught on Saturday, rather troublesome today. ­ In the morning I went to see old Mrs Glass, whom I found much better, & then Mr Cameron's little girl, who is still very bad. In the afternoon we set out to call at Windermere, (leaving Benny at home, to rest himself) but before reaching the house we say the rain appearing from the NW so turned back again. 15. Cold very troublesome today after a bad night. ­ Spent the day chiefly visiting among the sick. 1st Mrs Glass who is better, - then Mr Cameron's child, who is very seriously ill, Mr Cameron announced to me that the child had never been baptized: I therefore administered Private Baptism to it. ­ I found that Johnston the Blacksmith is very ill again ­ inflammation. Chas: Lee continues very weak & has not made much progress in the last 2 days. 16. Did not go to Branxton today, for two reasons ­ 1st the several sick people here requiring my attention & 2nd not being quite well myself. My cold & cough I thought required taking care of at home. Little Maggie Cameron I found very bad this morning, but after the application of more leeches & other strong remedies, she was better this afternoon. Johnston I found better this morning, & he was able to attend to me as I read to him a little. ­ Mrs Glass seems pretty well again, & Charlie Lee progressing favourably tho' slowly. This evening we all walked up to visit the Wiltons. 17. Visited the Camerons & Johnston this morning. Found the little girl, I think, better. Johnston was not so well, & seemed to be suffering great pain. ­ Got some English mail at the post, including one from Mrs Crichton, & a very interesting one from Isabella. ­ In the afternoon, Benny & I had a beautiful walk to the top of Sumr Hill. 18. Began the day as usual by visiting among the sick folk. Little Maggie Cameron, I think better. Johnston I could not see, Heard he was much worse. The doctor bled him profusely this morning & ordered that no on was to see him. Stayed at home, writing to Isabella. Cousin John216 arrived to dinner. 19. At home again, visited only the sick in the village. I hope, & think that Maggy Cameron & Johnston are a little better, Charlie Lee is getting on very nicely, but can only sit up for a short time in the day. Cousin John left us this morning. 20. Sunday. A beautiful day, but a poor attendance here at Lochinvar. The River being up again kept most of my Elderslie folks away from Branxton. 21. Service at Pokolbin which I went through with a very bad headache. ­ Was again disappointed at finding the Church not yet finished. The windows not yet in, & the large one for the end, broken. Green was not there. I returned direct to Mr Holmes's where Gellatley met me in the afternoon, & I took him to show him the

215 216

Where is Benny? Now that his daughter Jessie was living at the Parsonage, Cousin John started to become an extremely frequent visitor.

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spot where the Church was to be built. He promised to commence on Monday next. ­ My headache got much better in the afternoon. ­ Got home about dusk. 22. Benny & Anne set off today for Trevallyn. ­ I went up to the Station with them to catch the early train, & Geo: Townshend's buggy was to be waiting for them at Maitland. On going to see Johnston this morning, I found that he had just started off for Newcastle, to see Dr Bowker. Maggy Cameron I was glad to find much better. ­ This afternoon I went to see John Nash, who is still suffering in his feet & leg. On the way I called at Lees, Winder & Mrs Miller. Found Charlie Lee up & walking about. 23. Branxton day. Besides the usual routine of School & singing class, I called on old Robert Frigg, Mrs Thornton, & Mrs Higgins, with whom I had some talk about her unfortunate connection with Bayliss. 24. Dreadful hot day ­ regular hot wind with thermor 100 in the shade. Only went to see Johnston, who came back from Newcastle yesterday, & seemed better. Occupied indoors, chiefly Sermon-writing. 25. Not quite so hot as yesterday, but still very warm. Remained at home all day sermon-writing. Not a little to our surprise, just as we had finished dinner, Anne made her appearance, having come up by the midday train. ­ They made an early start from Trevallyn, & got to Maitland about 10 am. ­ Benny went on to the Bishop's by midday train. 26. Morning occupied with going to the post, & calling on Mrs Cameron, & sundry little jobs, then I went to Morpeth per midday train & dined with the Bishop & Benny. 27. Sunday. Being a very fine day the attendance at both Churches was good. 28. Went to Maitland today to see Mr Norman about Church seats, & a few little shopping matters. ­ came home with Benny, or brought him home with me. In the morning went to see Mary Anne Phillips, who is ill, also called on the Lees. 29. Busy all the morning cleaning the Harmonium, but it did not seem much the better for my labour upon it. ­ Benny went to Singleton by morning train ­ Bessy & I walked with him to the station & saw him off. 30. Started by early train for Singleton, where I was joined by Benny, & we both went on by coach to Muswell Brook. Had a very nice day for out journey only rather too much dust when we met wood drays on the road. ­ arrived safely about 4 PM & received a kind welcome at the Parsonage. 31. Spent all the morning with Mr White, seeing all that was to be seen. ­ Not having been at Muswell Brook for about 32 years, of course everything was quite new to me, as there was no town formed in those days. ­ We were both much pleased with the place, the chief attraction being, of course, the new Church, the masonry of which is very nearly completed. Mr White drove me across the river in the forenoon to call on Mr Fredk Doyle, & we intended, in the afternoon, to visit Mr Louis Doyle, but a thunderstorm came on which prevented us going out.

November 1867

1. Being decided on remaining at Muswellbrook, & join the Church service there today but fearing I might be wanted at home, I came away by the ½ p 8 coach, & reached Henry's at Singleton by about 2 PM. ­ Got some dinner there & came off by the 3 o'clock train, & here I am, safe at home again, scarcely able to persuade myself to believe that I have at last paid my long talked of visit to Muswellbrook. ­ I was highly pleased with everything, the Church is a perfect gem, & will be a real ornament to the place. 2. Paid a visit to the Camerons this morning, & found little Maggy sitting out on the verandah, Also called to see Johnston, but he had gone to Maitland, - very hot day ­ remained indoors, selecting sermons for tomorrow.

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3. Sunday. The excessive heat was I suppose the cause of my thin congregations today ­ 98 in shade. 4. At last I found the Pokolbin Church finished & settled with Green for his work. Also engaged with him about making the seats. On my way back I called at Pyne's about the sawed stuff, which is nearly all cut. ­ called also at Anderson's & Matthews's, & on reaching Mr Holmes's, found Gellatley there, & the man just beginning to dig the first post-hole of the new Church. 5. Went to Singleton today per train, returning in the afternoon ­ very hot again ­ 97. 6. Branxton day. In addition to my usual work, I baptized two children. Dined at the Lindsay's & called on Mrs Smith on the way home. 7. At home all the morning busy with my plans of the Rothbury Church. After dinner I was just preparing to ride over to Kaloudah when Mr & Mrs Chapman drove up in their buggy, also bound for Kaloudah. Having a seat for Anne in the buggy, she put on her bonnet & we all went together. Marianne remaining at home with Jessie, who is suffering from a stiff neck. Called on the Hungerfords as we came home. 8. Went out to the Wilderness to see how Gellatley is getting on with the Church, & found 7 of the posts in their places, & they were digging the hole for the 8th & last post. ­ They look very nice in their places, & I was pleased to find them getting on so well. I came around by Mrs Blick's & Crane's, calling on Patton also by the way. ­ At the Allandale station I called on Mrs Besley, & also made the Acquaintance of a newcomer there ­ Mrs Pont, successor to Mrs Brown, who has gone to Singleton. 9. Benny returned to us this morning by early train from Singleton. At home all day preparing for tomorrow's services. In the evening Benny & I called, first, at the Hungerford's, & then at the Lees ­ Cousin John arrived in the afternoon, & we had a call also from Spencer Holmes. 10. Sunday. Cousin John drove Benny to Branxton, where we had a good congregation. He took my horse after the service & rode to Dalwood, & I took his seat in the buggy & drove Benny home. Awfully hot & dusty ­ thermr 98. Very poor attendance here in the afternoon. 11. I took the opportunity of having John's buggy to drive Benny to the Wilderness, Saw Gellatley & found him getting on well with the Church. Nice cool day for our drive. 12. At home today. Visited some of the sick in the lane in the morning. In the evening took Benny to call on Mrs Martin, & Walters. 13. Walked up to the station with Benny in the morning & saw him off per train to Newcastle en route for Sydney where he proposes staying a few days & then return to Brisbane. Went to Branxton as usual, & went through my customary work there. 14. In the morning I made a round of calls, beginning at Mr Winder's, (where I found the little boy on his legs again) & coming round by the Willton's & the Horder's. On coming home I found a message for me to go to the Allandale gate, where Besby's daughter had met with a terrible disaster ­ dreadfully burnt by her clothes catching fire ­ I went out & found the poor girl suffering severely, but as the doctor had not arrived, I cd not learn the extent of injury done. 15. After visiting the sick at home (Redman & Toose) I rode out to see Amelia Besby, whom I found suffering very great pain. Sat some time with her reading &c. From thence I went on to Dalgetty, & so home by way of Oswald, where I found poor Mrs Harper apparently on her death-bed. For the first time, Mr Harper appeared & gave me a welcome reception. 16. Anne accompanied me this morning to Oswald, where we found Mrs Harper much the same. Had a dreadful hot ride, the thermr being 102 when we reached home between 11 & 12. It rose to 104 afterwards. In the evening I rode out to Page No: 127

Allandale, & thought the poor girl there seemed a little better. Charlton went to Maitland today for Medical advice ­ having had a bad cough for some days, & it seems he was just in time to arrest inflammation of the lungs. 17. Sunday, & though a fine & cool day, the attendance here was small ­ at Branxton & Wilderness very good. 18. Service at Pokolbin ­ only 9. I suppose harvest time is the cause. Found Green had nearly half the seats finished. Gellatley is getting on very well with his work, having the frame work nearly completed, on the way back I called in to see Amelia Besley ­ she is suffering greatly. 19. Went this morning to Oswald, - Mrs Harper much the same ­ from thence across to Allandale, - no apparent improvement in Amelia ­ on reaching home I found George Wyndham here. In the evening we all went to call at Windermere. Anne & Jessie on horseback, while Marianne & I walked. Saw Mrs Jackson there. 20. To Branxton by train this morning, after making a few calls, returned by midday train to Allandale. Poor Amelia, just the same, in great pain, & not quite so patient as I cd wish.217 Walked across the paddocks from thence & called to see Mrs Castleton ­ also called to see Walters, who is ill. At Mrs Forse's I found the children better. In the evening went to see Mrs Tuckey, whose children are just recovering from measles. 21. Paid one or two visits in the village this morning. Towards evening went to see Amelia Besley & fancied she seemed better. ­ Very hot again today, indoors during the heat of the day, writing &c &c. Charles Lee called in the afternoon to say good bye to us, & started off to catch the 5 o'clock train. 22. Dreadful hot day again ­ 102. Thought indoors the best place, so remained at home ­ sermon writing, planning Church Windows &c &c. 23. Went to Besley's directly after breakfast & found Amelia in much the same state, nothing worse but no visible improvement. From thence I crossed over to Oswald, where I found poor old Mrs Harper evidently in a dying state ­ quite unconcious, & not having moved or spoken since about 4 PM yesterday, - feeling sure that her departure was close at hand, I did not hesitate to use the Commendatory Prayer, & she must have died not many minutes after, for I was informed this evening that she died about 12 o'clock. ­ Eli King has been repairing the Church roof a little today. 24. Sunday. Good congregation as usual at Branxton where I administered the Holy Comn to 18. Only 60 at Lochinvar, tho' the day was fine & only moderately hot. 25. Went to Oswald early in the morng for the funeral of Mrs Harper, & afterwards crossed the river to Mr Davis's, - then went around by Xtians, Russell's, Fairhall's, Peck's & Yeo's & so home by Windermere ­ very cold day.218 26. Began the day by calling at Kaloudah, to see Cary who is unwell. From thence I went across to Allandale & spent an hour or so with Amelia, who I think is getting on favourably. She has evidently been much neglected, as to her religious education, & seems thankful for my attempts to instruct her. I came home to dinner, & spent the afternoon sermon-writing except a portion of it which was taken up by a visitor, Fred: Wilkinson, who is going back shortly to Bukkulla. 27. Branxton day. Had some reluctance to ride up through the burning heat, called first on Mrs Smith, then went to see Mr Rae ­ who is still confined to his bed very ill, - visited the School as usual, & finished with a small singing class. 28. Rode out to the Wilderness today to see how the Church gets on - & found it progressing most satisfactorily, the men complaining being delayed for want of timber. They are making excellent work of it. I found Dr Morson at Allandale, & was delighted to hear him give so favourable a report of poor Amelia ­ I looked in

217 218

You wish! Is there any more agonising pain than that following widespread burns? After 102 three days before!

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again on my way back ­ she was suffering a great deal of pain so that I did not read to her. Dreadful hot day again. 29. Another terribly hot day. After breakfast I rode up to Mr Winder's one of his boys being ill with inflammation of lungs ­ found it better. Called on Mrs Tuckey also ­ at home all the rest of the day, sermon writing & planning Church window. 30. Went to see Amelia Besley after breakfast, & was very glad to find her getting on so well. Came straight home again & spent the day reading chiefly. ­ Spencer Holmes called & dined with us & thus ends one of the hottest & driest months I ever remember. Bush fires are also doing their destructive work & the country all around presents a miserable & parched up appearance, so I shall feel quite called upon to use the prayer for rain tomorrow.

December 1867

1. Sunday. Holy Communion at Lochinvar, only 11. Mr Holmes & Spencer among them. Used the Prayer for Rain, Congregations at all three places tolerably good. 2. Went to Pokolbin, & found Green just finishing the seats & paid for everything. On the way back I called on Steward, McDonald, Wills, & Campbell. ­ Gellatley getting on well with the little Church. Looked in to see Amelia as I came home, found her not so well. Found John Osborne here, on his way up to the Namoi. 3. Went to Morpeth today, & arranged with the Bishop to come & open the Pokolbin Church on Sunday week next the 15th inst. ­ Did some shopping in Maitland, & among other things selected at Cappers the locks &c for the Rothbury Church. ­ On my return, found Guy & Bessie, & Willie here. 4. In the morning I went to Allandale to see Amelia Besley, who continues much the same, but getting very weak. ­ Did not go to Branxton today, having Guy & Bessie, & Willie here219. 5. After accompanying Bessie, Marianne & Willie to the Station, I went to Maitland, where a meeting of the Clergy was held at St Mary's Parsonage, 10 in number, & we formed anew a Clerical Society. 6. Went to visit Amelia Besley after breakfast, & found her much as usual, but complaining of great pain in her knees220. Returned home to dinner, & remained in the rest of the day. 7. Awakened this morning about 4.20 this morning by a knock at the door & on getting up found Mr Lee there, with a request that I would send to Maitland for a Medical man to come & see Mr Lee who he feared was dangerously ill. ­ I sent Charlton off at once on Farmer, & was glad to find on calling after breakfast that she was somewhat better. Remained at home today, sermon writing & letter writing, - Nice thunderstorm this afternoon. 8. Sunday. I did hope to see better congregations at both Churches today, to return thanks for the rain, which we prayed for last Sunday, but I was disappointed. ­ Not the first time, I may say. Gave notice at Branxton that there would be no service there next Sunday, & Holy Comn this day fortnight. 9. Spent the morning visiting in the village. In the afternoon went to Tuckey's Neal's & Bates', where the children are just recovering from measles. 10. Went out to Pokolbin this morning to take a few little things out for finishing off the Church (cords &c for the windows). Came back by the Wilderness calling by the way to announce the intended opening of the Church next Sunday. 11. So very hot today (100 in the shade) that I did not go to Branxton. Cousin John arrived about 11am from Paterson. In the afternoon (5 o'clock train) we took our departure for Singleton, to be present at Bessy & Guy's wedding221- Great

219 220

Yet Alfred seemed to continue his normal round while his brother ­ unseen for 18 years ­ was at the Parsonage. Surely a euphemism? 221 Elizabeth Glennie, Guy Wyndham, 12th December 1867.

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thunderstorm came on us as we were waiting for the train & just as it arrived the rain was coming down in great torrents. As we proceeded along the line, we found the rain had not been so heavy beyond Branxton, where there had been a good deal of hail also, & such a hurricane of wind as to take the whole roof off Mr Lindsay's new flour store ­ I stayed with Mrs Blackwood. 12. A most delightful day for the wedding, bright & cool ­ I assisted Mr Blackwood. The happy couple started about noon, intending to make Muswellbook their first stage. After taking Marianne to the Dentist in Singleton, John & I returned by the last train, accompanied as far as Branxton by John Wyndham & Fishy. ­ Called on the Lees in the evening. Mrs Lee still very poorly. 13. Went to Pokolbin today to carry out the Communion Table cover, &c, & give final directions about preparing the Church for Sunday ­ called at Allandale by the way, & read to Amelia the 1st Chapter of the "Distant Hills" with which she seemed pleased. ­ On my way home I called at Rose's, Cousin John drove Marianne & Emily Jessie to Maitland in the afternoon. 14. Remained at home today, to rest, & to prepare for tomorrow's work ­ went only to the Post Office, & then looked in at Glass's, where I found the old man very ill, in bed. ­ The Bishop arrived soon after 7 PM. 15. Sunday. A day to be recorded in one's memory, as well as in the Diary. We had a good Church full here in the morning, the people generally being appraised of the Bishop's coming. His Lordship gave us one of his usual impressive sermons from Isaiah II:5 ­ "O House of Jacob, come ye, & let us walk in the light of the Lord". ­ Soon after 1 o'clock we started for Pokolbin, & had rather a hot ride of a little less than two hours. Here we found a nice congregation assembled to take part in the opening of the new Church. ­ About 75 were present, just sufficient to fill the Church without crowding. ­ The Bishop's sermon was from the same text as in the morning but varied a little to make it more appropriate for the occasion. A collection was made after the sermon, which amounted to £3-19-6. I also baptized a child of William Pincher's, as the first Baptism in the new Church. ­ All seemed highly gratified by the interesting service, & I am sure it must have been doubly gratified when the Bishop announced to them that I should attend there regularly every fourth Sunday, & Mr Emanuel Hungerford would read service every Sunday when I was not there ­ the services to be always at ½ p 2 in the afternoon. ­ Having refreshed ourselves with a cup of tea at Mr Birmingham's, we rode home in the cool of the evening, after a very satisfactory day's work. 16. Not at all well today. ­ Took some medicine, by way of a change & remained at home, with the exception of a visit to old Glass. 17. Went out to Mr Holmes's, calling at Besley's by the way, where I found Amelia on the sofa in the outer room, which seemed to be an agreeable change for her. Met Mr John Bagot at the Holmeses. ­ Came round by Mrs Blick's & Crane's homeward. 18. Branxton day. Called at a few places along the road, dined at the Lindsay's, & spent the rest of the day visiting. ­ Called on Bayliss, who has been very ill, Baptized a child for Mrs Freel, instead of singing class. Found Cousin John here on my return. 19. Went to the Coal mines this morning to see a poor woman (Mrs Edmond Rostron) whose husband died last week in Maitland Hospital, leaving her with 4 young children in a state of destitution222. She requested me to try to get her children into some charitable Asylum, & I have accordingly written to try the Destitute Children's Asylum. Called at Oswald on my way home. 20. Very thankful that I was able to stop at home today, for it has been a terrible day. A regular hot wind with thermor 106 in the shade. ­ After breakfast I went to see

222

And she was pregnant, as we find out later, when Alfred baptised the infant. However, we never found out what happened to any of the children.

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Mr Edwd Horder, who is unwell, & then poor old Glass, who seems getting better. Sermon writing best part of the day. ­ John Osborne arrived this evening on his homeward journey ­ almost roasted. 21. J. Osborne left us this morning. After breakfast I rode out to see Amelia, whom I found much the same. ­ On the way back called on the Clift's, who have returned home. ­ Mrs Clift suffering just as much from her eyes, & the children also unwell ­ old Glass better. Spencer Holmes called on his way from Maitland with his new carriage, & dined with us. Fred: Wilkinson called and teaed with us. 22. Sunday. Holy Communion at Branxton ­ only 16 ­ Congregations not overflowing. 23. Visited old Glass after breakfast ­ At home the rest of the day, sermon-writing chiefly. 24. At home all today, preparing for tomorrow's services. Among other things, assisted in the evening to decorate the Church with a few oak boughs from Kaloudah. 25. About the severest Xmas I ever spent. ­ At the conclusion of morning service here, the thermor stood at 102 in our verandah & with that temperature I rode to Branxton, & from thence to Mr Holmes's, & then after my 3rd service there, rode home in the evening & got home about ½ p 8. My congregations were below average at all 3 places, but the extreme heat of the day made it quite pardonable. 26. None the worse for yesterday's roasting ­ being a General Holiday, I did not go out but spent the day chiefly sermon-writing. Pyne came with his account of sawn timber to be audited.223 27. Spent the morning visiting in the village. ­ Afternoon writing &c. ­ received a letter from the Bishop this morning inviting me to attend a Thanksgiving Service at Xt. Ch. Newcastle tomorrow morning, on the occasion of the arrival of the Bishop of Grafton & Armidale. 28. Took the early train to Newcastle, - on the way picked up Messrs Chapman, Walsh, Tyrrell, & Wood. We had a nice Hearty service in the old Church ­ Te Deum, Litany & Holy Communion ­ some 50 or 60 communicants I should think. Afterwards we all adjourned to the Schoolroom, where we Clergy were personally introduced to the new Bishop ­ a very young man (about 34 I believe) We all then returned to the Parsonage for luncheon, - very good ­ tho' rather crowded, as cd hardly be avoided. In the morning, having called on the Scotts, Mr Walsh & I went to the Millards, where I was glad to make Mrs Millard's acquaintance. ­ We all returned to our respective homes by the evening train. Dr & Mrs Sawyer accompanying our Bishop to Morpeth. 29. Sunday. Congregations below average at all three places. Weather hot, & very windy. 30. After breakfast went with Mr Holmes to inspect the little Church, which Gellatley was just finishing off. ­ He had made a most satisfactory job of it, & Mr Holmes paid him off this morning. We agreed with him to make the seats & the windows ­ the former @ 18/- each (18 in number) and the latter at £19. But before beginning them he had to put a new roof on Mr Lindsay's store at Branxton so that it will be 2 months yet before we can have the Church opened. I rode on to Pokolbin, calling at Campbell's & Wills's by the way, & after making a few calls there, came straight home, looking in to see Amelia, at Allandale. 31. Not well today, Feared an attack of Diarrhoea but feel better tonight, so hope it will pass off. Did not leave the house, but managed to do a little reading & writing. - & thus ends the year 1867.

223

Did he remember to deduct 2/- per 100ft as promised?

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January 1868

1. Sick, took some medicine & spent the greater part of the day on the sofa, reading the "Guardian". 2. Feeling myself getting worse, thought it prudent to send for the doctor (McKenzie) who pronounced my complaint a bilious diarrhoea & prescribed accordingly. 3. Still very poorly, could not keep anything on my stomach ­ sent Charlton to the doctor to report progress, & he returned about ½ p 11pm with more medicine, & instructions to apply a mustard poultice, which was done at once224. 4. Very weak & exhausted ­ remained in bed all day, till about 5 pm, & felt a little better. Dr Morson called in the afternoon & left a few pills. ­ Awfully hot day ­ 109. Got Anne to write to Dalwood, & Branxton, saying there would be no service at Branxton tomorrow.225 5. Sunday. Better today. No service at either Church. 6. Improving gradually ­ able to take a little beef tea.. 7. Much better today. Besides my lunch of beef tea, I was able to pick a bit of chicken for dinner, also to walk out in the garden. ­ Did some writing also ­ made up my Annual Statistical Return for the Government, besides writing a few letters, & then read some "Guardian". ­ I ought to have mentioned above, that on the 2nd inst, Marianne went by early train to Newcastle, on a visit to Mrs Millard. Anne was to have gone too, but for me being so unwell. 8. Getting quite convalescent now but did not venture out today, As it was drizzling with rain. Wrote a letter to the Bishop & one to the "Archdeacon" also226, besides other writing at accounts, & filled up the day with the Guardian. 9. Not quite so well this morning ­ obliged to have recourse to castor oil & laudanum, which I think has done me good. ­ Passed the day reading & writing: made up my Quarterly Report for the SPG. ­ Heard today of the arrival of the new Governor ­ Earl Belmore ­ on Tuesday last, the 7th. 10. Went out today for the first time since my illness. Went to see poor Amelia, who seemed very glad to see me again ­ She appeared much the same as when I last saw her ­ On my way back I called to see Mrs Clift, who is much better than she was. 11. Remained at home today, husbanding my strength for tomorrow. Did a little reading & some writing. Had a call from Mr Gordon & Spencer Holmes. 12. Sunday. A small thunderstorm between 8 & 9 in the morning, stopped the Branxton people from coming to Church. Small congregation here also. 13. We were going to Newcastle today by the midday train, but Charlton not coming in with his load of wood in time to saddle the horses, we missed the train & did not go. Miss Kelman & her brother came & spent the afternoon with us. He & I rode over to Kaloudah in the afternoon, & when I got back, I found a messenger had called to say that Taylor of Fangorin was very ill, & wished to see me, so I got my horse & rode out at once, - found him ill in bed. Got home a little before 12 PM. 14. {no entry} 15. {no entry} 16. {no entry} 17. {no entry} 18. On Tuesday last, the 14th, Anne & I took the morning train for Maitland, where we got out, & after a little business in the town, took refuge at Mr Chapman's till the midday train came in which we went on to Newcastle, Found Marianne very well, & were kindly welcomed by Mrs Millard. I remained there until yesterday

224 225

Where? How were the letters delivered ­ by Charlton? 226 What's going on here?

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afternoon, when I came home by the evening train. This morning I set off to Taylor's at Fangorin, but I found him at Mark Putter's. From thence I went to Dalwood, where I lunched, came home by Willah, & on the way back called on Mr Andrew Doyle at Harper's Hill. 19. Sunday. A nice cool day enabled me to get through my three services with ease. Attendance tolerable except at the Wilderness, where some of them did not expect me. 20. As it rained this morning & seemed likely to turn out a wet day, I did not go out visiting, but remained at Mr Holmes's, till after dinner, & then returned to my solitary home, calling on Mrs Kennerly [?] by the way & also at Allandale Station, where I saw a great alteration in poor Amelia, I fear she is now sinking rapidly, & has not long to remain in this world. Called also at the Clift's, & on Mrs Brown, from whom I learnt that poor Mr Rae of Branxton was dead & was buried yesterday evening at East Maitland. ­ Found Mr James Doyle here on my return, with his account of collections for last year. 21. Went across the river this morning to Mrs Yeo's, to administer Private Baptism to her baby, who is sickly. Had the pleasure of riding there & back again in the rain, A fine steady rain has been coming down all day, & now looks like a regular set-in rain. 22. Another wet day. In the afternoon I rode out to see Amelia again & read with her for an hour or so. 23. This day has been broken by two fruitless journeys to the Station. ­ I borrowed Mr Read's cart & drove up to the midday train, expecting to find Anne & Marianne there, Charlton taking Comet, but only their luggage came, & a message from the guard that they were coming up by the next train. ­ We went, accordingly, to meet the 5 o'clock train, but they were not there. 24. In the morning I went to the Coalmines to visit Mrs Rostron, & came back to dinner. Towards evening I rode out to see Amelia again, & called on Mrs Pont, who was up today for the first time since her confinement. ­ On my return I found Anne & Marianne at home again.227 25. Felt very good for nothing today. Spent the day at home, preparing for tomorrow's services. Towards evening made a few calls in the neighbourhood, namely ­ New, Taylor, Phillips, Troubridge, Lee & Mrs Dell, who has lately moved into the cottage formerly occupied by the New's. 26. Sunday. Small congregations & only 10 Commts at Branxton. Felt the heat very oppressive, riding home as well as in Church in the afternoon. 27. Went to Branxton by train this morning, chiefly to see poor Mrs Rae. ­ Made several other calls, & dined at the Lindsays. On my way back I got out at the Allandale platform to see Amelia Besley, & then walked home. Found the two Miss Davidsons here, with a lad named Smithers, & Cousin John also. Rain coming on, Rosa remained here, while her sister & escort went home. 28. This morning I went to the Coalmines to baptize Mrs Edmond Rostron's baby. Came home to dinner. I did not like to extend my ride as I cannot ride with comfort just now228 - Wrote to Mr Shaw this evening. Cousin John left us to go home this morning. 29. Remained at home today. Went to the Station to meet Mr Millard, who came by the evening train. A fine thunderstorm came upon about 6 o'clock. 30. Mr Millard, Rosa & Marianne went to Dalwood today. I stayed at home to baptize Mr Winder's child. ­ Spent the day chiefly Sermon-writing.

227

What happened? Wasn't Alfred worried? What did Anne & Marianne do separated from their luggage for the night? 228 Piles?

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31. Mr Millard left us today my midday train, & I went to Branxton, to bury Richd Thrift's little boy John, who died on Wednesday from the effects of scalding. On my way back visited poor Amelia - very ill ­ worse than ever.

February 1868

1. At home today, sermon writing & preparing for tomorrow's services &c &c. 2. Sunday, Holy Comn at Lochinvar, only 13. Small congregations owing I suppose to the unsettled weather. 3. Called on Campbells, Wills, Patton, Blick's & Crane's. Crane had gone to Maitland for Medical advice ­ Looked in upon poor Amelia at Allandale, & found her, in all appearances, in a dying state. She could hardly speak to me. Got home earlier than usual, which enabled me to make a few calls in the evening, accompanied by Anne, Marianne & Rosa Davidson ­ vizt. ­ Troubridge, Horder & Wilton. 4. Went to Morpeth to see the Bishop ­ among other things he fixed on the 15th March for opening to [sic] Rothbury Church. ­ He also very kindly lent me £20, to help me along these hard times.229 I took Rosa Davidson home, & Marianne went with us, & remained in E: Maitland, while I went on to Morpeth. The day was delightful & we enjoyed the ride. ­ Found a young Solling here on our return. 5. Went up to the Station to meet Mrs Solling & her two girls who came per the 9 o'clock train to spend the day. I went on to Allandale hardly expecting poor Amelia alive, & therefore not at all surprised to find that she had died little more than an hour before I got there. Arranged for the funeral to take place tomorrow at 5 PM & then came home ­ very warm today. 6. Went to Branxton this morning but had to come home early for the funeral which took place this afternoon. They also had a funeral across the road ­ Mrs Savage of Luskintyre.230 7. Was going to Fangorin this morning to see Taylor, but it began raining & threatened a wet day, which sopped me. After dinner we all three rode to Dalwood, where we found them all well. 8. At home all day preparing for tomorrow's services. Spencer Holmes called & dined with us. While at dinner a sudden noise in the parlour announced the falling of a bit of cieling [sic]. 9. Sunday. My first Pokolbin day, & being a nice cool day, was all in my favour. I found the work quite within my powers, & had plenty of time to spare when I arrived at Pokolbin.231 ­ Had a nice tidy congregation of 35 & had I intended it, could have been home by sunset. Returned to the Wilderness & slept there. 10. Spent this day visiting Mr Edwd Tyrrell & the Wilkinsons, called at Matthews' on the way out & Campbells on the way back ­ also at Besley's in the evening. 11. Started to visit Taylor at Fangorin, & as on a former occasion, found him at Putter's.232 From there I went to Fern Hill, where I found George [Wyndham] busy with his party of grape gatherers. Then fell back upon Dalwood, where I got some lunch. Came home by Windermere, calling at Burgess's. Found Cousin John & little Jessie here. 12. Did not feet quite equal to the Branxton work today ­ having had three long days running out to remained quietly at home. Spencer Holmes called in the afternoon & told us Mr Tyrrell had been thrown from his horse & much hurt.

229 230

What hard times were these? The Roman Catholic chapel was directly opposite Holy Trinity & the Parsonage. 231 Normally, either morning service at Lochinvar, afternoon at Branxton, evening at Holmes's, or Morning at Branxton, afternoon at Lochinvar, and no service at Holmes's. So on the monthly visits to Pokolbin, either Lochinvar or Branxton must have missed out. 232 Does Alfred sound just a little put out?

Page No: 134

13. The first meeting of our newly formed Clerical Society took place here today. The members present were Messrs Chapman, Thackeray, Walsh, Selwyn, F. Bode, Simm & Wood. We had a nice meeting, but Mr Tyrrell's absence made a sad blank, for it appears he is very seriously injured & dangerously ill. 14. Intended going to Elderslie today, but it proved a rainy day, so I remained at home, at least all the morning ­ In the afternoon, being anxious to hear some tidings of poor Mr Tyrrell, I rode into Maitland, to see Mr Chapman, whose report was only middling. Since I came home, a letter from Rosa Davidson by this evening's post gives us later news, which is far from favourable. ­ Brain fever seems to be setting in.233 15. Rainy day again ­ at home sermon writing &c ­ Glad to learn from Mr Brown this evening that Mr Tyrrell was better today, tho' not yet brought home. 16. Sunday. A thorough drenching rain the whole day. Phillips, the Sexton, was the only one who came to Church, - making, with ourselves, a congregation of 4: the smallest I ever had234. Did not go to Branxton. 17. The rain continued all the morning, so I stayed at home, & read part of Harold Browne on the 17th Article235 . ­ After dinner, as the weather showed signs of clearing up, I mounted on Farmer & rode to Kaloudah, calling first on Mrs D'Arcy, & then went on to the Doyles, - No mail from Sydney since Saturday morning, the River has risen about 20 feet [6+ metres] this morning but is falling again. 18. At home all the morning reading &c. In the afternoon I set off to Maitland with the purpose of enquiring after Mr Tyrrell, but I met Dr Morson on the road, who had seen him today, & he told me that he still complained of great pain in his head, & they durst not move him yet. Did a little shopping in Maitland & then came back again. 19. Went to Branxton, where I spent the day visiting up to 4 o'clock, when I had my singing class & then came home. ­ I found Mr John Hughes very ill in bed, Mrs Cox also was very poorly ­ bad cough - & full of aches & pains. 20. Went to the Wilderness to consult with Mrs Holmes236 about the Church furniture, &c. Took Marianne with me. Had a rather hot ride out, but a delightful cool one home again. 21. Marianne & I were going to Morpeth today, to select books for Rothbury Church &c but it looked so like rain we did not go. The morning was taken up, with me, putting a new lock on the back door, the afternoon, sermon writing. 22. Marianne & I rode to Morpeth today, to select books for Rothbury Church & had a very nice day for our ride. ­ Saw the Bishop & rearranged with him for the opening of the Church, which is now fixed for Thursday the 12th March. 23. Sunday. Small congregations at both Churches ­ gave notice for a collection next Sunday in aid of the Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Fund. 24. Anne having some shopping to do for Mrs Greenway, went to Maitland by early train, taking Marianne & Jessie with her237. ­ I stayed at home to keep house, & employed myself sermon-writing. 25. Made a few calls in the village this morning. In the afternoon Anne & I rode to Harper's Hill to call on the Andrew Doyles, - Marianne & Jessie walked with us to Kaloudah, where we called to pick them up on the way back. (Mr & Mrs A: Doyle & a lad named Harper came with us.) we had tea there & then came home.

233 234

Concussion and haematoma? Surely a company of 4 ­ Phillips, Anne, Marianne & himself? Unless Jessie was there as well? No mention of Cousin John's departure. 235 The 17th of the 39 Articles of Faith of the Church of England ­ "Of Predestination & Election", a Calvinist belief not held by Anglicans. 236 Definitely Mrs, not Mr. 237 Jessie would definitely appear to be in residence at the Parsonage.

Page No: 135

26. Ash Wednesday. Morning service here, with a congregation of only 22. In the afternoon I made a few calls in the village. Found old Mrs Martin better than she was yesterday. 27. Went to Branxton today (instead of yesterday) Dined with the Lindsays who then came down to pay us a visit, - that is ­ Mrs Lindsay & her two daughters. I then paid a few visits around the Station, called on Mrs Cox, who is very poorly ­ on Mr John Hughes, whom I found much better ­ on Mrs Pyne, & then singing class. 28. Paid Mrs Martin a visit in the morning ­ found her a little better. In the afternoon I rode down to East Maitland, hoping to see Mr Tyrrell, but was sorry to hear from Mrs Tyrrell that he was not quite so well this evening: - complained of pains in his head. Met Wm Boydell in Maitland & Sarah also, neither of whom I had seen since the death of Mrs Boydell, - called at Mr Chapman's & took tea with them. 29. At home today, preparing my sermon for tomorrow's collection for the Widow & Orphan Fund ­ Went to see Mrs Martin in the evening & found her better.

March 1868

1. Sunday. Most beautiful day. Congregation here might have been better, as well as the Collection for the Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Fund, which amounted to 26/11d only of which 3/6 was my own. At Branxton it was something nearer the mark, £3-9-5. ­ Held my last service, I hope, at Mr Holmes's house. Gave notice there about the opening of the new Church, on Thursday, the 12th March. 2. Spent the day visiting, & called on the following people ­ Campbell, Wills, Mrs Noon, (not at home) G.Chick, Lambkin, Joass, Wilkinson & Matthews. Made Mr Wilkinson's acquaintance & he favourably impressed me ­ Edith & Lizzie Holmes returned from Sydney today. 3. Visited in the morning ­ Mrs Martin, whom I found better, also Mrs Cameron, Mrs Tooze, & old Glass. In the afternoon called on Mrs Eli King, Mrs Nepham, then went to the Station & then back across the paddock to Mr Winder's, & so home to Wilton's, & Horder's. 4. Went to Branxton visited Mrs Pyne & Mrs Cox ­ both very unwell. Mr John Hughes I found much better. ­ After singing class, I called on Mrs Rae, on my way home. 5. We all took the early train (6.30) to Newcastle, & went to join the demonstration there to welcome Prince Alfred ­ Henry & his family went by the same train, & we all went together to the Scott's. In common with the other Clergy who were present, I attended the Levee, & made my bow to the Prince. We came back by the usual 5 o'clock train, but Henry's party remained longer. 6. We made another day of it & all went to Maitland to see the agricultural show & get another sight of the Prince. ­ Marianne & I on horseback, but Anne & Jessie with the Holmeses in their carriage. The day was very favourable, & everything passed of well, except that the Prince arrived on the ground before the time appointed & went off rather hurriedly which confused things a little. 7. After baptizing a newly born infant for Mrs Brown, I went out to the Rothbury Church, & spent the greater part of the day cleaning the Harmonium, which, I am glad to say, seems a very good one. Came home late, rather tired. 8. Sunday. Miserable Congregation at Branxton, Had nearly as many at Pokolbin. Slept at the Wilderness ­ Mrs Holmes very ill. Dr Hartigan came to see her at night. 9. After giving a few directions to Gellatley at the Church, I put Farmer in the Holmes's carriage & brought it over to take them all out tomorrow. After dinner I rode down to Maitland to get a few little things for the Church, & went on to East Maitland to see Mr Tyrrell, whom I found looking better than I expected. He talked of coming up soon to the Wilderness. Mr Wilkinson & his son John called today.

Page No: 136

10. My inclination was to take them all out to the Wilderness this morning, & then, in the afternoon, to ride into Branxton to visit Mrs Cox, who is seriously ill. But Kate Brown came in last night to say the little baby died last night, & they wished it buried this even. This quite upset my plans, - However, about 11 o'clock we started. Anne & Jessie with me in the carriage, & Marianne riding Nellie, but before we got to the Station, poor old Nellie came down on both knees, & cut her head too. Arthur Holmes had just overtaken us, & so I got him to bring Nellie back, & Marianne got into the carriage. I had barely time to go across to the Church, & give a few final directions to Gellatley, & then snap up about half a dinner, & come home in time for the funeral. Mr Tyrrell arrived at the Wilderness soon after us, having come up by midday train to Allandale, where his buggy awaited him. 11. Rode out early this morning to the Wilderness, where I spent the morning laying down the carpet &c &c. ­ In the afternoon I went on to Branxton to visit Mrs Cox, whom I found in bed, & I fear she will never rise from it again. ­ Made a few other calls, & got home rather late. Found Mr Bowyer Shaw here ­ come to assist in tomorrow's opening service at Rothbury Church. 12. Mr Shaw & I set off about 8 o'clock for the Wilderness. ­ At the Allandale Platform we were joined by the Bishop, & Mr Bode from Newcastle. ­ The Bishop's groom arrived at the same time with his horse, while I had Comet for Mr Bode. We had a most favourable day for our opening service, & everything went off quite to my satisfaction. The little Church was more than full, some few being unable to find sitting room, There must have been nearly 80 present, including about a dozen from Branxton. Everyone seemed highly pleased with the little Church, & I think none more so than the Bishop. ­ Besides 4 Clergy present, there were 17 Communicants, & the offertory Collection amounted to £13-6-9. Mr Tyrrell was not well enough to attend the Service, & he started home again in the afternoon.238 13. This morning, Anne & Marianne, & Lizzy Holmes & myself rode on horseback out to see the Wilkinsons, with whom we spent the day: wh: was a very hot one & got back again at quite dark, when we were greeted with the startling & mournful intelligence that an attempt had been made to assassinate Prince Alfred, by a ruffian who fired a pistol at him, & struck a ball into his back. 14. Came home this morning after breakfast, Arthur Holmes accompanying me, to get their post. Yesterday's Herald confirmed the report about Prince Alfred, giving all particulars of the outrage. The wound does not appear to be a mortal one, & great hopes are entertained of his discovery. Mr & Mrs McKenzie called this afternoon. I learnt from that that the ball had been extracted,239 & the Prince is doing well. ­ Called on Mrs Brown & Mrs Green this evening. 15. Sunday. Small congregations at Lochinvar & Branxton. A very satisfactory attendance at the little Church at Rothbury ­ 46. It was a nice cool day, & I got through all the services without fatigue. ­ Special prayer for the Duke of Edinburgh. 16. This morning Anne accompanied me first to the Church, where I wanted to take a few measurements, & the, we rode on to the Campbells, & Mrs Hills's, After dinner we came home, calling on the Crane's by the way. On reaching home, we found a slip of telegram, left by Mr James Doyle, announcing the grievous intelligence that the Bishop of Grafton & Armidale, with his second son & servant, were all drowned in the Clarence River on Sunday evening, by the upsetting of their boat.240

238

The Rev Tyrrell's interest in attending, despite his injuries, would have been because he was Alfred's immediate predecessor in the Parish. 239 Possibly under anaesthetic. 240 Drownings were common ­ even among the Clergy ­ Benjamin received his first posting to take over from a minister who had drowned while drunk.

Page No: 137

17. At home all the morning, reading &c. Towards evening we rode over to Kaloudah to call on Mrs D'Arcy, but found she was ill in bed, & so did not see her. Called then on the Doyles & then came home. ­ John Kimmorley called this evening & told us that John Wyndham got his arm broken today. His horse came down with him. 18. Went to Dalwood to see what John's accident really was. Found Henry & Dr Hartigan there leeching him. It turns out that his arm was not broken, but they think the cup, or socket of the shoulder is broken. From Dalwood I went on to Branxton. 19. The day appointed to elect a Lay Representative to our Diocesan Synod. Only 2 persons attended ­ Mr Doyle & Mr Winder ­ but as 6 must be in attendance before any business can commence, there was no election made. In the afternoon I rode down to East Maitland to see how Mr Tyrrell was getting on. Found him pretty well, & making preparations for his departure to England in about a fortnight. 20. Went to Dalwood again today to see John Wyndham. Still suffering pain in his arm & applying leeches. From thence I went to see Taylor at Ratigan, calling at Müller's by the way & at Mark Putter's on the way home. 21. Went to meet Marianne & Jessie, who came from the Wilderness by the midday train. Minnie & Ellen also came with them. Occupied chiefly in preparing for tomorrow's services & reading accounts of the Prince &c. In the evening we all walked out. Anne went to see Mrs D'Arcy, but I did not feel equal to a long walk, so rested on a lay [sic] till they returned. 22. Sunday. Very poor attendance at the Holy Communion at Branxton ­ only 11. 23. Long day's work today visiting my Elderslie parishioners. Started soon after 8 in the morning &did not get home toll 8 PM. Hottish day too. 24. After the hard day's work of yesterday, I felt entitled to a little rest, so found indoor occupation at home. 25. Went to Branxton today, visiting the Jones family (Mr Lindsay's shepherd) & then finished the day visiting in the village. Found Mrs Cox up, & better, tho' still very weak. 26. At home today, writing English letter (to John David) for tomorrow's mail. Posted 4 Eng: letters & 10 newspapers this evening. Sent home241 all the interesting particulars relating to the Prince. 27. It was my intention to go to Stanhope today, but I did not feel very well this morning, so thought it better to remain at home. ­ Began a letter to Alexander. In the afternoon we all went to Summer Hill. 28. At home all the morning. Spencer Holmes came & took his sisters home & from him we learnt that Mrs Wyndham had met with an accident last Sunday in getting out of her buggy. So after dinner Anne & I rode over to Dalwood to see her, as well as John with his maimed limb, - found them both getting on favourably. 29. Sunday. Rather a fatiguing day ­ so very sultry. Small congregation at Branxton: but very satisfactory at Rothbury ­ 46 again. 30. Spent the day visiting ­ began at Campbells & then worked my home [sic] calling at Mr McCormick Patton - Blick, Crane, Besley, Pont Fuller & Mrs Clift. ­ Found Mrs Crane only just recovering from a sharp attack of illness. 31. Rode down to Morpeth to consult the Bishop over a few little matters, & ordered a supply of books for the Rothbury Sunday School. Called at E: Maitland to say good-bye to Mr Tyrrell, but he was not at home. Met him afterwards in the street. ­ They sail for England in a few days.

April 1868

241

"Home" = England ­ a term still in use in my childhood a century later.

Page No: 138

1. Should have gone to Newcastle this morning to attend a meeting of our Clerical Society, but had to go to Branxton for the funeral of Henry Robinson, a Glendon Brook man. Finished out the day visiting amongst the people at Branxton. 2. Went by early train to Morpeth, to attending the Quarterly Committee Meeting of the N:Ch:Socy ­ - Good meeting. 3. Busy all day copying the plan of the Rothbury Church for the Bishop ­ had not finished by midnight. 4. Finished Church plans for the Bishop, & otherwise employed preparing for tomorrow's services. 5. Sunday. My Pokolbin day. Had very good attendance both at Branxton & Pokolbin. Stayed at the Wilderness at night, calling on Stewart by the way. 6. Paid some visits on the way home this morning, namely, Meares, London & Rose. Got home to dinner. In the afternoon we all walked out & called on Phillips, Golding & Mrs H: King. ­ Prince Alfred sailed for England today. 7. Went to Stanhope today, viâ Irish Town. Had a long day of it. ­ Arranged for service there next Monday week the 20th ­ got home very tired near 8 PM. 8. Branxton day. Made a few calls in the village & then went on to the Rudd's, who have taken a farm on the creek, opposite Clark Orman's. Finished the day with a small singing class, & came home tired ­ the day having been very hot, & feeling it the more after yesterday's work. 9. Stayed at home to rest myself today. In the morning I visited all the cottages in the Lane. In the evening called on Mrs New, Phillips, & the Lees. ­ Cousin John came today. 10. Good Friday. Morng service here with a congregation of 48. Aftn at Branxton, with 51. Fine warm day. 11. At home today, writing a little in the morning, (Baptismal Return) Called on the Hungerford's. In the evening went to see Mr Lee, then called at Filmer's. Cousin John drove to Maitland this morning with Marianne & Jessie to do a little shopping. Spencer Holmes called & dined with us. 12. Sunday. One of my very satisfactory days. 106 attended the Church here ­ 75 at Branxton & 64 at Rothbury. Administered the Holy Communication to 17 here in the morning. 13. After breakfast, Mr Holmes & 3 of the girls went with me over to the Church, where, in answer to an invitation I gave the people last night, about 20 children attended, that I might arrange & classify them for the Sunday School, which was to commence next Sunday. Several of the parents also attended to choose their seats. ­ I came home immediately afterwards, & found Mr Walsh here, who had come by midday train. Cousin John, Marianne & Jessie went to Singleton today, & returned by the late excursion train. 14. Had our meeting today for the twofold purpose of electing Churchwardens & a lay representative. Seven attended ­ the former Churchwardens were re-elected, & Mr Holmes chosen again as Representative. In the afternoon I went up to see Mrs George Horder, who is ill. ­ Cousin John drove Marianne & Jessie out to the Wilderness today. 15. Stayed at home today, after a bad headache last night, which robbed me of my rest. Employed making up the Stipend Fund Returns. ­ Cousin John left us, to go home, this morning. Miss Kelman came ­ with a Busby cousin & took Marianne away to spend a few days at Kirkton.242 In the evening I went up to call on Mrs Clift & Mr Brown, for their subscriptions. Got a quarter cask of wine today, as an Easter offering from Dalwood. 16. At home today, finishing off my Stipend accounts &c. In the evening I walked up to see Mrs George Horder, whom I found better.

242

No mention of Jessie.

Page No: 139

17. Rode out to Ratigan today, to see Taylor, who seems much better than he was. Called first at Mark Putter's, then went to McMullens, to see whether they would put me over the river on Monday morng which they will do. ­ Came back by Dalwood, where I got something to eat. Called at Woillah [sic] on the way home, also at John Nash's ­ he has lately removed to Kimorley's old place. 18. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's services &c. ­ Got a letter from Isabella this morning by which I find Gavin & Frederick have arrived in England from Mexico. Marianne returned home today escorted by Miss Kelman, Miss Codrington & young William Busby. 19. Sunday. Congregations not so good as they ought to have been. At Branxton I administered the Holy Commn to 14 ­ I was not a little surprised at meeting Charlie & Reggy Wyndham there. They & Guy had arrived at Dalwood on Friday. ­ Charlie came home with me, & returned to Dalwood in the evening. 20. Went to Stanhope, by appointment, & had service there, at Bolland's, where I had a nice little congregation of 15 & baptized a child. On the way back I called first at Mark Putter's, where & then at Dalwood, where I baptized Lucy's baby "Linda Lucy"243. ­ On coming home I found Isabella here, & old Mrs Brown, from the Paterson. 21. At home today, beginning "Thanksgiving Sermon" for next Tuesday. In the afternoon we had a visit from Mrs Doyle, with her son Fredk & wife. George Wyndham also called in on his way back from Maitland. 22. At home today, busy writing &c. In the evening I went to visit the two Mrs Horders. Edward's little boy is at home again, recovering from his attack of croup. 23. Remained at home today, but was a good deal interrupted. ­ Mr Winder called in the morning, & George Wyndham in the afternoon. 24. Took Mrs Brown & Anne up to the 9 o'clock train for Singleton. In the afternoon we all walked up to bring Anne home again. Mrs Brown went on to Morpeth ­ rather headachey today ­ at home writing ­ sermon. 25. At home today, finishing my sermon for Tuesday (Thanksgiving Day) & also preparing for tomorrow's work. ­ Alward Wyndham called this morning. 26. Sunday. A very satisfactory day ­ large congregations. 63 at Rothbury ­ gave notice at all churches about the Thanksgiving Service on Tuesday. 27. Came home direct from the Wilderness, & spent the day finishing my sermon & afterwards preparing for tomorrow's services. 28. Special Thanksgiving service today for the recovery of the Duke of Edinburgh. Had services at all three Churches, which were all well attended, though Lochinvar might have been better. ­ Collection at each Church for Mr Sawyer, amounting altogether to £8-15, We had a most beautiful day, & after morning service here, Spencer Holmes arrived with their carriage & drove them all out to the Wilderness, where Marianne presided at the Harmonium. 29. This morning I borrowed a horse from Spencer & rode to Branxton, calling first on the Crane's & then at the Joneses, where I got a little lunch, & went straight from there to Clark Orman's. I warned the young folks to be at the Church at Branxton, to commence our Confirmation there on Wednesday next. After getting a little refreshment at the Wilderness, Anne & I rode home, leaving the young folks to come home in the carriage tomorrow. 30. Here's another month gone ­ a very fine one as far as weather is concerned, but very dry. The country is beginning to suffer much from drought. This morning I spent visiting in the village, warning the young folks to attend for Confirmation Class tomorrow week. Towards evening Anne & I walked up as far as the Wilton's, calling on the Horder's on the way back. Spencer brought the girls home this morning ­ Jessie not well.

243 Linda Lucy Wyndham, born 18/12/1867, 6th child of Lucy Ellen Glennie (daughter of Dr Henry & Elizabeth Glennie, & so niece to Alfred) & John Wyndham ­ he of the broken shoulder. Alfred had married them in 1858).

Page No: 140

May 1868

1. Rode to Morpeth upon Farmer, to hand over to the Bishop the amount of our collection here on Tuesday last ­ Called on Mr Newman at East Maitland. ­ Got some dinner at Mr Walsh's. ­ Found Mrs Walsh preparing to start to Sydney. 2. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's services &c &c. Spencer Holmes called in morning. Anne & the girls walked over to Kaloudah in afternoon. 3. Sunday. A little astonished at finding Alick Wyndham244 at Branxton Church for they only arrived in Sydney on Friday afternoon. Went on to Pokolbin for afternoon service, where I had a very good congregation, & among them Richard Ellem, with his eldest girl, & a daughter of Thos Durrington. Came home after service, & got in at 7 o'clock. 4. At home today ­ very busy bottling the wine which Mr Wyndham sent me at Easter. It turned out full 15 dozen. Had a visit in the evening from the Misses Davidson245, accompanied by some of the Robt Hungerford family ­ George Wyndham called also. 5. Went up Lamb's Valley today, to visit the Peck family. 6. Began my Confirmation classes today ­ first at Elderslie with 4. & then at Branxton where only 3 attended. Just as we finished tea this evening, Gellatley called & asked me to go up & see Mrs Martin, who was very ill. I set off at once, & on arriving at the house found that the poor old soul was dead ­ It appears she was very well all the morning, at her usual occupation, helping her daughter to wash; & about 3 o'clock was taken ill, but they had no idea of her being so near here end, nor did she herself exhibit any consciousness of the approach of death. Poor old "Granny" will be much missed by us all, but it is a comfort to feel assured that she has been so attentive to her religious duties for many years past, I believe, or at least ever since we have known her. 7. Went up the village after breakfast to call at Gellatley's, & see when they wished the funeral to take place. Called on the Hungerford's also. ­ Towards evening we all walked over to Mrs Ferriers. Spencer Holmes brought Edith this morng in the carriage, & then took in Isabella & Marianne, & drove them to Maitland. Charles & Arthur were also of the party. ­ They all returned to dinner. George Wyndham also called on his way back from Maitland. 8. At home today, chiefly sermon writing & in the afternoon the funeral of Mrs Martin took place. Had a Confirmation class of boys this evening ­ 5 altogether. 9. Went to Branxton by first train to see the Joneses, & ask whether they could spare one of their girls for a servant. They expect Susan home from Scone directly, & perhaps she will come to us. Called on the people around the station. 10. Sunday. A very satisfactory day, large congregations especially at Branxton & Rothbury. Came straight home from Mr Holmes's & got in exactly at 9 o'clock. 11. Went by early train to Morpeth to attend the Special Committee Meeting of our Church Society. Returned by the evening train ­ Paid off Charlton this evening, & we are now left without servants. 12. Went to Maitland by early train to attend the Synod. ­ We all assembled at St Mary's Church, where we had Litany & Holy Communion. We then adjourned to the School of Arts, Where, as soon as Synod was formally opened, the Bishop delivered his address, & then, after a few formal notices, the Synod was adjourned till tomorrow, at 9.30 AM, & after lunch at Mr Chapman's, the afternoon was occupied with the last Meeting of the N: Church Society. Messrs James & Cyrus Doyle being in Maitland, they kindly gave me a seat in their buggy & drove me home.

244 245

Probably Alexander Wyndham, #10 of George & Margaret's fourteen children. Not Alfred's usual grammar.

Page No: 141

13. Cousin John drove me to Maitland this morning & I returned by evening train. The business of Synod was far from satisfactory today ­ We seemed to get enveloped in a thick fog, and none appeared to able to find their way out of it. ­ Hope we shall get on better tomorrow.246 14. Went to Maitland by early train. Had a much more satisfactory day's work, in the course of which some very good speeches were made, foremost among them, a very able speech by Mr Wilson on the subject of the Lambeth Conference.247 15. Rode into Maitland this morng in company with Henry Doyle. Attended Synod throughout the day, & returned home at 7 PM, too late for Confirmation Class. 16. At home all day ­ not very well. as the day advanced got worse, & began to fear another attack of Diarrhoea. 17. Sunday. Very bad night last night. Diarrhoea again. Quite unable for any duty today ­ sent Wm Walters up to Branxton to tell the people I cd not come. Got Mr Hungerford to come & advise me as to remedy248. ­ He suggested 15 drops laudanum in a teaspoon of Brandy which I took, & found great relief from it.249 18. Had a comfortable night's rest last night, & fancied myself getting quite well, but this morning the complaint returned on me again, & I felt very ill for a time. Took some castor oil with 15 drops laudanum on a little brandy & water, & it did me much good.250 19. Very much better today, & hope now I am on the road to recovery, & that I shall be well enough to keep my appointment at the Rothbury Church on Thursday. ­ I should have mentioned that Isabella took her departure on Saturday by the evening train. Cousin John arrived on Monday afternoon. 20. Still getting better. Made a few calls today ­ On Mrs King in the morning, & on old Greedy, Filmer & Redman in the Afternoon. 21. Ascension Day. Greatly disappointed today. I had given notice of my intention to have service, with Holy Communion, at Rothbury, & we arranged that we all wd go out ­ taking all the Children in Cousin John's buggy. But when preparing to start, I found I was not well enough, & we had to give it up. In the afternoon they all walked over to Kaloudah, while I remained at home in charge. Mr & Miss Lindsay called in afternoon. Cousin John & Jessie returned from Singleton per evening train. 22. Can't get well as fast as I should wish. Remained indoors all day ­ Got a cold now in addition to my other ailment. ­ James Doyle called in the morning & drove Cousin John down to Maitland to attend the meeting of the Vineyard Association. ­ I had my Confirmation class of girls in the Church in the afternoon, & boys here in the evening251. 23. Home all day sermon writing &c. Do not think I shall venture to Rothbury Church tomorrow ­ not strong enough. 24. Sunday. Holy Communion at Lochinvar ­ only 15 ­ good attendance at both Churches. I did not venture to Rothbury, but came home from Branxton. 25. This being observed as a holiday instead of yesterday252 - we all made an excursion to Summer Hill, & made a little picnic of it ­ the children enjoyed it exceedingly ­ Day perfect ­ Queen's weather. 26. Made a few calls in the village this morning ­ at home the rest of the day. 27. Went to Elderslie for my Confirmation class there, & then met the class at Branxton, & this quite filled up the day.

246

An unusual condemnation which together with a lack of Alfred's customary mention of the excellence of the Bishop's Address makes one wonders if His Grace was losing his grip ­ he was not to live many more years. 247 Synod of the Church of England under the Archbishop of Canterbury, held in Lambeth Palace. 248 Why not a doctor? 249 Laudanum ­ tincture of opium. 250 How, or possibly which? ­ castor oil is laxative, laudanum strongly constipatory. 251 Even Alfred had to segregate the sexes to get attention. 252 Empire Day ­ Queen Victoria's birthday.

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28. Went to Mr Holmes's today, to get my surplice, which I shall require for Sunday at Pokolbin. Took Nelly with me & left her there to be turned out. 29. At home today ­ Confirmation classes as usual. Some of the young folks acquit themselves well. 30. At home preparing for tomorrow's services, & otherwise writing & reading. In the evening began to prune a few vines. 31. Sunday. The weather being a little showery & threatening, I suppose, frightened some of the people from Church, I administered the Holy Communion to 14 at Branxton, where I also baptized a child for John Thrift, all this threw me behind time at Pokolbin, & when I reached there, I found that Mr Hungerford had just concluded the prayers, so that I only preached. ­ Started away straight from the Church, & reached home just at 6 o'clock, having ridden 33 miles.

June 1868

1. Remained at home today, with the intention of reading, but my time was much broken up from various causes, George Wyndham came in about midday & dined with us. In the afternoon Spencer Holmes also called. 2. I intended going to Dalwood today, but it came on to rain, so I remained at home & spent the day drawing out the plans of Rothbury Church for Mr Greenway. 3. Went to Elderslie & Branxton for my Confirmation classes, which now take up the whole of my Branxton day. 4. Went to Branxton today, chiefly to call on Alick & his wife, but they had gone to Maitland. Left Confirmation books at Dann's, & also with Mrs McKenzie. 5. Walkes over to Kaloudah in the morning to see Louisa, about Confirmation. Had my classes here in afternoon & evening. 6. At home all day, spent the morning reading the speeches in the House of Commons on the state of Ireland. ­ In the afternoon I pruned a few vines. 7. Sunday. ­ Three good congregations. Had a baptism at Rothbury, & then came straight home from the Church by moonlight. ­ got home at 8.45. Gave notice that I wd attend at the Church at Rothbury on Tuesday morning at 11AM to receive candidates for Confirmation. 8. Went to Morpeth by early train to see the Bishop on one or two little matters. Settled to have the Confirmation on early in September. ­ His lordship kindly consented to give £10 a year towards a stipend for Schoolmistress at Rothbury, provided the people wd find another £10. 9. Went by appointment to meet candidates for Confirmation at Rothbury Church, where 6 were in attendance ­ 2 Holmeses, 2 Blicks & 2 Campbells ­ I arranged to meet them once a fortnight, dined with the Holmeses & came straight home. 10. Went to Elderslie & Branxton for Confirmation classes, as usual. 11. At home today ­ reading, & vine pruning ­ With the help of Marianne & Jessie, took the little Millards up to the station, & saw them safe off by the midday train. 12. Occupied chiefly with the young people for Confirmation. First with Louisa Doyle at Kaloundah, then at home in the afternoon & evening. 13. Called on the Hungerfords & Mrs King this morning. ­ read the newspapers a bit ­ inspected the Parsonage walls with Mr Brown - & in the afternoon pruned vines. 14. Sunday. A dull day ­ Congregations very fair. Gave notice for Holy Communion here next Sunday. 15. Went to Stanhope for service ­ only 8 attended. ­ Drizzly rain came on about 12 o'clock which gave me wet grass to walk over on my way back to McMullen's, where I left my horse. ­ Rode up to Mrs McKenzie's door, but did not get off, as my feet were wet. ­ Came straight home. 16. Being a wet day, I did not go out, but spent the day reading. ­ We have had some splendid showers today, the heaviest rain for some months.

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17. Elderslie & Branxton Confirmation classes, as usual. 18. Quite a rainy day kept me at home ­ reading & sermon-writing. In the evening, the rain having ceased, I called upon Phillips's, Mrs Dell's & the Lees. ­ Earthquake at Midnight. 19. Went to call on the Andrew Doyles in the morning & from thence to Kaloundah, where I dined. In the afternoon only three came to the Confirmation class, so I soon dismissed them, & went to call on Mrs D'Arcy & Mrs Ferrier 20. Being Saturday I did not go out except to the post, & as far as Mrs McDermott's, to see why her girls did not come to the class yesterday. ­ found they were frightened at muddy roads. 21. Sunday. Out of a congregation of 90, only 10 remained for Holy Communion. ­ Returned home at night from Rothbury Church ­ beautiful starlight night. 22. Having learnt from Mrs Thrift yesterday that Louisa Cox had got a place in Maitland, I went by early train this morning to Branxton, & walked out to Mrs Jones's to see if there was any likelihood of Susan returning home, but find it is very uncertain, therefore we must look elsewhere for a servant. 23. Went out to the wilderness [sic] to meet my Confirmation class in that neighbourhood. Dined at the Holmes's & than after calling to see Mrs Keever & her new baby, I came straight home. 24. Classes as usual at Elderslie & Branxton. 25. Paid a round of visits in the neighbourhood of the Wilderness, calling on the following ­ Crane, Blick's, & Patton, - Matthews Wills, Campbells Holmes & Keever. One chief object of my visit was to ascertain from the people whether they were willing to attempt the establishment of a School, independent of the Governt. But I found that Mr McDonald & some others were already in communication with the Council of Education, with a view to getting a Provisional School established, so that settles the question. 26. At home today, pruning vines part of the morning. ­ also baptized an infant. The rest of the day taken up with Confirmation classes. 27. Went to Morpeth per midday train to see the Bishop about repairing the Parsonage. Decided to try at once to collect the required funds. 28. Sunday. A beautiful bright day ­ good congregations both at Branxton & Pokolbin. Got home at ½ p 6. Found old Farmer rather dull & heavy. 29. In the forenoon I paid a few visits in the lane. After dinner I walked over to Windermere to call on the Greens. On the way back I called at Walker's. 30. This morning I went first to call on Mr Winder & ask him to collect subscriptions for repairing the Parsonage. ­ Then went to see Mr Brown & Mrs Clift. In the afternoon I walked over to Kaloudah to see Mr Jas: Doyle on the same errand, & then went down to the river to see the work in progress there ­ a stone causeway at the end of Kaloudah lane.

July 1868

1. Went to Elderslie & Branxton, where my Confirmation classes occupied be the greater part of the day. Found old Charlie Hughes very ill in bed. 2. Went this morning to call on the Harpers at Oswald. ­ Found Mrs Harper confined to her bed with sickness. From thence I went to Dalgetty, & home round by Allandale. Pruned a few vines this afternoon. ­ The weather at present is most lovely ­ perfect Australian winter weather. 3. About midday I received a message to go & visit poor old Hughes at Branxton, so this prevented my Confirmation class in the afternoon. I found the old man very poorly & apparently wandering a little in his intellect. ­ Called on Widow Smith likewise.

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4. Went to see Hughes again this morning, & thought him a little better. Has a most disagreeable ride against a gale of wind, & through clouds of dust. ­ Pruned a few vines in the evening ­ Spencer called. 5. Sunday. Three services as usual ­ good congregations. Had a moonlight ride home from the Wilderness. 6. Called on Mrs O'Brien & Mrs Walters in the morning. ­ Spent the afternoon pruning vines. Cousin John came in the evening. 7. Went to meet my Confirmation class at Rothbury Church. The young people there acquit themselves well.253 Called at Crane's on the way home, hearing that he was ill. 8. Elderslie & Branxton again for Confirmation Classes. ­ Visited Hughes on the way back. ­ Found him low & weak. His son Thomas was there - & rode home with me. 9. The day for our Clerical Meeting at Mr Thackery's. Being a cold frosty morning I walked into Maitland, & managed it very well. We had a very nice meeting, the subject for discussion being the "Uniformity of practice in conducting the Public Worship". ­ I was much interested therein, 254 & the subject being an important & extensive one, is likely to occupy our time over several meetings. Mr Millard was present, & came home with me per train in the evening. 10. Walked over to Kaloudah this morning, to see Louisa Doyle, but found she had gone to Maitland.255 Had my classes here in Afternoon & evening. 11. At home all day sermon writing &c. 12. Sunday. Holy Communion at Branxton ­ 16 Comts ­ Nice congregation at Lochinvar. 13. Went to Stanhope in the morning for my usual monthly service there. Only 9 attended. The Pattersons have left, & some of the other folks seemed not to know I was coming. Called on Mrs Taylor As I came back, & on Mark Putter also. 14. Went to Maitland to pay quarterly accounts, & do a little shopping. 15. To Elderslie & Branxton as usual. ­ On calling to enquire after Hughes (whom I found getting better) I was told that Mrs Elson's little boy was drowned yesterday in the water hole at the Quarry behind her hut. I went to see her, but finding that the Coroner had just arrived, & a number of people about, I did not stay, but returned to my class at the Church. {Saw a beautiful meteor not long after sunset, when quite light, as I approached Harper's Hill. It was about ESE I think.}256 16. Went to Branxton for the funeral of Mrs Elson's little boy. 17. Went by early train to pay a visit of condolence to Mrs Elson. Sat some time with her & was pleased with the way she bore her bereavement. ­ Returned by midday train & had my Confirmation classes in afternoon & evening. 18. At home today ­ sermon writing. Geo: Wyndham called in the afternoon. 19. Sunday. Only 13 Communicants here. ­ At Branxton I had a very full Church ­ at or near 90. ­ Just as the service concluded it set in to rain pretty smartly & steadily from the SE. So much so that I gave up my ride to Rothbury & came home instead. ­ Turned out a wet night. 20. The most thorough soaking rain we have had for a long time. It never ceased a moment the whole day. Went to pay Haskins a visit in the morning, after which I spent some time over sundry jobs -­door fastenings &c &c, & then read a bit. 21. Much to our surprise we found a bright sky this morning, the wind having changed during the night to the NW. I went to Mr Holmes's, but owning to the fresh in the creek, the Blick portion of my class cd not attend. I had only 2 Campbells & Charlie & Minna257. Disagreeable ride with such a high & cold wind.

253 254

I'll bet they did ­ Joseph Broadbent Holmes was the son of a minister and a noted martinet. This seems to sum up Alfred's religious attitude ­ do everything correctly or else. 255 Why did Louisa Doyle get private instruction for her Confirmation? 256 This note is squeezed in following a curlicued bracket as given. 257 Note the Campbell children are not named, whereas the Holmes children are.

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22. Rode to Elderslie against a strong head wind. Had my class as usual in the morning, & at Branxton in the afternoon. -­Called to see Hughes, who is not quite so well, tho' he was sitting up by the fire. 23. Went out this morning to call on some folks beyond Allandale, namely Rose, London, Meares, & then on to the Wallaby scrub to Lodge's, whose hut I found locked, so left my card.258 Got home before 4 o'clock, & pruned some vines. 24. At home all day ­ reading in the morng, - Afternoon Confirmation Class ­ a small one only. 25. ­ do ­ preparing for tomorrow's services & reading a little. Also pruned a few vines, Called on the Hungerfords. 26. Sunday. The weather being a little showery & threatening, I suppose was the cause of a smaller congregation than usual at Branxton. ­ At Pokolbin I had a fair attendance & baptized two infants. 27. Having heard yesterday that Campbell's second daughter, Jane, was very ill, I rode out this morning to visit them, & found Dr Hartigan there. She is very seriously ill ­ inflammation of the lungs ­ I read a little with her, & prayed, & then repaired to Mr Holmes's, where I found Lizzie was laid up with a severe attack of Influenza. 28. Being a perfect day, we decided, while sitting at breakfast, to take holiday, so having prepared a supply of sandwiches, & mounted Anne upon Comet, we strolled out towards Summer Hill, & despatched our picnic beside a clear water hole we found in a gully. We then made our way to Windermere, & called on the Greens, & then came home in the dusk of the evening, all tolerably tired. 29. Went to Elderslie, & Branxton, where I found my two classes as usual. ­ Called on the Lindsay's & also visited Hughes, whom I found rather worse, getting weaker. 30. Rode this morning to Campbell's where I found poor Jane still very ill, but bearing her sufferings very patiently. Called at the Holmes's also ­ Lizzie much better, but Charlie in bed with Influenza. ­ Mrs Holmes also poorly. 31. At home today ­ sermon writing in morning. ­ Confirmation class in afternoon. Townshend took us by surprise this morning with his pony cart, laden with trees, on his way up to Scone &c. He stayed to dinner, & then went on to the Holmes's. ­ In the evening Mr Walsh drove in from Morpeth, bringing Daisy & little Florence to stay with us. ­ Engaged Agnes Young today as general servant @ 8/- a week.

August 1868

1. At home today, sermon-writing, but met with frequent interruptions. ­ Mr Winder called in the morning & Mr Doyle in afternoon. 2. Sunday. Fair congregation here, very good at Branxton, but owing to a heavy shower in afternoon & sickness being in some families, my congregation at Rothbury was below the average. Had a fine bright moon to light me home. 3. Went up to Wilton's in the morning, calling on Mr Horder on my way back. In the afternoon went to the post, & called in at Glass's, then pruned vines. 4. Went to the Wilderness, where I had my class at the Church, & then went to see poor Jane Campbell, Found her cough very bad, & apparently no improvement in her. ­ Returned to dine at the Holmes's, & then came home round by Crane's. ­ Mrs Holmes still in bed, tho' better. Minna's turn to be in bed. 5. Elderslie & Branxton, as usual. Made a long day of it, & came home late. 6. Rode out to Campbell's this morning & found Jane, I think, a little better. She had a young friend with her from Singleton (Miss Williams) ­ called & dined at the Holmes's, - glad to see Mrs Holmes up again. & so very much better. ­ The young folks are also getting right again.

258

I still want to know why Alfred always underlined this comment.

Page No: 146

7. Went to Kaloudah in the morning, & dined there. Only 4 came to the Conf: Class in the afternoon, so I dismissed them, hoping for a better class next week. 8. Went to Morpeth by midday train, to see the Bishop, who has requested me to go down, that he might have some talk with me on some private business between himself & Mrs Blick. I had a very satisfactory interview with his lordship, respecting my own affairs as well. Three things he mentioned to me which will be a great relief to me. 1st ­ he proposes, out of funds from the Church & School grant, to repay my claim upon the Gosford Church for £200, the amount advanced my me259, 2nd, from the SPG grant, he proposes to pay himself the £25 owing to him by the Pokolbin people for his loan to that amount, & 3rd, he proposes to apportion £50 p annum to myself from the SPG grant, if I will be answerable to the Diocesan Council for £100 p an: from the parish, which I told him I wd very willingly consent to do.260 - - Called at the Depôt261 & at the Parsonage after my visit to the Bishop, & then returned by the 5 o'clock train. In the train I was shocked to hear of the death of Mrs G: Bode, at St John's, Newcastle. The Bishop had told me he was dangerously ill. 9. Sunday. Ho: Comm. At Branxton ­ only 12. Roads very muddy from yesterday's rain ­ Good congregations. 10. Service at Stanhope to a small congregation of 10. ­ On my way back called on Mark Putter, Mrs McKenzie, & at Dalwood. Got home quite dark. 11. Confirmation class at Rothbury Church, after which I visited Jane Campbell, & was very glad to find her better. Returned to dine at the Holmes's, & then went to see Mrs Blick, on the Bishop's account. Called at Crane's also ­ the sick people in that quarter are all getting better. 12. Elderslie & Branxton Confirmation classes as usual. 13. Went this morning to visit old Ben Ladham, in Mr Wyndham's paddock, having heard that he had been ill. ­ I found him somewhat better than he had been, & apparently getting well, tho' 86 years of age nearly. From there I went to Hughes's, where I also read a chapter with the old couple. On my way home I called on Mrs Rostron in her new house, then on Mrs Harper & then on the Andrew Doyles. As I went out in the morning I called at Jere: McCarthy's on Harper's Hill, & got his pony for a day's trial, I liked the little fellow very much, & in the morning when I left him I agreed to give McCarthy his price, £8, & he is to bring him down in the morning.262 14. McCarthy brought the pony this morning, & I gave him a cheque for £8 for him. I walked over to Kaloudah to see Louiza [sic] Doyle, but not having her lesson prepared, I told her to go through the book to the end & to let me know when she had finished it & I would come and have our finishing lesson. Had my class at the church in the afternoon. Mr Walsh came & took away Daisy & Florence, & also Marianne & Jessie. 15. At home, resting & preparing for tomorrow's services. ­ Mr James Doyle called in the morning on his way to Osterley. 16. Sunday. Although the congregation here was good, the number of communicants was miserably small ­ only 12. At Branxton I had a fine congregation, about 95. ­ At Rothbury only 47, owing, I suppose to the prevailing sickness in some of the families there. ­ I gave my sermon on Ahab's death at the two latter places. Rode my new Horse Eclipse, who carried me very well. 17. At home all today, reading chiefly. Henry Doyle called to say Good-bye on his removal to Singleton. A fine thundershower fell this evening.

259 260

Ten years before! So if Alfred raised another £100 from his parish, he could have half if it! 261 Alfred only occasionally used the circumflex in this word. 262 Considering the non-mettle of his horses Mettle, Comet & Farmer, Alfred would appear to be no judge of horseflesh ­ it will be interesting to see how this one turns out. Certainly a pony would seem too small for Alfred.

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18. Anne accompanied me to the Wilderness today, where I had my class, as usual, after which I visited Jane Campbell ­ still very poorly, but I hope improving. The much-talked of eclipse took place this afternoon, but was a very small affair. 19. Went to Elderslie where I had my class, & then rode home in the pouring rain without calling at Branxton. 20. While sitting reading this morning, a message came for me to go & see Mrs Wilton, who was ill. I found her in bed, suffering, she thinks, from the bite of a snake, which she fancies bit her in the ancle, yesterday week. ­ Wilton had gone to Maitland for a doctor. ­ I went to see her in the evening when she thought she was somewhat better ­ Dr Wright had been to see her. 21. Went up to see Mrs Wilton in the morning, & found her better. Confirmation class in the afternoon: after which I went to pay Mrs Humphreys a visit, & called in upon the Greedys 22. At home all day with the exception of a walk to the train towards evening to meet Marianne & Jessie, but they did not come ­ Mr Walsh drove them up in his buggy instead. 23. Pokolbin Sunday. ­ Owing to the river being impassable, none of my Elderslie people cd get to church, which caused a small congregation at Branxton, Baptized 2 children at Pokolbin, The pony did not carry me well, very dull & sluggish, so that I was late home, - Canon Child came up & took the afternoon duty here. 24. Marianne accompanied me to Dalwood today, where I examined some young folks in their Catechism. On our way back we called on the Andrew Doyles. 25. Went to Rothbury, & finished with my class there, Called to see Jane Campbell ­ better, but coughing a good deal today. Dined at the Wilderness & then went to see Mrs Blick. 26. Elderslie & Branxton today, & finished my classes there. ­ Mrs Scott came this afternoon from the Lindsays to stay a few days with us. 27. Went by early train to Morpeth to see the Bishop about Mrs Blick's affairs & arrange about the day for Confirmation, which is now fixed, namely Monday the 28th September at Branxton at 10 AM, & at Lochinvar at 2½ PM, - Called at the Depôt, & at the Parsonage, & returned by the midday train. Towards evening I went to see Mrs Wilton, who is much better, tho' hardly able to walk yet. 28. Rode into Maitland this morning, partly on my own business, & partly on the Bishop's (to see Mr Owen).263 Returned to dinner, & had my confirmation class in the afternoon. 29. At home today ­sermon writing in the morning, in the afternoon took Mrs Scott up to the train. 30. Sunday. Congregations middling, stayed the night at the Wilderness. 31. Spent the day visiting around Pokolbin ­ called on Geo: Moore, Mrs Knight, Ingle, Gillard, J. Moore, Wills & Campbell. ­ Called at Stewart's also ­ found they are going away up the country. Got home late, tired & out of sorts, having had a bad head ache all day.

September 1868

1. Went to Kirkton, where I had not been for a very long time. Called on John & R. Thrift, & on Alfred Goodwin by the way ­ got home very late & found Townshend here. 2. Went to Branxton, where I had a class of 5 young men for Confirmation besides making a few calls. ­ After a small singing class, I came home - & found H. Ferris here. Had a call from Wm Boydell this morning. He & Sarah are at Kaloudah. He announced to us that Sarah is engaged to be married to Mr William Doyle.

263

At this stage, Alfred is 4th in seniority in the Diocese.

Page No: 148

3. At home today, spending a quiet day with Uncle Ferris. Took Marianne & Jessie up to the train in the morng bound for Morpeth. Wm Boydell & Sarah called in the morning on their way home. Townshend left us. 4. Ferris & I walked in to Maitland this morning, where I had a little shopping to do, & returned by the midday train. Singing class in afternoon. 5. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services &c. Went to see Mrs Eli. King in the forenoon, she being rather unwell. Towards evening walked up to the station to meet Marianne & Jessie who returned from Morpeth. 6. Sunday. Holy Commn at Branxton ­ only 14. Good Congregation at Lochinvar. Arthur & young Thackery came in. 7. Stanhope day. Found poor old Mrs Bolland in bed very ill. ­ Had service at Woodhouse's where I baptized an infant. 8. Took advantage of Cousin John's buggy being here, to drive Uncle Ferris to Dalwood. On our return we found Mr Bowyer Shaw here. 9. Had rather a long ride today. Went up through Irish Town & Stanhope to Elderslie & from thence to Branxton. Found a new family lately settled at Stanhope named Fowles. ­ My object in going that way was to see poor old Mrs Bolland, whom I found still very poorly, in bed. ­ At Branxton, among others, I called to see Mrs Charles Hughes who is confined to her bed with a scalded leg. 10. Went to Morpeth to attend the meeting of our Clerical Society. ­ On the way I heard the sad news of the death of Mr Croaker. ­ killed by a fall from his buggy. ­ The funeral will take place tomorrow - & I must attend it. On coming home I found Mr Edwd Tyrrell here, with a broken collar bone & two broken ribs ­ also occasioned by a fall from a buggy. 11. Lent Farmer to Mr Tyrrell to ride home upon & he started soon after breakfast. ­ I rode down to Morpeth to at [sic] the funeral of Mr Croaker, which was very numerously attended. The service was read by the Bishop & Mr Walsh ­ four of the Clergy were present besides myself, namely, Chapman, Simm, & the two Bodes. 12. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's services, called on the morning on Mrs Cameron, Emanuel & Mrs King. ­ Geo: Wyndham came & spent the evening. 13. Sunday. Administered the Ho: Comm to 20 here. Other services as usual. ­ Slept at the Holmeses. 14. Went to Pokolbin, to Inglis's, where I catechised some candidates for Confirmation. Called at Wills's on the way back & heard their daughter say her Catechism. Then visited the Campbell's & came home. ­ Marianne went to Singleton to consult Henry about her arm. 15. Went up to the Station this morning to meet Mr Rich, whom [sic] came from Newcastle per train. Found Uncle Ferris there also ­ just come from Singleton. Took holiday today to entertain Mr Rich. 16. Went to Elderslie & Branxton, to have a finishing conversation with my classes there. Made one or two calls in the village besides, namely, Mrs Chas: Hughes, (still in bed with her scalded leg) ­ Mrs Bayliss, & the Lindsays. Mr Rich & Ferris went up to Singleton today, & brought Marianne home with them in the afternoon. 17. Took Mr Rich to Dalwood today ­ round by Harper's Hill, & home again by the River. 18. Called on the Hungerfords this morning, after which, with Mr Rich's assistance, I hung the candlesticks in the Church, preparatory to an evening service on Sunday. Singing class in afternoon. Ferris left per last train for Singleton. 19. Occupied the greater part of the day with the arrangements for lighting the Church.264 ­ Arthur came up from Newcastle by the 5 o'clock train.265

264 265

What did they do prior to this? No idea who Arthur is.

Page No: 149

20. Sunday. A bad headache all night, which drove me out of bed soon after 4 AM, was not a very nice preparation for the hard day's work I had before me; Began service at Branxton at 10 o'clock, then rode to Pokolbin for a service at 2, & after that came straight home, & arrived before ½ p 5. Had a fine congregation of 90 for evening service & the lights provided seem to give general satisfaction. 21. At home in the morning. Afternoon at Kaloundah to see Louisa on her confirmation. 22. Went out Wilderness way. Called at Crane's, Mrs Blick's, & the Campbells & got home very late. 23. To Branxton, where, after dining with the Lindsays, I had my class of big boys, & gave them a final lecture preparatory to their Confirmation on Monday next. 24. Went to visit the Peck's in Lamb's Valley today. Enjoyed the ride among the green hills which are very beautiful now after the splendid rain of Monday night. ­ Found Ferris here on my return. 25. Rode out to Anambah after breakfast, & was caught in a squall of wind & rain which lasted near an hour. ­ from 9 to 10. ­ Called at Naseby, McQuirter's (not at home), - at Bird's & Nash's, also at the cottage of a man named Middleton. ­ Got home to dinner ­ Marianne Returned at noon from the Wilderness, where she had been staying since Tuesday. ­ Had my last class with the young people in the afternoon.266 26. Made a few calls in the morning, & in the afternoon rode to Harper's Hill to visit the Doyles, busy finishing off everything preparatory to the Confirmation. 27. Sunday. & a very satisfactory one ­ large congregations ­ preached my Confirmation sermon at all three Churches, "When thou vowest a vow", &c, Came home from the Wilderness so as to start early tomorrow morning for Branxton. 28. Another day to be remembered. Had a most satisfactory service in the morning at Branxton, where 39 were confirmed by the Bishop, of whom 5 were married people. The Church was overcrowded, some standing at the door, while others remained outside. We had rather a warm ride from Branxton, the thermometer being 85 in the shade. ­ Had another nice service here in the afternoon, where 23 more were confirmed. ­ Marianne & Jessie returned to the Wilderness with the Holmeses. 29. Started about 8AM for the Wilderness, having, on Sunday last, notified my intention of having service there this morning, with the Holy Communion. Had a most delightful service ­ about 50 attended, 27 of them remaining to partake of the Sacrament, & of that number, all the young people of that neighbourhood who were confirmed yesterday. This was exceedingly gratifying to me, & the pleasure was still more heightened by finding that Jane Campbell was sufficiently recovered to enable her to come to Church, & sit out the whole service, including the H: Comn. ­ I remained to dine with the Holmeses, & came home in the cool of the evening. 30. At home all day resting after my late Confirmation labours. Spent the day chiefly letter-writing, & making up Baptismal Returns &c, also did a little gardening among the vines, pulling off superfluous shoots & so forth. Marianne & Jessie came home from the Wilderness driven by Spencer & accompanied by Lizzie & Ellen.

October 1868

1. Made a few calls in the village this morning ­ did a little more vine dressing in the afternoon.

266

Co-educational by now.

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2. After going to the post, & making one or two calls, spent most of the day in the vineyard "thumbpruning" &c. Cousin John came in the evening ­ singing class in afternoon. 3. At work in the vineyard again, & nearly finished my job there. ­ In the afternoon Cousin John took Marianne & Jessie to Kaloudah in his buggy. 4. Sunday. Nice congregation at Branxton, where I administered the Holy Comn to 29 including 10 of the newly confirmed young people. ­ The afternoon service here was not so well attended. 5. Stanhope day. A few more than usual attended the service, & I baptized 2 infants. ­ Was sorry to find Mrs Bolland still very poorly & confined to her bed. ­ Called at Taylor's, Mark Putter's & at Dalwood on my way home. 6. Went to Branxton, in consequence of a note I found here last night from Geo: Maggs, requesting me to come & visit his wife who was in a dying state. She is a Rom: Catholic, however, & I was glad to find the Priest had been called for, & was with her before I got up there. Spent the day visiting in the village, & on reaching home found Annie Boydell & Willy just arrived per train with Marianne & Jessie, who went to Maitland this morning with Cousin John. 7. This morning I went to visit poor Mrs D'Arcy, who received intelligence of her husband's death by the last English mail. ­ In the afternoon I went to see Mr Winder, - who has been very unwell today ­ he seems better today. 8. Started per Midday train for Newcastle to visit Mr Bode ­ On reaching W: Maitland I heard he was at Mr Chapman's, So I left the train & went up & joined him & then we both went together by the evening train. 9. Remained with Mr Bode till the last afternoon train by which I returned home, In the morning we called on the Scotts, Selwyns & Millards. 10. At home preparing for tomorrow's services. Towards evening I made a few calls ­ Redman, Taylor, Phillips & Lee ­ G Wyndham & Townshend came in the evening. 11. Sunday. A very satisfactory service here in the morning, when I administered the Holy Comn to 38, including 15 of the newly confirmed young people. This combined with two very long chapters for the lessons, made it a full 3 hours service, so that I was late at Branxton, & a little so at Rothbury, where I had the addition of a Baptism, - very hot day too ­ thermr 88. 12. Did not feel at all well this morning, I suppose from the effect of yesterday's work. I had intended riding out as far as the Wilkinsons & Tyrrells, but did not feel equal to so long a ride. ­ I visited therefore the following families ­ Campbells, Wills, G: Chick, the two Lambkins, Joass, & Matthews, & then came home. Took some pills on going to bed. 13. At home today, doctoring myself. Mrs Jackson & her two sisters came & spent the day with us. 14. Did not go to Branxton today, feeling that I required rest. Spent the day drawing out a plan for a new Church at Branxton. In the afternoon, I walked up to the Station with Marianne & Annie Boydell, who went to Maitland, to accompany the Chapmans to a rehersal of singing at St Paul's. Townshend went to the Holmeses for the night. 15. Went to Stanhope to see Mrs Bolland, whom I found much better. Called at Dalwood on the way back. Also at Burges's [sic] & Halls. 16. Remained at home all day ­ chiefly sermon-writing. Mr Andrew Doyle came towards evening & took Marianne home with him to join a little party at his house. 17. At home getting on with my plans for Branxton Church. Louisa Doyle came to spend the day with us ­ Mr James Doyle came with his Mamma & Aunt in the evening & took her home. 18. Sunday. A nice cool day for my ride to Pokolbin, - In my congregation there I found some of my old Mangrove Creek friends, H. Parry & Richd Ellem. Had a

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baptism there, & got home about 20m: to 6. Had a famous congregation here in the evening ­ 105. 24. On Monday last we all left home for a little holiday. Marianne & Annie Boydell to the Wilderness, & Anne, Jessie & myself to Singleton. ­ On Tuesday evening we enjoyed a concert at Singleton at the "Mechanics", in aid of the Organ of Mr Blackwood's Church. I did not go about much, the object of my visit chiefly to be getting a little rest. Yesterday morning I took the train to Belford, & from thence walked to Kirkton to see Mrs Kelman who has met with an accident lately, & is confined to her bed. On Thursday we received a letter from Marianne, telling us of a mishap which befel [sic] her on the way to Wollombi with Mr Shaw ­ crossing Black Creek at Cessnock, the horse jibbed & capsized the buggy. Marianne jumped out in time, but in doing so sprained her ancle, & so quite disabled her. I shall have to go & fetch her home somehow next week. To add to our troubles, Chas Holmes came up yesterday to announce to us that Annie Boydell was very ill at their house ­ Attacked with one of her fits. Henry sent her a little medicine & Charlie came this morning to meet us at Allandale with the good news of her being much better. At home all day, preparing for tomorrow's services. 25. S[unday]. Pleasant cool day, which enabled me to get through my 3 services without fatigue. Came home at night. 26. Went to Maitland today to do a little shopping &c Dined at the Chapmans, John Wyndham called on his way back from Maitland in the evening & teaed with us, & offered me his buggy to bring Marianne home in. 27. At home all day, Employed chiefly sermon-writing. Annie Boydell returned from the Wilderness this morning, escorted by Charlie & Lizzy, who spent the day with us. 28. At home all the morning writing. After dinner I rode old Farmer to Dalwood, & brought back John's buggy for my journey to Wollombi tomorrow. 29. Started about ½ p 6 AM for Wollombi, driving Farmer in John Wyndham's buggy. About 3 hours brought me to Cessnock, where I thought it advisable to indulge Farmer with a feed of corn & an hour's rest. . Had a very hot & dusty drive to Wollombi, arriving there about 3 PM. Found Marianne getting on favourably, though not able to walk. 30. Started from Wollombi about 20m: to 7, & after a much pleasanter drive than we anticipated, (dreading a hot day) we reached the Wilderness between 12 & 1 o'clock & rested there till about ½ p 5, when we took to the buggy again & reached home safely between 7 & 8. 31. At home all day, finishing my sermon for tomorrow. ­ Annie Boydell went to spend the day at Kaloudah, - Willie Boydell came up by the evening train to spend tomorrow with us.

November 1868

1. Sunday. Wmn Boydell accompanied me to Branxton for the Morning Service where I administered both Sacraments ­ only 17 Communicants this time. ­ The service here was at night, & we had a fine congregation of 115. 2. Stanhope Day. ­ I had a congregation of 13 at Bolland's again this time for I was glad to find Mrs Bolland almost herself again. ­ Annie Boydell went as far as Dalwood with me. On our return we were caught in a great Southerly gale, accompanied with rain. ­ Among other damage done it blew down my thermometer & broke it. 3. Remained at home today, making up Return of Baptisms &c & also began my Annual Statistical return for the SPG. 4. Instead of going to Branxton today, I remained at home to finish my Return, & Quarterly Report for the SPG, Ellen Solling called in the evening with one of her

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brothers to invite us to dine with them on Monday next after the Choral Service at St Paul's. 5. Rode up to Kirkton today to see Mrs Kelman, whom I was happy to find getting better. Had a wet ride home, being caught in a fine thundershower. 6. At home today but did very little ­ so many interruptions. 7. My cold rather bad today ­ could not settle to work at anything beyond looking out sermons for tomorrow, & reading a little of the "Guardian". 8. Sunday. Had a nice congregation of 88, & administered the sacrament to 29 Communicants, but had a little difficulty in getting through the service, having very little voice, & very bad headache, or rather Influenza pains in my head. ­ I felt quite unable to go to Branxton & despatched William with a message to tell the people both there & at Mr Holmes's that I was too unwell to come. Head very bad all day & a good part of the night. 9. A wet day, quite prevented any of us going to Mr Thackery's Choral Service ­ thought I could not have gone, no matter how fine it might have been. Spent the day chiefly letter-writing. 10. Weather cleared up again today. In the morning I wrote to Willie, asking him to try to find servants for us in Sydney ­ Spencer Holmes called ­ In the afternoon I took Annie Boydell up to the Station & saw her off in the train for East Maitland. 11. Went to Branxton today. First visited poor old Hughes, who looks very ill, & I fear is gradually sinking. Then I called on the Lindsays & inspected their new upstairs rooms, which are very nice. After which I spent the rest of the day visiting about the Station calling on Mrs Gibbs ­ Harrop ­ Elson ­ Terry ­ Coldraks - & Atkins. 12. Went to Newcastle to attend our Clerical meeting at St John's. Had a very good attendance, eleven of the Clergy being present. ­ The weather was very disagreeable ­ cold, rainy & Stormy ­ The Hunter River Steamer had to put back again into Newcastle. My cold very troublesome. 13. Can't shake my cold off, which has now become a troublesome cough ­ Went to the School in the morning & spent an hour with the children ­ singing class in afternoon. 14. At home, reading a little, writing a little, & suffering from cough. ­ Also repairing Harmonium in the Church. 15. Sunday. & should have been Pokolbin Sunday, but I was not sufficiently recovered to attempt that long ride. My cough was very troublesome, & reading aloud did not improve it. I therefore came home from Branxton. Had a fine congregation of 104 in the evening. 16. At home all today. In the morning Mr Robt Walter Doyle of Jerry's Plains called on business of a very interesting nature. In the afternoon we had a call from Mr McDonald & Miss Minnie Lindsay, & in the evening Cousin John made his appearance. Marianne & Jessie went up to Singleton by early train this morning. 17. We took advantage of Cousin John's buggy today & drove into Maitland to do a little shopping. ­ Called & dined at the Chapmans. 18. Did not feel well enough to go to Branxton. Called at Kaloundah in the morning instead. Busy planning Branxton Church.267 19. Intended going to Branxton this morning, but the weather looked so doubtful & I did not feel altogether well enough, so stayed at home & got on with my Plans. In the afternoon I called on Mr Winder, Stuckey, Boggs (neither at home) & an old couple named James, near Naseby's. ­ Cousin John returned to us this evening. 20. Spent an hour in the School this morning & had a singing class this afternoon. Mrs Davidson came up from Maitland & spent the day with us.- Cousin John here also. 21. At home all day ­ busy with plans for Branxton Church.

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The handwriting for the last two days is uncharacteristically poor.

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22. Sunday. Found my cough very troublesome when reading, but I managed to get through the 3 services notwithstanding. Remained at the Wilderness, leaving Cousin John in charge at home. 23. Spent the whole of the morning in the Church at Rothbury, drawing a plan drawing out a plan of he Reading Desk & taking a few other measurements, as I have again to provide the Bishop with a copy of the plan of the Church &c, for Mr Hawkins, at the Manning [River]. Came home in the afternoon. 24. At home again today. ­ cough worse than it was ­ the chief part of the morning was spent in doing a little upholstery work ­ After dinner got to my plan of the Reading Desk until ½ p 4, when Anne & I rode to Kaloudah to see Mrs Doyle, who has been rather poorly, but is better again. 25. Determined not to go out if it can be avoided till my cold is better, so did not go to Branxton today, being busy at my plans. Reading desk for Mr Norton & Mr Greenway. 26. Very busy again with my plans ­ did not go out anywhere ­ Cough &c no better. 27. Rather a bad night last night from Influenza pains in the head ­ not at all well today ­ did not get on at all well with my work. 28. Began the day by going to meet Marianne & Jessie, who came by morning train from Singleton. Expected servants by 9 o'clock train from Sydney, but they stayed in Newcastle, & came by the 5 o'clock train this evening. Last night I received a note from Mrs Hughes at Branxton saying that she thought her husband was much worse, & he was anxious to see me, so I rode up in the morning, & had a very hot ride, which I think has not improved my cough at all, - I called to see Mr Lindsay also, who has been confined to his bed for a fortnight. He seems getting better again. 29. Sunday, & a terrible hot one ­ 97 in shade. Got nearly roasted coming from Branxton. Congregation not very large. 30. Good pleasant day again with sea breeze. Mr Robt Doyle called in the morning for his Marriage Licence ­ I spent the day at home, settling the preliminaries of Emily Hungerford's marriage &c &c. Our new servants seem so dissatisfied with the place that we have decided upon letting them go off again tomorrow for we can see very clearly that that they will not suit us at all ­ Genuine Irish ­ but calling themselves Church of England.

Volume V, 1 December 1868 to 25th September 1870

st

December 1868

1. Began this month with a wedding - rather an unusual occurrence here, seeing that I have not been called upon to marry any since September of last year. The parties married this morning were Mr. Robt. Walter Doyle of Jerry's Plains & Emily Hungerford. It was a very early wedding, the party being at the Church very soon after 6 o'clock. They went off by the 9 o'clock train to Singleton,- our newly engaged servants took their departure also by the 8 o'clock train, so that we are again left entirely without servants & must do the best we can for ourselves. This being the case, I rode into Maitland this afternoon to get a supply of bread, so as to save the trouble of baking.- I called to see Eli King, and was delighted to find him doing so well. The doctors seem to speak very hopefully of him now. 2. Could not get away to Branxton today, so many little jobs to do at home. Managed to get to my plans of Rothbury Church,- Spencer Holmes called in the afternoon, and Mr. James Doyle in the evening.

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3. Went to Branxton, & out to the Joneses, to see whether they would spare us one of their daughters for servic... they could not. Made a few calls in the village. 4. At home... on with my Church plans, which are now nearly finished 5. Various jobs took up the whole morning. Spent the afternoon over my plans, but could not quite finish them. 6. Sunday. Thirty communicants here in the morning.- Hot ride to Branxton, where the congregation was small. Came home after the service at Rothbury. 7. Got all my Church plans finished today. In the evening I went to call on the Lees, also on Mrs. Eli King, & Mrs. Dell. 8. Went to Morpeth today to see the Bishop, & deliver up to him the plans of Rothbury Church. His Lordship returned from Dungog while I was there, & I took dinner with him.- He paid me the sum of 77-5-0 as the first instalment towards paying off my claim of 200 on account of East Gosford Church268. On returning home in the evening I found Mr. G. Bode here & Cousin John & G. Townshend. 9. Remained at home to entertain Mr. Bode, and walked up to the station with him in the evening. G.T. and Cousin John left us in the morning, & A. Holden came in the evening. 10. Occupied all the morning with various jobs - one of which was at least an hour spent in the paddock catching my horses. After dinner I rode over to the Wilderness to call on Dr. and Mrs. Cusack, but found that they had left, & gone to Newcastle leaving the children behind them. 11. Very hot day again, as most of our Fridays seem to be.- Went to the School in the morning & then called on Mr. Hungerford.- Only two girls came to the singing class this evening. 12. At home preparing for tomorrow's services etc. 13. Sunday. With a temperature of 91 in the shade, my ride from Branxton to Pokolbin was a very hot one.- The ride home, with a seabreeze was much more agreeable, but I was decidedly tired when I got home.- Good congregation here at night. 14. Rather Mondayish this morning. After breakfast went to get "Comet" up from the paddock.- Called on Brooks and McDowall. In the evening I went to call on Mrs. McQuirter. 15. Intended going to Branxton today, but foreseeing a very hot day I altered my plans and went in the morning to see Mr. Winder about collecting the Stipend. I then went on and called at Neal's also on Mr. Day.- Towards evening I called at Wilton's & Horder's.- Not very well at night. 16. One of those dreadful hot days, (101½ ) which would even justify one in perfect health in remaining under the shelter of his roof, but I was too unwell to think of venturing out.- An attack of Diarrhoea again which came on last night, but a little medicine I hope has arrested its progress. There must have been some part of yesterday's diet which disagreed with us, for they were all upset in a similar way last night.- I tried to do a little in the way of sermon writing but it was only a little. Wrote a few letters also. 17. Went down to Neal's, to see their boy, who has just come home from a long up country journey, very ill.- Rheumatic Fever.- Dr. Morson is attending him & I hope will bring him round again.- Called on Mrs. Tuckey also. Mr. Buist came in the afternoon & tuned the Piano. 18. Went to Branxton today, & arranged with Chas. Hughes to act as Collector for the Clergy Stipend Fund in & around Branxton. Made several other calls, & the returned viâ Dalwood. 19. Jobbing all the morning. Marianne & I rode in to Maitland in the afternoon to do a little shopping. Called at the Chapmans. Mrs. C: out.- Mr Chapman showed us a

268

Alfred had advanced this £200 in 1858 ­ no mention of ten years interest!

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beautiful writing desk just presented to him by young members of his flock who were confirmed last Sunday.269 20. Sunday. A very hot day, but the congregations were good notwithstanding. At Lochinvar 107. Had a very hot ride to Branxton. Got home just at 9pm.- tired. 21. Another terrible hot day. Therm. 98. Went to see James Neal in the morning, & was glad to find him very much better. Almost too hot to do anything. 22. Remained at home today- chiefly sermon writing. Townshend came in, as usual, late at night. 23. Had one of the hottest rides I ever had in my life. Went to Branxton, & after visiting Hughes, went on to Jones's, where I baptized a child & then started at 1½ for Mrs. Blick's under a dreadful burning sun,- but by the time I reached Mrs. Behmout, the seabreeze had sprung up. I then went to Crane's & the Wilderness.- Learnt at Crane's that Susan is about to be married to a young man named Meares, from whom I suppose I shall receive a visit in a day or two. Mr. Holmes told me that in the sun, his thermometer reached 150 today. 24. An awfully hot day. Very thankful to be able to remain indoors.- Therm. 105½ . Finished my sermon for tomorrow. 25. Another terrible day.- Therm 103. I got well roasted even riding to Branxton in the morning & was not surprised at the comparatively small congregation- about 50 only- 14 communicants. From there I went to Rothbury, where 44 were assembled. The congregation here in the evening was formed mostly of children, & young people.- I was so exhausted & felt sickness coming on, that I dismissed them without a sermon.- In the night I was taken ill.- Bad headache & a bilious attack.270 26. Delightful cool day again- Though I got up very weak & exhausted in the morning, I got better as the day advanced, & I hope I am all right again.- Spent the day chiefly writing a sermon for tomorrow. 27. Sunday. Very nice, pleasant day, but the Branxton congregation was small. Here we had 112 in the evening. 28. Not over & above well today.- Martin Mears came in the morning early for a Marriage Licence,- to be married tomorrow at Rothbury. (very sleepy) 29. Started before 8 o'clock for Crane's where I found a nice family party assembled, & after getting a Declaration signed, & drinking the health of the Bride & Bridegroom, we all repaired to the Church for the Marriage of Martin Mears & Susan Crane. After the ceremony I went & called on the Campbells, & on Mr. Wills.- dined at the Holmeses, where I met Mr. Wilkinson, & we rode together to Lochinvar station. I then went in to Mr. Clifts, where I found little Johnny Brown, the Stationmaster's boy, laid up with a broken thigh, occasioned by a horse running away with him, & throwing him off.- He seems to be doing very well. 30. Rode down Kaloudah Lane this morning to see if any green lucern was to be had in that quarter, but found none.- Called on Mrs Darcy & the Ferriers also. 31. Went in to East Maitland this afternoon, to make a deposit in the Savings Bank, & do a little shopping besides.- Was delighted to find the roads so muddy & sloppy, after last night's rain. Sundry odd jobs filled up the day, besides preparing for a morning service tomorrow at Rothbury Church. And thus ends the year 1868.- In many respects an eventful one.- As regards my own Parish, or District, the most important event has been the completion & opening of the Rothbury Church in March last. The nice Congregation there has kept up very steadily from the first, & has been a source of great satisfaction to me. The little Church at Pokolbin might be better attended, but the population in that quarter is of a different character. The Branxton congregation keeps up very well while that at Lochinvar has increased a good deal since we adopted the late evening services.- The

269 270

Jealous, Alfred? None of his catechism classes ever gave him a present. No mention of the day being Xmas Day.

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Confirmation of 62 young people (mostly) in September, was also an important event with us, & the number of additional Communicants in consequence is a cause for thankfulness.

January 1869

1. Began the new year with Morning Service & Holy Communion at Rothbury. The congregation amounted to 37, of whom 17 remained to the Sacrament.- After Church I rode straight to Branxton to visit old Hughes, who still lingers on. Had a very hot ride home. 2. At home today. The morning occupied entirely with jobbing. Afternoon, looked out sermons for tomorrow.- Ellen Solling called in the afternoon, with her brother John, & took tea with us. 3. Sunday. Made a very satisfactory beginning of the New Year, with a congregation of 115 at Loch. & 36 communicants. This threw me ¼ of an hour behind at Branxton, where nearly 80 attended. I had to make the Pony step out pretty briskly from Branxton to Rothbury, where I had 48. Came home very tired at ¼ to 9. 4. Very Mondayish today: so could not do very much.- Had an early visit from John Wilkinson who announced to me the interesting piece of news that he is engaged to be married to Jane Hungerford.- James Wilton came this morning, & commenced his work, & in the evening Maria Jarret arrived from Paterson, so we are once more supplied with servants. 5. Marianne & Jessie went by early train this morning to Newcastle, on a visit to the Millards. I accompanied them as far as the East Maitland Station, & then went on to Morpeth, to get a few books at the Depot, & returned per Midday train. Had a very hot walk from the station, with therm. 95 in shade. 6. Began the day by riding up to the train, hoping to find John Lethbridge there bound for Morpeth, by whom I might get a letter conveyed to Mr. Langley, enclosing a portion of Stipend collections.- He was there as I expected. Foreseeing a very hot day, I postponed my intended ride to Branxton, in hope of a cooler day tomorrow, & was very glad I did so, as the thermometer rose to 99 in the shade.- Busied myself making up Returns. 7. Went to Branxton today. Visited poor old Hughes & found him evidently approaching his end. I hardly think he knows me. ­ I did [dined?] with Miss Minnie Lindsay, the rest being out. ­ Made a few calls and spent an hour at the school. 8. While at breakfast this morning, Henry Hughes knocked at the door, to tell me that his father died about ½ p 1 this morning, & that they propose having the funeral tomorrow evening. ­ Called on Mr Hungerford this morning, & when I came back, found Mrs Wyndham here. George had left her, & gone on to Maitland. 9. This morning passed away with broken sort of job work. In the afternoon I had a very hot ride to Branxton to bury old Charles Hughes. Being an old resident, the funeral was well attended. His 4 sons were all there with daughters and grandchildren. I have good reason in his case to hope & trust that his departure out of this world is indeed a happy release from suffering. 10. Sunday. Pokolbin day, & very thankful it was cloudy. ­ A little rain in the afternoon ­ I suppose kept some from Church both at Pokolbin & Lochinvar. 11. Rather Mondayish this morning after yesterday's long ride. ­ In the afternoon Anne & I took a ride into Maitland to do a little shopping and had a nice cool ride. 12. Intended going to visit the Elderslie folks today, but not feeling very well in the morning took some medicine and staid at home. ­ Called on Mrs Brown in the morning, and then rode up to Mr Clift's to see how little Johnny Brown is getting on, & took him some books. ­ Spencer called in the morning.

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13. Just as I was starting for Branxton, Mr Bowyer Shaw arrived, on his way to Newcastle, so I waited until he had gone to catch the Midday train, & then set off for Branxton. Called first on Widow Hughes, & then, after a few calls, visited the school, after which I had my singing class again, and called on Mrs Smith on the way home. 14. Clerical meeting today at the Hexham Personage. ­ A very good meeting, 13 clergy present, plus mosquitoes innumerable. 15. Visited the school in the morning ­ Sermon writing most of the day. In the evening called on Mrs Taylor & the Redmans. 16. Hearing from Mrs Taylor last evening that Redgrove has been very ill lately from the poison of a deseased [sic] bullock that he had skinned, I rode out to see him this morning, & was glad to find him pretty well recovered, & at work again. Called at Mr Andrew Doyle's also on the way home. 17. Sunday. Congregation of 112 here in the morning. Had a very disagreeable ride to Branxton against a high NW wind, with plenty of dust. The attendance there & at Rothbury rather short of the usual number. ­ Remained at the Holmeses for the night. 18. Rode out to the Wilkinsons, calling by the way at Matthews's, came home by way of the Cranes, to take farewell of Susan, who starts up the country on Thursday with her husband. On reaching home at ½ past 8, found a note from Mrs Wyndham, saying that Kate Müller was very ill and wished to see me. 19. Went to Dalwood after breakfast to see poor Kate, & found her very poorly in bed. After reading to her, she expressed a wish to receive Holy Communion, & I at once arranged to administer it to her in the afternoon, & did to. ­ On my way back I called at Windermere, where I had not been for a very long time. 20. Branxton day. ­ Went through my usual routine of work, & was stopped by a fine thunderstorm on the way home, which overtook me at the butcher's (Parsons). 21. At home. ­ part of the morning packing up a box of grapes for Mrs Millard, which we sent by the midday train. James brought back three sacks of flour from the station. ­ Afternoon sermon writing, & reading telegram of English news. 22. Went up to the station to meet Marianne & Jessie, who came by early train from Newcastle. At about 11 o'clock Charlie & Emily arrived in their buggy from Dalwood. ­ Charlie went off to Maitland about 12 o'clock to arrange about a cricket match to come off next week ­ Emily is looking very well, but is rather thin. 23. At home sermon writing & preparing for tomorrow's services. ­ Charlie went to Maitland. Mr Lee called. 24. Sunday. Rather a busy day with me. ­ Holy Communion at Branxton. ­21 commns. Got home about 2o'c, had a wedding at 3o'c, (Pilkington & Peck) then a funeral at 5 ­ an infant of A. Hoy's. - & finished the day with a fine congregation of 130 in the evening. 25. Started after breakfast prepared for service at Stanhope, but was met just outside the gate by Edith Holmes who had just come up by the morning train to acquaint me with the death of Mrs Cusack's youngest child ­ about 9 mos old, & asking me to return with her to East Maitland to arrange about the funeral, as they wish the child buried at Rothbury.271 ­ I turned back therefore, and went to Maitland with Edith. It was arranged to have the funeral on Wednesday morning. Cousin John arrived in the evening. 26. Remained at home today. Began by baptizing Mr Walker's baby. ­ The Chamberses came up & spent the day with us. 27. Went to the Wilderness first thing in the morning to bury Dr Cusack's little child. Mrs Cusack came up with Mr Holmes from Maitland. After the funeral I rode on to Branxton, where I had my accustomed work.

271

Maude Cusack, born 3rd March 1868, second youngest child of Dr Samuel Athanasius Cusack and Georgiana Frances Holmes, sister of Joseph Broadbent Holmes. Almost all the Cusack family died of TB.

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28. Rode over this morning to Dalwood to see Kate Müller. Found her sitting up but very weak. Lunched there, and in the afternoon witnessed the pressing of the first load of grapes of the season. Mr Wyndham told me that this is the first time he has ever made wine in January. The grapes have ripened earlier this year, & are very fine. Spencer Holmes, Minna & Miss Codrington spent the day here. 29. Spent this morning gathering grapes to send away. Some to the Scotts & Millards at Newcastle, & a basket for Mrs Brown at the station. Spent an hour at the School, & than called on Miss Hungerford. In the afternoon Charlie drove me to Kaloundah. 30. Terribly hot day. Charlie took Mar: & Emily to Maitland for shopping. They put up at the Chapmans, & came home in the cool of the evening, or rather, when it ought to have been cool. ­ Buried Mrs Water's baby this afternoon. Received a letter this evening from Mr Harrison, announcing the death of Mrs Harrison. Also one from Cousin John, announcing his father's death. 31. Sunday. A very hot & trying day. A congregation of 109 tended to increase the temperature of our Church in the morning. ­ 29 communicants, - Just as the Branxton service was over a thunderstorm came on, which delayed me a few minutes, but very little rain fell. ­ When within a mile of the Rothbury Church I was overtaken by another small thunderstorm, which prevented the people from coming to Church, so had no service there. ­ Stayed the night at the Wilderness.

February 1869

1. Spent the day visiting around the Holmeses, starting at Campbells & going round by Belmont. Came home in the cool of the evening. The Walshs are come up from Morpeth and spent the day here. 2. At home today. Made up Baptismal Returns for last month. ­ Townshend arrived in the forenoon. 3. Branxton day. Called on Mrs Elson &c, over the line, then School & singing class. 4. At home all the morning. After dinner I went to Luskintyre & called on the Davises & Coopers. 5. ----do.----do. In afternoon Anne & I went to Maitland to do some shopping. ­ Rode a little way along the Oakhampton road. 6. Busy in the morning making up Stipend collections & sending them to the Bank. ­ Looking out Sermons for tomorrow &c. Towards evening we all (except Anne) walked over to Kaloundah. Townshend rode with us on his pony. ­ Charley returned this evening from his trip to Collaroy. 7. Sunday. A nice cool day for my Pokolbin journey, which I accomplished very well notwithstanding a little mishap to begin with. The pony thought proper to come down with me, when trotting along Harper's Hill. He fell right on his head, & sent me sprawling in the mud, but I received not the slightest hurt. Had a very good congregation at Branxton, - a miserable one at Pokolbin, & 104 here in the evening. 8. At home ­ began preparing for my "Clergy Widows' & Orphans" Sermon for next Sunday. In the afternoon I went to call on Mrs Tuckey, also on the Winders & Mrs Golding 9. At home again; sermonizing etc. In the evening went to call on Mrs. H. King. Had a call this morning from Mr. Codrington with his daughter & Fish: on their way to Maitland. 10. Ash Wednesday. Better congregation than usual.- 35. In the afternoon I rode in to Maitland by appointment, to meet one or two of the Clergy at Mr. Chapman's, to prepare an address to Mr. G. Bode. Only Mr. Simm was there. Just before I started, Charlie Holmes came in with a note from Mrs. H: announcing the sad

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news of Dr. Cusack's death 272- I therefore rode on to East Maitland to see poor Mrs. Cusack, & afterwards went to see Mr Tyrrell who has just returned from England. Found them both looking remarkably well. 11. Went to Rothbury Church this morning for the funeral of poor Mr. Cusack.- The body was brought up in a hearse from Maitland, & Mrs. Cusack & her two eldest boys came by train. A fine shower of rain fell just before the funeral.- Returned to dinner & tried to do some sermon writing, but made very little progress. 12. Busy all day preparing a sermon for tomorrow's "Day of Humiliation & Prayer for Rain"; the Governor having issued a Proclamation, setting the day apart for that purpose. But I am in great hopes that we shall have to change the service in to one of "Thanksgiving for Rain" for we have had rain almost every day during the last week, & it seems inclined to increase upon us. 13. On getting up this morning we found it raining, with every appearance of a regular set in February rain. I therefore decided at once to make our Service one of Thanksgiving, instead of Humiliation and Prayer for Rain. I had to select what I considered the most appropriate Psalms & Lessons for the occasion, namely, Psalms 103 & 104, & 1 Kings 18 with Epist: James V- I preached a sermon on Thanksgiving from Eph: V. 20. "Giving thanks always for all things unto God." I regretted that so few attended the service, only 10 besides ourselves. Perhaps the rain kept the people away, for it came down rather heavily just at the time they would be coming to Church. 14. Sunday. The congregation at Lochinvar was so small that I postponed the collection for the Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Fund for a future occasion. At Branxton I had a good congrtn.- & very good collection, 5-0-1. At Rothbury the collection was 1-18-0, which I think very satisfactory. 15. I intended going to Pokolbin this morning, but it was so rainy that I gave it up, & came home by Dalgetty, & Oswald, where I called to see Mrs. Harper.- Called also at Andrew Doyle's & Kaloudah. 16. Stayed at home to write letters: but could not get on well, felt very heavy & stupid. Tried to rouse myself in the afternoon by walking to the station. 17. Branxton day. Went out to see the Jones's & had a talk with Susan about coming to the Communion. I hope to see them there on Sunday next. Had a class at the School & then finished as usual with the singing class. 18. Spent this day visiting the good folks at Elderslie, where I had not been since September. 19. At home today (except one hour at the School), getting on with plans of Branxton Church. 20. At work all day with Church plans. 21. Sunday. Morning service at Branxton, good congregation, & 24 communicants. Baptism also. Had a Baptism here also in the afternoon, & fine congregation of 117 in the evening. 22. Went to Stanhope today, but found no congregation, as they were not certain of my coming. I spent the day visiting among them, & found my way to James Yeo's, for the first time. 23. Charlie & the two girls went by early train to Newcastle, to spend a few days with the Scotts. I remained at home all the morning, busy with my Church plans. In afternoon I rode out & visited Bird's, Nash's & Mrs. McQuirter. 24. The nineteenth anniversary of my Ordination!- Branxton day.- Dined at the Lindsays, & the went about my business in the village.

272

Of TB ­ the Cusacks married in England, emigrated to Hamilton, New Zealand, and came to live on the Wilderness when Dr Cusack was too sick to work. The Cusacks met the Holmeses when Samuel and Arthur Parker Holmes, Joseph's youngest beother, were contemporaries at Trinity College Dublin in the 1850's doing medicine. Their last child was born after Samuel's death.

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25. We took advantage of Charley's buggy today, & drove up to Kirkton to see Mrs. Kelman. She is still quite unable to use her leg, & therefore confined to her chair & Sofa: but we were delighted to find her so cheerful.- We left Jessie with the Lindsays at Branxton, & picked her up on our return. 26. Today we drove out to the Wilderness & spent the day with the Holmeses.Found them very busy winemaking. 27. Went to Morpeth per Midday train to consult the Bishop about Branxton Church.He mentioned a stone Church now in progress at Waratah: & I have determined to go down & see it, before taking any steps with our Branxton Church.- I called on Mr. Walsh also, & got some books at the Depot. Picked up Marianne, & Emily & Arthur at the East Maitland station, & we all came up together. 28. Sunday. With a congregation of 84, & 26 Communicants, the collection for the Clergy Widows & Orphans' Fund amounted to 31/- only, of which 13/6 came from my own family, leaving the sum of 17/6 (!!) as the contribution of the Lochinvar congregation to the above object. Had a fine congregation of 94 at Branxton.Very warm day. Arthur went to Branxton also for afternoon service, & returned with Charlie in the evening.

March 1869

1. Went from Mr. Holmes's to Pokolbin, where I called on the following- Scott, G. Moore, Jas. Moore, Birmingham, Wilson, Pinchin, Mrs. Knight & White.- Called on the Campbells also on the way back. Very hot day,- therm. 98 in the shade. Got home late, & found Mr. Wilkinson here. 2. Being Emily's birthday, I felt myself bound to spend it at home: besides, I felt rather the worse for yesterday's wear & tear. Called in the morning on old Glass, & Mrs Tooze. 3. Had my horse saddled for Branxton this morning, but foreseeing a very hot day, & moreover not feeling quite up to the mark, I determined to remain at home, nor did I repent of having done so when the therm. reached 100 in the shade.- Mr Davies from Luskintyre called in the morning to report the death of his wife's mother, old Mrs. Hobart. 4. Had to stay at home today for the funeral of old Mrs. Hobart, which took place in the afternoon. Charley arrived early in the morning with John's buggy, & took the girls over to Dalwood. George also came to breakfast on his way to Maitland, & called again on his way back. 5. Had my accustomed class at the School this morning. In the afternoon drove Anne & Jessie in Charley's buggy, first to Kaloudah & then to call on the Andrew Doyles, at Harper's Hill. 6. In the morning I rode over the river to pay a visit of condolence to Mrs. Davies, after the death of her mother: called on Mrs. D'Arcy on my way back. Found Charley & the girls here on my return. In the afternoon I received a note from John Wyndham begging me to go over to see Kate Müller, who was much worse. I went, accordingly, & found her much the same as before.- Promised to go over on Monday & again administer the Holy Communion to her.- Found Alward at Dalwood. 7. Sunday. Rather a hot ride from Branxton to Pokolbin.- Good congregations at all three places. 8. Charley & Emily took their departure this morning, intending to reach Singleton this evening. I went to Dalwood, by appointment, & in the afternoon administered the Holy Comm. to Kate Müller, & then came home with a bad headache, which kept me wake till past midnight. 9. Went by early train to Waratah, Mr Wood joining me at Hexham.- Was much pleased with the little Church I went to see, & left with the builders the plan of the

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Gosford Church, which they are to look over & send me word for what sum they think one of the same size, but with rubble walls, can be built at Branxton.- Came home by the midday train. In the evening I went to see old Redman, who is ill, called on Mrs Dell also & on the Lees. 10. Went to Branxton by early train, & made a few calls there, & then returned by Midday train & went on to Maitland, to meet Mr. Simm & Mr. Walsh at Mr. Chapman's, to settle about the address & testimonial to Mr. Bode.- Returned by the 5 o'clock train. 11. Clerical Meeting at Mr. Tyrrells.- Twelve of us present.- After the meeting I called on Mrs. Cusack, & then rode home. Looked in at the Hospital to see old Redman: better. 12. At home today for the first time this week (Friday). Spent an hour at the school in the morning. Had a rummage among old newspapers in search of something I could not find, then sermon writing, etc. etc. 13. In the morning I called upon Mrs. Bellamy, Junr. & then looked in upon the old Glass couple on my way to the Post Office. At home the rest of the day preparing for tomorrows services. 14. Sunday. Good congregations at all Churches.- Rather warm riding in the sun. 15. Had a long day visiting in the Cessnock district:- Began at Ingles- & went on through them all about the Marrowbone ridge, ending at Stevenson Moore's.Made the acquaintance of Jackson Senr. & wife, who have come to live there since my last visit to that quarter. Left my card also at John Green's residence. On my way back I called on Mrs. Wills, whom I found sick in bed.- Called at Campbells also, & then pulled up for the night at the Wilderness, it being dark when I reached there. 16. Came home this morning, calling by the way at Crane's, Bezley's, & Fuller's. Found Elizabeth & Mary here from Singleton. 17. At home all the morning. Sermon writing. Walked to Windermere in afternoon to consult Mr. Green about the Parsonage walls.- Sent the old cow over to Mr. Holmes's. 18. Set off this morning soon after 10 o'c. intending to make a few calls at Luskintyre, & then proceed to Dalwood.- A very agreeable change in the weather took place, & it began raining a little. After visiting at Cooper's, Eary's & the three Russells, I was going on to Fairhalls, when I saw the clouds gathering thickly & very black to the southward, so thought it prudent to return home, & I just got in in time before the rain began. 19. Being a showery day, at least the early part of it, I did not go out any where, but spent the day indoors, chiefly sermon writing.- Between the showers I planted a Canwallia [?] plant in the shrubbery that is to be, to hide Mrs Hickey's buildings. 20. At home all day sermon writing, and preparing for tomorrow's services. 21. Sunday. Not at all well today. Symptoms of an attack of Diarrhea [sic]. ­ had some hesitation about going to Branxton, but was glad that I did go. Being showery and threatening weather only a small congregation. & 14 communicants only. ­ I had the addition of a Baptism, which altogether made the work very nearly of 3 hours duration. ­ It was 3 o'clock when I came home, feeling very exhausted. ­ I did not feel very strong for the evening service, but got through very well notwithstanding. Unfortunately it came on to rain about the time of going to Church, which kept some away. 22. This was my appointed Stanhope day, but I was too unwell to go even had the weather been fine. ­ It was a wet morning besides so I remained at home to nurse myself & write sermons. 23. Elizabeth left us this morning. She and Marianne took the early train to Maitland to do a little shopping, & I took Mary up to meet her on her return per midday train, when Marianne came home with me & Elizth & Mary went on to Branxton,

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where some one was to meet them & take them out to Dalwood. In the afternoon I walked out to Kaloundah. 24. I had Comet saddled this morning for my weekly visit to Branxton, but did not feel very well, so stopped at home and took some medicine instead. ­ Don't feel quite right yet. ­ The Misses Hungerfords called and teaed with us. 25. Rode over to Luskintyre this morning as far as Fairhall's, where I had not been for a very long time. Did not feel quite up to a longer ride, so came straight home again. 26. Good Friday. Service at all three churches, beginning at Branxton, Attendance tolerable at all. Here in the evening there were 70, which is the largest Congregation I ever had on Good Friday. 27. Engaged all morning preparing for tomorrow's service. In the afternoon I rode over to Dalwood to see Kate Müller, whom I found much the same as usual. 28. Easter Sunday. & one that I shall not soon forget, for the extreme heat, added to my extra work, was almost too much for me. ­ My congregations were large at all places. - & 28 Communicants here ­ I was in the first place almost melted in Church, & thus roasted riding to Branxton under a burning sun, & a dead calm. I was behind time both at Branxton & Rothbury, I rode straight home from the latter Church by moonlight, and was very much exhausted when I came in ­ headache into the bargain. 29. At home today, resting after the labours of yesterday. Busy with church accounts the greater part of the day. ­ Stipend &c. ­ Called on the Browns in the evening, after which we all strolled in Mr Hungerford's paddock. 30. According to appointment had Morning Service with Communion at Rothbury. Marianne rode over with me & acted as Organist. ­ We had a nice little congregation of 33, of which 19 remained to the Sacrament. ­ I left Marianne to stay a few days with the Holmeses. I came home in the afternoon, to prepare for my Easter Tuesday meeting in the evening. Mr Brown was the only person who attended at the Church & after waiting more than half an hour beyond the time appointed, I declared that no election cd take place for want of voters. ­ On returning to the house found Mr James Doyle here. 31. Remained at home today to take my Easter Holiday. ­ Busy over my Stipend account in the morning, In the evening we strolled up through the village, calling at Gellatley's to see the little girl with the sprained ancle ­ I found the little boy ­ Ben ­ very ill in bed, with an attack of inflammation of some kind, internal. Went on from that into Mr Doyle's paddock, to admire the beautiful view, which was very fine on such a lovely evening. On our return we found Cousin John here.

April 1869

1. This month has begun with rain. A rainy day has kept me indoors, with the exception of a visit to Gellatley's this morning to see the sick boy, who did not seem to be any better. 2. Weather still unsettled, and showery. ­ Went out only as far as Gellatly's. Little Ben I think better. ­ Called in on the Camerons also. ­ Cousin John & Jessie went to Dalwood. 3. Pouring rain All day, did not go out anywhere. ­ Read Guardian in the morning, at Church plans afternoon. 4. Sunday. Very Rainy morning, so I did not venture to Branxton. ­ Sent word around that the service here would be at 3pm, instead of the evening, by which meant I secured a small congregation of 29. The creek being up, prevented those on the other side from crossing. 5. The weather this morning seemed disposed to clear up, so Cousin John & I agreed to go to Maitland with Farmer & his buggy, I left him in Maitland and drove

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on to Morpeth to see the Bishop. Dined at the Parsonage, and then drove Miss Platt back to Est Maitland. 6. Cousin John took Jessie with him to Singleton this morning. I stayed at home to make up the Statistical & Financial Returns called for by the Diocesan Council, & a very troublesome job I find it. In the morning I called on Mrs Hoskins & old Mrs Redman. 7. Went to Branxton. Called on Mr Andrew Doyle by the way. ­ Dined with the Lindsays ­ on the Old Folks Home. Made a few calls ­ thin class at the school, and finished with singing class. Found Cousin John & Jessie here on my return 8. Cousin John left this morning to return home, & I took advantage of a lift in his buggy as far as Neal's, & I made a round of calls on the way back ­ Winder, Wilton & Mrs Border. In the afternoon I went to the German family, at the back of Wilton's to make a little enquiry about our White cat, which was said to have been killed by their dogs ­ but I could not get any certain tidings about him. ­ In the evening we all walked up the lane and paid Mrs Humphreys a visit. 9. Began the day with a visit to Mrs Taylor, who has been poorly of late. I then went to my class at he school, calling first on Mrs King. After school went to Gellatley's to see Ben, who is a little better, but very weak. ­ On coming home I found Marianne here, just returned from the Wilderness, escorted by Spencer & Ella. Began our singing class this afternoon with 3 pupils. 10. Went to Maitland this morning to attend a meeting, at Mr Mackay's, of the Committee of the "Newcastle Diocesan Association for the Promotion & Improvement of Church Music". Had just time to get home again before a heavy thunderstorm fell. 11. Sunday. The unsettled state of the weather, & the river being impassable, caused any congregations to be a little under the mark. 12. Spent the day visiting around Rothbury. ­ Called at the following houses. ­ Boughton, Campbells, Wills ­ the School ­ G. Crane, G. chick, Lambkin, Joass, Williams (newcomers) Jas Chick, Drayton, & Matthews. 13. Went by early train to Newcastle, to attend our clerical meeting at St John's Parsonage ­ a special meeting, to consider matters to be brought before the Synod. Had a nice meeting of 12 clergy. 14. Branxton day. Met Miss Kelman at the Church for a little Harmonium practice. Had my class as usual at the School, & singing afterwards. 15. At home, with the exception of a visit in the morning to old Redman, who returned from hospital yesterday, and also to Mrs Taylor. ­ Miss Kelman and & her brother Louis came and spent the day with us. 16. Went to see Redman the first thing, then went to the School. ­ Found Miles Wilkinson here on my return & presently his brother William appeared. They remained to dine. ­ singing class in evening 17. Busy all morning with my Financial Returns for the Synod. Wrote a letter or two in the afternoon. Visited Redman, who is still very poorly. 18. Sunday. A nice day ­ 22 communicants at Branxton, - nice congregation here in evening. 19. Stanhope day. ­ The river being deep, I went to Mr Millard's, & crossed in their boat. No congregation. The people did not seem to expect me. ­ Marianne rode with me as far as Dalwood, where I picked her up on the way back. ­ Visited Kate Müller, whom I found much worse. Arranged to go and administer the Holy Communion to her on Wednesday next. 20. Marianne & I went to Maitland to do some shopping, &c. ­ Dined at the Chapmans, & then called on the Sollings. ­ which made us rather late home. ­ Found Cousin John here. 21. Went to Branxton today expecting to find Miss Kelman at the Church for a little practice on the Harmonium, but instead of her, I found her brother John, with the Buggy which my good parishioners have very kindly & generously procured, & Page No: 164

presented to me as an Easter offering. It is really a first rate, handsome, & commodious double buggy, with hood to it, & everything very complete. George Wyndham was at the presentation also, and some others were to have been there, but were unavoidably prevented. I feel that I cannot adequately thank my parishioners for this substantial mark of their kindness. ­ From Branxton I rode to Dalwood (in company with G. Wyndham) to visit poor Kate Müller and administer the Holy Communion to her. She seems sinking fast now, and I think "the time of her departure" is drawing near. 22. Spent this day bottling the cask of wine (with Marianne's assistance) that came from Dalwood as my Easter offering from that quarter. It turned out nearly fifteen dozen, & is very nice wine.273 ­ Went to see old Redman this morning but found him in the midst of a comfortable sleep, so did not disturb him. His wife thinks him a little better. 23. Paid a visit to Redman this morning ­ Still suffering great pain at times. ­ Called at Gllatley's also, & found Ben had gone to Newcastle. Spent the day chiefly letter writing ­ to the Bishop, Mr Battley, & Ferris. 24. Jobs of various kinds consumed this day. Having first looked out sermons for tomorrow, I then took James down to the Stable, where we stowed away the pole of the buggy on the loft, . ­ found Spencer here when I came back. Did a little gardening. - sowed two small beds of cabbage seed. ­ In the afternoon we had a visit from Mr & Mrs Robert Doyle ­ a farewell visit, as they propose starting up the country in a few days. 25. Sunday. Most beautiful day. Quite a winter's day all on a sudden. ­ Good congregations in consequence. ­ 26 communicants here in the morning. 26. Leaving the Wilderness after breakfast, I called first on the Campbells, to thank them for the interest they took in the matter of the Buggy. I called on the Blicks, & then rode through Branxton to Dalwood to see poor Kate Müller, who is now a great sufferer: but I think her suffering will soon terminate. 27. Went by early train to Newcastle, to attend the Synod of our church there. We all assembled first at Christchurch, where we had the Litany & Holy Communion, at which a great number were present. We then adjourned to the City Hall, where the Synod was formally opened, and the Bishop delivered his opening address which was a very long one, but very interesting. Lunched at the Parsonage. Teaed at the Scotts, after which we went to work again till past 10o'clock, when I got Arthur, who was there, to accompany me to the quarters which had been prepared for me, at Mr Wallace's, - nice people with whom I was not previously acquainted. 28. (& 29) Engaged at Synod each day up to a late hour ­ past ten each night. 30. Sat out the Synod all the morning, & came home by the 5o'clock train.

May 1869.

1. Müller, from Dalwood, called early this morning to report the death of poor Kate. ­ She died about 3 o'clock this morning, & is to be buried at Branxton at eleven o'clock on Monday. After breakfast I went to see old Redman, & was very glad to find him very much better. James & I went & brought the buggy up & we spent the morning in oiling the wheels &c, &c. In the afternoon we took our first drive, or trial trip. We drove up to Harper's Hill & called on Mrs Andrew Doyle. On the way back we called at Kaloundah. It was a beautiful afternoon, & we enjoyed the drive exceedingly. Everyone seems as much pleased with the buggy as we are ourselves. ­ It is very comfortable, roomy, and runs very easily. On our return home we found Cousin John & Mary here.

273

Fifteen gallons of Dalwood red! Wow!

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2. Sunday. A beautiful day. Drove my rounds today in the buggy for the first time. Farmer behaved right well and took me round by Pokolbin, & all in very good time. 3. Went to Branxton this morning for the funeral of Kate Müller, good numbers attended, - called on Mrs Rostron on the way home. 4. We had intended to go to Kirkton today, but the weather being unfavourable we did not venture. Remained at home, writing letter to Mrs Greenway & Benny274, also sermon writing. 5. Went to Branxton, visited the people about the Railway Station, then School & singing class. 6. George Wyndham called & breakfasted with us. Being Ascension Day we had Morning Service in the Church, but only 14 attended. In the afternoon we all took a drive to Windermere. 7. Had a bit of a fright this morning from the kitchen chimney catching fire, towards eleven o'clock. James & I got up on the roof, and by passing a sougee [sic] bag soaked in water down the chimney a few times, and by pouring water down as well, we got it under [control] after a bit. ­ Went to Redman this morning, He continues much as usual, does not seem to get better. Mrs Hoskins is also very unwell: called to see her this afternoon. ­ Had a tolerably good singing class this evening ­ Mrs D'Arcy among the number. ­ I should have mentioned yesterday another mark of kind attention on the part of my parishioners. F. Müller, at Dalwood, who very kindly sent me a small case of wine, I suppose in acknowledgment of my poor services rendered to his daughter Kate. 8. We had arranged to go to Maitland today, but the weather looked so threatening, we did not venture. I may almost say I lost the day in that it was mostly frittered away in petty jobs about nothing. One among them was the planting of my Aliturnis [?] bush at the back of the church, which, if it lives, will certainly be something to show. ­ In the afternoon I went to see Mrs Hoskins, & old Redman, both much as before. 9. Sunday. Being showery, and the water over the road at the creek, I had a miserable congregation here of 25 only. At Branxton there were more than double that number, but at Rothbury none attended, so no service. The road being very dirty and wet, I preferred the saddle to the buggy. 10. Left the Wilderness after breakfast, & having called on the Cranes, made my way straight to Branxton, where I first called at the School, & arranged with Mr Ollis to change my hour of visiting the school from 3 to 2o'clock so that I can have my singing class an hour earlier to allow me daylight to return home. ­ I then called on Mrs Lindsay for a few minutes, & then struck out for lunch at Dalwood, after which I visited the Müllers, and then came home. 11. We all went to Maitland in the buggy today to do some shopping & made rather a long day of it, not getting home till about dusk. ­ Found the road very bad in places, which limited us a little in our progress. 12. Branxton day, & being a very fine one, I took Anne with me in the buggy to the Lindsays. & we enjoyed our drive exceedingly. ­ Cousin John & Mary arrived from Sydney this morning. 13. Had a delightful drive to the Wilderness, all four of us275. On arriving there we went across to call on the Campbells, & show them the buggy, with which they were highly pleased. We set out on our return about ½ past 3, & on the way back called on Mrs Clift. It has been a most brilliant day and we all enjoyed it Much. John & Mary went to Dalwood today, & returned in the evening. ­ John Wyndham called this morning on his way to Maitland.

274 275

Rev Benjamin Glennie, Darling Downs, Alfred's younger brother. Presumably Alfred and Anne plus Marianne & Jessie, if John & Mary went to Dalwood for the day. Note that Jessie did not accompany her parents to Dalwood.

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14. At home today. Went to the School in the morning, after which I called on Mr Hungerford. Singing class in the afternoon. Cousin John & Mary left this morning to return home. 15. Engaged in the morning finishing my S.P.G.276 sermon for tomorrow at Branxton, also took a walk up to the station to pay my account for parcels &c. ­ In the afternoon I rode into Maitland to see the tailor about my clothes. 16. Sunday. Had my collection for the S.P.G. at Branxton - 3/2/11. Only 19 communicants. Nice congregation of 100 here at night. ­ Gave notice of collection next Sunday for S.P.G. 17. Went to Stanhope. ­ no congregation ­ all busy wheat sowing &c. On the way back called at Taylors, Ritters, & Dalwood. Found Arthur & Fred there. 18. Soon after 11o'clock we all started in the buggy for Kirkton ­ where we remained the night. 19. Returned from Kirkton to Branxton, & took up our quarters with the Lindsays. ­ visited the School & had singing class afterwards. 20. Had a delightful drive to Elderslie, taking Anne & Marianne with me, whom I introduced to my Elderslie people. ­ returned to dine at the Lindsays and drove home in the afternoon, calling on Mrs Widow Smith on the way. Found Townshend here on our return. 21. At home today, with the exception of a visit to Mrs Cameron & old Redman. 22. After getting all my sermons ready for tomorrow, I wrote a few letters. In the afternoon, by way of warming myself, I took a walk up to the station, & called on Mrs Clift. Townshend went with me. 23. Sunday. Disappointed at the meagre collection here for the S.P.G., which including my own 1, amounted only to 1-9-8, so that the collection of the congregation was really only 9/8d. Townshend accompanied me to Branxton, where I left him, to go to the Lindsays. At Rothbury the collection was better, 14-1, making 5-16-8 at my three congregations. 24. After breakfast at the Wilderness, I borrowed a saddle & bridle from Spencer, & rode to Patton's, where Irwin, Mr Lindsay's shepherd, met me & conducted me to his house, between 2 & 3 miles off, where I baptized a child for him. I then returned & dined with the Holmeses, and drove home after dinner. 25. A little shopping being required, we took advantage of the fine weather, & drove in to Maitland this afternoon. Called at the Parsonage ­ St Mary's ­ I found Mrs Chapman just recovering from a severe attack of Influenza. ­ A young man called William Crugg, a carrier, called this evening for a marriage licence for himself & Sarah Bowman, to be married tomorrow morning. 26. Drove up to Branxton this morning (having first of all married the couple mentioned last evening), & began my days work by baptising 3 infants at the Church ­ I then called on Mrs Gibbs & ascertained that next Saturday week is the day fixed for the marriage of her daughter. ­ had my class at the School, & finished with singing class. ­ Found that Mrs Rudd has a son this morning. 27. At home today. A great part of the morning occupied in fixing a row of hat-pegs &c in the hall. Towards evening we all walked up the village, & after calling on Mrs King, Anne & I walked on & called first on the Constable & his wife, & then at McDermotts. 28. After breakfast I paid a visit to old Redman, then called at Mrs Phillips's & Mrs Taylor's. ­ Then went to the School, from which I rode on to Kaloundah, & dined with Mr James Doyle, whom I found alone. Leaving Kaloundah I rode across the paddocks to the station - inspecting Mr Ferrier's building by the way ­ Singing class as usual. 29. Having arranged my sermons for tomorrow, I spent the rest of the day chiefly reading the "Guardian". In the evening I called on Filmer & Brooks.

276

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel ­ Alfred's actual employers.

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30. Sunday. Had a delightful day for my ride to Cessnock, & Comet carried me very well, Had a baptism there (Pinchen)- Got home about ½ past 5 or a little later. 31. Took advantage of the fine weather, & drove to Morpeth, to get books for Mr Greenway, as well as some for our Sunday School, - called at the Parsonage, & found Mr Walsh very poorly ­ has been ill some 3 weeks or more. ­ Rather late coming home.

June 1869.

1. Had a good day's visiting today, & called on the following ­ Mr Tuckey (not at home), Boggs, Neal, Mr Day, Mrs Billington, & her daughter Mrs Phoenix, John Naseby, Nash, Bird & Mr Quilter, whom I found at home. 2. Branxton day. Began with a music lesson with Miss Kelman, then made a few calls, after which my class at the School & singing finished the day. 3. Marianne & I had a most delightful ride up Lamb's Valley today, to visit the Picks, whom I had not seen for a very long time. ­ The weather was perfect, a bright sunny day with cloudless shy & calm ­ I don't know when I have enjoyed a ride more. 4. The first frost this winter ­ Jessie's saucer quite frozen this morning.- Paid a visit to old Redman this morning, then went to the School. ­ Sermon writing & singing class this afternoon. 5. Drove up to Branxton this morning to marry William Hughes & Sarah Gibbs. ­ Afternoon sermon writing. 6. Sunday. Most delightful day. Bright and Calm. Congregations good at Branxton & Rothbury, - Middling here. 7. Visited the Wilkinsons today, & enjoyed my ride much. The weather being perfect. ­ the view from their house was splendid, Called at Mr Edwd Tyrrells also but he was not at home. Mr Chapman277 who drove Miss Stack up this afternoon, announced that he had married ... Tyrrell this morning at St Mary's. 8. Fred came down from Singleton by the morning train, & he & Marianne & myself have enjoyed a most delightful ride today. We rode through Mr Hungerford's paddock by the back of Summer Hill, crossed the river at Hillsborough, & then went to the top of Hudson's Peak: from thence, after despatching our sandwiches, & a pint bottle of Kaloundah red, we descended into the head of Kilfoyle's Creek, where we discovered one of the most lovely spots imaginable for a picnic, - Green grass ­ shady trees ­ pools of water as clear as crystal. Came home through Irish Town & Windermere. The perfection of the weather added greatly to the day's enjoyment. ­ Not a speck of cloud to be seen, & a moderate Westerly wind. 9. Went to Branxton for my usual Wednesday work, & after a good practice with Miss Kelman at the Harmonium, I drove out to visit the Rudds, & while there James arrived with a note informing me that a Funeral party was waiting for me, from Pokolbin. The eldest child of James & Rebecca Moore had died, & they brought her here for burial. ­ I hastened home as quickly as I could, and found, on reaching home, that they had buried the child themselves, & gone away. I found Spencer Holmes here, with Edith & Lizzy, just starting away home again. ­ In the evening Anne & I walked over to see Mrs Henry King, having heard that she had been ill, while Fred, Marianne & Jessie took a walk over to Kaloundah Hill. 10. After packing up the Clock to send to Mr Upjohn under Fred's protection, I started off for Pokolbin to see James & Rebecca Moore after their sad affliction. Mrs Birmingham & Mrs Scott were there, & shortly after my arrival, Mr Birmingham came in, & began complaining of the way they had been treated here yesterday.

277

Minister officiating, not groom!

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­ His language was altogether so very unbecoming, if not insulting, that I rose & came away, expressing my regret to Rebecca & James that I shd be so driven away from their house. On my way back I called on Mrs Clift, who is just recovering from a severe illness, & was just in time to see Fred off by the evening train, George Wyndham called and teaed with us, on his way from Maitland. 11. At home all day, chiefly engaged in sermon writing. 12. Had an examination of the Schoolchildren today, chiefly with a view to re-arrange the classes. A change of weather came on this afternoon. The wind having veered around to S.E. it began raining about 3pm. I went up to the station in the evening, to bring the little Millards down. Had a wet drive, & I was kept waiting nearly half an hour beyond the time, from some bungling of the train. 13. Sunday. Small congregation at Branxton, & only 14 Communicants. At Lochinvar only 34. A heavy shower of rain at about 2o'clock I suppose kept the others away. ­ Headache all the aft. & evening. 14. This was my Stanhope day, but being a very rainy morning, I did not venture. Occupied myself within doors for the most part, letter writing. Visited old Redman, also Mrs O'Brien, who is sick. 15. Another showery day, went to see Mrs O'Brien in the morning. Wrote a letter to John David278 to send by the outgoing mail. 16. Went to see Mrs O'Brien after breakfast, & found her somewhat better. Rode to Maitland afterwards. Rain began again while there, & I had a rather wet ride home. The heavy showers that have been falling all this evening make me doubtful about going to Muswellbrook tomorrow for the Consecration of the New Church there. Caught cold. 17. The rain having ceased, apparently, I went by early train to Muswellbrook. ­ Found in the train, the Bishop, Mr & Mrs Stack from Sydney, - Mr & Mrs Selwyn, F. Bode & Mr Tyrrell. At Singleton we were joined by Mr Blackwood & Mr Newman. The day turned out tolerably fine, & the opening service, (there was no Consecration Service after all, owing to some obstacle I believe about the land279) went off very well. The Church was quite full, & the 16 Clergy who accompanied the Bishop made rather an improving sight, (as the newspapers have it) in the eyes of the good townspeople of Muswellbrook. ­ The Church is truly a beautiful one, and I was very glad that I was there to take part in the service. The Offertory Collection at the Communion amounted to about 215. ­ Mr Stack preached the opening sermon. ­ In the evening we had service again; Mr Wilson being the Preacher. The river being rather high, I could not get over to the Doyle's, but, (with Mr Newman) was quartered with Mr Luscombe, the Chemist. 18. Confirmation this morning, after the Litany. Between 50 & 60 were confirmed, after which I returned by afternoon train, Accompanied by Messrs Tyrrell, Blackwood, Newman, Selwyn (& Mrs S.), & the Bishop. Before I had been half an hour at home, George Goodwin of Branxton called to Acquaint me of his father's death, & beg me to go up tomorrow afternoon for the funeral. 19. Went to see Mrs Phillips this morning, who is very ill again. ­ called on Redman also. ­ Had a very muddy ride to Branxton this afternoon for the funeral of old Henry Goodwin, who, they say, was 91 years of age. 20. Sunday. Congregation here not very good, & only 21 Communicants. ­ No Elderslie folks at Branxton, the river being impassable. Notwithstanding, there was a good congregation there. ­ Also at Rothbury considering the bad roads &c. 21. Spent the day visiting from the Wilderness out as far as Pinchin's, beginning at Boughton's, then Campbells, Wills, Geo. Moore, James Moore, Birmingham & Wilson, taking Scott on the way home. ­ Came home with my cold much worse.

278

Rev John David Glennie was Alfred's eldest brother, secretary of the Society for the Propagation of Christian Knowledge. 279 Consecration of a church can only occur when land and building are debt-free.

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22. Cold & cough troublesome today, so did not go out beyond a visit in the morning to Mrs Phillips & Redman. In the afternoon we280 looked through the books for the Sunday School, selecting them for distribution. 23. Thought it prudent to remain at home & nurse my cold, so sent James up to Branxton, to tell them that I was not coming. Tried to get on with some sermon writing, but met with too many interruptions. Ellen Solling & one of her brothers came up from Maitland, & dined with us. ­ Took a walk over to Kaloundah towards evening. 24. Rode up to Branxton today to baptise Mrs Rudd's baby. ­ Went out as far as the Joneses. ­ Called on the Lindsays also. 25. At home. ­ In the morning visited Mrs Phillips & Redman, called on Mrs Taylor also. In the afternoon I baptized four infants. ­ Mrs Cameron's twins & two children of Robt Way's. The rest of the day spent sermon writing &c, Mr Brown finished this afternoon the work of securing the northern wall of the house, by wooden frame and Iron rods, which he began yesterday morning. I think it is now quite secure. 26. The Sunday School children all assembled at the Church this morning to receive their books. ­ That done, I mounted old Farmer & rode to Maitland, & obtained from the Joint Stock Bank 10, which I gave to Arthur Gray, on account of Mr George Clark of Warwick, drawing on him for that amount. In the afternoon I wrote a note to Benny, telling him all about this, & asking him to acquaint Mr Clark. Sarah Boydell called this afternoon with a party of the Doyles. 27. Sunday. ­ A very fine day. ­ & I got through my long round of services today (Pokolbin Sunday) with comparative ease considering he bad state of the roads, & Comet being rather dull. 28. Got up with a headache this morning, which clung to me throughout the day, tho' not one of the severe kind. ­ had a wedding this morning ­ James Nash & Sarah Teal Friend ­ & a beautiful bright day they had for their wedding day. ­ In the afternoon I drove Marianne & the little Millards to call on Sarah Boydell, as well as the other good folks at Kaloundah. 29. St Peter's Day: had one of our new Quarterly Morning Services, with Holy Communion at the Rothbury Church. Congregation exactly the same as last time ­ 33, of which 20 remained for the Communion, & among them Mr John Hungerford, - I was very glad also to find Maxwell there. He arrived last Saturday morning. ­ Marianne accompanied me as usual, to preside at the Harmonium. ­ The day was perfection, with bright sky, & fresh breeze from N.W. 30. Rode to Branxton, where I found Miss Kelman at the church , & gave her a music lesson. After making a few calls, I came home early, To go & meet Mrs Millard, who came from Muswellbrook by the afternoon train. ­ Took the two little girls & Jessie up in the buggy to meet her. ­ Sarah Boydell called in Aftn.

July 1869

1. After breakfast took Mrs Millard a drive with her two little girls down the Maitland road to meet Mr Millard, who walked up from Maitland. Met him just a little beyond Mrs Tucky's & brought him home with us. Then putting out the little girls, & taking Anne in, we drove to the top of Harper's Hill, to show Mrs Millard that beautiful view. ­ In the afternoon Mr & Mrs M left us for Newcastle by the 4.27 train. ­ Cousin John came in the evening. 2. Has a delightful riding excursion today to "Parson's Brush" at the head of Kilfoyle's Creek.281 The party consisted of Messrs Jas & Com Doyle, Louisa, Sarah

280 281

Alfred & whom? Alfred's own name for the "picnic spot" they found on the 8th June?

Page No: 170

Boydell, Marianne & myself. The day was perfection, & we all enjoyed it much. ­ Cousin John left us after breakfast for home. 3. Little Godfrey Millard came up from Newcastle by early train this morning, in "Nurse's" charge, to stay till I take them all home next Thursday. Marianne went to spend the day at Kaloundah, & Anne & I took a drive to Maitland for a little shopping. I drove all the children, including Jessie, to the station this afternoon, to see "Nurse" safe off again. 4. Sunday. A very bright sunny day. Upward of 100 both here & at Branxton, only 42 at Rothbury. 5. In the morning I baptised Mrs Cusack's baby at the Rothbury Church282, Spent some time also examining the Harmonium. ­ Dined at the Holmeses, & after dinner ­ rode to Mr Blick's, having heard that Mrs Hungerford was very ill, - found her better than I expected, though still very ill. ­ Called at Crane's on the way home. The Old Folks were not at home. 6. After going to the post,- paying one or two bills, & calling to see Mrs. Phillips & Redman, about noon we all set out upon an excursion to Summer Hill.- Marianne on Comet, & all the rest of us (6 in number) in the buggy.- We had previously sent to ask Kate Green & Alice to meet us there, which they did, & we all enjoyed the ramble very much, more especially the children. 7. Went to Morpeth to attend the meeting of the Trustees of the Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Fund.- Dined with the Walshes. Mr. Walsh a little better, but still far from well. John Wyndham brought Amy to spend the day, & passed on to Maitland, picking her up on his return. 8. Went to Newcastle by early train to attend our Clerical Meeting at Mr. Millard's, & took the three children home with me.- Our meeting was rather smaller than usual, only 7 clergy being present. On my return home I found a note from James Moore, of Pokolbin, announcing the death of his other little child, Margaret,- to be buried here tomorrow. 9. Began this day by driving up to the station to meet Mrs. Solling & her two daughters, who came to spend the day with us. Remained at home all the morning expecting the Funeral from Pokolbin, but the did not come till near two o'clock.- About three o'clock the Constable & his party came with their baby to be baptized.- At 4 o'clock I took the Sollings back to meet the train: & on my return Anne & I went to see Mrs. Phillips, & thus ended a very broken day. 10. The morning spent in visiting one or two of the neighbours.- Found Mrs. Phillips I think a little better. After dinner I made a beginning at my vine pruning, but did not make much progress. Had a visit from Mr. & Mrs Edwd. Tyrrell: & while they were here Fishy rode in with one of her nieces & young Goodchild. 11. Sunday. Two excellent congregations again. Nearly 100 at Branxton, & just that number here. At Branxton, in the morning, I gave notice for a Public Meeting to be held on Tuesday the 27th, to consider & devise means for building a new Church there, which is sadly needed, but I cannot see at present where the funds are to come from. 12. Stanhope day. Had a small congregation of 9 only.- Called at Dalwood on the way home. 13. Paid Mrs. Phillips a visit this morning, & found her better.- About eleven o'clock we all started for the Wilderness, Anne, Jessie & myself in the buggy, & Marianne on Comet.- We left Marianne & Jessie there, & Anne & [I] returned alone, calling by the way on Mrs Bezley, & Mrs. Clift. Found that a large party from the Kelmans had called.- A Ton of hay was also brought by Prior from Oswald. 14. Anne & I had a nice drive to Branxton today. After calling to see Mrs. Rudd, we went on to the Joneses where we got a cup of tea. Returned by Clark Orman's,

282

Harry Samuel Cusack (1869-1926), born after his father's death.

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passing under the Railway bridge.- Called at the Lindsays, but they were all out.Then came away home, called at Mr. Andrew Doyle's. Weather perfection. 15. Anne & I drove to Dalwood today, & visited George also at Fern Hill, as well as Mrs. McKenzie. Weather still perfection. 16. Went to Elderslie today, & visited all the folks there, showing them plans of Church etc. Did not get away from them till near Sunset, which made us very late home. Townshend, who came here yesterday, went on to Branxton this afternoon. 17. At home today (Saturday) for the first time this week. In the morning, visited Mrs. Phillips, who is getting better, in the afternoon, pruning vines.- Maxwell Holmes called. 18. Sunday. About as gloomy a day as could be. A little rain served to frighten the people from the Church, both here & at Branxton, as only 32 attended here, & 28 at Branxton. My largest congregation, (34) was at Rothbury.- It is worthy of record; that, deducting my own offering from the collection here this morning that of the whole congregation, (including 13 communicants) amounted to one Shilling. Marianne & Jessie being away at the Wilderness I came straight home from the Church. 19. A regular pouring rain the whole day. Spent the day reading. 20. A bright sunny day again. In the morning I visited Mrs. Phillips:- found her sitting in her outer room, much better, though very weak.- Called on Mrs. Taylor also, & Mrs. Redman.- In the evening I called on the Lees & Mrs. Dell. 21. Went to Branxton today. Dined at the Lindsays, & spent the rest of the day visiting, as far as Clark Orman's & Rudd's, calling also on Mrs. Cox, Nixon's & the two Hugheses. 22. Went to Kirkton today, calling by the way on Charles Hughes, & then on R. & J. Thrifts, & at Alfred Goodwin's where I found only his Father & sister at home.- At Kirkton I found a large party, for besides their own visitors I found Maxwell Holmes, & Lizzy, & Marianne. Showed the Kelmans the Church plans.- One of them will attend the meeting on Tuesday. 23. Drove Anne to Dalwood again today, as I wished to see John before our Church Meeting, to arrange a few preliminary matters.- We had a nice day for our drive, & called in at Fern Cottage on the way back. 24. At home till towards evening, when I drove Anne to Kaloudah. Marianne & Jessie returned from the Wilderness today, accompanied by 6 of the Holmeses.- They all went to Summer Hill. 25. Sunday.- & a very nice day.- The state of the River kept many of the Elderslie folks away, notwithstanding I had a fair congregation at Branxton. The Pony carried me very well to Pokolbin, where the attendance was small.- Got home before half past 5.- Congregation of 90 here in the evening. 26. Remained at home today. Had a baptism in the morning- Mrs. John Yeo from Dubbo brought a little one.- Had a visit from Maxwell Holmes today. In the evening I rode up the lane to call on the Clifts, & was sorry to find Mrs. Clift ill in bed. 27. The day appointed for our Church Meeting at Branxton. Drove up in the buggy with a glorious bright sky overhead.- Our Meeting though a small one, was I think very satisfactory. There were only nine present besides myself.- We passed four simple resolutions unanimously, & opened a subscription list. The promised subscriptions of those present, (with the addition of 12 I have on hand from unexpected offertory collection) amounted to 89, & 12 was paid up, so that I have 24 on hand to begin with.- They selected me for Treasurer, & we appointed seven Collectors, each of whom we have provided with a subscription list. The business of the meeting passed over very harmoniously, every resolution being "carried unanimously".

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28. Remained at home today to receive a party of the Kelmans, who came to spend the day with us- namely Mr. Lewis Kelman & sister, two Miss Gordons, & Miss Williams. I was arranged that Marianne & Jessie shd. return with them, but unfortunately rain set in in the afternoon, & upset our plans. One of the Miss Gordons remained behind, & the rest set off home rather late, near 5 o'clock. 29. Rode to Branxton this morning with Miss Gordon & Marianne, & having delivered them over to the charge of Mr. Lewis Kelman, I made my way to the Wilderness, where I dined, & the set off towards Pokolbin, to see Wilson's daughter, who was very ill last Sunday: but on calling to see Mrs. Wills, she told me that the girl was getting quite well again, therefore I thought it unnecessary to pursue my journey, & after calling on Mrs McDonald, I came straight home.- Called at Crane's & Campbell' also. 30. At home today, sermon writing chiefly. After dinner I went to see Philmer, & took him some books to read. ­ Then went to see Mrs Phillips, who is getting much better. 31. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services, but a good deal interrupted. A party from Kirkton about dinner time ( Lewis & Miss Kelman, Mr Nesbit & Miss Gordon), bringing Marianne home, & shortly after their departure, Maxwell, Edith & Ella arrived from the Wilderness, to spend a few days.

August 1869

1. Sunday. Fine day, & good attendance at all churches. Gave notice at Branxton that next Sunday we should begin our collections for the new Church. 2. Spent the day visiting. ­ Called at Matthew's, Pyne's, James Rudd's, & the Wilkinsons. ­ no one at home at either at Anderson's or Edwd Tyrrells. ­ met Mrs Lindsay at Pyne's, Had a bad headache all day. Stayed the Wilderness the night. ­ Anne, Marianne & Jessie, with Maxwell, Edith & Ella arrived about sunset. 3. Came home this morning, leaving Anne very bad with headache. (too much rummage yesterday). In the afternoon, I drove into Maitland, to deposit money in the Bank of Australasia, where I opened an account for the Branxton Church. ­ Also to get a few things on Church account. 4. Drove to Branxton this morning, and after making one or two calls, & leaving at the station a box for Bukkulla, went to the Wilderness where I found Anne convalescent, & brought her back again in the evening, - called on the Clift's on the way. 5. At home all day sermon writing. 6. Do----Do----Do. In the afternoon Anne & I walked down to see Philmer. 7. At home all day. After finishing my sermon for tomorrow, pruned a few vines. A party from the Wilderness came in the evening, Maxwell, Edith & Lizzie, bringing Marianne & Jessie home. 8. Sunday. Maxwell accompanied me to Branxton in the morning. Congregation not a full one. 20 Communicants. I preached from the text "She hath done what she could", applying the subject to our new Church building. Had our first collection for that object, which amounted to 1-6-8, besides the Offertory Collection of 12-6. 9. Stanhope day. Finding the river pretty deep at Windermere, I rode all the way up through Irish Town & had a congregation of eleven. From Stanhope I went on to Elderslie, - called on the two Moores & Mrs Thrift. Then looked in at Branxton on Mrs Rudd, & came home about dark. Found George & Katie here, also Isabella. ­ Maxwell, Edith & Lizzie left about 4PM. 10. At home today, vine pruning. George & Katie left us early in the morning. ­ Freddy arrived from Singleton about noon.

Page No: 173

11. Being my Branxton day, & a very fine one, we took advantage of it, & had a nice drive in the buggy. Isabella, Marianne & Fred went with me. ­ We called on Mrs Lindsay first, & then drove out to the Joneses, having a little picnic in Clark Osman's paddock, just to the other side of the railway line. On the way back we had a singing class at the Church. 12. We all went to Morpeth today. Fred & Marianne on horseback, & the rest in the buggy. The weather was perfection, & we enjoyed the drive exceedingly. I had some talk with the Bishop about the Branxton Church, & he seems disposed to help us by advancing money. 13. Remained at home today, & after a few morning calls in the village, spent the rest of the day pruning the vines, which are now very sappy.283 Townshend came in the evening. 14. Finished pruning the vines today. In afternoon I paid a visit to Philmer, & to Mrs Phillips 15. Sunday. Most delightful day. Good congregations at all the Churches. ­ 38 Communicants here. Townshend rode across to the Wilderness for the evening service, & remained there. 16. Headache again today. Went to Cessnock, & visited all from White's to Pinchen's, & then returned home. 17. We all went to spend the day at the Wilderness, Marianne & Fred on horseback, the rest in the buggy. 18. Branxton day. Baptized a child for Mrs Ellis & then made several calls, finishing with singing class. Townshend left us this morning, & Fred also, & Isabella went away by the evening train. 19. Marianne & I took a drive to Maitland in the morning, & besides a little shopping business, we also got our likenesses taken at Hart's. In the afternoon we all went to Windermere, & drank tea there. 20. This morning's post brought us a letter from Cousin John, announcing thre death of our poor old friend Mr Boydell. ­ He appears, after many years of suffering, to have gone off rather suddenly at the last, - the funeral is to take place tomorrow. I am very sorry that I cannot attend it, owing to the late hour at which it is fixed, which would oblige me to ride home by night, which being Saturday, I could not stay there. ­ I went to the School this morning, & we had singing class this afternoon. ­ 21. At home today, sermon writing, & preparing for tomorrow's services. 22. Sunday. Cessnock Day. The roads being quite dry, I ventured in the buggy, but could not arrive in time at Pokolbin, owing to the rough & broken condition of the road in some parts. ­ I was about 2h. & 20m. going the 12 miles, & then 2 ½ hours coming home. The congregation at Branxton was small, at Pokolbin as usual, 101 here in the evening. ­ Felt rather fatigued, I think from the heat rather than the labour. 23. Quite Mondayish this morning, & inclined for headache, but it passed away as the day advanced. In the morning I finished a letter of condolence to poor Mrs Boydell, which I began on Saturday, & I then wrote a letter to Mary ­ at Warwick284. In the afternoon I paid Philmer285 a visit, & had a good long talk with him. I then went to see Mrs Henry King, , who has been unwell, & found her much better. 24. Spent the day visiting about home, In the morning paid Mrs Clift a visit, & then called upon nearly all in the lane. ­ In afternoon called on Redmans, Phillips, Mrs Widow King, Golding's, Winder's & Wiltons. Found Cousin John here on my return.

283 284

Left the pruning too late! Mrs Benjamin Glennie nee Crawshaw. 285 Also spelt Filmer.

Page No: 174

25. Branxton day ­ went through my accustomed routine ­ visiting, School & singing class. 26. Singleton Show today. Remained at home for my holiday. ­ Read a little of the Guardian & also partly employed taking the hood off the buggy to measure it for its summer covering. John & Jessie went to Singleton, but had a dreadful squeeze in the train. 27. Went to Newcastle by early train to meet & welcome the new Bishop of Grafton & Armidale. Had a very nice service in the Church, & then a meeting in the School House, & personal introduction. 28. Drove Anne in the buggy to Maitland to do a little shopping &c. Called on the Sollings & Chapmans. Henry popped in unexpectedly in the evening, having been sent for to attend Emily (Mrs Robert) Doyle. 29. Sunday, & a very satisfactory one. Good attendance at all three Churches, - took the buggy today. 30. Returned from the Wilderness in the morning, calling at Mr Clift's in passing. Found Jane in bed with a low fever. On reaching home found Ellen Solling & her intended here (Mr French) They came by train in the morning & left per the afternoon train. We then all started to Maitland in the buggy to go to Church at St Paul's where the Bishop of Grafton & Armidale had arranged to preach ­ I took Marianne & Jessie to the Sollings, & returned to St Mary's where Anne & I teaed, & Met Mr & Mrs Simm. We all went to St Paul's together, & were much pleased with the Bishop's sermon, which was from 2Cor.:14,18.286 ­ We were delighted with the organ, which is certainly a magnificent one, & beautifully played by Miss E. Thackery. ­ leaving Marianne & Jessie at the Sollings, Anne & I came home by the brilliant Starlight. 31. Felt in want of some rest today. ­ In the morning I put washers on the axles of the buggy, to cure it of the rattling of the wheels. ­ In the afternoon we drove up to call on the Andrew Doyles.

September 1869.

1. Branxton day. Called first at the Lindsays, found Mrs Lindsay still very poorly. Jemima Dixon seems a little better, but still very weak. ­ School & singing class filled up the day. 2. Anne & I drove into Maitland this morning to attend the wedding of Ellen Solling & Mr French, whom I had the pleasure of marrying at St Paul's Church, assisted by Mr Mackay. We were favoured with a most brilliant day for the wedding & had a very nice little party at the breakfast. After seeing the happy couple off to catch the train to Newcastle, we also took our departure & all came home in the buggy. 3. At home today. School in the morning, & called at the Hungerfords. Mr & Mrs Doyle called in the afternoon, & just as they were departing, Cousin John & Mary arrived. 4. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services. In the afternoon paid Filmer a visit, & Mrs Horder also. Cousin John drove Mary & Marianne & Jessie to the Wilderness. Sharp attack of bilious diarrhoea in the morning. 5. Sunday. Well again this morning & able to go on my duties. Holy Communion at Branxton, Mr Wilkinson & Mr Whitestone being present. The former bid me farewell as he goes to Sydney tomorrow to catch the outgoing mail steamer. 6. Stanhope day. ­ had rather an improved congregation, called after the service at Woodhouse's, Parkin's, Taylor's & Rockliffe's. Cousin John & Mary left us again this morning, taking Marianne & Jessie with them. 7. At home today. In the morning I went up to the Clifts where I found Jane still in bed, nursing her fever. ­ Called at Henry King's also.

286

A misreference ­ II Corinthians has only 13 chapters.

Page No: 175

8. Some rain came on just after breakfast, & as it seemed likely to continue, I did not go to Branxton but spent the day sermon writing. 9. Clerical meeting today at Mr Chapman's, Rather a small one, only 6 present. I drove Anne into Maitland, & she spent the day with Mrs Solling. -­got the front step of the buggy altered at Tuck's. 10. We were going to Branxton today to see how Mrs Lindsay is, but the weather deemed so threatening that we gave it up. ­ I went to the School in the morning. & wrote a letter to James.287 In the afternoon read some Guardian , &c &c. 11. Anne & I drove to Branxton today to see Mrs Lindsay, whom wee found recovering, but slowly. On the way back we called on Mrs Harper at Oswald. ­ No Sydney mail since Monday ­ bad weather on the coast. 12. Sunday. Only 24 Communicants at Lochinvar. Rode on horseback today, instead of driving as I had to come home from the Wilderness. 13. Drove into Maitland this morning to do some shopping for Mrs Greenway, In the afternoon we had the horses saddled intending to ride to Luskintyre, to see the Davises, but it came on to rain & stopped us. John Wyndham called this evening. 14. About noon Anne & I started in the buggy for Singleton. It was a calm, pleasant day & we enjoyed our drive very much. Found them all well. 15. I drove Elizabeth, Anne & Mary to Bridgman. The weather was a little threatening, & some gentle rain fell. 16. In the morning Ann & I went to visit the Hewson family, having learnt on reaching Singleton that old Mr Hewson died about a fortnight ago. In the afternoon we all drove across the river to Clydesdale. 17. I came home today [in the buggy] by Glendon288, Corinda, & Kirkton. Made a few calls in passing thro' Branxton. 18. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's services. Mr Hungerford called in the morning to arrange about the christening of his little grandson, which is to be on Monday afternoon. 19. Sunday. One of the most disagreeable days we have had for a long time. Quite a gale from the N.W. & very cold. ­ I found it hard work driving against it (or rather old Farmer must have found it hard work) from this to Branxton. From thence to Pokolbin I got on better, the wind being about on the starboard quarter, as the sailor would express it. & towards evening it did not blow quite so hard, so that my drive home from Pokolbin was pleasant enough. ­ I suppose it was this equinoctial gale which caused my congregations to be below par. ­ Had a baptism here in the evening ­ Mrs Stuckey's child. 20. Did a little home visiting today, called on Filmer, Mrs Phillips, Mrs Taylor, & the Redmans. In the afternoon Emily Doyle brought her little one to be baptized. ­ I afterwards visited the old Glass couple (both very poorly) then called at Gellatley's & Cruisals [?]. 21. Rode up to Branxton this morning to baptize [?] Skinner's child. From thence I went to Mrs Blicks then to Cranes next Holmes, & then home, calling at Fuller's & Clift's. Glad to find Jane Clift getting better. 22. Started about 9AM for the Paterson, with the buggy to bring Marianne & Jessie home. Reached Mr Addams' by 12, lunched with him, & then went on viâ Trevallyn to Oradinna, where I arrived before 5o'clock. Marianne & Jessie were staying at Trevallyn. 23. Cousin John accompanied me today on my round of visits. Called first to see Mary Ann (Bush) we passed on to Camyrallyn, where I sat some time with Mrs Boydell, while she related to me the closing scenes of her poor husband's life. ­

287 288

Almost the only recorded instance of Alfred writing to his brother. Originally the property of Robert Scott, (1799?-1844) a Magistrate and leading light of the Exclusivist "Sterling" faction in NSW.

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We then went to Glenthorne where we dined289, & then we looked in upon Catherine Handcock on the way home. 24. After breakfast I rode to Trevallyn, & returned by about 11o'c., when Cousin John & I rode out to pay a few more visits. We called first at Cawarra, then went out to Steer's. From thence we had a nice ride home along the top of the mountain. 25. We had a most delightful day for our homeward journey. It was ½ past 9 when we left Mr Bush's, & we reached home very comfortably before 5o'clock, having rested at Mr Addams as usual, & done a little shopping in Maitland. 26. Sunday. A brilliant day, the weather warm. Good congregations at all three churches, Came home at night from the Wilderness. 27. At home today writing a sermon for Wednesday ­ St Michael's Day, having given notice for service at Rothbury Church with Holy Communion. 28. At home all the morning, reading. In afternoon rode over to Luskintyre & called in at Davies & then Coopers. ­ Called on Mrs D'Arcy also by the way. 29. Service at Rothbury, &, as usual, a very nice one. There were only 24 adults present, of whom 23 remained to Holy Communion. Among the number was Mr Newman, from Jerry's Plains. Marianne & Jessie accompanied me in the buggy. 30. Spent this day at Elderslie, & paid my accustomed round of visits there. Being past ten before I got away in the morning, it was of course late when I came home & was rather tired, for old Farmer having a sore back, I could not take the buggy.

October 1869

1. At home today writing &c &c. & feeling a little the effects of yesterday's ride. 2. Do ---Do. Preparing for tomorrow's services. 3. Sunday. Holy Communion at Branxton - 21 ­ not a large congregation ­ baptism here in afternoon ­ Joseph Greedy's little child. 4. Stanhope day. Had a good congregation of 13. On my way back I called at Fern Hill & then at Dalwood. John Wyndham came here this afternoon & brought 5 of his children with him. 5. Began the day with a sort of funeral; that is, I had to bury a skeleton, supposed to be that of an old man named John Freeman, which was found in a log in Mr Hungerford's paddock on Sunday. An inquest was held yesterday. Being a rather wet day, I did not go out, except as far as Greedy's, to enquire after their baby, which was sick yesterday. 6. Went to Branxton today, & besides calling on several in the village, I rode out to the Joneses, where I took my usual "cup of tea", &c ­ called twice at Mr Lindsay's, but could not make anyone hear. On my way home called on Widow Smith, also at Andrew Doyle's. 7. When preparing to start for Morpeth this morning, to attend the Quarterly Committee Meeting of the Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Fund, I made the discovery that I ought to have gone yesterday. However, as I wanted to see the Bishop, as well as get books for the Sunday School children both at Branxton & Rothbury, I took my journey, & accomplished what I desired. 8. Had my usual visit to the School in the morning. In the afternoon I went to see Philmer, who now walks about a little: then called on Mrs Horder, & then walked across to Kaloundah, where I teaed. Soon after reaching home Townshend made his appearance with his pony cart. 9. Went up to the Station to make the Acquaintance of our new Stationmaster, Mr Ferris, son of Henry Ferris, formerly of the Paterson, - I was most pleased with him & am glad that we have at last a respectable man for our Station Master. He & his wife, however, are both Church people. ­ I called on Mrs Clift also, & was

289

Presumably with the Champains.

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glad to find that Jane was quite well again. Spencer, Edith & Minna, came over this morning, & are staying here tonight. Tomorrow they are to take Marianne & Jessie to the Wilderness, & then I shall be free to go to Singleton on Monday. 10. Sunday. A satisfactory day as far as congregations were concerned, but I felt it rather oppressive & was very tired at night. ­ Marianne & Jessie returned with the Holmeses to the Wilderness. 11. Got up this morning with the unmistakable indications of an approaching headache. Left the Wilderness immediately after breakfast, with the intention of starting about noon for Singleton, (called to inquire after Mrs Clift, who had to leave the Church yesterday, & found it was a bad bilious headache that obliged her to go out.) On reaching home I felt very unwell, - bad headache, & not at all inclined for a journey, Moreover, a very high NW wind was blowing, & raising clouds of dust along the road; I therefore determined to remain at home, hoping to accomplish the journey under more favourable conditions tomorrow morning. I found Townshend in full possession of the sofa & a pile of newspapers. He took his departure about noon. - Towards evening I went to Mrs Taylor's to enquire after her child, which is very ill. Called also on Mrs Phillips & the Redmans. 12. Started about 7.15, and had a delightful drive to Singleton where I arrived about noon, (called on the Hunt's at Belford, by the way) In the afternoon I called on Mr Blackwood. 13. We all (i.e. Elizabeth, Anne, Mary & myself) drove down to Kirkton & spent the day with the Kelmans. Had a very pleasant day & enjoyed ourselves much. 14. Today we made our long-talked of expedition to Dulwich290. Henry followed us on horseback after visiting his patients. Notwithstanding the scene of desolation presented by the dilapidated old buildings on the hill, the view from the old house was as pretty as ever, there being no change in the beautiful mountains. We crossed the railway, which passes along the flat from the direction of "Blackwall", & after despatching our basket of provisions under the shade of a tree in the blind gully leading down from the old house we called on a family called Mottam who occupy that western corner of the property, & then after walking through the old garden & gathering a few of the "Garden flowers grown wild", we returned home, & by the way called in at Dunolly. 15. Given old Farmer a morning's rest, & after dinner we took a drive, first to call on the Rodd's, from there we went across to Neotsfield, Mr Dangar was not at home, having gone to Bridgman. 16. This morning Anne & I packed up bag & baggage, & returned home. We were again fortunate in the weather, & had a delightful journey home, calling to see Mrs Lindsay by the way, who is now quite well again. We had only just reached the house when it began raining, & I had not been half an hour at home when a message came requiring my attendance at Branxton, to bury a child named McLeod, who had died at the mines. ­ It rained, gently, all the way up. 17. Sunday. Had a hard day's work rather, but from the state of the roads, poor old Farmer must have felt it more than myself. Yesterday's rain, followed by a thundershower, in the night, made the roads very heavy & impeded my progress a good deal, so that, with the addition of a Baptism at Pokolbin, it was nearly 7o'clock when I reached home. 18. At home today resting after yesterday's work. In the afternoon went to see how Mrs Taylor's child was, & found it much better. Called at the Redmans also. 19. Kept at home today by rain. Some glorious showers fell throughout the day. ­ Occupied reading & writing. 20. Rain again this morning prevented me going to Branxton. Sermon writing all the morning, & in the afternoon I paid a few visits in the lane.

290

Original property of James Glennie from 1824 to about 1840. Names after his birthplace in Surrey.

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21. Went to Branxton this morning, & after making a few calls there, rode on to Mrs Blick's to see how Mrs Hungerford was, having heard on Sunday last she was worse than usual. Was glad to find her sitting out in the verandah much better. ­ Called afterwards on the Cranes, then at the Wilderness. Found Cousin John here on my return. 22. This morning Cousin John & I walked over to Windermere, to see the cellars, taste the wine, &c. Mr Green took us all thro' his cellars, & we were much pleased with everything. Some of his wines are excellent. 23. Went to Morpeth this morning, & drove Cousin John as far as Maitland on his return home. Got back again to dinner. 24. Sunday. Congregations today only middling, although the day was fine. Took the buggy, & notwithstanding bad roads after last night's rain, was well up in time, both to Branxton & Rothbury. 25. Spent the day visiting as follows.- Boughton, Campbell, Wills, Matthews, Slis Chicks, Tyrrell (no one at home there), Wilkinson, Anderson & Pyne. The day was beautiful, & everything fresh & thriving after the rain of last week. Stayed the night at the Wilderness. 26. After breakfast I drove Mr Holmes up to his vineyard, & after inspecting it I came home, calling by the way on Mrs Bezley & Mrs O'Neil. Found Marianne & Jessie no better291. 27. Went to Branxton, where I spent the forenoon calling, chiefly on those about the Station. Visited the School at 3o'clock, singing class at 4 & then straight home. 28. Had Comet all saddled ready for a start to Lumb's Valley, to see the Pecks, when it suddenly clouded over & a thunderstorm set in, & the rain continued off & on all the forenoon. Received a note from Mr Bowyer Shaw, asking for plans of Rothbury Church, so I spent the day chiefly in tracing off the plans, & sent him a copy of them. Sent James to Maitland to get more medicine for the hooping coughs. 29. At home today, making up my Annual Return for the SPG. ­ in the evening I went to see Mrs Phillips. 30. Went to Singleton by train this morning to see if Henry would come down & see Marianne, who seemed so very poorly. He returned with me this evening, & by the time we arrived, Mar: appeared much better. 31. Wet morning (Sunday) ­ only 8 attended at Branxton, & 40 here in the evening.

November 1869

1. Stanhope day, but owing to the unsettled state of the weather, the people hardly expected me ­ only 9 attended. Called at Mark Putter's on the way home. 2. At home today, finishing my report for the SPG. ­ Went to see Mrs Phillips &c. 3. The weather was so threatening today I did not go to Branxton, hoping it may be finer tomorrow. Spent the day Sermon-writing, chiefly. 4. Went to Branxton & had a fine day for my ride. Dined at the Lindsays, & left my horse there, while I went about my accustomed work in the village. 5. Just as we were going to breakfast this morning, Bird called to say his wife was in a dying state & wished me to go & see her, which I did immediately after breakfast. Dr Scott arrived from Maitland while I was there & pronounced her to be in a dangerous state. ­ After a little reading, & prayer, I came home again, & had not been long in before one of the young Thrifts came from Elderslie, begging me to go & see his mother, who was taken suddenly ill this morning. I had Comet saddled again & set off at once. ­ I found poor Mrs Thrift very ill, & Dr Hartigan in attendance. He spoke hopefully of her case, however, & I trust she

291

First mention of what later turns out to be whooping cough in the house. Marianne, Jessie & Anne all suffered from it for some months.

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may yet be suffered to recover. I hope to go & see her again tomorrow. A fine thunderstorm came on while I was there, with a soaking shower of rain for about 2 hours. 6. The first thing this morning I went to see Mrs Bird & found her a little better. On reaching home again I found a messenger from Dalwood with a note from Mr Wyndham, saying that one of his men, Kohler, had been run over by a cart, & he wish [sic] to see me. I was just getting another horse saddled to go to Elderslie, so I took Dalwood by the way. ­ I found the poor man greatly hurt, & I fear his life is in danger. ­ I was very glad to find Mrs Thrift much better. 7. Sunday. A very pleasant day, & good congregations at all Churches. ­ None our party [sic] could venture to church on account of their coughs. ­ Having sick people to visit, I came home at night from the Wilderness. Mrs Wyndham was taken ill & had to leave the Church this afternoon. 8. Began this morning by riding to Dalwood to see the man Kohler, who is in a very bad state, & the doctor gives no hope of his recovery. - I saw Mrs Wyndham, who appears as well as usual. ­ They were expecting Henry down to see her. From Dalwood I drove straight to Bird's to visit Mrs Bird, whom I found apparently better, tho' still very ill. ­ At 4o'clock I drove up to the station to meet Elizabeth, who had come down to help nurse the sick. 9. Drove out to the Wilderness this morning and had an Examination on the Sunday School children & distributed some books among them.- In honour of the Prince of Wales birthday, they have had a great fête at Dalwood today, - a sort of Review of the Volunteers. They must have found it very hot, the therm. being 98 in the shade! 10. Branxton day. Went viâ Dalwood to see Kohler, who is still in a precarious state. I stayed to lunch at Dalwood. Mrs Wyndham seems as well as ever. ­ Arranged with Miss Cox for and Examination of the Branxton Sunday School next Wednesday. 11. Our Clerical meeting took place here today, & a very fair attendance we had, there being 8 of the Clergy beside myself. Soon after we commenced, Mr Cameron came in to announce the death of one of his twin babies. ­ After the departure of the Clergy I went to see Mr Cameron, & then old Greedy, who is disabled at present with an injured leg. This morning a messenger from Elderslie called to say that Mrs Thrift is taken ill again, & to request me to go & see her in the morning. 12. Started for Elderslie before 8o'clock to see Mrs Thrift. Found her in a very low & weak state, so much so that she could not benefit from any ministrations from me. She was in a heavy, drowsy condition & fell asleep when I began to read to her.292 ­ I returned viâ Dalwood, & visited Kohler who appeared much better & of whose recovery there is now some hope. ­ Got back before 3o'clock, to be in readiness for the funeral of Mr Cameron's child. ­ Miss D'Arcy came in the afternoon, to practice on the Harmonium for Sunday, having kindly offered her services, till Marianne is able to resume her post. 13. Was going to see Mrs Bird today, but a long thunderstorm prevented me in the morning, & again in the afternoon. Paid Mrs Phillips & the Redmans a visit between the showers. 14. Sunday. Got to Branxton by 9A.M. & baptized John Wyndham's baby (Harold Edward) before the service. ­ Had another small congregation there, but better than usual at Pokolbin. Was glad to see Edwd Tyrrell & his wife at the latter church, & her sister Amelia with them. ­ Went on horseback, knowing the roads would be very bad after yesterday's rain. Got home in excellent time. Miss D'Arcy kindly offered her services at the Harmonium until Marianne is well enough to resume her duties, & played very nicely.

292

"Sleep is an acceptable form of criticism" retailated a music critic accused of falling asleep at a concert.

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15. Went first to see Mrs Bird this morning, & found her much better. After dinner I went to Elderslie to see Mrs Thrift, who is in a very low condition. 16. Went to Dalwood in the morning to see Kohler, & found that Henry had been down again to see him.-From thence I rode up to visit the Peck's, in Lamb's Valley, calling at Parker's by the way.- On the way back I made the acquaintance of a young man named Locke, who lives in Lamb's Valley. Found him busy harrowing in the field.- The day was very warm, & I was not a little tired when I got home at night. 17. Went to Branxton & had an examination of the Sunday School children, & distributed some books among them.- The day was very hot- 90 in the shade. Henry came over from Dalwood in the evening to see Anne, & prescribe for her cough. He had come down to see Kohler, who is much worse, & Henry now fears he will not recover. 18. A terrible hot day- therm. 96 ½ in verandah. Felt thankful that I was not compelled to go out, for I felt not a little fagged after the last 4 days hard work.- I drove Henry to the station in the morning.- Received notice of the death of John Patton's little child, & a request to attend at Branxton for the funeral tomorrow morning. 19. Drove up to Branxton to bury Patton's little girl, & learnt from Mrs. Rudd that poor Mrs. Thrift was dead. After the funeral I drove straight to Elderslie; to see the Thrifts & arrange about the funeral, which is to take place on Sunday at 2.P.M.From Elderslie I went to Dalwood to visit Kohler, who was better than I expected to find him. He expressed a desire for the Holy Communion, & I agreed to go & administer it to him tomorrow morning.- Got home just in time to escape a thunderstorm. 20. Went to Dalwood in the morning, & administered the Holy Communion to Kohler, who seemed very weak & low. He expressed himself grateful for the Sacrament, &, as far as I can judge from his imperfect English, I think he is penitent, & quite resigned to the will of his heavenly Father. On my way back I called to see Madam Ferrier & Mrs. D'Arcy.- Busy all the afternoon preparing for tomorrow's services. 21. Sunday. Began my day's work with a Baptism; Mrs. Golding's little baby. Had to hurry away to Branxton for the funeral of Mrs Thrift, 1.45. being the hour fixed.- I was there before the time, & had to wait some 20m or more. Just as they arrived a very heavy shower came on, which lasted throughout the service.- All this threw me a little behind time at the Church, & when the service was over it looked so very threatening for rain, & being rather late as well, that I thought it useless to go on [to] the Mr. Holmes's, so just drove quietly home.- Heavy rain came on at night. 22. At home today; looking out & arranging Advent Sermons. In the afternoon I drove Elizabeth up to the station & saw her safe off for Singleton. 23. The weather still being wet & unsettled, I did not venture away from home today, but merely went to the post in the morning, & called on the Hungerfords.- This wet weather is by no means in favour of the coughs. 24. Had my horse saddled to go to Branxton this morning but the rising up of a thundercloud to westward made me alter my plans, & postpone my ride till tomorrow, when I hope the roads will be better to travel on, for they were very wet & slushy this morning, but the hot sun & drying wind of today have done wonders in drying up the puddles. This afternoon I rode up to enquire after Mrs. Clift who is still very poorly, though a little better. From that I went across to Kaloudah, where I found the Old folks alone, James & Louisa having gone to Murrurundi. 25. Had Farmer saddled this morning, intending to go to Dalwood & Branxton, but the wind was blowing such a gale, that I thought it better to postpone my ride, hoping for a calmer day tomorrow.- Paid a few visits about home in the morning &

Page No: 181

towards evening called on Mrs. Bellamy & Mrs. Walker. The river now impassable. 26. Went to Dalwood to see Kohler- very low & weak- suffering now from dropsy. He seems quite resigned & spoke of going to his other home.- Made a few calls among the work people.- Called also on the Andrew Doyles as I went out in the morning. 27. Rode out after breakfast to see Mrs. Bird, who is up & about again, but not quite up to her usual strength. Had a nice little talk with her, based upon the 116th. Psalm, which I read urging her to see that the warning she has lately received may not be lost upon her.- I the called a[t] Nash's, (they now live where the Naseby's & McQuirter's did) & from thence I went on to visit the Days having heard that Mr. Henry Day had met with an accident.- I found him with a broken collar bone, but getting on well.- Looked in at Neal's also, & Phillips's on the way home. 28. Sunday. Congregation rather below the average at both churches.- At Branxton I had the satisfaction of seeing Miss Kelman & her Brother John among the Communicants. Baptized John Nash's child. 29. Stanhope day. Had to go all round the road, & cross at McMullin's boat, the river being too high to cross yet.- Had a small congregation of only 8.- harvest time.On my return I called on Taylor & Rattagan, & then visited Kohler, at Dalwood, who appears no better. 30. Called on Mrs. Clift this morning, found her up & about again.- Then went on to Crane's, Mrs. Blick's, Patton's, Campbell's, Holmes's & so home again.

December 1869

1. Branxton day. Called on Chas. Hughes to furnish him with instructions etc. for collecting for the Stipend Fund.- Called also on Mrs. John Hughes, & the Nixons & the went on across creek to Mrs Coldrake.- School on my return, & the a slight thunder shower prevented the singing class. 2. After 4 days of "out" in succession, felt a little weary today, so remained at home. Began preparing a sermon for next Sunday, & read a little of H. Drummond on "Government" etc. 3. When preparing this morning to go to Maitland for sundry shoppings etc: I received a note from the Bishop requesting me to go & see him, as he wishes to arrange for a visit to my district some Sunday before the close of the year. This just fitted nicely, so I drove on from Maitland, & dined with his Lordship, who has fixed upon Sunday the 26th. For his visit.- Went to the Depot, & called at the Parsonage, where I found Mr. Walsh ill in bed.- John Lethbridge called today, & told them that Mrs. Kelman is very ill- must go & see her. 4. At home, preparing for tomorrow's services. 5. Sunday. Very hot day- felt a good deal exhausted after my 3 services, with holy Communion. 6. Drove from the Wilderness to Cessnock, & called on the following.- Campbell, Wills, Scott, G. Moore, Birmingham, Jas. Moore, Wilson, Pinchen, Picton, & Phil. Werzler. The day was very hot, & I was late home.- On reaching home I found a message requiring me to repair to Windermere, to see poor Mr. Green, who met with a sad accident this morning.- A heavy beam fell upon him, & besides breaking his left thigh, has bruised him fearfully, &, as they fear, given him some internal injuries.- At first sight, the doctors (Morson & Wright) pronounced his case hopeless, but he rallied greatly in the afternoon.- Mr. Green & Kate are unfortunately away in Sydney, but they have summoned them home by telegram. 7. Drove up to the station this morning, & finding Mrs. Green & Kate there, I drove the former out to Windermere, while Walter drove his sister & their luggage.

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Found Mr. Green apparently better.- On returning from Windermere I started off (about 12.30) for Kirkton, & had a very hot drive. Found Mrs. Kelman very much better. It was nearly 9 P.M. when I came home very tired. 8. Went to see Mr. Green, & from there on to Dalwood to see Kohler, but found that he had gone to Hospital. Great thunderstorm in afternoon, with hail which did much damage. 9. This morning Mary Ann Phillips came to ask me to go to see her mother, who wanted to receive the Holy Communion.- I went down there to see her, & had a little conversation with her on the subject, & promised to return at 4 P.M. to administer the Sacrament.- I then went to see Mr. Green, who, I think is progressing favourably.- In the afternoon I returned to Mrs. Phillips, & administered the Sacrament to her, with her husband & Mary Ann.- She appears to be sinking very low.- On my way back I called at the Lees. 10. Went to Windermere after breakfast, & was glad to obtain a favourable report of Mr. Green. He was enjoying a comfortable sleep, so I did not see him.- In the afternoon I rode down as far as Mr. Day's, but found no one at home there. Called at Neal's, Tuckey's (not at home), Winder, Mrs. King, & Phillips.- Mrs. Phillips very low.- can't speak.- Mr. Young came up this morning & mended the Church windows. 11. Sermon writing in the morning. Afternoon paid a visit to Mrs. Phillips, then rode over to Windermere, where I was glad to find Mr. Green getting on well. 12. Sunday. Had a hot drive today from Branxton to Pokolbin, & a small congregation when I got there. The badness of the roads caused my progress to be slow, so that when I reached home, I had only 20 minutes rest before commencing the third service. 13. Was delighted to learn from Dr. Morson this morning, that he had just set Mr. Green's leg, & that he was getting on nicely.- Went to see him this evening, & found him very comfortable, & cheerful, as well as thankful for his undeserved mercies.- Cousin John arrived this evening. 14. Tomorrow being the Polling day at Branxton & this place, I thought it best to go to Branxton today instead of tomorrow.- I called & dined at the Lindsays, where Rose & Alice Scott are staying at present. I then made a few calls in the village, & then drove out to Coldrakes. 15. Remained at home today.- Reading & sermon writing. In the evening we all went out for a drive in Mr. Hungerford's paddock. Cousin John took Marianne & Jessie in his buggy, & I drove Anne. It was a beautiful evening, & all enjoyed it. 16. Went to see Mr. Green after breakfast: found him tolerably well.- Called at Miller's (the cooper) & on the way home called on Robt Way in his field of corn, also on Mrs McDermot. Dreadful hot day. Spent the rest of it at home, sermon writing &c &c. Cousin John started for home this morning. 17. Went to the school this morning but found the holidays had commenced.293 ­ remained at home ­ sermon writing. In the evening I went to see Mrs Phillips, who does not seem to alter at all. I fear she is suffering from Paralysis. 18. Rode over to Windermere after breakfast, & received from Mrs Green a good report of her husband, who was enjoying a comfortable doze, so I did not see him. At home the rest of the day, preparing for tomorrow's services. 19. Sunday, - & a very hot one. One of the Nash boys fainted in Church & had to be carried out. ­ The heat seemed to keep some away from the afternoon services. ­ On arriving at the Wilderness, Mrs Blick asked me to offer up prayers in the church for Arthur Hungerford, who was sunstruck last Thursday, & is declared by

293

Did he keep this diary because of his fears of a faulty memory?

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the Dr. to be in a hopeless case. ­ Anne, Marianne & Jessie all came to Church for the first time since the whooping cough attacked them.294 20. Borrowed "the grey" this morning & went to see the poor invalid at Mrs Blicks. ­ A most distressing case. ­ The poor young man was raving all the time I was there, & has been in that state from the first. ­ It was so intensely hot today that I would not venture any further, but returned to the Wilderness (where I found Louis Kelman), & drove home when it began to get cooler. 21. Drove to Branxton this morning to see poor old Avis, who, in addition to his other infirmities, contrived to get his face burnt. ­ I found him in a very low state, just conscious, & that is all, but unable to speak. I think he cannot survive this week. ­ I heard at Branxton that Louisa Cox, of Elderslie, got thrown from her horse on Sunday last, & broke her thigh. ­ a very bad break. ­ From Branxton I went to Belmont, & found poor Arth: Hungerford quieter than yesterday, but I fear in a very bad way. 22. Started early this morning to visit Louisa Cox, at Elderslie. Found Dr Hartigan there, the poor girl is delirious, & has been so since the accident, which happened on Sunday morning. The fracture is at the neck of the thigh bone, close to the hip joint.295 ­ On reaching Branxton, I found that poor old Avis died about 4o'clock yesterday afternoon, & they wished the funeral to take place this evening. ­ I went out from Branxton to Belmont, where I was delighted to find the poor invalid (Arthur Hungerford) restored to his senses & apparently coming round nicely. I returned to Branxton for the funeral & got caught in a thunderstorm by the way. Some delay was occasioned by the coffin not arriving per goods train, so we had to wait for the 5o'clock train. ­ Rain came on again during the funeral. 23. Glad to be able to take a day's rest today. ­ Spent the morning sermon-writing. In the afternoon, having first paid a visit to Mrs Phillips, I went to see Mr Green, who is getting on very nicely indeed. 24. We all went to Maitland today to do a little shopping296, & had a nice cloudy day for our trip. ­ Took the Clock down to be examined & put to rights. Poor Mrs Phillips took an unfavourable turn this morning, & died about 9o'clock this evening. 25. Xmas Day come round again. ­ but several things conspire to render it anything but a merry one this year. Two deaths have occurred during the week, & other cases of sickness & accident have cast a cloud over some families, calling for sympathy from others. ­ According to arrangement I had Morning Service with Holy Communion at Rothbury Church. The Congregation & Communs were fewer than I anticipated. ­ a thundershower in the evening stopped some from coming to this Church. Arthur Hungerford is so far recovered that we returned thanks for him this morning. 26. Sunday. Rather a busy day with me. ­ first Holy Commn at Branxton, after which a Baptism. Then the funeral of Mrs Phillips took place in the afternoon, after which, another Baptism before Eveng service. ­ Being a hot day, I was rather fatigued. 27. Had to go to Branxton this morning for a funeral; - an old man named Weatherhead from Glendon Brook. It was intensely hot; (98 in shade). After the funeral I went on to Elderslie to see Louisa Cox, who appears a little better .Great thunderstorm cam on about 4o'clock, with very heavy rain & some hail. ­

First mentioned as "hooping cough" on 29th October, but the girls were reported "no better" on the 26th of that month. So the disease lasted at least eight weeks. This last sentence was squeezed in at the end of a line in tiny script ­ probably inserted a day or two later. 295 There is no hint of censure in Alfred's telling of this accident, in distinct contrast to the story of young Kelly, killed while riding on Sunday in 1855, so either Alfred had mellowed considerably, or more likely, Miss Cox was on her way to or from Church. 296 For presents?

294

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Took refuge at John Moore's ­ Called also at Thrifts. On nearing home I found that the rain had not extended this far 28. Thought myself entitled to a rest today, so remained home. Mr Winder called this morning with his collection for the Stipend. 29. Remained at home again today: occupied partly reading & partly sermon writing &c. A servant girl ­ Emma Curran ­ came up from Maitland today, to take Maria's place during her absence 30. Went to Branxton this morning to baptize a poor little sickly infant, only a few days old, (Mrs Freel again). ­ From thence I went to see the Joneses, where I got a cup of tea, & then went on to Mrs Blicks. Arthur Hungerford was out, & I did not see him. Poor Mrs Hungerford was very ill, confined to her bed. ­ Called at the Wilderness, & then came home 31. Spent the morning at home, among other matters making up my first remittance to the Bank on account of Stipend Fund. ­ In the afternoon we all went to Maitland to do a little shopping, & bring home the Clock, which we are very glad to get back again. And thus ends the year 1869.

January 1870

1. Having heard yesterday that Mr Green was not so well, I rode over to see him this morning, & was sorry to find that he had been compelled to undergo the setting of his leg again, the bone having somehow shifted out of its place. ­ On returning home, I found John Wilkinson here; & when he had taken his departure, Spencer Holmes came in, & thus the morng passed. In the afternoon I finished my sermon for tomorrow. ­ James has had a holiday, & been to Newcastle with some of his brothers & sisters. A man from the Coal pits called this afternoon to request me to bury a man at Branxton tomorrow, Buchanan by name, who was killed at Anvil Creek yesterday. 2. Sunday. Rather a hard days work ­ Sacrament Sunday ­ 25 in number Comts & then the funeral at Branxton. I managed to accomplish it all within time. ­ But the day was hot & tired me. 3. Spent the day visiting, & called at the following houses. ­ Campbell, Wills, G. Crane (not at home), G Chick, Lambkin, Joass, Williams, three Whites, & McDonald's. Came home very tired. 4. Intended to go to the Coalpits today, but did not feel at all well, so stopped at home to rest and recruit. ­ Busy making up sundry Returns. 5. Went to the Coal pits this morning, to visit the poor Widow Buchanan, who is left to battle against the world with a family of six young children. From them I rode across to Belmont to see poor Mrs Hungerford, who was sitting up in her parlour very much better than ... 6. At home all the morning, reading, &c. In the afternoon we all drove in to Maitland, for shopping &c. 7. Started about 7 A.M. for Elderslie, to see Louisa Cox, whom I found much better, getting on nicely. Called at Mat: Moore's, & then made my way to Dalwood to lunch: On the way home called to see Mr Green, who is again progressing favourably. 8. This day spent at home, writing a sermon for tomorrow, &c &c. 9. Sunday. Had a very comfortable journey round by Pokolbin today; - the roads in good order, & weather pleasant seabreeze ­ but congregations not good except here in the evening 10. At home today, resting, after yesterday's work. In the evening went to call on Mrs Fitzgerald at the Hungerfords, but she was out.

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11. Drove Anne to Morpeth this morning to visit the Walshs. It turned out a terrible hot day so that we did not set out homeward till 5 o'clock. Called on the Davidsons on the way back. 12. Got up with a headache this morning, which continued the greater part of the day. Even without that the extreme heat of the day (102½ ) wd. have stopped me going out. Tried to read abit [sic], & also to write some letters, but found myself quite good for nothing. 13. Went to Newcastle to attend our clerical meeting at Mr Selwyns, which was a very satisfactory one, eleven of the clergy being present. On returning home I found Mr & Mrs Robt. Doyle at the station, & as my buggy was there to meet me, I brought Emily down. ­ In the evening, taking advantage of the moonlight, after tea Anne & I ventured to Kaloudah & returned about 10 o'clock. 14. The Fifty ninth anniversary of my birthday. I spent the morning by going to visit Mr Green. The heat was dreadful, so I drove in the buggy for the sake of shelter by the hood. Found that since I last saw Mr Green, this day week he had been compelled once more (for the 4th time), to undergo the setting of his leg, owing to the bones having got misplaced. I called also on Mrs Miller, the Cooper's wife. By 2 o'clock, the thermometer had reached 106½ in the shade, but a sudden change of wind to SE brought up a delightful, cool, refreshing sea breeze, which was most enjoyable after such extreme heat. 15. Rainy Morning, & being Saturday, I did not attempt to go out anywhere. ­ Spent the greater part of the day writing letters. Despatched a box to Branxton by this evening's train to catch a dray loading for Bukkulla. 16. Sunday. Although the day was delightfully cool & pleasant, the congregations both here & at Branxton were small. ­ Better at Rothbury. 17. Went to Cessnock & visited, first George Moore, found both himself & wife ill. Then called at Birmingham's ­ Mr B. disabled with a sprained foot & ancle. Went next to Wilson's, Pinchen's, & Picton's. ­ Collected among them 12/6 for Stipend fund. 18. Went over to Luskintyre this morning to visit the Russell family &c, having heard that John Russell had a sunstroke last Thursday. I found it was only a slight one, & that after one day's rest, he was able to resume his work at Dalwood. ­ Called also at Easy's, & on the Coopers, & then got home to dinner at 2 o'clock, found a party of the Holmeses here, & Miss Gordon. 19. Intended going to Branxton today, but rain set in after breakfast & stopped me. Spent the day sermon-writing instead. In the evening went to see Mrs Greedy, who was poorly yesterday, & found her better, also called to inquire after Mrs Haskins. 20. Went to Branxton today, & after making a few calls there went on to Belmont, & The Wilderness. Glad to learn at Belmont that Mr E.B. Hungerford who had gone to Maitland for Medical advice, was better. He also, it appears, must have had a slight sunstroke ­ went to the Wilderness to inquire after Mrs Cusack's little girl, Georgy, who had the misfortune to get burnt on Tuesday last. I fear the poor little child is very seriously injured. Maria Jarrett came home this evening297 21. Went to Dalwood today, & after lunch, went to Fernhill. On my way back called on Mrs Parker, also at Windermere ­ Mr Green but so so. Mr Louis Kelman called today. 22. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's work, &c. In the morning went to see Mrs Taylor, who is laid up with a sprained ancle. ­ Towards evening we all took a drive in the buggy down as far as Neal's, & about the Paddocks there. ­ Mr L Kelman came to breakfast, on his way to Maitland. 23. Sunday. Holy Communion at Branxton ­ 25 ­ Congregations good at both Churches.

297

Servant.

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24. Stanhope Day ­ a very small congregation ­ only 8. I went on to Elderslie to see Louise Cox, & was glad to find her progressing very favourably. ­ Had rather a warm day's ride. 25. Drove Anne in the morning to see Mr Green: found him much as usual. They are expecting a visit from Dr Bowman tomorrow. On the way back we looked in at the Hungerfords to call on Emily, & Mrs Fitzgerald. ­ We intended going to Maitland in the afternoon, but it was too hot (91 in the shade). So in the evening we took a drive down the Ostwald Lane. 26. This being a general Holiday, (& a very hot day moreover), I did not go to Branxton, but purpose going tomorrow instead. In the morning I went to see Mrs Taylor with her sprained ancle, & after that spent the day reading & sermon writing, as well as the heat would allow me. 27. Rain stopped me from going to Branxton today. Spent the day Sermon writing & reading the "Guardian". 28. Went to Branxton today, after first calling at Mr Ferrier's, & then to Kaloundah, where I found Mr William Doyle upon the sofa, having come down the country crippled in both legs from rheumatism, or something of that kind. From Branxton I went on to Belmont to see Mr & Mrs Hungerford, - both on the sick list, & then I went to the Wilderness. ­ Poor little Georgi: Cusack does not seem to be much better yet, but we may hope she is doing well. 29. We all went in to Maitland to do some shopping, & called on Mr Thackery. 30. Sunday. Administered the Holy Communion here to 27. ­ On reaching the Wilderness I found they had quite a sick house there ­ bad colds. 31. Spent the day visiting about Cessnock, Calling on Mrs Knight, Inglis, Gillard, & George Moore. ­ got home about dusk.

February 1870

1. At home resting. Busy making up Stipend Accounts. ­ Mr Codringham, Guy & Reginald Wyndham called in the afternoon. Mrs Fitzgerald & Emily Doyle also called. In the evening we drove to Windermere to see Mr Green. 2. Went to Branxton today via Dalwood. ­ Found Mrs Wyndham poorly. 3. Marianne & I took a drive into Maitland this morning. Started at 8 & were back again at 10.10. ­ At 12 o'clock we started on horseback for the Wilderness. Found Miss Kelman there, & her brother James, lately come from Queensland. 4. Began the day by driving Marianne to the station & seeing off per train en route for Sydney. ­ Left her in Reg. Wyndham's charge. Remained at home, making up Returns &c. 5. A broken sort of a day. ­ Went to see old Glass in the morning. ­ he has been poorly for some days past. In the afternoon I went to Windermere, having heard that Mr Green was worse, & was sorry to find it so. He appears to be suffering from one of his internal injuries. ­ Dr Bowker was up the other day, & said that the bone of his leg is not yet knitted: but he gave them hope that all would yet be well. George Crane called this morning to obtain a Marriage Licence, - he is to be married on Thursday to Ann Walters. ­ Had a letter from Marianne this morning ­ She had a delightful passage to Sydney yesterday, - quite a pleasure trip. 6. Sunday. Pokolbin Day. Got through my work very well, being a cool day. ­ A fine congregation here in the evening ­ at the other Churches not so. 7. Started this morning for Pokolbin, for the purpose of marrying William Jackson & Anne Stafford, but to my astonishment I met the party coming to be married here, so turned back with them, & married them here. Went to see Mr Green this evening & found him very ill, - suffering severely from Inflammation of the lungs.298

298

Pneumonia?

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8. Ann & I took a drive to Kirkton today to pay a visit of condolence to Mrs Kelman after the death of her brother, Dr Busby, of Bathurst. ­ We found her wonderfully well, & very much improved in her own health since we last saw her. ­ We took Jessie with us as far as Branxton, & left her with the Lindsays, not liking to take her among children.299 ­ On our return home we found Cousin John here. 9. Branxton day. I rode round by the Wilderness to see how the invalids there are getting on & was glad to find them better, especially little Georgy, whom they now consider out of danger. Had me [sic] class at the School, & then singing class as usual. Cousin John went to Dalwood. 10. Had a wedding this morning ­ George Crane & Ann Walters. & a very nice party assembled at the Church. Two buggies & the "Royal Mail" were in requisition. In the afternoon, Anne & I drove to East Maitland, & after doing a little Savings Bank business, called at the Parsonage, also on the Davidsons, & then drove home, the latter part of the way by moonlight. ­ Cousin John took Jessie to Singleton this morning, they are to return tomorrow morng 11. At home all today to do a little sermon writing, but was dreadfully afflicted with drowsiness. In the evening I rode to Windermere to see Mr Green, & was glad to find him much better. ­ Cousin John & Jessie returned by early train this morning, & then John started off homeward. 12. At home all day, finishing sermon, & otherwise preparing for tomorrows work. 13. Sunday. Three small congregations, - I did not feel quite up to the mark. Possibly others may have felt the same & therefore did not come to Church. 14. Spent the day visiting about Pokolbin, beginning where I left off a fortnight ago, namely, at Lacock's then visited in succession Richd King ­ Wmn King ­ Charles King (gentlemen all away from home) Jackson Snr, Henry Jackson, Birmingham & Scott. ­ Got back to the Wilderness between 5 & 6, & found old Farmer nice & fresh to bring me home. 15. Being called away to Branxton to bury a little child (one of Mrs Rae's twins.) I made out the day by going on to Elderslie, to see how Louise Cox was getting on. ­ Found her still in bed, but apparently pretty well, & I hope to find her up next time I go.300 Had a very hot drive, & old Farmer seemed to feel it much. Called on Mrs Skinner, - Thrift's & Mal: Moore's. 16. Foreseeing a very hot day I did not go to Branxton, & intended to be very busy indoors making up my Statistical Return for the Diocesan Council: but just as I commenced work Rosn Davidson & her brother arrived from Maitland, & so put a stop to my writing. It has been a terrible hot day, 96 in the shade. Cousin John arrived this evening on horseback viâ Lamb's Valley. 17. John started early this morning.301 After breakfast I went to see Mr Green, found him much better. Called on Mrs Gellatley on my way back. ­ Spent the rest of the day making up my returns &c. Mr Louis Kelman called on his way from Maitland. & afterwards Miss Hungerford & Mrs Gellatley called. 18. The greater part of the morning spent packing up a box of grapes to sent to Willy in Sydney. Employed the remainder of the day chiefly sermon-writing. ­ Weather still very hot. 19. Scorching hot day. ­ with therm. 103 in the shade.- At home all the morning at home Sermon-writing &c. In the afternoon drove to Branxton to bury Mrs Rae's other little child, the twin brother of the little girl buried on Tuesday last. 20. Sunday. A nice cool, cloudy day, but notwithstanding that, the congregation at Branxton was a small one. Here, in the evening, the attendance was very good.

Why not? ­ was she still suffering from whooping cough? A quite rapid recovery without surgery from what had been diagnosed as a broken neck of the femur about 20th December! 301 One of the few times he is not referred to as Cousin John.

300

299

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21. Stanhope day. ­ only 8 attended. After the service I called at Woodhouse's & Taylor's, & then looked in at Dalwood on the way home. ­ Mrs Wyndham is very much better than she was. ­ had a hot day to ride. 22. Busy all the morning with grapes. Packed up three boxes and despatched them per evening train, namely one to the Scott's & another to the Millard's at Newcastle, and the third to Singleton. Another very hot day. In the evening walked across to Kaloundah. 23. Branxton day. ­ visited the folks around the Railway Station, also called on Mrs Cox, - I then went to the School, &c. 24. We intended to go to Morpeth today, to bid farewell to the Walshes, but it began raining soon after breakfast & stopped us. ­ I was trying all the morning to make out my "Financial Return" but could not manage it, & sent it away incomplete. ­ Towards evening we took a drive to Windermere, to see Mr Green. The poor man's leg is just the same, - the bones not yet knitted. 25. The first thing after breakfast I drove the buggy up to the station to bring down a small trunk from Singleton. ­ Called in upon Mrs Clift also. ­ About 11 0'clock we all started for Morpeth to pay a farewell visit to the Walshes who leave nest week. Called on the Davidsons also & took them some cold dewy grapes. ­ Got dark before we reached home. 26. Had my horse saddled this morning, intending to ride down to see poor Mrs Hungerford who is lying seriously ill, as Mrs Chapman informed us yesterday at the Simpson's near Maitland, but the rain came on & stopped me. ­ Spent the day sermon writing. 27. Sunday. Began with a very small Sunday School ­ only 10. ­ a small congregation came next, - but out of it 25 remained to the Communion. ­ Had a very muddy road to drive to Branxton, where another small congregation awaited me. ­ nor was that at Rothbury much better. ­ Gave notice at Rothbury for a collection this day fortnight towards the Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Fund. 28. Borrowed "the Grey" this morning & rode out to see the Wilkinsons, calling by the way first at Campbell's, & then at Mrs Wills's & Geo: Crane's. ­ then at Chick's, Drayton's & Matthews's. It was getting dark as I got back to the Holmes's, & this obliged me to spend the night there.

March 1870

1. Came home in the morning from the Wilderness, & in the afternoon I rode down to see poor Mrs Hungerford. ­ Although greatly weakened & reduced by her long & severe suffering, she did not seem so near her end as I expected to find her. ­ She appeared pleased to see me, & I was very glad to find her so cheerful & resigned. I offered up a Prayer with them, & returned home, glad that I had had the opportunity of seeing her. 2. Ash-Wednesday. Had the usual morning service in the Church, at which 9 only attended, It was a rainy day, which I suppose kept some of the people away. 3. Rainy morning. ­ Remained at home, & spent the day looking out sermons for next Sunday, & preparing for my Clergy Widows' & Orphans' Sermon. ­ Budded a peach tree or two in the afternoon, & then called on the Lees. 4. Called on Mr Hungerford this morning to see if he had any tidings on Mrs Hungerford. While there two of his nephews came in from Maitland & said that she continued just the same. ­ In the afternoon I went to see Mr Green, he told me Dr Bowker had been up this day week, & gave him hopes of his leg being knitted in about 6 weeks. 5. Intended riding down to see poor Mrs Hungerford today, but this morning's post brought me a letter from Alexn Gittins, which required answering at once, & by the

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afternoon heavy rain set in, with thunder too, & at present it looks very much like the beginning of a March Flood. 6. Sunday. Rode to Branxton in the rain, but found no congregation there. No one expected me. Only 20 attended here in the evening. 7. Went to Maitland this morning, & after getting some lunch at the Chapmans, went out to see Mrs Hungerford302 - I found very little alteration in her, & she seemed to be in the same cheerful, happy state of mind, though evidently a great sufferer. I returned by way of Unambah, & called at John Naseby's (no one at home) ­ Nash & Bird's. 8. Rainy day again, which kept me indoors. Busy drawing out plans of Rothbury Church again for the Bishop (for Mr A: Shaw) Towards evening I went to call on Mr Taylor & the Redmans. Mrs Taylor is just able to walk a little on her sprained foot after being laid up for 8 weeks. 9. Very rainy again nearly all day, so I did not go out. Busy sermon-writing & writing to Benny. 10. do morning. ­ At home again all day. ­ finished my letter to Benny & did a little sermon writing. 11. At home all the morning, sermon writing. Paid Mr Green a visit in the evening. ­ River very high. 12. Soaking rain again all day, which prevented my going out as I intended to have done, to visit Mrs Hungerford again. ­ In the morning I was sermon-writing, in the afternoon taking down bedsteads & putting them up again ­ changing them. 13. Sunday. Owing to the bad weather, & muddy state of the roads, my congregations were small both here & at Branxton. ­ Black Creek was flooded so I could not reach Rothbury Church. ­ I went to Mr Holmes's & came home again. 14. Rode down to Maitland to see poor Mrs Hungerford. ­ Found Mr Chapman at the Burial Grounds, where he had a funeral, - after which we both went to visit Mrs Hungerford. She seemed to me much thinner & weaker than when I last saw her, but was free from pain. I think she cannot live many days longer. ­ I returned with Mr Chapman to the Parsonage & dined there, after which I did a little shopping, & went to see the wreck of the Flood Gates at Wallis Creek - & a sad wreck indeed it is. The river is still very high, the water pouring over the bank at the creek, & washing across the road. 15. Rain again this morning decided me upon staying at home. ­ Spent the day chiefly reading Guardians. In the morning assisted James to take down the iron tank in the corner, & re-adjust it after he had cleaned it. 16. Pouring with rain the greater part of the day, so kept prisoner again. Reading Guardians &c. I fear tomorrow will reveal a great flood again. ­ Wrote to Mr Wilson this evening, asking him to sent me 12 copies of the "Parish Magazine". 17. Another day's pouring rain has kept me indoors again. Had a good day's Guardian reading &c. Maria rode into Maitland on Comet, & brought back word that the back water had spread a long way past the long bridge. The showers this afternoon were tremendous; & the creek very high in consequence. 18. Still raining, & very heavily in the morning. I rode up to the Station to learn the state of the river, & also to see if Elizabeth from Singleton or Mrs Solling from Maitland should come by the train, but no one came. Had to wait till near eleven o'clock before the train came up from Maitland, or rather from Stony Creek, for they cd go no further, the line being under water. The mail had to be conveyed in a trollie from Elgin Street Station. I learnt from Mrs Ferris that the river at Singleton was rising at the rate of 2 feet per hour. ­ This evening we cd see distinctly the water backing up the creek from Windermere. I hear that the back water at Maitland just touched the under side of the Long Bridge, & is rising still.

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In the hospital?

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19. Only a few showers have fallen today which gives us hope of the weather breaking up at last. The River, however, has been rising all day, & I hear is 36 feet up at Singleton & still rising, while the backwater at Maitland is increasing very much, & is about 3 feet over the platform at Elgin Street Station. So we are told by Mrs Solling, who came up this evening by train from Stony Creek, having reached that far in a boat from their own house. I fear I may not be able to reach Branxton Church tomorrow, but we must see. 20. Sunday. A dismal rainy morning again, so I made no attempt to reach Branxton, Heard the River had fallen 9 feet at Singleton, but was rising again at Murrurundi. I sent James around among the neighbours to tell them that service would be at the Church at 3PM instead of the evening. By this I secured a small congregation of fifteen. In consideration of the long protracted rain & the great destruction going on from this flood of waters, I felt myself called upon to use the Prayer for Fair Weather. 21. Still raining this morning, & up to about 2PM. ­ In the afternoon I rode to the Allandale Station to see one of the railway men there (O'Neil) who is laid up with a badly bruised leg. He is a nephew of the late Mrs Swaddling of Brisbane Water, & I knew him there as a young lad. ­ On the way back I called on Mrs Clift & also the Ferrises. Learnt from Mr Ferris that the backwater is falling at Maitland, but the river was rising again at Singleton, & was over the banks this morning at Muswellbrook. 22. The first day without rain since the first of the month. I rode down to see Mrs Hungerford in the morning, & was glad to find her apparently better. ­ She looked much better & said she felt stronger & had a better appetite, But to add to her troubles two of her children have got Whooping Cough. I did not go into Maitland, having nothing to take me there & quite satisfied with the sad spectacle of the sea of waters all around the part I was in. ­ Mr Chapman was at the Burial Ground again, & went with me to see Mrs Hungerford. ­ After dinner I went to see Mr Green, who does not seem to be getting on at all well, & talks now of removing to Newcastle. 23. Went to Branxton today, & after making sundry calls there, rode on to the Wilderness, to give the people notice that the Bishop intends coming up next Sunday. 24. In the morning I called first on the Hungerfords, then on Mrs Pyne, who has come to reside at Lochinvar, & then went on to Kaloudah, where I stayed to dinner. In the afternoon I drove Mrs Solling & Lina to the top of Harper's Hill, but the sky was so covered with gloomy clouds that the view did not show to advantage. 25. At home all the morning, writing, &c. After dinner I drove Mrs Solling to Maitland to see how matters are getting on. The waters seem to be subsiding very slowly. 26. At home all day, sermon writing &c. 27. Sunday. very fine day, & that, added I suppose to the expectation of the Bishop's presence, gave me good Congregation at all three Churches. In the morning I baptized 3 infants here before the service & afterwards administered to 27 Communicants. 28. My intended visit to Cessnock was prevented today but heavy rain setting in again. Several smart showers fell at the Wilderness up to 11o'c: when it held up a bit, so I got my horse & came home. ­ Surprised to find there had been very little rain here. But it has commenced again this evening. ­ Mr Lewis Kelman is here tonight. 29. Pouring rain again today, so kept at home ­ Reading & so forth. 30. Rode up to the Station this morning to enquire the state of the river upwards, & was told it was rising fast at Singleton, but not at Muswell Brook. As Mrs Solling seemed desirous to return home this afternoon, I did not go to Branxton, but remained to drive her either to Maitland or the Station; but rain set in again in the afternoon, which decided her to remain till tomorrow. Page No: 191

31. Still wet weather, but rain much lighter today & it has shown symptoms of clearing up.

April 1870.

1. At home all the morning, sermon writing, & reading debate on the Divorce Bill. In the afternoon I drove Mrs. Solling & Lina to Maitland, to see whether their house was approachable, & happily found that it was, so I left them at a sliprail not far from their door. 2. Sermon- writing all the morning. In the afternoon I went to see Mr. Green, & was delighted to find they have some hope of his bones having united at last.- This of course has put them all in good spirits.- Gellatley came today to fix some new windows in the little verandah rooms. We have also a painter at work painting the Church. 3. Sunday. Bad roads & shorter days compelled me to lay aside the buggy, & go my rounds on horseback. At Branxton I baptized 2 babies before the service, & one at Poko[l]bin, (Rebecca Moore's), after the second lesson.- It was nearly 7 o'clock before I reached home, so that I barely had time to take a cup of tea. 4. After yesterdays hard work I felt entitled to a day's rest, so made it so. Read some "Guardian" etc.- Rain set in again this afternoon. 5. Mr Newman came down by the morning train from Singleton, & spent the day with us. The purpose of his visit was to obtain information about Brisbane Water, to which place he is shortly to be removed. He left again by the afternoon train for Maitland.- I then called at Humphrey's, Greedy's, & also the Lees. 6. Went to Morpeth today.- Quarterly Meeting of Trustees of "Widows & Orphans Fund".- Met Wm. Boydell in Maitland.- Cousin John arrived soon after I reached home. 7. This morning Mr Winder brought his child to be baptized.- A broken sort of day.In the evening we all went & called on the Ferriers.- Mrs. D'Arcy unwellInfluenza.- Cousin John suffering tonight from neuralgia. 8. Visited the School in the morning, then called at Tooze's & Glass.- In the afternoon visited Mrs. King,- Phillips- Taylor- & Redman,- Cousin John suffering all day from neuralgia. 9. To our great astonishment, just as we had finished breakfast, in came Mariannehaving arrived by early train from Newcastle, under John Wyndham's wing. It was indeed a most agreeable surprise, as we did not expect her before next week.Cousin John took his departure this morning, his toothache- or neuralgia- being very much better.- Of course the arrival of Marianne rather interfered with work I had marked out for myself, but having everything pretty well prepared for tomorrow, it did not signify so much.- In the afternoon I cut away all the vines from the verandah posts, preparatory to getting them painted next week. 10. Sunday. Rather a poor congregation here, but for what reason, I know not, the day being very fine. I gave notice for the annual collection, next Sunday, for the "Clergy Widows & Orphans Fund". Also for the Good Friday services at all the 3 Churches, beginning at Rothbury.- Had the Collection this evening at Rothbury for the W. & O. Fund amounting to 2-3-9, being an increase upon last year. 11. Having called upon Mrs. Cusack (little Georgy getting better) I came home this morning, calling by the way, first on O'Neil, at Allandale, & then on Mrs. Clift. This evening I called on Mrs. Jos. Greedy & then at the Hungerfords. 12. At home today, sermon writing. In the evening I called on Mrs. Cruise, & Mrs. Brown.- Fish & George A. called in the afternoon on their way from Maitland. 13. Went to Branxton today, & after making a few calls, spent most of the afternoon in cleaning the Harmonium. 14. At home all day Sermon-writing.

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15. Good Friday. I had arranged to begin my services today at Rothbury, & the come home round by Branxton, but very heavy rain in the morning stopped me from going to the Wilderness, so I sent James round to tell the people there wd. be morng. service here, by which means I got a congregation of 22. Had 44 at Branxton in the afternoon, & again a small congregation of 27 here at night. 16. A splendid bright April day after yesterdays showers. A long chain of interruptions hindered me a good deal in my sermon-writing in the morning, but in the afternoon I completed my Easter Day Sermon, which concludes with an appeal on behalf of the Clergy Widows & Orphans Fund. 17. Easter Sunday. Morng. Service at Branxton, where I had 23 Communicants, & a fair congregation notwithstanding the Elderslie people are still cut off by the swollen river. Had the collection for the Clergy Widows' & Orphans Fund today.At Branxton the amount was 4-17-11., & at Lochinvar with a congregation of 96only 2-1-10 of which 14/- was from ourselves. The total amount however, was a slight increase upon last year, being 9-3-6.- Bad headache at night. 18. At home all day taking holiday.- Wrote a letter to England, to Isabella. 19. Being Easter Tuesday, we had our Vestry Meeting for the election of Churchwardens.- The only persons who attended were, Mr. Hungerford, Mr. Clift, & Mr. Brown- the last was re-elected, & Mr Clift was elected, & I again chose Mr. James Doyle.- Towards evening Marianne & I rode to Windermere, & called on Mrs. Green who came up from Newcastle yesterday.- Her report of Mr. Green was not very encouraging, but he was no worse than when he left home.- Guy & Wad. Wyndham called while we were away. 20. A few little shopping matters requiring attention, we took advantage of the fine day, & all drove in to Maitland. Having completed our shopping, we called on the Chapmans, & then came home, calling at Mr. Winder's by the way. 21. We all went out to the Wilderness this morning. Called on the Clift[s] in passing. Just got home in time, as rain was beginning. 22. Rain again kept me in-doors.- Spent the morning looking over Synod papers, etc., & the afternoon in a variety of little jobs above the house. 23. At home all day.- Sundry jobs ran away with the greater part of the morning.Reading Guardians etc. the rest of the day. 24. A very wet night, & continued rain up to 9 o'c. this morning- so that I had only about 16 in Church, of whom 7 remained to the Communion.- Being fine in the afternoon I rode up to Branxton, but had no service, for I found the people all busily engaged moving out of their houses, as the water was rising (Sunday) fast upon them. I called at the Rudds, who came down from Muswell Brook only this morng. They reported the river over the banks both at Muswellbrook & Singleton. About 1 P.M. a special train passed up, conveying boats from Newcastle to Singleton, & Muswellbrook, too I believe.- The water at Branxton was just touching the sleepers of the bridge, & spreading gradually over Mr. Lindsay's garden. Rain set in again about 5 P.M., & continued all night, tho' not heavily. 25. Terrible Flood again, I think we shall find it higher than the '57 flood. I went up to the station this morning to ascertain the state of affairs: but no trains appeared from either side, nor cd. Mr. Ferris get any tidings at all from Singleton.- The river has been rising fast all day.- Anne & I rode to the top of Summer hill this afternoon, to see the flood, & a sad picture it presented.- Certainly higher than we have seen it before.- The Mill at Windermere was completely surrounded; & the water seemed nearly meeting across the roadway in front of the house.- It appeared to be still rising at Sunset. 26. The River still higher this morning, but was just beginning to fall again. I took Marianne & Jessie to the top of Summer Hill after breakfast, to have a good view of the waters. After dinner I rode down to se Mrs. Hungerford, & found her evidently better, & stronger.- The flood was coming close up to their house, & a

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terrible sight it was to see so many miles of water. It was running I shd. Think about 18 inches deep across the long bridge. 27. Began preparations this morning for bottling wine, but finding so many of the bottles dirty had to put off the bottling till they are washed. Did a little reading & some carpentering work.- Rain again- Called in the evening to see Taylor, who arrived here from Singleton. 28. At home all the morning- reading a little, & engaged at sundry jobs.- In afternoon I rode over to Kaloudah, to see how they were faring there after the flood.- Mr. Doyle showed me the mark that the water had reached to & said that 6ft. 4 inches more wd. Have brought it in to his house. 29. Occupied the whole day bottling the cask of wine, (Mr. Wyndham's Easter Offering).- Mrs. Doyle & her son William called this evening. 30. Our ears were gladdened by the sound of the Train-whistle again this morning, so that we get our mails again.- At home today.- Wrote a letter to Henry about floods sending him James's account of the '26 flood.- In the evening I drove Anne up to call on Mrs. Clift, whom we found getting on well, with her little baby.

May 1870

1. Sunday. Pokolbin day. A Baptism at Branxton threw me rather late, nevertheless I was at home again soon after 6.- The congregations were small at all three Churches, owing, I suppose to the unsettled appearance of the weather, & some of the good folks not having got over the effects of the late flood.- Alexr. Codrington was at Church at Branxton.- He has lately arrived from England with his wife. 2. We were going to the Wilderness today, but the threatening state of the weather made us alter our purpose, hoping for a finer day tomorrow. In the afternoon I called at Golding's & at H. King's, & was then caught in a shower on the way home. Wrote a few letters in the morning. 3. Another showery day kept me at home. The morning was spent in job work.chiefly fixing curtains in the verandah to protect the buggy.- Henry Lee called in the afternoon. 4. Weather still showery & unsettled. Remained at home reading etc. Called on the Lees in the evening & invited the young folks to spend the evening with us, which they did.- Henry is going off to Queensland in a day or two. 5. A fine day at last. I rode up to Branxton to see how the people there were settling down after the flood.- Called at the Lindsay's first.- The water had been within about 9 inches of the ceiling in the lower rooms.- In the mill the flood mark was just 22 inches above that of '57. It seems that all the houses on the north side of the road were more or less flooded. 6. Went to the School this morning for an hour. After that called on Mr. Hungerford.In the afternoon I took a walk out at the back.- Called first on Heyward, & then went on to Way's, caught in a shower coming home. 7. Thought it would do them all good to take them out for an airing today, as it promised to be fine- so we had old "Farmer" put in the Buggy & started off for Maitland; but we found the roads in such a terrible plight, that when a little more than half-way, we turned back again. Wm. & Louisa Doyle called this afternoon. 8. Sunday. Beautiful day, so I had good congregation again. 9. Spent the morning visiting about the Wilderness.- Called at Boughton'sCampbell, Wills, Patton, Blick & Crane,- also on Mrs Fuller on my way home.Found Mr Wills at home again, having returned unexpectedly from California. 10. At home.- Rather a broken day. Began pruning a few vines.- In the afternoon we drove to Kaloudah.

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11. Went to Branxton today & had my hour at the school. Made a few calls & rode home in the rain- only light rain. 12. This was the day appointed for our Clerical Meeting at Mr. Tyrrell's, but the pouring rain compelled me to stop at home.- Occupied reading Guardians & sermon-writing. 13. Took advantage of a brilliant day to ride in to Maitland to do a little shopping. Found the River very high, flowing across the road at the High Street enbankment, & still rising, but the people apparently little disconcerted about it- I suppose they are getting used to floods; this being the third in about 2 months. When I left Maitland, the water was just commencing to run over the bank behind the Northumberland. 14. Rode up to the station this morning, to see whether Emily Doyle came down from Singleton, or Mrs. Solling from Maitland, but neither came. In the evening I drove the buggy up with the like intent, but came back empty.- Saw Arthur in the train going to Singleton.- Sermon writing in morng. 15. Sunday. Small congregation at Branxton, & only 16 Communicants.- Baptized Mr. Hall's baby.- Good congregation here in the evening being a brilliant full moon. 16. Went to Dalwood today; calling on Mrs Putter by the way. Went on to Fernhill after lunch, & on the way back called on the Müllers, & on Mrs. McKenzie.Received a telegram this evening from Mary Collins, saying she intends being with us by early train tomorrow. 17. Drove to the station this morning to meet Mary. Marianne & Jessie accompanied me.- & we took James with us to drive them back again; as I went on to Singleton to see Bessy.- Called on Mr. Blackwood, as a matter of course.- Found Katie also there.- all well. 18. Began by driving Marianne & Mary to the station, to catch the train for Singleton.Next we drove up to see Mrs. Wilton who has been very poorly, but who is now better.- By the time we returned the day way [sic] nearly half gone, so I gave up my Branxton visit, & must go another day.- At 4 P.M. I again went to the station to bring Mary & Marianne home, & found Emily Doyle & her baby there, & brought her down also. 19. Began the day again by driving to the Station to Meet Mrs Ebbitts, who this morning. Marianne & Jessie of course accompanied me. ­ Being Marianne's birthday, I kept holiday at home. Lizzie & Ella Holmes came to spend the day escorted by Charlie. Rain set in again unfortunately in the afternoon, & gave them a wet ride home. ­ Townshend arrived this evening with his pony cart. 20. At home. ­ wet morning. ­ Engaged chiefly sermon-writing. 21. A broken day. Townshend left us this morning. ­ Charles Lee called soon after breakfast to say his father had been attacked with paralysis. Went to see him and found him speechless & almost unconscious, but I think he knew me. ­ Dr Wright came up to see him, & told me he had little hope of his recovery. I went to Maitland this afternoon, to get some cough medicine for the invalids. Called in at the Lees on my return. Poor Mr Lee seems sinking. ­ On going in again about 10 o'clock I found he had expired only a few minutes before. 22. Sunday. Only a small congregation here (62)- Administered the Holy Communion to 23. At Branxton I had a better attendance; but it came on to rain just as I left for Rothbury Church, & I found no congregation there.- The creek was rather deep, the crossing place being damaged by the recent floods.. 23. Came straight home from the Wilderness after breakfast, to be in readiness for the funeral of Mr. Lee, which took place soon after noon.- John Wyndham came down to visit the poor afflicted family, & called in here on his way back.Headache today.24. Remained at home all the morning, expecting Edwd. Tyrrell to bring his baby to be Christened, according to arrangement, but he did not come.- Occupied sermon writing for Ascension Day. In the afternoon Anne & I paid a visit to the Page No: 195

Lees, after which we all went to Summer Hill, except Anne.- I drove the buggy full, & Marianne rode on Comet.- The day was very fine over head, but the ground dreadfully sloppy- like an over-flowing sponge. 25. The weather was so unpromising in the morning that I did not go to Branxton. Spent the morning sermon writing. In the afternoon I walked to the station to see if Henry came down, but I got a letter from him instead saying he hopes to be here by early train tomorrow.- Charley Holmes came over today with "the Grey", & took Marianne & Mrs. Ebbetts back to the wilderness. 26. Ascension Day. Had morning service, with Holy Communion at Rothbury Church.- A small congregation of 27- of whom 16 remained to the Sacrament.Mrs. Ebbetts & Marianne returned with me from the Wilderness.- Found Mr. Townshend & Cousin John here. Katie also came, from Dalwood by the afternoon train. Townshend went on to Maitland, as we could not accommodate so many, & John has to get a bed at Greedy's.- Henry also came down in the morning to see Mary, & returned by evening train.- Had evening service here. 27. Cousin John drove Mary to Dalwood today.- I remained at home, but did not do much.- Wrote a letter to the Secretary of works about the Lochinvar Railway Lane. In the evening Anne & I called on the Lees. 28. Mr. Clift came down with his family this morning to have his baby Christened. He very kindly gave me a cheque for 10 to be expended on Repairs of the Parsonage. In the afternoon I was engaged making up a collection of vine cuttings for Mary to take to Queensland with her. In the evening soon after tea, I was taken ill with a sort of bilious attack- violent vomiting & purging, which continued for several hours, until at last I checked it with some burnt brandy.Townshend came again this evening but we could not give him a bed, being too full, so he went to the Lees. 29. Sunday. After last night's Illness I did not feel at all equal to the 30 miles ride & 3 services, & therefore did not even attempt the Branxton service. Sent word by Townshend that I could not come. Had the usual service here in the evening.30. At home all day, with the exception of a call I made on the Hungerfords in the morning, also on Mrs. Cameron, who has been very ill, but is now better.- Mr. Cameron has left us having removed to Dunmore, where he commences his duties today.- He is succeeded here by a Mr. Irving, from Bolwarra.- Mr. Edward Tyrrell & party came this afternoon & brought their little baby to be Xtened. 31. Went by early train to Newcastle, to attend the Synod of our Church. Mrs Ebbetts, Marianne & Jessie accompanied me to the station, & took the other train to Allandale, where Spencer was in readiness with the carriage to take them all out to the Wilderness.- We had a fine day at Newcastle for the opening of our Synod, and a very good attendance of both Clergy & Laity.- The usual course of proceeding was observed, namely,- we began with the Litany & Holy Communion in Xt. Church, after which we repaired to the City Hall, & as soon as the Synod was formally opened, the Bishop delivered his address ­ a most admirable one, as usual. - & we then adjourned for lunch. Re-assembled & 3 o'clock. - & had an evening sitting after tea. I got a few minutes after lunch to call & see Mr Green. (Mr Holmes also going with me.) In the evening I joined a large party at the Millard's.

June 1870.

1. Had a very interesting debate in Synod on the Presentation, or Patronage Bill, which occupied nearly the whole day.- Made an alteration as to the arrangement of time today.- prolonging the morning sitting till 2 o'clock, & the re-creating in the afternoon, & meeting again at 6.30.- I spent the afternoon making a few calls.-

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(1), on Mrs. Wallace- (2) on Mr. Wallace at his office, (3) on old Mrs. Shaw, who is staying with her sons at the "Great Northern". (4) on Mr. Green again, & (5) teaed with the Scotts, & then walked back to Synod with the Bishop. 2. Remained at Synod throughout the morning Sitting, & came home by the afternoon train. Had Mr. Nowlan for a fellow traveller to West Maitland.- Found Anne & Lina Solling waiting for me at the station with the buggy.- Katie left this morning so I just came home in time to prevent Anne's being left alone.- During my stay at Newcastle I was kindly entertained by Mr. & Mrs. Stokes, who took great care of me..- Mr. Stokes is a son of the Mr. Stokes, of the Firm of Stevens & Stokes, who originated the "Sydney Morning Herald". 3. At home all the morning, finishing a sermon for Sunday. In the afternoon we went out intending to call on Mrs. Pyne & Mrs. Cameron, but found too much water at the creek, from last night's rain, so we contented ourselves with a visit to Mrs. Cruise & Mrs. Hickie. 4. At home.- Morning preparing for tomorrow's services.- In afternoon drove to the station to bring the party home from the Wilderness.- They came by train from Allandale.- Townshend arrived towards evening. 5. Whitsunday. Nice congregation here in the morning, & 32 communicants.Townshend went with me to Branxton, & passed from thence with the Kelmans.Fair attendance also at Rothbury. 6. Went to Pokolbin & called on G. Moore, Jas. Moore, Birmingham, Wilson, & Pinchen, then came straight home.- Found Mrs. Ebbetts had gone to Singleton. 7. Having a little business to transact in Maitland, Anne & I took a drive down in the buggy, & went on to East Maitland to visit the Chambers.- The day was beautiful, & we enjoyed our drive. Mrs. Ebbetts returned from Singleton by the afternoon train. 8. Went to Branxton today, & spent the day visiting, & distributing Reports of Church work for last year.- Went out to the Joneses, & Mrs. Jones had only returned from Maitland two days ago where she had been obliged to undergo the operation of having her finger cut off. 9. While sitting at breakfast this morning, knock at the door called me out, & much to our surprise, there stood Mrs. Edward Mann, & one of her little boys, Teddy.- It appears she has been staying with a sister at Newcastle, & so came up to spend with us.- We took her back to the train in the afternoon, & then called to see Mrs. Ferris, & her baby.- On reaching home again we found Kate Nunn & Willy here, whom we were expecting. The greater part of today I have spent in writing letters.- a long one to Mr John Shaw. 10. Took advantage of the fine weather, & drove Mrs. Ebbetts to Maitland to do a little shopping. Marianne & Willy Nunn went also, & we had a glorious drive, notwithstanding the high westerly wind, which was very cold in our faces as we returned.- Mrs. Ebbetts went to Singleton by this evening's train, & all the young folks went to see her off.- James also drove Mrs. Cameron & her little girls up to catch the 4.27 train 11. At home all day sermon-writing etc. 12. Sunday. Being a beautiful day my congregations were good.- but the Elderslie folks are still cut off by the River, which is not yet fordable.- 23 Communicants at Branxton.- Gave notice at both Churches for a Collection next Sunday for the SPG. 13. Went to Stanhope today, but the people hardly expected me, so I had no service. I find there are three children there to Xten;- born since I was last there.- I crossed at Bendick's boat, & visited all the families on the Woodville estate. 14. At home, preparing my SPG sermon for next Sunday.- In the evening Anne & I called on Mrs. Pyne. 15. Mr. Wilkinson called this morning, & had an hour's chat with us.- Went to Branxton after his departure. Visited the School, & called to see Mrs. Hughes, Page No: 197

who is poorly.- An attack of Lumbago I think.- On my way home called on Mrs. Rostron. 16. Had all the chimneys swept today, which rather interfered with my indoor work.Called on Mrs. Eli King this morning, & in the afternoon Anne & I drove to Harper's Hill to call on the Andrew Doyles. Kate Nunn left us by early train this morning for Muswellbrook, en route for Scone.- Mrs Ebbetts returned from Singleton this evening, & Mr. Townshend popped in also with his pony cart. 17. At home all the morning Sermon-writing. In the afternoon drove Anne & Marianne, & Townshend as far as Mr. Ferriers, & leaving them there, I took Mrs. Ebbetts, Jessie, & Lina into the buggy, (they having walked that far) & drove them to the top of Harpper's Hill, to see the view. 18. Busy this morning fixing a thumb-latch onto the outer door of the back verandah.In the afternoon I pruned a few vines & then called on the Lees.- Mr. Fred. Wilkinson called this evening. 19. Sunday. Had my collection for the SPG at all three Churches. Amount altogether was 6-9-10. The amount at Lochinvar, though actually 3-9-10, cannot be said to be more than 1-2-10 from the Congregation, as 42/- came from my own pocket, & 5/- from Mrs. Ebbetts.- On the whole it was satisfactory to find an increase upon the collections of last year for the same object. 20. Went to visit the Wilkinsons today, calling at Campbell's & Wills's by the way. It was a lovely day, & the view from the Wilkinsons was very fine.- The sun was down when I left the "Wilderness", so that it was late when I got home.- I found our party diminished by the departure of Mrs. Ebbetts to Sydney this morning, & also of Mr. Townshend.21. At home all the morning.- Wrote to Mr. Langley, enclosing my SPG collections.In the afternoon I walked across to Windermere to call on Mrs. Green, & to my astonishment met Walter driving the Buggy to the station, to meet his Father who is coming home from Newcastle.- Called at Miller's also, & made an attempt to reach Way's but could not cross the creek. 22. Branxton day. Called on Mrs. Gibbs,- Terry- & Atkins, & then spent my usual hour at the School.- Called on the Lindsays on my way home. 23. Walked over to Windermere this morning to see Mr. Green.- Found him very well in bodily health, but there seems some doubt yet as the uniting of the bones of his leg.- He is able to get about on crutches, & is recommended to do so as much as he can..- From thence I started to pay a round of visits, calling at Way's, Bird's, Nash's, & James Nash's, & that finished out the day. 24. At home today, reading & sermon-writing. Had a visit in the afternoon from Miss Kelman, her brother James, & Minna & Ellen Holmes.- Towards evening I went to call on the new Schoolmaster, Mr. Irving, but he was away from home. 25. At home all the morning, reading etc. In the afternoon I rode up to Harper's Hill to see how Mrs. Andw. Doyle was, & found her, I hope, a little better, but still poorly.- On my way back called at Kaloudah. 26. Sunday. A glorious day for my Pokolbin journey, which I should have enjoyed much more, but for the dullness of my steed "Comet", who, like myself, has seen the best of his days, & is not so lively as a younger animal wd. be.- Had a nice congregation of nearly 100 here in the evening. 27. Did a little home visiting today, beginning with Emanuel in the morning. Then went to see Phillips, who was ill yesterday, but he had gone out. Learned from Mary Anne that Mrs. Henry King was ill.- went at once to see her.- She was up but very poorly,- On the way back called on Mrs. Taylor- suffering from a bad eye.- then on [to] the Redmans: found Mrs Redman in bed, sick. In the afternoon Anne accompanied me in the buggy to the station to meet Mrs. Boydell & Marianne, who came from Singleton by the 4 o'c train.- We called to see Mrs. Clift.- Cousin John came this evening.

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28. Drove Cousin John to Maitland this morning & then went on to Morpeth to see the Bishop, & also to get a few books from the Depot.- Had a very disagreeable drive home against a cutting cold wind. 29. Went up to the Coalmines this morning & administered private baptism to an infant child of Mark Hodges, the mother fearing it would not live, sent word to me yesterday, begging me to call there on my way to Branxton this morning.- I felt a bad headache coming on, so came home again with[out] going elsewhere. 30. Drove Mrs. Boydell & Marianne B. to Dalwood today- had a nice drive, & spent a very pleasant drive. On the way back I took them to the top of Harper's Hill.

July 1870

1. Remained at home today, hoping to have a quiet morning's work, but had not been long seated when Mr Buist arrived to see whether we required his services in the Piano Tuning [?] & seeing that our piano had not been tuned for more than 18 months, we were glad to employ him. This interruption quite disarranged my plans ­ towards evening I called on Mrs Dell. 2. Drove Marianne Boydell to Maitland this morning & left her at Mr Thompson's Horseshoe Bend. ­ Did some shopping, & then got home soon after 3. 3. Sunday. Glorious bright day. 22 Communicants only here. Glad to see a good sprinkling of Elderslie folks at Church in the afternoon at Branxton. Spencer & Minna Holmes were there also, having ridden in with the Kelmans, who had been staying at the Wilderness. 4. Went to Pokolbin this morning to pay a visit to poor Mrs Birmingham, who seems to be ailing greatly now, from her long established cough. ­ The weather was quite perfect, which made my journey a pleasant one. 5. Today being such a delightfully bright one, we all went to Summer Hill.- I drove Mrs. Boydell, Anne, Jessie & Lina Solling in the buggy, & Marianne rode on Comet.- The weather was perfection, & we never saw the view to greater advantage. 6. Having to attend the Quarterly meeting of the Trustees of Widows & Orphans Fund today; Anne took the opportunity of going to call on Mrs. Child, at Morpeth.Mrs. Boydell also went with us as far as Maitland, where we left her at Dr. Liddell's.- The weather was most glorious & enjoyable. 7. Intended going to Elderslie today, but felt a cold coming on, & thought I had better stay at home.- In the morning I just walked across the paddocks to visit Mrs. Henry King, whom I found much better, up & about. Wilton came this afternoon & killed our monster pig. 8. Drove down to Maitland this afternoon, to attend the Levee, which the Governor held at the Northumberland. Marianne went with me, & I left her at St. Mary's Parsonage while I attended the Levee.- It was a nice, calm, bright afternoon & we enjoyed our drive. 9. At home all day.- rather a troublesome cold upon me.- Pruned a few vines.- In the afternoon Mrs. Doyle brought Mrs. Louis Doyle's baby to be Christened. 10. The Bishop came, according to appointment, & I drove him to Branxton for Morning service, with Holy Communion.- Congregation of 90. Communicants 30.A nice congregation of 125 here in the afternoon. 11. Stanhope day. Began by marrying Walter Sparke & Alice Woodhouse, in their private dwelling. Then baptized 3 infants during the service. 12. At last , the river is low enough to cross easily at Elderslie: so I went up & paid them all a visit there. Had a long day of it, as usual, & came home very late.7.30.- Mrs. Solling came today.

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13. Went to Branxton today.- Baptized John Thrift's child, & then, after making a few calls, & distributing some Parish Magazines came home again, for it began raining about one o'clock, & seemed likely to continue. 14. Clerical meeting today at Mr. Thackery's.- I rode the pony in.- We had a very nice meeting. Mr. John Shaw, who was there, walked out here in the evening & stayed the night with us. 15. At home today.- Drove Mr. Shaw up to the station to catch the morning train to Muswell Brook.- Went to the School at eleven o'clock. Afterwards called Widow King (& her son Charles). Then on the old couple - Glass - & on Mrs. Tooze. 16. At home sermon-writing & preparing for tomorrows services. 17. Sunday. Being rather showery, my congregations were small. I did not go to Rothbury Church, as the afternoon was so rainy. I knew there would be no congregation. 18. Went to Crane's this morning to see Crane, having heard that he had met with an accident. I found him in bed, laid up with broken ribs,. He & Mrs. Crane were both jolted out of their spring cart about ten days ago, & the wheels passed over his body, & broke his ribs.-He seems to be getting on very well. Mrs. Crane was attacked suddenly with a fit, shortly before I got there, but on my way back from the Wilderness (where I dined) she was in a sound sleep, & therefore I hope, better. 19. Rode down to E. Maitland this morning, by invitation from John Wyndham, to meet Mr. G.B. White, who pointed out the flood mark of the great flood of 1826.On taking the level of that flood, & comparing it with the flood of April last, (the highest this year), we found that the flood of 1826 was about 20 feet higher than the late flood in April. The actual measurement we made 22ft. 2inches, but we could not be quite certain of the accuracy of the instrument, which was a little out of order. Mr. Darley, however, who was there, is going to take the level in a few days, & then we shall have the true measurement.- Mr. White told us that on the occasion of the '26 flood, there was not a single spot of dry land to be seen where West Maitland now stands, & that passing over it in his whale boat, with a crew of six men, the boat just grounded on the ridge (if I may call it) where St. Mary's Church now Stands. Moreover, he told us that Mr. Oxley, the then SurveyorGeneral, who witnessed that flood with him, said that he had seen much higher floods in the Hunter prior to that date.- Mr. Chambers & Mr. Mitchell (of Dunmore) were with us, while taking the levels, & before completing our survey we were joined by Mr. Keene, & Mr. Darley from Newcastle.- We all adjourned to the Hunter River Hotel, where J. Wyndham had provided a lunch for us, & then we were joined by Mr. Smith- Police Magistrate- & Mr. Eiper, of the Mercury Office.On my way home I called to see Mrs. Hungerford & was glad to find her so cheerful, tho' still very poorly.- She is up, & walks about a little. 20. Went to Branxton this morning- from there to the Joneses viâ Clark Orman's, & then home round by Crane's. Found Crane getting on very favourably, & Mrs. Crane well again. Came in rather late, & found Cousin John here. 21. Some small purchases being required in Maitland, I drove Anne & Marianne down in the forenoon.- It was a dismal foggy morning, & began raining before we reached Maitland, which rather spoilt the pleasure of our drive. Mr. Millard called during our absence. 22. Visited the School in the morning, & called on Mr. Hungerford. After dinner walked over to Kaloudah, calling by the way at Gellatley's, & McDermot's. 23. At home today, preparing for tomorrow's services, & reading. Sent James out with Cousin John in the afternoon to look for his horse, but the could not find him.- He got out of the paddock on Thursday night, & I suppose has gone home. 24. Sunday. A long & tiring day's work. Owing to the horrible state of the roads, & the dullness of my horse (Comet) I could not get along fast, which threw me rather behind time at Pokolbin. I had also the addition of the Baptismal service- (2 Page No: 200

infants) so that when I reached home, there was just 7 minutes only to rest before commencing my third service, & by the time that was finished, I felt I had done quite enough for one day.- At Pokolbin the congregation was somewhat better than usual. 25. At home today. In the morning I baptized an infant, brought to me by Mrs. John Green. Towards evening I rode old Farmer over to Windermere, to see Mr. Green, who continues much as usual. 26. I drove Marianne this morning to within a mile of Branxton, she having been invited to Miss Lindsay's wedding, which took place there at noon.- James rode the pony up for me, & having sent him on with Marianne, & to bring back the buggy, I turned off to Dalwood, wishing to see John if he were at home, which he was. On my way back I called on Mrs. Harper at Oswald.- This evening, at John Wyndham's request, I wrote a letter to Mr. Moriarty on the subject of the flood of 1826, giving him the information I had gathered from James, ......?, Scott, & Crane. 27. Began the day by going to the station to meet Marianne, & bring her home.- This broke so far into the day that I did not go to Branxton. Spent the morning writing letters, & the afternoon in visiting. Called on Mrs. Rose, a family lately come to Lochinvar, the on the Old couple Glass, & Mrs. Tooze, & the finished with a visit to the Lees.- Louis Kelman came in late from Maitland, & stayed the night. 28. Marianne & I took a ride up to Kirkton today. I had not been there for a very long time, & was anxious to see Mr. & Mrs. James Busby, who have been staying there lately, & whom I had not seen for nearly 40 years I think.- They left Kirkton this afternoon to go by the 4 o'clock train to Newcastle. Considering the state of the roads, we got through our journey very well.- We found Mrs. Kelman wonderfully well, & cheerful as ever. Her brother is of course greatly aged, & has become very deaf. His eyesight is also affected by the formation of a cataract on one of his eyes. 29. Wishing to see the Bishop about Licensing a Lay Reader for Branxton, I drove down to Morpeth, & took Anne with me to select a few books at the Depot. It was a nice calm day, & we enjoyed our drive, with the exception of the bad roads. 30. At home today, looking out sermons for tomorrow etc.- In the morning I went up to see Emanuel, who is suffering from an attack of Sciatica, or something of that kind.- The rest of the day I spent pruning vines. 31. Sunday. A satisfactory day regards the congregations which were good, & there were 31 Communicants here in the morning.- But I could not keep up to time at the other two Churches, & the roads being very bad I was a good deal fagged at night.- Moreover Mr. Wyndham handed me a note from John, expressing his inability to make the declaration about the 39 Articles, so I fear the help I expected from him as Lay Reader, cannot be obtained.

August 1870

1. After calling on Mrs Cusack, - Keevers & Drummond, I started homeward viâ Crane's, & then across by Dalgetty, calling at Shi?iars & Redgroves (they were away in Maitland). Also on Mrs Andrew Doyle. ­ Fred Wilkinson came & stayed the night with us, to be in readiness for his brother John's wedding tomorrow. ­ John also looked in in the evening. 2. Not at all a nice day for the wedding. ­ It rained gently all the morning, When the party came to the Church, at 2.30, it was a steady pouring rain. ­ I lent Mr Hungerford our Buggy for the occasion, the hood of which was very serviceable in sheltering the Bride (Jane). ­ The couple went off by the 4.27 train to Newcastle, Fred driving them to the station in the buggy & coming back pretty

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well drenched. This evening we have had a regular thunderstorm, but not very close to us, ie, the thunder, tho' the rain was very heavy for a few minutes. 3. After last night's heavy rain, I thought I wd not go to Branxton today, but let the road dry a bit, & go tomorrow instead. Made up my Baptismal Returns for the last month in the morning, - After dinner I went out a little, called on Mrs Cruise & Mrs Greedy, & then went to see Emanuel, who gets no better. 4. After visiting Emanuel, & calling on Mrs Gellatl[e]y & Mrs McDermot, I rode up to Branxton. Called & lunched at the Lindsays, then called on Mrs Rudd, Thornton, C. Hughes, J. Hughes, Nixon, & Mrs Cox. 5. Went to Emanuel in the morning & then called on Mr Hungerford. ­ bad headache all the afternoon: could not do much. 6. At home all day, Sermon writing. ­ pruned a few vines towards evening. 7. Sunday. Although the state of the River cut my Elderslie folks off from the Church, there was a good congregation at Branxton, & 24 Communicants. ­ Had a Baptism there also before the service. The evening congregation here was very fair also. 8. Stanhope day. Only 8 attended the service. Called at Dalwood, & on Mrs McKenzie on the way back. ­ Marianne, Jessie, Lina Solling went to the Wilderness this morning per train. In the afternoon James drove Anne & Mrs Lee over to Kaloudah in the Buggy. ­ Poor Mr Doyle is very seriously ill. ­ I must go & see him in the morning ­ Mr Wilkinson called this evening & chatted for an hour or so 9. Went to Kaloudah after breakfast, but did not see Mr Doyle, as he is forbidden to see any one. Mr Hartigan was there. He seemed to think his case a very serious one. Congestion of the lungs seems to be his complaint. ­ After dinner Anne & I drove to Oswald to call on Mrs Harper. ­ I went to see the Samuels also, who have lately lost a child, a girl of 11 yrs of age. ­ On our way back we looked in at Kaloudah ­ Mr Doyle much the same: Dr Bowker had been up to see him. 10. Maria & James have had a holiday today, to go to the Singleton Show, so that Anne & myself are left at home by ourselves. ­ I was in the act of saddling Farmer this morning to go to Kaloudah, when William Doyle came in to report on his Father, whom he described as much the same, - I did not go therefore but went & paid a visit to Emanuel, whom I found much the same. After dinner we drove up to the station to get a bag of oranges which was sent us from Dalwood last week. Called on Mrs Clift. Met Mr Fitz at the station, from whom I was glad to hear that Mr Doyle had taken a favourable change since the morng. 11. Went to Kaloudah after breakfast, & found Mr Hartigan there who did not report favourably of Mr Doyle: They all seemed to fancy he was better this morning but Hartigan detected some unfavourable symptoms which he did not like. He went on to Maitland, & from thence intended going to Newcastle, with a view to bring Dr Bowker up in the morning. ­ I spent the rest of the morning pruning vines, & in the afternoon Anne & I made a few calls in the lane, among the rest I called to make the acquaintance of a new family, named Morris, lately come from Hexham. 12. Went to Kaloudah this morning, & was truly glad to find that Mr Doyle was much better. ­ Three doctors had been to see him, namely, Bowker, Scott & Hartigan, & there report was very favourable. ­ On my was back found Emanuel at work in his shop again. ­ Vine pruning today. 13. Had a good day's vine pruning today, & have got through the greater part of them. ­ Whether it was standing on the wet ground all day, or from any other cause, which I know not, I was taken ill again in the evening, & feared another attack of bilious Diarrhoea; but I checked it with a dose of Chlorodine ­ Townshend arrived with his pony cart this evening, after dark of course: & the girls came back from the wilderness. 14. Sunday. Got up with a headache this morning & did not feel at all equal to the day's work. I got through the service pretty well, however, & then Townshend Page No: 202

accompanied me to Branxton, where there was a large congregation. At the conclusion of the service my head was so bad & I felt altogether so unequal to the third service at Rothbury, that I did not go there, but Townshend rode on to say that I was unwell, & ask Mr Holmes to read the service for me, & I just rode leisurely home. 15. Had a quiet day at home to rest myself & recruit.- Spent 2 or 3 hours in the garden, & very nearly finished the vine pruning. Mr. Solling called this afternoon to arrange for Lina's return home tomorrow, her Mamma having come back from Sydney. 16. At home again.- Finished my vine pruning, & filled up a few vacancies where I planted some last year. In the evening I went to call on Mrs. Pine, but got no answer to my knock at her door.- Out I suppose. Lizzie Holmes came today to spend a few days with us, & Lina Solling left us by the afternoon train. Townshend also came back this morning. 17. Drove Anne up to Branxton today for a little change.- I baptized a child for James Thrift.- We then drove round by the Station, called on Mrs. Cox, & then, rain commencing, we came home, calling in at Kaloudah by the way. Mr. Doyle better, but his brother very ill. 18. Having heard yesterday that a man at the coal pits, named Lewis, had met with an accident in the pit, by the coal falling in upon him, I went there this morning, & found him, as I hope, not so seriously hurt as I expected, & hope he will recover from his injuries, which are internal, about the kidneys. After visiting some of his neighbours, I returned home to dinner. After dinner I took Lizzy Holmes & Marianne to Maitland (all on horse back) to do a little shopping. On the way, a man from the coalmines overtook us, hurrying to Maitland for the doctor to come up & see another man- Barber- who met with a similar accident today to that which befel Lewis yesterday.- I must go & see him tomorrow. 19. Went to Dalwood & Fernhill today with Lizzie Holmes & Marianne.- I intended going from there to the Coal mines to see Barber, but hearing on the way that he is not considered in danger, I thought it as well to postpone my visit till tomorrow. 20. Baptized a child this morning for a man named Spratt.- a Carrier,- stranger to me. Spent the rest of the morng. preparing for tomorrow's services.- In the afternoon, I went first to Kaloudah, where I saw Mr. Doyle for the first time since his illness came upon him. He is now rallying nicely, & took his seat at the dinner table today.- From there I rode out to the Coalmines, to see Barber, & Lewis, both of whom, tho' much injured, are I trust not dangerously hurt. 21. Sunday. Not a very large congregatn. At Branxton.- I found the road to Pokolbin horridly cut up by the heavily laden drays. Disagreeable ride home, partly with rain. Nearly 7 o'c. when I came in tired enough.- Only 38 in church here, & when we came out of Church at 9.20, I felt that my day's work had at any rate had been long enough if not too long. 22. Feeling all the day the effects of yesterday's overwork..- Spent the greater part of the day in the garden, tying up vines. 23. We all drove to Morpeth today, to select some books & tracts from the Depot besides transacting a little business in Maitland by the way. The day was beautiful, & we enjoyed our drive much. 24. Went to Branxton today, calling at the Coalmines by the way, to see the two invalids there, Lewis & Barber, both of whom seem to be doing very well.- Called on Mrs. Farthing also.- Spent an hour at the Branxton School & then came home. 25. Went to Dalwood this morning, via Oswald, where I called to see Mrs. Samuel, leave her some books. Saw a Mr. Key there, who, it appears is coming to reside at Oswald.- After lunch at Dalwood, John Wyndham & I repaired to Mark Putter's, for the purpose of Marrying the old couple over again, for it has lately been discovered that at the time of their marriage (some 23 years ago or more) Mark's

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wife was the alive in England, consequently it was no marriage, but now I have been able to make them really Man & Wife. 26. At home, with the exception of an hour spent at the School in the morning. Mr. Lewis Kelman came in the evening & stayed the night with us. 27. At home all day. The morning spent in Sermon writing, & preparing for tomorrow's services, afternoon reading. 28. Sunday. Though the day was fine, my congregations were not.- Only 21 Communicants here. 29. Spent the day visiting the following families.- Campbell, Wills, Geo. Crane, Geo. Chick, Lambkin, Joas, Williams, Whites, Matthews, & the took Keevers on the way home.- Got home late & tired. 30. In the morning called to say Good bye to Mrs. Pyne & husband, who have left Lochinvar, & removed today to Mr. Eales. Then went on to Kaloudah, where there are still some invalids, though Mr. Doyle is quite recovered apparently. His brother has been very poorly again, but better this morning.- In afternoon I visited the Neal family, & the Misses Day.- Found the Neals preparing to take their departure for "Up the country".- They purpose moving to Tamworth.- The English Telegram, published in yesterday's Herald, gave us the startling intelligence that war is raging between France & Russia. 31. Branxton day, & being fine, & the roads dry, we all drove up in the buggy, & I left them at the Lindsays while I went to the School, & paid a few visits.

September 1870

1. Set out this morning intending to visit the coalmines. Called at Kaloudah first to see Mr. Doyle, who has had a slight relapse, but seems better again. Before I reached the top of Harpers Hill it began raining so I turned back, & spent the afternoon sermon writing.- As it turned out a thick rainy afternoon I was very glad I had not gone on.- Fred arrived from Singleton by early train this morning. 2. At home today- Spent an hour at the School..- Fred. & Marianne took a ride to the Wilderness.- On their return Fred took the train to Newcastle, & I went up to bring the pony from the Station & escort Marianne home. 3. Just after breakfast this morning I received a note from John Wyndham, conveying the painful intelligence that his mother had died early this morning, & requesting me to come up for the burial this evening at 5 PM.- I went accordingly, after dinner, & performed the painful duty.- No one beside their own family was present, except their old friend Mr. Wilkinson.- Not even one of their domestics was present or took any part in the funeral. The grave was dug on the top of a rising ground, about halfway between the house & the river- a very nice spot, selected I believe by herself, & the body was borne to the grave by four of her sons- George, Frank, Guy, & Wad.- Kate Nunn arrived from Scone by this evening's train. 4. Sunday. A delightful calm, & peaceful day, but rather warm. I was doubtful whether I should see any of the Wyndham family at Church, but at the same time, being Communion Sunday, I thought it not unlikely some of them would be there.Was much gratified to see them all, as usual, in their places, & to administer the Communion to seven of them, including old Mr. Wyndham himself, to whom it must have been a sorrowful trial, experiencing the sad blank in his seat in the Church.- I found it rather a struggle myself, when we began the Communion Service. 5. Stanhope day. Found poor old Mrs. Bolland very unwell, & had a congregation of 4 only. On my return called in at Mark Putter's, & then at Dalwood, where I received the joyful news that Emily has a little son, born on the 1st. of this month.

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A letter from Charlie by this morning's post also brought us the same good news.both doing remarkably well..6. At home all the morning. After dinner Anne & I took a drive in to Maitland to do a little shopping,- also to get a small bolt to the wheel of the buggy- one having broken.- It was a fine, mild afternoon & we enjoyed our drive greatly. 7. Instead of going to Branxton today, I took a walk on the other side of the river, chiefly for the purpose of visiting Fairhall, who has been rather unwell of late. I extended my walk us[sic] as far as Parker's, calling at Burgess's by the way.Called to see Mr. Green both going & coming. 8. At home all day, chiefly sermon-writing. In the evening Anne accompanied me in a few calls among the neighbours close at home.- Lee-Dell-Pring-Phillips, & Taylor.- The Redman's & Mrs. Taylor were away in Maitland. 9. Visited the School in the morning, then called on Mrs. Tooze, & Glass.- Sermonwriting most of the day. Mrs. Doyle called in the afternoon. 10. Not very well today.- Remained indoors reading etc. 11. Sunday. A very fine day. Congregations fair, but not overwhelming.- Bad colds are very prevalent just now, & I think some of the people are away in Sydney at the Great Exhibition. Found Mr. Holmes ill with a cold & cough, & Charlie laid up in bed. 12. Went straight to Joass's in the morning & baptized his baby.- I then went on to Mr. Tyrrell's. Found Mrs. Tyrrell at home, but he had gone out. Came straight away home after calling on Mrs. Cusack,. 13. Drove Anne to Dalwood today, taking advantage of the fine weather & the dry roads.- Found that Mr. Wyndham, Fishy & Wad had gone off to Sydney this morning. After lunch we drove on to Fern Hill, & then took in Woesilhah [?] on the way home. 14. Branxton day.- After making a few calls, spent an hour at the school, & then had my singing class again. Mrs. Solling's Lina came up by train this morning, & spent the day with us.- Cousin John arrived in the evening. 15. Clerical meeting at St. John's, Newcastle.- There were several absentees, but nine of us were present, & we had a very nice discussion. The chief point was as to the meaning of the word "Oblations" as used in the prayer for the Church Militant.- On putting the matter to the vote, in the form of a resolution, there were 5 for, & 4 against the word having reference to the bread & wine.- On my return home I had our old Brisbane Water acquaintance Mr. Woolfrey, for a fellow passenger. 16. At home today. Baptized the constable's child in the morning, & the went to the School, but found it empty- the children had a holiday.- Employed the rest of the day sermon writing, & reading a little of the "Guardian".- Cousin John went to Newcastle today to see Mr. Selwyn, but unfortunately he was out, & he only got a ten minutes glimpse of him before he came away. 17. Cousin John left us by train this morning to return home.- I rested at home today in view of my 33 miles journey tomorrow.- Spent the day reading, & writing letters. 18. Sunday. small congregation at Branxton- why, I know not.- At Pokolbin I had more adults than usual- Baptized two infants there.- Got home in better time today (6.15) the roads being much better. Not a very good attendance here.- too many absentees.19. We intended driving to Morpeth today, but Kate Nunn was not very well, so we put it off, hoping to accomplish it tomorrow.- Employed myself sermon-writing.Miss Hungerford called in the afternoon, also Chas. & Fred. Wilkinson on their way to Dalwood. Fred starts for Bukkulla tomorrow. 20. My turn to be not well enough to go out today, so we again postponed our drive to Morpeth: & well we did, for it clouded over & began raining before noon.Occupied writing sermon, & reading etc. etc. Received a Telegram this evening

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bringing War News viâ California. The French defeated by the Russians303, with great loss.- Prince Imperial, & all the jewels sent to London for safety! 21. Not at all well today, & could do very little even at home in the way of reading or writing.- I have resolved to go to Singleton & consult Henry tomorrow. 22. Went to Singleton & consulted Henry, who says it is just an attack of Influenza I have, & which numbers have been suffering lately, including himself. He gave me a big bottle of physic wh. he hopes will have the effect of restoring me.- In addition to his medicine I may take as much Dalwood Red as I like- of course within the bounds of moderation. 23. My Influenza rather worse today.- Cough became very troublesome towards evening- & limbs full of aches & pains- very restless & feverish till past midnight, when I fell off to sleep.- John Wyndham called in eveng. 24. A little better, I hope, today- not so much cough, & less pain.- Was able to do a little writing. 25. Sunday. Found the morning service here- with Communion, almost too much for me.- It increased my coughing very much.- Did not venture elsewhere. 26. Felt better again this morning, & spent it sermon writing.- In the afternoon, the weather being mild & balmy, I walked up the Lane to see Mrs. Henry King, & paid a few other visits, which I ought not to have done, for it brought on a terrible coughing fit after I got home. 27. Bessy ...sse, & children came down by train this morning from Singleton, en route for Trevallyn. Guy arrived from Dalwood with his buggy a few minutes afterwards, & after an hour's resting started off, & must have had a disagreeable drive up the Paterson against a high & rather warm Norwester. 28. Not satisfied with the progress, or rather the no progress of my bodily ailments I went to Singleton today to consult Henry again, who changed my medicine, ordering Alfred's diary stops here in mid-sentence.

303

Prussians, not Russians!

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Peregrinations of a Pastoral Parson:

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