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Defense &

IntelligenceCareers.com Career Guide

A Guide To Information Intelligence Careers

Compiled, Edited and Commented by William D. Golden Director, IntelligenceCareers.com Contact Info: [email protected] 1.800.919.8284

Available online at www.intelligencecareers.com/careerguide.cfm Copyright 2002, IntelligenceCareers, Inc. All Rights Reserved v2002.07.19 r4

IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Contents

Introduction What is an Information Intelligence Career? Market Outlook for Some Career Specialties Career Change: Getting Into Intelligence & Cleared Careers How Much Are You Worth? Your Resume ­ An Important Yet Tricky Document Organizations That You Should Know About Recruiters That You Should Know About Using the Internet To Find Jobs Career Fairs and Career Fair Cultures Security Clearances ­ Passport to Success 3 4 5 6 8 9 14 19 26 27 28

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Introduction

Welcome to the IntelligenceCareers.com Career Guide. Your suggestions and ideas about how to improve the guide are welcomed. This is a living document and is updated several times monthly. Send comments, corrections, and recommended additions to [email protected] As an initial version document there are many things that can yet be added. Below are just some of the areas to be covered in future versions: * Apprenticeships & Internships * Competitive / Market Intelligence Careers * Foreign Intelligence Services (for non-US citizens) * U.S. Government Intelligence (CIA, FBI, NSA, etc.) * International & Regional Organizations such as the UN, NATO, etc. * Law Enforcement Intelligence * Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) * Non-US Intelligence Opportunities * Open Source Research Careers * Overseas Opportunities Best regards, William D. Golden Director, IntelligenceCareers.com [email protected]

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

What is an Information Intelligence Career?

An Information Intelligence Career has 7 primary foci:

Computing, Mediation & Fusion Technology

! !!!

Analyst Tools, HSI, & Human Factors

Domain Of Interest Communications Technology

CBT

Reporting & Data Dissemination

Actionability

Customer Information Needs & Expectations

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Market Outlook for Some Career Specialties

Competitive Intelligence ­ there is a strong market for competitive intelligence, market intelligence, technology transfer monitoring specialists (security clearance often required), and business developers in almost every city in the USA and by any company that competes for business via contracts. Engineers ­ C4ISR and SIGINT engineers are in short supply and in big demand in Aurora-Colorado SpringsDenver CO, San Diego CA, Northern Virginia, Annapolis-Columbia-Linthicum-Baltimore MD, and Hampton Roads-Norfolk-Suffolk VA. The requirement for security clearances runs the spectrum from SECRET to TOP SECRET/SCI with Full/Lifestyle polygraph. Intelligence Analysts ­ 2002 is a good year to be an intelligence analyst, and 2003 may be as well. However, the market for intelligence analysts is usually hidden from public view and opportunities are normally hard to identify. To be competitive you must have a TOP SECRET/SCI security clearance. A Full/Lifestyle polygraph will up your value considerably. Major markets for intelligence analysts are limited to a few intelligence hubs: Fort Meade MD, Washington DC, Northern Virginia, Stuttgart Germany, and Camp Eagle Bosnia. Minor markets: Tampa FL, San Diego CA, Honolulu HI, Aurora-Colorado Springs-Denver CO, Johnstown PA, Rome NY, Manassas VA, Orlando FL, and Hurlburt Field FL. Places where there should be demand but opportunities are obscured or hard to find: Charlottesville VA, Fort Bragg NC, San Antonio TX, and Fort Huachuca AZ. ----- Word to the wise: get your BA/BS degree, stay close to major intelligence hubs, learn new things. The current boom market will be unpredictable as to its duration or number of opportunities. Industry (and government) often considers intelligence analysts to be budget busters and expendable. ----- CounterIntelligence & HUMINT: I believe that this will be a growth market for years to come. You should largely ignore the above advice about the markets for intelligence analyst skills ­ you should pick an area of the USA or world that you want to live and work and there is a good chance that someone will be looking to employ you; alternate careers with potential and for which you have very appropriate skills: competitive intelligence and corporate security. Linguists ­ There is a sizeable market for linguistics but limited demand for professional linguists. Being a linguist is not a viable long-term career option. The exception is if you are a government or military linguist ­ but even then you should diversify and realize that your value as a linguist could disappear overnight. (Been there, done that: Czech, French, German, and Russian). However, your language skills can be a major reason to employ you ­ the trick to success is being a Something-that-also-has-language-skills; example: competitive/market intelligence analyst, intelligence specialist, policy analyst, open source researcher, etc. For former (or about to be) military and government linguists you should normally identify yourself as an `Intelligence Operations Specialist'. Refocus each and every point of discussion during preemployment interviews to portray yourself as an `Intelligence Operations Specialist' with linguistic skills. Network Specialists ­ NT / MCSEs, Linux, Solaris and Unix box network administrators and engineers with security clearances have always been in demand and these areas will remain in demand for the foreseeable future (2002-2003). ISSA and CISSP certifications will increase your value significantly. Systems and network security (INFOSEC, Information Assurance, Information Operations) experience should bring a premium ­ but these are not `overnight technical school' kinds of careers. If INFOSEC and Information Assurance sounds interesting then explore the opportunities and block out the next few years to become an Information Jedi. Science, Technologists and R&D ­ Lots of opportunities that could not be covered in less than a chapter or two. If you have a security clearance, and do not object to possible relocation, then opportunities exist for almost any specialization. Some premium skills currently in demand: RF engineers, C4ISR anything, and Radar. Hot states for your Science, Technology and R&D skills: CA, CO, MA, MD, NJ, NY, OH and VA.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Career Change: Getting Into Intelligence & Cleared Careers

Intelligence Careers are often accidental careers. Many veterans of intelligence service wandered into their line of endeavor while engaged in 'problem solving' activities unrelated to 'intelligence'. Some key points to ponder: -- Opportunities in Federal Government are far fewer than in the Armed Services. -- The defense industry, even in good times, has few entry-level positions. -- The defense industry needs experience and security clearances to put you to work. -- Security clearances can take as long as 18 months to acquire. You cannot be used in most environments without a prior government security clearance. -- Acquiring a security clearance comes ONLY from government service or employment by a defense contractor with national defense requirements. -- Except for rare engineers, government service offers most entry-level opportunities requiring a new security clearance; "entry-level" meaning that someone is willing to give you a paycheck without you already having a security clearance -- your knowledge and experience have value ONLY if you readily usable. Professional Value Bottom line: To succeed have patience, focus and a 2-5 year plan. You must also be realistic -MOST intelligence specialists have recent military or government backgrounds (within last 24 months). If you are unwilling to join the Armed Forces for a 3-4 year stint then you are decreasing future opportunities by as much as 90%. Options to Military Service: If you are opposed to exploring military service: -- There are entry-level opportunities in the civilian intelligence agencies. However these positions are rare and a multitude of candidates often compete for each position. Minimum education: BA/BS degree. -- Many miscellaneous opportunities exist in Federal Government outside of the mainstream agencies. You'll find these positions listed at http://www.usajobs.opm.gov/ -- Seek out the largest defense contractors. They may have an interesting commercial sector positions that you can use as a springboard to 'hire from within' opportunities for national defense contracts. Example: join Boeing and aim for Boeing Autometric; other candidates: Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems.

Your focus needs to be on having some 'problem solving' value. Intelligence professionals are like bandaids - they are applied as needed. Have you asked yourself WHY you are needed? The answer should be that you have some level of expertise that can be used in problem solving. Many more thoughts on this are available is our downloadable career guide at: http://www.intelligencecareers.com/careerguide.cfm Finding Open Doors

Assuming that you have at least a BA/BS degree (with exception to military service), below are some recommendations for finding entry-level or career changer positions: Career Fairs -- Seek out the CIA, DIA, FBI, NSA and State Department. They often attend at academic, professional and technical events. -- Seek out other federal agencies. They probably have MORE opportunities than some mainstream agencies. -- University career events - universities with strong programs in computer science, foreign languages, information science, international affairs, policy - foreign or public - offer many unique opportunities. Be bold! Ask your professors - quite a few consult for government agencies or defense contractors. Seek out research opportunities in research contracts the university may have with government. -- IntelligenceCareers.com has its own career fair series. Our series are focused primarily on transitioning cleared professionals from one challenge to the next. If you do not have a security clearance you will find our events educational but not necessarily a door opener.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Agency Internships Most intelligence agencies offer internships for college students, and many even offer programs for high schoolers. -- Check out: www.cia.gov, www.fbi.gov, www.nsa.gov Defense Industry Sometimes it pays to think big. VERY FEW small to mid-size organizations have entry-level positions, or positions by which you can gain a security clearance. You need to target large organizations like BAE Systems www.baesystems.com, Boeing www.boeing.com and Lockheed Martin www.lockheedmartin.com -- These organizations will pose a challenge to you as well and patience yields the reward. You want to get into these organizations because, once you are on the payroll doing something productive, they can often sponsor you (via their government contracts) for a security clearance. Being on the payroll however is no guarantee of being sponsored. You will have to seek out 'hire from within' positions that require a security clearance. If you are academically, professionally and technically qualified then there is no reason that you shouldn't be selected. -- An EXCELLENT source of who the players are around the world is available from membership in the Armed Forces Electronics and Communications Association (AFCEA). AFCEA publishes its 'Source Book' annually with the names, numbers and mission of defense contractors from around the world. A hardcopy is sent to members and a searchable version is online at http://www.afcea.org/sourcebook2002/results2.asp Government Service Three main opportunities: civil service (federal), military service or service within one of the intelligence agencies. -- Civil Service - many federal positions require a security clearance. The rule for civil service opportunities is akin to those in industry: Come in as entry-level and then seek 'hire from within' positions. Once you have your security clearance then your options grow immensely. -- Intelligence Agencies - CIA, DIA, FBI, and NSA recruiters can often be found at most large career events oriented to educated professionals. You should also visit their websites. -- Military Intelligence - the Armed Forces are the great source of the majority of security clearances held today. It is the fountain of experience common to many in the civilian intelligence services, and the great source of cleared personnel for industry. Military Intelligence and Armed Forces service has no near competitor in being the means to gain those security clearances that industry needs and seeks. About military service: -- Lack of a degree will not hinder you in getting a military intelligence position. The military will in fact pay for you to get your degree through part-time study and even after you complete military service. -- I strongly advise seeking out the counsel of a former military intelligence professional before wandering into a recruiting office. The military has a large need for fresh talent and dealing with a recruiter can be like wandering onto a car dealership.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

How Much Are You Worth?

Presented below are some thoughts on how to determine your value in the defense and intelligence marketplace. Datapoints for determining your value: Nr. 1 - Do other folks like yourself exist in private industry or government? If the answer is yes then you need to find a relevant salary survey. For example, if you are a network administrator go to Google and put in the following keywords: "salary survey network administrator" -- you'll get plenty of information. Search for something current within the last year. * Technologist shortcut http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupdate/filters/salaryzone/welcome/ * Salary surveys almost NEVER include information about the value of security clearances so the survey will shortchange you. A "Secret" clearance may add 5% to your value but only if the employer doesn't generally help new hires get a secret clearance. A "Top Secret" or "Top Secret SCI" should add 10-15% to your salary survey value. If a polygraph is required as a prerequisite for employment, but is not provided prior to hire, then boost your value to 20% over the salary survey. If provided as part of the employment process then there is no extra value. * A reliable salary survey will present findings across a spectrum of at least two major variables: skill level (junior, mid-level, senior) and location (region or major city). Any survey without these variables should be considered dart board material -- if a salary is reported as an average then subtract 15% if your skills are junior and add 15% if you are among the best. * Be honest with yourself about your skill level. Do not think of yourself as senior unless your skills are matched by only a few peers. These things have a way of catching up with you. * Be mindful of where your job will be located. It doesn't matter if you live in the country as long as the job is in a major city. Your job should be valued based upon its location. For example, the bulk (75.32%) of network administrators surveyed by ZDNet make between $29-60K (those making over $50K are rarer). Less than 5% make more than $70K. Honest self analysis is essential. (The MANY radio commercials about how much network administrators can make are very misleading). * Look at the cost of living differential (locational pay) if you work in a nearby city. A very good cost of living calculator will come in handy -- example: I live near to Woodbridge, Virginia which is only 19 miles from Alexandria, Virginia. The difference in the cost of living between the two cities is very stark. If I made $50,000 per year in Woodbridge then I would need to make $80,820 to have an equivalent lifestyle in Alexandria. Your job should be valued where your job is located. Nr.2 ­ Are you unique: intelligence analysts, linguists, market & competitive intelligence, etc.? There are several ways to approach this. Do you have a government equivalent? For example, if you are an imagery analyst - what grade of government employee would normally perform the job that you are undertaking? If the answer is an E-7 or GS/GG-12 then the answer is pretty straightforward: Add 15% to the salary of the relevant government employee. Many contractors receive contract awards with the understanding that they are essentially replacing a government employee on a temporary basis. (If you are working onsite with "the customer" then this is almost always true. Some snooping or accurate guestimating should determine the relevant government employee grade. Companies really do not have a lot of leeway in salaries under these conditions. You should also factor in whether the government employee would normally be entitled to a cost of living allowance for that location. If so then factor the allowance into your own salary calculation: Formula: ================

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Government employee grade $alary + 15% + location cost of living allowance (if any) -------------------------------------------------= $alary negotiation starting point No allowance for security clearance was made because the assumption is that the relevant government employee would have the same clearance. * Linguists: your value is extremely relative. Primarily only the government employs linguists as a primary careerfield and skillset. You need to reposition yourself as an 'Intelligence Operations Specialist' that also has language skills in language A, B or C. * No government or industry equivalent job position? Then your salary will be relative and relevant only to select employers. I will write about strategies for folks like yourself more in the future. However for now you may want to consider using something like the formula below. $37,000 base salary (national USA average) +/- cost of living // see footnote below +/- education (HS only -$5K, AA/AS=$0, BA/BS +$5K, MA/MS +$10K) + experience ($2K x years of relevant experience, max 10 years) +/- skill expertise (junior -$5K, midlevel=$0, senior +$10K) +/- contract basis (replacing government employee? = $0, R&D or product focused company +$5K) +/- desperation factor (recruiter says folks like you are hard to find! +$5K) ------------------------------------------------= $alary negotiation starting point

TIP! Find out how your Zip Code compares to the average American's cost of living: http://list.realestate.yahoo.com/realestate/neighborhood/main.html -- add or substract the difference between your area and the average American. If the average (or median) income in your zip code is $55,000 then add $18,000 (55K - 37K = 18K) Does this work for you? If you are an intelligence professional please use this formula and let me know how close it comes to your own current income -- [email protected] -- also include your thoughts as to what may influence the differences in my formula and your income.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Your Resume ­ An Important Yet Tricky Document

About your resume: keep it simple, make it understandable, and for the defense industry have an objective, plus place your security clearance information right up front ­ after your name and even before your objective statement. Bottom line: anyone can get a degree but security clearances almost take an act of God. What you know is important but the fact that you have a clearance will let you make use of your knowledge and skills. For high-level clearances or SIGINT specialists that require review by an approving authority ­ you've probably noticed that your resume becomes almost unrecognizable after the review process. Often enough not even you recognize yourself within your resume. To circumvent the reduction of your resume almost to the level of being anonymous -- Unknown did unknown at unknown location for the period of unknown duration involving unknown skills -- you really should consider a Curriculum Vitae (CV) style of resume. More often than not all of the slicing and dicing of your professional life occurred because of the chronological relationships between time, place and function. A CV largely ignores the structure of time, place, and function focusing instead on knowledge, skills and abilities. To keep your resume meaningful consider a CV-style resume if yours gets chopped up by the reviewers. Note: there is plenty of information available in libraries, bookstores and online about how to develop a CV; CVs are the preferred style by academics and for a good reason: what you know is poorly represented by chronological timelines. There often is no relationship between your linear professional career and how smart or knowledgeable you are. Specialists who think for a living may gain expertise over time but just as many lose expertise. A CV captures the fact that you are educated and that you have repeatedly demonstrated the use of that education, combined with your experience, to do something productive. Wine and Cheese Resumes (AKA Chronological Resumes) CVs are not the most common style of resume because expertise and knowledge is more often gained through a combination of training (not always equivalent with education) and on the job experience. In the world of government and military intelligence your chronological progression through various assignments, schools and functions usually is a predictor of how well you will perform in future assignments. The reason is simply that intelligence is as much an art as a science. Like wine and cheese your aging in the process of intelligence application matters. Industry is contractually-focused on particular customers. So if you have a Naval Intelligence background then you should seek out organizations that focus on whatever is your background (like Anteon for the Navy, or ANSER if you are former Air Force). This doesn't mean that there are not lots of crossover opportunities, because there are. But knowing the marketplace will help you maximize your potential and earnings. You may know Army C4ISR but a former Air Force C4ISR specialist has more value in an Air Force-oriented contract just because they are more knowledgeable of the systems, corporate culture, and the specifics of how the systems works. (This is perhaps even more true for contracts associated with the civilian intelligence agencies). Recommended Chronological Resume Style The resume format presented below provides the basis for a good solid chronological resume. There can be other variations, but you should aim your resume (within the defense and intelligence industries) towards both the human and non-human reader. Resumes are seldom read by human resource managers or recruiters unless they become interested in actually interviewing you. Your resume lives or dies normally by the content on the top half of the first page. The human reviewer is often LESS important than the non-human reader: resumes scanned into computer databases. A reviewer that ignores your resume at a career fair will still probably send your resume to the human resources department for scanning and inclusion into a database. The great majority of resumes, whether collected at a career fair or received via mail, end up in one of two places: a database of scanned resumes or the round file. A great resume by a fantastic candidate can also end up in the round file if fancy colored paper, columns of data, and styled bullets are used. Simple rules the day. Simple is easier to

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

read. Simple is easier to scan into a database. Simple causes fewer problems for web databases. Simple could get you your next job. Simple means: * Align your resume left - whether it be titles, bullets or content. * Use common fonts and sizes - at least 10 point and Times New Roman or Arial (or almost anything that looks like them). * Use standard round bullets - using arrows and angel heads and diamond shapes as bullets confuse scanning software. No one wants to rewrite your resume for you. * Avoid colored paper - slate gray or medium blue papers affect font interpretation. White standard bond paper is best. * No columnar data! Listing your skills in a three column table saves real estate on paper and is concise to look at, but this format is not scanner friendly. * Use the simple version for web forms - styled bullets and columnar data definitely present a challenge for online databases. Suggestion: Attractive resumes can indeed bring you attention. Carry copies of a simple resume with you. When presenting your resume ask if the recruiter will later scan your resume. If the answer is yes then exchange your attractive resume for the simple one. You'll make a friend and look smart, too. Some things not to put in your resume: * No Social Security Numbers or personal identification numbers. * Skip job titles including military rank and military occupation codes. These are meaningless even to most defense contractors although there is an appropriate time to have such a resume. Translate job titles - this will take work and several iterations to be both meaningful and relevant to the original position name. Note: There is a place for rank and many contractors will disagree about not including your rank ­ this goes back to the discussion about Wine and Cheese Resumes. The bottom line is that your rank can be used against you for two purposes: 1) it defines how much money you are used to receiving each month, and 2) there is no shortage of former whatevers that will immediately form an opinion as to how clever and useful (and valuable) you are. Negotiate based upon skill and expertise and relative value and keep rank out of the subject. Rank can also work against former seniors: unless you bring a rolodex with you of who you know that has influence then you will often be seen as an expensive investment. There are plenty of opportunities for you but there are as many negatives as positives. Think, evaluate, act. * Save proclaiming love of mom, apple pie, and country for another time. Include a concise, meaningful objective statement that clearly defines your career interest. If you have no experience and are looking for an entry level position then state so. Example: Seeking entry level position within the field of .... Example: Seeking mid-level avionics maintenance position - management or senior tech. Example: Seeking senior level competitive intelligence analyst position re telecommunications trends in east Asia (or military forces, or organizational effectiveness in mid-sized companies, or banking, or ...). * Do not assume that your leadership qualities will shine through or be meaningful. Many former military offer the assumption that they are leaders in their field but often fail to provide evidence. Senior rank is not evidence. The defense industry builds, buys and sells stuff. Intelligence (government or private sector) hires knowledge specialists. Only "leaders" with current and thick rolodexes migrate to industry without clearly defining

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

their credentials. Membership on various staffs, attendance at X number of schools, and being a designated project manager is important but not necessarily sufficient evidence. ?? Avoid political identification unless seeking a political activist position. This should be self-explanatory but ...

Simplified Chronological Resume Example

The format below is not appropriate for all career fields and industries, but it should serve you well within the defense and intelligence communities.

Name Mail Address Email address (No email? Get free email from Yahoo, Netscape or Hotmail.) Telephone and Fax number Security Clearance: TS/SCI, Counterintelligence Polygraph (optional section)

Comments: This is also a good place for certifications or background investigation designators like ISSA, CISSP, EBI, SSBI, etc. and whether you have been polygraphed (indicate type: full-scope poly, aka life-style poly, or counter-intelligence poly). No need for explaining a clearance's update history. If the clearance currency is dated it still may be in your favor to indicate the fact that you had a clearance within the last 10 years. Example: Top Secret/SCI, last active 1996. Do not indicate any special compartmented caveat (such as B / G / TK, etc.) that may be attached to the core designator. Use of these designators may be appropriate but it freaks out the security folks. A good recruiter will know that TS/SCI and SSBI folks seldom exist without additional caveats and will ask appropriate questions. Example designators: S or Secret, TS or Top Secret, TS/SCI, TS/SBI, TS/EBI, ISSA, CISSP, EBI -- use others at your own discretion.) Security Clearance Holders: If you have an indepth professional history of doing 'stuff' in the service of your country then a chronological resume can work against you in many ways. Your best choice of resume styles is to develop a CV Resume, formally known as a Curriculum Vitae resume. Security reviewers often butcher chronological resumes and leave them meaningless, offering little assistance otherwise in helping you transition your knowledge of 'stuff' to the marketplace. Many of the security edits are due to association of training and specific knowledge to particular periods of place and time. A CV neutralizes most of these concerns and produces a far superior resume in this circumstance; focusing on skills and accomplishments and not the cross references of how, when and why you came to know certain things. Info about building CVs is commonly available on the Internet. CVs are popular among academics because they emphasize your knowledge and its professional application.

Objective: Seeking a position in ... (optional section)

Comments: Be clear, concise and specific. If you can't develop such an objective then leave it out completely.

Availability Date: Immediate, willing to relocate.

Comments: Give either a date or indicate whether your availability is 'immediate' or 'now'. Do not indicate a date that is more than 30 days in the past. Some recruiters are strongly biased against candidates that are not immediately snapped up. It is ok to indicate that you are available as much as 6 months in the future - just don't expect a lot of phone calls until you are within 30-60 days of being available. If you are willing to relocate then state as much. If unsure, or unwilling, then say nothing.

Certifications: MCSE; Novell Engineer; Senior Electrician; 98C (optional section)

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Comments: Identify certifications, do not explain them. Military occupational speciality codes are appropriate in this space.

Demonstrations of Expertise: (optional section)

- 1999 promoted to Senior Corporate Trainer position. -- managed $1.7 million annual budget and 15 member staff. - 1998 selected as Most Valuable Securities Analyst. -- moved assets into more stable funds 2 months before market crash. -- provided Senior Consultant services at request of major customer. - 1997 advance promotion ahead of peers. -- selected by Army (or whomever) as 'Top 5%" in field, given choice of assignments. Comments: Your 3-6 demonstrations of expertise should complement your objective. Relevance is important.

Professional Experience

1997-present Position Name Organization Name - Responsible for daily analysis of trading in east Asian mutual funds and advising ..... - 1998 selected as Most Valuable Securities Analyst. - Bullet item three goes here. Publish no more than 3-5 bullets. 1994-1997 Position Name Organization Name Chief of a regional motor vehicle maintenance facility supporting 200+ vehicles and a staff of 42. Vehicle types ranged from light duty trucks to 10-ton tractor trailers, with responsibility for providing customer-site services across a five state region. Selected in 1996 as Maintenance Facility of the Year and was personally awarded with a promotion and a bonus. Seniors should focus on accomplishments and less on the tasks performed. Comments: You can use bullets to outline responsibilities and accomplishments (demonstrations of expertise) or you can prepare a 3-5 line narrative of responsibilities and accomplishments. There is no need to outline positions held more than 10 years ago - consider a Summary of Positions Prior to 199X if these positions have relevance and significance to achieving your current career objective.

Summary of Positions Prior to 200X (optional section)

Early development of my skills includes five years of service in Germany, to include liaison duties with the German Air Force (or ABC Engineering, AG, or the DEF Combined Staff, or ...) and attendance at the Advanced XYZ Course for XYZ specialists. During this period .... outline an accomplishment or significant event in which you participated.

Education:

- BS Management, School Name, City, State, Year. ---- graduated with 98.2 GPA, or some accomplishment if appropriate. - AA Computer Science, School Name, City, State, Year. Technical Certification - 1999, Area of Study, School Name, other identifying data. --- Honor Graduate, or some accomplishment if appropriate. - 1995, Area of Study, School Name, other identifying data. Military Education - 1999, Area of Study, School Name, other identifying data. --- Honor Graduate, or some accomplishment if appropriate. - 1995, Area of Study, School Name, other identifying data.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Keywords:

System ABC, Project DEF, Facility name GHI, Toolset nomenclature JKL, Foreign language MNO, etc. (You can't have too many keywords. Push the important ones that support your objective up front. A good size for this section is 3-15 lines). Comments: This is a very important box. Not everything about you fits nicely in a resume. Employers and search engines thrive on keywords. Keywords dramatically increase the chance of someone finding and reading your resume. Include keywords that describe your experience. equipment types, military occupational codes, base names, project titles, certification names or codes.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Organizations That You Should Know About

Associations

The following associations offer networking opportunities and/or career information that will help you find that next great challenge: American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) - www.aaai.org American Society for Industrial Security (ASIS) - www.asisonline.org American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) - www.asis.org American Society of Military Comptrollers (ASMC) ­ www.asmconline.org Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) - www.afcea.org Association of Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO) - www.afio.org Association of Old Crows - www.crows.org Association of the United States Army (AUSA) ­ www.ausa.org Defense Intel Alumni Association, Inc. (DIAA) - www.dialumni.org Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) - www.ieee.org International Association for Artificial Intelligence and Law (IAAIL) - http://130.89.90.24/iaail International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA) - www.ialeia.org International Association of Professional Security Consultants (IAPSC) - www.iapsc.org Marine Corps Intelligence Association (MCIA) - www.mcia.org Marine Corps Counter Intelligence Association (MCCIA) ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jrl/MCCIA.htm Marine Corps Cryptologic Association (MCCA) - www.flash.net/~davemose/mcca.html Military Intelligence Corps Association (MICA) ­ www.micorps.org National Army Security Agency Association (NASAA) - www.nasaa.npoint.net/index2.html National Computer Security Association (NCSA, now TruSecure) - www.trusecure.com National Defense Industry Association (NDIA) - www.ndia.org National Military Intelligence Association (NMIA) - www.nmia.org Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP) - www.navintpro.org Open Source Solutions, Inc. (OSS) - www.oss.org - a hybrid commercial yet agenda-focused organization. Operational Security Professionals Society (OPSEC) - www.opsec.org

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Society for Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP) - www.scip.org The Retired Officers Association (TROA) - www.troa.org - I got my first post-military intelligence position via TROA's job services program. The World Association of Research Professionals (ESOMAR) - www.esomar.nl U.S. Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association (USNCVA) - www.usncva.org

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers Organizations With Cleared Careers

Abbtech ­ www.abbtech.com Acclaim Technical Services - www.acclaimtechnical.com ACS Defense Services - www.acsdefense.com Adroit Systems Inc. - www.adroit.com Advanced Concepts, Inc. - www.aci-hq.com ANSER - Analytic Services, Inc. - www.anser.org Autometric, Inc. - www.autometric.com Aviant - www.aviant.com BAE Systems - www.baesystems.com Bay Search Group - www.baysearch.com Beta Analytics International, Inc. - www.betaanalytics.com Boeing Company - www.boeing.com Boeing Satellite Systems, Inc. - www.hsc.com Booz Allen Hamilton - www.bah.com BTG, Inc. - www.btg.com CACI International - www.caci.com Concurrent Technologies Corp. - www.ctc.com DynCorp - www.dyncorp.com Exceptional Software Strategies, Inc. - www.exceptionalsoftware.com General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems - www.gd-ais.com Hadron Inc. - www.hadron.com IMSI, Inc. - www.imsidc.com Integic Corporation - www.integic.com IntelData - www.inteldata.com L-3 Emergent - www.emergent-it.com Lockheed Martin Company - www.lockheedmartin.com McDonald Bradley, Inc. - www.mcbrad.com Meridian KSI - www.meridianksi.com Northrop Grumman Information Technology - www.northropgrummanit.com Oracle Corporation - www.oracle.com Premier Technology Group, Inc. ­ www.ptginc.net PROSOFT Engineering - www.prosoft-eng.com SAIC ­ www.saic.com SBI Consulting, Inc. - www.sbiconsultinginc.com SRA International, Inc. - www.sra.com Sytex Inc. - www.sytexinc.com TECHEXPO, USA - www.mastersontech.com Titan Systems Corporation - www.titan.com TRW - www.trw.com USIS Professional Services - www.usis.com Veridian - www.veridian.com

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers Government

Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance ­ www.af.mil Army Intelligence ­ www.army.mil Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) ­ www.cia.gov Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) ­ www.dia.mil Defense Security Service (DSS) - www.dss.mil Department of Energy (DOE) - www.doe.gov Department of State, Bureau of Intelligence and Research - www.state.gov Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) ­ www.fbi.gov Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - www.fema.gov Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FINCEN) - dosfan.lib.uic.edu Information Systems Security Organization/NSA (ISSO) - www.nsa.gov:8080/isso/ Interagency OPSEC Support Staff (IOSS) - www.ioss.gov Marine Corps Intelligence - www.usmc.mil National Counter Intelligence Center (NACIC) - www.nacic.gov National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) ­ www.nima.mil National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) ­ www.nro.gov National Security Agency (NSA) ­ www.nsa.gov Office of Coordinator, Counterterrorism, Dept. of State (OCC) www.state.gov/www/global/terrorism/index.html President's Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCIP) - www.pccip.gov The Treasury Department, Office of Intelligence Support - www.ustreas.gov/index.html U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) - www.usdoj.gov U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), Office of Intelligence & Security 152.122.41.10/secure_links_OIS.html U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) - www.dea.gov U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) - www.odci.gov/ic/ U.S. Secret Service (USSS) - www.treas.gov/usss

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Recruiters That You Should Know About

ABBTECH Staffing Services ­ Gail Howard -- www.abbtech.com -- Nationwide opportunities for cleared specialists: Information Systems, Professional, Technical, Telecom and Administrative personnel for both commercial and private sector positions. -- ABBTECH is a small woman-owned Virginia Corporation specializing in Information Systems, Professional, Technical, Telecom and Administrative personnel. We have a computerized resume database of over 100,000 resumes updated annually since 1992. Our current client database exceeds 200 clients of various sizes. What we bring to the table is experience, knowledge, dedication and a commitment to service. Although we staff locally in MD, VA, DC, Delaware, and West Virginia, we recruit nationally through various INTERNET sources, National resume services, trade publications, newspapers, campus recruiting, state agencies, job fairs, and referrals. Our key staff members possess over 100 years of cumulative experience in all aspects of the staffing business with an established reputation. ABBTECH has both a top secret and secret level facility clearance granted by DISCO. -- Send resumes to [email protected] ; additionally you may mail your resume and/CV to Gail Howard; Technical Recruiting Manager, Abbtech Staffing Services, Dulles International Airport, P.O. Box 20098, Washington, D.C. 20041, Phone: 703/450-5252 x227, Fax: 703/406-9261, Toll Free: 877/936-7569. ACS Defense, Inc. ­ Scott Kagen -- www.acsdefense.com -- SIGINT Analysis, Linguistics, ELINT, Information Assurance and support to national programs operated by Fort Meade, MD. TS/SCI clearances required. -- E-mail resume to [email protected], always include job title, and for immediate consideration please call Scott Kagen at 410.309.9720. ACS Defense, Inc. ­ Chris Blahm -- www.acsdefense.com -- HUMINT, Force Protection, Network Administration, Systems Engineering within CONUS (FL MA MD VA) and intelligence specialist direct support to intelligence operations in Bosnia, Italy and Germany. TS/SCI clearances required. European service requires BA/BS degree and clearance. -- For consideration send your resume to [email protected] or fax to 703-333-6482. For immediate consideration please call Chris Blahm at 703-916-9508. Advanced Resource Technologies, Inc (ARTI) - Stefanie Bisignano -- www.team-arti.com -- Seeking individuals with counterintelligence/antiterrorism and security experience (physical, industrial, TSCM, OPSEC, COMSEC, INFOSEC). FSO, SSO, and NISPOM experience also a plus! Positions generally available in the DC Metro area. Applicants should be US citizens with a minimum of Top Secret clearances to qualify for most positions. ---- Candidates can visit our career page and apply online at www.team-arti.com/jobopening.htm, fax their resume to 703.683.3197, or mail their resume to 2800 Eisenhower Ave, 4th Floor East Alexandria, VA 22314. ANSER (Analytic Services) ­ Jim McFarland -- www.anser.org -- Seeking DoD acquisition specialists, program managers and policy analysts for USAF and Space programs at the HQ USAF and Pentagon level. -- Candidates can send resumes to [email protected] or send your resume to ANSER, ATTN: HR/Recruiting, 2900 South Quincy St., Suite 800, Arlington, Virginia 22206 or Fax Number: (703) 416-3019. You will be contacted by an ANSER representative if there is an appropriate opening matching your skills.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

AVIANT ­ Marc Rodriguez -- www.aviant.org -- Staffing opportunities in aerospace engineering and information engineering. If you have a security clearance then we have opportunities in Southern California. -- Send engineering and software development resumes to [email protected] or call 800.352.3737 ext 544, Fax 562.989.6614 or mail your resume to 3780 Kilroy Airport Way #400, Long Beach CA 90806. AVIANT - Michelle L Shafer -- www.aviant.org -- Seeking Imagery and SIGINT analysis specialists and C4ISR engineers knowledgeable in the integration, operation and maintenance of computer systems, tactical networks, and communications equipment. The qualified candidate will be a US CITIZEN and will have BS in EE, EET, or CS or equivalent experience. -- Interested applicants should submit a resume to Michelle L Shafer, Recruiter at [email protected] or call her at 703-506-8399 or 877-418-3737 ext 223. BAE Systems ­ Joseph D Gardiner -- www.baesystems.com -- Seeking Navy Logistics knowledgeable specialist with the following backgrounds: Integrated Logistic Support, Acquisition Logistics Planning, DoD Inst 5000 series experience, with preference for the following: AIT, Technical documentation mgmt., Life cycle support, Supply chain management, IT security (FIPS 140), Material management, Provisioning, Depot planning. -- For immediate results contact Joseph D Gardiner at 1-301-863-9667, or send your resume to [email protected] or via Fax : 301-863-0715 or mail: BAE SYSTEMS, Human Resources, Attn: Joseph D Gardiner, 23481 Cottonwood Parkway, California, MD 20619 BAE Systems - James K McMorris -- www.baesystems.com Seeking AEGIS specialists with experience in Ship Integration/Combat Systems Engineering, ability to write Technical Point Papers, conduct ship checks and coordinate trail cards. Understanding of Navy Message Traffic to include the Defense Message System. --- For immediate results contact James K McMorris at [email protected] or Fax : 301-8386303 or mail: BAE SYSTEMS, Human Resources, Attn: James K McMorris, 1601 Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850-3173 BAE Systems ­ Ken Aubrey -- www.baesystems.com -- Seeking Joint Strike Fighter team members ­ wide range of positions: Systems Integration, Training Systems, Flight Systems, Aerodynamics and Electromagnetic Engineering, Human Factors and more. If it is associated with Joint Strike Fighter please make contact. --- For immediate results contact Kenneth L Aubrey at 1-301-838-6320 [email protected] Fax : 301-838-6303 or mail: BAE SYSTEMS, Human Resources, Attn: Kenneth L Aubrey, 1601 Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850-3173 Bay Search Group ­ Ford Sayre -- www.baysearch.com -- Seeking Artificial Intelligence, Software Engineers / Applications Developers, Oracle DBAs and Developers, Java Developers, SQL Server DBA's, Web Developers: HTML, Perl, Dreamweaver, Cold Fusion, Java, JavaScript, BroadVision, ASP, SQL, Visual Basic Programmers, Unix Systems Administrators, Network Engineers, Network Administrators, Data Warehousing, Data Architects, Network Security Applications Analyst. Nationwide opportunities. --- Want to relocate? We are members of National Personnel Associates

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

(NPA) and are able to help candidates find a job almost anywhere in the world through this association with other recruiters located all over the United States, Canada, Europe and the Pacific Rim! -- Visit our website, find a position and send your resume to [email protected] Beta Analytics International, Inc. ­ Scott Raye -- www.betaanalytics.com -- Seeking experienced security professionals: HUMINT, CounterIntelligence, Diplomatic Security, Corporate Security, DoD Security Management/Systems, Systems Security. -- Please forward your resume to [email protected] Fax (301) 599-8087, or mail to Beta Analytics International, Inc., Attn: Recruiting, 9600 Pennsylvania Ave., Upper Marlboro, MD 20772. Booz Allen Hamilton ­ Kedra Harris -- www.bah.com -- Network Operations, Information Assurance, Cyber Threat Analysis specialists. Qualifications: Military/US national intelligence agency training; BS/BA degree; 8-10 years experience computer network operations analysis; SSBI required; Experience with computer network operations / computer network defense & attack analysis techniques; Knowledge of threat information operations capabilities and experience working with cyber threat analysis. -- For consideration, please e-mail your resume directly to [email protected] and [email protected] or forward your resume to our international headquarters office: Fax: 703-917-3362. Mail: Booz Allen Hamilton, 8283 Greensboro Drive, McLean, VA 22102. Booz Allen Hamilton ­ Heather Skeen -- www.bah.com -- Seeking C4ISR Analysts. Qualifications: BA or BS degree in a related field required; Knowledge of military (preferably Navy) C4ISR systems and their tactical contribution to warfighting in all operating environments required; Knowledge of concepts and applications of Network Centric Warfare required; Possession of excellent communication and presentation skills required. -- For consideration, please e-mail your resume directly to [email protected] and [email protected] or forward your resume to our international headquarters office: Fax: 703-917-3362. Mail: Booz Allen Hamilton, 8283 Greensboro Drive, McLean, VA 22102. Booz Allen Hamilton ­ Christina Hulsey -- www.bah.com -- International Logistics Analysts - BA/BS degree; 10+ years experience in international logistics plans or operations; Experience military/DoD international logistics; Experience in operational research with an emphasis on logistics capabilities at the operational to strategic level; Knowledge of logistics information systems and Command and Control (C2) enablers; Experience in multi-lateral or bi-lateral partnerships with Pacific nations or in a military setting with coalition partners; Experience in a Joint Command within the Pacific AOR. -- For consideration, please e-mail your resume directly to [email protected] and [email protected] or forward your resume to our international headquarters office: Fax: 703-917-3362. Mail: Booz Allen Hamilton, 8283 Greensboro Drive, McLean, VA 22102. CACI International ­ Richard Hart -- www.caci.com C4ISR, Information Assurance, SIGINT Systems engineering, systems integration and operations. Opportunities for SIGINT Signals Analysts and Military Intelligence Analysts. Numerous opportunities in CO, FL, MD, NJ, VA. -- For consideration visit our website, identify a position and then apply online, or mail your resume to 14151 Park Meadow Drive, Attn: Recruiters, Chantilly, VA 20151, via Fax (703) 679-4510 or email [email protected] Please send resumes in text (.txt) format only

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

L-3 EER Coleman Research Corporation - Blake Harper-Senior Technical Recruiter -- www.crc.com CRC provides systems design, engineering and integration services and other consulting services to the Federal government and commercial customers. We recruit for Software Developers, Systems Engineers, Systems Administrators, Systems Analysts and ELINT Analysts primarily. We have facilities all over the continental US and require Top Secret/SCI clearances for a majority of our positions. -- Applicants can call Blake Harper at 301-621-8600x12233 or e-mail me at [email protected] or mail 9891 Broken Land Parkway Suite 101, Columbia, Maryland 21046 Concurrent Technologies Corp. ­ David Hamaty, Manager, Human Resources -- www.ctc.com -- Seeking a wide range of C4ISR technical professionals. Current skills sets needed are SIGINT professionals, Systems Engineering, Network Engineering, Database Administration/Engineering, Software Engineering and Program/Project Management. -- Locations for these positions would be out of our Johnstown, PA or Annapolis Junction, MD offices. All positions require the ability to obtain and maintain a US Government Security Clearance. Most positions require a current and active SSBI. -- Interested candidates can forward their resumes to [email protected] fax to 814-269-2500 or visit our website at www.ctc.com. EOE M/V/H/F. DynCorp ­ Jeff Snyder -- www.dyncorp.com -- Seeking National Security Analysts: Provides analytical and/or program support to various U.S. Government agencies, including Departments of Defense, Energy, and State within one or more of the following areas: WMD Arms Control Counter-Intelligence, Counter-Proliferation Nuclear Weapons, Technical support, Counter-Terrorism Classification/Declassification support, Program Development, Vulnerability Assessments, Intelligence Analysis -- For consideration send your resume to [email protected] Exceptional Software Strategies, Inc. ­ Barry Becker -- www.exceptionalsoftware.com -- Software for SIGINT: Sybase, dotNet, JAVA/XML, WebLogic, J2EE/EJB/JSP; TS/SCI with polygraph required for almost all positions. -- Send resumes to [email protected] F. Gloss International (FGI) ­ Fred Gloss -- F. Gloss International (FGI) is a retainer search firm with strategic specialization in the Intelligence Community and national defense. Our clients retain us to identify senior level candidates for business development, program management and, highly specialized technical disciplines in information technology, encryption/information security, SIGINT, weapon systems and missile systems. -- Contact and Resume info: Fred Gloss, CEO of FGI, 1309 Vincent Place, McLean, Virginia 22101 [email protected], 703/847-0010 General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems -- www.gdais.com -- GDAIS combines command and control, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and information operations businesses to create command information, intelligence and surveillance solutions. GDAIS provides joint, interoperable and integrated mission solutions. Nationwide opportunities. -- Email your electronic resume to [email protected] L-3 Communications Analytics Corporation - Leigh Card -- www.emergent-IT.com -- Recruiting for Systems Engineers (IBS/TDDS), Operations Analysts (Joint C4ISR systems JCAPS/ICARIS), OR Analysts (OPNAV, warfare proficiency) and other

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opportunities as they arise. -- Locations: Fort Meade, MD, Pentagon, Crystal City, North Virginia, Fort Walton Beach, FL, Sierra Vista, AZ, Fort Bragg, NC, Hampton, VA, and Colorado Springs, CO. -- Applicants should be US Citizens with a minimum of an active Top Secret clearances to qualify for most positions. -- For more info or to apply, contact: Leigh Card, Technical Recruiter, L-3 Communications Analytics Corp., 2600 Park Tower Drive, Suite 800, Vienna, VA 22180, Phone: (703) 641-7185 Fax: (703) 641-7225, [email protected] ManTech Systems Engineering Corporation - Mr. Lee Williams -- www.mantech.com -- Seeking Powerbuilder, JAVA and other high level programming candidates for N/MCI; should have MCSE; wide range of positions available both CONUS and OCONUS -- Candidates can send resumes to [email protected] National Security Agency -- www.nsa.gov -- Recurring requirements for Linguists - Asian, Middle Eastern, Slavic languages -- E-mail resume to: [email protected] National Security Agency -- www.nsa.gov -- Recurring requirements for Mathematicians -- For consideration, please forward your resume, cover letter and official or unofficial detailed undergraduate/graduate transcripts to [email protected] You may also apply directly to the National Security Agency, Suite 6779, 9800 Savage Road, Ft. George G. Meade, MD 20755-6779 or send fax to (410) 854-4593. Oracle Corporation ­ Barbara Lamblin -- www.oracle.com -- All positions require USA citizenship & Active TS/SCI government clearance. Seeking experienced consultants with proven Oracle Technology expertise for our team in the following positions: Oracle Web Portal/Java Development: Oracle Portal 9ias, Portal Oracle Portal Tools, Oracle Web DB, Java, Java Servlets, Java Server Pages, JavaScript, Jdeveloper, Jbuilder; Oracle Federal Application Implementation: Oracle Federal Financials, Federal Accounting, Functional Accounting and Financials; Technical Architectures: Technical Architect Design, Rational Rose, Java, J2EE, Oracle RDBMS distributed databases, Oracle applications, System readiness audits, Oracle 8/8I; Locations Include: DC metro Area, Reston, VA, Norfolk, VA, Columbia, MA, Tampa, FL, Dayton, OH, Philadelphia, PA, Los Vegas, NV, Los Angeles, CA -- For consideration, send your resume to [email protected] or call 703.354.4549 Professional Software Engineering, Inc. ­ Lisa McDonnell -- www.prosoft-eng.com -- Communications engineering support, including site survey analysis and design, systems architecture analysis and design, structured cable plant installations, system integration and configuration, help desk and maintenance support. We currently operate and maintain large, complex communications networks for: Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Joint Forces Command (JFCOM), Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), Special Communications Requirements Branch (SCRB) and the Marine Corps Distance Learning Program (MCDLP). -- E-mail: [email protected]; or send your resume to PROSOFT, Attn: Recruitment Unit, 477 Viking Drive, Suite 400, Virginia Beach, VA 23452; Office: (757) 431-2400 Fax: (757) 463-1071 (Local) or (443) 947-0509 (Out of Area) PMCS Inc. - Denise Mark -- www.pmcsonline.net -- Skillsets recruited for: Enterprise Architect with active TS/SCI or higher clearance (10 to 15 years direct eBusiness/e-Commerce/Infrastructure experience required. 5-8 years in

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Enterprise Application Consulting; Strong understanding of Internet/e-Commerce Solutions, Data Rationalization Requirements, Data Management and the Web. Skilled at mentoring and providing support to tech support personnel is required). -- Locations: Ft. Meade MD, Bethesda MD, Chantilly VA, Reston VA -- Recruiter Contact Info: [email protected], 770-614-9398, fax 770-932-5666). PTG, Inc. - Sandy Keller -- www.ptginc.net Seeking cleared military systems force protection, threat assessment, counterintelligence, intelligence specialists, background investigators, HUMINT specialists, network administrators/help desk, and logisticians for service within the Northern Virginia region and Germany (active TS/SCI and BA/BS are minimum requirements). Candidates should have a Secret, Top Secret or SCI clearance in order to be considered for employment. -- Candidates can send resumes to [email protected] SAIC/Advanced Technologies and Solutions Group ­ Joan Stanfield -- www.saic.com Actively searching for fully cleared (TS and polygraph) candidates interested in becoming employee owners! Positions are located in the Columbia, Maryland area and involve: Software Engineers, Systems Engineers, System Architects, INFOSEC Engineers, and Hardware Engineers. -- Interested candidates should forward their resumes to [email protected] SBI Consulting ­ Harry Watt -- www.sbiconsultinginc.com -- Seeking Information Technology Engineers, Software Engineer/Trainers, Computer Inventory Technicians and Finance Technicians. Most current openings require a Top Secret clearance or above. -- Please contact our recruiter, Mr. Harry Watt [email protected], regarding job openings. TECHEXPO, USA ­ John Masterson -- www.techexpousa.com -- Seeking systems engineers, software development specialists, RF and Electro-Optical Engineers, database developers and almost any technologist with a security clearance for nationwide opportunities; some international opportunities as well (Egypt, for example) -- Phone John Masterson at (212) 655-4505 ext. 224 or send your resume as an MS Word attachment to the following email address: [email protected] Strategi LLC - Daniel Parrillo - President/Staffing Consultant Skillsets that are recruited for: Technology positions which require Security Clearance Status; Specializing in government/military based projects nationwide. -- For consideration, contact Daniel Parrillo, Staffing Consultant ­ President, Strategi LLC, 415-519-1828 or [email protected] / [email protected] The Sytex Group ­ Marc Michaelis -- www.sytexinc.com -- Data fusion, Information Operations, Intelligence Analysis, Imagery, SIGINT, Biometrics, Force Protection, CounterIntelligence, Exercise Planning, Software Development and Systems Engineers. If intelligence uses it then Sytex provides it. -- Email resume with interest to our recruiting team at [email protected] (Word attachment preferred) or forward via fax to 561-760-6130 or send by mail to 9891 Broken Land Parkway, Suite 304, Columbia, MD 21046. Be sure to indicate title/number of job reference with submission. Titan Systems Corporation ­ Ivy Greene -- www.titan.com -- Nationwide (and some international) opportunities in database development, information security (INFOSEC), GIS systems, and configuration management. -- For consideration, send cover letter and resume via email to [email protected]

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

TRW ­ Carol Cleary -- www.trw.com -- Seeking Top Secret Full/Lifestyle Polygraph Intelligence Analysts with experience in/with military forces, order-of-battle, and weapon systems. Responsibilities include research on organizational structure, command and support relationships, manning levels, equipment allocations, readiness and disposition. -- For consideration send your resume to [email protected] TRW ­ Kortnie Peterman -- www.trw.com -- INFOSEC/Systems Security, Systems Administrators, and Software Engineers with C4ISR and/or SIGINT backgrounds and Top Secret SCI Full/Lifestyle polygraphs for positions in the Maryland area. -- For consideration send your resume to [email protected] Vision Systems & Technology, Inc. - Dwayne Robinson -- www.vsticorp.com Seeking Java Developers, Lotus Domino R5 web application developers, Unix/NT Database Administrators (Oracle-Sybase experience), Software Architects, Technical Writers, Configuration Managers, GIS/ArcView Users. Positions available in Fort Mead immediately. Applicants should be US citizens with minimum of TOP SECRET clearances to qualify for positions. -- Candidates should send resumes to Melissa Harris at [email protected] or fax resumes to 410.884.4001

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Using the Internet To Find Jobs

Below are some of the online websites with opportunities for cleared personnel. Career Builder - www.careerbuilder.com Cleared Connections ­ www.clearedconnections.com CLEWS ­ Classified Employment Web Site - www.yourinfosource.com/clews/ Hot Jobs - www.hotjobs.com IntelligenceCareers.com ­ www.intelligencecareers.com Monster - www.monster.com TechExpoUSA ­ www.techexpo.com Transition Assistance Online (TAO) ­ www.taonline.com

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Career Fairs and Career Fair Cultures

No One Career Fair Serves All

There is no one specific career fair that you should attend. For example, IntelligenceCareers.com has many opportunities for `no clearance required' positions. Our career events however focus almost exclusively on careers that do require security clearances. The reason is the marketplace ­ career fairs must attract X number of companies in order to be profitable. Depending upon the event location and the local workforce availability career fairs tend to have a personality all their own.

What To Expect From Recruiters

Do not expect a career fair recruiter to know all the positions available within their company. Be prepared to tell a recruiter which position you are interested in. Most career fairs list on their websites which companies will be represented at an event. Do your homework by visiting those companies' websites. Print off specific job listings. Take them to a career event and use them to focus a recruiter's attention. Doing your homework about a company is very important ­ you may have to tell a recruiter what is available within their own company. Recruiters often attend events just to search for a few specific candidates. The marketplace impacts which recruiters attend a career fair. Perhaps only a department within the organization needs immediate candidates. There is a good chance that only representatives from that department will recruit at the career fair. Your resume will still make it back to the HR department, but wouldn't it be nice to have your resume attached to a specific job listing?! Career fair resumes often are taken back to an HR department, scanned via OCR software and then entered into a database. If special attention was not given to your resume up front then you will sit in a database until a keyword search one day brings you to the fore.

Some Recommended Career Fair Series

There are many valuable career fairs besides the serial events listed below that you should consider. Any university with major departments capable of producing information intelligence professionals will draw appropriate attention if the university holds a career fair. You will also find competitive/market intelligence positions in almost any regional career event, and DoD security clearance/intelligence positions in abundance at career events near Baltimore-Fort Meade MD, Denver metro area CO, San Antonio TX, San Diego CA, Tampa FL, Hampton Roads-Virginia Beach VA, the greater Washington DC metro area including northern Virginia and southern Maryland, and most large military bases with surrounding large metropolitan areas (good example: Jacksonville FL; poor example: Fort Bragg NC). Military Transition Assistance Army ­ www.acap.army.mil Navy ­ see your local Transition Assistance Management Program (TAMP) Advisor Air Force - www.afpc.randolph.af.mil/transition/jobfairs.htm Brass Ring www.brassring.com Corporate Gray www.corporate-gray.com Information, Intelligence & Defense Careers www.intelligencecareers.com Professional Exchange www.professional-exchange.com Trade Shows & Conferences with exhibits ­ while these are not career events per se, corporate representatives are usually there for one primary reason: to draw attention to their organization. A common objective is to find three things: new customers, partners, and potential employees. Do not be timid about asking a representative to tell you about opportunities within their organization.

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IntelligenceCareers Guide to Information Intelligence Careers

Security Clearances ­ Protect Your Passport to Success

Get Your Information from the Source Your guide to security clearance information while in private industry will be the Defense Security Service's (DSS) National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM), formally known as DoD 5220.22-M. Your primary interest will probably be on Security Clearances for Personnel, viewable online at http://www.dss.mil/isec/chapter2.htm; the entire NISPOM can be downloaded as a pdf file from http://www.dss.mil/isec/nispom.pdf. Don't Walk Away From Your Clearance ­ Reality Check: Use It or Lose It! Your security clearance can theoretically be reactivated within 24 months of last use; per the NISPOM, para 2-217. clearance reinstatements are available if: "No more than 24 months has lapsed since the date of termination of the clearance." The reality is that a good number of employers will not want to interview you if you last used your clearance more than 12 months ago. The time lapse in getting your clearance reinstated can exceed an employer's willingness to employ you. There are no shortage of stories where a reinstatement took 6-12 months. To keep your clearance active and portable you must use it ­ this may even require changing employers in order to protect your clearance status! The key to keeping your clearance available is to use it. You may have to be proactive with employers but this is very much a case of self-interest. Only the larger defense contractors have productive employment for you while your security clearance is reinstated. Your adventure in private enterprise will be marked by times when your contract does not require the use of a security clearance. This will be a moment that you must consider carefully your options. Just as your employer's mind must be on the bottom line so must your mindset. A security clearance keeps you in the game. Once you have your clearance activated, use it and protect it. A security clearance is very portable: if you have a TOP SECRET, SECRET, CONFIDENTIAL, Q or L security clearances then you can move into another position requiring an equal or lesser clearance without a new background investigation: "Any previously granted PCL (personnel clearance=PCL) that is based upon a current investigation of a scope that meets or exceeds that necessary for the clearance required, shall provide the basis for issuance of a new clearance without further investigation or adjudication unless significant derogatory information that was not previously adjudicated becomes known to the granting agency." Some key things to know about security clearances: ?? You must normally be a U.S. citizen to receive a clearance; very rare exceptions exist when "compelling reasons may exist to grant access to classified information to an immigrant alien or a foreign national." (NISPOM para 2-210) ?? Former military need their clearance documented in their DD-214. ?? An SF 86 form is required to initiate or update a Single Scope Background Investigation (SSBI); an SSBI is required for TOP SECRET, Q, and SCI access. ?? An employer/contractor cannot initiate any pre-employment clearance action unless the recruitment is for a specific position. ?? Any employer which submits the paperwork to activate your clearance must hire you within 180 days. ?? Contractors are no longer permitted to grant clearances. (1995)

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Errata and Change Log 2002.03.13 - Cleared Jobs / Cleared People - www.clearedjobs.com removed from listing of websites for candidates. Appears to be defunct (0 jobs listed 2002.03.13) and there are numerous emails circulating among corporate security officers that something is not right about email solicitations to candidates.

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Information

IC Career Guide.PDF

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IC Career Guide.PDF