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CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA ARRIVE: DEPART: ON-SHIP TIME: THURSDAY TUESDAY TUESDAY 17 FEBRUARY 22 FEBRUARY 22 FEBRUARY 0800 2000 1800

--------------------------------------------- THURSDAY, 17 FEBRUARY --------------------------------------------Cape Town is a city of beauty, a city of history and a city of contrasts. As the ship pulls into the harbor, with the waterfront nestled before the majestic Table Mountain, the beauty is evident in Cape Town`s unique landscape. However, if one looks beyond Table Mountain and the immediate Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, the real beauty is its people and the story they tell through their experiences during, as well as post, Apartheid. The nearby townships may look grim in comparison to the pristine waterfront area but looking past the overcrowding and poor construction, the beauty and resilience of the townships and its peoples are clear. Even with political struggles and financial adversity, the threads of family, culture and community are apparent. Each township tells its own powerful story. A visit to a township is critical to understanding and embracing this resilient country; it is a rewarding experience that should not be missed. Semester at Sea is offering several opportunities to visit a township in a safe, informative and insightful way during your call to Cape Town. The following trips include a visit to a township: Amy Biehl Foundation Trust, Baphumelele Orphanage & Township by Bike, Habitat for Humanity, Khayelitsha Township Visit, Operation Hunger, Township by Bike & Interactive Soccer (full and half-day options), Township Homestay and Xhosa Cultural Tour, Cape Town, and Apartheid and Robben Island. In addition to these standard trips, the following FDP will visit a township as part of a class field experience: Cape Town, Apartheid & Robben Island. GENERAL DESCRIPTION FOR ALL SAFARIS/GAME RESERVES (SAS offers a wide variety of safaris. Please see following pages for dates, approximate departure/return times and specific itineraries.) Africa`s wildlife heritage is fittingly celebrated in superlatives. Such familiar wonders as the elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus and giraffe are the largest of the continent`s astonishing assemblage of mammals. With these march a parade of predators, an immense collection of antelopes, a veritable ark-full of monkeys and mongooses, aardvarks and insectivores, and a host of other animal oddities. A profusion of colorful birds, weird reptiles and fascinating insects rounds out the experience. As amazing as the variety is the spectacle of numbers, for the African plains are the last place on Earth where vast herds still roam in primeval abundance. Africa`s wild creatures do not live in isolation; each species represents a strand in the web forming the community of plants and animals in which it has carved its niche. Even the briefest safari will traverse

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many such ecological communities and habitats. The eye soon discerns that the African wild is not a singular entity in which animals occur at random, but an ordered realm, where every creature has its appropriate place. Some species are extremely adaptive and survive in a wide spectrum of environments. Others are confined to specific niches or microhabitats. It would take volumes to describe all of Africa`s animals, not to mention their relationships and the habitats in which they live. A small understanding of African ecology will go a long way toward enriching your safari experience, for the wonder of the animals is heightened by an appreciation and awareness of their total environment. Although the famous big game animals naturally command the most attention, people who look only for lions, elephants and other large mammals tend to get bored after a few days. Those curious about African wildlife in all of its varied forms never have that problem, for it is impossible to run out of new and fascinating discoveries. Game Drives: The game drive is the standard mode of wildlife viewing in the African national parks, where both regulations and safety considerations restrict exploration on foot. Conditions are ideal for vehicular safaris; cruising savanna game country from the security and comfort of a car, you will encounter a large number and variety of animals simply by chance. In many parks, the animals have lost all fear of vehicles and permit you to drive right up to them. Game drives in such places are always invigorating. You may go from one species to the next--observing a zebra here, a giraffe there, a knot of impala on the right, a trio of elephant bulls ahead. However, there is really no guarantee on what you will see; the animals are free to move around as they please, and may even pass beyond park boundaries. While on a game drive, each group will be accompanied by a seasoned professional who is highly experienced as a field naturalist. The guides/drivers of each safari vehicle are also well trained and attend training classes on subjects as varied as the maintenance of safari vehicles, tracking animals and preservation and conservation. Be sure to ask questions of these informed resources! Accommodations: Lodges come in many shapes and sizes. Many lodges are famous for their beauty as well as comfort. The general quality of comfort, cleanliness and service is very high. Each facility has its own ambience. The newer safari lodges are modern hotels designed for harmony with the natural setting. Spacious verandas look out over game viewing areas with stunning landscapes well visited by game. Some lodges are so well placed, usually by strategic water points, that game can be seen at any time. Packing Suggestions: As a general rule, the following items are recommended: toiletries, sun block, sun hat, sunglasses, comfortable (closed-toe) walking shoes, windbreaker, swimsuit, comfortable light-weight clothing, and possibly a sweater and light-weight long pants for the evenings. Brightly colored clothing is not recommended safari attire. Temperatures reach approximately 86°F during the day, with cooler temperatures in the evening, so plan accordingly. Safari Departure and Return Times: Actual flight details for safaris that include air travel are not confirmed at this time; details will be made available closer to port arrival. Many flight times (and thus departure and return times) are based on current timetables which may change prior to arrival. Despite the potential for time fluctuations, all safari activities described will occur as outlined. While on safari you will be amazed by the superabundance of animals. Yet the question nags as to how long the game will last. Commercial poaching is the most dramatic and immediate danger, but loss of habitat is the ultimate threat. Both perils are exemplified by the plight of the two major species that are already in serious trouble, the elephant and the black rhino. Rather than abandon all hope, consider what you can do to aid the cause of African wildlife. A number of organizations fund and manage conservation projects in Africa. It also helps to stay informed and to spread the word that African wildlife needs help.

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CAP00 DIPLOMATIC BRIEFING (On Arrival, Thursday, 17 February) Attendance is mandatory. A representative from the U.S. Consulate in Cape Town will present a briefing in the Union shortly after our arrival. Information regarding the current political and economic situation in South Africa will be presented. Safety and security considerations as well as practical information on such items as currency exchange, postal/telephone service and transportation will be discussed. CAP01 DIPLOMATIC BRIEFING FOLLOW-UP DISCUSSION: SOUTH AFRICA (On ship, following Diplomatic Briefing - 1030 Thursday, 17) Minimum 5/No Maximum (PRICE: FREE) [FDP: CERONE, FU & GODFREY] Students will meet with an American diplomat assigned to South Africa and have an opportunity to learn about work in diplomacy and the Foreign Service. Occurring directly after the general briefing, this FDP will provide an opportunity for Professor Cerone`s students to engage in discussions focusing on relevant human rights issues, including South Africa`s human rights records and its foreign policy with respect to human rights violations committed by others outside its territory. Professor Fu and Godfrey`s joint course engages students to explore South Africa`s impact on U.S - China relations; thus this opportunity to meet with U.S. Foreign Service officials who are working at the front line of these relationships is invaluable. This session is open to all members of the shipboard community. CAP02 ZANDVLEI, CAPE PENINSULA AND CAPE POINT (0915-1830 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 160 (PRICE: $149 + OOPEX) [FDP: ARMSTRONG] Begin this tour with a visit to the Zandvlei Estuary Nature Reserve. The Zandvlei Reserve, located on the northern shore of Zandvlei, was proclaimed a bird sanctuary in the 1980s. The area conserves endangered Cape Flats thicket vegetation and valuable seasonal salt marsh. As a functioning estuary, Zandvlei receives inputs from both the sea and the catchment area. Twenty-four indigenous fish species have been recorded there. Enjoy a guided walk and discussion with the manager of the Educational Centre. Next, continue along the shoreline of the Indian Ocean, through the historic naval base of Simonstown. Visit Boulder`s Beach, one of only two mainland Jackass Penguin breeding colonies in the world. Enjoy some free time for swimming. Thereafter, drive to The Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve, which occupies 19,151 acres of indigenous flora and fauna. Walk to the platform on top of the hill for a great view of the peninsula and the spot where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans are said to meet. If you prefer, take the optional funicular railway, which will transport you to the platform. From that location, there are approximately 120 steps to the old lighthouse on top of Cape Point. Contrary to popular belief, Cape Point is not the southernmost tip of Africa. That honor belongs to Cape Agulhas. It is, however, the meeting place of the Atlantic Ocean and False Bay. In the late afternoon return to the ship. (continued on next page)

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(continued from previous page) This FDP will give students in Professor Armstrong`s courses the opportunity to make observations that could be used for several different field assignments. We will visit one of the most unique plant communities in the world, and see penguins in the wild! Although South Africa is a long way from the Mediterranean, it contains a globally important example of a Mediterranean biome with the highest number of plants that are found nowhere else. We will discuss the unique aspects of this biome, visit a marsh to observe some South African birds, visit the only penguin colony on the African continent and watch for marine mammals from Cape Point. Please note: Wear comfortable lightweight clothing and comfortable walking shoes. Bring sun block, sun hat, sunglasses and windbreaker; bring a swimsuit and a towel to swim during free time at Boulder`s Beach. Lunch at a local restaurant is included, as are entrance fees to Cape Point Nature Reserve and Boulder Beach. Optional funicular railway is an out-ofpocket expense. Trip price includes a donation to the Zandvlei Conservation Trust. CAP03 POETS & AUTHORS IN CAPE TOWN (1000-1230 Thursday, 17 February, On ship) Minimum 11/No Maximum (PRICE: $12) [FDP: ARATA] In the last seventy years, South African English literature has established itself as a world literature read and celebrated around the globe. This literature includes important works by Alan Paton, Athol Fugard, Nadine Gordimer, and J.M. Coetzee, the last two of whom have won the Nobel Prize. In this FDP we will have the exciting chance to hear and talk to contemporary writers now working in this powerful, vibrant tradition. Meet some of Cape Town`s successful writers ­ poets and authors from Cape Town`s major publishing house, NB Publishers. Your local host, Ettie Williams, will introduce the work of some of South Africa`s prominent writers during this discussion. We will meet aboard the ship with these local writers, who will discuss their works in contemporary South Africa. This exchange will be particularly worthwhile for those interested in and studying the poetry and literature of southern Africa, especially that of South Africa. CAP04 THREE FAITHS PILGRIMAGE (1000-1600 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 29 (PRICE: $25 + OOPEX) [FDP: J. KOTTLER] Cape Town is a multiracial city that includes vibrant Muslim, Jewish and Christian communities. Islam was introduced by slaves brought over 300 years ago from Indonesia. The Jewish community traces its history to religious persecution in Europe. An estimated 80% of South Africans are Christians, and St. George`s Anglican Cathedral was the site of much interfaith protest during the struggle against apartheid. Guided by South African peace activist Terry Crawford-Browne (a former SAS professor), the walking tour of downtown Cape Town will include a mosque in Bo-Kaap, the Jewish Center, the Slave Lodge and St. George`s Cathedral. The visit to the Cathedral also includes an opportunity to walk the labyrinth (praying with your feet) to meditate upon the experiences. (The price of this practicum includes entrance fees and a donation to the Bo Kaap Mosque. The out-of-pocket expense is approximately R 3.90 for public transportation costs.)

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CAP05 WEST COAST NATIONAL PARK/LANGEBAAN LAGOON (1000-1830 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 25/Maximum 50 (PRICE: $62) [FDP: HON] Travel west along the coast from Cape Town to West Coast National Park and Langebaan Lagoon, one of South Africa`s most popular national parks. The coastal region is composed largely of marine sedimentary rocks, less than 5 million years old, which record many of the Earth`s climate fluctuations during that period. Langebaan National Park is centered around a salt water marsh and lagoon that is the largest of its kind in Africa. There are more than 250 species of birds, both migratory and native, that inhabit the swamp at various times of the year including flamingos and ibises. Long beaches with coastal sand dunes are found along much of this stretch of coastline, including within the National Park. The oldest known footprints of modern humans (about 117,000 years old) were found in older dune fields within the park. Dr. John Rogers of the University of Cape Town will join the FDP and guide us through features of the park. Professor Hon`s students will appreciate the opportunity to look at continental coastal process including beaches, backshore dune fields, lagoons and a large saltwater marsh that is home to migratory birds. We will also see fossil dunes where 117,000 year old human footprints were formed and talk about climatic changes. Please note: Box lunches from the ship included. Participants may want to bring their own additional snacks. CAP06 ROBBEN ISLAND OVERNIGHT (1000 Thursday, 17 February ­ 1045 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 19/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $399) PRE-SALE ONLY For more than four centuries, Robben Island has been a place of punishment for exiles, prisoners and political prisoners. In its early days it served as a place of confinement for lepers, the sick and an animal quarantine station. Since 1960, it has become synonymous with the political struggle against apartheid in South Africa. Political prisoners of the past have included Nelson Mandela and poet Dennis Brutus. The last political prisoners were released in 1991 and, on January 1, 1997, the Robben Island Museum opened its doors to the public. Today, many of the Robben Island guides are former political prisoners. Declared as a world heritage site by UNESCO in 1999, Robben Island itself is an outcrop of rock formed by geological processes extending millions of years ago. Rising and falling sea levels have changed the appearance of the island periodically. Over the past 700,000 years there have been 12 periods of lower sea levels during which the island has been linked to the mainland. Except for the administrative buildings and prison infrastructure, the island is primarily sand covered with somewhat limited vegetation. It is home to penguins, seals, chameleons, lizards, snakes, seabirds and a variety of buck. Robben Island hosts about 23 mammals and 132 bird species including the African penguin. Robben Island hosts the third largest colony of African Penguins. (For more information, visit: www.robbenisland.org.za)

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ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to the Nelson Mandela Gateway to board the ferry to Robben Island. Once on the island, meet with an ex-political prisoner for a guided walking tour of the Maximum Security Prison where Nelson Mandela, among others, was incarcerated during South Africa`s Apartheid years. After the prison tour, proceed on a bus orientation of the island. View the WWII exhibition before proceeding to the island dormitories where a late lunch will be served. In the afternoon, visit the house where Robert Sobukwe, the founder of the Pan African Congress stayed while imprisoned. Sobukwe was the only person in South Africa`s history to have been incarcerated under the Sobukwe Clause. The procedure was conducted under the General Law Amendment Act, which allowed his imprisonment to be annually renewed at the discretion of the Minister of Justice. Sobukwe was kept in solitary confinement but permitted certain privileges including books, newspapers, civilian clothes, bread etc. He lived in a separate area on the Island where he had no contact with other prisoners. The only contacts were his secret hand signals whilst outside for exercise. Despite this he succeeded in giving his approval to the external PAC to adopt a Maoist political program. He studied during this time and received (among others) a degree in economics from the University of London. After a tour of Sobukwe`s house, meet and interact with the current residents as well as several of the island`s ex-political prisoners. Enjoy some free time to freshen up, get settled in your bunkbed accommodations or further explore the island before enjoying a barbecue dinner. The remainder of the evening is at your leisure. (L, D; Robben Island dormitory) Day 2: After breakfast, board the ferry to return to the Nelson Mandela Gateway. Upon arrival, return to the ship. (B) CAP07 BISHOP PETER STOREY: INTERFAITH RESISTANCE TO APARTHEID & WALKING TOUR OF CAPE TOWN (1145-1700 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 21/Maximum 25 (PRICE: $51) [FDP: COPENHAVER] The purpose of this FDP is to enrich our understanding of the courageous resistance to apartheid and the united work of people of faith in opposing it. Bishop Peter Storey was a leader and participant in those struggles, and his personal testimony is both inspiring and challenging. His story highlights the role of nonviolence in resisting oppression. Bishop Peter Storey served as President of the South African Council of Churches with then-Bishop Desmond Tutu during the height of resistance to apartheid. He also served as chaplain to Nelson Mandela during Mandela`s imprisonment on Robben Island. Meet Bishop Storey for lunch onboard the ship during which we will discuss the courageous work of diverse faith groups in nonviolent resistance to apartheid. Bishop Storey will also discuss his latest work with the international Charter of Compassion. Following lunch, we will proceed first to the District Six Museum, which was the Bishop`s church at one time. The Museum now features a plaque honoring his work and contributions. Next, enjoy a special walking tour with the Bishop, including Parliament, The Presidency (South Africa`s White House) the Dutch East India Company Gardens (dating back to 1650s), The Old Slave Market, the old Race Classification Offices and St. George`s Cathedral. End at the Central Methodist Mission Hall for tea and coffee before returning to the ship. Please note: The order of the visits may change at the Bishop`s discretion.

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CAP08 WINE PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT (1230-1830 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 28/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $117) [FDP: ARTZ] South African wines are gaining an increasing share of the wine market in many countries, including the United States. Visit Backsberg Wines Estate and Nelsons Creek to learn about production techniques and management strategies. The FDP departs the Cape Town quayside and travels into the heart of the Cape wine lands. Our first stop is Backsberg Wine Estate, situated along the slopes of the Simonsberg Mountains, midway between Paarl and Stellenbosch. The estate has been producing quality wines for over 70 years. The philosophy of Backsberg remains that of providing pleasure and enjoyment to a broad range of wine lovers by producing wines not only with structure and finesse, but with a high level of drinkability. Backsberg emphasizes quality in all of their products and has been chosen as one of the Top 100 Wineries of the Year by Wine & Spirits Magazine in New York. Backsberg also has a strong environmental focus. They have a holistic approach to preservation ­ from the seemingly smaller features such as the weight of bottles, to reserving a section of land on the farm for the Fynbos biome. Backsberg made history recently when it became the first wine producer in South Africa - and one of only three in the world - to gain Carbon Neutral status by sequestering its carbon emissions. Simon Back, the proprietor and marketing manager of the estate will welcome and escort you on a tour through the wine cellar. After the tour, Simon will host a talk on Backsberg`s sales and marketing strategies and the estates environmental practices. After a Q&A session, students can enjoy an optional wine tasting in the Vat Cellar. Continue next to Nelson`s Creek Wine Estate near country town of Wellington. Nelson`s Creek Wine Estate stands upon one of the first pieces of land to be selected by the French Huguenots for making wine. A deeds office entry dated 1692 records the fact that the new arrivals from the Loire Valley immediately recognized the potential of the area and set about making their contribution to the fledgling wine industry. These early pioneers probably had the same dream as the present owner Alan Nelson - to make wines that would proudly carry the family name, wines that would be among the finest coming out of South Africa. After touring the vineyard, cellar and facilities, meet with Alan Nelson and his marketing team to discuss topics such as international marketing, sustainable procedures and social and environmental practices. Return to the ship in time for dinner. Please note: Participants are advised to wear lightweight clothing and comfortable walking shoes and to bring sunblock, sun hat, sunglasses and windbreaker.

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CAP09 !KHWA TTU ROUTE (1230-1900 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 23/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $92 + OOPEX) [FDP: ACHESON] Travel an hour out of Cape Town along the west coast, to the San Culture and Education Centre. This is a beautifully assembled and progressive project celebrating ancient indigenous San traditions in a contemporary and relevant fashion. On this day`s journey, gain insight into how ancient culture is relevant today; receive a short lesson in the clicks of the San languages; and experience a guided tour of the estate, which is slowly being set up as a game estate. After a friendly welcome, the San themselves will take you on a journey into their history, traditional knowledge, skills, languages, customs and current affairs. The !Khwa ttu San guides introduce the history of !Khwa ttu while on a relaxing drive through the hilly landscape in an open-air trailer. The 850-hectare nature reserve is home to hundreds of plant species of the indigenous fynbos flora and a wide array of indigenous fauna. As you drive up and down the hills, the San guides will point out some of the many game species such as eland, zebra, oryx, bontebok and springbok. Hear stories of the animals, which are forever linked to San oral history. Leave the vehicle and follow an easy nature walk with your guide, who will talk about hunting, gathering and tracking techniques used by the San people. Watch the guide demonstrate a traditional bird snare and storing water in ostrich eggs. Learn significant insights in traditional practices that are often still part of the Sans` lives. At the replica traditional San Village, observe demonstrations on the use of tools such as bows and arrows. If you wish, try shooting an arrow or igniting a fire with sticks under the guidance of experienced San. Watch the unique skills of San women as they make ostrich eggshell jewelry. Learn about some extraordinary aspects of the San`s social life such as the healing power of the trance dance and the traditional egalitarian society. Next, visit the boma, sustainably constructed of natural materials. Here, at the highest point in the landscape of !Khwa ttu, experience breathtaking views of Table Mountain to the south and the Langebaan Lagoon to the north. Continue to the gallery to view the exhibition entitled The San and the Camera. The artistic and informative display includes eye-opening quotes, realistic life stories and explanatory texts, as well as historic and contemporary photographs. Issues close to the hearts of the South Africa San people are highlighted in this presentation. Students in Dr. Acheson's Anthropology courses will find this field directed practicum extremely rewarding because the San are one of the last remaining foraging cultures on the planet earth today. We, as humans, have lived for the vast majority of prehistory without agriculture and strictly by means of hunting and gathering in direct contact with the natural landscape with incredible knowledge of plants and animals. Unfortunately, the onset of agriculture and later industrial and even post-industrial agriculture has altered the face of the planet, making it nearly impossible for foragers to continue with their traditional methods of sustainable living. Dr. Acheson is thrilled to lead a visit to the San Culture and Education Center so that we will have a once in a lifetime opportunity to visit a truly unique human group and learn about foraging directly from them. This trip complements our assigned readings and will bring to life the terms: band society, sustainability, foraging, gender roles, infant dependency and a host of other anthropological concepts. Box lunches from the ship provided; or enjoy a meal at the estate`s restaurant (at your own expense), which serves up exquisite interpretations on classic indigenous dishes and freshly baked farm bread. Please note: Please wear lightweight clothing, walking shoes, and sun protection. OOPEX for optional snack purchases.

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CAP10 RACE & RACE CLASSIFICATION BEFORE & DURING APARTHEID (1300-1700 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 27 (PRICE: $37) [FDP: SILVERSTEIN] We will travel to the South African Natural History Museum, the oldest and, according to many residents and visitors, the most interesting museum in the country. After a presentation on races in South Africa and how they have been classified and portrayed, we will look at the ethnographic and archaeological exhibits in the museum. We will then walk through the Company Gardens to the Cultural History Museum (about a 15-minute walk) where we will contrast the way in which South African peoples are displayed in this more politically engaged institution. Professor Alan G. Morris, from the University of Cape Town, will give a presentation on the old classification laws and how they controlled every aspect of life for every citizen. In particular, he will discuss the category "coloured", which is not the same as the American usage and continues to be a contentious issue of identity in modern South Africa. Professor Morris will also consider the current times by talking about racial redress and the problem of using race to give differential access to University systems. Can the effects of old discrimination be removed by using new forms of discrimination? Return to the ship will be from the Museum. CAP11 MAKING THE NEWS: CAPE ARGUS (1300-1700 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 12/ Maximum 28 (PRICE: $88) [FDP: GILLIS & GOFF] Depart the quayside and travel to Argus House in the city center, where you will gain a fascinating insight to the workings of local media in Cape Town. Founded in 1857, the Cape Argus is a daily newspaper published by Independent News & Media in Cape Town, South Africa. It is commonly referred to simply as "The Argus." Although not the first English language newspaper in Southern Africa, the Cape Argus was the first locally to use the telegraph for news gathering. As of 2009, the Argus had a daily readership of 359,000 and a circulation of 60,552. Independent News & Media PLC is a media organization based in Dublin, Ireland, with interests in 22 countries on four continents worldwide. The company owns over 200 print titles, more than 130 radio stations, over 100 commercial websites and many billboard locations, and is a leading press player in five countries. Tony O`Reilly, CEO until early 2009, and his family dominated the INM group of companies since 1973 (one of his sons, formerly COO, became CEO in early 2009, and two others were nonexecutive directors for many years), Upon arrival you will be met by a representative of Argus House for a guided tour of the building, learning more about the process of how the news is collected, processed and printed ­ from beginning to newspaper. After your tour, you will then be addressed by a senior resident journalist, to learn more about the personal perspective and experience of being a journalist in modern day South Africa. You will also have the opportunity to ask questions in this Q&A session. Visit the Argus online at http://www.capeargus.co.za/. (continued on next page)

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(continued from previous page) Through participation in this FDP, students in the Global Journalism course will be able to observe firsthand how news is produced at a mainstream media outlet. During conversations with working journalists at Cape Argus, they will be able to pursue one of the main goals of the course: how do different news publications serve different audiences? In particular, students will have a chance to analyze the point of view of news coverage at the Cape Argus, in order to compare it to the Daily Sun, another South African news publication that the class will be examining while in port. Please note: This day trip requires a manifest; therefore, participants cannot sell or exchange tickets. CAP12 CITY ORIENTATION (1300-1700 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 24/Maximum 160 (PRICE: $62) [FDP: EHNBOM] Cape Town is a remarkable city where the present and the past harmoniously converge--in history, architecture, cultural pursuits and the essence of its people. Take a step back in time when you pay a visit to the Castle of Good Hope, the oldest building in South Africa. Built between 1666-1679, it is a pentagonal fortification with a moat and bastions at each corner. Adderley Street is the principal thoroughfare of Cape Town and is renowned for its fine examples of old Cape architecture, including the Standard Bank Building, St. George`s Anglican Cathedral and the Cultural History Museum. Afterward, stroll through the Company`s Garden, the oldest garden in South Africa. Established in 1652 by Jan van Riebeeck, it was originally used as a vegetable garden to supply fresh produce to passing ships. Located within the gardens are the red-bricked House of Parliament, the South African National Gallery, the Jewish Museum and the Great Synagogue. Enjoy a refreshment stop in the tranquil surroundings of the gardens before you proceed to the South African Museum. Established in 1825, it is the oldest museum in sub-Saharan Africa and houses an extensive natural history collection. Before returning to the ship, end your city orientation with a visit to the Foreshore, an area of land that was reclaimed during the construction of the harbor, known as Duncan Dock. Vast quantities of sand dredged up during the building of the dock created 145 hectares (352 acres) of level ground. CAP13 BEHIND-THE-SCENES VISIT TO TWO OCEANS AQUARIUM (1300-1800 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 5/Maximum 21 (PRICE: $5 + OOPEX) [FDP: KENNEDY] The southern tip of the African continent is the meeting place of two oceans, the Indian and the Atlantic. The acclaimed Two Oceans Aquarium on the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront in Cape Town displays the great diversity of marine life found in these two oceans, as over 3000 living sea animals, including sharks, fishes, turtles and penguins live in this underwater nature reserve. It is worth a visit by anyone interested in the ocean and its inhabitants; however, this trip will allow Professor Kennedy`s students to do more than look through the glass walls of aquaria. After walking from the ship through the Waterfront to the Aquarium, participants will be met by a guide who will help them understand how such a facility maintains water quality, obtains or cultures organisms, prepares food, educates the public and protects endangered species. This knowledge supplements understanding of how the ocean works and what organisms can be found in the sea. After the guided tour behind the scenes ends, the participants will be free to explore the aquarium on their own until the aquarium closes at 6 PM. Please note: OOPEX includes individual entrance to the aquarium upon arrival. Student price = R66.50 (approximately USD$11) and adult price = R86.50 (approximately USD$14). Please have local currency for payment.

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CAP14 KHAYELITSHA TOWNSHIP VISIT (1330-1800 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 10/ Maximum 25 (PRICE: $59) Visit Khayelitsha, South Africa`s fastest growing township. The impression from the outside is fairly grim--many shacks line the outskirts and give no indication of the vibrant culture found within. However, life in Khayelitsha is filled with entrepreneurial energy and community spirit; this trip is your opportunity to gain first-hand experience. Upon entering the township, visit the Khayelitsha Craft Market. After exploring the market, proceed to Look Out Hill to view recent developments in the township. Continue to the Philani Nutrition Centre, where you will view weavings and silkscreen paintings, a project undertaken by the women in the community. A visit to Vicky`s Bed and Breakfast is followed by a visit to the Waterfront shebeen (tavern). Finally, visit Kopanong (meeting place), a guesthouse operated by Mpho and Thope Leakau, where Thope will show you around her community. Then enjoy a cup of tea in the guesthouse before returning to the ship. CAP15 LION'S HEAD PICNIC HIKE (1600-2100 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 16/Maximum 100 (PRICE: $45) Lion`s Head is a beautiful rocky peak which lies between Table Mountain and Signal Hill and forms part of the dramatic backdrop to the city of Cape Town. Its name was derived in the 17th century by the Dutch who saw the rock formations and thought they resembled a crouching lion--Signal hill as the lion`s tail or rump and Lion`s Head its mane. The area is part of the Table Mountain National Park and is covered in indigenous fynbos vegetation and is home to a variety of small animals. On a clear day, the peak provides spectacular 360-degree views of Table Mountain, the city centre, harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. Depart the ship and travel to the base of the peak. Here, begin the circular path to the top. Upon reaching the summit, refreshments and a picnic dinner will be served while watching the sunset. Once the sun sets, the beauty of the city starts to shimmer as the city lights are turned on and the moon and stars start to light the sky. The guides will carry flashlights to light the path on the journey down. Please note: Flashlights are highly recommended for this trip. This hike can be considered strenuous at times. A moderate level of fitness is required; therefore this trip is not suitable for children under 12. CAP16 THE TAMING OF THE SHREW--A NIGHT OF THEATRE IN CAPE TOWN (1830-2345 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 28/Maximum 150 (PRICE: $59) PRE-SALE ONLY Enjoy a new production of Shakespeare's wonderful comedy of love and intrigue under the skies of the Southern Cross. Mynardville's outdoor theatre in the old gardens of Cape Town has a long and proud history dating back to the 1930's with annual performances of Shakespeare's plays. Director Roy Seargent, of Artscape Drama, directs a cast of South Africa's finest actors in a uniquely African setting. Meet the director and members of the cast while you enjoy a picnic on the lawns of the garden before the performance. (Bring a warm jacket)

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CAP17 CAPE TOWN JAZZ SAFARI (1900-2330 Thursday, 17 February) Minimum 16/ Maximum 40 (PRICE: $159) A wonderful way to connect with people and their culture is by listening to their music; this practicum provides just that opportunity. Cape Town Jazz is a unique mix of Western and African music with global influences interspersed. It expresses South Africa`s struggle and freedom; it is the music of the people. Access to the jazz scene takes time and is difficult if you are only in the city for a short time. Experience Cape Town`s musical fabric and visit several jazz venues--an intimate evening in the living rooms of a variety of Cape Town musicians, enjoying exclusive musical performances by the artists, dinner, drinks and conversation. Afterward, enjoy live jazz at an authentic venue outside of the inner city before returning to the ship. Please note: If you wish to play with the musicians, you must bring your own instrument on this trip. ------------------------------------------------ FRIDAY, 18 FEBRUARY -----------------------------------------------CAP18 FOUR-DAY SAFARI EXPERIENCE WITH ELEPHANT RIDE (LODGE) (0500 Friday, 18 February ­ 14000 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 15/Maximum 19 (PRICE: $2,084) PRE-SALE ONLY This four-day adventure spans two South African provinces, Eastern and Western Cape, and provides a unique opportunity to explore a part of the African bush atop an elephant. The trip first visits the Eastern Cape`s pristine valley of the Zuurberg Mountains, which borders the Greater Addo Elephant National Park. This region is regarded as Africa`s most biologically diverse, supporting five of the seven biomes in Southern Africa. With the Langeberg Mountain as its backdrop, the Western Cape stop on the Garden Route Coast complements the earlier landscape. Accommodations during this trip will be at the Elephant Safari Lodge and Garden Route Game Lodge. The Elephant Safari Lodge is located on a 7,500-hectare wildlife conservancy and was designed to blend into the valley`s lush bushveld. The environmentally friendly suites are built on elevated wooden decks made from recycled Brazilian pine. Each suite has an en suite bathroom, indoor and outdoor showers, solar-powered hot water geyser, hair dryers and 220V electric outlets. For more information, visit www.aebs.co.za. The Garden Route Game Lodge offers recently refurbished accommodations with an African décor. Each room has an en suite bathroom and access to the west-facing balcony, which is near the property`s pool. Interested in wildlife conservation, the Garden Route Game Lodge introduced the first free-roaming cheetahs to the area in 2007. ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to the Cape Town International Airport for the one-hour flight to Port Elizabeth. Upon arrival, meet your local guide and travel approximately 90 minutes to the Addo Elephant Safari Lodge. After enjoying a welcome drink, freshen up in your suite before embarking on an afternoon game drive. Typical sightings include eland, gemsbok, springbok, wildebeest and zebra herds. Enjoy the reserve`s numerous biomes, which consist of savanna grassland, valley bushveld, fynbos, riverine forest and acacia woodland. After dinner at the lodge, enjoy the rest of the evening discussing the day`s events. (Box L, D; Elephant Safari Lodge) Day 2: After an early morning wake-up call, you will experience how nature comes alive with the rise of the sun at your morning game drive. Enjoy a hearty breakfast at the lodge before experiencing today`s highlight ­ a 30-minute elephant ride. (Due to number of available elephants, the group will split into subgroups of six; each group participating in this unique experience.) Today is about learning and becoming familiar with one of Africa's most stately, intelligent mammals - the African Elephant. After the elephant ride, enjoy a bush walk with the elephants through ravines, bush and forest. The walk is not strenuous and at an enjoyable pace. During the walk observe the elephant`s habits and embrace the interaction, whether standing between them, being touched by them, scented by them, being nudged or

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gently pushed at by them. Rangers say that feeling their curiosity and their trust is to feel oneness at an emotional and visceral level ­ a feeling that is immensely elevating and yet, somehow, disquieting. End the afternoon by relaxing at the waterhole, enjoying refreshments and light snacks while hopefully observing the elephants swim and make the most of the mud. In the late afternoon, meet in the restaurant for afternoon tea, before departing on yet another game drive. Sundowners will be served in the bush, before returning to the lodge for dinner. (B, L, D; Elephant Safari Lodge) Day 3: After a morning game drive and leisurely breakfast, check out of the lodge and continue along the majestic Langeberg mountain range to South Africa`s world-famous Garden Route Coast. Arrive at the Garden Route Game Lodge, which adheres to optimal conservation practices to create a balanced ecosystem, and enjoy a welcome refreshment. The area is home to many permanent and migratory bird species that are best viewed on foot and identifiable by the game rangers. The large variety of fynbos and other plant species on the reserve complement the tranquil setting. Enjoy some free time before having high tea followed by an afternoon game drive. The relatively small size of the land coupled with the consequent density of game enables easy, plentiful viewing of wildlife in their natural habitat. Dinner is served in the African Boma (weather depending); this unique dining experience offers a hearty menu of tasty traditional cuisine and chefs` specialties, which are presented over open coals in African pots. (B, L, D; Garden Route Game Lodge) Day 4: After breakfast and, if time permits, a short game drive, return to Cape Town along the N2 via Swellendam. This 3.5-hour scenic drive is a relaxing way to end this unique safari adventure before embarking the ship. (B) CAP19 PILANESBERG GAME RESERVE & JOHANNESBURG (0700 Friday, 18 February ­ 1940 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $2,799) PRE-SALE ONLY This four-day trip combines a safari experience with an opportunity to explore Johannesburg, South Africa`s largest city and the most metropolitan city in Sub-Saharan Africa. As the provincial capital of Gauteng, Johannesburg is renowned for its museums including the Apartheid Museum, a touching and dynamic museum that exhibits South Africa`s turbulent history. Just two hours outside of Johannesburg is the Pilanesberg National Park, which is well regarded for its diversity of game and fascinating geological formations. This reserve is centered on the ancient crater of a dormant volcano divided by riverine woodlands and elephant trails. The park is also home to a wide variety of general game including a healthy population of Africa`s Big Five (lion, leopard, rhinoceros, elephant and buffalo). In addition, both species of rhinoceros (black and white), cheetah, wild dog and over 360 bird species can be seen within the park. One of the largest national parks in Southern Africa, it is said to have the highest concentration of rhinoceros per square kilometer of any park on the continent. While in Pilanesberg, stay at the Bakubung Bush Lodge and enjoy the comfortable accommodations of this full-service lodge. Tucked in the expanses of the Park, the Bakubung Bush Lodge offers a natural rockhewn swimming pool, floodlit tennis courts, beach volleyball, outdoor chess and a children`s adventure playground. Game drives in open-air vehicles and bush walks are part of the wildlife experience at the lodge. For further information on this property, please view the following website link: www.bakubung.co.za.

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ITINERARY Day 1: Depart for the airport for the two-hour flight to Johannesburg. Upon arrival, depart for a panoramic city tour including stops at the Apartheid Museum and Mandela Family Museum in Soweto. Opened in 2001, the Apartheid Museum is considered the pre-eminent museum in the world dealing with 20th-century South Africa, at the heart of which is at the apartheid story. The museum illustrates the rise and fall of apartheid and is a beacon of hope as it shows the world how South Africa is coming to terms with its oppressive past and working towards a future that all South Africans can call their own. After exploring the Apartheid Museum, visit Nelson Mandela's humble little house in Orlando West, Soweto, now called the Mandela Family Museum. This is an interesting stopover showcasing the authentic history on the world's most famous former prisoner. The museum, a house comprising four inter-leading rooms, contains a rather higgledy-piggledy assortment of memorabilia, paintings and photographs of the Mandela family, as well as a collection of honorary doctorates bestowed on Mandela by universities and institutions around the world. After touring the museum, enjoy lunch at a local restaurant before transferring to the Sandton Sun Hotel. Situated in one of Johannesburg`s exclusive northern suburbs, the hotel adjoins the Sandton City shopping complex and Nelson Mandela Square. The square commemorates the country`s first decade of democracy as illustrated by the six-meter bronze statue of Nelson Mandela. The square was aptly renamed Nelson Mandela Square at Sandton City once the donated sculpture was unveiled and placed there. The statue honors the former president`s vision of a free and just South Africa while also creating a focal point for locals and foreigners to contemplate the events that led to the creation of the Rainbow Nation. The remainder of the day is free to explore the Sandton City complex and Nelson Mandela Square. Dinner is served at the hotel. (L; D; Sandton Sun) Day 2: After breakfast, proceed to the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) and enjoy an informal tour of the complex. Established by London businessman, Benjamin Minors Woollan, the JSE is the largest stock exchange in Africa. Continue to Pilanesberg National Park and the Bakubung Bush Lodge. Lunch with refreshments will be served on arrival. After some free time in the afternoon, depart on an open-vehicle game drive, enjoying refreshments while watching the sunset. Return to the lodge for dinner and overnight. (B; L; D; Bakubung Bush Lodge) Day 3: Explore Pilanesburg National Park. Game drive times are determined by optimal animal activity periods. During this time of year, drives take place early in the morning (before breakfast) and late in the afternoon. (B; L; D; Bakubung Bush Lodge) Day 4: Enjoy a leisurely breakfast and perhaps a short game drive before transferring to the airport in Johannesburg for your flight to Cape Town where you will rejoin the Ship (B, Snack on flight). CAP20 THREE-DAY SAFARI TO HLUHLUWE-UMFOLOZI GAME RESERVE (UMKHUMBI LODGE) (0745 Friday, 18 February ­ 1810 Sunday, 20 February) Minimum 10/Maximum 22(PRICE: $1,969) PRE-SALE ONLY The province of KwaZulu Natal is referred to as the Kingdom of the Zulus and claims the oldest game reserve in Africa, the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve. Established in 1895, this combined reserve spans more than 237,000 acres of hilly terrain and wooded savannah. The rich habitat is prime Big Five country and is the only park in its province under formal conservation. The park reclaimed its international standing during the 1950s and 60s with Operation Rhino, which increased the thendiminishing white rhinoceros population through anti-poaching control. The park has the largest concentration of black and white rhinoceros in the world. The wild dog, believed to be Africa`s mostendangered carnivore, is now one of the park`s conservation priorities. The park also is renowned for its wilderness trails, which date back to the 1950s and its Game Capture Unit, a benchmark for animal capture and sustainable utilization throughout Africa. Accommodation will be at the Umkhumbi Lodge. Nestled in the bush, Umkhumbi is the Zulu name for the Red Duiker, a shy small red antelope, which can commonly be seen picking its way across the forest floor. Each room has en suite bath and shower, private veranda, refrigerator, tea and coffee making facilities and air-conditioning.

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ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to Cape Town International Airport for your two-hour flight to Durban. On arrival, travel to your lodge and enjoy lunch. In the afternoon, visit the western tip of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Walk along the nature trail and follow the shoreline of this large lake. Small wild animals and many birds, as well as beautiful scenery, make for a pleasant afternoon. Finish the walk with a sundowner before heading back to the lodge for dinner and overnight. (L, D; Umkhumbi Lodge) Day 2: Embark on a full-day game drive in the Hluhluwe Umfolozi Game Reserve. After a picnic lunch in the reserve, continue to search for the Big Five. In the late afternoon, return to the lodge and freshen-up before dinner. The remainder of the evening is at your leisure. (B, L, D; Umkhumbi Lodge) Day 3: After breakfast, enjoy one last view of the savannah while driving to Durban for your return flight to Cape Town. (B, Snack on flight) CAP21 THREE-DAY SAFARI TO KWAZULU NATAL (ZULULAND TREE LODGE) (0745 Friday, 18 February ­ 1810 Sunday, 20 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $2,010) PRE-SALE ONLY The province of KwaZulu Natal is referred to as the Kingdom of the Zulus and claims the oldest game reserve in Africa, the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve. Established in 1895, this combined reserve spans over 237,000 acres of hilly terrain and wooded savannah. The rich habitat is prime Big Five country and is the only park in its province under formal conservation. The park reclaimed its international standing during the 1950s and 60s with Operation Rhino, which increased the then-diminishing white rhino population through anti-poaching control. The park has the largest concentration of black and white rhino in the world. The wild dog, believed to be Africa`s most endangered carnivore, is now one of the park`s conservation priorities. The park is also renowned for its wilderness trails, which date back to the 1950s, and it`s Game Capture Unit, a benchmark for animal capture and sustainable utilization throughout Africa. Accommodations will be in the Zululand Tree Lodge under the shade of a fever tree forest on thatched, stilted chalets. The lodge features a quiet lounge, observation deck and an outdoor pool where wildlife such as warthog, red duiker and purple-crested loeries are known to meander nearby. ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to Cape Town International Airport for your two-hour flight to Durban. On arrival, travel to Zululand Tree Lodge. After check-in, the remainder of the afternoon is at leisure. In the late afternoon, enjoy an exhilarating game drive. (Box L, D; Zululand Tree Lodge) Day 2: Enjoy a quick cup of tea and biscuits before you embark on a full-day game drive in the Hluhluwe Game Reserve. After lunch in the reserve, continue to search for the Big Five. Return to the lodge and freshen up before dinner. The remainder of the evening is at leisure. (B, L, D; Zululand Tree Lodge) Day 3: After breakfast, enjoy one last view of the savannah while driving to Durban for your return flight to Cape Town. (B, snack on flight) CAP22 SERVICE PROJECT: HABITAT FOR HUMANITY ­ GROUP A (0800-1600 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 20 (PRICE: $39) Millard Fuller believed that, We have the know-how in the world to house everyone. We have the resources in the world to house everyone. All that`s missing is the will to do it. In 1976, this lawyer and businessman from Alabama started Habitat for Humanity International. Thirty years later, Habitat for Humanity`s impact is colossal, reaching 100 countries across the globe. In 1998, Habitat began building houses for people in need in Cape Town. Habitat`s mission is to eliminate poverty housing and homelessness all over the world.

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It takes more than desire, sweat and hard work to embrace this mission and build a Habitat house. The cost of a brick house with electricity and indoor plumbing in South Africa is approximately US$12,600. Last year, the shipboard community donated money to the SAS Annual Fund to provide funding for this project in Cape Town. Their generosity created this opportunity for you to be an integral part of the house that Semester at Sea built. During this service project, you will be working alongside South Africans in a nearby township. In partnership with Habitat, the future homeowners will also be there. Homeowner families are chosen according to their need and their ability to repay the no-interest mortgage. A typical day begins with a welcome from the Habitat team and some instruction on the day`s activities. This is followed by a morning work session, lunch and an afternoon work session. An experienced local builder provides supervision on site. Tea is provided by the homeowners. Box lunches from the ship will be provided. (The price of this practicum is based on round-trip transportation to and from the site. The cost to build the Habitat house is courtesy of the SAS Annual Fund.) CAP23 THREE-DAY SAFARI TO KARIEGA GAME RESERVE (LODGE) ­ GROUP A (0810 Friday, 18 February ­ 1700 Sunday, 20 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 35(PRICE: $1,679) PRE-SALE ONLY In the heart of the 1820 Settler Country, the Kariega Game Reserve is a private game reserve set in 14,800 acres of pristine wilderness high above the spectacular Kariega River Valley. Nestled between the Kariega and Bushmans Rivers, the reserve incorporates contrasting riverine, bushveld and grassland ecosystems and hosts more than 25 species of game, including elephant, zebra, buffalo, leopard, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, hyena, giraffe, eland, wildebeest, waterbuck, a wide variety of antelope and more than 250 bird species. Accommodations will be in the Kariega Main Lodge, located on the banks of the Bushmans River. The lodge, which overhangs the river, consists of air-conditioned thatched-roof suites and has a swimming pool and sun deck on the premises. The suites feature modern African décor with an en-suite bathroom; each offers a view of the river and floodplain beyond. There are a variety of other activities and facilities available, at your own expense, such as canoeing, mountain biking and horseback riding at the nearby beaches of Kenton-on-Sea. For more information, visit www.katiega.co.za. ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to Cape Town International Airport for the one-hour flight to Port Elizabeth. On arrival, travel to Kariega Game Reserve where refreshments will be served before checking-in to your suite. After some free time, take a river cruise on the Kariega Queen through a bird sanctuary in the upper reaches of the Kariega River. Afterward, depart on an extended open-vehicle game drive, enjoying refreshments while watching the sunset. In the evening, enjoy a barbeque dinner in the open-air boma. (Box L, D; Kariega Main Lodge) Day 2: In the early morning, enjoy a game drive. Experience how nature comes alive with the rise of the sun. Return to the lodge for breakfast and then take a short hike to enjoy the magnificent scenery. One of the unique features of the Kariega experience is the ability to walk safely on marked trails close to abundant game and bird life. Enjoy lunch at an architectural award-winning restaurant, nestled in the bush. Enjoy a late afternoon game drive before returning to the chalets to freshen up for dinner. (B, L, D; Kariega Main Lodge) Day 3: Enjoy a leisurely breakfast and perhaps a short game drive before traveling to the airport for your return flight to Cape Town. (B, L, Snack on flight)

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CAP24 THREE-DAY SAFARI TO KRUGER NATIONAL PARK (SABI RIVER SUN) (0830 Friday, 18 February ­ 1730 Sunday, 20 February) Minimum 25/Maximum 41 (PRICE: $2,679) PRESALE ONLY Kruger National Park is one of the world`s most popular sanctuaries for nature and wildlife and home to innumerable species. There is an ideal opportunity in the park to observe Africa`s Big Five up close-- the lion, leopard, elephant, buffalo and rhinoceros--in addition to no less than 336 types of trees, 49 species of fish, 114 types of reptiles and 507 bird species, as well as an endless number of giraffe, baboons, zebra and buck. Accommodations will be in the Sabi River Sun Resort, which is on the banks of the tranquil Sabi River. Surrounded by the scenic Lowveld, the resort is known for its sporting facilities, tranquil nature walks, bird watching, and sightings of their resident crocodiles and hippopotamus. On the Sabi River Sun property, there are five outdoor pools, three tennis courts, an 18-hole golf course, a bowling green, volleyball, table tennis and walking trails. There are a variety of other activities and facilities available, at your own expense, such as horseback riding, white-water rafting and hot-air ballooning. ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer from the ship to Cape Town International Airport for your flight to Kruger (connecting through Johannesburg). On arrival, travel to the Sabi River Sun Resort. After check-in, the remainder of the afternoon is at your leisure. In the late afternoon, the game ranger takes you on a game drive in open 4x4 vehicles. At dusk, enjoy sundowners deep in the bush. Return to the lodge to freshen up before dinner. This evening, dinner is served in the boma. This African tradition is typically dinner outdoors around the campfire. (L, D; Sabi River Sun Resort) Day 2: In the early morning, awaken for a full-day game drive. Experience how nature comes to life with the rise of the sun. Breakfast packs are available for the drive. Later, enjoy a picnic lunch in the bush. Afterward, continue the game drive in search of more sightings of the Big Five. Return to the lodge in the afternoon. Relax before dinner. (Packed B, Picnic L, D; Sabi River Sun Resort) Day 3: In the early morning, awaken for a game drive; breakfast packs are available for the drive. Continue to the airport for your return flight to Cape Town. (Packed B, Packed L; Snack on flight) CAP25 SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM TOUR (0900-1200 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 12/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $62) Established in 1825, the South African Museum (SAM) is the oldest museum in sub-Saharan Africa and has been adding to their collections for nearly 200 years. Its collections range from fossils of insects and fish found as recently as a week ago, to Stone Age tools more than 120 000 years old, to displays of traditional clothes from last century. The South African Museum offers a diverse range of exhibitions and visitors often leave the museum with a better understanding of the earth and its biological and cultural diversity--both past and present. The South African Museum was founded by Lord Charles Somerset and is the second oldest scientific institute in the country--the Royal Observatory was established just five years earlier. It is both a research and educational institution and offers collections of natural history and anthropological objects that document all forms of life, living and extinct, from southern Africa. The museum also traces the material cultural heritage of the indigenous populations back to their earliest origins, and the research collections are studied by scientists and students world-wide. The South African Museum is one of the biggest attractions in Cape Town with more than 400,000 visitors each year.

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CAP26 FOOTSTEPS TO FREEDOM AND STREETWIRES (0900-1300 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 16/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $109) The city of Cape Town is beautiful and its history dramatic. This eye opening, tactile and fascinating three-hour walking tour of South Africa`s most historic square mile will provide an excellent geopolitical and historic overview of Cape Town. There is no better way to experience Cape Town than on foot. With an expert guide, walk through the chronological events that have shaped the national and the geopolitical map. The tour begins with tales and facts about the San and Khoikhoi peoples, whose lives were forever and indelibly changed by the arrival of the Dutch East India Company, slavery, British Colonial rule, The Union of South Africa, the rise and fall of apartheid and the birth of the Rainbow Nation. During this walking tour, explore Old Town, catch the buzz of the city in Greenmarket Square, hear tales of Dutch rule at the Castle of Good Hope and Grand Parade and see where slaves were traded and where they toiled in the Company`s Garden. Take a look at the Parliament Building, where the apartheid laws were passed and repealed, and see the devastating consequences of unfettered racism at the District Six Museum. Following the walking tour, visit one of the central tenets of the modern South Africa--the need for thriving upliftment of previously disadvantaged peoples. There is no more tangible example of this in the city than Streetwires, which employs more than 75 formerly unemployed people. This company marks a clever conjoining of street art and social development in the dynamic genre of wire art. The project provides the skills training, support and raw materials necessary to enable many formerly unemployed South Africans to channel their natural creative energies into this vibrant art form. While wire art is not a new genre, the Streetwires team brings together a group of people with skills in wire art, marketing, production development and industrial design. In doing so, it successfully empowers needy South Africans by creating opportunities where none had existed. There will be an opportunity to talk to the artists and learn their craft, and try first-hand the art of creating wire art. Please note: As this trip involves a lot of walking, comfortable, sturdy shoes are recommended. CAP27 ARTS FOR HOPE TOUR (0900-1415 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 4/Maximum 12 (PRICE: $169) Participants of this practicum will enjoy an intimate look inside two local art projects which double as social programs serving local artists. We will proceed to the workshop and gallery of African All Sorts based in Salt River. This uplifting social bead and wire art project was established in March 2004 by brothers Jason and David Rosenstein who were recently joined by Dr. Leila Rajah. Their aim is to address job creation issues and skills development in Africa. The artists at African Allsorts are talented individuals who through hard work, dedication and nurturing have honed their skills to create some of the finest bead and wire art work in the world. The emphasis of their work lies in attention to detail and innovation in design, while maintaining high standards of quality. Since 2004 their beautiful art pieces have been exported to Europe, USA, Australia, South Korea, Mozambique, Kenya, Tanzania, Botswana and Namibia. Their work has been exhibited at the Maison & Objet show in Paris. In addition, they have had a successful exhibition at the New York International Gift Show in 2006 to which we will return in 2007. You will have the opportunity to interact with these artists and help create a small master piece of your own. It will be the perfect opportunity to put your own wire and beading skills to the test under the expert tutelage of these experienced artists. The professional finishing touches will be done by the artists, while you continue your tour, and then delivered to the ship prior to your departure Continue your journey to the Montebello Design Centre. This Design Centre is hidden in the leafy green belt of Newlands, with the Table Mountain range towering above; it is situated in the original farm

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buildings of the historic Montebello. The Design Centre is a development project for previously disadvantaged artists, which aims to create jobs in craft and promote local design. This centre is home to several artisan studios, including a forge, two jewelry studios, a pottery studio, hand weavers studio and even a green house. You will be met by a representative of the Centre and a private tour will take place. Here you will be able to meet the various artists in their studios and hear how this centre has given them the opportunity to flourish. Our next stop will be at the world renowned Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens, which skirt the slopes of Devil's Peak, creating dramatic and stunning views. One of the world's most famous Botanical Gardens, it is spread over 560 hectares on the eastern slopes of Table Mountain and contains over 8500 species of indigenous fynbos plant species. It is home to one of the six floral kingdoms of the world, and can lay claim to having more diversity of plant species in this small area, than in the entire United Kingdom! Embark on a tour of the gardens. You will also have the opportunity to view the Chapungo Sculptures made by Zimbabwean artists (Stone art) throughout the Gardens, and at the Sculptures Park. There will also be some time at leisure available for browsing in the well-stocked Curio Shop After our visit to Kirstenbosch, depart for a breathtakingly scenic drive passing through the most beautiful and expensive real estate suburbs of Constantia and Bishops Court en route to the ship. CAP28 OPERATION HUNGER - GROUP A (09001800 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 30/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $45) Operation Hunger is an NGO whose mission is to create partnerships between vulnerable households and caring people to combat malnutrition which, when suffered by children, undermines the nation`s health, education and economic potential. The objectives are to improve the nutritional well being of the poor; promote the dissemination of knowledge about poverty and malnutrition in South Africa; improve existing facilities to reduce malnutrition in South Africa and to render financial assistance to develop such programs; cooperate with communities, organizations and authorities to combat malnutrition; and publicize and promote the objectives via lectures, exhibitions, meetings, conferences, pamphlets, newspapers, books, leaflets, radio, television and films. Operation Hunger`s integrated development program includes locally managed growth-monitoring programs, targeted food support, water supply, sanitation facilities, health/hygiene education, income generation and livelihood programs, agriculture and food production. The staff of Operation Hunger provided the following vivid description for this visit: You will visit the squatter camps on the outskirts of Cape Town, filled with people mainly from the Transkei and Ciskei, who come to the big city at a rate of 10,000 per month, in search of non-existent work. On arrival, these people are already malnourished. They find no land, no shelter, no work and no means by which to return home. So they set up shacks made out of plastic, tin, cardboard or anything else they can find. Through Operation Hunger, women in the community have established feeding programs--setting up their pots of soup in the dusty little lanes and in all the crèches. About 50 kilometers outside Cape Town, in the beautiful wine lands; you will also visit the children of farm workers who are part of Operation Hunger`s feeding program for malnourished children. Most farmers in the wealthy wine lands area are paid an absolute pittance in exchange for 12 hours of hard labor. While the parents are out picking, child-minding and feeding are nonexistent. Women in the community have set up street kitchens to feed the children. The day`s activities will include visits to several townships such as Spandau, Green Park and Chris Hani, and an opportunity to witness the efforts of Operation Hunger. (The price for this practicum includes a small donation to Operation Hunger. Box lunches from the ship will be provided.)

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CAP29 CAPE TOWN, APARTHEID & ROBBEN ISLAND (0900-1845 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 36/Maximum 80 (PRICE: $145) [FDP: CONNOLLY & COPENHAVER] This trip provides historical insight into the social injustices of Cape Town`s past. Begin the day`s journey with a stop at the Bo-Kaap Museum, a typical example of a Malay Quarter residence. Experience the unique culture, lifestyle and personality of this Cape Muslim community and their role in Cape Town`s development. Then visit the District Six Museum and learn how 60,000 families were forcibly removed from that once vibrant suburb. Next, a visit to the townships and Cape Flats shows how sprawling satellite camps of seemingly endless shanties provide little more than a roof and some shelter. This journey through history continues with a visit to Langa, the oldest existing township on the Western Cape. Local community workers host you in this vibrant community as numerous squatters set about building their own brick homes, with the help of state grants. Then sample traditional African sorghum beer at a local tavern, or shebeen, before enjoying a lunch of traditional South African dishes. Afterward, continue to Robben Island by ferry. This former leper colony was a political prison during apartheid. View Nelson Mandela`s prison cell while ex-political prisoners give a detailed commentary. Also visit the quarry, where the former president`s eyes were damaged permanently, and where personalities in the struggle were put to back-breaking labor. Now operating as a living museum, Robben Island also hosts about 23 mammals and 132 bird species including the African penguin. Return to the ship after this fulfilling, thought-provoking day. In this practicum, participants will have an opportunity to use important concepts, such as historical context, historical remembrance and reconstruction, and continuity and change. We also will visit concepts such as the impact of African colonialism and the consequences of the European imperialism. The major aims of this FDP are to relate the historical information about apartheid to the historical remembrance and reconstruction of this episode as well as to emphasize the importance of continuity and change when viewing historical events. We can also relate the historical information about apartheid and South Africa to the broader concept of the aggravation of racial and ethnic tensions. Please note: Wear comfortable light-weight clothing and comfortable walking shoes. Bring sunblock, sun hat, sunglasses and windbreaker. CAP30 BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE OPERA: REHEARSAL OF CARMEN (1230-1530 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 15/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $59) PRE-SALE ONLY Join SAS Alum Michael Williams, managing director of Cape Town Opera and former SAS Theatre professor, for a rehearsal of Bizet`s Carmen at the Artscape Theatre. After a tour of Artscape theatre complex, enjoy a brief discussion of Bizet`s masterpiece, which Williams himself is directing, followed by 45-minute attendance of a piano rehearsal. Meet some of the soloists of the Cape Town Opera Studio and learn more about Cape Town Opera`s activities. Coffee and donuts will be served. CAP31 XHOSA CULTURAL TOUR (1600-2100 Friday, 18 February) Minimum 16/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $95) This trip provides insights into the isiXhosa language and the Xhosa people and their culture. Today, there are approximately eight million people in South Africa who speak isiXhosa. This language is the second-most common language in the country; Zulu is the most common. With a rich cultural history that predates the arrival of the Dutch in the 1600s, isiXhosa is easily distinguished by its prominent use of click consonants. This tonal language has three basic clicks in addition to its inherent low and high tones. Many visitors to South Africa have heard the language before ever visiting as the South Africa National Anthem begins in isiXhosa. Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika Maluphakanyisw' uphondo lwayo which means, Lord, bless Africa; Raise high Her glory. In addition to isiXhosa, the current anthem features four other widely-spoken languages in South Africa ­ Zulu, Sesotho, Afrikaans and English.

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Travel to Gugulethu Township and meet your local hosts who will share a presentation on Xhosa culture. Afterward, learn some of the tongue-twisting sounds, word and phrases in the isiXhosa language. Then, learn about the traditional meals of the Xhosa people and help prepare a traditional lunch. Enjoy the meal and conversation with your hosts. In the afternoon, walk around the township and interact with its residents. Before returning to the ship, visit a local NGO (Non-Government Organization) in order to gain a better understanding of the work that these types of organizations carry out in the community. CAP32 TOWNSHIP HOMESTAY ­ GROUP A (1630 Friday, 18 February ­ 1000 Saturday, 19 February) Minimum16/Maximum 30 (PRICE: $99) PRE-SALE ONLY Townships in South Africa came about as a result of apartheid city-planning policies, which excluded non-white` people from living in the suburbs of the city. They were forcibly moved to peripheral areas on the edge of the city, where they had to live in harsh conditions and cope with extreme poverty. Although apartheid may have ended with the birth of democracy on April 26, 1994, when all races were allowed to vote, many people still face harsh conditions from the consequences of poverty. Despite these conditions, the townships are filled with a strong sense of community, vibrancy and faith. There is a growing sense of hope as many redefine their futures within and beyond the boundaries of the township. Tambo Village is a community located within the Gugulethu Township. As a small, contained community where everyone knows each other and lives within walking distance, Tambo is an ideal location to experience a homestay. This homestay project is fully-embraced by the community; it is owned and operated by community members. They have a vested interest in the comfort and safety of their guests. The accommodations in Tambo are simple. The houses are built out of brick and mortar and have running water, flush toilets and electricity. Geysers (water heaters) are not standard; bathing in some houses is either with cold water or with water heated up on the stove. Participants registered for this trip will share a room with another SAS participant within the family home and must be prepared to share a double bed. This is a separate room from where the family sleeps. All linen and bedding is provided. Meals are prepared and provided by the host family. The food quality is excellent and special dietary needs may be catered for on request. Please note: At the village`s request, this trip is not suitable for children under 12 years of age. --------------------------------------------- SATURDAY, 19 FEBRUARY --------------------------------------------CAP33 THREE-DAY GAME RANGER INTERNSHIP AT PUMBA GAME RESERVE (0800 Saturday, 19 February ­ 1300 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 10/Maximum 15 (PRICE: $2,649) PRE-SALE ONLY In addition to providing a safari experience, this trip includes rare insight into the training and fieldwork of reserve guides. The trip includes interactive, hands-on guiding experiences. The Pumba Private Game Reserve covers 6,500 hectares of privately-owned property and is located in the heart of the Eastern Cape`s malaria-free game-viewing region. Overlooking Lake Kariega, the reserve offers views of the wilderness and water from every vantage point. Pumba is home to Africa`s Big Five, where visitors have a chance to experience many of Africa`s wildlife--from giraffe to the elusive leopard, antelope, other small game and more than 300 species of birds. Elephants in the dense bushveld environment also favor the unique vegetation of the Eastern Cape. (For more information, visit www.pumbagamereserve.co.za.)

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ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to the Cape Town airport for your 70-minute flight to Port Elizabeth. Upon arrival, travel 90-minutes by road to the Pumba Private Game Reserve. Once there, learn more about the size of the reserve and the species found within its boundaries. The orientation will highlight the importance of conservation within the reserve. Become familiar with the reserve`s predator Bomas and projects, such as: white lion breeding program (with animal viewing), leopard introduction program (with animal viewing) and alien plant species control and the importance of this program (view work in progress). In the late afternoon, participate in the theory component and learn about animal behavior and physiology, with specific reference to species found on the reserve. Modules include: a short film to familiarize group with the reserve and all its components; introduction to nature guiding and the role of field guides in the industry; how to conduct an effective game drive; understanding the flora and fauna of the reserve and animal`s defenses and means of protection. After dinner, the rest of the evening is at leisure. (Box L, D; Gameston Lodge) Day 2: In the early morning, accompany a trail guide for a hands-on session that covers: etiquette and safety for guided walks; animal signs and traces as well as how to interpret the bush and identify certain flora and fauna for survival if lost or separated from a group and plant and bird identification. Return to the lodge for breakfast. Afterward, participate in the Wilderness Trails on Foot theory component which includes: rifle safety out in the field; rifle mechanics including ballistics; how to carry a rifle in the field under various circumstances, particularly while viewing potentially dangerous game on foot; tracker/back-up relationship; shot placement on potentially dangerous game; animal sociology when out on a trail (theory and practical) and etiquette and required safety procedures when approaching dangerous game on foot. After lunch at the lodge learn how to control and drive in a 4x4 game-viewing vehicle. In the late afternoon, enjoy a guided game drive through the reserve, returning well after dusk. During the game drive, discuss the various game encountered. As the vehicle returns after dusk, view the southern night skies and learn about the visible constellations as well as experiencing a night drive. The etiquette and control of the vehicle`s spotlight will also be discussed. Enjoy dinner at Tree Tops Boma, where all the rangers will attend the braai. The dinner is a great opportunity to meet and interact with this knowledgeable team. (B;L;D; Game stone Lodge) Day 3: Accompany a trail guide on an early morning walk applying previously learned concepts. During the walk, interpret the bush, read and identify tracks alongside the guide. View large game on foot and discuss different scenarios. Return to the lodge for breakfast. After checking out of the lodge, transfer to the Port Elizabeth airport for your return flight to Cape Town. (B) CAP34 TABLE MOUNTAIN HIKE (0900-1700 Saturday, 19 February) Minimum 16/Maximum 100 (PRICE: $59) The world-famous Table Mountain is the centerpiece for the city of Cape Town and the main attraction in the Table Mountain National Park. With a height of 1,086 meters, this unique level plateau is surrounded by steep cliffs and is flanked by Devil`s Peak to the east and Lion`s Head to the west. Together with Signal Hill it forms the natural amphitheater of the city bowl and is a spectacular backdrop to Cape Town and its Table Bay Harbour. Table Mountain is also home to 2,200 plant species, making it a natural world heritage site. Join experienced guides on a trip up Platteklip Gorge and follow the trek made by Antonio de Saldanha, who gave Table Mountain its name during the mountain`s first recorded ascent in 1503. It takes approximately two hours to reach the summit. Once at the summit, participants are rewarded with lunch and spectacular views of the mountainous Cape Peninsula, the Twelve Apostles, the city bowl and Robben Island. On a clear day, you can see as far as 200 kilometers (125 miles). Descend the mountain using a different circular route and return to the ship. Please note: Sturdy hiking shoes, a small backpack with an extra shirt or jersey as it can be cold at the top; a snack to boost your energy and plenty of water are recommended. It is also a good idea to wear a hat and sun block. This hike can be considered strenuous at times. A moderate level of fitness is required; therefore this trip is not suitable for children under 12.

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CAP35 CYCLING IN THE WINELANDS ­ GROUP A (0900­1700 Saturday, 19 February) Minimum 11/ Maximum 40 (PRICE: $103) Depart the ship by motorcoach for the university town of Stellenbosch and explore the town and surrounding area for approximately one hour, using 21-gear mountain bikes. Then pack up the bikes and transfer by vehicle over the Helshoogte Pass to the other side of the mountain. Once there, cycle approximately 19 kilometers along the Simonsberg on an evenly paved road to the picturesque wine land region of Franschhoek. After a brief visit at the Huguenot Monument, continue to a local winery for a wine tasting and a picnic lunch in pristine surroundings before returning to Cape Town. Please note: Please bring sunscreen and a hat. The biking can be considered strenuous at times; a moderate level of fitness is required. CAP36 TOWNSHIP HOMESTAY ­ GROUP B (1630 Saturday, 19 February ­ 1000 Sunday, 20 February) Minimum16/Maximum 30 (PRICE: $99) PRE-SALE ONLY Townships in South Africa came about as a result of apartheid cityplanning policies, which excluded non-white` people from living in the suburbs of the city. They were forcibly moved to peripheral areas on the edge of the city, where they had to live in harsh conditions and cope with extreme poverty. Although apartheid may have ended with the birth of democracy on April 26, 1994, when all races were allowed to vote, many people still face harsh conditions from the consequences of poverty. Despite these conditions, the townships are filled with a strong sense of community, vibrancy and faith. There is a growing sense of hope as many redefine their futures within and beyond the boundaries of the township. Tambo Village is a community located within the Gugulethu Township. As a small, contained community where everyone knows each other and lives within walking distance, Tambo is an ideal location to experience a homestay. This homestay project is fully embraced by the community; it is owned and operated by community members. They have a vested interest in the comfort and safety of their guests. The accommodations in Tambo are simple. The houses are built out of brick and mortar and have running water, flush toilets and electricity. Geysers (water heaters) are not standard; bathing in some houses is either with cold water or with water heated up on the stove. Participants registered for this trip will share a room with another SAS participant within the family home and must be prepared to share a double bed. This is a separate room from where the family sleeps. All linen and bedding is provided. Meals are prepared and provided by the host family. The food quality is excellent and special dietary needs may be catered to on request. Please note: At the village`s request, this trip is not suitable for children under 12 years of age. ----------------------------------------------- SUNDAY, 20 FEBRUARY-----------------------------------------------CAP37 THREE-DAY SAFARI TO KAPAMA (0600 Sunday, 20 February ­ 1800 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 30/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $2,430) PRE-SALE ONLY Named after Kapama, a Swazi king whose tribe inhabited the area in the 1880s, the Kapama Game Reserve supports a wide variety of the big game of Africa with 42 mammal species and approximately 350 bird species. This huge natural diversity includes the Big Five--lion, leopard, elephant, buffalo and rhinoceros--as well as a large population of giraffe, impala, blue wildebeest and kudu. Other predators include the cheetah and spotted hyena. The Northern Drakensberg mountain range provides a majestic

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backdrop to the largest private game lodge in the Greater Kruger National Park region. Accompanied by highly skilled game rangers, discover the wonder of the African bush with its majestic inhabitants. The Kapama River Lodge (five-star graded, pending confirmation) and the Kapama Main Lounge are situated within the park. Each of the rooms features a full en-suite bathroom and enjoys uninterrupted views of this game-rich reserve. The central guest entertainment areas include a tiered swimming pool, which overlooks the Kapama River--an area that various animals use as a watering hole--a lounge, a curio shop and an outdoor boma. Meals are buffet style and offer a variety of Pan African dishes. The lodge also offers a variety of other activities, at your own expense, including bush walks, elephant-back safaris, bird watching, hot-air balloon rides and visits to the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre. These options may be booked upon arrival at the lodge. ITINERARY: Day 1: Transfer from the ship to Cape Town International Airport for your two-hour flight to Johannesburg and one-hour connecting flight to Hoedspruit. Upon arrival in Hoedspruit, travel to the Kapama complex. After your arrival at the lodge, tea is served prior to departing on your afternoon game drive. Depart in open 4x4 vehicles in search of the Big Five and other animals. At dusk, enjoy sundowners in the bush. Return to the lodge to freshen up before dinner. The rest of the evening is at your leisure. (L, D; Kapama) Day 2: Awaken early for a snack of tea, coffee and biscuits before heading out on an early morning game drive. Stop midway through the game drive for hot drinks and rusks and enjoy the view from the Landrover. Return to the lodge for a full breakfast. The rest of the morning is at your leisure at the lodge. After high tea, embark on a late afternoon game drive. Enjoy a sundowner as you stretch your legs while watching the sunset over the distant Drakensberg Mountains. Return to the Landrover and head to the lodge as you continue your search of wildlife, this time through the tracker`s spotlight. (B, L, D; Kapama) Day 3: In the early morning, awaken for a morning game drive. Return to the lodge at around 9am for breakfast. Transfer to the airport and assistance with check-in for your return flight to Cape Town via Johannesburg (B, Snack on flight). CAP38 AQUILA GAME RESERVE (0615-1645 Sunday, 20 February) Minimum 22/Maximum 100 (PRICE: $279) PRE-SALE ONLY This full-day tour to Aquila Game Reserve will take you to the semi scrub desert of the Karoo for a wild encounter with Africa`s game. Travel in an air-conditioned coach to your game drive destination. This comfortable 90-minute drive will meander through the scenic Hex River Valley to Cape Town`s closest private game reserve, Aquila. The Aquila Game Reserve in South Africa is situated on 4,500 hectares of Southern Karoo Highlands and combines the fauna and flora of three beautiful valleys. The reserve encompasses a natural wetland and a magnificent mountain range. Here, you will have the opportunity to experience an outstanding variety of game. Once at the reserve, a welcome drink awaits your arrival. Then, head out on a 2-3 hour game drive. While traveling in 4x4 safari vehicles with an experienced ranger guide, view the animals roaming the reserve. There is an ideal opportunity to observe rhinoceros, buffalo, giraffe and lions. (The lions are in an enclosure.) Large herds of zebra, black and blue wildebeest, red hartebeest, warthog, eland, springbok, blesbok and gemsbok may also be seen in the semi-arid desert conditions. Hippopotamus and crocodile lurk in the wetlands and in the rainy season; flamingoes also reside there. Aquila`s wide array of bird species includes several pairs of the rare and endangered black eagle, after which the reserve has been named. After your drive, enjoy a delicious buffet lunch, which is served in the African boma restaurant before returning to Cape Town.

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CAP39 CAPE PENINSULA AND CAPE POINT (0800-1630 Sunday, February 20) Minimum 26/ Maximum 160 (PRICE: $139) Contrary to popular belief, Cape Point is not the southernmost tip of Africa. That honor belongs to Cape Agulhas. It is, however, the meeting place of the Atlantic Ocean and False Bay. The scenic route to Cape Point takes you through the seaside suburbs of Sea Point, Bantry Bay and Clifton to Camps Bay, behind which the impressive peaks of the Twelve Apostles rise. Continue along the Atlantic seaboard toward Hout Bay, a small fishing village. The Hout Bay harbor is the homeport for a fleet of fishing vessels and nearby factories process crayfish (Cape rock lobster) for export overseas. After a short orientation of Hout Bay, continue your journey through the award-winning wine-producing valley of Constantia to the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve. The Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve occupies 19,151 acres of indigenous flora and fauna. Walk to the platform on top of the hill for a great view of the peninsula and the place where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans are said to meet. If you prefer, take the optional funicular railway, which will transport you to the platform. From that location, there are approximately 120 steps to the old lighthouse on top of Cape Point. Enjoy free time to explore the area on your own. In the late afternoon, depart the reserve and continue along the shoreline of the Indian Ocean through the historic naval base of Simonstown. Stop at Boulder`s Beach, one of only two mainland Jackass Penguin breeding colonies in the world, before returning to the ship. Please note: Wear comfortable lightweight clothing and comfortable walking shoes. Bring sun block, sun hat, sunglasses and windbreaker. Lunch at a local restaurant is included, as are entrance fees to Cape Point Nature Reserve and Boulder Beach. Optional funicular railway is an out-of-pocket expense. CAP40 THREE-DAY SAFARI TO KARIEGA GAME RESERVE (LODGE) ­ GROUP B (0810 Sunday, 20 February ­ 1430 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $1,679) PRE-SALE ONLY In the heart of the 1820 Settler Country, the Kariega Game Reserve is a private game reserve set in 14,800 acres of pristine wilderness high above the spectacular Kariega River Valley. Nestled between the Kariega and Bushmans Rivers, the reserve incorporates contrasting riverine, bushveld and grassland ecosystems and hosts more than 25 species of game, including elephant, zebra, buffalo, leopard, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, hyena, giraffe, eland, wildebeest, waterbuck, a wide variety of antelope and more than 250 bird species. Accommodations will be in the Kariega Main Lodge, located on the banks of the Bushmans River. The lodge, which overhangs the river, consists of air-conditioned thatched-roof suites and has a swimming pool and sun deck on the premises. The suites feature modern African décor with an en-suite bathroom; each offers a view of the river and floodplain beyond. There are a variety of other activities and facilities available, at your own expense, such as canoeing, mountain biking and horseback riding at the nearby beaches of Kenton-on-Sea. For more information, visit www.katiega.co.za. ITINERARY Day 1: Transfer to Cape Town International Airport for the one-hour flight to Port Elizabeth. On arrival, travel to Kariega Game Reserve where refreshments will be served before checking-in to your suite. After some free time, take a river cruise on the Kariega Queen through a bird sanctuary in the upper reaches of the Kariega River. Afterward, depart on an extended open-vehicle game drive, enjoying refreshments while watching the sunset. In the evening, enjoy a barbeque dinner in the open-air boma. (Box L, D; Kariega Main Lodge)

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Day 2: In the early morning, enjoy a game drive. Experience how nature comes alive with the rise of the sun. Return to the lodge for breakfast and then take a short hike to enjoy the magnificent scenery. One of the unique features of the Kariega experience is the ability to walk safely on marked trails close to abundant game and bird life. Enjoy lunch at an architectural award-winning restaurant, nestled in the bush. Enjoy a late afternoon game drive before returning to the chalets to freshen up for dinner. (B, L, D; Kariega Main Lodge) Day 3: After breakfast, enjoy one last view of the savannah while driving to the airport for your return flight to Cape Town. (B, Snack on flight) ----------------------------------------------- MONDAY, 21 FEBRUARY ----------------------------------------------CAP41 INVERDOORN GAME RESERVE (0730-1645 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 24/Maximum 60 (PRICE: $254) PRE-SALE ONLY Depart the pier for a game drive in the green oasis amidst the harsh and dry Karoo environment. Pass the wine region of Paarl while traveling through the fertile Tulbagh Valley to the deciduous fruit-growing region of Ceres, just over two hours from Cape Town. Enjoy a refreshing welcome drink upon arrival at the Inverdoorn Game Farm. With more than 10,000 hectares dedicated to conservation, the Inverdoorn Game Lodge & Safari contains more than 1,200 wild animals representing 28 different species and hundreds of species of birdlife. Africa`s magnificent wild animals have returned to this area for the first time in over a century. During your two-hour game drive, you will have the chance to see giraffe, zebra, waterbuck, Oryx, sable antelope, kudu, impala and springbok. A large number of birds can also be seen. The reserve also runs an on-site Cheetah Rehabilitation Program. (Lions and cheetahs are in an enclosure.) After your game drive, enjoy a lunch made with fresh farm produce. After an enjoyable day viewing African wildlife, return to the ship. Please note: Participants with walking difficulties or with limited mobility might find it difficult to get in and out of game vehicles. The actual game drive can be bumpy so this trip is not advisable for those with back problems. Participants should wear lightweight clothing and comfortable walking shoes and bring sun block, sun hat, sunglasses and windbreaker. CAP22 SERVICE PROJECT: HABITAT FOR HUMANITY ­ GROUP B (0800-1600 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 20 (PRICE: $39) For a description of this trip, please see CAP12 Service Project: Habitat for Humanity ­ Group A. A typical day begins with a welcome from the Habitat team and some instruction on the day`s activities. This is followed by a morning work session, lunch and an afternoon work session. An experienced local builder provides supervision on site. Tea is provided by the homeowners. Box lunches from the ship will be provided. (The price of this practicum is based on round-trip transportation to and from the site. The cost to build the Habitat house is courtesy of the SAS Annual Fund.) CAP43 TOWNSHIP BY BIKE AND INTERACTIVE SOCCER (0830-1300 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 10 /Maximum 25 (PRICE: $74) Travel a traditional Xhosa township called Langa, which means sun in the Xhosa language. Langa is known as the oldest existing township on the Western Cape Peninsular. Local community workers host you in this vibrant black community as numerous squatters set about building their own brick homes, with the help of state grants. Upon arrival you will tour the arts and crafts center, absorbing the local culture and appreciating the work of the talented budding artists. Next, enjoy a bike tour, which is a great way to explore the township. Visit hostels, shacks and middle class homes. Afterward, sample some of the traditional African refreshment at a local tavern, or shebeen.

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Visit the local crèche and Baphumelele orphanage where you will have an insiders view into the profound work being done in the township. A short performance by the local performing artists Happy Feet will offer a glimpse into the popular dance style known as Gum Boot Dancing, which has its origins in the mines of Africa. Next, let the games begin! It`s time to put your soccer skills to the test. Play a fun game of soccer with the local school children. As part of the experience, the soccer balls and equipment will be donated at the end of the visit. After your game enjoy a quick refreshment break before returning to the ship. (Please note: A portion of the proceeds from the sales of this trip will be donated directly to the crèche facilities. Also, if you wish to purchase any items while in the arts and craft center, please note that only local currency will be accepted.) CAP44 FOOTSTEPS TO FREEDOM AND TOWNSHIP (0900-1645 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 14/ Maximum 60 (PRICE: $139) The city of Cape Town is beautiful and its history dramatic. This eye opening, tactile and fascinating three-hour walking tour of South Africa`s most historic square mile will provide an excellent geopolitical and historic overview of Cape Town. There is no better way to experience Cape Town than on foot. With an expert guide, walk through the chronological events that have shaped the national and the geopolitical map. The tour begins with tales and facts about the San and Khoikhoi peoples, whose lives were forever and indelibly changed by the arrival of the Dutch East India Company, slavery, British Colonial rule, The Union of South Africa, the rise and fall of apartheid, and the birth of the Rainbow Nation. During this walking tour, explore Old Town, catch the buzz of the city in Greenmarket Square, hear tales of Dutch rule at the Castle of Good Hope and Grand Parade, and see where slaves were traded and where they toiled in the Company`s Garden. Take a look at the Parliament Building, where the apartheid laws were passed and repealed, and see the devastating consequences of unfettered racism at the District Six Museum. Continue to Langa township where you will meet local residents, learn of their hardships and triumphs, and be inspired by their sense of community. Walk the streets of Langa to meet and greet friends, family and strangers alike. Hear the laughter of children at play. See homes, schools, shabeens and new apartments. Smell sizzling meat on the roadside braai (barbecue). This township visit is not about ticking township names off a list. It is about people. It is about sharing experiences. You are invited to ask questions about residents` hopes, fears, dreams and challenges. To ensure an authentic experience, registered tour guides who are either residents in the townships or intimately involved in township life conduct the township tours. Due to the guides living in the township, you will not be seen as a tourist, but as a guest. You are invited into their neighborhood and their lives. Do not be surprised if your visit to the townships turns out to be the most profound human experience of your entire visit in their beautiful country! Please note: As this trip involves a lot of walking, comfortable, sturdy shoes are recommended. CAP45 CYCLING IN THE WINELANDS ­ GROUP B (0900­1700 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 11/ Maximum 40 (PRICE: $103) Depart the ship by motorcoach for the university town of Stellenbosch and explore the town and surrounding area for approximately one hour, using 21-gear mountain bikes. Then pack up the bikes and transfer by vehicle over the Helshoogte Pass to the other side of the mountain. Once there, cycle approximately 19 kilometers along the Simonsberg on an evenly paved road to the picturesque wine land region of Franschhoek. After a brief visit at the Huguenot Monument, continue to a local winery for a wine tasting and a picnic lunch in pristine surroundings before returning to Cape Town. Please note: Please bring sunscreen and a hat. The biking can be considered strenuous at times; a moderate level of fitness is required.

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CAP46 OPERATION HUNGER - GROUP B (0900-1800 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 30/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $45) Operation Hunger is an NGO whose mission is to create partnerships between vulnerable households and caring people to combat malnutrition which, when suffered by children, undermines the nation`s health, education and economic potential. The objectives are to improve the nutritional well being of the poor; promote the dissemination of knowledge about poverty and malnutrition in South Africa; improve existing facilities to reduce malnutrition in South Africa and to render financial assistance to develop such programs; cooperate with communities, organizations and authorities to combat malnutrition; and publicize and promote the objectives via lectures, exhibitions, meetings, conferences, pamphlets, newspapers, books, leaflets, radio, television and films. Operation Hunger`s integrated development program includes locally managed growth-monitoring programs, targeted food support, water supply, sanitation facilities, health/hygiene education, income generation and livelihood programs, agriculture and food production. The staff of Operation Hunger provided the following vivid description for this visit: You will visit the squatter camps on the outskirts of Cape Town, filled with people mainly from the Transkei and Ciskei, who come to the big city at a rate of 10,000 per month, in search of non-existent work. On arrival, these people are already malnourished. They find no land, no shelter, no work and no means by which to return home. So they set up shacks made out of plastic, tin, cardboard or anything else they can find. Through Operation Hunger, women in the community have established feeding programs--setting up their pots of soup in the dusty little lanes and in all the crèches. About 50 kilometers outside Cape Town, in the beautiful wine lands; you will also visit the children of farm workers who are part of Operation Hunger`s feeding program for malnourished children. Most farmers in the wealthy wine lands area are paid an absolute pittance in exchange for 12 hours of hard labor. While the parents are out picking, child-minding and feeding are nonexistent. Women in the community have set up street kitchens to feed the children. The day`s activities will include visits to several townships such as Spandau, Green Park and Chris Hani, and an opportunity to witness the efforts of Operation Hunger. (The price for this practicum includes a small donation to Operation Hunger. Box lunches from the ship will be provided.) CAP47 SERVICE VISIT: AMY BIEHL FOUNDATION TRUST (0930­1730 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 25/ Maximum 50 (PRICE: $39) Amy Biehl was a young American Fulbright Scholar who was stoned to death in 1993 in South Africa, where she had gone to help in the struggle against apartheid. She was very interested in working with disenfranchised voters in the country and had worked there previously, studying multi-party elections in various African states. Her parents, Peter (now deceased) and Linda, and their family established the Amy Biehl Foundation Trust to continue Amy`s work and have been highly supportive of groups concerned with the lasting effects of apartheid. In the townships, you will see the lasting impact of apartheid and the continuing racial discrimination of poverty today. As you meet the townspeople, remember that there are social forces at work that have caused these terrible conditions to occur. Reflect back on what you have learned in class pertaining to racism and inter-group patterns. This highly interactive trip is a favorite with SAS participants; many revisit the Foundation during their remaining time in Cape Town because it is such a rewarding experience. On this trip, spend the day touring the various facilities and programs in the townships run by the Amy

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Biehl Foundation including the Amy Biehl Music Program, which teaches sixth and seventh graders music theory and practice; the Youth Reading Role Models program, where seventh graders read to first graders; the Buthisizwe Training Centre, a facility which provides instruction on block making, sewing and aluminum window-frame making; and the Khayelitsha Golf Club--A Driving Range for the People. The Foundation provides children and youth with the opportunity for constructive and safe activities after school and makes the game of golf accessible to all South Africans regardless of race or economic circumstance. Lunch is included at a township restaurant featuring traditional Xhosa foods. CAP48 CAPE MALAY COOKING SAFARI (1000-1400 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 12/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $119) Perched on the slopes of Signal Hill and overlooking Table Bay and Mountain is the colorful Bo-Kaap community with its cobblestone streets, legends and secrets. Walk to Cape Town`s historical quarter and turn your focus to the extraordinary cuisine of the Cape Malay community. While shopping for ingredients to prepare a typical Cape Malay dish, discover links between history, food and religion. Enjoy an informal cooking workshop in a Bo-Kaap family restaurant, which is just below their home. Learn how to mix masala, fold samosas, and balance the flavors of Cape Malay curry, catering to both vegetarians and nonvegetarians. Share the table with the hostess and cooking instructor and enjoy the rich opportunity of interesting conversation and interaction. CAP49 BREEDE RIVER RAFTING & OVERNIGHT (1230 Monday, 21 February ­ 1630 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 12/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $599) PRE-SALE ONLY The Breede River winds its way through the Boland near Worcester and is home to some of the Cape`s finest winelands. The bird life is abundant, and the vegetation is lush. You can enjoy it all as you paddle along in two-person inflatable rafts. The water is relatively calm; at no time will the waters require advanced rafting experience. Rafting equipment and lifejackets, as well as safety and paddling instructions, will be provided. The evening is spent relaxing around the campfire. Please note: Bring at least one change of clothing and an extra pair of shoes, as you are likely to get wet. Toiletries, a towel, pillow, sun protection, insect repellent and a flashlight are also recommended. For conservation reasons, no bottles are allowed on the river. ITINERARY: Day 1: Depart by motorcoach and travel over the Du Toitskloof Pass toward Worcester. Stop for a wine tasting at one of the prominent wine cellars in Worcester. Arrive at the river camp. With its rolling green lawns sheltered by eucalyptus trees, the rustic camp is situated on the banks of the tranquil Breede River, which snakes its way toward the sea. Your river guides will show you around the camp. Before dinner, meet the local botanist and learn about the local flora and fauna, such as the natural fynbos and the river`s indigenous species. Enjoy a barbeque dinner around the roaring campfire. (Box L, D, camp) Day 2: After breakfast and a safety and equipment demonstration, begin your river adventure. Paddle along the Breede River in two-person Mohawks, stopping along the riverbank for lunch. Return to camp in the late afternoon and then depart for Cape Town. (B, L)

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CAP50 ANIMAL WHISPERS TOUR (1315-1715 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 20/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $112) Located in the heart of the Cape wineland region is the Spier Wine Estate. The estate is renowned for its fine modern wines as well as its conservation efforts. The estate, which covers 1,000 hectares, is dedicated to protecting and preserving South Africa`s fauna. Recognized by Condé Nast Traveler in 2007 as one of the world`s top responsible tourist destinations, Spier is committed to eco-tourism and sustainable development. In 2007, they launched two major initiatives to reduce their carbon footprint. In addition to planting more than 1,000 trees on the estate, they introduced an innovative waste water treatment plant. Spier`s macro goals include carbon neutrality, zero waste solids, zero wastewater, water sustainability, biodiversity enhancement, organic farming and poverty eradication. (For more information about the company`s sustainability efforts, please visit www.spier.co.za/sustainability.) In addition to their pioneering sustainable efforts, the estate is committed to educating its workers through development programs and visitors through the Bird of Prey Centre and the Cheetah Outreach Project. This half-day tour focuses on Africa`s valuable resource--its wildlife. Depart the pier and travel 45 minutes outside of Cape Town to reach the Spier Wine Estate. Visit the Bird of Prey Centre, which was founded in 2001 as a rehabilitation and educational facility. The mission of the center is the preservation of the eco-environment by protecting birds of prey through the release of prime rehabilitation candidates and community awareness through programming and eco-tourism efforts. Enjoy a private viewing and meet birds of prey like eagles, owls, kestrels, kites and ghost hawks. These birds, which have been previously injured, poisoned or illegally removed, are now being nurtured until they can be released back into the wild. After the private viewing, visit the Cheetah Outreach Project for a personal encounter with these majestic cats. The project supports the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) in their efforts to ensure the survival of free-ranging cheetah. Come face-to-face with resident cheetahs, stroke an adult cheetah or maybe even cuddle up with a little cub (cat willing). Continue to the Spier Wine Tasting Centre for a private wine tasting before returning to the ship. CAP51 BAPHUMELELE ORPHANAGE & TOWNSHIP BY BIKE (1330-1745 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 10/Maximum 25 (PRICE: $79) Travel 45 minutes on the N2 National Highway to the Baphumelele Children`s Home, located in the Khayelitsha township. Founded in 2001, the orphanage was a humble woman`s response to an alarming situation. Rosie Mashale had no money when she decided to provide a home and place of safety for children who were orphaned, abandoned, abused or neglected, but she had a vision, a big heart, a lot of resolve and the constant support of her community. At present, the children--ranging in age from newborn to 19 years old--live in nine separate buildings. Members of the community volunteer and care for the children, providing them much needed love and support. The sustainability and unique nature of Baphumelele as a community-based project is assured through its deep roots in the community. The home in particular is viewed by many as a sentinel of hope in the townships of the Western Cape and a demonstration of what a community can achieve when all work together. At the orphanage, meet the founding member of the establishment, Rosie Mashale, who will offer a brief tour of the orphanage coupled with an explanation of its mission. Once you are familiar with the establishment,

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the group will be split up to assist with various activities taking place throughout the orphanage, including minding infants, playing with toddlers, reading to the children, completing general handiwork and preparing meals. After completing the various tasks assigned, bid farewell to the children at the orphanage and travel to Mandela Park where you will meet the YEP (Youth Empowerment Project) leadership group. During a bicycle tour of Kayelitsha with the YEP group, you will learn about the organization and their efforts to keep youngsters off the streets. This will be followed by a game of informal soccer before you board the coach to return to the ship. CAP52 WOZA CAPE TOWN!--A NIGHT OF THEATRE IN DISTRICT SIX (17302130 Monday, 21 February) Minimum 35/Maximum 150 (PRICE: $49) PRE-SALE ONLY Woza Cape Town! looks at Cape Town through the thoughts, views and experiences of three young South Africans from different cultural backgrounds. Their anxieties, pleasures, hopes and pains are conveyed through verse penned by some of this country`s most respected poets. Full of South African songs, dances and poems, Woza! provides insights into the joys and challenges facing young Capetonians. Located in the heart of the historic District Six, the production is creatively staged in Chapel Street`s refurbished church hall, one of Cape Town`s oldest and most historic buildings. Now called the Theatre in the District, this building has had a long-standing tradition of serving its community and promoting the arts. Once at the theatre, enjoy an evening meal of Cape cuisine drawing on the multiplicity of its cultural tastes and influences. After dinner, meet the cast of Woza! and learn the Gumboot Dance. Next, Brian Notcutt, who created the show, will give a brief introduction, explaining the history of District Six and putting the show in context. Then, sit back and enjoy Woza Cape Town!, an exhilarating celebration of life in Cape Town today. After a memorable evening of entertainment and reflection, return to the ship. ---------------------------------------------- TUESDAY, 22 FEBRUARY----------------------------------------------CAP53 SERVICE PROJECT: HABITAT FOR HUMANITY ­ GROUP C (0800-1600 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 15/ Maximum 20 (PRICE: $39) For a description of this trip, please see CAP12 Service Project: Habitat for Humanity ­ Group A. A typical day begins with a welcome from the Habitat team and some instruction on the day`s activities. An experienced local builder provides supervision on site. Tea is provided by the homeowners. Box lunches from the ship will be provided. (The price of this practicum is based on round-trip transportation to and from the site. The cost to build the Habitat house is courtesy of the SAS Annual Fund.) CAP54 SOUTH AFRICAN DECISION MAKING: NATIONAL PARLIAMENT TOUR (08301115 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 16/Maximum 20 (PRICE: $55) [FDP: R. FREDLAND] The city of Cape Town, though not the capital of South Africa, is home to South Africa`s National Parliament. While the seat of government is in the administrative capital of Pretoria, Cape Town is the legislative capital. (continued on next page)

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(continued from previous page) Completed in 1885, the parliament building itself, which also houses the Library of Parliament, is admired for its central dome and Corinthian porticos and pavilions. Opposite the Library is the imposing façade of the Houses of Parliament. The original building, in which parliamentary sittings were first held in 1814, has been much altered and extended since then. Here the South African Parliament meets between the end of January and the end of June; during the rest of the year it meets in Pretoria. Its debates are open to the public. Due to the building`s location in the uppermost corner of the Company Gardens, with its entrance on Parliament Street, it is not unusual for locals and visitors alike to encounter members of Parliament in coffee shops or restaurants in the surrounding areas; and journalists use this locale to scout for news. It is from here that the President gives his State of the Nation Address following the opening of Parliament. A tour of this compound will acquaint participants with South Africa`s recent history and its political system. The tour includes visits to the National Assembly, the National Council of Provinces and the old apartheid-era assembly which is now only used for caucus and committee meetings. Please note: Date and time subject to final confirmation by local host. This day trip requires a manifest and each participant to carry his/her passport; therefore, participants cannot sell or exchange tickets. All participants are further required to undergo a security check upon entrance to the building. In addition, cameras are only allowed in certain sections of the building. Video Cameras are not allowed. CAP55 SERVICE PROJECT: PHILANTHROPIC SCHOOL FEEDING PROGRAM (0900-1245 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 5/Maximum 16 (PRICE: $77) [FDP: FU] Accompanied by your guide, travel to an area school where you will have the opportunity to prepare, as well as serve food to the children that are currently being fed by the Philanthropic School Feeding Association (PSFA). In feeding school children, PSFA aims to reduce short-term hunger as well as increase attendance at schools in the Western Cape. PSFA also assists the communities in the promotion of vegetable gardens, to improve household food-security. The Philanthropic School Feeding Association (PSFA) is a registered non-profit organization that was established in 1958 when the previous government discontinued school feeding. The Rotary Club of Paarden Eiland, aware of the dire need in less privileged communities, called a public meeting, where a decision was taken to form the PSFA. Since then, PSFA has provided nourishment to hungry children in primary schools, secondary schools and special-needs schools across the Western Cape. PSFA feeds 155,000 children daily in more than 600 schools. The organization receives a subsidy from the Department of Education`s National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) to feed 80% of these children. The difference is covered by PSFA from funds that are raised from public donations, corporate donations, legacies and trusts. Our tour operator through its philanthropic division, Abercrombie and Kent Philanthropy (AKP), supports this program. As such, in addition to numerous AKP donations, the majority of the cost for this tour will be donated directly to the PSFA. Once at the local school, you will have a chance to help prepare meals for the children. Mid-morning, the children will be fed and here you have a chance to meet some of the youth that benefit from this special program. After the meal, help clear the dishes and interact with school`s staff before returning to the ship. For more information on the Philanthropic School Feeding Program, please visit their website at www.psfa.org.za.

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CAP56 OPERATION HUNGER - GROUP C (0900-1800 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 35/Maximum 40 (PRICE: $45) For a description of this trip, please see CAP28 Operation Hunger ­ Group A. CAP57 WALKING WITH BABOONS (1230-1630 Tuesday, 22 February) Minimum 10/Maximum 20 (PRICE: $149) Just outside of Cape Town on the Southern peninsula, the Chacma baboons face a bleak future. Urbanization continues to expand, drastically reducing the available wilderness. Baboons are therefore seeking food and shelter in residential areas; the result is an on-going battle between man and baboon, with the baboon sadly losing. At the current baboon mortality rate, there will not be a viable baboon population on the peninsula within the next ten years and extinction is predicted within 15. Conservationist Jenni Trethowan founded Baboon Matters as a sustainable solution to this conflict. In an effort to create a level of awareness and appreciation for these intelligent wild animals, the organization formed two inspiring operations, the Baboon Monitor Project and the Walking with Baboons project. Formed in 1999, the Baboon Monitor Project employs men from the nearby community of Masiphumelele who work closely with the baboons, moving them out of residential areas. Their contributions have considerably reduced the conflicts by keeping the baboons out of villages during daylight hours--their peak foraging hours. Walking with Baboons supports the efforts of the monitors. The walks educate residents and visitors alike, increasing understanding, acceptance and tolerance of these creatures. The ultimate goal of man and baboon living together in harmony now seems achievable. Funding for the Baboon Monitor Project is an on-going concern, as pressing social issues dominate the current funding situation in South Africa. To support this important conservation initiative, 25 percent of net proceeds from this walk will be used to ensure the continuation of the Baboon Monitor Project. Please note: A high level of fitness is required. Wear comfortable lightweight clothing and walking shoes, and do not bring any food on this practicum.

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