Read hanashimashoo OCT-DEC 2006 text version

Hanashimashoo

VOLUME II, ISSUE 4

A Joint Newsletter from Maui's Japanese Community

OCTOBER--DECEMBER 2006 EDITION

Nihon Bunka Award nominations sought

Hanashimashoo, which translates to "Let us talk" was voted as the name for this joint Japanese community newsletter. On June 1, 2005, approximately 50 interested individuals and representatives from various churches and cultural groups attended the first meeting. It was an enthusiastic display of support to unify Maui's Japanese community. The Japanese Cultural Society of Maui has volunteered to publish this enewsletter (mail for those unable to get email) and maintain a database of organizations.

The Japanese Cultural Society of Maui recently announced it is seeking nominations for its annual Nihon Bunka Award. The organization recognizes individuals each year for their excellence and contributions to the arts and for their unselfish willingness to share their talents with the community. Nominations are due on Dec. 1, 2006, via mail to Lynn Araki-Regan, 620 Mapuana Pl., Wailuku, HI 96793. Past winners include taiko/fue performer and instructor

Albert Watanabe, Maui Arts & Cultural Society founder Pundy Yokouchi, kendo master Sayoko Kobata, former Japanese dance instructor Lily Tam, and aikido instructor Shinichi Suzuki, bonsai instructor Walter Ouye, and Japanese dance instructor Ken Tasaka. Winners will be honored at the Japanese Cultural Society of Maui's Shinnen Enkai (New Year) dinner on Saturday, Jan. 27, 2007, at the Maui Beach Hotel Elleair Room. For more information, call 870-0115.

Grants to promote Japanese performing arts offered

Performing Arts Japan (PAJ), a program initiated by the Japan Foundation to promote Japanese performing arts in America, provides support through two grant initiatives. Touring Grants assist in the presentation of Japanese performing arts in the U.S. and Canada, emphasizing locations outside major metropolitan areas where there is no regular exposure to the Japanese culture. Collaboration Grants help American and Japanese artists develop new works with the potential to become touring projects which will further an appreciation of Japanese culture when presented to American audiences. Grants are made to nonprofit organizations in the U.S. only. Applications for both grant opportunities are due by October 13, 2006 for projects taking place between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2008. Visit http://www.jfny.org/jfny_paj.html.

Maui Matsuri offers grants to schools

Newsletter is accessible via the internet by visiting the Japanese Cultural Society of Maui website at: The Maui Matsuri Committee announced the availability of two types of grants for schools. The first makes available $6,500 in funds to interested schools (elementary, intermediate and high schools) to fund Japanese educational and cultural programs. Funds can be used for books, supplies, etc. and children are encouraged to share or display their work at the 2007 Maui Matsuri scheduled for mid May 2007. Interested schools and teachers are encouraged to call Tiffany Iida at 276-5444 for information. Sales of Hisashi Otsuka special posters sponsored by Lahaina Galleries allowed these grants to be available. More posters are also available for purchase with proceeds continuing to fund this program. Call Kay Fukumoto at 283-9999 for information. The second grant goes out to all high school Japanese cultural clubs. The grant specifically provides up to $250 to each club to make happi coats (traditional festival coats) for use during the 2007 Maui Matsuri and other club activities. Interested cultural clubs are asked to call Fukumoto.

www.jcsmaui.com

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H A N A S H I M A S H O O

OCTOBER--DECEMBER 2006

Message from Japanese Cultural Society of Maui President Kay Fukumoto

How do we get our children engaged in the Japanese culture and to love all things Japanese? I say we immerse them in it and something should sink in. This summer it seemed that there were many opportunities for students to visit Japan either through school-based or temple-based programs. Nothing else sparks a child's or adult's excitement about our culture than to travel to Japan and to "become Japanese". I always enjoy talking to students who have experienced such programs because inevitably they are hooked. They fall in love with Japan and want to visit again. These programs spark our children's interest in the culture. My son had attended Japanese language school for eight years. It wasn't until he traveled to Japan did he get fired up about learning the language and appreciating what he learned about the culture. Similarly, the home stay programs of Miyakojima City and the Fukuyama Chamber of Commerce encouraged children from Japan to be inspired about learning English and loving what Hawaii has to offer. When they were here, they had numerous opportunities to experience our multi-cultural society thus broadening their experiences. Two boys from Fukuyama lived with us for over a week. They experienced an obon dance and danced with other teenagers, youngsters, and seniors. They asked to go the second night because they had so much fun. They had never been to an obon dance in Japan. Imagine that, they experienced something here that is a summer time tradition for us. Their comment was that "obon in Japan is only for old people". "Obon here in Hawaii is fun and we really enjoyed it". WOW, did we inspire them about their Japanese culture! That was exciting! Special thanks to the many Maui families and organizations who opened their homes for these children from Japan. Congratulations also to the families who sent their children to Japan. Both programs bring us closer to our Japanese roots. Let us continue to foster these types of programs and engage the younger generation to learn about our culture. Sincerely, Kay Fukumoto President

Message from Maui County Mayor Alan Arakawa

On July 31, I had the opportunity and pleasure to host a welcome reception for 17 students from Maui County's sister city, Miyakojima City, Okinawa, and 20 students from Fukuyama City, through the Fukuyama Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which is the sister chamber to the Maui Japanese Chamber of Commerce. The students were enrolled in the Rainbow Studies Program at Maui Language Institute located at Maui Community College (MCC), and had the opportunity to live with families who so graciously opened their homes. Thanks to Stephanie Ohigashi, Helen Nielsen, MCC, and the many organizations and home stay families who made their two-week visit a most memorable one.

Shigetaka Fukunaga, General Manager of the Industrial Relations of Fukuyama Chamber, presents an "omiyage" gift to Mayor Alan Arakawa. Also pictured is Helen Nielsen, president of the Maui Japanese Chamber of Commerce.

My vision in strengthening Maui County's Sister Cities Program is the establishment of a non-profit Maui County Sister Cities Foundation made up of individuals from our Maui Nui community to help foster international student, educational, and cultural exchange programs, as well as to develop trade ties for economic development purposes. I'd like to thank the Japanese Cultural Society of Maui and the many individuals, including Kay Fukumoto, Tiffany Iida, and Edward Zwick, Esq. from the Japanese community, for stepping up to the plate and supporting this effort. For more information or to become a member of this newly established organization, call Lynn ArakiRegan at 270-7710.

Aloha,

Alan Arakawa Mayor

Osarae Kai free to public

by GERALDINE KODANI Nakayama Minyo-Kai

Nakayama Minyo-Kai's "Osarae Kai" (Dance Revue") led by Nakayama Yoshimi Sensei (Mrs. Ken Tasaka) will be held on Sat., Oct. 28, at the Maui Okinawa Cultural Center. Set to begin at 2 p.m., the event will feature performances by approximately 40 of Tasaka's students Admission is free and open to the general public. Tasaka received the prestigious 2006 Nihon Bunka Award for her outstanding contributions in promoting and perpetuating the art of Japanese dance.

OCTOBER--DECEMBER 2006

H A N A S H I M A S H O O

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Autumn Food & Craft Fair to be held Oct. 21

by WAYNE TANAKA Wailuku Hongwanji Mission

Fukuyama & Maui

Tomodachi from across the sea by STEPHANIE OHIGASHI

The annual Autumn Food & Craft Fair, started 20 years ago by the Wailuku Hongwanji Buddhist Women's Association (then known as the Fujinkai), will be held at the church grounds at 1828 Vineyard Street, Wailuku on Saturday, Oct. 21 from 7:30 a.m. to 12 noon. It is the biggest fund-raising project for the WHBWA which uses the money to assist the church's youth organizations and temple activities. Last year, the women's group donated a $25,000 organ to the church. The craft fair attracts crafters from Oahu, as well as Maui.

Maui Taiko's Mitchell Fukumoto bids his new Fukuyama friend an upbeat aloha at the Kahului Airport.

Sakura Square offers array of Japanese books

Open to the general public 5 days a week, Sakura Square Library offers approximately 4,000 Japanese books, as well as English language books on Japan and its culture. As long as library users are registered as Sakura Square Library members, books are available for loan at no charge in Suite 108 of the Kihei Makai side of Azeka Place, 1280 South Kihei Road. The library also accepts donations of Japanese books and English books about Japan. Graciously sponsored by Dormtech Hawaii Inc., Sakura Square's hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Mon/Fri, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tue/Wed, and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. The library is closed on Thursdays, Saturdays, holidays and observances. For more information, call 891-0105.

The Maui Japanese Chamber of Commerce and the Fukuyama Chamber of Commerce and Industry co-sponsored twenty high school students from Fukuyama City, Hiroshima Prefecture for a one-week cultural exchange program on Maui this summer. The students lived with friends and families of both the Maui Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Maui Taiko. Many local activities were enjoyed by the students including canoe paddling, hula dancing, lei making , horseback riding as well as visits to the Maui Ocean Center, Maui Tropical Plantation and the Old Lahaina Luau . The trip ended with a visit to the Lahaina Hongwanji Obon Festival where the Fukuyama students joined in the obon dancing around the yagura. An impromptu performance of Soran Bushi by Maui Taiko in the parking lot of the Lahaina Hongwanji bridged the cultural gap between the Maui youth and Japan students. The tradition of obon dancing is observed by older members of the community in Japan and most youth are not familiar with their home town dances or "ondo"; therefore, the Fukuyama youth were more than surprised to see so many Maui youth enjoying the Bon Odori. For more information about the Maui Japanese Chamber of Commerce Summer Exchange Program to Fukuyama in 2007, contact Chamber President Helen Nielsen at 283-1038.

Nihongo proficiency test to be held in Dec

The Consulate General of Japan in Honolulu announced that the Japan Foundation's Japanese-Language Proficiency Test will be held on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2006 at 1 p.m. at the University of Hawaii of Manoa. The application deadline is October 6. Registration fees are $50 for Levels 1 & 2 and $40 for Levels 3 & 4. For detailed information about the exam as well as a study guide, visit the Japan Foundation's Los Angeles office website at: http://www.jflalc.org/?act=tpt&id=8 For logistical information, contact Kakuko Shoji at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa at 956-8798 or [email protected]

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H A N A S H I M A S H O O

OCTOBER--DECEMBER 2006

Kawakami leads Chamber, Hawaiian Carpet One & Ceramic Tile

M y l e s Kawakami was installed as b o a r d cha irm an of the Maui Chamber of Commerce on June 22. Kawakami, a sansei and owner of Hawaiian Carpet One and Hawaiian Ceramic Tile, succeeds Charlie Jencks of Wailea 670 Associates, Inc.

Tsukano Family, circa 1932: Myles Kawakami's mother, Chiyoko Tsukano Kawakami, is pictured second from the right. Left to right Tsugio (Shangi), Sueo (Guto), Mitsuo (Pachi), Nisei, Kimie (Shiotsugu), Itsuo (Yellow), Shimoe, Chiyoko (Kawakami), and Emiko (Betty Ward).

HANASHIMASHOO

Editor: Lynn Araki-Regan

Contributing Reporters: Kay Fukumoto Geraldine Kodani Wayne Tanaka Benita Brazier Benita Brazier Yuki Lei Sugimura Stephanie Ohigashi

Comments, suggestions, and submissions for the quarterly newsletter are encouraged, and may be forwarded to: [email protected] or by calling 870-0115.

Upcoming festival brings international films to Maui

The 26th edition of the Louis Vuitton Hawaii International Film Festvial continues its legacy as the premiere film festival of the Pacific Rim. This year's organizers are pleased to present 254 films from a record 47 countries. There will be live concerts, four free outdoor screenings on Waikiki Beach, two special evenings with celebrity guests, seminars with the cast and crew of the hit television show LOST...as special focuses on the cinema of Southeast Asia, the Philippines and Vietnam. Advance ticket sales begin on Thursday, Oct 12 and are priced as follows: $7 General Public and $6 Senior Citizens and Students. The following shows will be played on Maui at the Maui Mall Megaplex, 70 E. Kaahumanu Ave., Kahului:

Mon., Oct. 23: 6 p.m. OPENING NIGHT RECEPTION 7:30 p.m. THE SHIMMERING Tues., Oct. 24: 5 p.m. SHORTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD (Shorts Compilation) 7 p.m. SAMOAN WEDDING 9:30 p.m. KING AND THE CLOWN Wed., Oct. 25: 5 p.m. ZEN LIFE 7 p.m. SURF STORIES: TSUNAMI DIARIES + ONE WINTER STORY 8 p.m. JOURNEY FROM THE FALL Thurs., Oct. 26: 5 p.m. SHARKWATER 7:00 PM SILENT HOLY STONES 9:00 PM SUMMER HEAT

Founded over 25 years ago, Hawaiian Carpet One and Hawaiian Ceramic Tile moved into its new, larger showroom and warehouse facility at 162 Alamaha St., Kahului in 2004, doubling its size. From modest beginnings, Hawaiian Carpet One, thanks to Kawakami's foresight, has

steadily grown to become the premier floorcovering dealer on Maui. "The care our customers receive stems from our philosophy of offering only the finest products and services from a family-owned local business, coupled with a vast selection and savings that we pass on as one of 1,000 Carpet One stores," said Kawakami.

Emoto wins public works' honors

The Department of Public Works and Environmental Management's Highways Division Wailuku District Supervisor Edwin Emoto captured two prestigious honors at the 7th Annual Public Works Superintendent/Overseers Conference held on Kauai Sept. 68. awards presented at the conference. The prestigious US Army Corp of Engineers "Best Maintained Flood Control Project" Award was presented to Emoto for the `Iao Stream Flood Control project ­ maintenance from debris basin in Happy Valley to

Juli Kobayashi, Program Manager for the Hawaii Local Technical Assistance Program (Hawaii LTAP), presents the "2006 Better Mousetrap" Award to Edwin Emoto. Also pictured is Hawaii Local Technical Program Director C.S. "Costas" Papacostas, PhD.

Sponsored by the Hawaii Local Technical Assistance Program, University of Hawaii and the County of Kauai, the conference provided county superintendents, district supervisors and overseers from Hawaii and Guam an opportunity to meet and share their experiences and techniques. Emoto captured two out of two first place

the ocean.

The second first place "2006 Better Mousetrap" award, sponsored by the Hawaii Local Technical Assistance Program, University of Hawaii, was also presented to Emoto for the invention of the hooded blinker and removal tool for the testing and maintenance of the blinker barricades.

For more information, including a detailed description of each film, visit www.hiff.org.

OCTOBER--DECEMBER 2006

H A N A S H I M A S H O O

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Organizations & Contact Information

Paia Mantokuji Mission Taiko P.O. Box 790207, Paia, HI 96779 Rev. Kenji Oyama, Instructor Ph: 579-8051 Fax: 579-8120 [email protected] Ryukyukoku Matsuri Daiko Hawaii 18 Lawai Place, Wailuku, HI 96793 Ph: 242-6962 Traci Fujita Villarosa [email protected] Mission: Performing Arts, Okinawan Eisa Educational Wailuku Hongwanji Japanese Language School 1828 Vineyard Street, Wailuku, HI 96793 Rev Shinkai Murakami Ph: 244-0406 Fax: 244-9647 [email protected] Maui Community College 310 Kaahumanu Avenue, Kahului, HI 96732 Ph: 984-3213 Fax: 244-0862 Dr. Clyde Sakamoto, Chancellor Kenjin Kai Maui Fukushima Kenjin Kai 71 Makawao Ave, Makawao, HI 96768 Ph: 270-7924 Brain T. Moto, President [email protected] Mission: Preserve and honor heritage of Japanese immigrants from Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, celebrate ties of fellowship and kinship; maintain avenue of exchange and communication between Fukushima Prefecture and Maui. Maui Kumamoto Kenjin Kai 1480 Honoapiilani Highway, Wailuku, HI 96793 Ph: 244-0747 Nadao Makimoto, President [email protected] Mission: To perpetuate Japanese culture by sharing various aspects of Kumamoto Ken with Maui's people. Maui Okinawa Kenjin Kai PO Box 1884, Wailuku, HI 96793 Ph: 242-1560 Bob Yonahara, President Mission: To promote and perpetuate the Okinawan culture. Maui Yamaguchi Kenjin Kai 1890 Makahala Place, Wailuku, HI 96793 Ph: 244-3843 George Kaya, President Mission : To promote the Yamaguchi Kenjin Kai Prefecture throughout Maui, to uphold the culture amongst the younger generation. Religious Iao Congregational Church 2371 Vineyard Street, Wailuku, HI 96793 Rev. Jack Belsom Ph: 244-7353 Fax: 244-5963 Jodo Mission of Wailuku P.O. Box 1155, Wailuku, HI 96793 Rev. Yoshinori Nakazawa Ph: 244-0066 Fax: 244-5963 [email protected] Kahului Hongwanji Mission 2915 S. Puunene Street, Kahului, HI 96732 Rev. Daien Soga Ph: 871-4732 [email protected] Lahaina Jodo Mission 12 Ala Moana Street, Lahaina, HI 96761 Rev. Gensho Hara Ph: 661-4304 Makawao Hongwanji Mission P.O. Box 188, Makawao, HI 96768 Rev. Toshiyuki Umitani Ph: 572-7229 [email protected] Maui Nikkei Christian Church 101 W. Kamehameha Ave., Kahului, HI 96732 Rev. Gen Hashimoto Ph: 877-3594 Mantokuji Mission of Paia P.O. Box 790207, Paia, HI 96779 Rev Kenji Oyama Ph: 579-8051 Fax: 579-8120 [email protected] Rinzai Zen Mission 120 Alawai Road, Paia, HI 96779 Rev. Ryozo Yamaguchi Ph: 579-9921 Wailuku Hongwanji Mission 1828 Vineyard Street, Wailuku, HI 96793 Rev Shinkai Murakami Ph: 244-0406 Fax 244-9647 [email protected] Veterans Maui 442 Veterans Club Lower Kula Road, Kula, HI 96790 Stanley Izumigawa Ph: 878-6583 Mission: Welfare of 442 Veterans Maui Sons & Daughters of the Nisei Veterans PO Box 882, Wailuku, HI 96793 Leonard Oka, President Ph: 249-2163 Nisei Veterans Memorial Center PO Box 216, Kahului, HI 96733-6716 Ph: 244-6862 Barbara Watanabe, Executive Director If your organization would like to be added to this listing, please contact Faye Otsuka at [email protected] or 244-6729.

Consulate-General of Japan Shigeo Iwatani, Consul-General 1742 Nuuanu Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96817 Ph: 808-543-3111 Fax: 808-543-3170 Business Maui Japanese Chamber of Commerce 1942 Main Street, Ste 104, Wailuku, HI 96793 Ph: 249-0032 Fax: 249-8486 Helen Nielsen, President, [email protected] Mission: To establish and maintain business contacts between Maui business and Japan, primarily Fukuyama, our sister chamber. We also continue a student exchange, alternating Maui and Fukuyama, Fukuyama and Maui each year. Cultural Chado Urasenko Maui Kyokai 74 Kunihi Lane, #416, Kahului, HI 96732 Takako Dickinson, VP Ph/Fax: 877-3523 Mission: The way of tea. Ikenobo Ikebana 282 Hololani Street, Pukalani, HI 96768 Hideko Zwick, 573-2628 [email protected] Mission: To offer instruction and demonstration in the floral arts. Ikenobo School is over 600 years old. Japanese Community Association 2145 Wells Street, Ste 405, Wailuku, HI 96793 Stanley Okamoto, Chairman Ph: 242-4405 Fax: 242-5647 [email protected] Mission: Umbrella Organization for Japanese Organizations Japanese Cultural Society of Maui P.O. Box 5090, Kahului, HI 96733 Kay Fukumoto, President, 283-9999 [email protected] Mission: To perpetuate the culture of our Japanese Heritage Komei Juku Beikoku Honbu 688 Nukuwai Place, Wailuku, HI 96793 Tel: 573-1965 Fax: 572-6047 Robert W. [email protected] Mission: Traditional/historical martial art of Japanese swordsmanship; includes the study of samurai culture and sword culture. Matsuo Kai 20 W. Kauai Street, Kahului, HI 96732, 877-7492 Matsudai Tamao (Tama Makishima) Mission: Japanese buy dance instruction Maui Taiko 543 Pohaku Street, Kahului, HI 96732 Kay Fukumoto, President 283-9999 [email protected] Mission: To teach taiko and promote taiko music through Obon Festivals and other community events. Nakayama Minyo Kai 874 Kanakea Street, Lahaina, HI 96761 Ken Tasaka, Instructor Ph: 661-4523 [email protected]

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H A N A S H I M A S H O O

OCTOBER--DECEMBER 2006

to our SPONSORS of this edition of Hanashimashoo:

Domo Arigato

Want to advertise at a reasonable rate? Purchase a business card sized ad for inclusion in upcoming Hanashimashoo publications! Call Yuki Lei at 870-8047.

Post Office Box 5090 Kahului, HI 96733

Japanese Cultural Society of Maui

TO:

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