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Teacher's Guide

Atoms Video Quiz

Grades 5-9

AVTV

CREDITS

Program Production S u n b u r s t Vi s u a l M e d i a Te a c h e r 's G u i d e Rose Bulau M.Ed. National Board Certification Print Material Design Desktop Productions

© 2004 Sunburst Visual Media, a division of Global Video, LLC Hawthorne, NY 10532 Approximate running time: 26 minutes

Atoms Video Quiz

Table of Contents

Guide Information ....................................05 Fast Facts..................................................07 Before Viewing Activities ..........................08 During Viewing Activities ..........................12 After Viewing Activities ............................17 After Viewing Quizzes ..............................23 Additional Resources ................................26 Answer Keys ............................................31 Script........................................................43

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Atoms: Video Quiz

About This Guide

Guide Information

Providing students with visual media is an excellent way to take them out of the classroom and into the real world. Our programs offer real-world footage, dynamic graphics, engaging dramatizations, and first-person testimonials that keep students interested and help them visualize difficult concepts. More importantly, they reinforce critical learning objectives shaped by state and national educational standards. However, the learning doesn't begin and end when the program does. You can make the learning experience even more effective by using the materials provided in this Teacher's Guide.

This guide is divided into the following sections:

· Fast Facts are designed to give your students a quick overview of the information presented within the video. · Before Viewing Activities help identify what students already know about the subject, what they are curious about, and what they hope to learn. · During Viewing Activities may be used during viewing to enhance students' understanding of the video. · After Viewing Activities help students summarize and draw conclusions from the information that was presented. · After Viewing Quizzes test students' retention of the information presented in the program and activity sheets. · Additional Resources are designed to help you extend the information presented in the program into other areas of your curriculum. · Answer Keys are provided for relevant activities or reproducible pages. · Script content is provided in an unabridged version for future reference.

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Program Overview

Guide Information

Atoms provides a comprehensive look at this topic. Students will see historic contributions made to the study of atoms. They will explore the structure of atoms and learn about the Periodic Table of Elements.

Viewing Objectives

By viewing the video and engaging in the activities provided, students will be able to:

· · ·

explain history behind our current atomic theory illustrate and label the parts of an atom read the atomic number and mass of an element and determine its average isotope describe electron transfer

·

Correlation With the National Science Foundation:

All students should develop an understanding of properties of objects and materials. Objects have many observable properties, including size, weight, shape, color, temperature, and the ability to react with other substances. Those properties can be measured using tools, such as rulers, balances, and thermometers. Objects are made of one or more materials, such as paper, wood, and metal. Objects can be described by the properties of the materials from which they are made, and those properties can be used to separate or sort a group of objects or materials.

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Clouds Fast Facts

· The atom is the basic unit of matter that forms everything. · An atom is the smallest amount of a material you can have that will retain all of its original characteristics and properties. · An atom can only be seen with an electron microscope. · An ancient Greek philosopher, Democritus, was one of the first Atomists. · John Dalton, an English chemist, first proposed the modern atomic theory. · Dalton's theory had four main concepts: all elements are composed of atoms that are indivisible, atoms of the same element are exactly the same in structure, different elements have different structures, and atoms of two or more different elements join together to create a compound. · J.J. Thomson was the first to discover a particle smaller than the atom, the electron. · Thomson proposed an atomic model with random placement of positive and negative particles, which came to be known as the Plum Pudding model. · Rutherford determined that each atom had a nucleus which contained the positively and negatively charged particles. · In 1913, Neils Bohr proposed that electrons circle the nucleus on tracks. · A more accurate atomic model was constructed through Wave Mechanics. In the wave model, electron movement appears to be more like a vibration within an electron cloud than a circular orbit. · Atoms are made up of protons, neutrons, and electrons. · Protons and neutrons are found in the nucleus. · Electrons orbit the nucleus, forming an electron cloud. · Subatomic particles are measured in atomic mass units (AMU's.)

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Fast Facts

· Each proton and neutron together have an atomic mass unit of one. · The Periodic Table lists the elements in order by their atomic number. · The atomic number represents the number of protons in every atom of an element. · The number of neutrons within an atom of any element can vary; the variations are called isotopes. · On the Periodic Table, there is an Atomic Mass number for each element. · The Atomic Mass of an element is figured as the weighted average of all its isotopes as they occur in nature. That's why the Atomic Mass number has decimal points. · Electrons orbit the nucleus at different levels depending upon how much energy they have. · Each level can hold a certain number of electrons; the first level has two and the second and third levels hold eight each. · When the outer electron level is not full, it bonds with other atoms to help fill it. · The tendency for an atom to attract or share electrons in the outer shell is called valence. · An atom's electron arrangement determines the element's chemical properties, or the way they tend to bond with other elements. · Atoms that have gained or lost electrons are called ions. · Atoms gaining electrons are negative ions. Atoms losing electrons are positive ions. · Ionic bonding occurs when an electron is transferred from one atom to another. · Compounds are more commonly formed through covalent bonding, the sharing of electrons.

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Name

Before Viewing Activity 1

What Do You Know?

Think about the letters in the word ATOMS. Think about what you know about this topic. Next to each letter in the chart below, write words or a sentence that start with the given letter. The things you write should show what you know about atoms.

A T O M S

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Atoms: Video Quiz

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

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Name

Before Viewing Activity 2

Word Splash

The words splashed across the page are included in the video you will watch. Write a paragraph about atoms, using as many of the words correctly as you can. Use a dictionary, if necessary.

________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

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Name

Before Viewing Activity 3

Table Search

You will be learning about the Periodic Table of Elements in this video. Get prepared for the information you will need by doing some advance research. Use reference materials and write your answers in complete sentences.

1. What is an element? __________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

2. On the Periodic Table of Elements, what are the rows called? ________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

3. What are the columns called? __________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

4. Define Atomic Number. ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

5. Define Atomic Mass. __________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

6. What is a shell? ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

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Name

Before Viewing Activity 4

Atoms Preview

Each statement below is related to information you will gain in the video. Put a check mark by each statement that you believe to be true. We will revisit this page after the video to see if any of your thinking has changed.

Before Viewing

true/false Everything in the world is made of matter. Atoms can be seen with the naked eye. The atom is the basic unit of matter that forms everything. People have been studying atoms for 2000 years. Democritus proposed the first atomic theory. Neils Bohr created the wave model of atoms. The electron is the center of the atom. Atoms are made up of three main subatomic particles. We measure subatomic particles in pounds. Electrons have a negative charge. Neutrons have a positive charge. Elements are the simplest forms of matter. The Periodic table lists the elements. All isotopes have the same number of neutrons. The number of protons and neutrons added together is called the mass number. An electrically neutral atom has equal numbers of protons and electrons.

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After Viewing

true/false

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Name

During Viewing Activity 1

Take a Note

In the video, you will hear about several important scientists and their work with atoms. As you hear each scientist's name, write his or her important contribution or discovery in word balloon above the corresponding name.

Decmocritus John Dalton

J.J. Thomson

Ernest Rutherford Neils Bohr

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Name

During Viewing Activity 2

Take a Note

Read the information below about atomist John Dalton. Then, as you hear the four main components of his atomic theory, record them in the space provided. John Dalton, an English chemist, was studying the science of weather and gases when he found that atoms were influencing his experiment. He proposed the first modern atomic theory in 1803. His theory included four main concepts.

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Name

During Viewing Activity 3

Vocabulary Match

Draw a line to connect each word with its definition. covalent bonding ionic bonding ion valence neutral mass number atomic mass isotope Periodic Table element neutron electron the number of protons and neutrons added together subatomic particle has a negative charge equal to 1 the weighted average of all of the isotopes of an element an electron is transferred from one atom to another the philosopher who first theorized about atoms lists the elements in order by their atomic number scientist who constructed the wave model an atom that has lost or gained an electron Atomic Mass Unit sharing of electrons subatomic particle has a positive charge equal to 1 tendency for an atom to attract or share electrons in the outer shell the smallest amount of a material you can have that will retain all of its original characteristics and properties an atom that has equal number of protons and electrons the center of the atom subatomic particle with neutral charge occur in nature at different rates the simplest form of matter

proton

AMU nucleus atom Neils Bohr Democritus

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Name

After Viewing Activity 4

Diagram Time

Information is provided in the video about the structure of atoms. In the space below, draw and label a diagram of an atom. Be sure to include the nucleus, protons, neutrons, and electrons.

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Name

During Viewing Activity 5

Cloze

Write each word from the word bank in its correct space in the paragraph. matter proton neutron electron mass number periodic table atomic number electron microscope AMU mass 1/1836 elements isotopes neutral outer nucleus atom properties subatomic valence ions negative positive

Everything in the world is made of __________________. Matter is made of __________________s. The __________________ is the basic unit of matter that forms everything. An __________________ is the smallest amount of material you can have that will retain all of its original characteristics and __________________. But, atoms are very small, and can only be seen through an ___________________________________. Inside an atom are even smaller particles called __________________ particles. They are __________________s, __________________s, and __________________s. The __________________s and neutrons are packed together in the center of the atom called the __________________ and the electrons orbit the nucleus forming an ____________________ cloud. Subatomic particles are so small that we measure them by atomic mass units, or __________________s. Each proton and each __________________ __have an atomic mass equal to 1 unit. But the atomic mass of each electron is extremely small -- __________________ of an atomic unit! __________________ are the simplest forms of matter. The __________________ lists the elements in order by their atomic number. The __________________ represents the number of protons in every atom of an element. But, unlike protons, the number of __________________s within an atom of any element can vary somewhat; these variations are called __________________. Isotopes occur in nature at different rates. Because __________________ have varied numbers of neutrons, isotopes of the same element weigh differently. The number of __________________ s and neutrons in added together is called the __________________ of the element. An electrically __________________ atom has equal numbers of protons and __________________. Their positive and negative charges cancel each other out. Electrons orbit the __________________ at different levels depending upon how much energy they have and each level can hold a certain number of electrons. When the __________________ electron level is not full, it bonds with other atoms to help fill it. The tendency for an atom to attract or share electrons in this outer shell is called __________________. Atoms that have gained or lost electrons are called __________________. Atoms gaining electrons are negative ions and atoms losing electrons are __________________ ions.

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Name

After Viewing Activity 1

Atom Prove-It

Read the statement at the top of the page. It is a true statement. Use information you have gained from the video to write a paragraph that uses details to prove the statement to be true.

Atoms are made up of three main subatomic parts.

______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Name

After Viewing Activity 2

Periodic Tabling

Use the periodic table to answer the questions below.

1. How many protons does helium have? ____________________________ 2. What is the atomic mass of helium? ______________________________ 3. How many neutrons does helium have? __________________________ 4. What is the most common isotope of helium? ______________________ 5. How many protons does aluminum have? __________________________ 6. What is the atomic mass of aluminum? ____________________________ 7. How many neutrons does aluminum have? ________________________ 8. What is the most common isotope of aluminum? ____________________ 9. How many protons does lead have? ______________________________ 10. What is the atomic mass of lead? ________________________________ 11. How many neutrons does lead have? ____________________________ 12. What is the most common isotope of lead? ________________________ 13. How many protons does silver have? ____________________________ 14. What is the atomic mass of silver? ______________________________ __________________________

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15. How many neutrons does silver have?

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Name

After Viewing Activity 3

Atom Anatomy

Use information you have gained from the video to complete the Venn diagram below. When you are finished, you will have an excellent comparison of the parts of an atom.

neutron protron

electron

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Name

After Viewing Activity 4

The Human Atom

Follow the steps below to create a human model of ionic bonds.

1. Gather materials: white kitchen trash bags (with holes for head and arms), small round balloons in different colors, tape, scissors, construction paper, markers, string 2. Your group will be given an element to represent. 3. With your group, identify your atomic number, and the number of valence electrons 4. The `model' for each group will put the white trash bag on and the group should label the `model' with construction paper hanging around their neck with the string. On one side should be the element's symbol and atomic number. On the other side should be the charge of the resulting ion after they have transferred electrons. 5. The students will then tape the "valence" electrons to the `model's' bag. The number of valence electrons determines the number of balloons ­ use different colored balloons for different elements. 6. Your group will then act out electron transfer in order to achieve chemical stability for your element. 7. Once transfer is complete, then the models must identify their appropriate electrical charge and turn over their tag that has the correct charge written on it. 8. After the activity is completed, show what happened in words and in pictures on a piece of paper.

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Name

After Viewing Activity 5

What If?

Follow the steps below to explore life without an element.

1. Imagine that one day, out of nowhere, one of the elements in the periodic table suddenly starts to disappear from the face of Earth. Depending on the element, the results could be cataclysmic. 2. Choose one of the elements from the table and write a fictionalized "firsthand" account of the day your element disappeared. (An example: the day Earth lost its iron--buildings crumble, bridges collapse, blood gradually becomes anemic, and so on.)

Gather the following information before you begin writing. · · · · · Where do they appear in nature, if at all? How do scientists, engineers, artists, doctors, and so on use them? Where are their presences crucial? How would life be different without them? Would life even be able to survive?

3. Be prepared to present a dramatic reading of your work. 4. The class writing will be published in a "periodic table of disasters" to share with another class or publish on our school's Web site.

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Name

After Viewing Activity 6

Adopt an Element

Follow the steps below. 1. Your teacher will assign you an element. Research the information below for your element. Name of element: ____________________ Symbol: ______________________________ Atomic Number: ______________________ Atomic Mass: ________________________ Number of Protons: __________________ Classification: (nonmetal, metal, metalloid): ______________________ Family: ______________________________ Origin of Name: ______________________ Discovered By: ______________________

Number of Neutrons: __________________ Number of Electrons: __________________

in: __________________________________

Other interesting details: (uses, facts, compounds, etc.): __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Create an advertisement for your element. It must include all of the information gathered. It must be neat and colorful. Add pictures that relate to your advertisement theme.

3. Prepare to share your advertisement with the class.

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After Viewing Activity Quiz

After Viewing Activity Quiz

Choose the best answer for each question. 1. When did humans first theorize about the atom? a. During the last 200 years. b. About 400 years ago c. About 5 minutes ago d. Over 2000 years ago 2. An atom can be divided into a smaller piece that still retains all of its original characteristics. a. True b. False 3. The air is made of atoms. a. True b. False 4. Who proposed the first modern atomic theory? a. Ernest Rutherford b. J.J. Thomson c. John Dalton d. Abraham Lincoln 5. Which of the following was not included in Dalton's atomic model? Make sure your punctuation is correct. a. Electrons travel in energy levels b. All elements are composed of atoms that are indivisible c. Atoms of different elements have different structures. d. Atoms of the same element have the same structure. charged particles is random. We sometimes refer to this model as________________. Watch the style. a. the Ford Model b. the Plum Pudding Model c. the Modern Atomic Model d. Rutherford's Model 7. Which scientist is credited with discovering the nucleus of the atom through his gold foil experiment? a. John Dalton b. J.J. Thomson c. Albert Einstein d. Ernest Rutherford 8. Who was the Danish scientist that proposed electrons orbit around the nucleus, like planets around the sun? a. Democritus b. Niels Bohr c. Albert Einstein d. Ernest Rutherford 9. What is the current atomic model called? a. The Wave Model b. The Plum Pudding model c. The Atomic Model d. The Bohr Model

6. J.J. Thomson proposed an early atomic model in which the placement of

10. Which association most accurately describes the size of the nucleus in relation to its electron orbit? a. A penny inside a gallon jar

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After Viewing Activity Quiz

After Viewing Activity Quiz

Choose the best answer for each question. b. A drop of water in the Grand Canyon c. A bee inside a football stadium d. A slice of pickle inside a hamburger bun 11. Which of the following is NOT a subatomic particle? a. Electrons b. Neutrons c. Protons d. Ions 12. Where in the atom might one find an electron? a. In the nucleus b. In the electron section at the supermarket c. In the electron cloud d. Inside a neutron 13. Which two particles have the same atomic mass? a. Protons and electrons b. Protons and neutrons c. Electrons and neutrons d. Neutrons and positrons 14. An atom's atomic number represents the number of __________________ in the atom's nucleus. a. Protons b. Neutrons c. Electrons d. Ions 15. The number of which subatomic particle can vary within an atom? a. Isotopes b. Neutrons c. Ions d. Protons 16. Protium, Deuterium, and Tritium are three ____________ of Hydrogen. a. Ions b. Bonds c. Neutrons d. Isotopes 17. If the atomic mass of the element Calcium (Ca) is 40.08, and its atomic number is 20, which is the most common isotope of calcium? a. Calcium-40 b. Calcium-20 c. Calcium-60 d. Calcium-20.08

18. What is the name of an atom that loses or gains electrons? a. Ion b. Charger c. Metal d. Atomizer 19. If a neutral atom gains two electrons,

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After Viewing Activity Quiz

After Viewing Activity Quiz

Choose the best answer for each question. its charge with be a. 0 b. Positive 2 c. Negative 2 d. Neutral 20. An atom's electron arrangement determines the element's chemical properties, or the way the element tends to bond with other elements. a. True b. False

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Extensions

Additional Resources

Biography ­ choose one of the scientists that has studied or developed a theory about atoms. Research that scientist and write a short biography about his life. Flash Cards ­ On one side of each card, write a vocabulary word from the video. On the back of the card, write the definition of the word. Illustrate the card if you wish. Use these cards to quiz your friends about atoms. Mnemonics ­ use mnemonics to develop ways to help you learn the vocabulary in the video. Make up a sentence to help you remember the different scientists who have contributed to atomic theory, a sentence to help you remember the names of the subatomic particles and what they do, etc. Creative Writing ­ Write a story from the point of view of an electron. What happens when it is transferred or shared through bonding? Be creative! Historical Connections ­ Using your library or the internet, research the atomic bomb. Why was it invented? What was it used for? How has it changed the world? Science and Culture ­ Using your library or the internet, study what part of the world is home to most scientific research on atoms. Write a short report describing this part of the world and why you think this research is focused there. Atoms and people ­ Using your library or the internet, research how atomic research affects people. In what ways does new knowledge of atoms help people and in what ways, if any, does it hurt, or cause potential harm to mankind? Periodic Table ­ Use a standard periodic table with just the atomic number and mass labeled. Fill in other information that you can figure out using what you have learned in the video (e.g. number of protons, number of neutrons, most common isotope, etc.) Math quiz ­ Using some of the concepts from the video, create a math quiz to give to a friend. Create questions about atomic mass, positive and negative charges, or how to determine the average isotope. Create a game ­ Before your next P.E. class, create a physical game that you can play to help reinforce some of the concepts of the video. Be creative, but use evidence from the program. Game Show ­ With a group of students, create a game quiz show to practice your knowledge of atoms. Fashion the game after your favorite TV game show or be creative and make up your own format.

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Extensions

Additional Resources

Board game ­ create a board game for other students. The game should include the history of atomic theory, subatomic particles, the periodic table, and electron transfer. Test it out on your classmates to see if it is fun and educational. Poster ­ Make a poster showing a diagram of an atom. Be sure to label your drawing Fortune Telling ­ People have been interested in atoms for over 2000 years. Think ahead two hundred years. What do you think will happen with atomic research? What do you think we'll find? In general, how do you think the study of science will change in the next 200 years? Extension ­ You have learned about atoms and subatomic particles in this video. Now, extend your knowledge by researching elements and compounds. Make a short report of what you learn and present it to your class.

The Dramatic Element Divide your students into research teams, and assign each team either the alkali, metal, or noble gas groups of the elements that make up the periodic table. Ask the teams to investigate the basic properties of the elements in the group they have been assigned. The teams should also include the element hydrogen in their study: Point out that hydrogen does not belong to any group but stands alone in the periodic table. When their research is complete, ask each team to express its new knowledge of the elemental group they have studied by writing and performing skits in which they personify each of the elements in their assigned group. The skit's dramatic action should be based on the interaction--or, in the case of the noble gasses, noninteraction--with the other elements of the group. Since hydrogen reacts with many other elements, they should also include a hydrogen "character" in their skits. One interesting extension to this activity is to have students perform short adlibs between element characters from other groups. This will give students the chance to demonstrate their understanding of the ways in which different elements interact.

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Suggested Reading List

Additional Resources

Knapp, Brian. Elements. Grolier Educational, 1996. This 15-volume set provides an accessible approach to the elements. Each element is highlighted in its own volume. The volumes contain descriptions of each element's characteristics, behavior, and occurrence, as well as step-by-step demonstrations that link each element to its realworld applications. Kramer, Stephen. Hidden Worlds: Looking Through a Scientist's Microscope (Scientists in the Field Series). Illustrated with photographs by Dennis Kunkel. Houghton Mifflin. Stunning photos of microscopic images invite the reader to investigate the amazing hidden world that comes to life under a microscope. This captivating book discusses how a scientist becomes interested in microscopes, how he uses them in his work, and what he has discovered in his research. Levi Biel, Timothy. Atoms: building Blocks of Matter. Lucent Books, 1990. Mebane, Robert C. Adventures with Atoms and Molecules: Experiments for Young People. Enslow Publishers, 1998. Passachoff, Naomi. Niels Bohr: Physicist and Humanitarian (Great Minds of Science). Illustrated with photographs. Enslow. This book will captivate any student with an interest in physics or the history of science. Written to highlight a mix of Bohr's scientific accomplishments and humanitarian efforts, this book gives the reader an appreciation of a great man. Richardson, Hazel. How to Split the Atom. Franklin Watts, Inc., 2001. Roxby Cox, Phil. Atoms and Molecules. Edu Dev, 1993. Stwertka, Albert. A Guide to the Elements. Oxford University Press, 1996. This beautiful book is devoted to making the elements easily understandable. Stwertka begins with an introductory session on the basic concepts of chemistry and the history of the periodic table, then discusses each element in separate articles. The book also includes photographs and examples of each element's practical applications. Wiker, Benjamin. The Mystery of the Periodic Table. Ignatius Press, 2003

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Internet Sites

http://www.chemistry.org/portal/a/c/s/1/educatorsandstudents.html This is a resource of all things chemistry for researchers and students alike. www.chemicalelements.com This is an easy to use, interactive periodic table site for students. http://www.webelements.com/ This is a comprehensive site dealing with the periodic table of the elements http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/textbook/atom.html This is an electronic textbook with some fine pictures

Additional Resources

http://education.jlab.org/atomtour/ All About Atoms is a very basic overview of atomic structure. Students can click on particles to learn more about them and even discover some fun facts about atoms. http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/textbook/bonding.html This site includes many visualized links such as Lewis dots, sharing electrons, transferring electrons! http://www.liv.ac.uk/Chemistry/Links/refbiog.html Biographies of chemists and scientists in an alphabetical listing. http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/mysteries_l1/composition.html This web site introduces us to the evolution of matter from its least complex to most complex form. http://ippex.pppl.gov/ippex/PhysicsModules.html This online interactive multimedia tutorial should be your first stop to learn about the basics of atomic structure and how atoms interact to create more complex compounds. http://www.brainpop.com/science/matter/atoms/flashmov/subjmov.swf A fantastic animated introduction to the atom. Complete with review quiz. http://particleadventure.org/particleadventure/ At this site, students can follow the path of a particle and see its function. http://science.widener.edu/svb/tutorial/protons.html This drill & practice page lets you determine the number of protons, electrons, and neutrons in an atom or ion if only given partial information. http://science.widener.edu/svb/tutorial/startestructures.html This lets you practice filling the electron orbitals for atoms and ions given to you randomly. Bring your periodic table

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Internet Sites

http://www.miamisci.org/af/sln/ The Atoms Family - Click on any of the links to learn some "astonishing" facts.

Additional Resources

http://www.uky.edu/Projects/Chemcomics/ Welcome to the Periodic Table of Comic Books. Click on an element to see a list of comic book pages involving that element. Click on a thumbnail on the list to see a full comic book page. For technical information about an element, follow the link to Mark Winter's WebElements.

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Answer Key - Before Viewing Activity Sheet 3

Table Search

You will be learning about the Periodic Table of Elements in this video. Get prepared for the information you will need by doing some advance research. Use reference materials and write your answers in complete sentences.

1. What is an element? __________________________________________________________

The building blocks of all matter ________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

2. On the Periodic Table of Elements, what are the rows called? ________________________

Periods (elements have the same number of shells) ________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

3. What are the columns called? __________________________________________________

Groups (have the same number of electrons in their outer shell) ________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

4. Define Atomic Number. ________________________________________________________

The number of protons in every atom of an element ________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

5. Define Atomic Mass. __________________________________________________________

The weighted average of all the element's isotopes as they occur in nature ________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

6. What is a shell? ______________________________________________________________

Areas in which electrons are held, from one to seven ________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

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Answer Key - Before Viewing Activity Sheet 4

Atoms Preview

Each statement below is related to information you will gain in the video. Put a check mark by each statement that you believe to be true. We will revisit this page after the video to see if any of your thinking has changed.

Before Viewing

true/false Everything in the world is made of matter. Atoms can be seen with the naked eye. The atom is the basic unit of matter that forms everything. People have been studying atoms for 2000 years. Democritus proposed the first atomic theory. Neils Bohr created the wave model of atoms. The electron is the center of the atom. Atoms are made up of three main subatomic particles. We measure subatomic particles in pounds. Electrons have a negative charge. Neutrons have a positive charge. Elements are the simplest forms of matter. The Periodic table lists the elements. All isotopes have the same number of neutrons. The number of protons and neutrons added together is called the mass number. An electrically neutral atom has equal numbers of protons and electrons.

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After Viewing

true/false

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Answer Key - During Viewing Activity Sheet 1

Take a Note

In the video, you will hear about several important scientists and their work with atoms. As you hear each scientist's name, write his or her important contribution or discovery in word balloon above the corresponding name.

first speculated that atoms existed

found that atoms were influencing his experiments, proposed the first modern atomic theory

Decmocritus discovered negatively charged particles existing in gases know to be electrically neutral

John Dalton

J.J. Thomson concluded that positively charged particles of an atom existed ­ not randomly throughout the atom but in the nucleus

proposed that electrons circle the nucleus on tracks, similar to the way planets orbit the sun

Ernest Rutherford Neils Bohr

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Answer Key - During Viewing Activity Sheet 2

Take a Note

Read the information below about atomist John Dalton. Then, as you hear the four main components of his atomic theory, record them in the space provided. John Dalton, an English chemist, was studying the science of weather and gases when he found that atoms were influencing his experiment. He proposed the first modern atomic theory in 1803. His theory included four main concepts.

all elements are composed of atoms that are indivisible

atoms of the same element are exactly the same in structure

atoms of different elements have different structures

atoms of two or more different elements join together to create a compound

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Answer Key - During Viewing Activity Sheet 3

Vocabulary Match

Draw a line to connect each word with its definition. covalent bonding ionic bonding ion valence neutral mass number atomic mass isotope Periodic Table element neutron electron the number of protons and neutrons added together subatomic particle has a negative charge equal to 1 the weighted average of all of the isotopes of an element an electron is transferred from one atom to another the philosopher who first theorized about atoms lists the elements in order by their atomic number scientist who constructed the wave model an atom that has lost or gained an electron Atomic Mass Unit sharing of electrons subatomic particle has a positive charge equal to 1 tendency for an atom to attract or share electrons in the outer shell the smallest amount of a material you can have that will retain all of its original characteristics and properties an atom that has equal number of protons and electrons the center of the atom subatomic particle with neutral charge occur in nature at different rates the simplest form of matter

proton

AMU nucleus atom Neils Bohr Democritus

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Answer Key - During Viewing Activity Sheet 4

Diagram Time

Information is provided in the video about the structure of atoms. In the space below, draw and label a diagram of an atom. Be sure to include the nucleus, protons, neutrons, and electrons.

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Answer Key - During Viewing Activity Sheet 5

Cloze

Write each word from the word bank in its correct space in the paragraph. matter proton neutron electron mass number periodic table atomic number electron microscope AMU mass 1/1836 elements isotopes neutral outer nucleus atom properties subatomic valence ions negative positive

matter Everything in the world is made of __________________. Matter is made of atom atom __________________s. The __________________ is the basic unit of matter that forms atom everything. An __________________ is the smallest amount of material you can have that properties will retain all of its original characteristics and __________________. But, atoms are very electron microscope small, and can only be seen through an ___________________________________. Inside an subatomic atom are even smaller particles called __________________ particles. They are proton neutron electron __________________s, __________________s, and __________________s. The proton __________________s and neutrons are packed together in the center of the atom called the nucleus electron __________________ and the electrons orbit the nucleus forming an ____________________

cloud. Subatomic particles are so small that we measure them by atomic mass units, or neutron AMU __________________s. Each proton and each __________________ __have an atomic mass equal to 1 unit. But the atomic mass of each electron is extremely small -- 1/1836 Elements __________________ of an atomic unit! __________________ are the simplest forms of periodic table matter. The __________________ lists the elements in order by their atomic number. The

atomic number __________________ represents the number of protons in every atom of an element. But, neutron unlike protons, the number of __________________s within an atom of any element can isotopes vary somewhat; these variations are called __________________. Isotopes occur in nature at isotopes different rates. Because __________________ have varied numbers of neutrons, isotopes of proton the same element weigh differently. The number of __________________ s and neutrons in mass number added together is called the __________________ of the element. An electrically neutral electrons __________________ atom has equal numbers of protons and __________________. Their nucleus positive and negative charges cancel each other out. Electrons orbit the __________________

at different levels depending upon how much energy they have and each level can hold a outer certain number of electrons. When the __________________ electron level is not full, it bonds with other atoms to help fill it. The tendency for an atom to attract or share electrons valence in this outer shell is called __________________. Atoms that have gained or lost electrons

ions are called __________________. Atoms gaining electrons are negative ions and atoms losing positive electrons are __________________ ions.

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Answer Key - After Viewing Activity Sheet 2

Periodic Tabling

Use the periodic table to answer the questions below.

2 1. How many protons does helium have? ____________________________ 4.00260 2. What is the atomic mass of helium? ______________________________

3. How many neutrons does helium have?

2 __________________________

Helium-4 4. What is the most common isotope of helium? ______________________ 13 5. How many protons does aluminum have? __________________________ 26.98 6. What is the atomic mass of aluminum? ____________________________ 14 7. How many neutrons does aluminum have? ________________________ Aluminum-27 8. What is the most common isotope of aluminum? ____________________ 82 9. How many protons does lead have? ______________________________ 207.2 10. What is the atomic mass of lead? ________________________________ 125 11. How many neutrons does lead have? ____________________________ Lead-207 12. What is the most common isotope of lead? ________________________ 47 13. How many protons does silver have? ____________________________

14. What is the atomic mass of silver?

107.868 ______________________________ 61 __________________________

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15. How many neutrons does silver have?

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Answer Key - After Viewing Activity Sheet 3

Atom Anatomy

Use information you have gained from the video to complete the Venn diagram below. When you are finished, you will have an excellent comparison of the parts of an atom.

neutron protron

packed together in the nucleus, atomic mass = 1 unit, protons + neutrons = mass number positive charge neutral charge

matter, form elements

balance each other, charge = 1

extremely small atomic mass, travel in an electron cloud, travel like a vibration, negative charge, "corpuscle" ­ original name

electron

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Answer Key - After Viewing Activity Quiz

After Viewing Activity Quiz

Choose the best answer for each question. 1. When did humans first theorize about the atom? a. During the last 200 years. b. About 400 years ago c. About 5 minutes ago d. Over 2000 years ago 2. An atom can be divided into a smaller piece that still retains all of its original characteristics. a. True b. False 3. The air is made of atoms. a. True b. False 4. Who proposed the first modern atomic theory? a. Ernest Rutherford b. J.J. Thomson c. John Dalton d. Abraham Lincoln 5. Which of the following was not included in Dalton's atomic model? Make sure your punctuation is correct. a. Electrons travel in energy levels b. All elements are composed of atoms that are indivisible c. Atoms of different elements have different structures. d. Atoms of the same element have the same structure. a. the Ford Model b. the Plum Pudding Model c. the Modern Atomic Model d. Rutherford's Model 7. Which scientist is credited with discovering the nucleus of the atom through his gold foil experiment? a. John Dalton b. J.J. Thomson c. Albert Einstein d. Ernest Rutherford 8. Who was the Danish scientist that proposed electrons orbit around the nucleus, like planets around the sun? a. Democritus b. Niels Bohr c. Albert Einstein d. Ernest Rutherford 9. What is the current atomic model called? a. The Wave Model b. The Plum Pudding model c. The Atomic Model d. The Bohr Model

6. J.J. Thomson proposed an early atomic model in which the placement of charged particles is random. We sometimes refer to this model as________________. Watch the style.

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10. Which association most accurately describes the size of the nucleus in relation to its electron orbit? a. A penny inside a gallon jar b. A drop of water in the Grand Canyon c. A bee inside a football stadium d. A slice of pickle inside a hamburger bun

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Answer Key - After Viewing Activity Quiz

After Viewing Activity Quiz

Choose the best answer for each question. 11. Which of the following is NOT a subatomic particle? a. Electrons b. Neutrons c. Protons d. Ions 12. Where in the atom might one find an electron? a. In the nucleus b. In the electron section at the supermarket c. In the electron cloud d. Inside a neutron 13. Which two particles have the same atomic mass? a. Protons and electrons b. Protons and neutrons c. Electrons and neutrons d. Neutrons and positrons 14. An atom's atomic number represents the number of __________________ in the atom's nucleus. a. Protons b. Neutrons c. Electrons d. Ions 15. The number of which subatomic particle can vary within an atom? a. Isotopes b. Neutrons c. Ions d. Protons 16. Protium, Deuterium, and Tritium are three ____________ of Hydrogen. a. Ions b. Bonds c. Neutrons d. Isotopes 17. If the atomic mass of the element Calcium (Ca) is 40.08, and its atomic number is 20, which is the most common isotope of calcium? a. Calcium-40 b. Calcium-20 c. Calcium-60 d. Calcium-20.08

18. What is the name of an atom that loses or gains electrons? a. Ion b. Charger c. Metal d. Atomizer 19. If a neutral atom gains two electrons, its charge with be a. 0 b. Positive 2 c. Negative 2 d. Neutral 20. An atom's electron arrangement determines the element's chemical properties, or the way the element tends to bond with other elements. a. True b. False

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Answer Key - After Viewing Activity Quiz

After Viewing Activity Quiz

Choose the best answer for each question.

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Script

CAST

Professor Science ..............................................................host Victor Velocity ............................................................volunteer Wendy Rivers ............................................................volunteer Quizitor ......................................................................volunteer Quiz Clown ................................................................volunteer Star Struck ..................................................................volunteer Salty Gales ................................................................volunteer Fizzle the Genie ........................................................volunteer Coach Nuke Rockney ..............................................volunteer Sandy Space ..............................................................volunteer DJ Ricky Wave ..........................................................volunteer

S CENE O NE

PROFESSOR SCIENCE Hello. Welcome to the wonderful world of science. My name is Professor Science. And today we are going to discuss ATOMS. No, not the students named Adam in your class, but A-T-O-M-S, Atoms! The stuff that makes up -- EVERYTHING! After you've learned all about atoms, some friends of mine will quiz you on . . . you guessed it, ATOMS! But first, let's refresh your memory on the matter of ATOMS. (Giggle) Get it, the Matter of Atoms. If you didn't get it now, you'll get it in a minute! Everything in the world is made of matter. You, your desk, the air, everything ­ is made of matter. But what is matter made of? (Short pause) Matter is made of atoms! The atom is the basic unit of matter that forms everything. An atom is the smallest amount of a material you can have that will retain all of its original characteristics and properties. Here's what I mean, if you took a block of gold and cut it into the smallest piece possible that still holds the properties of gold, that would be an atom of gold. Because this piece of gold is as small as you can get it, it is indivisible or not able to be divided. You wouldn't be able to see this piece of gold with your naked eye, though. An atom can only be seen with the use of a microscope. Not just any microscope, but a highly specialized one called an electron microscope! These microscopes were only recently invented, but the road to atomic knowledge was under construction many years ago!

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Script

Over 2000 years ago, long before any microscope was ever invented, a Greek philosopher known as Democritus first speculated that these small pieces of matter existed. He called them "atomos", which is Greek for indivisible; thus, our word, ATOM. Because Democritus and his fellow philosophers believed and taught their idea of the atom, they were called the Atomists. They spent much time contemplating the atom and thought that there were many different kinds of atoms that were of different sizes and shapes. Despite the Atomists early insight, no substantial developments in atomic theory were made until the early 1800's. While studying the science of weather and gases, an English chemist named John Dalton found that tiny particles, or atoms, were influencing his experimental data. In 1803, he proposed the first modern atomic theory. His theory included four main concepts. First, Dalton stated that all elements are composed of atoms that are indivisible. Second, atoms of the same element are exactly the same in structure. Third, atoms of different elements have different structures. And finally, atoms of two or more different elements join together to create a compound. Dalton's first modern atomic theory has provided the basis of modern chemistry and created a foundation for the current atomic theory. In 1897, J.J. Thomson discovered negatively charged particles existing in gases known to be electrically neutral. Thus, he claimed a particle smaller than the atom must exist within the atom; Thomson named the negatively charged particles "corpuscles". Today, we call them electrons. The discovery of a negatively charged particle in a neutral gas led Thomson to reason that positively charged particles must also exist to balance out the negative charge. He then proposed an atomic model with random placement of positive and negative particles, which came to be known as the Plum Pudding model.

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S CENE T WO

PROFESSOR SCIENCE A few years later, while shooting positively-charged particles through a thin piece of gold foil, Ernest Rutherford concluded that the positively-charged particles of an atom existed--not randomly throughout the atom, as Thomson proposed--but in a relatively small area in the center of the atom, called the nucleus. He found most positively charged particles passed through the atoms of the gold sheet without any problem, leading him to believe that most of the atom was empty space. Rutherford and his 1908 gold foil experiment created a working model that eventually led to the Bohr Model. In 1913, Neils Bohr, a Danish scientist, asked the question, where exactly in the atom are the negatively charged particles? He proposed that electrons circle the nucleus on tracks, similar to the way planets orbit the sun. The tracks are called energy levels. These energy levels help us to understand how atoms of certain elements tend to come together to form compounds. Eventually, Bohr's model gave way to the current wave model. Thanks to some complicated mathematical equations called Wave Mechanics, scientists were able to construct a more accurate atomic model. In this wave model, electron movement appears to be more like a vibration within an electron cloud than a circular orbit. The image shown here is not to scale, but gives the general arrangement of the atom and it's particles. In reality, a nucleus, in relation to the area of its electron cloud, can be compared to a bee in a football field. Well, that was quite a history lesson! But I thought we were studying science today? Hang out with some of my friends and answer their questions while I prepare a science lesson for you! See you in few!

S CENE T HREE

VICTOR VELOCITY That Professor Science, he's a smart guy! I bet he could handle the curves of this race track really well. Let's see if you can handle this curve coming up!

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Musical intro: When did humans first theorize about the atom? a. During the last 200 years b. About 400 years ago c. About 5 minutes ago d. Over 2000 years ago Well, novice drivers, how did you do? It seems like you handled that like old pros. Write down your answers now for later! QUIZ CLOWN Hey! I'll take a break from plate twirling to ask you this one! (clown attempts to twirl a plate on a stick, it crashes to the floor) 1. When did humans first theorize about the atom? a. During the last 200 years b. About 400 years ago c. About 5 minutes ago d. Over 2000 years ago Well, novice drivers, how did you do? It seems like you handled that like old pros. Write down your answers now for later! Musical intro: 2. True or False: An atom can be divided into a smaller piece that still retains all of its original characteristics. All right, no confusion for you! Write down your answer for later, and let's try on the next one! DJ RICKY WAVE Welcome all you science lovers to Dj Ricky Wave's science show. I'm bringing you all the top science sounds you want to hear. Dj Ricky never let's a listener down! Check out this sound! Musical intro: 3. True or False: The air is made of atoms.

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Script

All right, that was smooth! Now you've heard the latest! Write down your answer and stay tuned for the next hit question! STAR STRUCK Wow! We are moving through the stars quickly now, it must be almost show time! Some big names have been through like Kelly Kluster and Karl Kinetic. We better get inside, I think the show is about to start! Musical intro: 4. Who proposed the first modern atomic theory? a. Ernest Rutherford b. J.J. Thomson c. John Dalton d. Abraham Lincoln That question was amazing! Stay tuned and we will bring you some more great questions! FIZZLE the GENIE (POOF! Fizzle appears in a cloud of smoke.) Whew! (checks to see if her body is complete) A couple thousand years of materializing here and there puts quite a toll on your molecular structure. Back to atomic history, here's the next one! Musical intro: 5. Which of the following was not included in Dalton's atomic model? a. Electrons travel in energy levels b. All elements are composed of atoms that are indivisible c. Atoms of different elements have different structures. d. Atoms of the same element have the same structure. Well, how did you do? I bet you didn't need to use any wishes to get this right! Now, don't forget to write your answer down! Bye! WENDY RIVER Howdy there, pardners! I here you've been learning all about ATOMS, like I've been learning about my roping skills. Let's just see, shall we?

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Musical intro: 6. J.J. Thomson proposed an early atomic model in which the placement of charged particles is random. We sometimes refer to this model as . . . a. The Ford Model b. The Plum Pudding Model c. The Modern Atomic Model d. Rutherford's Model All right, pardners, round up your answer there! Settle into your saddle now, there are more questions on their way! COACH "NUKE" ROCKNEY Okay team, stay focused and keep your eye on the question! Don't let it try to fool you! Here we go! Musical intro: 7. Which scientist is credited with discovering the nucleus of the atom through his gold foil experiment? a. John Dalton b. J.J. Thomson c. Albert Einstein d. Ernest Rutherford Way to go team! Log your answer now and let's get prepared for our next challenge! ASTRONAUT SANDY SPACE Hey there, I don't get many visitors way out here. Tell you what, I'll give you a special tour if you take a look at this, uh, thing I found outside earlier. Musical intro: 8. Who was the Danish scientist that proposed electrons orbit around the nucleus, like planets around the sun? a. Democritus b. Niels Bohr c. Albert Einstein d. Ernest Rutherford

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Script

Whew! That specimen wasn't as bad as I thought. You guys were pretty brave. Now write down your answer and whatever you do, don't touch anything wood! QUIZITOR Hello, I have been programmed to test your knowledge. My creators thought you might appreciate this coming from a computer. Musical intro: 9.What is the current atomic model called? a. The Wave Model b. The Plum Pudding model c. The Atomic Model d. The Bohr Model Are you done? Did you write your answer down? Good, now I can go get oiled. That is all. SALTY GALES Ahoy science sailors! Last question for this round, then we'll sail on over to Professor Science. Musical intro: 10. Which association most accurately describes the size of the nucleus in relation to its electron orbit? a. A penny inside a gallon jar b. A drop of water in the Grand Canyon c. A bee inside a football stadium d. A slice of pickle inside a hamburger bun Whew! Write down your answer to help stabilize this boat! I'd hate to tip over! Professor Science to our stern!!

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S CENE F OUR

PROFESSOR SCIENCE Wow! You were awesome! There were so many scientists that contributed to our current atomic model, and you knew all of them! Now let's take a closer look at that atom. If an atom is the smallest piece of any element, what do you suppose an atom is made of? As you can see here, atoms are made up of three main subatomic particles: protons, neutrons and electrons. The protons and neutrons are packed together in the center of the atom called the nucleus. And the electrons orbit the nucleus forming an electron cloud. Subatomic particles are so tiny, we measure them by atomic mass units, or AMUs.Each proton and each neutron have an atomic mass equal to 1 unit. But the atomic mass of each electron is extremely small: 1/1836 of an atomic unit! Although electrons have relatively no mass compared to protons and neutrons, electrons do have a negative charge equal to 1. And protons have a positive charge equal to 1. Neutrons are, you guessed it, neutral. So, atoms with equal numbers of protons and electrons are electrically neutral, because their charges cancel each other out. These charges and weights help to define the properties of the elements. Let's talk about elements for a minute. Elements are the simplest forms of matter. And, as we already know, an atom is the smallest possible quantity of an element. Have you ever studied the Periodic Table of Elements? (v.o.)The Periodic Table lists the elements in order by their atomic number. The atomic number represents the number of protons in every atom of an element. Let me show you some atomic numbers. Nitrogen's atomic number is 7, therefore each Nitrogen atom has 7 protons in its nucleus. Boron's atomic number is 5, it has 5 protons. Look up the element Sulfur. What is it's atomic number and how many protons does it have? (short pause) You got it! Sulfur's atomic number is 16, which means each atom of Sulfur has 16 protons.

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Script

Unlike protons, the number of neutrons within an atom of any element can vary somewhat; these variations are called Isotopes. Isotopes occur in nature at different rates; some are common and some are rare. Hydrogen is an element that has naturally occurring isotopes. From the periodic table, we can tell that hydrogen has one proton. But, in nature, there are three forms of Hydrogen. Each has a different number of neutrons. The first isotope of Hydrogen is called Protium; it does not have any neutrons. The second isotope, Deuterium, has only one neutron. The third isotope has two neutrons, and is called Tritium. As we discussed before, each proton and neutron have an atomic mass unit of one. Because isotopes have varied numbers of neutrons, isotopes of the same element weigh differently. On the Periodic Table, there is an Atomic Mass number for each element. You may be wondering, if each element has isotopes that weigh different amounts, then how is an element's Atomic Mass determined. That's a very good question. The Atomic Mass of an element is figured as the weighted average of all its isotopes as they occur in nature. That's why the Atomic Mass number has decimal points. From the Periodic Table, we can determine the most common isotope of any element and how many neutrons this isotope has. Carbon, for example, has an atomic mass of 12.0111. Rounded to the nearest whole number, we get 12. Carbon-12 is the most common isotope of carbon. We also know from the Atomic Number that every carbon atom has 6 protons. We can determine, by subtracting the total number of protons, 6, from the atomic mass number, 12, that Carbon-12 has six neutrons. The number of protons and neutrons added together is called the mass number. It's basically counting the number of subatomic particles in the nucleus. Let's try one together. Let's look at Aluminum. The atomic number is 13. Now, its atomic mass is 26.98. Round the atomic mass to the next whole number, which is 27. So, Aluminum27 is the most common isotope of aluminum. To figure out how many neutrons this isotope of aluminum has, subtract 13 from 27 to get 14. Aluminum-27 has 14 neutrons.

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S CENE F IVE

PROFESSOR SCIENCE Great job on protons and neutrons, now let's work on electrons. An electrically neutral atom has equal numbers of protons and electrons. Their positive and negative charges cancel each other out. Remember those electron levels that Neils Bohr proposed? Well, the electrons orbit the nucleus at different levels depending upon how much energy they have. And each level can hold a certain number of electrons: the first level has two, and the second and third hold eight each. When the outer electron level is not full, it bonds with other atoms to help fill it. The tendency for an atom to attract or share electrons in this outer shell is called valence. That's why we say an atom's electron arrangement determines the element's chemical properties, or the way they tend to bond with other elements. Let's look at two kinds of bonding. Atoms that have gained or lost electrons are called ions. Atoms gaining electrons are negative ions; atoms losing electrons are positive ions. Take common table salt for example. Salt is a compound made of two elements: sodium and chlorine. When sodium gives up one electron, it becomes a positive ion. Chlorine, on the other hand, takes the electron, becoming a negative ion. Sodium and chlorine become oppositely charged ions that bond together to form sodium chloride, better known as table salt. This is known as ionic bonding, because an electron is actually transferred from one atom to another. Compounds are more commonly formed through covalent bonding, or the sharing of electrons. Water is a good example. Two atoms of hydrogen share electrons with one atom of oxygen, stabilizing each atom's outer electron shell. The chemical properties of elements determine how they combine to form compounds. And compounds are just a more "compound" form of matter. So, do you see just how much Atoms matter? AMAZING, isn't it? Alright. Now that we have "recharged" your knowledge of atoms, it's time for the quiz. Are you ready!?!?

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S CENE S IX

WENDY RIVER Howdy, pardners! You caught me just as I'm heading off to the rodeo. I have a quick question for you first! Musical intro: 11. Which of the following is NOT a subatomic particle? a. Electrons b. Neutrons c. Protons d. Ions Wow! That looked like a wild ride! But I bet you hung on tight! Now, just scribble down your guess and we can move onto a harder challenge! CARBON CLOWN Hi! I practiced my plate twirling (spinning plates on stick, but much better this time) while you were learning about atoms ­ let's see what you know! Musical intro: 12. Where in the atom might one find an electron? a. In the nucleus b. In the electron section at the supermarket c. In the electron cloud d. Inside a neutron Well, looks like you've got the balance figured out! Write down how you did that for me! Thanks! SALTY GALES Get this next question right or you may find yourself walking the plank!

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Musical Intro: 13. Which two particles have the same atomic mass? a. Protons and electrons b. Protons and neutrons c. Electrons and neutrons d. Neutrons and positrons All right sailors! You saved yourselves this time, good job! Write your answer down, we are sailing on to brighter shores! VICTOR VELOCITY We're zooming right through this lesson and you're doing great! Show off your atomic knowledge by answering this one! Musical Intro: 14. An atom's atomic number represents the number of ______________ in the atom's nucleus. a. Protons b. Neutrons c. Electrons d. Ions Hey! You handled that just like us professional racers! Keep up the good work and don't forget to write your answer down! DJ RICKY WAVE DJ Ricky Wave coming to you straight down the science line! Do I have some great hits to play for you! Check this new one out! Musical Intro: 15. The number of which subatomic particle can vary within an atom? a. Isotopes b. Neutrons c. Ions d. Protons

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All righty, science fanatics! Write down your answer and I'll catch you on the flip side. FIZZLE the GENIE Well students, after you answer my question, it's back to my magic bottle for some rest and deionization. Study hard! Musical Intro: 16. Protium, Deuterium, and Tritium are three _______ of Hydrogen a. Ions b. Bonds c. Neutrons d. Isotopes You are so smart! Don't forget to write down your answers. Well, I'm going back in my bottle to rest now! Call me when you need me! COACH "Nuke" ROCKNEY Ok, it's back to the drawing board for this one! Do your best, and score one for the team! Musical Intro: 17. If the atomic mass of the element Calcium (Ca) is 40.08, and its atomic number is 20, which is the most common isotope of calcium? a. Calcium-40 b. Calcium-20 c. Calcium-60 d. Calcium-20.08 I have never had a team who works so well! You are amazing! Write down your answers and it'll be time for a cool down! STAR STRUCK Oh my! I cannot believe how amazing this show is! The atomic numbers are just

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fascinating! Someone is going to win an award for sure! Focus hard and it could be you! Musical Intro: 18. What is the name of an atom that loses or gains electrons? a. Ion b. Charger c. Metal d. Atomizer That was a wonderful presentation. Be sure to cast your vote for the best answer, and I'll see you at the next big science gala! QUIZITOR Hello, Quizitor is back! It is time to test your hard drives again. Musical intro: 19. If a neutral atom gains two electrons, its charge will be _______. a. 0 b. Positive 2 c. Negative -2 d. Neutral Write down your answers. Goodbye. ASTRONAUT SANDY SPACE Before I go on my space walk, let's see how you handle the depth of this question. Musical intro: 20. True or False: An atom's electron arrangement determines the element's chemical properties, or the way the element tends to bond with other elements.

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Wow, you are as smart as physicists! Way to go! And I'll see you on my next orbit!

S CENE S EVEN

PROFESSOR SCIENCE Well, how'd you do? Thanks for learning with us today. Stay tuned for a list of answers to our questions. So long and I'll see you soon!!! Answers 1. d, Humans began to theorize about atoms over 2000 years ago. 2. False, atoms cannot ever be divided into smaller pieces that still maintain original characteristics. 3. True, the air consists of gases, which are made of atoms. 4. c, Dalton proposed the first modern atomic theory. 5. a, Dalton's atomic model did not include the travel of electrons in energy levels. 6. b, Thomson's model was called the Plum Pudding Model. 7. d, Ernest Rutherford discovered the nucleus. 8. b, Neils Bohr proposed the notion that electrons circle the nucleus. 9. The current atomic model is called the Wave Model. 10. c, Electrons are extremely small when compared to the entire atom, like a bee in a football stadium. 11. d, An ion is not a subatomic particle. 12. c, Electrons are found within the electron cloud. 13. b, Protons and neutrons have the same mass of 1 atomic mass unit. 14. a, An atom's atomic number represents the number of protons. 15. b, A varying number of neutrons creates isotopes. 16. d, Hydrogen has three isotopes. 17. a, Calcium-40 is the most common isotope. 18. a, An atoms that loses or gains an electron is an ion. 19. c, When a neutral atom gains two electrons, it's charge will be 2-. 20. True, an atom's arrangement does determine its chemical properties.

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Atoms: Video Quiz

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