Read Organizational Behavior text version

Organizational Management I Organizational Behavior

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar Experiment

Course Objectives This course is designed to provide students with fundamental knowledge about how individuals behave at the workplace. Students will better understand their own behavior and that of others. Thus they should be able to better perform and more effectively interact with others at work. Class Topics . Introduction to Organizational Behavior Introduce basic concepts of organizations and behavior and discuss the challenges involved when analyzing organizational behavior. Topics of the day *Perspectives on organizations *Perspectives on behavior *Analyzing organizational behavior 2. Individual Behavior Overview on theories of motivation, and related topics such as work attitudes, learning, job satisfaction. Empirical findings will also be presented and discussed. The second half of the session will be devoted to reflection on experiences made by students in their job. Topics of the day *Motivation theories *Work attitudes and learning * Job satisfaction * Reflection on own work experiences 3. Interpersonal Behavior Overview on theories and empirical findings with regard to social interaction and communication. Elaborating on the politics of working relations. What do we know about the success factors of teams? The second part of the session will be reserved for role plays with actors and observers followed by discussions. Topics of the day *Social interaction as communication

*Power & Influence in working relationship *What makes teams succeed? *Role play *Discussion of role play 4. Leadership Overview on the theories and empirical findings with regard to leadership styles and leadership functions and roles. Are there differences in leadership styles between men and women and across cultures? The second part will be devoted to role play with actors and observers followed by discussions. Topics of the day *What is leadership? *What makes a good leader? *Gender and cultural factors *Role play *Discussion of role play

5. How organization matters Discuss how an organization's structure affects behavior, how each organization has its own culture that acts to shape the behavior of its members, and the organizational development. The second part of the session will be used to sum up the course and to give guidance for reports. *Organizational Structure *Organizational Culture *Learning Organization

Work requirements 1) Students will be required to actively participate in class discussion. 2) Each student will write a short summary (2 to 3 pages) on ONE session. The sessions will be allocated at the beginning of the course. 3) Students are required to write a short report (5 to 7 pages) relating a workplace experience to one of the topics of the course. Guidance with regard to the choice of topic and the structure of the report will be provided during class. Text book, cases, reading materials Original handouts and reading materials will be provided at classroom. Robbins, S. P. & Judge, T. A. (2010) "Essentials of Organizational Behavior" (13th edition) is highly recommended as reference book. Prerequisite / Recommendation None Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Website.

Participation: 30pts. Session summary: 30pts Final Report: 40pts. (Total 100pts.)

Grading Policy

Human Resource Management I: Human Resource Management

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course is designed to provide students fundamental knowledge and strategic views of human resources management. After taking this course, students will learn basic theory, concept and function of human resources management and how to develop human resources management system such as grading, compensation structure and performance management system. Class Topics 1 Overview of Human Resources Management 1.1 HRM Philosophy and Responsibilities 1.2 HRM Functions 1.3 Labor Union and Labor Relationship management 1.4 History and Trend of HRM 2 Compensation Management 2.1 Grading and Cash Compensation 2.2 Fringe Benefits 2.3 Long-term Incentives and Pension & Retirement benefits 2.4 Market Price Mechanism 2.5 Total Compensation and Motivation Management 3 Performance Management ­ Evaluation and Assessment 3.1 Performance Evaluation 3.2 Management By Objectives 3.3 Personnel Assessment 3.4 Performance Management 4 People Management 4.1 Motivation and People Management 4.2 Motivation Management 4.3 Communication Management

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Human Resources Development and Career Development 5.1 Human Resources Development 5.2 Coaching and Communication 5.3 Developing Managers and Leaders 5.4 Career Development Plan 5.5 Global Leadership Development

Text book, cases, reading materials Original handouts and class materials will be provided in class and through Moodle. No text books are required for the course, but following books are recommended to read, in order to back up understanding of Human Resource Management. 1. L.A. Berger and D.R. Berger, "The Talent Management Handbook", McGraw Hill 2. L.M. Spencer, Jr. and S.M. Spencer, "Competence at Work", John Wiley & Sons 3. Dave Ulrich, "Human Resources Champions", Harvard Business School Press 4. Michael Armstrong, "A Handbook of Human Resources Management Practice", Cambridge University Press Prerequisite / Recommendation Nothing specific Class attendance and withdrawal policy Withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB official web site. Instructor will also make every attempt to inform enrolled students by e-mail of any changes in schedule. Submission of Course Papers Submit by e-mail to Grading Attendance: 30% Contribution and presentation at class activities: 30% Term paper: 40%

Marketing 1 Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course

Problem Finding Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management

Teaching methods

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Decision Making

Implication

Course Objectives "Because the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two ­ and only two ­ basic functions: marketing and innovation. Everything else is an expense." (Peter Drucker) In today's global knowledge society, the complexity of the business environment is exponentially increasing. In order to survive in such a dynamic market, companies and organizations must continuously capture the changing needs of the market and innovate to create new value. Marketing is the organizational function that integrates all organizational activities to create, deliver and communicate value-to-customer. It also is the responsibility of persons at all levels and in all divisions in an organization. The aim of this course is for students to gain knowledge and understanding of the marketing process through a mixture of lecture and critical discussions of theory and practical cases. To enliven the discussion, students are expected to have read the assigned readings before class. Student responsibilities are one individual assignment and one group project. The individual assignment is an action-oriented solution of one of the three major cases discussed in class (max. 6 pages text plus 2 pages appendices, 12pt, 1.5 spacing with space between paragraphs, due at the beginning of the last class). The group assignment involves the development of a marketing plan for a product or service of each group's choice.

Class Topics 1. Introduction to Marketing - What is marketing? What is the role of marketing? - The marketing strategy development process - Marketing opportunities and threats Reading: - Kotler/Lane, Marketing Management, Chaps. 1-4 Analyzing Customer Behavior - Consumer Markets - Business Markets Readings: - Kotler/Lane, Marketing Management, Chaps. 5-7 - Case: L'Oreal of Paris: Bringing "Class to Mass" with Plénitude Market Segmentation - Levels of market segmentation - Bases for market segmentation - Segment-specific price-product configurations Readings: - Kotler/Lane, Marketing Management, Chap. 8 - Case: Ontela PicDeck (A) and (B) Branding and Product Strategy - Branding and Brand Equity - Product Strategy (Product Mix, Product Life Cycle) Readings: - Kotler/Lane, Marketing Management, Chaps. 9-13 - Case: Cola Wars Continue: Coke and Pepsi in 2006 Group Project Presentations

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Reading materials Students are required to purchase the following textbook prior to the first class meeting. Philip Kotler, Kevin Keller, Marketing Management 13th edition, Prentice Hall, 2008 Cases: - L'Oreal of Paris: Bringing "Class to Mass" with Plénitude (HBS 9-598-056) - Ontela PicDeck (A) and (B): Customer Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning (KEL450-PDF-ENG and KEL451-PDF-ENG) - Cola Wars Continue: Coke and Pepsi in 2006 (HBS 9-706-447) The above cases can be purchased at http://hbsp.harvard.edu/ .

Prerequisite / Recommendation None Class Attendance and Withdrawal Policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up Classes Notices will be posted on the courses Moodle page, and e-mails will be sent through the Moodle system. Also check the bulletin board in the 1F floor of Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Hard copies of the assignments should be submitted directly to the instructor in class. Late submissions will not be graded. Grading Classroom participation: Individual assignment: Group Project: 30% 40% 30%

Business Strategy I Business Strategy Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course

Problem Finding Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management

Decision Making

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives In an ever-changing environment of hyper-competition, organizations must have a clear sense of direction of where they want to go and the flexibility for innovation to achieve competitive advantage. Business strategy is the scenario or playbook for transforming an organization from its present state to a future desired state. This course is designed to provide students with a framework for environmental analysis, and development and implementation of business strategy. Precisely, students will understand 1) how to analyze an industry's and market's attractiveness, 2) how to analyze and nurture corporate resources and 3) the development process and intricacies of business and corporate strategies. Classes will be a mixture of lecture and critical discussion of theory and practical cases. To enliven the discussions, students are expected to have read the text and analyzed the cases before class. Class Topics 1. Introduction to Business Strategy and Strategic Analysis - What is Strategy? - The Business Strategy Development Process - Firm Performance and Competitive Advantage Readings: - Strategic Management and Competitive Advantage, Chapters 1&2 2. Analyzing and Evaluating the Environment - Positioning Approach

Opportunities and Threats - Five Forces - Resource-based View Approach Readings: - Strategic Management and Competitive Advantage, Chapters 3 - Case: Matching Dell (A), (B) 3. Business Strategy: Strategic Choices - Business Strategies Cost Leadership Strategy Product Differentiation Strategy Niche Strategy Readings: - Strategic Management and Competitive Advantage, Chapters 4-5 - Case: Google Inc. - Article: How Company's Become Platform Leaders 4. Business Strategy: Strategic Choices - Corporate Level Strategies Readings - Strategic Management and Competitive Advantage,, Chapters 6, 7, 9 - Case: Strategic Planning at United Parcel Service 5. Group Project Presentations

Text book, cases, reading materials Students are required to purchase the following textbook, cases and article prior to the first class meeting. Textbooks 1. Barney, J., Hesterly, W., Strategic Management and Competitive Advantage, 3/E, Pearson Education Cases, Articles (These can be purchased online at http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu.) 1. HBS Case: David A. Garvin, Lynne C. Levesque, Strategic Planning at United Parcel Service, Product Number, 306002-PDF-ENG , 2005 2. HBS Article: Gawer, A., Cusumano, M., How Companies Become Platform Leaders, Product Number SMR268, 2008

3. HBS Case: Herman, K., Eisenmann, T., Goggle, Inc., Product Number, 806105, 2006 4. HBS Case: Rivkin, J., Porter, M., Matching Dell. Product Number 799158, 1999; Rivkin, J., Giorgi, S., Matching Dell (B) Product Number 9-704-476, 2004 Prerequisite / Recommendation None Class Attendance and Withdrawal Policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up Classes Notices will be sent out via the Moodle site for the course. Also check the bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building. Submission of Course Papers Submit a hard copy of your assignments to the Report Box in front of the Academic Service Office. Also upload a soft copy (MS-Word or PDF file) on the Moodle site for this course. Grading Classroom participation: 30% Individual assignments: 40% Group Project: 30%

Finance I: Corporate Finance

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Course Objectives This course focuses on basic concepts in corporate finance, which are needed for financial managers to understand the theory of finance and financial market. It shows students how to evaluate whole companies and projects, how to determine the optimal capital structure, and how to evaluate an appropriate dividend policy. It introduces time value of money, discounted cash flow, a weighted average cost of capital, and capital budgeting process. Additionally it covers the Modigliani-Miller theory and Porter's competitive strategy. Class Topics and Learning Outcomes 1. Time value of money (Chapter 2 & 3) Determine the concept of present value and future value. Compute the present value of the bond and ordinary annuity. Spot rate and forward rate (Chapter 23) Describe the yield curve. Describe the methodology for computing the theoretical Treasury spot rate curve, and compute the value of a bond using spot rates. Explain a forward rate, and compute spot rates from forward rates, and the value of a bond using forward rates. Capital budgeting (Discount cash flow, Net present value, IRR, WACC) (Chapter 5, 6 and 9) Explain the process and the principles of capital budgeting including the choice of proper cash flows and determining the proper discount rate. Calculate and interpret the methods to evaluate a single capital project: net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), payback period,

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

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discounted payback period, average accounting rate of return, and profitability index. Explain the NPV profile, contrast the NPV and IRR methods when evaluating independent and mutually exclusive projects. Calculate and interpret the weighted average cost of capital (WACC). Capital budgeting (Application of DCF) (Chapter 6) Compute the NPV after tax basis, given information about the cash flow, tax purpose depreciation, working capital and initial investment amount. Describe the incremental cash flow, cannibalization, sunk cost and opportunity costs, Leverage (Operating leverage and financial leverage)(Chapter 10) Define and explain leverage, business risk and financial risk. Calculate and interpret the degree of operating leverage and the degree of financial leverage. Calculate the breakeven quantity of sales. Modigliani=Miller theory (Capital optimization theory)(Chapter 17 & 18) Explain the Modigliani and Miller (MM) proposition concerning capital structure irrelevance and the describe the relation between the cost of equity and financial leverage. Discuss the effect of taxes on the MM propositions Explain the costs of financial distress and the relation to a company's optimal capital structure. Dividend policy(Chapter 16) Summarize the factors affecting dividend payout policy. Differentiate among the thoughts on dividends (dividend irrelevance, dividend preference, and tax aversion). Compare the impact on shareholder wealth of a share repurchase and a cash dividend. Merger's and Acquisitions (Chapter 32 & 33) Discuss the motives for mergers Compare the estimated net present value(NPV) and cost for a merger using cash Describe the defensive measure that takeover targets can employ Describe the LBOs and discuss the motives Portfolio theory (Markowitz portfolio theory, efficient frontier)(Chapter 7) Calculate the expected return and the standard deviation of return of two assets. Discuss diversification benefits and explain how the correlation in a two-asset portfolio affects the diversification benefits. Portfolio theory (Capital asset pricing model, beta)(Chapter 8) Explain the capital asset pricing model (CAPM). Explain the security market line (SML), the beta coefficient, and the market risk premium.

Text book, cases, reading materials Brealey, R.A., Myers, S.C. and Allen, F. "Principles of Corporate Finance 8th ed.", McGraw-Hill, 2006 (Other edition acceptable) Class attendance and withdrawal policy Late coming more than 20 minutes is not counted to attendance. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informed by mailing list in advance. Submission of Course Papers Submit be E-mail to Grading Group work and homework 60%, Attendance and participation in the class 40%

Accounting I Basic Accounting Theory

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management

Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course deals with basic accounting theory in accordance with Accounting Business Standards in Japan. Some of these topics are (1) structures of financial statements that are Balance Sheet, Income Statement and Cash-Flow Statement; (2) measurement of corporate risks associated with financial instruments and fixed assets; (3) two methods of profit measurements a. net income or b. comprehensive income. It also deals with harmonization of the worldwide diversity in financial reporting. We discuss problems such variations create for financial reporting, control, and decision-making within multinational business enterprises. TERM PAPER AND CLASS PARTICIPATION Term paper topic will be assigned at the last class. You may include appendixes for your answers to the paper, but your main report (excluding the appendixes) should not be more than 1000 words. Class participation is vital to the success of this course. Just attending/sitting the class is not meaning of participation. I welcome your positive participation/comments at the class. The quality of your comments is more important than the quantity.

Class Topics Week 1 Chapter/Assignment 1. Accounting Business Standards in Japan

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Overview of standards setters Accounting Principles (Japan Standards and IFRS) Related Laws

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Interested parties and Auditing Accounting Cycle: Closing date and Share Holders meeting

4. Why and how to consolidate Financial Statement?

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Internet: access EDINET website (//http://info.edinet-fsa.go.jp/) to have Japanese Financial Reports, access TSE

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Overview of the structure of B/S Classification principles of Assets and liabilities

3. How to measure the assets? The Criteria of assets. · · Is Brand intangible asset? Goodwill

4. Detailed survey of Liabilities 5. Detailed survey of the Owners' equity 3 1. Overview of the structure of P/L 2. Measurement of the results; cost (FIFO/LIFO ?) 3. Marginal Cost

4. Measurement of the results; depreciation 5. Accounting discretion by managers; · Incentives? · Extraordinary Income and Extraordinary Expenses · R&D cost [[Bushee 1998]Bartov 1993] 5. Inefficiency of Cash-Flow statement to Japanese companies

Internet: Check the status of issuing Promissory note in Japan

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Revaluation of Assets; HCA or CCA Currency fluctuation Investment; financial instrument, lands, subsidiaries Disclosure issues?

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Which i more reliable for information users? s

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Net Income vs. Comprehensive Income

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1. Harmonization of Financial Reporting

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Current Issues in Japan, harmonization project between IASB and ASBJ Discussion of issues of business combination accounting; treatment of goodwill,

U.S., IFRS and Japan 2. Analysis of Foreign Financial Statements

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Discussion of problems associated with analyzing foreign financial statements; under the different accounting standards.

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Japanese firms preparing FASB standards

Text book, cases, reading materials Hands-outs and lecture materials are provided (all students allow to download the materials from the website before each session). Strongly recommended to read following books; Kako, Yoshihito, Zaimu Kaikei Gairon, Chuo Keizaish( ). Class attendance and withdrawal policy Late coming more than 20 minutes is not counted to attendance. Withdrawal notice should be informed before the third class.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informing by Mailing list in advance.

Submission of Essay Submit by e-mail Grading Class Participation (getting PINK coupon) Attendance Term paper Total 40 30 30 100 percent percent percent percent

Global Management I International Relations and Economics

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Experiment/ Practice

Course Objectives Today's manager must not only master the traditional parameters of management -- marketing, finance, production, and organizational leadership -- but also needs to understand the political and economic frameworks within which businesses operate. The intent of this class is to ensure that students have the necessary tools to perceive the impact that macroeconomic issues and international relations have on business decisions. Accordingly, the class will begin by instruction on the common language of balance of payments accounting, international relations theory and the ideologies of political economy. Once the common language is in place, the class will use the language to discuss readings, current events, and specific business problems. Class Topics Class Session 1: The Context: State, Market, and Balance of Payments Accounting. Understanding the accounting of economic relations between states; the parameters of state and market. Reading: Alexander Murphy "The Sovereign State System as Political-Territorial Ideal: Historical and Contemporary Considerations" in Thomas J. Biersteker and Cynthia Weber, ed., State Sovereignty as a Social Construct (Cambridge, 1996). Hernando deSoto, The Mystery of Capital (New York: Basic Book, 2000) chapter 1-3. Instructor's Note 1: "The Accounting and Finance of International Trade and the Balance of Payments." Class Session 2: Ideologies and International Trade. Understanding the ideologies that govern political and economic actors; comparative advantage and international trade theory. Reading: Robert Gilpin The Political Economy of International Relations (Princeton, 1987), chapter 2; Instructor's Note 2: "The Price-Specie Flow Model and the Theory of Comparative Advantage." Class Session 3: Economic Nationalism and the Developmental State; Monetary Policies and International Capital Flows. The emergence of the Japanese economic model and its variants in China and other Asian nations; the linkages between domestic monetary policies and international capital flows. Reading: Chalmers Johnson, Miti and The Japanese Miracle, (Stanford, 1982) chapters 1, 9; Instructor's Note 3: "Currency Frameworks, Monetary Policy, and International Capital Flows."

Class Session 4: The Clash of Ideologies and the Global Economic Order. The role of ideologies in supporting/fraying global financial and trading architecture, links between financial crises and political tensions; stability of the global financial order. Readings: Charles P. Kindleberger The World in Depression, 1929-1939, (University of California, 1986) chapter 14; R. Taggart Murphy "The Wreck of the Models: Conceptualizing Development in the Wake of the Asian Financial Crisis." (U.N. University, occasional paper). Class Session 5: Regionalism and the Developing World; Financial Crises Local and Global; Final Thoughts. The implications of regional economic groupings for businesses and the challenge of development. Reading: de Soto chapter 7; "Instructor's Note 4: Capital and Currency Crises." . Text book, cases, reading materials Primary text: Hernando de Soto The Mystery of Capital, (Basic Books, 2000) (available in paperback) Other assigned reading will be distributed by the instructor. Prerequisite / Recommendation This is a core course without prerequisites. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Instructor will also make every attempt to inform each enrolled student by e-mail of any change in schedule. Submission of Course Papers This class will have a final take-home exam distributed at the final class session. Paper should be submitted to the instructor's mail box Grading Class Attendance: 20% Class discussion: 20% Exam result: 60%

Operations Management Operations Management

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course covers five topics on operations management, which are PERT/CPM, Linear Programming, Modeling Multi-criteria Problems, Decision-Making Model and Inventory Models. Fundamental concepts, principles of each topic and their applications in business will be introduced by different instructors in the corresponding fields. Class Topics 1. Managing Projects with PERT/CPM Models When we would like to carry a project successfully, we have to divided project work into some tasks and making reasonable schedule. In this class we will learn the scheduling technique of PERT/CPM. 2. Introduction to Linear Programming This class introduces the fundamental concepts on mathematical programming and linear programming including model formulation, graphical solution, computer solution, etc. 3. Modeling Multicriteria Problem In this class, we will introduce two techniques that when they have multiple objectives: the analytical models. The analytical hierarchy process and scoring of decision alternatives for different criteria that preferences. can be used to solve problems hierarchy process and scoring models are based a comparison reflects the decision maker's

4. Introduction to Uncertainty Management This class illustrates a systematic scenario of reasonable decision under uncertain situations based on non-statistical and statistical decision theory, including Max-Min

strategy and Maximum expected utility etc. 5. Inventory Models In this class, we describe the classic economic order quantity models, which represent the most basic and fundamental form of inventory analysis. These models provide a means for determining how much to order (the order quantity) and when to place an order so that inventory related costs are minimized. Text book, cases, reading materials Prerequisite / Recommendation 1. n/a 2. n/a 3. n/a 4. n/a 5. Basic knowledge of mathematics and data analysis Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check the MBA-IB official website and Moodle. Submission of Course Papers 1. After the classroom, a short report shall be submitted. More details are introduced at the class room. 2. After the classroom, a short report shall be submitted. More details are introduced at the class room. 3. After the classroom, a short report shall be submitted. More details are introduced at the class room. 4. After the classroom, a short report shall be submitted. More details are introduced at the class room. 5. Exercises distributed in the classroom shall be submitted just after the class Grading 50% Class attendance 50% Report/ Examination at each class

Business Mathematics

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives The objective of business mathematics is to introduce or review some mathematical concepts and methods for students in business, which includes topics such as functions and graphs, matrix algebra, probability and statistics, and differentiation. The topics will be taught by three instructors respectively. Class Topics 1. Functions and Graphs Basic concepts and methods of functions and graphs such as linear function and quadratic function will be introduced. 2. Probability and Statistics Basic concepts and methods such as random variables, distribution, mean, variance and Bayes' formula will be introduced to evaluate probabilities and risks of uncertain events with several examples. 3. Differentiation Basic concepts and methods of calculus such as limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation, maxima and minima and their applications in business will be introduced. 4. Matrix Algebra Basic concepts and methods of matrix algebra such as matrix, vector and the operations (addition, scalar multiplication, and multiplication) will be introduced.

Text book, cases, reading materials The handouts will be provided in the classes. Besides the handouts, we recommend you the following book as a reference book. Ernest F. Haeussler, Richard S. Paul, Richard J. Wood : Introductory Mathematical Analysis for Business, Economics and the Life and Social Sciences, Pearson Education. Prerequisite / Recommendation Whether you need to take the course will be determined depending on the results of your placement test in Freshman Camp.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official website. Submission of Course Papers n/a Grading Class attendance Quizzes and exercises

Data Analysis I Introduction to Data Analysis

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Language (English/Japanese) E Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar experiment

Course Objectives Basic statistical principle and methods are learned through the experiences to analyze a financial data by R. Class Topics Lecture 1. Descriptive statistical methods - Grammar of Science - Graphical description of data - Numerical description of data Exercise 1. Group work on descriptive data analysis by R Students should bring their own mobile PC Lecture 2. Statistical modeling for prediction - Function and elements of a statistical model - Quantitative prediction - Qualitative prediction Exercise 2.. Group work on prediction. Students should bring their own mobile PC

Lecture 3. Group Presentation

Text book, cases, reading materials All the materials are distributed in the meetings. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board managed by Academic Service Office or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Submit via e-mail using MS-Word. Grading Classroom participation: Group report: Individual term paper:

20% 20% 60%

Introduction to Economics

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course covers basic Economics concepts. We will discuss contemporary short-run models of macroeconomics, integrating the real economy, the monetary system and the foreign sector. We will review the simple Keynesian model of real economy, develop and apply the IS-LM model to policy questions, and explore these models in the context of international currency system. We also cover Microeconomics basic concepts. Class Topics and Learning Outcomes 1. Cost Structure of the Firm and Perfect Competition 2. Monopoly Pricing Strategies 3. Keynesian System(Aggregate Demand Model) Explain the major components of the Keynesian model. Explain Keynesian macroequilibrium. Discuss the Keynesian view of the business cycle. Distinguish between classical economics and Keynesian economics. 4. Keynesian Aggregate demand Model(Practice Problem) 5. Money Supply and Money Demand Discuss the determinants of the demand for and supply of money. Explain the motives for holding money according to Keynes's theory of money demand (Transaction demand, Precautious demand and Speculative demand). Explain the Liquidity trap 6. Money Supply and Money Demand(Practice Problem)

7. IS-LM curve(The money market and the LM curve) Explain the relationship between interest rate and aggregate demand Explain why LM curve slopes upward to the right. Discuss the factors that shift LM schedule. IS-LM curve(The goods market and the IS curve) Explain the determinants of the IS schedule. Explain why IS curve slopes downward to the right. Discuss that shift the IS schedule. 8. Combination of IS-LM curves(Explaining fluctuations with the IS-LM Model) Explain how fiscal policy shifts the IS curve and changes the short-run equilibrium. Explain how monetary policy shifts the LM curve and changes the short-run equilibrium. Explain the interaction between monetary and fiscal policy Text book, cases, reading material Necessary handout and copy will be provided. Text (not necessarily required to purchase): Froyen, R. T., "Macroeconomics, Theories and Policies 8th ed.", Pearson/Prentice Hall Reference: Mankiw, N.G., "Macroeconomics 6th ed.", Worth Mankiw "Microeconomics" Nakatani, I., "Introduction to Macroeconomics 5th ed.", Hippon-Hyoron-Sha( 5 ) Class attendance and withdrawal policy Late coming more than 20 minutes is not counted to attendance. Withdrawal notice should be informed before the second class. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informed by mailing list or the moodle in advance. Submission of Course Papers Either submitting through E-mail to or turning in homework in the next class (to be instructed in the class) Grading Homework 60%, Attendance and participation in the class 40%

Cross-Cultural Management III Cross-Cultural Management and Distributed Teams (Joint course with Grenoble Ecole De Management in France) Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming

Lecture Exercise Practical training

This distance learning course uses video-conference classes, an e-learning platform, with students from both institutions grouped in remote teams. This module takes place over 10 classes and is worth 2 credits with a limited number of students selected from the University of Tsukuba MBA-IB program and GEM 2nd year ESC students. It is centered on cross cultural management with a specific focus on remote teams. Course Objectives This module is designed to provide first an introduction to cultural differences focusing on the Japanese and French cultures in a business context. The explosive growth in international business and trade has created a highly interrelated and interdependent world in which people from various nations and cultures must work together. Individuals, team members and managers working in such an environment must be knowledgeable about culture and cultural differences and how this impacts management behaviors & practices. This module covers some of the basic theoretical findings and practical applications of these findings in the first four sessions. It also presents a first understanding of culture and important differences between Japanese and French cultures. It should enable participants to apply this basic knowledge in a multicultural and multinational management environment. This year, this approach is developed further in the following sessions, where these aspects will be further analyzed in the context of global remote teams.

Session

Lecture & topics Pre-module assignment

Readings Textbook Chap. 1, pp. 3-18; Chap. 2, pp. 20-48

Session 0 Grenoble only Off-line Session 1 Off-line Session 2 Video-conference Session 3 Video-conference Session 4 Video-conference

Introduction to the program ­ Expectations Introduction to culture & cultural differences Introduction to culture & cultural differences Analysis of Japanese culture Analysis of Japanese & French cultures Global remote teams Textbook Chap. 1, pp. 3-18; Chap. 2, pp. 20-48 Textbook Chap. 4, pp. 81-114; Chap. 5, pp. 118-143 Management: A Skills Approach, P. Hunsaker: Chap. 14, pp. 350-377 Textbook Chap. 7, pp. 185-212 Textbook Chap. 8, pp. 216-244 "Managing Virtual Teams", INSEAD WARDELL C., "The Art of Managing Virtual Teams", Harvard Management Update TARVENPAA S., LEIDNER D., "Communication and Trust in Global Virtual Teams", Organization Science, 1999 HINDS P. BAILEY D., "Out of Sight, Out of Sync Understanding Conflict in Distributed Teams", Organization Science, 2003 HUGHES J., WEISS J., "Simple Rules for Making Alliances Work", Harvard Business Review, Nov 2007 DYER J., KALE P., SINGH H., "When to Ally and when to Acquire?", Harvard Business Review, Aug 2004 No reading No reading

Session 5 Video-conference Global remote teams (cont'd)

Session 6 Video-conference ATG (A): A Chinese Miracle. A Sino-Japanese-Euro Joint-Venture Session 7 Video-conference Session 8 Video-conference Session 9 Video-conference Global Alliances ATG (B): A Chinese Miracle. A Sino-Japanese-Euro Joint-Venture Presentations by each group Feedback & reflection on the module

Text book, cases, reading materials Original handouts and reading materials will be provided in the classroom. SCHNEIDER S.C., BARSOUX J.L., Managing Across Cultures, Prentice Hall, 2nd edition, 2003 ISBN 027364663X Prerequisite / Recommendation None Class attendance and withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check Moodle or bulletin board in front of the Academic Service Office on the 3rd floor of Bldg-G or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Submit a hard copy of your assignments to the Report Box in front of the Academic Service Office on the 3rd floor of Building G. Also submit an electronic copy (MS-Word or PDF file) on Moodle. For those taking the class from Tsukuba's main campus, you only need to submit your assignments on Moodle. Grading Individual work: 50% Class participation & animation of the forum: Post module - individual personal paper: Individual papers: sessions 2 & 3: Group work: 50% S3 ­ 2 page-paper: S4 ­ 3 page-paper: S6 ­ ATG (A) case: S7 ­ Global alliance analysis: S8 ­ ATG (B) case: 15% 20% 15% 5% 10% 15% 10% 10%

Human Resource Management IV: Human Resource Management at Mergers and Acquisitions

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming

Course Objectives This course is designed to provide knowledge, skills and strategic views of human resources management issues at mergers and acquisitions, including high-level study of HR due diligence, HR system and policy integration, organization and cultural integration, communication process, and restructuring and employee retention. Students will learn what HR has to do at M & A's. What students lean from the class is not much theoretical and much academic, but will acquire practical view and understand M&A HR requires speed, process management, sensitivity and strong project management Class Topics 1 Understanding Mergers and Acquisitions 1.1 Current MA market 1.2 What happens at M&A's 1.3 HR at merger and acquisitions 1.4 Experiencing HR at M&A (small case) 2 Understanding Mergers and Acquisitions 2 and Due Diligence 2.1 What is M&A, how it goes 2.1.1 Nature of M&A's; Financial Deals and Strategic Deals 2.1.2 Process and Schedules of M&A's 2.1.3 M&A's and HR; why HR is important at M&A's 2.2 What is due diligence - What is HR due diligence 2.2.1 HR Due Diligence (HRDD) 2.2.2 Contents and Issues of HRDD 2.2.3 HRDD for Valuation, Risk Management, Business Synergy Planning 2.3 Group case 1; preparing HRDD 3 Post Merger Integration 3.1 Preparing Post Merger Integration with the result from DD 3.2 Integration Planning 3.3 HR Post Merger Integration 3.3.1 Integration of Compensation and Benefits 3.3.2 Integration of Pension and Retirement Benefits 3.3.3 HR Policy and System Integration 3.4 Group case 2; presenting HRDD

4 5

Leadership at Merger and Acquisitions Guest speaker presentation by Mr. Makoto Ariga, HR Director of HP Japan Organization and Culture integration and Global M&A 5.1 Organization and Culture Integration 5.1.1 Integration of Organization and People 5.1.2 Culture Integration 5.2 Issues with Cross Border M&A's 5.3 Group case 3; presentation

A group case study will take a major role in this course, spending a lot of class time for presentation. Students are asked to commit to the group work. The fourth class is planned to have a guest speaker sharing Leadership experience, specially at organizational change. Text book, cases, reading materials Original handouts and class materials will be provided at classes. No text books are required for this course, and books recommended to read are to be announced at class. Prerequisite / Recommendation Nothing specific Class attendance and withdrawal policy Withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board in front of the Academic Service Office on the 3rd floor of bldg-G or the MBA-IB Office web site. Instructor will also make every attempt to inform enrolled students by e-mail of any changes in schedule. Submission of Course Papers Submit by e-mail to Grading Attendance: 30% Contribution and presentation at class activities: 40% Case study final report: 30%

Finance II Valuation

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course focuses on basic concepts in valuation, which are needed for financial managers to understand the and financial market. It covers the several methods of equity valuation and bond valuation which are frequently used in financial market and M&As. By the end of the course, students have all the tools necessary to value a company, a stock and a bond by projecting cash flow and discounting it at an appropriate rate. Class Topics and Learning Outcomes 1. Equity valuation (Dividend discount model) Explain the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) and bond yield plus risk premium approaches, and calculate the required rate of return using each approach Calculate the value of a common stock using the DDM for multi­period holding time. Calculate the value of a common stock using Gordon growth model. Equity valuation (Multi-stage DDM, H-Model) Explain the assumptions and justify the selection of the two-stage DDM, the H-model, the three-stage DDM. Calculate the value of a common stock using the two-stage DDM. Explain the assumption and justify the selection of the H-model. Explain the strengths and limitations of the two-stage DDM and multi-stage DDM.

2.

Equity valuation (Free cash flow model) Define and interpret free cash flow to the firm (FCFF) and free cash flow to equity (FCFE). Describe the FCFF and FCFE approaches to valuation, and contrast the appropriate discount rates for each model. Contrast the recognition of the value in the FCFE model to the recognition of value in dividend discount models. Equity valuation (Application of Free cash flow model) Calculate FCFF and FCFE given a company's financial statements prepared according to U.S.GAAP or international Accounting Standards.

3.

Equity valuation (Residual income model, EVA) Calculate and interpret residual income and describe alternative measures of residual earnings (economic value added, market value added). Explain the relationship between residual income model to dividend discount model and the free cash flow to equity model. Equity valuation (Stock valuation using price multiples) Calculate each price multiples (P/B, P/E, P/S, P/CF) Discuss rationales for using each price multiple in valuation. Discuss possible drawbacks to the use of each price multiples.

4.

Bond valuation (Bond pricing, bond risk, interest risk, duration) Identify the bond terminology, the types of bonds and the risks of the bonds Compute the value of a bond and the change in value that is attributable to a change in the discount rate. Explain the interest rate risk and concept of duration. Compute and interpret the effective duration of a bond and compute the approximate percentage change price change for a bond, given the bond's duration and a specific change in yield. Bond valuation (Convexity, Callable bond) Discuss the convexity measure of a bond and estimate a bond's percentage price change, given the bond's duration and convexity and a specified change in interest rates. Demonstrate the price volatility characteristics of callable bonds when interest rate change (the concept of negative convexity) Differentiate between modified convexity and effective convexity.

5.

Case Presentation by students

Text book, cases, reading materials Brealey, R.A., Myers, S.C. and Allen, F. "Principles of Corporate Finance 8th ed.", McGraw-Hill, 2006

Class attendance and withdrawal policy Late coming more than 20 minutes is not counted to attendance. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informed by mailing list in advance. Submission of Course Papers Either submitting through E-mail to or turning in homework in the next class(to be instructed in the class). Grading Homework 20%, Attendance and participation in the class 30%, Final Presentation 50%

Finance III Derivatives

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course focuses on basic concepts in derivatives which are very popular and frequently used in financial institutions. It shows students the basic characteristics of forward contracts, futures, options and swaps. It shows students the concepts of arbitrage/hedging and how to evaluate price and value of each derivative. It also introduces put-call parity, option Greeks and option strategies. Class Topics and Learning Outcomes 1. Derivative Market Define a derivative and differentiate between exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, Define a forward commitment and a contingent claim, and describe the basic characteristics of forward contracts, futures contracts , options (calls and puts), and swaps. Discuss the purposes and criticism of derivative markets Explain arbitrage and the role it plays in determining prices and promoting market efficiency. Forward contracts and Futures Differentiate between the positions held by the long and short parties to a forward contract in terms of delivery/settlement and default risk. Describe the procedures for settling a forward contract at expiration, and discuss how termination alternatives prior to expiration can affect credit risk. Describe the characteristics of future contracts, and distinguish between futures contracts and forward contracts.

2.

3.

4.

Futures(Margin transaction) Differentiate between margin in the securities markets and margin in the futures markets, and define initial margin, maintenance margin, variation margin, and settlement price. Describe price limits and the process of marking to market, and compute and interpret the margin balance, given the previous day's balance and the change in the futures price. Describe how a future contract can be terminated at or prior to expiration by a close-out (i.e. offset), a delivery, an equivalent cash settlement, or an exchange-for-physicals. Mathematics on Forwards and Futures Explain how the value of a forward contract is determined at initiation, during the life of the contract, and at expiration. Calculate and interpret the price and the value of an equity forward contract, assuming dividends are paid either discretely or continuously, Explain why the futures price must converge to the spot price at expiration. Determine the value of a future contract, Option Define European option, American option, and moneyness, and differentiate between exchange-traded options and over-the-counter options. Identify the types of options in terms of the underlying instruments. Define interest rate caps, floors, and collars. Compute and interpret option payoffs, and explain how interest rate option payoffs differ from the payoffs of other types of options. Define intrinsic value and time value, and explain their relationship. Explain how option prices are affected by the exercise price and the time to expiration Put call parity Explain put-call parity for European options, and relate put-call parity to arbitrage and the construction of synthetic options. Option pricing (Binomial tree) Calculate and interpret prices of interest rate options and options on assets using one- and two-period binomial models Option Strategies, Option Greeks, Delta Hedge Determine the value at expiration, profit, maximum profit, maximum loss, breakeven underlying price at expiration, and general shape of the graph of the strategies of buying and selling calls and puts, and indicate the market outlook of investors using these strategies. Explain how an option price, as represented by the Black-Scholes-Merton model, is affected by each of the input values (the option Greeks). Explain the delta of an option, and demonstrate how it is used dynamic hedging.

5.

Swap, Swap pricing Describe the characteristics of swap contracts and explain how swaps are terminated. Define and give examples of currency swaps, plain vanilla interest rate swaps, and equity swaps, and calculate and interpret the payments on each. Distinguish between the pricing and valuation of swaps. Calculate and interpret the fixed rate on a plain vanilla interest rate swap and the market value of the swap during its life. Equity swap, Credit Derivatives Calculate and interpret the fixed rate, if applicable, on an equity swap and the market values of the different types of equity swaps during their lives. Describe the characteristics of a credit default swaps, and compare and contrast a credit default swap to a corporate bond. Explain the advantages of using credit derivatives over other credit instruments.

Text book, cases, reading materials Text book Brealey, R.A., Myers, S.C. and Allen, F. "Principles of Corporate Finance 8th ed.", McGraw-Hill, 2006 Reference Chance, D.M., "Analysis of Derivatives for the CFA Program", CFA Institute Class attendance and withdrawal policy Late coming more than 30 minutes is not counted to attendance. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informed though e-mail or by post in advance. Submission of Course Papers Submit through e-mail to Grading Homework 50%, Attendance and participation in the class 50%

Quality Management I Outline and Fundamental Principles

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar Experiment/Practice

Course Objectives This course covers outline and fundamental principles of quality management through a review on history of quality management, introduction of case studies, discussion etc. For example, the historical review explores the fundamental philosophy and activities and the recent trends in quality management. Furthermore, some important tools for quality management are introduced. Class Topics 1. Historical review on quality management Historical review of quality management is introduced with economical growth. Evolution of organizational attitude will be introduced. 2. Fundamentals philosophy of on quality management This topic introduces fundamentals philosophy on quality management that includes what quality is, what management is, what the management concepts are and so forth. This section may include student presentation. 3. Tools for process improvements Some tools for process improvements are introduced, such as control chart, histrogram, scatter diagram with examples. Furthermore, we discuss how to measure the customer satisfaction. This section may include student presentation.

4. Organization wide promotion of quality activity One of the key on quality management is organization wide promotion. This section considers how to deploy quality activity for all departments. Quality circle, policy management, daily management will be introduced. This section may include student presentation. 5. Other topics of quality management This section focuses on these current such as quality award that can be regarded as a driving force of quality management. Deming prize in Japan, MBNQA in USA and European quality award model are also introduced. ISO 9000, Six Sigma and relatively new concept of quality management are introduced. Student presentation may be added. Text book, cases, reading materials Handout will be provided at the classroom. Prerequisite / Recommendation Nil

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Cancellation and making-up classes may be informed via general office. Submission of Course Papers Reports should be submitted by hard copy to the Report Box in front of the Academic Service Office on the 2nd floor of Jimbocho-bldg. Grading Classroom participation: 40% Group presentation/ discussion: 40% Individual term paper: 20%

Accounting II Financial Analysis and Bankruptcy Prediction

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management

Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course deals with financial data analysis. Especially we get the way to analyze financial data to predict bankruptcies. Why do companies go into bankrupt? Why there are two groups? One goes into bankrupt, and the other one continues even if they are doing the same type of business. Is there any way to know the sign of the bankruptcy in advance? This course deals with how to assess the Japanese companies with their peculiar business practice. TEAM PROJECT There is a team projects required for this class. The team analyses a set of corporate annual reports from some Japanese companies chosen by your team. The team should provide presentation of the results of the analysis at the last class.

Class Topics

Week 1

Chapter/Assignment 1. Mechanism of Financial Distress

· · · ·

Strategy Marketing Credit control Financing

2.

Technique of Financial Analysis

· ·

Ratio Analysis vs. Real Number Analysis Relationship with other economic index; Stock Price; Rating

3.

Accounting Cycle: Closing date and Share Holders meeting

4. Getting Financial Report; public companies vs. non-public

· ·

EDINET, EDGAR Internet: access EDINET website (//http://info.edinet-fsa.go.jp/) to have Japanese Financial Reports, access TSE(http://www.tse.or.jp/)

2

1.

Tool for Financial Analysis

· · ·

Spread Sheet Financial Language; HTML vs. XBRL EDINE, EDGAR and TDB, CD

2.

Factors to change financial numbers

· · · · · · ·

Increasing/Decreasing Assets; influence to total? Decreasing Liabilities; influence to total? Increasing Owners Equity; three different factors Other comprehensive income Increasing/Decreasing Sales Increasing/Decreasing income (three different income) Extraordinary Income/Loss; influence to cash-flow?

3

1.

Minimum rule to calculation;

· · · ·

B/S vs. P/L P/L vs. P/L B/S vs. B/S How to measure increasing rate; negative vs. positive

2. 3.

Missing Value Distribution; Median vs. Mean

·

What influence the trend of ratios; Interest, Land Price and General price index

4.

Reliable Ratios vs. Non-Reliable Ratios

5. Inefficiency of Cash-Flow ratios 6. Difference between Assets efficiency and Equities efficiency (ROA vs. ROE) 4 1. How to find reliable ratios; what can predict financial distress 2. How to built analysis model; linear or non-linear 3. How to use the model; bankruptcy prediction and rating 4. How to read the result from the model 5 Group Presentation

Text book, cases, reading materials Hands-outs and lecture materials are provided. Strongly recommended to read following books; Shirata, Yoshiko, Rating with Bankruptcy Prediction Model, Chuo Keizaish( ).

Class attendance and withdrawal policy Credit for Accounting II is a prerequisite for enrollment in Accounting I. Consult the charge teacher about the exception. Late coming more than 20 minutes is not counted to attendance. Withdrawal notice should be informed before the third class.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informing by official mailing list in advance. Submission of Course Papers Course papers are not required, but team presentation is required. Grading Class Participation (getting PINK coupon) Attendance Team presentation Total 30 30 40 100 percent percent percent percent

Class participation is vital to the success of this course. Just attending/sitting the class is not meaning of participation. I welcome your positive participation/comments. The quality of your comments is more important than the quantity.

Corporate Social Responsibility

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Making Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Course Objectives By the end of the module students will: X X X X X Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture X X X X

and Seminar

1. Understand the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within the framework of corporate governance. 2. Understand the strategic potential of CSR. 3. Learn about how companies decide about and implement CSR activities. 4. Learn how to report about CSR and how to assess CSR reports.

Class Topics . Introduction to Corporate Social Responsibility Understand what CSR and related concepts of business ethics and corporate citizenship and why these has become relevant for global business. Topics of the day *What is CSR? *Discussion of Milton Friedman's paper "The social responsibility of business is to increase its profit" *Historic background and development of CSR *Drivers of CSR *Areas of CSR involvement 2. The relationship between CSR and profitability Understand how CSR may enhance profitability Topics of the day *Channels how CSR and profitability are linked *Findings of empirical research *The case for strategic CSR *How to organize CSR? *Applying findings to typical areas of CSR involvement 3. CSR reporting and assessment of CSR activities How do companies report their CSR involvement? How are such reports assessed? Topics of the day *The KPMG International Survey on CSR reporting 2008 *CSR rankings *What do Socially Responsible Investors do?

4. / 5. CSR case studies Students will present one company's CSR as documented in the company's CSR report. The presentation should take into account aspects discussed in class.

Work requirements 1) Students should actively participate in class discussion. 2) Each student will be asked to make a short presentation on one company's CSR activities. 3) Students are required to write a short report (5 to 7 pages) related to CSR at the end of the course. Advise on the choice of the topic and the structure of the paper will be provided in class. Text book, cases, reading materials

Werther, William B. and David Chandler (2006): Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility. Stakeholders in a Global Environment. London: Sage Publications. Crane, Andrew and Dirk Matten (2007): Business Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2nd edition.

Reference Texts

Barnett, Michael and Robert M. Salomon (2006): Beyond Dichotomy. The Curvilinear Relationship Between Social Responsibility and Financial Performance. In: Strategic Management Journal, 27 (11), p. 1101-1122. Caroll, Archie B. (1979): A Three-dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Social Performance. In Academy of Management Review, 4 (4), p. 497-506. Friedman, Milton (1970): The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits. In: The New York Times Magazine, 13 (September). Hill, Ronald P et al. (2007): Corporate Social Responsibility and Socially Responsible Investing. A Global Perspective. In: Journal of Business Ethics, 70 (2), p- 165-174. Locket, Andy, Jeremy Moon and Wayne Visser (2006): Corporate Social Responsibility in Management Research. Focus, Nature, Salience and Sources of Influence. In: Journal of Management Studies, 43 (1), p. 115-136. Margolis, J., H. Elfenbein and J. Walsh (2007): Does it pay to be good? A meta-analysis and redirection of research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance, Working Paper, Harvard Business School. Nakao, Yukio et al. (2007): Relationship between Environmental Performance and Financial Performance. An Empirical Analysis of Japanese Corporations. In: Business Strategy and the Environment, 16 (2), p. 106-118. Porter, Michael E. and Mark Kramer (2006): Strategy and Society. The Link Between Competitive Advantage and Corporate Social Responsibility. In: Harvard Business Review, 84 (12), p. 78-92.

Portney, Paul R. (2008): The (Not so) New Corporate Social Responsibility. An Empirical Perspective. In: Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, 2 (2), p.261-275. Scholtens, Bert (2008): A Note on the Interaction between Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Performance. In: Ecological Economics, 68, (1-2), p. 46-55.

Acquaintance with the topic through readings and following public discussions. Class attendance and withdrawal policy Withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Website. Prerequisite / Recommendation None Grading Policy

Participation: 30pts. Presentation: 30pts Final Report: 40pts. (Total 100pts.)

Corporate governance

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Making Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management X X X X X X Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise /Exercise Practical Trainig

X

X X

Course Objectives By the end of the module students will: 1. Understand the problems resulting from the separation of ownership and control and the private and social benefits of good governance. 2. Understand the conflicting interests by various stakeholders that managers are confronted with and the mechanisms available to realign them. 3. Understand how the market environment and regulations impact corporate governance. 4. Be able to critically assess existing corporate governance structures and practices. Class Topics . Introduction to Corporate Governance Understanding of the concept and its importance for business and the economy. Topics of the day *The problem of governance *What do we mean by corporate governance *How can shareholders be protected *Overview of next sessions 2. Special topics in corporate governance Topics of the day *Executive pay *The role of institutional investors *Stakeholder versus shareholder orientation *National systems of corporate governance ­ convergence or co-existence?

3. How to evaluate corporate governance structures Topics of the day *What companies are likely to encounter governance problems *How to detect effective governance *The role of institutional investors *Analysis of corporate governance rankings

4. / 5. Corporate case studies Students will present and assess the corporate governance structure of a specific company as documented in publicly available material. The presentation should take into account the various aspects discussed in class.

Work requirements 1) Students will be required to actively participate in class discussion. 2) Each student will be asked to make a short presentation on one company's corporate governance structure. 3) Students are required to write a short report (5 to 7 pages) related to the topics discussed in class at the end of the course. Advise on the choice of the topic and the structure of the paper will be provided in class. Text book, cases, reading materials

Tricker, Bob (2009): Corporate Governance. Principles, Policies, and Practices. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Bebchuk, Lucian A. and Michael S. Weisbach Research. NBER Working Paper 15537

Reference Texts

(2009): The State of Corporate Governance

Aoki, Masahiko, Gregory Jackson, Hideaki Miyajima (eds.): Corporate Governance in Japan. Institutional Change and Organizational Diversity. Oxford University Press, 2007. Fauver, Larry und Michael E. Fuerst (2006): Does good governance include employee representation? Evidence from German corporate boards. In: Journal of Financial Economics 82 (2006), 673-710. OECD (2007): Asia ­ Overview of Corporate Governance Frameworks in 2007. Paris: OECD. Tirole, Jean (2001): Corporate Governance. In: Econometrica 69, pp 1-35. Coffee, John C. Jr. (2005): A Theory of Corporate Scandals: Why the US and Europe Differ. In:. Oxford Review of Economic Policy, vol. 21/2, 198-211.

OECD (2009): The Corporate Governance Lessons Learned from the Financial Crisis. Paris: OECD.

Prerequisite / Recommendation Acquaintance with the topic through readings and following public discussions.

Class attendance and withdrawal policy Withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Website Grading Classroom participation: 30% Individual presentation: 30% Individual term paper: 40%

Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar experiment

Course Objectives Upon completion of this course you should be able to: 1. Understand the process of establishing a new company 2. Identify key conditions under which start-ups prosper and how entrepreneurs develop new ideas 3. Understand different types of entrepreneurs in corporate environments 4. Be able to successfully put together a Business Plan to establish a new venture. Class Topics The course is designed to enable students to understand (i) the dynamics of successfully starting a new business, and (ii) to understand the role of entrepreneurship in large corporations. It will involve studying the key challenges a start-up faces as well as analyzing case studies. Classes topics will include: 1. Defining Entrepreneurship 2. Starting a New Business 3. Financing of New Ventures 4. Managing Growth 5. Presentation of a Business Plan / Case Study Analysis (teamwork) Text book, cases, reading materials Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation. (2005), Entrepreneur's Toolkit. Harvard Business School Publishing.

Models of Entrepreneurship

MIT Sloan Management Review, Robert C. Wolcott, Michael J. Lippitz (2007), The Four

HBS Case Study Icedelights Prerequisite / Recommendation None. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the 1F of Jimbocho bldg. or Moodle course site. Submission of Course Papers Papers will be due in class per the schedule provided at the first class by the Professor. Papers have to be submitted at the beginning of class in hard copy and via e-mail using MS-Word. Grading Assessment for this course will be based on: 1. Active participation in class and group discussions: 40% 2. Write-up "Entrepreneurship that works in your company" 10% 3. Case Study discussion "Icedelights" 20 % 4. Business Plan write-up and presentation: 30% Students will be assigned to groups. Groups have to submit a written business plan and present their business venture in the last class (February 17, 2011) Details on the report writing and the group presentation will be provided at the first class by the Professor.

Entrepreneurship II Supply Chain Management

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar Experiment

Course Objectives Upon completion of this course you should be able to: 1. Understand what a supply chain is. 2. Develop a better appreciation for the complexities and challenges of establishing an effective supply chain. 3. Understand the key challenges a Supply Chain Manager faces and the strategies different companies take to create an effective supply chain system.

Class Topics This course is designed to enable students to understand the dynamics of the world of Supply Chain Management. It will involve studying the importance of supply chain management to a company's success in today's competitive environment and the basic supply chain strategies a company can choose from. An interactive supply chain simulation will form the core part of the final two classes where student will have to make supply chain decisions. Class topics will include: 1. Introducing the concept of what a Supply Chain Management system is. 2. Conducting supply chain management analysis. 3. Case studies on strategies to implement Supply Chain systems. 4. How to make sourcing decisions. Text book, cases, reading materials Selected chapters (details to be announced in class) of: Taylor, D. (2004) Chains: A Manager's Guide. Addison-Wesley.

Supply

HBS case studies, "Sport Obermeyer" and "Crocs". Prerequisite / Recommendation None Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the 1F of Jimbocho bldg. or Moodle course site. Submission of Course Papers Papers will be due in class per the schedule provided at the first class by the Professor. Papers have to submitted in hard copy at the beginning of class and via e-mail using MS ­Word. Grading Assessment for this course will be based on: 1. Active class participation: 30% 2. Case Study Discussion Crocs: 10% 3. Case Study Sport Obermeyer: 20 % 4. Supply Chain Simulation (details to be announced at beginning of the course): 40% Details on the report writing and game simulations will be provided at the first class by the Professor.

Finance Seminar I

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes This course focuses on practical application of basic concepts of valuation. The members would participate in the CFA Institute Global Investment Research Challenge Competition sponsored by CFA Institute. The members consist of Tsukuba team. The team will analyze the target company which is given by the CFA Institute. The analysis includes the business structure analysis, SWOT analysis, five forces analysis, financial ratio analysis and should result in the valuation. The valuation process includes the scenario analysis, cash flow projection, estimation of required rate of return, estimation of growth rate, and estimation of beta. The analyzing process includes the participation in the IR meeting of the company during the time. Top three team who are selected by the reports could be entitled to make a presentation at CFA Institute (Japan). The champion team in Japan can proceed to the Asian Pacific Investment Research competition. This seminar requires strong commitment, energetic contribution and cooperative teamwork in addition to the comprehensive knowledge of finance. Prerequisite Finance I (Corporate Finance) is prerequisite, Finance II (Valuation) is preferable. Seminar participants are required interview in advance and should be permitted to join.

Text book, cases, reading materials Koller, T., Goedhart, M., and Wessels, D. (McKinsey & Co.), (2005). Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Class attendance and withdrawal policy Late coming more than 20 minutes is not counted to attendance. Withdrawal notice should be informed before the second class. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Informed by mailing list in advance. Submission of Course Papers Submit be E-mail to Grading Group work 80%, Attendance and participation in the class 20%

Asian Pacific Conference on International Accounting Issues

Overseas Conference Seminar I

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management

Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives The main aim of this course is having experience to participate the academic international conference. Students will have chances to listen the updated research topics. This year, all students will participate the Asia-Pacific Conference on International Accounting Issues which will be held in Las Vegas Hilton Hotel, USA. The Conference will provide an important forum for the interaction of different ideas and information between academicians and practitioners, in order to enhance the understanding of international accounting issues in various countries. Prominent scholars and practitioners from the United States, Canada, Europe, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, China, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, India, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Brazil, The Netherlands, Poland, Russia, The Middle East, and other countries are expected to attend the conference. CONFERENCE TOPICS Research paper presentation and special workshops will be held by well-known international accounting scholars and practitioners to discuss issues on international accounting research, education, and practice, impact of advanced technology in international accounting, comparative ethics in international auditing and business, and related international business topics.

Topics are as follows; Global Accounting and the Challenges of IFRS Accounting's Role in International Capital Markets Regulation of National and International Banking Implementation and Value Relevance of IFRS The Accountability of Government Functions

Changing Paradigm in Accounting, Finance, and Management Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) Accounting for Carbon Credit Sustainable Reporting Micro-Finance Forensic Accounting International accounting research, education, and practice Corporate Governance and Accountability Earnings Management Revenue Recognition and Quality of Earnings Adaptability of International Accounting Standards Capital Markets Behavioral Issues in Accounting Social and Environmental Issues ­ Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainable Development: Performance Measures and Indicators Impact of International Free Trade and Investment on Accounting Education and the Profession Comparative Analysis of Financial Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Auditing, Taxation and Finance, in an International Arena Contemporary Issues of Advanced Technology in International Accounting (such as Impact of Enterprise Resource Planning and E-commerce on Accounting Systems) Information and Control Systems for Multinational Corporations Interrelationship between Accounting and Other Disciplines (such as Management, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resource Management and Information Management) Comparative Ethics in International Auditing and Business Cross Cultural Studies in International Accounting Impact of Currency Fluctuations on Financial Reporting and Control Impact of International Mergers and Acquisitions on Accounting Practice Privatization of Governmental Functions and Government Enterprises and their Impact on Accounting Accounting-Marketing Issues Accounting-Finance Issues Accounting-Human Resource Management Issues Accounting-Entrepreneurship Issues Accounting-Management Issues Accounting Programs and Leadership Government and Nonprofit Accounting History and Integrative Teaching and Curriculum Islamic Accounting: Challenges and Opportunities Issues in Public Sector Other related international business topics Course Objectives All students should participate/listen 12.5 hours sessions (One session is usually 1.5 hours. Therefore, students should participate more than 8 sessions). Professor's confirmation of students' participation of the session is required.

Prerequisite / Conference registration The registration fee of the conference is $300 (US dollar). A special registration fee of $150 is available to full-time graduate students. Registration fee includes: Reception 2 Luncheons 4 Coffee Breaks Gala Dinner (Banquet and Entertainment) Copy of Conference Program and Proceedings Admission to all Conference Sessions To register for the conference, please visit www.apconference.org Submission of Course Papers It is required to submit 3 pages or more reports of at least 3 participating sessions. The report should be attached with conference material (i.e. handout of the session) Grading Participation Paper 50 50 Total percent percent 100

percent

Global Knowledge International Financial Markets

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives In an era when almost any type of financing can be securitized, swapped, and/or traded, financial markets are increasingly integrated across national boundaries, currencies, and type of instrument. No business, no matter how localized, can succeed without understanding the parameters of global finance. This course is designed to acquaint students with the principal global markets in foreign exchange, money, bonds, equity, and corporate control. We will examine markets from the perspectives of both the corporate treasurer and the finance professional. Students are expected to complete the assigned reading BEFORE class, participate actively in class, and submit individual term papers. Class Topics Class Sesssion 1: The Context: Economics, Politics, and Foreign Exchange. We will consider briefly the history of cross-border finance, examine the factors that determine the price and availability of money on global markets, and discuss foreign exchange markets. Reading: Smith/Walter, chapters 1-2. Class Session 2: The International Money and Bond Markets. Overview of the principal global markets for debt; mechanics of bringing debt issues to market. Reading: Smith/Walter, chapter 3. Class Session 3: International Bank Lending. We will look at international bank lending, and the regulation of international banking . Reading: Smith/Walter, chapters 4, 13 Class Session 4: Swaps and other Derivatives. We will consider the impact of swaps and other

derivatives on global financial markets. Reading: Smith/Walter, chapter 5. Class Session 5: Asset Finance; Global Markets for Equity and Corporate Control.

Topics covered include trade finance, big-ticket assets (e.g., aircraft), leasing, project finance and global equity markets as well as cross-border mergers and acquisitions. Reading: Smith/Walter chapter 6 -8

Text book, cases, reading materials Primary text: Roy C. Smith and Ingo Walter, Global Banking, Second Edition (Oxford, 2003) Prerequisites / Recommendation This course has the following prerequisites: Accounting I, Finance I, Global Management I. Exceptions require the explicit permission of the instructor which will generally be granted only to students with substantial work experience in the finance sector. Students are also strongly recommended to have taken Finance II and III. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Instructor will also make every attempt to inform each enrolled student by e-mail of any changes in schedule Submission of Course Papers Submit to the instructor's mailbox in the Sumitomo Jimbocho Bldg, 2F. In certain cases, electronic submission may also be possible on notification to the instructor. Grading Class Attendance: 20% Class discussion and performance on in-class exercises: 20% Individual take-home exam: 60%

Cross-Cultural Management I Managing Across Borders Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Course Objectives This course explores the dynamic global environment of business management, by looking at the political, legal, technological, competitive and cultural factors that shape corporations worldwide. The main goal of this course is to provide theoretical and practical examples and exercises on the global manager's environment, the cultural context of global management, the formulation and implementation of strategy for international and global operations, and global human resources management. The course primarily uses a combination of lecture, class discussion, case analysis, group and individual assignments. Class Topics 1. The Global Manager's Environment - Assessing the Environment: Political, Economic, Legal, Technological - Managing Interdependence: Social Responsibility and Ethics Reading: - "India: The Employment Black Hole?" 2. The Cultural Context of Global Management - Understanding the Role of Culture - Cross-cultural Negotiation and Decision Making Reading: - "Canada Timber: Negotiating with the Japanese" Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming

Lecture Exercise Practical training

3.

Formulating and Implementing Strategy for International and Global Operations - Formulating Strategy - Organization Structure and Control Systems Reading: - "There's Detroit and There's Trvana: The Strategic Attraction of Eastern Europe"

4.

Case Discussion Reading: - Wal-Mart: Managing Globalization in 2007 Written examination: Short individual MCQ-type exam

5.

Group Project Presentations

Text book, cases, reading materials Original handouts and reading materials will be provided in the classroom. No textbook is required for this course. However, for those interested, more information can be found in: Deresky Helen, International Management: Managing Across Borders and Cultures, 6/E, Prentice Hall, 2008 (ISBN-13: 9780136143260) Prerequisite / Recommendation None Class attendance and withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check Moodle or bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building. or the MBA-IB Official Web site.

Submission of Course Papers Submit a hard copy of your assignments to the Report Box in front of the Academic Service Office on the2nd floor of Jimbocho bldg. Also submit an electronic copy (MS-Word or PDF file) on Moodle. For those taking the class from Tsukuba's main campus, you only need to submit your assignments on Moodle. Grading Classroom participation: Group Project: Case Study: Written Examination: 20% 30% 20% 30%

Cross-Cultural Management II International Business: The Challenges of Globalization Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Course Objectives This course focuses on selected international business issues at the macro and micro levels. Topics covered include economic systems and development, international trade, foreign direct investment, regional economic integration, and cross-cultural communication. A case study in session 4 will enable the students to apply some of the knowledge they will have gained in previous sessions, as well as to share their own experience in international business. This class is aimed at anyone who wants to understand the people, culture, geography, and politics of international business. The course primarily uses a combination of lecture, class discussion, case analysis, group and individual assignments. Class Topics

Week 1 Topic 1. Economic Systems and International Trade Economic Systems and Development International Trade 2. International Investment and Integration Foreign Direct Investment Regional Economic Integration Reading/Discussion/ Presentation Assignment Course material

Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming

Lecture Exercise Practical training

2

Course material Individual assignment: "First in Asia and the World"

3

4 5

3. Cross-cultural Communication Communicating across Borders Oral and non-Verbal Communication 4. Case-study session 5. 1. Global Human Resources Management Staffing, Training, and Compensation for Global Operations Written examination:

Course material Communication Script

Group assignment: "P&G Japan: The SK-II Globalization Project" Course material Short individual MCQ-type exam

07/16

Individual assignment: "Mercedes-Benz is Footloose in Tuscaloosa"

Text book, cases, reading materials Original handouts and reading materials will be provided in the classroom. No textbook is required. Relevant reading materials will be distributed when necessary. Cases: "P&G Japan: The SK-II Globalization Project" By Christopher A. Bartlett; product #303003-HCB-ENG; published March 24, 2003; available for purchase at http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu In groups of 5 people max., answer the 4 related questions in 4 pages maximum "First in Asia and the World" (provided in class) "Mercedes-Benz is Footloose in Tuscaloosa" (provided in class) Prerequisite / Recommendation None Class attendance and withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board in front of the Academic Service Office on the 3rd floor of Bldg-G or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Submit assignments (hard copy) in class or in Professor's box (2nd floor) AND on Moodle (or by email for credited auditors). Late papers will incur penalty points. Grading Classroom participation: Individual assignment: Group assignment Written Examination: 20% 30% 20% 30%

Global Management Course Title: ODA Project Management

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Lecture/Case

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives This course provides the actual ODA cases in many countries to the students rather than theoretical principles. Through the lectures by active practitioners (guest speakers), students can understand the actual ODA projects and know the meanings and difficulties of the ODA projects in developing countries. This course would be prerequisite for Nippon-Koei Overseas Internship. The class topics cover railway development, irrigation project, water resources, unban projects and others (depends on guest speaker's availability). Class Topics 1. URBAN PLANNING PROJECTS (by K. Yamada) About half of the world population live in urban areas. While the urban area provides site for production and services, it also houses poverty. Urban planning is a tool for managing and regulating the urban growth based on a pre-designed urban master plan, and provides room for conservation of greenery, heritages, water area and others. Effective urban planning will be the key for controlled development and conservation of precious environment in developing nations. Urban planning has been one of the target areas in Japan's Official Development Program (ODA) to the developing countries. Nippon Koei has conducted a number of these urban planning projects under JICA's program, including Vientiane (Laos), Cairo (Egypt), Bangkok (Thailand) and Sihanoukville (Cambodia). In this presentation the essence of effective urban planning methodologies and participatory process will be faocused.

2. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECTS (by S. Soeda) One of major environmental issues in developing countries is solid waste problems such as inadequate collection and illegal dumping caused by their high economic growth. Due to the unsuitable waste management capacity of developing countries, it is difficult for authorities to respond to the large volume and various types of waste generated, especially in urbanized areas. In order to help solving these situations, Japan's ODA programs, mostly through Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), have been implementing various types of assistance with a range of aid-schemes like "development studies", "grant aid", "experts dispatch", or "technical cooperation projects". A recent trend of solid waste management projects is to consider promoting the 3 R's (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) and capacity development, in addition to extending its aid-schemes to ODA loans for construction of solid waste management facilities. Some real-life experiences of these overseas projects will be provided in the presentation to share the changes and prospects in the field of solid waste management. 3. AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT (by Takahashi) Main objectives of the project on the agriculture and rural development sector are poverty reduction and improvement of the living standard in the rural area through developing infrastructures such as irrigation facilities and rural roads; supporting the agricultural technology; and strengthening local organizations. The presentation will focus on the project approach mainly for the following two different types of the projects under Japan's ODA programs. One is Small-scale Integrated Rural Development Project in the Philippines composed of i) infrastructure development of irrigation facilities, rural roads, rural water supply system and post-harvest facilities, and ii) institutional development such as strengthening of cooperative and water users association. The other is Large-scale Irrigation Development Project in India composed of construction of irrigation facilities, agricultural intensification program, strengthening of water users association and malaria mitigation measures. 4. RAILAWAY DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR (by H. Kawahara) The concept of industrial corridor development encompasses to develop transport facilities and to transform them as economic corridors. Such corridors which have been advocated and carried through by concerned organizations include the economic corridors in the GMS (Greater Mekong Subregion) in Southeast Asia and Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor in India. In order to keep sustainable development through industrial corridors, the contributions in terms of our technology and experiences as well as providing funds are expected. Railway transportation has been increasingly recognized for its advantage over other transportation modes in terms of high output volume of transportation per

unit energy input, and is contributing to the alleviation of burden on the environment. Therefore, it is considered as important means of transportation for industrial corridor development. This presentation will provide information with regard to the case study of railway development for industrial corridors in East Asia, South Asia and East Africa. 5. Water Resources Development and Management Projects (by Miyagawa) Presently, one third of world population do not have access to enough water. Additionally, a rapid population increase and an economic development accelerate the water demand which leads to the inadequate water resources availability. Water quality degradation is becoming one of the major problems. The global warming, the climate change and El Niño phenomena also influence the water resources potentials and bring floods and droughts. Many developing countries have been suffering from such natural disasters: floods in Manila, Philippines (2009); in Solo, Indonesia (2007); in Middle Vietnam (2010); drought in Somalia (2011), etc. Japan's ODA has been supporting the developing countries to mitigate the damage and to cope with water related disasters through the integration of structural and non-structural measures. The presentation will be focused on approach and methodology for formulation of water resources development and management projects. Text book, cases, reading materials The original handout and necessary materials would be provided at classroom. General information: http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/oda/index.html http://www.jica.go.jp/english/index.html Prerequisite / Recommendation None Class attendance and withdrawal policy Withdrawal policy Once registered for a course, a student may withdraw from the course without penalty by notifying the instructor before the THIRD CLASS MEETING of the course. Absence without notice may result in a failing grade and the student may receive a "D." Courses will be closed for registration after the second class meeting. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Notice should be done through e-mail.

Submission of Course Papers Submit soft copy(MS-Word or PDF file) via e-mail. Grading Attendance and classroom participation:60%, ReportTwo reports:40% Others (Important!) Student who has a plan to take the Nippon-Koei's international internship must have this course in advance of the internship.

Global Management ODA Field Work

Types of competencies expected to be gained Teaching methods after taking this course Lecture/Case Problem Accept change Debate Finding Commitment to success Field study Anticipate problems Discussion Decision Gather information Case method Making Analytical orientation Quantitative analysis Creative thinking Simulation Strategic planning Role playing Implication Organization management Programming Communication Lecture Exercise Practical training Risk management Course Objectives This course provides students the opportunity to visit actual ODA sites in many countries. Through the 1 week visit to the ODA projects sites, students meet practitioners and discuss with them. Students can understand the actual ODA projects and know the meanings and difficulties of the ODA projects in developing countries. The sites to visit are the followings (not limited to) COMMUNITY-DRIVEN DISASTER MANAGEMENT, IRRIGATION AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT, URBAN PLANNING PROJECTS, and others. Text book, cases, reading materials The original handout and necessary materials would be provided. General information: http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/oda/index.html http://www.jica.go.jp/english/index.html Prerequisite / Recommendation Attendance to ODA Project Management is recommended Class attendance and withdrawal policy Nil Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Nil. Submission of Course Papers Submit the soft copy (MS-Word or PDF file) via e-mail. Grading Attendance and Participation :50%, Presentation/Report:50%

Global Knowledge IV Financial Crises

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Creative thinking Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives Financial crises involving sudden collapses in asset values, plummeting markets, and extreme volatility form a recurrent feature of contemporary economic life. Every business will almost surely have to cope at some point with such a system-wide crisis. This class will take primarily an historical approach in attempting to understand the nature of financial crises ­ how (or whether) they can be anticipated, the typical course of a financial crisis, how businesses and investors can weather such crises, and the aftermath. Among other crises, we will look at the Great Depression, the collapse of Japan's "bubble economy," various developing country balance of payments crises, and the recent subprime loan crisis as well as considering contemporary developments. Each student will be asked to become an "expert" on a particular financial crisis of the last 100 years, research that crisis, and write a term paper analyzing the crisis using the framework developed in class. Students are also expected to complete the assigned reading BEFORE class and to participate actively in class,. Class Topics We will look at the history of financial manias and the combination of monetary policies and "irrational exuberance" that bring them on. We will pay particular attention to Japan's bubble economy of the 1980s, the internet stock bubble of the late 1990s, and the U.S. housing bubble of the early 2000s.. Reading: Kindleberger, chapters 1-3. Oct. 23: The Crash: Financial Markets and Transmission Mechanisms. We will consider how the credit markets work to fan the flames of manias. Reading: Kindleberger: Chapters 4-6. Oct. 30: Going Global: Balance of Payments Crises. We will consider how crises "break" and are transmitted worldwide with particular attention to the collapse of the Bretton Woods system in the early 1970s and the Asian Financial Crisis of 1997/98. Reading: Kindleberger, Chapters 7-8. Nov. 6: Frauds, Swindles and the Policy Response. The class will consider how and why fraud

Oct. 16: Speculative Manias: The Origins of Financial Crises.

often accompanies financial crises as well as the policy response and the implications for business. Reading: Kindleberger, Chapter 9; Michael Lewis "The End of Wall Street's Boom." Nov. 20: Applicability of the Kindleberger/Aliber Framework. We will apply the framework developed in class to the major crises of the past 100 years. Reading: Kindleberger, Chapters 10-13. Text book, cases, reading materials Primary text: Charles P. Kindleberger w. Robert Aliber Manias, Panics and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises, Fifth Edition (John Wiley and Sons, 2005). Other assigned reading will be distributed by the instructor. Prerequisite / Recommendation This course has the following prerequisite: Global Knowledge 3: International Financial Markets. Exceptions require the explicit permission of the instructor which will generally be granted only to students with substantial work experience in the finance sector. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Instructor will also make every attempt to inform each enrolled student by e-mail of any changes in schedule Submission of Course Papers Submit to the instructor's mail box on the 2nd Floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building. In certain cases, electronic submission may also be possible on notification to the instructor. Grading Class Attendance: 20% Class discussion and performance on in-class exercises: 20% Individual report: 60%

Business Simulation

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management

Teaching methods Language (English/Japanese) J/E Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar experiment

Course Objectives The main purpose is to encourage students to find various styles such as information gathering, data analysis to make more effective decisions on management through gaming simulation.

Class Topics 1. Orientation, Grouping, Scenario Explanation and Gaming Simulation (Homework1 announcement) 2. Presentation of Homework1, Gaming Simulation (Homework2 announcement) 3. Presentation of Homework2, Team work on Analysis of the results and Discussion 4. Gaming Simulation, Analysis of the results (Management Report announcement) 5. Presentation of the strategy and management report (Homework3 announcement)

Text book, cases, reading materials All the materials are distributed.

Prerequisite - This course is consisting of several presentations based on the previous class. In addition, team work/discussion has a great role. All attendances are basically required. - Only 15 students can take this lecture because seats of the PC room (802) are limited. Please submit with "Registration/Questionnaire for Business Simulation team building items (see next page)" until 21:00, August 20, 2010 to The students who can take this lecture will receive the acceptance notification. It is decided by lot when many submissions come.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board managed by Academic Service Office or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers All reports have to be from individuals. Submission Style is mentioned in the class.

Grading Classroom participation: Homework: Individual term reports:

30% 30% 40%

Registration/Questionnaire for Business Simulation team building Deadline: August 20 (Fri.), 2010 1) Student ID number: 2) Name: 3) Email address: 4) Experienced/Current job: (example: sales, management, accounting, marketing, IT (techniques), engineering, education, and so on.)

5) Your favorite area: (favorite subject, license, etc.)

6) Is there a day you have to be absent? When is it, if you have?

7) Your computer skill and others: EXCEL, (beginner, middle, advanced) Programming (VBA, C, java, others, Internet (Can you enter the Tsukuba campus LAN? UN-favorite skill ( 8) Can you bring your mobile computer for this lecture? YES, YES, NO) ) NO )

Thank you

Data Analysis II Application of Quantitative Research

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise/Seminar Practical training

Course Objectives Statistical data analysis is helpful to measure the current status, obtain countermeasures, make decision and so forth in various business fields and various processes by quantifying the measured data on the fact. This course introduces fundamental concepts and tools on statistical data analysis through a virtual survey study, where the approach sometimes called a conjoint analysis in the field of marketing Class Topics 1: Concept design At the beginning of product planning, non-quantitative research is required before the quantitative research to determine the framework for data collection and analysis. Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is helpful for non-quantitative research priori to quantitative research for product planning. In the virtual survey study, product planning based on the QFD is applied. 2: Data collection by DOE Design for data collection is the next stage after determining the framework for data collection based on non-quantitative research. The techniques of Design Of Experiments (DOE) is a helpful tool for data collection. In the virtual survey, DOE is applied to collect customer preference data. , 3: Fundamental statistics and data visualization to interpret the data The first step on quantitative research is visualization of data by graph and summarization by fundamental data. This class reviews interpretation of data by visualization and summarization by some fundamental statistics. In the virtual study, the collected data is analyzed to grasp the feature of data.

4. Estimation of relationship between response and factors One of the typical problems in the quantitative research is to estimate the relationship between response, say Y and its factors, say x1, ..., xp. This class introducing the techniques to estimate the relationship between Y and x1, ..., xp, including regression analysis that is widely applied in many areas. In the virtual survey study, the relationship between customer preferences and its design specification will be analyzed. 5. Group Presentation The virtual survey study is performed by each group. At the final class, the main topic is group presentation in order exchange the opinion on the approaches.

Text book, cases, reading materials All the materials are distributed at the class room Prerequisite / Recommendation Students should take Business Mathematics and Data Analysis I before registering this course.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site.

Submission of Course Papers Submit to the moodle site. Grading Classroom participation: 25% Group report: 50% Individual term paper: 25%

Data Analysis III Data Mining

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Language (English/Japanese) Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar experiment E

Course Objectives This course is designed to enhance understanding of key techniques of Data Mining which are applied into the various fields like marketing researches, medical information analysis and so on. Another aim is to acquaint students with basic mathematical descriptions in order to read more professional articles by themselves. Class Topics Lecture 1. Overview of Data Mining - What is data mining - What is Knowledge Discovery from Database Students should bring their own mobile PC to install WEKA Lecture 2. Association Rule and exercise by WEKA Students should bring their own mobile PC Lecture 3. Decision Tree / ID3 and exercise by WEKA Students should bring their own mobile PC Lecture 4. Exercise Lecture 5. Presentation and discussion Text book, cases, reading materials All the materials are distributed in the meetings.

Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board managed by Academic Service Office or the MBA-IB Official Web site.

Submission of Course Papers Submission Style is mentioned in the class. Grading Classroom participation: Homework: Individual term paper:

30% 20% 50%

Operations Management II Decision Analysis

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar experiment

Course Objectives The objective of decision analysis is to provide supports to decision-making activities. In this course, we will learn some fundamental concepts and practical methods of decision analysis in various situations such as decision with multiple objectives, decisions under uncertainties and decisions with different decision makers and different/conflict decision objectives, namely, game problems. Class Topics 1. Value-focused decision structure We will introduce a value-focused decision structure at first, and the basic elements that affect decisions. After the analysis of the decision elements, we will learn how to structure these decision elements into the model for a systematic analysis of decision making issues. 2. Multiple objectives decision We will consider the situation where decision alternatives are evaluated by using multiple objectives. We will introduce the basic concepts and techniques to determine attributes and make choice. 3. Decision under uncertainties We will consider the situation where decisions are made under uncertainties. We will introduce a basic tool in decision analysis, which is called decision trees, to deal with this kind of decision problems. 4. Interactive Decision We will learn how to deal with strategic decision problems that involve multiple decision makers with different objectives. Interactive decision problems are usually called game problems. We will introduce models and techniques to deal with this kind of decision problems.

5. Group Presentation Students will be asked to split into 3-4 person groups and to make group presentations on the application of value-focused thinking and a multi-criteria decision model in a business, social, political etc. situation. Text book, cases, reading materials The handouts will be provided. The reference books and materials will also be introduced in the class. Prerequisite / Recommendation Microsoft Windows system is required to use Excel spreadsheets. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board in front of the Academic Service Office or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Students are required to submit their individual reports in Report Box in front of

Academic Service Office.

Grading Classroom participation: 20% Individual reports: 30% Group presentation: 50%

Operations Management III Risk Analysis

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Seminar experiment

Course Objectives Risk analysis can be defined as a systematic use of information and knowledge to identify risks (hazards, treats, opportunities), as well as their causes and consequences, and then present an informative risk picture for decision-making activities. The objective of the course is to learn fundamental concepts of risk analysis and a variety of methods, models, and techniques to deal with risk analysis issues. Class Topics 1. Introduction of Risk Analysis Risk analysis is a part of risk management. In this class, we will introduce the basic concepts and the process of risk management, and find the position of risk analysis in the whole process. Then, we will learn a method, called hierarchical holographic modeling method, to identify risks. 2. Risk Analysis Process In this class, we will learn risk analysis process which include risk identification, risk measurement/estimation and risk treatment. Students are required to conduct a group work to construct risk identification models to their interested problems by using the method introduced in the first class. Then, some models and techniques will be introduced to measure/estimate the causes and the consequences of risks. 3. Risk Analysis Methods In this class, we will learn a selection of methods that can be used when carrying out a risk analysis, which may include, for example, reference lotteries, the quantile method, coarse risk analysis, failure modes and effects analysis, trade-off analysis, etc.. 4. Risk Analysis Using Crystal Ball In this class, we will learn how to use Crystal Ball, a software package, for the simulation analysis of risk. 5. Group presentation Students will be asked to make group presentations on the application of Risk

Analysis in a business, social, political etc. situation.

Text book, cases, reading materials The handouts will be provided. The reading materials will also be introduced in the classes. Prerequisite / Recommendation Microsoft Windows system is required for installing Crystal Ball free trial software. Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board in front of the Academic Service Office or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Students are required to submit their exercise reports in Report Box in front of Academic Service Office Grading Classroom participation: 20% Exercise: 20% Group presentation: 60%

Operations Management Project Management

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Finding Decision Making Accept change Commitment to success Anticipate problems Gather information Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods

Implication

Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives In order to accomplish a project successfully, it is important to carry out systematized management processes, such as visualizing a concept, planning, executing tasks, and monitoring and control. This course provides the fundamental knowledge of the project management. Class Topics 1. Introduction to project management This session introduces a framework of the project management and following topics. - What is project - Project life cycle - History of the project management 2. Project planning Creating a project plan is very important process in the project management. In this session we introduce following topics: - Requirements definition - WBS(Work breakdown structure) - Scheduling 3. Project planning This session introduce following topics: - EVM(Earned Value Management) - Quality management planning

- Communication planning - Risk management planning

At the end of sessions, Project planning,, students will be able to make PMP (Project Management Plan).

4. Project monitoring and control It is important to recognize the gap between the plan and the actual as soon as possible. This session introduces tools and techniques to monitor the project performance. 5. Advanced Project Management This session introduces some advanced topics in project management as followings: - Project management office - Enterprise project management - Social Project management - Personal Project Management In the classroom we will try a small project as group work. Text book, cases, reading materials Handouts are provided Prerequisite / Recommendation n/a Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building. or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Submit via e-mail using MS-Word or PDF file. Grading Classroom participation: 50% Individual report: 50%

Operations Management VI: Systems Design Theory

Types of competencies expected to be gained after taking this course Problem Accept change Finding Commitment to success Anticipate problems Decision Gather information Making Analytical orientation Creative thinking Strategic planning Implication Organization management Communication Risk management Teaching methods Debate Field study Discussion Case method Quantitative analysis Simulation Role playing Programming Lecture Exercise Practical training

Course Objectives Understanding behaviors of social systems is one of key factors to our success in business or life. The concepts of UML modeling, Systems Dynamics and Multi Agent Simulation are helping our understandings. Additionally, fundamental knowledge of evolutionary biology or psychology is important, too. In this class, we will learn those topics, making/design models and simulate them. Note:

1) Please bring on your personal computer. (Windows or Mac OS) 2) The skill or knowledge of software programming is not required. We will learn in the class.

Class Topics In this course, we discuss about following topics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. General System Theory Fundamental knowledge of evolutionary biology UML modeling (including Entity-Relationship modeling) Systems Dynamics Multi-Agent Simulation

Text book, cases, reading materials Text books are announced in the Moodle before the class will start. Prerequisite / Recommendation n/a Notice of Class Cancellation and Make-up classes Check bulletin board on the first floor of the Sumitomo Jimbocho Building or the MBA-IB Official Web site. Submission of Course Papers Submit via e-mail using MS-Word or PDF file. Grading Classroom participation: 40% Individual Reports : 60%

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