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HANDBOOK FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR

Old Dominion University Department of Mechanical Engineering College of Engineering and Technology Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0247

2002-2004

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING HANDBOOK...................................................................1 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT ODU ..........................................................................2 THE ME DEPARTMENT ........................................................................................................2 Academic Programs ................................................................................................................2 Cooperative Education ...........................................................................................................2 Facilities ..................................................................................................................................3 ADMISSIONS ...........................................................................................................................3 Admission for Freshmen and Transfer Students ....................................................................3 Criteria for Transfer of Freshmen Students ...........................................................................3 Financial Aid...........................................................................................................................3 ADVISING................................................................................................................................4 ME Senior Options .................................................................................................................4 Graduation Requirements ......................................................................................................4 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS..............................................................................................5 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) ..............................................5 American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) .........................................................5 Fellowship of Minority Engineers and Scientists (FMES)......................................................5 Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) ...............................................................................5 Tau Beta Pi .............................................................................................................................6 Pi Tau Sigma ...........................................................................................................................6 Society of Women Engineers (SWE)......................................................................................6 SPECIAL RECOGNITION AND AWARDS.........................................................................6 CSEM Scholarships ....................................................................................................................7 FACULTY ACTIVITIES..........................................................................................................8 Faculty Members ....................................................................................................................8 Support Staff -.........................................................................................................................9 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS....................................................................................................11 B.S. DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.......................................................16

1 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING HANDBOOK This handbook has been designed to help you earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering at Old Dominion University. The handbook complements the ODU catalog by providing further details about the undergraduate mechanical engineering program. The handbook is revised periodically as the undergraduate program and departmental policies change. Comments and suggestions that will improve the handbook are welcome.

2 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT ODU Mechanical engineers design systems, which convert energy into useful work. Using the laws of nature, along with mathematics, communications and computational skills, they are educated to develop creative solutions for society's needs. As a fundamental engineering discipline, mechanical engineers are sought by virtually every industry and government agency. Mechanical engineers are found in: design; research and development; manufacturing; production management; project planning; consulting; testing; quality assurance and technical sales. In addition, some mechanical engineering graduates pursue graduate degrees, which prepare them for research and development careers and university teaching. Old Dominion University's mechanical engineering program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Students taking the mechanical engineering curriculum select one of three emphasis areas: Aerospace; Mechanical Systems and Design; or Power and Energy Conversion. Supported by a nationally recognized faculty, the mechanical engineering curriculum at Old Dominion University is designed to provide a rigorous background in engineering fundamentals during the first three years with some specialization in the fourth year. Mechanical engineering students use state-of-the-art laboratories, computers and software in the upper level courses to prepare them for careers, which will span the first half of the 21st century. THE ME DEPARTMENT Academic Programs The Mechanical Engineering Department offers a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering and M.S., M.E., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering, as well as Engineering Mechanics. The Aerospace Engineering Department only offers graduate degrees. There are approximately 200 undergraduate students and 80 graduate students in the Mechanical Engineering Department. The department is located in Room 238, Kaufman Hall. Cooperative Education Cooperative education at Old Dominion University allows students to combine academic study with professional-level training. The integration of academic and professional experience provides a broader education than classroom instruction alone. The Eastern Virginia area affords students p lenty of opportunity for practical experience such as the Engineering College's affiliation with NASA Langley Research Center; CEBAF, and numerous other research sites, various industries, and a large number of consulting firms in the Hampton Roads region. The Co-Op office is located in Kaufman Hall, room 123; phone number: 683-5341.

3 Facilities The Department of Mechanical Engineering has access to or operates a low-speed wind tunnel, materials and solid mechanics laboratories, composite materials laboratory, controls laboratory, design laboratory, CAD laboratory and manufacturing laboratory. Mechanical Engineering students have access to several computational facilities in the department and the college. These include the Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) Laboratory (KH-124), the Mechanical Engineering Software Laboratory (KH-240), the Computer-Aided Drafting Laboratory (KH206) and the College PC Laboratory.

ADMISSIONS Admission for Freshmen and Transfer Students Admission policies and procedures for the College of Engineering and Technology for freshmen and transfer applicants are described in the University catalog. Students are strongly encouraged to register early to attend either a freshmen or transfer student orientation session (Preview); the Admissions Office will send information about Preview following admission to the university. All freshmen intending to major in mechanical engineering will be advised in the Freshmen Engineering Division. Transfer students without credit for the first year of the engineering curriculum will also be advised by the Freshmen Engineering Division. All student records will be transferred to the ME department upon successful completion of first year requirements. Other transfer students will work directly with the ME department for articulation of transfer credit, advising, and class scheduling upon admission to the university. Criteria for Transfer of Freshmen Students In order to transfer from the Engineering Fundamentals Division to the Mechanical Engineering program, students must satisfy the following criteria: 1. complete 30 credit hours applicable to the BSME degree program with a minimum of 2.0 GPA, 2. complete Calculus I course with a grade of C or better, 3. complete ENGL 110C, PHYS 231N, ENGN 110, and ENGN 111 courses.

Financial Aid Information concerning federal and state aid programs and University scholarships is available from the Financial Aid Office. In order to be considered for financial aid during the fall semester, students should

4 be aware that most application deadlines are in early spring.

ADVISING Every student in the program is assigned a faculty advisor. Students work with faculty advisors who provide professional guidance throughout the students' program. This guidance relates to academic program advice, senior specialization and design projects as well as mechanical engineering career opportunities in industry and graduate programs. The department holds two mass advising sessions for course selection, one in the late October-early November time frame for the spring semester, and one in the late March-early April time frame for the summer and fall semesters. Details of advising procedures and curricular requirements are given in the Undergraduate Advising Handbook on the ME Department web site. Each student also works closely with our program support technician Ms. June Blount. Under the supervision of the Department Chair, Ms. Blount maintains student records, assists with transfer credit evaluations, clarifies University and departmental procedures, and meets with students to assist in the selection of appropriate courses. This combination of advising provides students a breadth of advising which aids in timely completion of undergraduate mechanical engineering education. ME Senior Options Students must choose one of the three concentrations (Power/Energy Conversion, Mechanical Systems/Design or Aerospace) in which to specialize their studies during the senior year. Each student's faculty advisor must be consulted and sign off on the Option Approval Form prior to enrolling in the appropriate courses. Students governed by 2000-2002 or later catalogs are required to take three senior technical option courses, while students whose catalog of record is 1998-2000 or before are required to take four senior technical option courses. Details of three available concentrations are given in the Option Approval Form. Students are required to declare their option no later than the second semester of their junior year, and encouraged to discuss various options with their respective faculty advisors during the course advising sessions for pre-registration. Graduation Requirements To obtain the B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, a student must complete the undergraduate mechanical engineering program of 126 semester hours with a grade point average of 2.00 or better. Mechanical engineering students must earn a passing grade in all required engineering courses and have a 2.00 average in all ME courses. The student must also earn a C (2.00) grade or better in the following "minimum performance" courses: Statics, Dynamics, and Mechanics of Solids. Students are generally not permitted to take courses requiring the "minimum performance" courses as prerequisites until after they have earned the C (2.00) grade minimum.

5 In addition, all students must pass the University's Exit Exam of Writing Proficiency. Students are eligible to take this test upon completion of 58 credits. Contact the Writing Center (683-4112) for testing dates and information. After students apply for graduation, they will also receive notification of dates, times, and locations for the SENIOR ASSESSMENT test, administered by the University Testing Center (6833697).

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) is a technical society consisting of 35,000 professional and student members who are devoted to science and engineering in the field of aerospace. Over 7,400 students belong to AIAA. The local ODU AIAA Student Branch is one of 130 Student Branches at college and university campuses across the country. Student membership in the AIAA is open to all full-time college and high school students who have an interest in aerospace and aerospace technology. American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) The American Society of Mechanical Engineers Student Section provides students the opportunity to begin their professional careers by joining a professional engineering society. It can also make students more aware of recent developments in the field of mechanical engineering through publications and activities of the society, as well as promote fellowship and interaction with other engineering organizations. Old Dominion University's ASME Student Section addresses these objectives by sponsoring guest speakers, industrial tours, activities with student sections of other engineering societies, interaction with the parent chapter, and various social activities. ODU's ASME Student Section offers a special opportunity to mechanical engineering students to get involved and become acquainted with professional aspects of mechanical engineering. Fellowship of Minority Engineers and Scientists (FMES) The Fellowship of Minority Engineers and Scientists is a student-run, non-profit organization whose mission is to recruit, retain and successfully graduate its members. The organization acts as a vehicle promoting unity through programs that encourage academic excellence, personal growth and professional development, thereby increasing the number of minority professionals who are committed to the development of the minority community. The organization is also involved in community service projects with the goal of encouraging minority youth to pursue non-traditional careers in science and engineering.

Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) The Society of Automotive Engineers at Old Dominion University is the premier project oriented student

6 chapter on campus. The national chapter of SAE sponsors annual collegiate design series programs that challenge participants in mobility design. Two of the ongoing projects at the ODU student chapter include SAE Mini-Baja and Formula SAE. These projects have a history at Old Dominion and continue to be a career motivated stepping stone for graduating engineers. The student chapter also attracts various practicing engineers from professional industry to interact with students on professional development. The student chapter is also proud to be involved in community outreach programs, which challenge K-12 development and encourage future engineers. Tau Beta Pi Tau Beta Pi, the second oldest honor society in the United States, was founded in 1885 to recognize distinguished scholarship and exemplary character in engineering students, and to "foster a spirit of liberal culture." To be invited to join Tau Beta Pi, a student must display exemplary character and be in the top eighth of the junior class or the top fifth of the senior class of the College of Engineering. The Virginia Gamma chapter at Old Dominion University meets twice a month and performs several service projects such as offering a scholarship for juniors in engineering and providing proctors for the high school "JETS" and "TEAMS" test. Pi Tau Sigma Dr. G. L. Goglia, the first Chairman of Mechanical Engineering at Old Dominion University, founded the Old Dominion Delta Omega Chapter of Pi Tau Sigma. Pi Tau Sigma is a national honorary mechanical engineering society with the sole purpose of recognizing mechanical engineering students who have maintained outstanding scholastic achievement. Campus services include free tutoring related to the mechanical engineering curriculum and aiding ASME in its student activities. Society of Women Engineers (SWE) The Society of Women Engineers is a student and professional organization composed of over 13,000 members nationwide. The specific objectives of the society are: to inform young women, their parents, counselors, and the general public of the qualifications and achievements of women engineers and the opportunities open to them; to assist women engineers in readying themselves for a return to an active work professional; to serve as a center of information on women in engineering and to encourage women engineers to attain high levels of education and professional achievement.

SPECIAL RECOGNITION AND AWARDS Each year the College of Engineering and Technology selects two outstanding graduating seniors for special recognition. The senior with the highest grade point average in the College of Engineering and

7 Technology is recognized at graduation. In addition, a graduating senior in engineering is awarded the Lampe award, honoring the first Dean of engineering. The Lampe award is given to a student who has maintained an outstanding academic record, while demonstrating leadership in extracurriculum activities within the College of Engineering and the University Community. The Lampe award consists of a plaque and an engraved watch, provided by the Engineer's Club of Hampton Roads. The Department selects the graduating senior with the highest academic record to receive the Mechanical Engineering Faculty Award. The department also holds an annual awards and honors luncheon during late spring for all graduating seniors. All graduating students, including those with outstanding academic performance, are recognized in a ceremony attended by the ME faculty and a guest of honor. Besides regular scholarship awards, the Kovner Scholarships for High Academic Achievement (one-time) are awarded to three rising seniors in the Department with quality point averages of 3.5 or higher during their junior academic year. Awards are $300 for the rising senior with the highest QPA, $200 for next highest QPA and $100 for the third highest QPA during their junior academic year only. No application is required. The Kovner Scholarships for Extra-Curricular Activities and Academic Achievement (one-time) are awarded to three rising seniors from the engineering departments who have demonstrated leadership in extra-curricular activities which contribute to the university and who have demonstrated a high level of academic achievement. The awards are $250 each and the definitions of rising senior, junior academic year, and credit hour requirements are the same as for High Academic Achievement Scholarships. Application is required. Kovner Scholarships for minority students in engineering (renewable) are awarded based on potential for successfully completing the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. Awards are $500 per student and may be awarded to entering freshmen, transfer students, or continuing sophomore, junior or senior students. All recipients must be full-time students, and an application is required. In addition, many of the faculty in Mechanical Engineering will consider senior mechanical engineering students with superior academic records for Undergraduate Research Assistantships. A senior who is within two semesters of graduating and has an interest in graduate school can be nominated by a faculty member in the department for an Undergraduate Research Assistantship. Upon selection, undergraduate research assistants receive a stipend of up to $1000, so that they can devote time toward working on a faculty-directed research project. CSEM Scholarships In response to huge market demand for professionals in the areas of computer science, engineering and mathematics (CSEM), the National Science Foundation (NSF) is making extra funds available for students studying in these highly technological areas. Forty new two-year CSEM scholarships with awards ranging from $2,500 to $4,000 per year are available. Typically rising juniors and transfer

8 students with an Associate in Science (AS) degree or equivalent credits are eligible to apply. Selected students must take a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester, and must be able to graduate within two years of receipt of the scholarship with a BSME degree. Application deadline is April 1st. For more information contact Karen R. Kendall in the Scholarship office at (757) 683-5524 or June Blount in the ME office at (757) 683-4557. Recipients of the Governor's Technology Scholarship are not eligible for this award.

FACULTY ACTIVITIES There are 13 faculty in the Mechanical Engineering Department. The department is substantially involved in research and generates more than one million dollars in external support each year. The faculty also normally publishes over 30 journal articles and critically reviewed papers each year.

Faculty Members The Mechanical Engineering Department is fortunate to have a nationally recognized faculty with expertise in a variety of important fields in mechanical engineering and engineering mechanics. Faculty members and their specialties are as follows: Bao, H. Mitsubishi Kasei Professor of Manufacturing Engineering. B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of New South Wales Australia. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. Concurrent Engineering, Life Cycle Costing, project Management. Bawab, S. Associate Professor. B.S., M.S., State University of New York-Buffalo; Ph.D., The Ohio State University. CAD, Mechanical Engineering Design, Kinematics, Dynamics, Vibrations. Chaturvedi, S. K. Professor. B.S., Indian Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University. Heat and Mass Transfer, Solar Energy, Combustion, Thermodynamics. Cupschalk, S. G. Associate Professor. B.S., M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. Metallurgy, Materials Science, Micromechanics. Demuren, A. Professor. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Imperial College, London. Computational Fluid Mechanics, Turbulence Modeling. Hou, J. W.

9 Professor. B.S., National Cheng Kung University; M.S., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., University of Iowa. Design Optimization, Computer Aided Design. Huang, J. K. Professor. B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Automatic Controls, Estimation, Expert Systems. Ibrahim, S. R. Professor. B.S., M.S., University of Alexandria, Egypt; Ph.D.,University of Calgary, Canada. Vibrations, Modal Identification, Structural Dynamics. Prabhakaran, R. Eminent Professor. B.S., M.E., Indian Institute of Technology, Madras; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology. Composite Materials, Nondestructive Testing, Experimental Mechanics, Design, Fatigue and Fracture. Roberts, A. S., Jr. Professor Emeritus. B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., North Carolina State University. Nuclear Engineering, Energy Conversion Systems, Solar Thermal Sciences. Selby, G. V. Professor. B.S., University of Virginia; M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware. Fluid Mechanics, Flow Visualization. Taylor, A. C. III Professor. B.S., Washington and Lee University; B.S. Old Dominion University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Computational Fluid Dynamics, Thermal Sciences. Tiwari, S. N. Professor and Eminent Scholar. B.S., University of Allahabad, India; M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., State University of New York-Stony Brook. Thermal Sciences, Reacting, High Speed Flows, Atmospheric Radiation, Planetary Entry. Williamson, K. M. Assistant Professor. B.S., Bucknell University; M.S. Northwestern University; Ph.D., Tufts University. Bifurcation theory, alloy solidification systems.

Support Staff Blount, June ­ Program Support Technician for the ME Undergraduate Program Mitchell, Diane - Program Support Technician for the ME Graduate Program

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11 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGN 110. Explore Engineering and Technology I. Laboratory 4 hours; 2 credits. An introduction to fundamentals of the practice of engineering including innovation, creativity, design and manufacturing, commercialization, teaming skills, communication and presentation skills, environmental impact, and ethics. ENGN 111. Explore Engineering and Technology II. Laboratory 4 hours; 2 credits. An exploration of engineering and engineering technology disciplines with an emphasis on project management. Projects are required. MET 100. Engineering Graphics. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. A modern treatment of the basic principles of descriptive geometry and engineering drawing, including geometrical construction, orthographic projection, sectional views, and multiview production drawings and an introduction to tolerancing, utilizing both manual and computer based drafting methods. 195, 196. Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Lectures variable; 1--3 credits each semester. Permission of the chair required. 201. Materials Science. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Principles of materials science and emphasis on the relationship between structure and properties and their control through composition and processing. Metals, polymers, ceramics, and composite materials are considered. 203. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I-Materials Science. Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Corequisites: ME 201 and CS 150. This laboratory involves experiments demo nstrating lecture material covered in the ME 201 course. 204. Engineering Mechanics I-Statics. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: PHYS 231N. Prerequisite: MATH 211. Introduction to mechanical engineering problems and their solutions through the study of statics of particles and rigid bodies. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of the static loads with the mechanical properties of the materials being considered. Introduction to the concepts of stress and strain and internal forces as applied to static bodies. 205. Dynamics. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 204 or CEE 100. Corequisite: MATH 212. Introduction to engineering problems and their solutions through a study of the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. General force systems are studied including friction. 220. Engineering Mechanics II-Solid Mechanics. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 204 or CEE 100. Introduction to the concepts of stress, strain and their relation to each other. Stress and strain in axially loaded members and circular rods and tubes subjected to torsion. Normal and shear stress in beams under bending loads. Additional topics include bending deflection, transformation of stress and strain. Mohr's circles, statically indeterminate problems, combined stress and thin walled pressure vessels. 225. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II-Solid Mechanics. Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: CS 150. Corequisite: ME 220. Experimental study of the mechanical behavior of materials under axial, bending and torsional loads. Measurements of elastic properties and strengths. Statistical treatment of data. Use of strain gauges. Experiments with composite materials and piezo-electric transducers. Use of data acquisition system. Experiments parallel lectures in ME 220. 295, 296. Topics of Mechanical Engineering. Lectures variable, 1 to 3 credits each semester. Permission of the chair required.

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303. Mechanics of Fluids. Lectures 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 205, MATH 307U, and MATH 312. Corequisite: ME 305 and 311. Fundamental concepts, fluid statics, basic equations in integral form, open-channel flow, Bernoulli's equation, dimensional analysis and similitude, incompressible viscous flow, pipe friction, boundary layers, introduction to differential analysis. 305. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III-Thermo/Fluids. Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Corequisites: ME 303 and 311. An introduction to thermo -fluid experimentation and measurement; basic flow phenomena demonstrated; measurement techniques for flow temperature, pressure and properties; report writing and data reduction methods, including statistical treatment of data; formal oral reports. 311. Thermodynamics I. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 312. Corequisite: ME 303, 305. Essential definitions of thermodynamics, first law, physical properties, ideal and real gases, second law, reversibility, irreversibility and consequences thermodynamic cycles. 312. Thermodynamics II. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 307U, ME 303 and 311. Concepts and principles dealing with thermodynamic cycles, relations and generalized charts, mixtures of fluids, chemical reactions, chemical and phase equilibrium, thermodynamic aspects of fluid flow; introduction to compressible flow, isentropic and normal shock wave relations. 315. Heat and Mass Transfer. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 303 and 311. Fundamental laws of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; boundary-layer concepts; simultaneous heat, mass and momentum transfer. 332. Mechanical Engineering Design I. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 201, 205, 220 and MET 100. Corequisite: ME 225. Introduction to machine design including review of stress and deflection analysis. Statistical considerations in design, strength of mechanical elements with emphasis on theories of failure and fatigue design, design of mechanical elements such as screws, fasteners, connections, welded joints, and flexible mechanical elements. 340. Computational Methods in Mechanical Engineering. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: CS 150, MATH 307U and MATH 312. A survey of modern computing techniques for mechanical engineers. Numerical algorithms are presented to solve practical problems in mechanical engineering as found in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, dynamics and heat transfer. Emphasis is on providing computational experience in applied numerical methods using computers. Topics include roots of equations, simultaneous equations, differential, integration, regression analysis, interpolation and differential equations. Analysis, understanding, and quantification of computational errors are included in all topics and applications. 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 credits (may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs. Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (qualifies as a guaranteed practicum experience)

368. Internship. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Available for pass/fail grading only. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (qualifies as a guaranteed practicum experience)

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369. Practicum. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career-related experience. (qualifies as a guaranteed practicum experience) 395, 396. Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Lectures variable; 1--3 credits each semester. Permission of the chair required. 404. Vibrations. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 205, 220, and 340 and MATH 312. Free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped, single-degree of freedom, multi-degree of freedom, and continuous systems. Exact and approximate methods to find natural frequencies. 406. Fluid Dynamics and Aerodynamics. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 303, 312 and 340. Inviscid flow concepts include: Euler equations, stream function, velocity potential, singularities, vorticity and circulation laws. Viscous flow topics include boundary layers, separation and turbulent flow. In addition, external flows, lift and drag, thin airfoil theory, finite wing theory and airfoil design will be discussed. 411. Mechanical Engineering Power Systems Theory and Design. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 312 and 315. Thermodynamic properties of gases and vapors relating to power generating devices, work-energy relations, combustion and heat exchangers. Performance analyses and design concepts of gas turbines, internal combustion engines, steam power plants and heat exchanger equipment from theoretical and applied viewpoints. 412. Environmental Control. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 312 and 315. Engineering principles as applied to the analysis and design of systems for automatically controlling man or machine environments. Course encompasses fundamentals of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, refrigeration, cryogenics, and design of building energy systems. 413. Energy Conversion. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 312. Introduction of relevant kinetic theory, solid state and thermodynamic principles; operation and analysis of thermoelectric, photovoltaic, thermionic, magnetohydrodynamic devices, fuel cell, isotopic, and solar power generators. Course seeks to define engineering limits of converter efficiency and other performance criteria. 414. Introduction to Gas Dynamics. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 303 and 311. One-dimensional compressible flow considering isentropic flow, normal shocks, flow in constant area ducts with friction, flow in ducts with heating and cooling, oblique shocks, Prandtl-Meyer expansions, shock-expansion theory, flow around diamond shaped airfoils and wind tunnel mechanics. 416. Solar Power Engineering. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 315. Basic solar radiation processes on earth are followed by engineering analysis of collectors (flat-plate, focusing, etc), receivers/boilers, energy storage methods, space heating and cooling techniques, systems design and dynamic simulation. 417. Propulsion Systems. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 312 or 414/514. Basic principles of operation and performance of propulsion systems --- including turbojet, turboprop, turbofan, and ramjet engines; an introduction to chemical rockets, ion and plasma thrusters. 422. Modern Engineering Materials. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 201, 203, 220 and 332. Limitations of conventional materials; inter-relationship among materials, design and processing, material selection criteria and

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procedures; strengthening mechanisms in metals; superelasticity; shape memory effect, amorphous metals; structure-property relationship in polymers; polymers crystallinity; thermoplastic and thermosets; high-temperature restraint polymers; ceramics; toughening mechanisms in ceramics. 424. Environmental Effects on Materials. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 201, 203 and 225. Degradation of metal due to corrosion, stress-corrosion, dealloying, liquid metal embrittlement, radiation etc.; damage mechanisms in polymers, such as crazing; effects of high and low temperatures on materials; creep and combined creep and fatigue of metals. 426. Structure and Properties of Materials. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 201, 203, and 225. Characteristics of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites; relationship between structure and properties; general considerations of fabrication and mechanical behavior; different types of tests to determine mechanical properties; service requirements, materials selection criteria and procedures. 431. Mechanisms Analysis and Design. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 205 and 332 and MATH 312. Basic relations necessary for analysis of plane motion mechanisms, numerical and analytical solutions for some of the basic mechanisms, methods of calculating rolling and sliding velocities, and accelerations of contacting bodies, cams, and gear. 433. Mechanical Engineering Design II. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 332 and senior standing. Kinematic analysis, force analysis and design of spur, helical, worm, and bevel gears. Antifriction bearings, lubrication and journal bearings, shaft design, mechanical spring design, design of clutches, brakes and couplings. 434W. Project Design and Management I. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 332. This course prepares students to complete their design projects in ME 435. Lecture topics include engineering economics; project planning; costing and risk analysis; and product realization techniques. Course involves written and oral presentations for students to improve communication and teamwork skills. (qualifies as a guaranteed practicum experience) 435. Project Design and Management II. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 434W. Conceptual design ideas are expanded into detailed design ideas. Product realization is applied to complete hardware. Course covers Gantt charts, preliminary design, evaluation and trading matrices, detailed design and analysis, oral and technical reporting including cost analysis. Ethics and patent issues are also included. (qualifies as a guaranteed practicum experience) 436. Dynamic Systems and Control. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 205, MATH 307U and 312. Analysis and synthesis of feedback systems; functional description of dynamic systems; basic controllers; sensitivity, stability and error analysis; transient and steady-state response using computational techniques, root locus and frequency response methods; state-space analysis of control systems.

438. Control System Design and Applications. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 436. Analysis, computer-aided design and implementation of practical control systems; introduction to state-space and digital control; laboratory sessions on data acquisition, system identification, analog-computing, and implementation of analog and digital controllers. 440. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 315, 332 and 340. Basic concepts of finite-element method, method of weighted residuals, interpolation functions, numerical implementation

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of finite-element method, applications to engineering problems such as beam deflection, heat conduction, and plane elastic problems. 441. Computer-Aided Design of Mechanical Systems. Lecture 1.5 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: ME 332. Prerequisites: CS 150, ME 220, MATH 312. Case studies are used to introduce students to CAD software; design processes involving modeling, analysis and design, and verification. Typical case studies are beam and plate designs, turbine blade design, and pipe networks. Advanced topics include: thermal stress analysis and plates and shells.

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B.S. DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Freshman Year 1st Semester MATH 211 CHEM 115N ENGL 110C ENGN 110 Social Science Perspective Calculus I Foundations of Chemistry I English Composition Exploring Engr. & Tech I 4 4 3 2 3 16

Freshman Year 2nd Semester MATH 212 CHEM 117 PHYS 231N CS 150 ENGN 111 Calculus II Foundations of Chemistry II University Physics I Introduction to Programming Exploring Engr. & Tech. II 4 3 4 4 2 17

Sophomore Year 1st Semester PHYS 232N MATH 312 MET 100 ME 201 ME 203 ME 204 University Physics II Calculus III Engineering Graphics Materials Science ME Lab I ­ Materials Engrg. Mechs.I-Statics 4 4 3 3 1 3 18 Sophomore Year 2nd Semester ME 205 ME 220 ME 225 MATH 307 ENGL 131C Philosophy Perspective Dynamics Engineering Mech.II- Solid Mechanics 3 ME Lab II - Solid Mechanics Differential Equations Technical Writing 3 3 1 3 3 16

17 Junior Year 1st Semester ME 311 ME 303 ME 305 ME 340 History Perspective I Thermodynamics I Mechanics of Fluids ME Lab III - Thermo/Fluids Computational Methods in ME 3 3 1 3 3 13

Junior Year 2nd Semester ME 312 Thermodynamics II ME 332 Mechanical Engineering Design I ME 315 Heat and Mass Transfer ENGN 401 Fundamentals of Engineering Literature Perspective Fine and Performing Arts Perspective 3 3 3 1 3 3 16 Senior Year 1st Semester ME 434W Project Design and Management I ME 433 Mechanical Engineering Design II ME 436 Dynamic Systems and Control ME Option Gen. Ed. Upper Division (Cluster) 3 3 3 3 3 15

Senior Year 2nd Semester ME 435 Project Design and Management II ME Option ME Option Gen. Ed. Upper Division (Cluster) 3 3 3 6 15 TOTAL 126

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