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MERCY COLLEGE

Undergraduate Catalogue 2004­2005

OVERVIEW

Table of Contents

· Overview .................................................................... 2 · Admissions ................................................................. 6 · Tuition and Financial Assistance .......................... 12 · Academic Regulations and Procedures ............... 31 · General Education Program .................................. 47 · Programs of Special Interest .................................. 56 · Support Services ...................................................... 63 · Graduate Studies ..................................................... 67 · Student Life .............................................................. 69 · Certificate Programs ............................................... 74 · Associate Degree Programs ................................... 82 · Bachelor Degree Programs .................................. 113 · Honors Program .................................................... 180 · Course Descriptions .............................................. 244 · College Directories ................................................ 366 · Faculty of Instruction ............................................ 369 · Correspondence Directory ................................... 387 · Maps & Directions ................................................ 388 · Accreditations ........................................................ 393 · Index ........................................................................ 395

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Overview

Mercy College is dedicated to offering a curriculum of liberal arts and sciences, as well as pre-professional programs, in order to equip men and women with the knowledge and resources that will enable them to become productive citizens of the community. A diverse faculty of 231 full-time and over 700 part-time faculty instructs more than 10,000 students in day, evening, weekend, and online sessions. The student/faculty ratio is 15:1, and more than 60% of full-time faculty have earned doctorates. Primarily a commuter college, Mercy attracts students from Westchester County and the New York/ New Jersey/Connecticut metropolitan area.

Mission Statement

Mercy College is a comprehensive college offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees. Founded in 1950 by the Sisters of Mercy, the College became independent in 1969. While maintaining academic excellence and access as core values, the College follows the guiding principles of service to the community through the education of both traditional and non-traditional students; reliance on the liberal arts and sciences as the foundation of education; and dedication to teaching and the advancement of knowledge. Mercy College encourages self-discovery and personal and social responsibility in a supportive learning environment in which students are challenged to live a life enhanced by the spirit of inquiry. The College encourages students to appreciate the natural and artistic realms; to grasp the complexity of moral issues; to recognize the significance of technologies; and to understand human differences in culture, gender, and race. In this spirit, in order to afford each student an opportunity for the greatest possible achievement, the College: · provides programs in the liberal arts and sciences as well as career-oriented, pre-professional, and professional degree programs; · offers activities and services that enrich students' intellectual, social, personal, and work lives; · serves students with varied obligations and backgrounds through innovative programs and learning methodologies as well as through flexible scheduling and multiple locations; · affords opportunities to develop skills and competencies needed in the workplace.

History

1950 1961 1968 Mercy College is founded as a junior college under the auspices of the Sisters of Mercy. Mercy College is established as a four-year college offering programs leading to the Baccalaureate Degree. Mercy College receives full accreditation from the Middle States Association. Expansion of the physical plant is completed, doubling the size of the facilities. The Bilingual Program is started.

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1969

The Board of Trustees resolves that the College become independent and non-sectarian. First enrollment of men at the College as full-time students.

OVERVIEW

1974 1975

Extension Center is established at Yorktown Heights. Graduate programs are offered at Mercy College through Long Island University. Extension Centers established at the Bronx and White Plains. Graduate program in Nursing is established at Mercy College. Branch Campus status granted to the Bronx and White Plains. Graduate Programs in Human Resource Management and Learning Technology are established at Mercy College. Six Extension Centers are established in Westchester County and New York City. Graduate Programs in Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy are established at Mercy College. Extension Center established in Queens. Graduate Programs in Education, Organizational Leadership, and Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine are established. Extension Centers established in Jamaica, Queens, and Manhattan. Graduate Program in Banking established.

1982 1986 1991 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

1998-99 Ten additional graduate programs received authorization in 1998-99: Master of Arts in English Literature, Master of Business Administration, Master of Professional Studies in Physician Assistant Studies, Master of Science in Counseling, Master of Science in School Psychology, Master of Science in Psychology, Master of Science in Reading, Master of Science in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Master of Science in School Administration and Supervision, and a Master of Science in School Business Administration. Branch campus status granted to Mercy Manhattan at St. Michael's Academy. 2000 Mercy College celebrates its 50th Anniversary. New graduate programs in Adult Nurse Practitioner, Internet Business Systems, Communication Disorders, Health Services Management and Securities are authorized by the NYSED.

Locations

Mercy College has campus locations in Dobbs Ferry, Yorktown Heights, White Plains, the Bronx, and Manhattan, as well as a thriving online campus. The academic offerings of Mercy College are available at all locations, making the educational process more convenient and accessible to students from the New York metropolitan area. The courses given at the various locations are identical, and are taught by the same academic departments. Although not all majors are offered at each location, most courses in the more popular majors are offered at most locations. Mercy College is easily accessible by bus, train, or car from Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Orange and Dutchess counties; New York City; Northern New Jersey; Long Island; and Southern Connecticut.

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Online Campus

Mercy's sixth campus, MerLIN (Mercy LINK) offers students an accessible and convenient way to learn. No matter where students are located, with Internet access, they may take courses, or even entire degrees, on the College's online campus. Web-based courses and degrees through MerLIN are the equivalent to their on-campus counterparts and are available any hour of the day, anywhere around the globe. At Mercy, there is no distinction between the expectations of traditionally taught classes and online classes. A tour of the College's virtual campus may be found at www.mercy.edu/ merlin

Extension Centers

Mercy's efforts to reach out to prospective students by providing courses at locations and times convenient to them are well known in the communities served by the College. In addition to the five campuses, an extension center has been established in Yonkers. The College also has an extension center at the Global Institute of Finance in Manhattan. Limited credits can be taken at the extension centers. Students are offered courses in the liberal arts and sciences which lead toward the completion of the general education requirements for all four-year degrees. It is the policy of the College that students must move to one of the five campuses before completion of coursework for a degree.

Libraries

The Mercy College Libraries serve students, faculty, staff, and alumni/ae of Mercy College. Members of the general community are also welcome for in-library use of the resources. The main library at the Dobbs Ferry Campus holds the majority of collections and supplements those at four branch campus libraries and smaller extension library sites through a courier delivery system. All library facilities afford space for concentrated learning and easy accessibility to library holdings and services on and beyond any one campus. Librarians are available to provide reference service and information literacy instruction. Learning resources in many media are provided-books, journals, newspapers, audiovisual software and equipment, as well as workstations, which provide access to the Libraries'online catalog, course reserves, and selected electronic databases and Internet resources to support the College's on-site and distance education programs. Some databases provide articles in full-text. Off-site users have access to the Libraries' catalog, course reserves and databases through the library homepage on the College's website www.mercy.edu/libraries. Information resources in all formats are selected for quality and their ability to support the total curriculum and selected research areas. The Libraries' total print collection numbers over 300,000 volumes and approximately 1,442 currently received periodicals. The Yorktown Campus library is a partial depository of the United States Government publications. Most of the Libraries' on-site resources are catalogued using the major bibliographic utility in the nation, OCLC, and the Libraries' local online catalog, and arranged according to the Library of Congress classification system. The Libraries have in place a variety of resource sharing arrangements for both electronic and print resources with other libraries and library systems, principally through WALDO (Westchester Academic Library Directors Organization) and METRO (Metropolitan New York Library Council). Materials at other libraries can be requested through Interlibrary Loan; most arrive in a week or ten days free of charge. Comments from faculty, students, and other library users are welcome and useful to the Libraries as they continue to enhance the systems, services, and collection of physical and virtual resources.

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The Division of Libraries also offers selected open elective courses for credit. Please refer to page 184 and 297 for the explanation of the Division's academic course offerings and description of the courses offered.

OVERVIEW

Computer Facilities

Mercy College has an ongoing commitment to excellence in technology and continues to improve both the technology infrastructure and services to its community. The Mercy College website, http://www.mercy.edu, includes a secure online Admissions application. A comprehensive Wide Area Network connects all five campuses and Extension Centers. The College has twenty-nine student labs and computer classrooms that provide a foundation for technology-based instruction. Each lab has approximately 20 computers. Wireless Internet access is available at the Manhattan and Bronx campuses and is being phased in to other campus locations. All courses are enabled with a web-based online component. Faculty may use this online capability to enhance the classroom experience or to provide a completely online course. Mercy College offers a robust curriculum via Merlin (Mercy College's online learning environment), including several degree programs that can be pursued entirely online. The Mercy College portal, Campus Pipeline, provides access to online learning, email, discussion list, chat and web-based services such as registration, advising, grades, tuition payment, financial aid and degree audit. Registration and tuition payment are also available via phone through the MARS system. Students, faculty and staff may visit and socialize online in the Merlin Café, a virtual meeting place Upon admission, all students are assigned a college email address and are expected to use both their email and the webbased services as an integral part of their college experience. Many official communications from Mercy College are sent via email.

Email

Mercy College considers the college's e-mail system, e.g. employee's [email protected] or [email protected] or student's [email protected] along with the United States Postal Service, an official means of communication. The college will consider employees and students to be duly informed and in receipt of notifications and correspondences sent by a college administrator, staff, or faculty delivered to an employee's or a student's college e-mail account. It is recommended that employees and students frequently access their college assigned e-mail account for official information. Individuals may choose to have their @mercy.edu or their @pipemail.mercy.edu e-mail accounts forwarded to an offcampus account. Such individuals, however, are responsible for managing their disk quota such that there is room for new mail to arrive and for forwarding their Mercy email account to a functioning alternative e-mail address. The college is not responsible for delivery problems to non-official e-mail accounts.

Interinstitutional Cooperation

In the autumn of 1970, Mercy College became a founding member of the Consortium of Colleges in Westchester County. The College also offers courses in Music Performance in Consortium with the Music Conservatory of Westchester.

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Admissions

Degree-Seeking Students (Matriculating)

Mercy College provides access to higher education for all applicants who demonstrate motivation, desire, and the potential to benefit from, and contribute to, its programs of study. Qualified applicants are admitted without regard to race, religion, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, age, or physical disability. The College welcomes applications from: · High school juniors and seniors · High school graduates, and GED recipients · Non-high school graduates · Transfer students · Adults who are returning to education · International students For special admissions categories, see page 9.

Campus Visits, Information Seminars and Interviews

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the College and to schedule an appointment with an Admissions Counselor to discuss academic and career goals, admission requirements, financial aid availability, and registration procedures. Appointments may be made with an Admissions Counselor at any of Mercy's campuses or extension centers. Applicants can also visit our web site at: http://www.mercy.edu Appointments are available at the following sites: · Dobbs Ferry Campus, 555 Broadway, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 (914) 693-7600 or 1-800-MERCY-NY · Yorktown Campus, 2651 Strang Boulevard, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (914) 245-6100 or 1-800-MERCY-NY · White Plains Campus, 277 Martine Avenue, White Plains, NY 10601 (914) 948-3666 or 1-800-MERCY-NY · Bronx Campus, 1200 Waters Place, Bronx, NY 10461 (718) 678-8013 or 1-800-MERCY-NY. · Manhattan Campus, 66 West 35th Street, New York, NY 10001 (212) 615-3300 or 1-800-MERCY-NY. · Virtual Campus, www.mercy/merlin.edu

Extension Centers:

· Yonkers Extension Center, Industrial Park (I-Park), 29 Wells Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10701, (914) 375-9070 · Maiden Lane Extension Center - Global Institute for Finance, 80 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, (212) 480-3200

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Applicants are invited to spend a day or evening on campus, attending classes and talking with students, faculty, and administrators about academic programs and student activities. This is an excellent opportunity to experience first-hand student life at Mercy College. Prospective students are asked to attend one of the frequently scheduled Information Sessions, which are held on each Mercy campus throughout the year. Led by Admissions Counselors, these seminars provide applicants with an opportunity to discuss choosing a college, planning a career, and understanding the job market, as well as the ways in which Mercy can help toward the achievement of those goals. To schedule an appointment with the Office of Admissions or to attend an Information Session, please call 1-800-MERCY-NY.

New Matriculating Students

To qualify for admission to Mercy College an applicant must meet one of the following criteria: High School graduate with an 85 or above average and 4 years of English, 2 years of a Foreign Language, 3 years of Math, 2 years of Science, 2 years of Global Studies and 1 year of American History OR High School graduates who have a Regents Diploma with an 85 average OR Students who have a GED with a score of 280 or better (paper-based test) or 300 or better (computer-based test) OR High School graduates who score 500 or better on both the verbal and math portions of the SAT's OR International Students who score 500 or better on the TOEFL--Within the last five years. Students will be eligible for admission and placement into ENGL 111, Written English and Literary Studies I. They may be eligible for honors courses and/or to challenge some core requirements. High School graduates and GED holders who do not meet the above criteria may gain admission by an acceptable score on the Mercy College Placement Test and a successful interview with an admission counselor. Students without a High School Diploma or GED must also pass the 'ability to benefit' test, as defined by U.S. Department of Education Freshmen candidates who are high school students, recent high school graduates or transfer candidates with less than 60 applicable transfer credits toward their degree at Mercy must submit the following to the Office of Admissions: · A completed Application for Admission (available from the Office of Admissions), accompanied by a non-refundable application fee of $35. · An official high school transcript (which should be mailed by the high school directly to the College), which includes all secondary school grades and class rank. Students whose transcripts are unavailable should consult with an admissions counselor. · A High School Equivalency Diploma, if applicable, and scoresheet. Students who do not meet the minimum criteria for admission into the regular Mercy College program may be eligible for admission to one of the special programs under the umbrella of the College Opportunity Program. The admissions staff will review the application package and the results of the placement exams and may require an interview.

ADMISSIONS

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While a student may be eligible for admission to the College, admission to a specific program (e.g. Veterinary Technology, Communication Disorders, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapy Assistant, Music Industry and Technology, Computer Arts and Technology, and Social Work) is dependent on a student's credentials, placement, and special requirements. See each program's requirements in the appropriate section of this catalogue. Upon notification of acceptance by Mercy College, applicants are requested to contact the Office of Admissions to complete their registration, call 1-800-MERCY NY. All acceptances are based upon completion of all admission requirements and forms. The final high school transcript and any other forms and material that may be required are due on or before August 1. If the high school transcript and the other required forms and material are not submitted by that date, admission may be denied. Application is made with the understanding that admission, matriculation, and graduation are subject to the academic policy of Mercy College and that acceptance implies the obligation to abide by the rules and regulations of the College. The College reserves the right to request the withdrawal of any student who does not meet the requirements stated above. Interested students may request the academic "profile" of the most recent entering freshman class by writing to the Office of Admissions. Information on retention rates may also be requested by writing to the Office of the Dean for Student Affairs.

Matriculating Transfer Students

Transfer candidates must submit the following to the Office of Admissions: · A completed Application for Admission (available from the Office of Admissions), accompanied by a non-refundable application fee of $35. · An official transcript from each college or university previously attended and official translation if necessary. · For applicants who have completed less than 60 college credits in transfer applicable to their degree at Mercy, a high school transcript in addition to their college transcript(s). Although the College requires neither SAT scores nor ACT scores from transfer applicants, applicants may be required to take and receive satisfactory scores on the Mercy College Placement Examination. Transfer applicants without a high school diploma or GED with less than 60 applicable degree credits must also pass the "ability to benefit" test, as defined by the U.S. Department of Education. Upon notification of acceptance by Mercy College, applicants are requested to contact the Office of Admissions to complete their registration by calling 1-800-MERCY NY. Transfer candidates applying for advanced standing will receive credit in transfer upon matriculation at Mercy College. Credit is usually transferable for all courses in which the applicant has obtained a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher. If a student has an associate's degree and an average of "C" in courses taken for that degree, he/she will ordinarily receive full credit for all the courses successfully completed in earning that degree. If a student has an associate's degree, with 48 credits in liberal arts and sciences, and an average grade of "C" in courses taken toward that degree, he/she may receive full credit for having completed the general education requirements for the bachelor's degree at Mercy College with the exception of the six credit Mercy College English requirement which cannot be waived. The evaluation of transcripts for the purpose of determining transferable credit is done on an individual basis. Matriculating students must successfully complete at least 30 semester hours of credit in residence, 15-21 credits of which must be in their major concentration, in order to receive their degree from Mercy College.

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A maximum of 75 credits may be accepted upon transfer from accredited two-year colleges. A maximum of 90 credits may be accepted upon transfer from accredited fouryear colleges. Combined transfer credits from two- and four-year colleges may not exceed 90 credits. Once a transferring student has received notification of acceptance and has, in turn, notified the College of intent to enroll, he or she is encouraged to schedule a meeting with a transfer advisor to plan a program of study and to register for the coming semester.

Academic Advising

In order to assist students to plan a program of studies that meets their individual needs and interests, academic advising is available to all students at Mercy College. Students should discuss their course registration with an academic advisor or Praxis mentor prior to registration. When a student declares a major, a faculty advisor is assigned. Students must obtain the approval of an advisor for any change of program during the semester. Advisors will meet with students throughout the semester, and assist in answering questions and referring students to other offices when appropriate. However, all students must remember that they are responsible for knowing all academic requirements, graduation requirements, policies and procedures as they are stated in the Mercy College Undergraduate Catalogue, course schedule bulletins, Student Handbook, and other publications of the College. Online student support services can be accessed at http:mercy.edu/merlin/resources/stadvising.cfm.

ADMISSIONS

SPECIAL ADMISSIONS CATEGORIES

Members of the Armed Forces

Mercy College is recognized as a Service Members' Opportunity College (SOC), providing educational assistance to active-duty service members and is a joint member of Concurrent Admissions Program. Mercy is an approved college for National Guard Tuition Grant Program. An SOC institution offers the following benefits for service members:

(1) Use of admissions procedures that insure access to higher education for academically qualified military personnel; (2) Evaluation of learning gained through military experiences and academic credit awarded where applicable to the service member's program of study; (3) Evaluation of non-traditional learning and awarding of academic credit for such learning where applicable to the service members' program of study; (4) Evaluation of requests for interinstitutional transfer of credits and acceptance of such credits whenever they are appropriate to the service member's program and are consistent with the College's curriculum; (5) Flexibility to service members in satisfying residence requirements by making adjustments for military students who transfer when there are other assurances of program balance; (6) Designation of personnel with appropriate academic qualifications and experience to administer and supervise SOC-related activities and to develop policies and procedures appropriate to the scope of their voluntary education programs; (7) Education services for veterans. For further information, please write to the Director of Admissions.

Veterans

Qualified students who have found it necessary to postpone or interrupt their college education due to military service are encouraged to enroll at Mercy College. The general

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requirements for admission may be waived for veterans at the discretion of the Dean of Admissions. Mercy College has been approved by the New York State Education Department for the training of veterans under the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966, Public Law 89358.

Advanced Placement

Students who have taken college-level courses in high school and who have received satisfactory scores on the College Board Advanced Placement Examinations are exempt from taking corresponding courses at Mercy College and are eligible for advanced standing. Students may also obtain advanced placement by achieving satisfactory scores on tests administered by the College Level Examination Program, and the Regents College Exam. Credits earned in this way may be used to satisfy general requirements. Also, credit can be awarded for Life Achievement. For further explanation of CLEP and RCE examinations and Life Achievement, see page 39.

Accelerated Students

Accelerated students who have completed the requirements for a high school diploma after three years of high school may matriculate at Mercy College. Such students should apply for admission during their junior year in high school. Exceptional students may matriculate and study full-time under supervision at Mercy College without completing formal work for the high school diploma. Such students are accepted by Mercy College in accordance with the Early Admission Guidelines set forth by the New York State Education Department.

Advanced Study

Exceptional students who wish to complete a fourth year in high school are encouraged to enroll in courses at the College for college credit during their senior year.

Provisional Matriculation/Granting of a High School Equivalency Diploma

A person who has not earned a high school diploma may be matriculated provisionally under the provisions of the New York State High School Equivalency Diploma Program. Upon successful completion of 24 college credits applicable toward a degree program, the student may apply to New York State for a high school equivalency diploma and continue study toward a college degree. The New York State Education Department requires the following credit distribution, beginning with applications for a high school equivalency diploma made on or after September 1, 2000: · Six credits in English language arts, including writing, speaking and reading (literature) · Six credits in mathematics (college level courses only) · Three credits in natural science · Three credits in social science · Three credits in humanities · Three credits in career and technical education and/or foreign languages Students planning to matriculate under this program must be interviewed by an Admissions Counselor and take the Mercy College Placement Examination. The interview and test results are used to assess the student's ability to successfully complete college level

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work. For additional information about this program, students should contact the Office of Admissions at Mercy College, call 1-800-MERCY-NY.

International Students

International applicants who plan to attend Mercy College under F1 status should contact the International Student Office for the application for the I-20 Certificate of Eligibility, admissions application materials and assistance. In addition to providing academic transcripts from previously attended secondary schools and/or colleges, international applicants whose primary language is not English are recommended to submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). For more information regarding TOEFL requirements, please contact the Office of Admissions at 1-800-MERCY-NY or write to [email protected] International applicants also must submit a statement of financial support indicating sufficient funds to cover educational and living expenses. The International Students Office assists members of the Mercy College international community by providing direct support with academic, career, employment, immigration, personal, cross-cultural and financial matters as it serves as a referral source to other college offices and academic departments. In addition, the International Students Office will advise on immigration matters including, general information on students' rights and responsibilities, assistance with procedures required for transferring institutions, extensions of stay, permission to work, and practical training experiences. All F-1 international students must report within fifteen days of arrival to the International Students Office of Mercy College with their travel and immigration documents. International students may contact the International Students Office at (914) 674-7284 or [email protected]

ADMISSIONS

Non-Degree-Seeking Students (Non-Matriculating)

Students who wish to enroll in courses for college credit on a non-matriculating (nondegree) basis may register for those courses by completing a simple non-degree application for admission to Mercy College. Placement testing may be necessary depending on the prerequisites of the chosen courses. Applications for non-matriculating students are available in the Admissions Office at each location. Undergraduate student may only take up to 24 credits as a non-degree seeking student. Credits earned as a non-degree seeking student may not count toward your degree at Mercy.

New York State Department of Health Bureau Immunization Program

All students attending colleges and universities in New York State are required to show proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella. Students born before January 1, 1957, are exempt from this requirement. Failure to show proof of compliance with this regulation may prohibit students from attending classes. In addition, students are required to submit a record of meningococcal meningitis immunization within the past 10 years, or an acknowledgement of meningococcal disease risks and refusal of the immunization signed by the student. For further information about the New York State Department of Health immunization requirements, please contact the Dobbs Ferry Registrar's office at (914) 674-7265.

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Tuition and Financial Assistance 2004-2005

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition

· Full-time per semester (student may register 12-18 credits) ......................... $ 5,615

A student with 12 or more credits in any semester is considered a full-time student.

· Part-time per semester hour (1-11 credits) .................................................... $

472

Fees

· Freshman Application Fee (non-refundable) .................................................. $ · Transfer Application Fee (non-refundable) ..................................................... $ · Audit Fee (50% tuition discount available) · Technology Fee (non-refundable) ............................................................ $7 per credit $84 maximum for 12-18 credits (per semester) · Non-applicant Credit Review ......................................................................... $ · International Student Fee (new students only) ............................................... $ · Challenge Exam Fee (for BIOL 305, BIOL 316, BIOL 317) .......................... $ · Change of Program Fee ................................................................................... $ Payable by all students who add and drop a course during the period from the first day of class to the end of late registration. · Senior Citizens (age 62 +; on the 1st day of class if seats are available) ............... $100/cr · Late Processing Fee (assessed for special computer processing) ...................... $ · Returned Check Fee ......................................................................................... $ Payment covering returned checks and fees and all payments to the College thereafter MUST be made by Cash, Money Order, or Certified Check. · Transcript Fee (official) .................................................................................... $ (student copy) ........................................................................... $

Upon graduation, one complete transcript is provided free of charge; thereafter a fee of $4 is charged for each additional transcript requested. No transcripts are released until all accounts are paid in full.

35 35

35 412 77 11

· Learning Disabilities Fee (per semester) (S.T.A.R. Program) ....................... $ 1,375

77 41

4 2

· Parking ............................................................................................................... $

The parking decal is valid for one year from September through August. Fines for improper parking range from $10 to $50, with a late fee of $6.

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Tuition and Financial Assistance / 13

· Certificate Fee (for completion of Certificate Program) .............................. $ 15 · Graduation Fee Associate's Degree ........................................................ $ 35 Bachelor's Degree ......................................................... $ 60 · Life Achievement Portfolio Submission Fee** ............................................. $120 · Reinstatement of a Cancelled Registration Fee ............................................

**See page 39 for additional costs.

$ 77

Payment

Tuition is payable in full before the start of classes. Arrangements for payment in installments must be made with Tuition Management Systems (TMS). Contact TMS at www.afford.com or 1-800-722-4867. These arrangements must be made at least four weeks before the start of classes. Payment may be made by MasterCard, VISA, or Discover. All tuition and fees are subject to change without prior notice. Many Mercy College students are eligible for Financial Aid Grants and Loans from the state and federal sources. Tuition payment is deferred based upon receipt of these awards. If, for any reason, these awards are not forthcoming within a reasonable length of time, the full balance of tuition and fees is due and payable upon demand by Mercy College. Should it be necessary to place a delinquent account with a collection agency, all fees, including reasonable attorney fees, become the responsibility of the student. Dormitory students should be aware that the due dates for their financial arrangements may be different from the dates for the at-large students population. Please read the housing agreement carefully. Not withstanding anything contained in this catalogue the College administration expressly reserves the right, whenever it deems advisable: (1) to change or modify its schedule of tuition and fees, and (2) to withdraw, cancel, reschedule, or modify any course, program of study, or degree, or any requirements in connection with any of the foregoing.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

For questions regarding billing please contact (914) 378-3489.

Refunds

When a student officially withdraws from any course or courses by filing a formal withdrawal notice (Drop/Add Form) with the Registrar's Office, refund of tuition will be made according to the schedule outlined below. The date of withdrawal is the date upon which the formal withdrawal notice is received in the Registrar's Office. When you register for a course you reserve a place in that particular class. If you register, never attend a class, and do not officially withdraw from one or more classes, you maintain responsibility for full tuition payment. Should it be necessary to place a delinquent account with a collection agency, all fees, including reasonable attorney fees, become the responsibility of the student. The refund policy published is a general policy and may not apply to all sessions in a given semester. Students receiving federal aid, who withdraw completely from the College whether officially or unofficially by ceasing to attend, are subject to federally mandated refund policies. These are described within this publication under Financial Assistance.

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Date of Withdrawal Prior to second week of scheduled course meetings* Prior to third week of scheduled course meetings Prior to fifth week of scheduled course meetings During and after fifth week of scheduled course meetings

Fall or Spring Semesters 100% Refund

Eight-Week Sessions and Summer Sessions 100% Refund

80% Refund See Semester Course Bulletin

80% Refund

No Refund

No Refund

* Computer Arts & Technology, Music Industry & Technology, Social Work, Veterinary Technology fees, and other special course fees are refundable before the opening date of the semester or session; thereafter, they are completely non-refundable.

This refund policy may not apply to international students who enter the U.S. under the terms of their international contract with Mercy College or to students receiving discounted tuition. Students who have elected to pay on the installment plan are responsible for completing all payments if they withdraw during or after the fifth week of the scheduled course meeting for the Fall or Spring Semester, and during or after the second week of scheduled course meeting for the Eight-Week Sessions and Summer Sessions.

Letters of Credit/Special Financial Consideration

Students who withdraw from courses during the semester due to extenuating circumstances (reasons that require credit consideration beyond that allowed by the Official Refund Policy) may apply for special financial consideration. All cases are reviewed by a committee at the end of each semester. Due to state and federal regulations, all withdrawals by students who receive financial aid must be reviewed by the Financial Aid Office. Students requesting special financial consideration must send a letter to the Chair of the Committee for Special Consideration, explaining his/her circumstances. Currently, the Chair is the Dean for Academic Advising. Supporting documentation (medical note documenting illness, dates of medical care, and doctor's approval to return to school; death certificate of parent; spouse; etc.) must be provided for verification. Upon receipt, the student is informed when the Committee for Special Consideration will meet and if additional information is needed. It is the function of the committee to determine if the circumstances merit tuition credit in addition to that which was granted in accordance with the Official Refund Policy. When a decision is reached, the student is notified through Campus Pipeline by the Chair of the Committee for Special Consideration.

Tuition and Financial Assistance / 15

College-Related Costs

Students are advised that they should anticipate certain expenses over and above tuition expenses. While Mercy College cannot guarantee that each student will incur the same expenses, or that these expenses will remain constant throughout the student's years at Mercy College, the following may assist the student in making financial plans.

2004-2005

Full-time 12-18 credits (per semester)

Tuition and Fees .................................................................... $11,398 per year Books .......................................................................................... 1,200 Transportation ........................................................................... 1,136 Maintenance at Home .............................................................. 3,916 Personal Expenses .............................................................. 924 Total ................................................................................... $18,574 per year

The maintenance at home figure is used for students living at home with parents. The living expenses figure used for independent students living off-campus is $8,240 for nine months. Room and board charges for dormitory students are available from the Office of Student Activities and Housing.

Financial Assistance

The primary purpose of financial assistance is to provide academic achievement scholarships and/or financial aid to all eligible matriculated students who find it difficult to meet their educational expenses at Mercy College. The family's ability to finance a college education is measured by a comprehensive financial statement, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This form is the primary instrument used at Mercy College for determining financial need. All students requesting financial assistance, are required to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This form is available from the high school or the College Financial Aid Office or on the web www.fafsa.ed.gov. When filling out the FAFSA, the student must list Mercy College as one of the institutions to which the information may be released. Use the Mercy College Federal Code, which is 002772. When the FAFSA is processed, the College receives the results electronically and will package the student. The student will be sent an email notice through Campus Pipeline that their package is ready. The screen will show the aid programs and the amount of aid from each that the student is eligible to receive and that the College can make available. Students are urged to apply early for Financial Aid in order to have the funds available at the start of the semester. Funds are credited to the student's account when all requirements for eligibility are met, and this is done once a semester for most aid programs. The difference between the total college costs (tuition, fees, transportation, books, and personal expenses) and the ability of the family to contribute to the educational costs determines the student's financial need. Student financial aid is intended to meet this need only to the maximum extent possible. Awards are made without reference to racial or ethnic origin, sex, age, or marital status. Student financial aid is awarded from two sources: (1) the College; and (2) outside funding agencies, such as the federal government, individual states, various public and private agencies, organizations, or companies. The following pages contain capsule

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descriptions of these financial aid programs. Detailed descriptions may be obtained by writing or calling the Financial Aid Office, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York 10522, (914) 674-7328 or by checking our web page at www.mercy.edu In order to maintain their eligibility for financial aid, all students who receive financial aid from the federal and/or state government are required to meet specific standards of academic progress (total number of credits passed and the student's grade point average in a specific semester) and program pursuit (total number of courses completed). The Financial Aid Office and/or Academic Advising maintains current records on all students receiving financial aid and thereby monitors their ongoing eligibility for such aid. More detailed information about these standards follows.

MERCY COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS

During the FAFSA processing by the Department of Education central processor, edits are applied and students may be selected to undergo a process called Verification. The Financial Aid Office is required to collect copies of the student's and/or their parents' 2003 tax return and a Verification Worksheet. Notification of selection for Verification is detailed on the Student Aid Report the student receives from the central processor an electronic message through Campus Pipeline. The student must submit the documents within twenty business days of the date of the Student Aid Report. No aid is awarded until the Verification process has been complete and any changes processed. Failure to supply requested documentation will result in the student not being eligible for aid and owing the full balance due on their account.

Academic Scholarships

Mercy College Scholarships are awarded primarily on the basis of superior academic performance, demonstrated financial need, and the students potential contribution to the intellectual life of the College. These scholarships are available to new incoming freshmen and transfer students. The scholarship application and the FAFSA should be filed by April 1st. Mercy College Scholarships include: Mercy College Freshmen Scholarship: Scholarships awarded to entering freshmen who have demonstrated academic merit by achieving an 87 high school average or above or 1,100 on the SAT. Scholarship awards are renewable for the duration of the undergraduate degree as long as the recipient meets the conditions for retaining the award. Scholarship students are invited to interview with the Mercy College Honors Program. Scholarships allocated are partial awards. The Mercy College 9-11 Grant: In response to the tragic events of September 11th the 911 Grant was established. Full tuition awards are available for undergraduate study to dependents and spouses of the firefighters and police officers who lost their lives. In this way their families are guaranteed to have access to a quality education. Mercy College Transfer Scholarships: Partial scholarships awarded to outstanding entering transfer students who have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above and at least 24 transferable credits. Scholarship awards are renewable for the duration of the undergraduate degree as long as the recipient meets the conditions for retaining the award.

Tuition and Financial Assistance / 17

June Brazil Fellowship: $500 grant for a Mercy College senior in the Acupuncture Program used to support research. Buckingham Scholarship: A scholarship awarded to an honors student who has demonstrated financial need and is a first generation college student. The Carol Burnett Scholarship Fund: Partial scholarship offered to a student who has exhibited academic achievement and has an interest in the arts or humanities, especially the performing arts. The scholarship derives from a generous contribution to the college by Carol Burnett, the world-renowned entertainer. Career Opportunities in Research (COR) Program Sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health: The main purpose of this comprehensive Career Opportunities in Research (COR) Program is to improve the chances of Mercy College undergraduates to gain entry and successfully complete graduate school programs for Ph.D. and/or M.D. degrees to pursue research careers in mental health. A few Mercy College scholars will be selected each year as COR Trainees to receive 1-2 years of full-time enhanced education at Mercy College in conjunction with research training and research experience at the NYS Psychiatric Institute in Manhattan during their junior and/or senior years. Program participants receive tuition assistance as well as stipend support in addition to other support services including tutoring, financial aid counseling, study skills workshops, preparation for graduate school admission exams, and assistance with the graduate school application process. This program is open to all Mercy College students who meet the eligibility criteria and who apply prior to the junior and/or senior year. Participants must have a minimum 3.2 GPA, have completed the college general education curriculum, be a US citizen or permanent resident. To be considered COR application must be submitted and an interview by COR staff is required. Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarship Program sponsored by the National Science Foundation: Scholarship provides tuition support as well as support for other expenses such as books, supplies, fees, and equipment. To be eligible students must be a declared Computer Science, Computer Information Systems or Mathematics major and have completed at least CISC 231; must be a US citizen or national; must be PELL eligible and have a minimum 3.0 GPA and be a full-time student. Selection is made by the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and is competitive. Daddy Short Legs Scholarship: Scholarship supported by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous. Intended for Mercy College seniors who are in jeopardy of dropping out due to financial struggles. Funds can cover transportation, childcare and other expenses. A faculty or staff member of Mercy College must refer students to the Development Office of the College. Dr. Lousie Feroe, President of Mercy College, makes final selection. Direct Marketing Scholarship: Scholarships offered annually to Direct Marketing majors funded by the Direct Marketing Association. Additional past donors for the scholarship fund include The Direct Marketing Club of New York, The Direct Marketing Day of New York and the Direct Marketing Idea Exchange. Criteria for the scholarship is donor specific. Please contact Dr. Walter Neff, Program Director of Direct Marketing for further details.

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The Allida Marie D'Aquino Scholarship in Psychology: A partial scholarship awarded annually to an outstanding psychology student. The scholarship is derived from a fund generously established by friends and colleagues in memory of Dr. Allida Marie D'Aquino, R.S.M., a member of the Mercy College Class of 1968, school psychologist and member of the College's faculty. Eva Ellis Travel Scholarship Fund: The Ellis Traveling Scholar Award has been established for students in the Mercy College Honors Program to travel to Honor Semesters sponsored by the National Collegiate Honors Council. E.L. Franz County Scholarship Program: Scholarships awarded annually to needy adult students who have not recently been in a "normal schooling pattern" and are not normally eligible for scholarship funding. Reflecting the breadth of the College's service area, the program selects scholars from both Westchester and Bronx counties. E.L. Franz Restricted Loan Fund: Loans awarded to members of the student body who demonstrate emergency financial need that would threaten their ability to attend the college in a given semester. The loans, to a maximum of $500, shall be awarded for up to 120 days and are interest-free. Offers voucher loans up to $300. Contact: Financial Aid Office. E.L. Franz Scholarship Fund: A monetary award to an employed student receiving full financial aid in order to reduce dependence on employment income and enhance opportunity for academic success. The Steven Gans Memorial Scholarship: A partial scholarship awarded annually to a continuing undergraduate who has demonstrated creativity and academic achievement in his/her pursuit of an undergraduate degree. Students should be nominated by the faculty in the field of computer science, mathematics, and related sciences on the basis of academic excellence, creativity, community service and financial need. The Linda Christof Guglielmo Scholarship Fund: Established in honor of Mercy College alumna, Linda Christof Guglielmo, the scholarship is designated to a female student having completed freshman year (if full-time) or the equivalent number of credits if part-time. Award is made based on a combination of financial need and academic achievement. To qualify, the recipient must have a minimum of a "B" average with no grade less than a "C". Recipient must maintain this academic standard each academic year in order to qualify for grant continuance. The general intent of the award is to support those who are pursuing careers in education. To qualify, recipients must therefore be enrolled in an education-related undergraduate major, such as (but not necessarily limited to) Education, Speech and Psychology. The award amount shall be $500 per academic year up to three years. The Joel A. Halpern Memorial Scholarship: A scholarship derived from a donation by the Joel A. Halpern Memorial Fund, Inc., made to perpetuate the spirit of Mr. Halpern and in recognition of his contributions to the enrichment of the cultural and educational environment of Westchester County. Awarded annually to a student from Westchester; renewed in the sophomore, junior, and senior years provided the recipient continues to qualify for financial aid according to College guidelines. Hispanic Professional Association Scholarship: A full tuition scholarship awarded annually to a new incoming freshman. Recipient is chosen from candidates recommended by the Hispanic Professional Association.

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HCOP-Health Careers Opportunity Program: College students who are interested in pursuing careers in health care can find the extra help they need through HCOP. Funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, HCOP is geared toward providing economically and educationally disadvantaged students with support they need to enter the health professions. The program provides a summer enrichment program, tutoring, specialized workshops, field trip experiences, assistance with preparing for entrance examinations, guidance through the graduate school application process, and information on securing fellowships, and other funding for graduate school. For more information, contact HCOP at (914) 674-7624. The LINKS-LeMelle Scholarship Program: A partial scholarship awarded annually to defray travel expenses anywhere in the world to undertake a study project, preferably at a major university or educational institution, in preparation for a professional or graduate career. The scholarship will be awarded on a competitive basis to a black, female student who has completed a minimum of 60 credits. The scholarship derives from a fund generously established by the Westchester Chapter of LINKS to honor and perpetuate the ideals of President Wilbert John LeMelle. The Frances T.M. Mahoney Endowed Fund for Students: Please contact the Office of Institutional Advancement for information. Matero Scholarship: Two partial scholarships awarded to one full-time and one parttime student who are member of a union or have an immediate family member who is a member of a union. Eligible students must pursue a degree in industrial relations or business and have a record of academic achievement. The Dr. J. Mae Pepper Memorial Scholarship Fund: Partial scholarships awarded annually to one undergraduate and one graduate student majoring in Nursing. Scholarship selection is based upon academic excellence. This scholarship was established in memory of the former Chairperson of the Nursing Department, Dr. Jessie Mae Pepper. MOBilE: Mercy's Opportunities in Bilingual Education: Paraprofessionals or provisionally certified teachers interested in careers in Bilingual Education may be eligible for assistance through the MOBilE program. MOBilE is comprehensive bilingual teacher training program designed to meet the needs of the growing number of Limited English Proficient (LEP) students in the New York City Schools. The MOBilE Program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, and is a collaborative effort between Mercy College and the New York City Schools. Eligible participants must be working within the New York City Schools and they must be (1) paraprofessionals or provisionally certified teachers currently assigned to work with LEP students; (2) working without permanent certification as bilingual teachers; or (3) intending to complete permanent certification requirements in Bilingual Education. All participants must commit to participate in all MOBilE's training activities. MOBilE provides participants with scholarship funds, academic support, tutoring, specialized workshops and the support services they need to successfully complete advanced degrees in bilingual education. For more information about the program, contact the Education Division. Mortimer Levitt Bright Star Scholarship: Partial scholarships awarded to a freshman, a sophomore and a junior based on academic merit. Student must be summa cum laude track and be nominated by Mercy faculty. The award is renewable with continued academic excellence. Scholarship funding made available by Mortimer Levitt.

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The Mortimer Levitt Scholarship Fund: A scholarship awarded annually to a female member of the student body to help defray travel expenses anywhere in the world, preferably at a major university or educational institution, while undertaking an approved study project. The scholarship(s) will be awarded on the basis of a competition involving the submission of project essays. It originated from donations by Mr. Levitt, founder and president of The Custom Shop. Michael I. Muro Scholarship: An annual $2,500 scholarship for a student entering his senior year and majoring in History. Recipients must be Yonkers residents and shall be chosen on the basis of academic excellence, community service and financial need. The scholarship is derived from a generous contribution to the college by Ann Villane Muro, Class of 1965, in memory of her late husband. Jeanne Marie Neillis Scholarship: A scholarship established in memory of former Natural Science Department Chairperson, Dr. Jeanne Marie Neillis. Students must have demonstrated academic excellence and be a student majoring in the natural sciences. The Anne M. Rice Scholarship: A partial scholarship awarded annually to a student in the natural sciences who has maintained academic excellence. This scholarship was established in memory of the former Dean of the College for Academic Support Services. Rockland Community College Transfer Scholarship: Awarded annually to an outstanding transfer student majoring in business. The student is selected by Rockland Community College faculty. Juan Miguel Roldan Scholarship: Partial scholarship awarded annually to an undergraduate student majoring in Music Industry and Technology with grade point average of 3.2 and above. Award is presented in the spring semester and is renewable each year as long as the student maintains their GPA. Today's Students, Tomorrow's Teacher's Scholarship: Half tuition scholarship awarded to students currently participating in the Today's Students, Tomorrow's Teacher's Program (TSTT). The Director of TSTT directly refers students to Mercy College. U.S Department of Health and Human Services Scholarship for Communication Disorders: Scholarships available for disadvantaged students through a grant from the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Funding available for students who have been accepted into the Bachelor's Degree program in Communication Disorders. Gianetta and Alberto Vitale Scholarship: A partial scholarship for students who demonstrate extraordinary academic ability and who have an interest in Business or Health Science. The scholarship includes a mentorship opportunity and is designed to help reduce the students dependence on outside work to complete his or her college study. Westchester Community College Transfer Scholarship: Awarded annually to two outstanding Westchester Community College graduates majoring in Business and in Liberal Arts. The students are selected by Westchester Community College faculty. The Ilza Williams Scholarship Fund: A partial scholarship award allocated to one or two students in the Teacher Education Program, preferably to someone with an interest in Special Education and/or to a student who is committed to teaching in an urban area. To qualify the student(s) must demonstrate academic achievement with a GPA of no less than 3.0. Students can apply for the scholarship or be nominated by the education faculty. The scholarship is derived from income contributed in the name of Ilza Williams, mentor to Walter Anderson '72, CEO of Parade Publications.

Tuition and Financial Assistance / 21 N.B. Scholarship recipients are expected to maintain a 3.0 scholastic index. Those who fall below 3.0 but maintain a least 2.5, may be allowed to retain their scholarship for one semester on probation. Those who fall below 2.5 automatically lose their scholarship.

Graduate Scholarship

Founded by Dr. Eva F. S. Ellis, the Steinitz Memorial Award of $ 500 is presented annually to the most outstanding student in the Teacher Education Program who plans to enroll in a Mercy College graduate program in Education. The money will be credited toward the first-year graduate tuition. Graduates who have been awarded their degrees in August and December are eligible to receive the award at the June Commencement. They must have completed 45 credits at Mercy College prior to the beginning of the semester in which the June Commencement takes place. Candidates are chosen by the faculty members of the Education Division on the basis of their excellence in the liberal arts and their commitment to the teaching profession.

Mercy College Tuition Assistance Grants (MAG)

Mercy College offers need-based tuition scholarships to supplement federal and state aid. Application is made by completing the FAFSA. Based on the Estimated Family Contribution, full time students will be allocated funds to assist them in meeting their financial obligations to the College. Students who receive non-need based grants from sources outside Mercy College are not eligible for MAG.

Air Force ROTC Scholarship

Mercy College offers an ROTC program administered by personnel from the ROTC program at Manhattan College. AFROTC Cadets at Mercy College are eligible to compete for an AFROTC Scholarship, which pays full tuition, books, incidental fees and provides a stipend of $100 a month tax-free. Upon graduation, cadets are commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Air Force and assigned to positions commensurate with their degree specialties and personal desires.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Army ROTC Scholarships

Mercy College offers an ROTC program administered by the military personnel from Fordham University, which is located in the Bronx. All Army ROTC cadets at Mercy College are eligible to qualify for a two-year scholarship. If the cadet does not win a scholarship, he/she will receive a subsistence allowance for two years. Upon graduation, cadets are commissioned as Second Lieutenants.

Campus Employment

Campus employment is available for full-time students who have demonstrated academic potential and a willingness to earn some of their college expenses. Job assignments are made on the basis of financial need and the skills required for available positions. Students work 12 to 20 hours per week at the prevailing rate of pay.

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NEW YORK STATE FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)

Application for TAP is made by completing the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and listing Mercy College's Federal Aid Number, 002772, in the first slot. Applicants can sign an Electronic TAP Application (ETA) when they sign the FAFSA using their Federal PIN number. HESC (Higher Education Services Corporation) will not process a TAP award without the signed ETA. Those students, who signed an ETA prior to Summer 2000 term, will receive only a Change Form, which should be returned ONLY if there are changes to be made to the Application. Awards can range up to $5,000 and are based on the family's New York State net taxable income on the New York State Tax Return. A student must be registered for at least 12 credits for the 16-week semester or 12 credits at the beginning of Term B for the two eight-week terms. Any student withdrawing from course work may be ineligible to receive the subsequent award. Students who matriculate for a bachelor or an associate degree must meet pursuit and academic progress standards. The principal difference is that for the associate degree the number of semesters of eligibility is limited to six. The following are the academic eligibility requirements for TAP for a student matriculated for the bachelor degree or the associate degree:

1. PROGRAM PURSUIT In each of the semesters a student receives TAP, he or she must register for a minimum of 12 credits and must complete with a pass or fail grade a specific number of credits. (Remedial courses can be included.)

The chart below summarizes this information for both degrees (eligibility for the associate degree is limited to six semesters). These requirements are subject to change pending legislative action.

CHART OF PROGRAM PURSUIT TAP SEMESTER Minimum # Of Credits You Must Register For Minimum # Of Credits You Must Complete With A Pass Or Fail Grade 1 12 2 12 3 12 4 12 5 12 6 12 7 12 8 12 *9 12 *10 12

6

6

9

9

12

12

12

12

12 12

*Note: all students eligible for TAP can receive a total of eight semesters of aid. Semesters nine and ten are applicable only to those students in specifically designated programs. A TAP waiver does not grant an additional semester of TAP.

2.

ACADEMIC PROGRESS At the completion of each TAP semester a student must have accumulate a minimum number of total credits toward his or her degree with a minimum Cumulative Point Index. (Remedial courses cannot be included.)

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The charts below summarize this information for both degrees:

CHART OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS -- Bachelor's Degree TAP SEMESTER Total Credits You Must Have Accumulated By The End Of The Semester Cumulative Point Index You Must Have Achieved By The End Of The Semester 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 *9 *10

0

9

21

33

45

60

75

90

105 120

0

1.2 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

2.0

CHART OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS -- Associate's Degree and Certificate Program TAP SEMESTER Total Credits You Must Have Accumulated By The End Of The Semester Cumulative Point Index You Must Have Achieved By The End Of The Semester 1 2 3 4 5 6

3

9

18

30

45

60

.5

.75 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0

LOSS OF TAP ELIGIBILITY

If a student fails to meet any of the requirements outlined above, he or she will lose eligibility for a TAP award for the following semester. Options at that time are: 1. Request a TAP Waiver. A TAP Waiver is not automatic and is granted only for reasons of EXTRAORDINARY CIRCUMSTANCES. For further information about a TAP Waiver contact the Office of Academic Advising. 2. Remain out of school for at least one full year after losing eligibility. Students who have used four semesters of TAP, but have a GPA of below 2.0, must attain a 2.0 GPA at Mercy College to regain eligibility. 3. Transfer to another college. 4. Continue in college using funds other than TAP to finance educational costs. Eligibility will be regained when the student once again meets the academic requirements.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

New York State Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)

The Aid for Part-Time Study program is a grant program financed by New York State through participating educational institutions. The program provides up to $2,000 per year for qualified part-time undergraduate students. Contact the Financial Aid Office at Mercy College for more information about eligibility and APTS application forms.

Regents Awards for Children of Deceased and Disabled Veterans

Awards for children of deceased or disabled veterans are available to the children of veterans who die or who have a current disability of 50% or more resulting from U.S. Military service. The amount of the award is $450 per year. Application may be made through the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation.

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Regents Awards for Children of Deceased Police Officers, Firefighters, and Corrections Officers

These awards provide up to $450 annually for children of police officers, firefighters, and corrections officers of New York State who have died as a result of injuries sustained in the line of duty. Application may be made through the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation.

Regents Awards for Children of Deceased State Corrections Officers and State Civilian Employees of a Correctional Facility

This award provides financial aid to children of New York State corrections officers or civilian employees of a correctional facility who dies as a result of injuries sustained in the line of duty during the September 1971 Attica uprising. Individuals cannot be eligible for both this award and the regents award for children of deceased police officers, firefighters, and corrections officers. The awards are for full-time undergraduate study and are equal to the sum of annual tuition and average room and board charges specified by the State University of New York. Application may be made through the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation.

New York State Aid to Native Americans

New York State Aid to Native Americans is an entitlement program with neither a qualifying examination nor a limited number of awards. Students may be eligible for an award of $1,000 per year for a maximum of four years of full-time study.

Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP)

Students in this program must be academically underprepared and economically disadvantaged. They may receive supplemental financial assistance from HEOP. Financial aid is calculated on an individual basis and is provided to help students cover the cost of books, supplies, travel, maintenance, tuition, etc. Financial aid packages of HEOP students will also include assistance from various other state and federal programs so that the student's need is met. Application for HEOP is made through the College Opportunity Program Office.

Vietnam Veterans Tuition Award Program

The Vietnam Veterans Tuition Award Program provides financial assistance to veterans enrolled in undergraduate degree programs on either a full or part-time basis. For more information on eligibility and the application procedure, please contact the Financial Aid Office at Mercy College.

FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS

Application for federal programs is made by submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. To be eligible the student must: · have financial need (except for some loan programs) · have a high school diploma, or a New York State General Education Development (GED) Certificate, or have passed the Mercy College Placement Test. · be enrolled as a matriculated student in an eligible program

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· be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen · have a valid social security number · register with a Selective Service, if required. Students receiving federal financial aid must also meet academic requirements. The eligibility requirements for financial aid are: 1. Maintain a Cumulative Index of 2.0. If a student's index is below 2.0, he or she is placed on Academic Probation and must subsequently demonstrate SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS toward a 2.0 Cumulative Index. 2. Maintain a Cumulative Index during each specified semester at or above the minimum standard as outlined in the chart below. 3. By the end of each semester, a student must have accumulated a specified number of degree credits as defined below. Students who matriculate for a bachelor or an associate's degree must meet similar academic progress standards. The principal difference is that for the associate's degree the number of semesters of eligibility is limited to six. The following are the academic eligibility requirements for federal financial aid for candidates for both degrees:

Mercy College Satisfactory Academic Policy for Federal Funds

To be eligible for Federal Student Aid (including federal direct loans) students are required to meet minimum standards at satisfactory academic progress. These standards are measured in both qualitative (cumulative grade point average) and quantitative (maximum time frame to achieve a diploma) terms. Mercy College has set the following minimum requirements for satisfactory academic progress.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Qualitative Measures:

Students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average at the end of each academic year sufficient to successfully graduate from their program of study. In order to ascertain that students are meeting this requirement the following minimum grade point averages must be met at the indicated benchmarks:

Earned Credits Hours 0 - 30 31 - 60 61+ Quantitative Measures:

Minimum GPA 1.50 1.75 2.0

The maximum amount of time a student can take to successfully complete a program of study and receive federal aid is 150% of the normal length of the program as measured in attempted credit hours and academic terms. For a student enrolled in an Associate Degree program, this means they may receive aid for up to six semesters or 90 attempted credit hours, whichever comes first. For a student enrolled in a Bachelor's Degree program they may receive aid for up to twelve semesters or 180 attempted credit hours, whichever comes first. To meet this requirement students must successfully complete at least 67% of attempted hours . For the purpose of determining satisfactory academic progress, all courses attempted must be taken into account. Courses with a grade of "I" or incomplete will be counted

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as a grade of "F' until the requirements have been completed and a final grade has been received. For repeated courses, ONLY the highest grade is included in the grade point average for determining federal financial aid eligibility. Remedial courses and courses with a grade of "W" will be counted in calculating total hours attempted towards the degree.

Appeal Procedures

At the end of each spring term, each student will be evaluated to determine if they are meeting both standard of satisfactory academic progress. If it is determined that a student is not meeting one or both of the standards, then the student will be notified in writing, typically within thirty days of this determination. Once a student has received notification of ineligibility, he or she has the option of requesting a waiver of the above requirements due to "mitigating circumstances". For the purpose of this policy, mitigating circumstances are defined as non-academic, extenuating situations that have had a negative effect on the student's ability to successfully meet the normal satisfactory academic standards. Students must request a waiver in writing with documentation attesting to the mitigating circumstances within thirty days of receipt of notification of ineligibility. A committee of academic advisers and financial aid counselors will consider waivers. Students will be notified in writing of the committee's decision. All decisions made by the committee are final. Likewise, a student may appeal the loss of federal financial aid eligibility to the above policy being incorrectly applied. Appeals should be in writing and should explain how they feel the policy was mistakenly applied. Again, a committee will consider the appeal and that decision will be final.

Transfer Credits

No courses attempted at other institutions (whether federal aid was received or not) are counted as attempted or complete hours when determining aid eligibility.

LOSS OF ELIGIBILITY FOR FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID

If a student fails to meet any of the requirements outlined on these pages, he or she will lose eligibility for federal financial aid. His or her options at that time are: 1. Request a waiver due to "Mitigating Circumstances." A waiver is not automatic and is granted only for reasons of extraordinary circumstances that can be documented. For further information about a waiver contact the Office of Academic Advising. 2. A student may continue in college using funds other than those of federal financial aid programs to finance educational costs. 3. A student who has lost eligibility for Title IV funds may also transfer to another college and regain eligibility. To be eligible for a Developmental Semester, a student must test into and register for a minimum of three remedial credits.

Pell Grant

Eligibility is determined by the application of a formula to the information submitted on the FAFSA. The amount of the award is dependent upon congressional action. In 20042005, the Pell Grant range is from $400 to $4,050 for the academic year. Federal loans requires a minimum of six credits, however, if a student drops below six credits they will lose their loan.

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant

Awards are made to students who demonstrate exceptional need. Exceptional need is defined as having an EFC of less than 500 as computed using the FAFSA information. The grants range from $100 to $4000 per year. Limited funds restrict the size of the grant and number of recipients. Students enrolled for three or more credits may be eligible.

Federal Work Study Program

Positions are available on campus and some students may be able to work off campus for a private non-profit organization or a public agency. To be eligible, the student must show financial need. The hours are usually 12 to 20 hours per week and the rate of pay is at least the federal minimum wage. Students packaged for work study must contact the Office of Career Planning and Placement for available positions.

Federal Stafford Student Loan Program:

There are two types of Stafford loans. Subsidized Stafford loans are based on demonstrated financial need and the federal government pays the interest while the student is in school. Non-need-based Stafford loans are "unsubsidized" and the student is responsible for the interest during in-school and deferment periods. Students may be eligible for both need-based and non-need-based loans but the combined totals may not exceed Stafford limits. For each academic year, a dependent undergraduate student may borrow a maximum of $2,625 as a first-time student, a maximum of $3,500 as a second-year student, and a maximum of $5,500 as a third- and fourth-year student. There is an aggregate loan limit of $23,000 for dependent undergraduate students.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

For each academic year an independent undergraduate student may borrow up to $6,625 (at least $4,000 of this amount must be in unsubsidized Stafford loans) as a first-year student, up to $7,500 (at least $4,000 of this amount must be in unsubsidized Stafford loans) as a second-year student, and up to $10,500 (at least $5,000 of this amount must be in unsubsidized Stafford loans) as a third- or fourth-year student. The aggregate Stafford total for independent undergraduate students is $46,000. A fee of 4% is deducted from the amount of the loan and is paid to the lender. Repayment begins six months after cessation of at least halftime attendance. Annual variable interest rate is based on a 91-day T-bill + 3.1%, capped at 8.25%. When the college receives the results of the processed FAFSA, an email notice is sent directing the student to access Campus-Pipeline-Financial Aid which indicates the amount and type of loan for which the student is eligible. The student must complete a Stafford Loan request to start the loan process specifying the lender they wish to borrow from and the amount of the loan. The link is at the bottom of the Award Summary screen. First time borrowers must also complete an Entrance Interview. The link is at the beginning of the Stafford Loan Application. Once the application has been submitted and certified, the student will receive notification from their lender and they must sign a promissory note. This is a Master Promissory Note which must be signed once and is valid for the entire student's future Stafford Loans. No funds will be released to the school until the lender receives the signed note. The note can be signed electronically or the student can request a paper note. Students who cannot complete the loan process through Campus Pipeline may complete a paper application, entrance interview and promissory note at any of the Financial Aid offices. Loans are generally processed for two semesters

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and the funds are posted to the student's account after the beginning of the term. One semester loans are disbursed in two halves, one at the beginning of the term and the other after 50% of the term has been completed. The student must be registered for at least six credits when the loan funds are received to be eligible for the loan. In order to apply for and receive loan funds, you must be registered for a minimum of six credits. The Stafford Program offers four repayment plans. Every student who borrows a loan must receive entrance and exit counseling. During each counseling session the student will receive detailed information about the repayment plans. The plans are as follows: The Income Contingent Repayment Plan (based on annual income and loan amount) Repayment over 25 years. The Extended Repayment Plan - Over a period of 12 to 30 years depending on loan amount. The Graduated Repayment Plan - Payment increasing every two years over a period of 12 to 30 years. The Standard Repayment Plan - Payment of a fixed amount each month (at least $50) for up to 10 years. The length of time of the actual repayment period will depend on the amount of the loan.

Examples of Typical Beginning Payments for Stafford Loan Repayment Plans

Monthly and Total Payments Under Different Repayment Plans

Standard Graduated Extended Income Contingent

Income= $25,0001 Total Debt Per Month Total Per Month Total Per Month Total Option 12 Per Month $2,600 4,000 7,500 10,000 15,000 $50 50 89 118 178 $3,148 5,539 10,650 14,200 21,300 $25 25 47 63 95 $4,008 6,637 12,444 18,185 27,277 $50 50 79 92 138 $3,148 5,539 11,355 16,615 24,921 $90 96 110 121 142 Total Option 23 Per Month $27 42 79 105 142 Total

$2,867 4,613 9,522 13,451 22,197

$3,937 6,056 11,356 15,141 23,126

Note: Payments are calculated using the 1994-95 interest rate of 7.43%.

1 2 3

Assumes a 5% annual income growth (Census Bureau). Under "Option 1," the borrower always pays the formula amount; i.e. payback rate times income. Under "Option 2," the borrower never pays more than the standard 12-year amortization amount.

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

Parents may borrow an amount up to the cost of attendance less any financial aid each year for each financially dependent student. The annual variable interest rate is based on the 52-week T-Bill + 3.1%, capped at 9%. A fee of 4% is subtracted from the amount of the loan. Repayment begins within 60 days of final loan disbursement.

Tuition and Financial Assistance / 29

When the parent responds requesting the loan, an application/promissory note will be sent to the parent. This must be completed and signed by the student's parents and returned to the Financial Aid Office. A credit check will be done by the lender. Upon approval the funds will be credited to the student's account, and any excess will be refunded to the parent. A parent may apply for a Plus Loan without filing a FAFSA. However, it is strongly recommended that the FAFSA be filed in order to take advantage of receiving the lower interest rate Stafford Loan.

Federal Aid to Native Americans

Native Americans who are full-time students working toward a bachelor degree may receive federal grants. The students must possess one-fourth or more degree of Native American Indian ancestry, must be members of tribes served by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, must presently reside or have resided on the reservation, and must have definite financial need.

Applications may be obtained from the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Syracuse, New York 13210.

Veterans Administration (VA) Educational Benefits

Many programs of educational assistance benefits are available to those who have served in the active military, naval, or air service and to their dependents. Mercy College is fully approved to conduct college level education programs for veterans. Detailed information is available from offices of the Veterans Administration.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

The Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program and the Paul Douglas Teacher Scholarship Program

The Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program and the Paul Douglas Teacher Scholarship Program are federal programs administered by the state. For additional information and application forms, write to: New York State Education Department, State and Federal Scholarship and Fellowship Unit, Cultural Education Center, Albany, New York 12230.

National and Community Service Program

A new program provides full-time educational awards of $4,725 a year. A student can work before, during, or after college and the funds can be used either to pay current educational expenses or to repay federal student loans. Only high school graduates or those students with a GED may participate. For more information call 1-800-942-2677 or write to: The Corporation for National and Community Service, 1100 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20525.

Federally Mandated Refund of Federal Financial Aid Funds Policies

Mercy College is required to prorate the amount of federal financial aid that must be returned to Federal Aid Programs for students who officially withdraw (through the

30 / Tuition and Financial Assistance

Registrar's office) prior to attending 60% of a semester. The percentage of aid retained, less an administrative fee of $100.00, will be applied toward the institutional charges. This situation may leave the student with a balance due the college because institutional charges are separately calculated which should be referenced in the "Refund" section of the catalog. The order in which the refunds are applied to the federal programs is: Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Plus Loan, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, other Title IV Aid Programs, other Federal Sources of Aid, other State, Private, or Institutional Aid, the student. Also, since the New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) award is based on tuition charged, a reduction of tuition will result in a decrease in the TAP award. Faculty members are no longer required to record attendance in class. The are required to report students with academic problems, including non-attendance, using the Early Alert Form to the Academic Advisors. For purposes of calculating tuition charges, all students are considered registered for courses unless they officially withdraw. For further information on official withdrawals and leaves of absence, please refer to that section of this catalogue. Upon official withdrawal from all classes before 60% of a semester has elapsed, the amount of financial aid, grants and loans, that a student may apply towards the charges for that semester will be calculated based upon the percent of time the student attended classes as mandated by the Return to Title Four Regulations of the United States Department of Education.

Academic Regulations and Procedures / 31

Academic Regulations and Procedures

Matriculation and Credit

A student may register for courses without being matriculated, but in the event of subsequent matriculation, the student may not apply any degree requirements from catalogues issued previous to his/her matriculation. Interruption of study other than Leave of Absence (see page 35) will result in loss of matriculation.

Registration

The regular registration periods are designated precisely for each semester, term, and session. Additional times are designated as periods for late registration. It is preferable, both for students and the College, to have students register early in order to avoid being closed out of courses. Students can register for courses each semester via the web (http:/ /www.mercy.edu or telephone 914-674-6400). Registration is subject to academic procedures published by the Registrar's Office, and billing procedures published by the Business Office. All program changes and late registrations are contingent upon advisor approval. Academic policy in some divisions may preclude a student from entering a course after its first meeting.

Prerequisites

Some courses in the catalogue have other courses as prerequisites. Permission to take a course without indicated prerequisites must be obtained from the chairperson of the division offering the course.

Auditing a Course

Students may enroll in a course on an audit basis. Students receive a 50% discount on the current tuition rate to audit, but receive no grade or credit for the course. Students must fill out an Audit Form available in the Registrar's Office at each campus within the first two weeks of a semester, term, or session.

Course Load

Matriculated students may normally register for no more than a total of five courses in a given 16-week daytime semester, or five courses during a 16-week evening semester, or two courses in an eight-week term. Permission to register for an additional course (18 credits) must be obtained from the Registrar. Guidelines for 18 credits include at least a 3.0 GPA in the previous two full-time semesters at Mercy College. Permission to register for 21 credits in any combination of terms during any semester must be obtained in writing from the Undergraduate Dean at the Dobbs Ferry Campus. Guidelines for approval for 21 credits include the following: minimum GPA of 3.8, successful completion of 18 credits in one semester with a good GPA (no withdrawals, "F"s, or "D"s), and assessment by the Assistant Provost. Non-matriculated students may not register for more than 15 credits in any given 16-week term. A student may register for fewer than five courses, and some students may be recommended or required to take a

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reduced program in cases of academic deficiency. In summer sessions no student may register for more than two courses in each session, or more than a total of four courses in three sessions extending over a 12-week period.

Scheduling Options

Mercy College has long been noted as an innovator in the field of higher education. One of its most important contributions has been the use of flexible scheduling patterns designed to make traditional education more convenient and accessible to the nontraditional student. Web and telephone registration is available to all students. In general most courses are scheduled at least once a year at one of the Mercy College campuses. Many courses are scheduled in multiple sections at more than one location. A complete listing of course offerings for each location is published three times a year for the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters. Day classes are offered at all campuses in a traditional 16-week semester. Evening classes are offered at all campuses with 16-week semesters and 8-week terms available. Weekend classes are offered in a 16-week semester during the day on Saturday at the Dobbs Ferry, Bronx, and Yorktown campuses. The White Plains Campus offers a Weekend Program which meets for 10 weekends in the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Summer classes are available at the main and branch campuses offering 6- and 12-week terms.

Tutorial Courses

A tutorial course is a substitute for a regular course offering that is not scheduled to be given during the last year of a student's residence and is needed to complete his/her requirements for graduation. It is not meant to be used as a scheduling convenience, but, rather, as a last resort after all other scheduling alternatives have been exhausted. The tutorial will always be worth the same number of credits as the catalogue course. (1) The tutorial will ordinarily be given in the student's senior year and only if the required course will not be offered during that year. (2) The student must obtain the approval of an instructor, who will submit to the division chairperson an outline of the course, a bibliography, an assignment plan, and a procedure for evaluating the student's performance. After approval by the division chairperson, the plan must be submitted to the Undergraduate Dean at the Dobbs Ferry Campus or the Campus Dean at the branch campus, whose approval must be obtained prior to registration. (3) The student will register for the course as listed in the catalogue, rather than for independent study, and all registration deadlines for a given semester, session, or term apply to tutorial registrations.

Independent Study Projects

An independent study project is an original course of study planned by the student in conjunction with a faculty member for the purpose of covering material not offered as a regular course. The student must be at least a junior and have a cumulative index no less than 3.0. To initiate the independent study, a student must fill out the required form (which can be obtained in the Academic Advising Office at each Mercy College location), attach to it a written proposal for the course of study to be undertaken, and obtain the approval of his/her mentor, the division chairperson, and the Undergraduate Dean at the Dobbs Ferry Campus or the Campus Dean at the Branch Campus in that order. The Undergraduate Dean or Campus Dean will send it to the Office of the Registrar, and the student can register for the course at any campus location.

Academic Regulations and Procedures / 33

A student may take no more than nine credits in independent study in his/her major area and no more than a total of 15 credits toward his/her degree. No more than one independent study may be taken in any semester.

Evaluation

Students are evaluated in the majority of their courses by the commonly used grading system in which: A AB+ B BC+ C CD F P NC AU Z 4.0 3.67 3.33 3.0 2.67 2.33 2.0 1.67 1.0 0.0 excellent very good very good good good satisfactory satisfactory passing but unsatisfactory passing but unsatisfactory failure acceptable work work not acceptable for credit the student is auditing the course no grade submitted by instructor

The grade of "I" is given for a course in which the student has not completed all course requirements. All incomplete work must be completed and delivered to the instructor, or to his/her designated representative, by the last day of the four-week period immediately following the final day of the term in which the course was offered. The instructor shall take such work into consideration in assigning a final grade. If the instructor judges that all the student's work taken together does not justify the change from "I" to a passing grade, she/he shall submit no further grade, and the "I" shall automatically become an "F" on the day by which resolution of "I" grades is required. Students who have at least sophomore standing and a "C" average or better may have the option of taking courses ordinarily graded under the conventional system, under the P/ NC system with the following restrictions. (1) A course taken optionally for P/NC grading may not be used to fulfill any major requirements, or any general requirement except under the heading Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective or Open Elective. (2) No student may take more than one course graded P/NC optionally during the time period of any given semester. (3) Students must make formal application on forms provided for this purpose in the Office of the Registrar. The application must be signed by the course instructor and must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar within the first two weeks of a semester, session, or term. Once submitted, the request stands and the student may not petition for a change to a letter grade in the course. Some courses are offered, by way of an exception to general practice, for only a P/NC grade. Such courses are not subject to the restrictions described above. The final grade in a course is the instructor's estimate of the student's achievement; it is based upon quality of performance in addition to regularity of attendance and class participation.

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34 / Academic Regulations and Procedures

Instructors are required to keep a complete grade record of each class for one full year after the end of the semester or term in which the course was taught. Questions regarding a grade received in a course must be addressed within this time frame and should be addressed first with the instructor. The division chairperson and the Assistant Provost in turn may be consulted by either party to insure fairness.

Withdrawal from a Course

A student who has decided that he/she will be unable to complete the work of a course satisfactorily may withdraw from the course up to the 12th week of a 16-week term and up to the fifth week of an eight-week term. Permission to withdraw must be obtained in writing through the Academic Advising Office or Praxis Center at the campus where the student is registered for the course. Course withdrawls can be processed via the web, MARS or in person at the Registrar's Office at your campus of choice. Any student withdrawing from one or more courses must also have a financial aid counselor sign the withdrawal form. The counselor will advise the student regarding refund policy and the effect of the withdrawal on continuing eligibility for federal funds and New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). Withdrawal from a course is indicated on a student's transcript by "W." Note that a student who stops attending a class but does not officially withdraw by completing a withdrawal form (signed by an advisor and turned into the Registrar's Office, before the withdrawal deadline) will receive a regular letter grade as assigned by the instructor, in most cases an "F."

Late Registration or Late Add

Late registration ends one week after the first day of class for any given term. Any student who wishes to register after that time, and has made the appropriate payment or payment arrangement, must show written permission signed and dated on the registration form by the Dean of the Campus where the class is being offered. If the student has missed more than one meeting of the class the student must also get written permission from the instructor of that course or written proof that the student has been attending the class before the Campus Dean may give approval. If the class is closed, the student must get a permit from the Division Chairperson before the Dean may sign the late registration form.

Late Withdrawal

Students wishing to withdraw after the last published day of withdrawal for any given term must get permission from the Campus Dean of their home campus. The withdrawal form, with the Dean's signature, must be processed in person at the Registrar's office at any Mercy College location. Note: The Dean will usually request supporting evidence such as a letter from the student explaining the extraordinary circumstances that warrant a late withdrawal as well as medical or other documentation as needed. Students receiving any form of financial aid including scholarships, grants and loans must also meet with a financial aid counselor to determine the financial implications associated with the withdrawal. It is important to note that all withdrawals are based upon tuition commitments for the full semester in accordance with the published refund schedule. The effective date of withdrawal is the date when the student withdrew using either Campus Pipeline, MARS (automated telephone registration) or the date the withdrawal was processed in the Registrar's office. Notification of intent to withdraw to the instructor, advisor/ mentor, financial aid or admissions counselor is not sufficient. Failure to attend classes does not constitute a withdrawal.

Academic Regulations and Procedures / 35

Exception to Refund Policies

If extraordinary circumstances warrant the issuance of a full or pro rated refund after the allowable date a formal request must be made in writing within 45 days of the student's withdrawal. The written justification should be submitted to the Dean for Advising who will review and forward it with a recommendation to the Committee for Special Consideration. The following situations may be considered: Personal Illness ­ The policy applies to the student's or a dependent child's personal illness only and must be documented with an original copy of the physician's diagnosis and recommendation, and if working, disability papers. Business Transfer ­ Students who leave the area due to a permanent business transfer during the first 50% of the class. Written substantiation from the employer must accompany the request. Note: A change of employer, work responsibilities, hours, or required business travel does not constitute a Business Transfer. Military Service ­ Any student required to discontinue attendance of classes due to military service. A copy of the orders to report to active duty must accompany the request. Note: Students who have applied for and received a refund from a loan may not apply for special consideration until the loan refund is fully repaid to the college.

Attendance at Class

Generally, attendance at class is a requirement for successful completion of a course. Attendance policies are established by each academic division. In most divisions a maximum of four absences (in a 16-week course which meets twice weekly) can be taken before a student may be given a failing grade for unsatisfactory attendance. Details of specific attendance requirements, and of other course requirements, are indicated at the beginning of each semester in each class by the instructor. Students m es in which they are enrolled if the courses are to be used in meeting credit requirements for receiving financial aid.

Leave of Absence

A student in good standing may request a leave of absence from the College, for a maximum of two consecutive semesters, without prejudice to his/her standing. If the student does not return for the third semester he/she must re-apply to the College for admission and follow the rules and regulations of that catalogue year. A leave of absence may be obtained by written request from the Office of Academic Advising at the campus where the student is taking courses or online via Campus Pipeline under School Resources on the left side of the School Services Tab. Students receiving Title IV funds, Pell, SEDG, FWS, SUB and UNSUB Stafford and PLUS loans must refer to the Leave of Absence for Title IV purposes listed below.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

Leave of Absence (Title IV Purposes)

Students who are receiving or who have received financial aid through Federal Title IV programs may request a leave of absence, however, the student must request a leave of absence in writing. The request must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for approval. There is no charge for processing the request. Only one request will be granted to a student in any 12-month period, not to exceed 60 days. A student who has been granted a leave of absence by the financial aid office is not considered to have withdrawn from the institution for purposes of determining the

36 / Academic Regulations and Procedures

student's in-school status. If, however, the student fails to return at the expiration of the approved leave of absence, the institution must use the student's documented last recorded date of class attendance as the student's withdrawal date. A student who has registered for courses must also submit a withdrawal form to the Business Office.

Good Academic Standing

In order to be in good academic standing a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, or must be placed officially on academic probation by the Committee for Academic Standing and subsequently demonstrate satisfactory academic progress toward a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. At the end of each semester the Committee for Academic Standing reviews the records of all matriculated students whose grade point average is below 2.0. These students are then placed on academic probation. At the end of each semester those students on probation who have not demonstrated acceptable academic progress toward a 2.0 scholastic index are academically dismissed. Those students who have made acceptable progress may be continued on probation for one or more additional semesters. Students receiving funds from TAP and Title IV must follow the Guidelines for Academic Progress stated on page 22. Students who place into non-degree courses in English as a Second Language, are required to complete these courses during their initial semesters at the College. A student who withdraws from or fails the same non-degree course three times will not be permitted to register again at the College without approval from the Committee for Academic Standing.

Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid

In order to maintain their eligibility for financial aid all students who receive financial aid from the federal and/or state government are required to meet specific standards of academic progress (total number of credits passed and the student's grade point average in a specific semester). The Financial Aid Office and/or Business Office maintains current records on all students receiving financial aid and thereby monitors their ongoing eligibility for such aid. More detailed information about these standards is available through the Financial Aid Office and the Office of Academic Advising.

Scholastic Index

The scholastic index shows the average grade attained in a set of completed courses. The scholastic index for a given set of courses is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned in those courses by the total number of credits that would be conferred by the successful completion of those courses. The number of quality points earned through completion of a given course is determined by multiplying the number of academic credits the course may confer by the coefficient corresponding to the grade received. The scale of coefficients is as follows:

A ......................... 4.0 A- ........................ 3.67 B+ ....................... 3.33 B .......................... 3.0 B- ........................ 2.67

C+ ....................... 2.33 C ......................... 2.0 C- ........................ 1.67 D ......................... 1.0 F .......................... 0.0

Academic Regulations and Procedures / 37

Example: If a student completes five courses, each conferring three credits, grades "A", "B+", "C+", "C", he/she can compute his/her scholastic index as follows: Credits 3 3 3 3 3 X X X X X Coefficient 4.0 (A) 3.33 (B+) 2.33 (C+) 2.33 (C+) 2.0 (C) = = = = = Quality Points 12.0 9.99 6.99 6.99 6.0__ 41.97

Scholastic index = 41.97 = 2.798 15

Courses taken under the Pass/No Credit system, courses for which a student has received a "W", and courses taken at other colleges do not affect the student's scholastic index.

Grade Suppression

If a student repeats a course, the lower grade will be suppressed from their GPA. The original course and the repeated course must be taken at Mercy College. The lower grade will remain on the transcript but will not count in the overall GPA. Students receiving Financial Aid should check with their counselor to make sure that repeating does not affect their aid.

Transcripts and Grade Reports

Grade reports are sent as soon as possible after the end of each semester, usually within a three-week period. Transcripts are only processed at the i-Park Yonkers extension. No transcript is issued for a student whose financial account is not settled.

Dean's List

A student whose semester index is at least 3.7 is eligible for inclusion on the Dean's List; the student must be matriculated and carrying a full program of studies (12 credits per semester).

Academic Grievance Policy

The purpose of the academic grievance policy is to provide a process for the equitable resolution of formal academic grievances. Responsibility for this purpose resides with the Academic Grievance Panel, whose composition and functions are described in the Student Academic Grievance Handbook. The academic grievance policy applies to faculty-student, administrator-student, and student-student grievances over academic issues including grade disputes, cheating and plagiarism, and the application of academic policies. The Academic Grievance Panel will have jurisdiction over these matters. Such jurisdiction does not include matters covered by existing grievance procedures for issues such as sexual harassment or over issues covered by the student disciplinary policy (see Mercy College Student Handbook). Appeals of academic dismissal are made directly to the Committee on Academic Standing. In developing the Academic Grievance Policy, Mercy College continues to recommend and encourage the informal resolution of academic grievances, believing that effective communication is also part of the educational process. Students with academic concerns are

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encouraged to communicate with their instructors and/or academic advisors early in the semester to resolve issues and to allow time for appropriate actions and referrals. Copies of the Student Academic Grievance Handbook may be obtained from the Office of the Undergraduate Dean, the Office of Student Affairs, or the Office of the Campus Dean. See page 70 for further information regarding complaint procedures.

Cheating and Plagiarism

Cheating and plagiarism are contrary to the purpose of any educational institution and must be dealt with most severely if students' work is to have any validity. An instructor who determines that a student has cheated on a test or assignment will at a minimum give a zero for that item and may give a failure for the course. Normally the matter is dealt with by the instructor and the student, but the division chairperson or Assistant Provost for Academic Affairs may be consulted by either party to ensure fairness. Plagiarism which is the appropriation of words or ideas of another without recognition of the source is another form of cheating. An instructor who determines that a student has plagiarized will give a zero for the paper or project and may give a failure for the course. Both cheating and plagiarism are grounds for dismissal from the College. Any action taken regarding cheating or plagiarism is subject to the Academic Grievance Policy outlined in the Undergraduate Catalogue and in the Student Handbook.

Academic Dismissal

A matriculated student who after being placed on Academic Probation, fails to achieve good academic standing will be dismissed from Mercy College and will not thereafter be allowed to register for any courses at Mercy College. A student who has been academically dismissed for the first time has the right to make a formal appeal to the Committee on Academic Standing. If the student is readmitted he/ she is placed on one-semester probation during which time he/she must meet the conditions specified by the Committee or be subject to final dismissal.

Transfer of Credit from Other Institutions

Mercy College imposes no time limit on courses eligible for transfer credit. In order to have credits accepted in transfer, a student must be matriculated in a Mercy College degree program. The transfer credits must be applicable to degree requirements, and the applicant must have obtained a grade of "C" or higher. Credit accepted in transfer does not affect a student's cumulative scholastic index for purposes of academic standing at the College. If a student has an associate's degree with 48 credits in the liberal arts and sciences from an accredited institution of higher education, and an average of "C" in courses taken toward that degree, full credit may be received for having completed the general education requirements for the bachelor's degree at Mercy College. A maximum of 75 credits may be accepted in transfer from accredited two-year colleges. All evaluation of transcripts for the purpose of determining transferable credit is done on an individual basis. Students who are matriculated at Mercy College are encouraged to complete their programs at the College. Students who wish to take courses at other colleges with the intention of transferring the courses to Mercy College must obtain written approval from the appropriate division. The appropriate division is defined as the Mercy College division that offers comparable courses to the course being transferred. Students must

Academic Regulations and Procedures / 39

obtain approval prior to enrolling in a course at another institution, in order to insure that the course is equivalent in content to the comparable course at Mercy College. Students must complete the course with a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher. Transferring courses to Mercy College can in some cases make the student ineligible for graduation honors. Students should check the section on Graduation Honors for further information. For a full explanation of transfer procedures, see page 8.

Credit by Examination

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) allows students to earn credit for what they already know. The advantages of CLEP are twofold: first, students can eliminate classes in subjects about which they are already knowledgeable and, second, students can reduce the time spent in college. Up to 18 credits can be earned through CLEP's General Examinations. Through CLEP's Subject Examinations, even more credits can be earned and applied toward graduation. Awarded CLEP credits are considered as transfer credits. Therefore, they do not count toward the minimum residency requirement, and they appear on the student's transcript with no effect on the grade point average or the calculation of graduation honors. Students interested in CLEP examinations should consult with an Academic Advisor. For further information, contact CLEP at http://www.collegeboard.com/clep. Students may also obtain advanced placement by achieving satisfactory scores on tests administered by the Regents College Exam. For more information on the RCE, call the Admissions Office at 914-674-7402.

Credit for Life Achievement

Many adults, although they have not attended college, or at least have not completed the requirements for a bachelor's degree, have held positions or engaged in activities which, as educational achievements, may be considered comparable in value to some of the academic experiences that a college affords. Consequently, Mercy College has established a policy of granting college credit for such achievements, subject to the following conditions: Up to 30 credits may be granted for achievement that results in learning the college judges to be of such quality as to be comparable to educational achievement at the college level. Professional and paraprofessional work, political activity, volunteer work, and other employment that can be related to academic disciplines are among the kinds of experience that may have this quality. Applicants are judged on both the quality and length of their achievement, and must have spent usually at least five years in the employment of activities for which credit is sought to be eligible to receive the full 30 credits. Life Achievement credit is given only in the category of Open Electives; it does not count toward the residency requirement at the College. Although credit is formally granted only after the applicant has completed 30 credits at Mercy College, application is open to any matriculated student at Mercy College who, at the time of application, is at least 25 years old. Notice of intention to grant credit, subject to the satisfactory completion of 30 credits, will be given when appropriate. Application may not be made during the student's final semester before graduation. Students who have received credit for professional preparation and who seek additional credit for practice of the same profession cannot receive more than 45 credits in all for the preparation and practice combined.

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Since credit is not automatically awarded for any achievement, the applicant must submit a portfolio describing in detail the experience for which credit is sought and convincingly demonstrate the reasons for considering his/her achievement worthy of college credit. The portfolio consists of an application, a worksheet, a synopsis, and essay. Any student interested in applying for life achievement credit must get a copy of the guidelines for students available at the Office of Academic Advising at each campus. There is a non-refundable $120 fee due upon submission of the portfolio. Students who receive up to 15 credits for their portfolio pay an additional $320. Students applying for a maximum of 30 credits pay the $420 fee and an additional $40 for every three credits granted above 15 credits.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Bachelor's Degree

To be eligible for graduation with the bachelor's degree, a student must successfully complete at least 120 academic credits, and these credits must fulfill one of the major curricular distributions in the college catalogue. The student must follow the curriculum requirements of the catalogue under which he/she matriculates or of any successive catalogue during his/her continued matriculation prior to graduation. He/she may not use combinations from two or more catalogues to satisfy these requirements. It should be noted that for the bachelor of arts degree, 90 of 120 credits must be completed in the liberal arts and sciences and for the bachelor of science degree, 60 of the 120 credits must be completed in the liberal arts and sciences. Curricular distributions should be interpreted accordingly. Further, to be eligible for graduation with the bachelor's degree, a student must fulfill the following conditions: (1) A minimum average of "C" in course grades represented by a cumulative scholastic index of not less than 2.0 in courses taken at Mercy College. (2) A minimum average of "C" in course grades represented by a cumulative scholastic index of not less than 2.0 in courses taken at Mercy College in the major field of study. (3) A minimum of at least 30 credits taken in residence at Mercy College. Graduate level courses are not included in the 30 credit residency requirement. (4) A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration taken in residence at Mercy College. The minimum for each major concentration is listed under the major concentration requirements. (5) Residency is defined as courses offered by Mercy College for academic credit. Courses offered by other institutions or in cooperation with Mercy College do not fulfill residency requirements. Programs of study leading to the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree are available with the following major concentrations (Hegis Codes indicated):

Behavioral Science (2201) Biology (0401) Communication Disorders (1220) English (1501) Film Studies (1010) History (2205)

Interdisciplinary Studies (4901) Mathematics (1701) Medical Technology (1223) Psychology (2001) Spanish (1105) Sociology (2208)

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Programs of study leading to the bachelor of science degree only are available with the following major concentrations (Hegis Codes indicated): Accounting (0502) Business Administration (0506) Computer Information Systems (0702) Computer Science (0701) Corporation Communications (0699) Criminal Justice (2105) Environmental Health and Safety Management (2199) Health Science (1299) Journalism and Media (0699) Legal Studies (0599) Music Industry & Technology (1099) Nursing (Upper Division only) (1203.10) Organizational Management (0506) Social Work (2104) Therapeutic Recreation (2199) Veterinary Technology (0104)

Program of study leading to the bachelor of fine arts degree is available in the following major concentration (Hegis Code indicated): Computer Arts and Technology (1009) Specific requirements for each major concentration are listed at the beginning of each division's course offerings. The College also offers the following professional programs in Education leading to "initial" certificates: Single Certificate Programs:

· · · · Early Childhood, Birth - Grade Two Childhood Education, Grades One - Six Middle Childhood Education, Grades Five - Nine Adolescence Education, Grades Seven - Twelve

Integrated Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Birth - Grade Two · Childhood Education and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Grades One - Six · Early Childhood and Childhood Education, Birth - Grade Six · Middle Childhood and Adolescence Education, Grades Five - Twelve Comprehensive Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood, Childhood Education and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Birth ­ Grade Six · Middle Childhood, Adolescence Education, and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Grades Five ­ Twelve

Double Major

Occasionally a student wishes to specialize in two discrete areas of study to prepare for his/her intended career. In such a case the student may want to apply for a double major. The student will complete a single set of core and elective requirements and complete two sets of major requirements, one for each major desired. Where the same course is required in each major, the student may use no more than four such courses to satisfy both major requirements. Some major concentrations contain overlapping courses and therefore a double major cannot be completed. Students wishing to pursue a double major should consult with the Registrar early in their academic career.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

Double Degrees

Occasionally a student wishing to specialize in two discrete areas of study (e.g., Business Administration and Computer Science) will complete a double major. The New York State Education Department has issued guidelines stating that under such circumstances

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the award of two separate degrees would be inappropriate. In rare cases, however, where the two specializations are clearly widely separated (e.g., Business Administration and Music), and the student might need separate credentials attesting to his/her achievement in each area, separate degrees may be awarded. Students wishing to pursue two separate degrees should consult with the Registrar early in their academic career.

Associate's Degree

To be eligible for graduation with the associate's degree, a student must successfully complete 60 or more academic credits, and these credits must fulfill one of the curricular distributions catalogued by the College. It should be noted that for the associate in arts degree all 60 credits must be completed in the liberal arts and sciences; for the associate in science degree, 48 of 60 credits must be completed in the liberal arts and sciences. Further, to be eligible for graduation with the associate's degree, a student must fulfill the following conditions: (1) A minimum average of "C" in course grades represented by a cumulative scholastic index of not less than 2.0 in courses taken at Mercy College. (2) A minimum of one year's work in residence, i.e., at least 30 credits taken at Mercy College. Note: Enrollment in other than registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize a student's eligibility for certain student aid awards.

Curricular Distributions for all the Bachelor's Degrees and Associate's Degrees in Liberal Arts: General Rules and Definitions ENGLISH

Based on the English and Reading Placement Examinations, all students are required to take a sequence of two to five English courses beginning with ENGL 006, ENGL 109, ENGL 110, ENGL 111, and culminating with ENGL 112. All students are required to complete ENGL 111 and ENGL 112 or the equivalent. ENGL 006, ENGL 109, and ENGL 110 do not count toward fulfilling the general education requirement in English.

SPEECH

All students are required to complete SPCM 110, Oral Communication. SPCM 105, SPCM 108, and SPCM 109 do not count toward fulfilling the general education requirement in Speech.

MATHEMATICS

Based on their Mathematics Placement Examination results, students may be required to take MATH 105, Mathematics: Concepts and Applications. All students are required to complete MATH 115, Mathematics for the Liberal Arts, or MATH 116, College Algebra. MATH 105 does not count toward fulfilling the general education requirement in Mathematics/Natural Science. Note: No more than 12 credits earned in courses in English as a Second Language are applicable toward a degree. The same limitation holds for courses that teach secretarial skills (typing, shorthand, etc.). Students who present courses from both categories, ESL and secretarial, may apply no more than 15 credits from the combined categories.

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LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES ELECTIVES

These are courses selected in the area of the liberal arts and sciences. The College offers courses in these areas under the following headings (check individual course listings):

Art Behavioral Science Biology Chemistry Economics English English as a Second Language French History Humanities Interdisciplinary Studies Italian

Linguistics Mathematics Music Philosophy Physical Science Physics Political Science Psychology Religion Sociology Spanish Speech

OPEN ELECTIVES

These are any courses selected by the student, whether in the liberal arts and sciences or in such professional areas as Education, Accounting, Management, Law, Finance, Marketing, Computer Information Systems, Hotel and Restaurant Management, Social Work, Journalism and Media, Physical Education, Nursing, Public Safety, Criminal Justice, Paralegal Studies, Therapeutic Recreation, Veterinary Technology, etc. Please see the associate's degree section for the curricular distributions of the following associate in applied science degrees: Banking, Business, Information Technology, Music Industry & Technology, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Television Production, and the associate in science degree in Accounting, and Human Services.

Graduation Honors

To be eligible for academic honors (summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum laude) and major program honors, a student must be a candidate for a baccalaureate degree and complete a minimum of 36 credits in residency at Mercy College. Required indices for honors are as follows: Summa Cum Laude ........................ 3.8 Magna Cum Laude .......................... 3.6 Cum Laude ....................................... 3.4

To be eligible for major program honors, a student must have an overall GPA of 3.0 and a 3.5 GPA in courses meeting requirements for their major program in the semester prior to the beginning of the semester their commencement takes place.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

To be eligible for the President's Medal, the Chancellor's Medal, and major program honors, which are awarded annually, and to have his/her honors appear in the published commencement program, a student must complete a minimum of 36 credits in residency at Mercy College prior to the beginning of the semester in which his/her commencement takes place. Candidates for the Associate Degree are eligible for honors if they have completed at least 36 credits at Mercy College and a minimum GPA of 3.4 for courses completed at Mercy College in the semester before their commencement takes place. Transfer credits are not included in the calculation for graduation honors.

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Graduation Application

Formal graduation ceremonies take place in May. Diplomas are issued in February, May and August. A student applies for graduation by filling out the Graduation Application Form (available in the Office of the Registrar) and submitting the completed form to the Registrar. Applications must be submitted according to the following deadlines. Failure to meet the appropriate deadline will result in postponement of graduation to the next scheduled date for issuing diplomas. There are no exceptions to this policy.

Deadlines for applying for Degree Conferral

Application Date

February .......................................................................................... October 15 May .................................................................................................. February 2 August ................................................................................................... May 17

Graduation Fee

Associate's Degree ................................................................................. $35.00 Bachelor's Degree .................................................................................. $60.00

Honor Societies

Mercy College has established chapters of 14 national honor societies. Alpha Chi is an honor society promoting general academic excellence and character. Divisions that have established chapters of honor societies are: Business, Accounting -- Delta Mu Delta; Criminal Justice -- Alpha Phi Sigma; Education -- Kappa Delta Pi; English -- Sigma Tau Delta; Foreign Languages -- Phi Sigma Iota; Gerontology -- Sigma Phi Omega; History -- Phi Alpha Theta; Mathematics and Computer Information Science -- Pi Mu Epsilon; Natural Sciences -- Beta Beta Beta; Nursing -- Sigma Theta Tau; Philosophy -- Phi Sigma Tau; Psychology -- Psi Chi; Social Work -- Phi Alpha; and Social Sciences -- Pi Gamma Mu. For information concerning requirements for Alpha Chi, contact Dr. Benson, Director, Honors Program; for all other honor societies, contact the appropriate division.

Undergraduate Programs

BACHELOR OF ARTS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS ASSOCIATE IN ARTS ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE

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Major Concentrations

Most major concentrations are offered at the main campus in Dobbs Ferry (DF). In addition, major concentrations are offered at the branch campuses in Yorktown Heights (YH), the Bronx (BX), Manhattan (MT) and White Plains (WP). All campuses offer the associate's degree in arts and in science.

Criminal Justice (2105) (DF, YH, WP, BX) General Accounting (0502) English (1501) (DF, YH, BX) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Environmental Health and Safety Computers and Information Systems Management (2199) (DF) Financial Accounting Film Studies (1010 (DF) Taxation Health Science (1299) (DF) Management Accounting (0502) History (2205) (DF, BX, WP, YH) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Interdisciplinary Studies (4901) (WP) Computers and Information Systems Digital Media Production Public Accounting (0502) Journalism and Media (0699) (DF) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Legal Studies (0599) (DF) Computers and Information Systems Behavioral Science (2201) (DF, BX, WP, YH, MT) Paralegal Studies Political Science Community Health Mathematics (1701) (DF) Gerontology Computer Science Health Services Management Medical Technology (1223) (DF) Biology (0401) (DF) Music Industry & Technology (1099) (WP) Pre-Health Professional Studies Nursing (1203.10 (DF) Business (0506) (DF, BX, WP, YH, MT) (Upper Division Program) Banking (Maiden Lane, ABI) Organizational Management (0506) Direct Marketing (DF,YH,WP,BX, MT) Finance Pre-Chiropractic (DF) General Business Administration Psychology (2001) (DF, YH, WP, BX) International Business Computer Applications Management Social Work (2104) (DF) Marketing Sociology (2208) (DF, YH, WP, BX) Communication Disorders (1506) (DF) Computer Applications Computer Arts + Technology (1009) (WP) Spanish (1105) Computer Information Systems (0702) Therapeutic Recreation (2199) (DF) (DF,BX) Veterinary Technology (0104) (DF) Computer Science (0701) (DF) Pre-Veterinary Medicine Corporate Communications (0699) (WP)

Associate's Degrees

The following associate's degrees are offered at Mercy College:

Accounting (5002) (A.S.) (DF) Banking (A.A.S.) (AIB) Business (5004) (A.A.S.) (DF,BX,WP,YH) Human Services (5501) (A.S.) (DF,BX,WP,YH) Child Care Elder Care Substance Abuse Television Production (5008) (A.A.S.) (DF) Occupational Therapy Assistant (5210) (A.A.S.) (DF) Physical Therapist Assistant (5219) (A.A.S.) (DF) Liberal Arts & Sciences (5649) (A.S.) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Music Industry & Technology (5012) (A.A.S.) (DF) Information Technology (5104) (A.A.S.) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Associate in Arts (5649) (DF, BX, WP,YH, MT) Associate in Science (5649) (DF, BX, WP, YH, MT)

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

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Teacher Certification

Single Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood, Birth - Grade Two · Childhood Education, Grades One - Six · Middle Childhood Education, Grades Five - Nine · Adolescence Education, Grades Seven ­ Twelve Integrated Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Birth - Grade Two · Childhood Education and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Grades One - Six · Early Childhood and Childhood Education, Birth - Grade Six · Middle Childhood and Adolescence Education, Grades Five - Twelve Comprehensive Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood, Childhood Education and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Birth ­ Grade Six · Middle Childhood, Adolescence Education, and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Grades Five - Twelve

Minor Concentrations

Students may group a set of elective courses as a minor concentration. Minor concentrations are noted on a student's transcript as a way of recognizing that he/she has, over and above the required major program, also concentrated to a lesser degree in one or more other areas. The rules governing a minor concentration are the same for all areas except Social Work and are as follows:

A minor concentration is constituted by a group of courses (numbered 120 or above) amounting to at least 15 credits in one of the following areas:

Accounting Banking Biology Business Administration Chemistry Communications Disorders Computer Information Science Computer Science Criminal Justice Economics English Enviornmental Health and Safety Film Finance History Humanities Journalism* Legal Studies Management Marketing Mathematics Music Industry + Technology Psychology Social Work** Sociology Spanish Speech Therapeutic Recreation

* Requires 18 credits ** Requires 15 credits of social work theory with no more than 3 credits in social work practice.

The following conditions should be noted: (1) At least nine credits to be used toward a minor concentration must have been taken at Mercy College. (2) A student must have a 2.0 cumulative scholastic index in an area for it to be recorded as a minor concentration. (3) Courses already counted toward a major or the general requirement can not also constitute part of the minor concentration.

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General Education Program

The General Education Curriculum has two distinct but interrelated purposes. First, it is designed to insure that students have a certain breadth of knowledge. That knowledge is drawn from the liberal arts and sciences, and extends beyond the specialization of a major field. Second, the General Education Curriculum is designed to insure that students develop the basic competencies that support continued growth and achievement in careers and in the professions. The Goals of General Education: · Critical, logical, and creative thinking · · · · · Effective reading and writing Effective speaking and listening Effective quantitative reasoning Effective use of information technologies An understanding of: ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ The world of nature and technology The past and its implications for the present and future Individuals, groups, institutions, societies, and culture Aesthetic forms Ethical issues

To achieve these goals, the General Education Curriculum has been designed with the following components:

Communication Skills................9 credits English Speech Quantitative Skills..................3-6 credits Mathematics Information Technologies..........3 credits Computers Scientific Perspectives............3-6 credits Science Historical Perspectives...............6 credits History Social Perspectives.....................9 credits Economics Political Science Psychology Sociology Cross-Cultural Perspectives.......12 credits Arts Music Foreign Language Philosophy Religion

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

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General Education

COMMUNICATION SKILLS

WHY ENGLISH? The ability to turn your thoughts into written words that are clear, precise, and well-ordered is a key skill for college and career. Learn how to write competently, and you will gain a major competitive advantage. Become a superior writer and you should go far. In order to write well, you must acquire the parallel ability to read well. Reading well results in greater self-understanding, wisdom, and general knowledge. WHY SPEECH? Humans are unique in the power and complexity of their oral communication. We use spoken language in an immense variety of ways, from utterances of one syllable to lengthy declamations. Words can wound, heal, inspire, humiliate, inform, amuse and do a thousand other things. Knowing what you want to say, and how to say it effectively, are aptitudes of the greatest value in both private life and on the job. QUANTITATIVE SKILLS WHY MATHEMATICS? Much of the world can be understood in terms of numbers, from the demographics of the street you live on to the fluctuations of the economy. We think in numbers continually as we go through the day, checking the time, buying something in a store, preparing a meal, and considering a job change. To survive and prosper in modern society requires the ability to comprehend the complexities and relationships of numbers and to apply them in both daily life and for specialized purposes. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES WHY COMPUTERS? Once horses powered the world, as did steam for a period and then oil. In an information age, computers in many ways power the world. This technology, which is still in its early years, has transformed almost every aspect of contemporary society, including education, business, medicine, art, entertainment, warfare, etc. Being computer literate has become as necessary as being literate.

SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVES

WHY SCIENCE? Among the benefits science has brought to mankind is a method of finding and verifying phenomena that is remarkably accurate. This method has revealed many of the beauties and intricacies of the physical world while solving some of its greatest mysteries. As applied, science is responsible for much of modern society, from electricity to flight to heart transplants. Without knowledge of scientific method and content, much of the physical world is less interesting and less accessible.

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

WHY HISTORY? "Everything is history," a famous anthropologist once said. With coverage ranging from the individuals and events that changed the world to the routine customs of a society, history provides mankind's collective memory. By connecting us to what came before, history gives us our bearings. You cannot know who you really are without knowing the past.

SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

WHY ECONOMICS? If there was always enough of everything for everyone, the discipline of economics would not exist. Since there is not, economics explains how natural resources, physical and mental labor, capital, and other assets are organized and allocated. Knowledge of the different systems that societies have set up for production and distribution, and their strengths and weaknesses, provides perspectives on contemporary American capitalism and the ways in which it is evolving.

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WHY POLITICAL SCIENCE? Who governs, how did they gain that right, and what are their policies and methods? These are issues as old as the beginning of civilization and as fresh as today's newspaper. Everyone in a society has a stake in the way political power is acquired and how it is used although only some societies have allowed the general population an influence of these matters. An understanding of the American political structure in particular is essential for anyone living within it. WHY PSYCHOLOGY? The varieties of human thought, emotion, and behavior are almost endless. Psychology finds patterns in this remarkable diversity by charting the ranges and limits of the ways in which we think, feel and act, and searching for the causes. By exploring our minds and conduct, psychology enables us to better know ourselves and to better know others. WHY SOCIOLOGY? "When in Rome, do as the Romans do," goes the old saying. But what exactly do the Romans do, and why do they do it? Sociology examines the customs and habits of a society, and the relationships that hold it together and make it work. This discipline can open startling new angles of vision by showing the insiders of a society the people who live there - how to see their lives with the detachment of outsiders.

CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

WHY ART? The forms of art are vast, from cave paintings to miniature portraits to abstract sculptures to collections of "found" objects. Vast too are art's evocative powers, as it can please, shock, educate, amuse, embarrass, sadden, enrage, etc. Definitions of what is and is not art, and criteria for what constitutes "good" art, also vary, both from society to society and within the same society over time. To engage with this complex realm, to have art in one's life, broadens and enriches. WHY MUSIC? Like art, the forms, definitions, and standards of music are numerous, culturally distinct, historically variable, and easily subject to controversy. Reactions to music are also broad ranged and can be as extreme - riots have been caused by a musical performance. Without the pleasure of music the world would be a far duller place. The advantage of an informed ear allows one to share more deeply in the wonders of vocal and instrumental music. WHY FOREIGN LANGUAGE? Over 6,500 languages are spoken in the world. To know only a single language is to foolishly go hungry at a feast. The ability to read, write, or speak a foreign language, even to a limited degree, makes one more multi-faceted. It also provides a connection across a formidable divide to another culture. And in a nation where many different languages are heard, being bilingual may be important for professional success. WHY PHILOSOPHY? Philosophers can be pesky. They look beyond the surface of things that preoccupy most people and ask probing, often disturbing, questions about nature, man, and universe. By examining such fundamental issues as how we think and how we know, what is morality, what is justice, and the like, they force us to work out in our minds our own deepest convictions. WHY RELIGION? Over the centuries and around the world, religious belief has inspired saints, martyrs, ascetics, causes of many different kinds, masterpieces of literature, great art and architecture, and elaborate systems of theology. The religious impulse is among the oldest and strongest of human urges and has been central to many cultures. To know a society one must know what it holds sacred.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

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Before they can be awarded a degree, all students will demonstrate an appropriate level of competence in the essential skills expected of a college graduate. Assessments will occur in courses within the General Education curriculum, in the Junior Seminar, and in each major. The essential skills, as determined by the faculty of Mercy College, are: 1. written communication 2. oral communication 3. critical thinking 4. critical reading 5. quantitative reasoning 6. information literacy The pursuit of competence in these areas is a process of intellectual and personal growth. Through regular assessment, students will come to recognize both their strengths and weaknesses, and learn to build on their achievements while improving the areas in which they are deficient. Assessment begins with placement tests for freshmen that evaluate the student's current level of accomplishment and indicate the appropriate initial course placement. Constructive assessment continues throughout the student's undergraduate experience. The process enables all students to monitor their progress in learning each skill. The College's academic support services are available to assist students in their skill development, including the libraries, the Center for Learning, Career Planning and Placement, etc. The competence process culminates in a final assessment project, or a series of projects, completed by the student's last semester. These projects are designed to certify the student's mastery of the core techniques and subject matter in their major programs.

WRITING

Students will gain the ability to communicate clearly and effectively through written communication. Students need to demonstrate the following skills: · Choose and narrow a subject. · Identify a purpose and formulate an appropriate thesis statement. · Organize ideas effectively and develop them within a logical paragraph structure. · Support points clearly with specific and adequate evidence. · Demonstrate command of accepted English sentence structure and grammar. · Revise and edit according to standard English practice, including attention to punctuation and appropriate vocabulary. · Acknowledge all sources by documenting research according to a recognized manual.

ORAL COMUNICATION

Students will gain the ability to comprehend and to communicate orally in American English with precision and clarity. Students will demonstrate the following skills: · Appreciate the nature of the listening audience and anticipate its needs and requirements.

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· Express information orally (without reading from a written text) in natural, energetic and vocally varied phrases. · Incorporate the responses of listeners into the oral communication process. · Hear, interpret, and evaluate information and accurately respond to instructions. · Speak in phases that conform to the conventions of accurate English pronunciation, articulation (diction), grammar and syntax. · Employ appropriate non-verbal face and body movements, posture, dress, and visual aids to reinforce the oral/verbal message. · Select and narrow a subject plus clarify a purpose/objective. · Structure information into purposeful, recognizable units (opening, body, closing) and support ideas using appropriate data and referenced documentation.

CRITICAL THINKING

Students will acquire the ability to analyze and interpret a subject insightfully and in depth. Students need to demonstrate the following skills: · Place subject matter in context. · Discover its patterns and relationships · Identify its positive and negative elements. · Indicate its significance. · Provide evidence for positions taken by using relevant data accurately. · Support these positions with arguments that are clear, precise, logical and carefully qualified. · Show an understanding of opposing positions, identifying their assumptions, reasoning and conclusions. · Recognize strengths and weaknesses in opposing positions.

CRITICAL READING

Students will gain the ability to read and understand primary and secondary sources. Students need to demonstrate the following skills: · Understand core vocabulary. · Recognize and distinguish main ideas from supporting ideas in various printed materials. · Outline and summarize the content of printed material. · Distinguish facts, interpretations, and opinions in printed material. · Analyze and evaluate the value and validity of printed material. · Draw conclusions and make inferences based on content of printed material.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students will gain ability to use established methods of computation and contemporary technology to analyze issues and answer questions germane to their environment.

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The quantitative reasoning competencies students need to acquire in college include the ability to: · Apply quantification as a problem-solving strategy to real world situations. · Perform arithmetic computations necessary to solve common mathematical problems. · Critically evaluate information presented in tabular and graphic form. · Demonstrate computer literacy through the use of software applications. · Recognize the reasonableness of numeric answers. · Employ quantification and quantitative techniques both in generalization from data, or observed facts, and in deriving predictions from generalizations. · Understand sampling and recognize its role in statistical claims.

INFORMATION LITERACY

Information literacy involves the ability to identify, retrieve, evaluate, organize, cite properly and use a wide range of resources including print, graphic, and electronic for independent learning and practical problem solving. Students need to demonstrate the following skills: · Recognize and articulate the need for information. · Access information from appropriate sources. · Critically analyze and evaluate information and its sources. · Organize, synthesize and integrate information. · Apply information to the development of a specific purpose using effective and creative decision making. · Generate and effectively communicate information and knowledge. · Develop skills in using information technologies. · Understand and respect the ethical, legal, and sociopolitical aspects of information and information technology. · Develop an appreciation for the role of information literacy in fostering lifelong learning.

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General Education Curriculum

Outline of Requirements CREDITS Note: Courses in the Honors Program may fulfill many of the general education requirements (see page 55). ENGLISH ............................................................................................................... 6 ENGLISH 111 Written English and Literary Studies I (3 crs.) ENGLISH 112 Written English and Literary Studies II (3 crs.) SPEECH .................................................................................................................. 3 SPEECH 110 Oral Communication (3 crs.) HISTORY ............................................................................................................... 6 Students choose two courses from the following areas of study. These two courses may not be taken from the same area of study. EUROPEAN HISTORY: HISTORY 101 European History to 1500 (3 crs.) HISTORY 102 European History Since 1500 (3 crs.) AMERICAN HISTORY: HISTORY 105 American History Through 1877 (3 crs.) HISTORY 106 American History Since 1877 (3 crs.) NON-WESTERN HISTORY: HISTORY 117 Introduction to Asian History (3 crs.) HISTORY 118 Introduction to African History (3 crs.) HISTORY 119 Introduction to Latin American History (3 crs.) PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY, ECONOMICS, AND GOVERNMENT . 9 Students choose three courses from the following four courses: PSYCHOLOGY SOCIOLOGY ECONOMICS POLITICAL SCIENCE 101 101 115 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 crs.) Introduction to Sociology (3 crs.) The Economy, Jobs, and You (3 crs.) Political Power in America (3 crs.)

PHILOSOPHY, RELIGION, FOREIGN LANGUAGE, ART, AND MUSIC ............................................................................................... 12

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

Students choose one course from each of the following three areas and one additional course from the combined list of course offerings. PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3 crs.) PHILOSOPHY 112 Logical Thinking (3 crs.) RELIGION 109 Introduction to Religion (3 crs.) RELIGION 111 Judaism, Christianity, Islam (3 crs.) RELIGION 112 Far Eastern Religions (3 crs.)

* Only available to non-native speakers of English.

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ART HISTORY AND MUSIC APPRECIATION: ART 107 Art History Survey (3 crs.) MUSIC 107 Music Appreciation (3 crs.) FOREIGN LANGUAGES: FRENCH 115 FRENCH 116 ITALIAN 115 ITALIAN 116 SPANISH 115 SPANISH 116 HUMANITIES 101 HUMANITIES 102 Beginning French for Communication (3 crs.) Communicating in French (3 crs.) Beginning Italian for Communication (3 crs.) Communicating in Italian (3 crs.) Beginning Spanish for Communication (3 crs.) Communicating in Spanish (3 crs.) American Culture I (3crs.)* American Culture II (3crs)*

MATHEMATICS, NATURAL SCIENCES, AND COMPUTER SCIENCE ............................................................................. 12 Students choose one course from each of the following three areas: MATHEMATICS: MATHEMATICS MATHEMATICS 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts (3 crs.) 116 College Algebra (3 crs.)

COMPUTER SCIENCE: COMPUTER SCIENCE 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software (3 crs.) or any liberal arts COMPUTER SCIENCE course numbered 120 or higher. Only one computer science course may be used to satisfy the general education requirement. NATURAL SCIENCE: CHEMISTRY PHYSICS PHYSICAL SCIENCE PHYSICAL SCIENCE BIOLOGY BIOLOGY BIOLOGY BIOLOGY BIOLOGY BIOLOGY BIOLOGY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY PHYSICS NATURAL SCIENCE 110 110 110 111 110 111 112 113 116 117 130 160 160 160 110 Introduction to Chemistry (3 crs.) Introduction to Physics (3 crs.) Introduction to Geology (3 crs.) Introduction to Astronomy (3 crs.) Introduction to Human Biology (3 crs.) Introduction to Human Genetics (3 crs.) Environmental Science (3 crs.) Evolution (3 crs.) Plants and People (3 crs.) Nutrition (3 crs.) Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 crs.) General Biology I (4 crs.) General Chemistry I (4 crs.) General Physics I (4 crs.) Principles of Science I (3 crs.)

Students choose one course from the following: MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE: Any NATURAL SCIENCE course from the above list or numbered 161. Any MATHEMATICS course numbered 115-122, 201, 212, 244, 260, or 261. TOTAL CREDITS ............................................................................................... 48

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A student may meet the course requirements of the general education curriculum through a combination of several approaches. (1) Courses. The student earns credits by achieving a passing grade in the individual courses designated in the general education curriculum. (2) Honors Courses. The student earns credits by achieving a passing grade in designated Honors courses that fulfill general education requirements: REQUIREMENT English Speech History Psychology/Sociology Economics Philosophy Religion Art Music Foreign Language Natural Science HONORS COURSE(S) ENGL 190 and/or 191 Honors English I and II SPCM 190 Honors Speech HIST 195 and/or 196 Honors Topics in History I and II PSYN 195 Honors Psychology BHSC 190 Honors Cultural Anthropology ECON 190 Honors Economics and Public Policy PHIL 190 and/or 191 Honors Philosophy I and II RELG 190 Honors Topics in Religion ARTT 190 and/or 191 Honors History of Art I and II MUSI 195 Honors Music FORL 19X Honors Foreign Language BIOL 190 Topics in Honors Biology

(3) Credit-Bearing Exams. With the approval of individual divisions, a student may earn credit for general education courses by successfully passing a standardized examination (for example, the Advanced Placement examination). (4) Departmental Waiver. Departments responsible for general education courses may waive their general education courses for students who demonstrate exceptional skill or achievement according to departmental placement tests or other criteria established by the department. (5) Transfer Courses. The student earns credits in the general education curriculum by transferring approved courses with a grade of "C" or better from accredited institutions of higher education. (6) Associate's Degrees. Mercy College recognizes an associate's degree with 48 credits in the liberal arts and sciences from an accredited institution of higher education, and with an average grade of "C" or better, as equivalent to complete the requirements of the Mercy College general education curriculum.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

JRSM 301 JUNIOR SEMINAR: The Junior Seminar is designed as a general education capstone course to be taken by all Mercy College students as a requirement for graduation. Its purpose is to insure that students have achieved an acceptable performance in the practical application of the skills taught in the basic courses. The topic for each section of this course will be indicated in advance, and students will bring the diversity of their interests and/or their area of concentration to the examination of the topic. The course will be conducted in an intensive seminar format; students will research various aspects of the selected topic and give multiple presentations in written and oral form. Students will register for the course after completing 60 credits and before attaining 91 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; SPCM 110; MATH 115 or 116.

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Programs of Special Interest

Program in English as a Second Language

Mercy College offers a program in English as a Second Language for students whose native language is not English and who need preparation in the language before and/or while undertaking their studies at Mercy College. All applicants take a placement test to determine their proficiency in English. In accordance with their scores, students are then placed at the appropriate level of instruction in English as a Second Language. See page 303 for course offerings.

Bilingual Programs for Spanish and Korean Students

Students who enroll in the Spanish or Korean Bilingual Programs and place into English as a Second Language courses must take English as a Second Language (speaking, reading, writing, and grammar) each semester, and then must take the English composition and speech sequence each semester until they complete the English requirements at Mercy College. Six credits of Foreign Language credit towards the General Education Requirement will be given for HUMN 101 and HUMN 102 (Reading at the Intermediate and Advanced levels of ESL) to students whose native language is not English, and who place into ESL courses upon admission to the College.

College Opportunity Program

Several federal and state funded programs fall under the umbrella of College Opportunity Program. In support of our nation's commitment to provide educational opportunity for all persons, the United States Congress established a series of programs to assist eligible individuals to enter college and successfully graduate. These programs are known as the federal TRIO programs (Upward Bound, Student Support Services and McNair).

Upward Bound Program

Upward Bound provides fundamental support to participants in their preparation for college entrance. Upward Bound serves eligible high school students from the Public School of the Tarrytowns, Sleepy Hollow High School, who are preparing to enter postsecondary education. Academic assistance is provided to participants during their school day, after school, on Saturday's and during a six-week summer program. Services include tutoring, regents review sessions, SAT preparation, college exploration, and cultural enrichment. The New York State Department of Education programs STEP and HEOP share this common overall purpose, namely, to expand the educational opportunities available to various historically disadvantaged populations.

Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP)

STEP is designed to increase participation of students from under-represented populations in science and technology oriented fields. The program provides academic enrichment for students in grades 7 through 12 from northern Westchester communities.

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STEP offers students a more intensive exploration of mathematics and the sciences during its Summer Academic Camp.

PROGRAMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST

Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP)

HEOP is funded by the New York State Education Department to provide supportive services and supplemental financial aid to eligible New York State residents. Students are eligible for this program if they are both economically disadvantaged and academically underprepared. High school graduates may be eligible if they were not in a college preparatory program in high school. Individuals may also be eligible if they possess a General Equivalency Diploma (GED) or if they have neither a high school diploma nor a GED and they are 18 years of age or older. Transfer students are eligible if they were enrolled in EOP, HEOP, College Discovery, or SEEK at a previous college. Application for HEOP is made available through the College Opportunity Program Office.

Student Support Services Project

The Student Support Services Project provides opportunities for academic development, assists students with basic college requirement, and serves to motivate students towards the successful completion of their post-secondary education. The goal of SSSP is to facilitate the process of transition from one level of higher education to the next. Student must meet the federal eligibility guidelines that include first generation, low-income and have academic need, for acceptance into the program. SSSP also invites applicants from transfer students who were enrolled in SSSP at a previous college or university. Application for SSSP is made available through the College Opportunity Program Office.

The S.T.A.R. Program for College Students with Learning Disabilities

The S.T.A.R Program for students with learning disabilities at the Dobbs Ferry Campus has been designed precisely to provide support to those students whose primary classification is a learning disability. The student is provided with the courses, academic counseling, facilities, and extra academic support he or she needs for success in a mainstream college academic environment. Contact the Director of the Program for Students with Learning Disabilities for more information. Enrollment in the program is limited each semester. See page 12 for fee information.

Cooperative Education

Cooperative Education is a unique educational program that links the college classroom with the external world of work. The program is designed to enhance student academic and personal development in preparation for careers. With the guidance of the cooperative education staff and faculty advisors, students are placed in two separate professional work settings related to their studies and are monitored during both experiences. Most Co-op placements are salaried positions. In addition, students receive college credit for academic work related to the placements. For further information, contact the Career Development Center at Dobbs Ferry (Room 117), or call (914) 674-7203.

Honors Program

Students selected on the basis of motivation and achievement, as demonstrated by previous experience in high school or college, are invited to join the Mercy College Honors Program. The Honors Program offers special courses in its own center that can be taken to fulfill General Education Requirements. In addition, the Program consists of interdisciplinary and team-taught courses that can be taken as electives. Courses are supplemented whenever possible by special events on and off campus. For further information, see page 180.

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College Scholars

Students who demonstrate excellence in completing course work toward their general requirements and in the study of a particular discipline, can be nominated to be College Scholars. Scholars design a six-credit project that they work on for a year with the help of a faculty mentor. For further information, see page 181.

The Center for Innovation in Education at Mercy College

The Center for Innovation in Education was established in September of 1991 to provide a mechanism for bringing to the College new and creative programs that did not fit within the existing structure. Since its inception, the center has been responsible for working with school districts, governmental agencies, and community-based organizations with regard to the development and implementation of new programs. The Center was instrumental in developing and implementing extension centers throughout the New York metropolitan area. In addition, the center has attracted substantial outside funding to the College. The Center for Innovation in Education continues to work with faculty members and administrative staff to bring new and innovative programs to the College.

The New York City Superintendent's Institute

This Institute is a collaboration between Mercy College and the New York City Board of Education to provide high quality orientation, professional development and support services targeted to the common and disparate needs of new superintendents, as well as ongoing professional development opportunities to continuing superintendents. The Co-Directors of this project are Aaron Freedman and James Mazza and can be contacted at (914) 674-7677.

The MerLIN Campus of Online Learning

Mercy College was one of the first in New York State to venture into teaching and learning via the Internet. Since 1992, it has offered asynchronous learning through MerLIN (the Mercy LINK); an average of 2,500 students is enrolled in 200 separate web based courses each semester. There is a limit of 20 students in each course. Courses run during the fall, spring and summer semesters. Mercy offers four complete undergraduate degree programs online, each having received the approval of the New York State Education Department and the Middle States Association, the College's regional accrediting agency. Students may complete an approved associates degree program in Liberal Studies, or bachelors degree programs in Business, Computer Science, and Psychology through MerLIN. Classes are also offered in the liberal arts, language and communications, social sciences and natural sciences. Students may also complete the General Education Requirements towards all Mercy College degrees through Online learning. The Idea of Online Learning -- Learning is accessible, convenient and exciting, no matter where our students are located. Web-based courses through MerLIN are the equivalent to their on-site counterparts. Students receive the same high quality instruction as they would in the classroom - only delivered online. Studies may be completed at home or at work, or wherever students can access the Internet. Although these courses are self-paced, instructors expect regular participation and contact. Online learning courses typically contain web pages of course content and asynchronous online discussion. Faculty moderate the discussion and provide questions that direct student participation. There are similar written and research assignments to an on-site course. In addition, real time chat, slide presentations, sound bites and video may be

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added to a course. Students will find that most courses use textbooks, which are purchased through our online bookstore. Students who need tutoring or academic advising will find that help provided online as well. New online learners are required to take the Online Quiz and Orientation and should take no more than two online courses if they live near a campus or extension site. Making the Choice -- The most successful MerLIN students are self-directed and motivated. They understand that taking an online course is convenient, but no less challenging or less rigorous than the same course taught in the classroom. Take an honest look at your past performance. Determine if you have the potential to succeed in MerLIN. If you are a strong, self-motivated student, you are ready to participate in MerLIN -- an intensive learning environment in which you are the key player. Some courses will require a visit to a Mercy College campus for proctored mid-term and final exams. Non-regional students (that is, those outside the two-hour driving distance) are required to identify proctors in their aea for these exams. Technical Requirements -- Students enrolling in a MerLIN course must have basic computer skills, including word processing, Internet and email. Access to a computer with a modem (at least 56 kbps) at home or work is required too. Students must have their own Internet Service Provider. The Internet service should be operating with a minimum browser of Internet Explorer 5.0 or Netscape 4.7 to 5.0. While they are not required, a sound card and speakers or headphones are recommended. Guidelines for Online Participation -- MerLin students must complete an online orientation, available at http://mercy. edu/merlin/resources/sthome.cfm. During the course, students are expected to log in no less than three times each week. When you log in, you will read course information, participate in discussion and complete assignments. Some courses include audio or video segments online. Most courses require students to compose and post at least four substantive messages per week. Some courses may have additional requirements. Failure to meet these requirements could affect the student's final grade for the course. Exams and Testing--Each professor and course has different requirements for exams, testing and grading. Courses may require a visit to a Mercy College campus for proctored mid-term or final exams. Non-regional students (that is, those outside the two-hour driving distance) are required to identify proctors for these exams. Proctors are approved by Testing and Tutoring, and reimbursed for their services. Detailed information about the exam process can be found online. For additional technical course information, contact the Online Learning Office at 914-674-7508 , or for general information at 914-674-7521 or visit the web site at http://www.mercy.edu/merlin for a course demonstration, additional information, and current news.

PROGRAMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST

Home Study Program

Sometimes schedules and programs are not compatible with the student's goals and lifestyles. In recognition of this, Mercy College offers a Home Study Program that involves specific courses designed for students who prefer to work independently or who are unable to attend regular classes due to illness, disability, or scheduling conflicts. Course requirements generally include a mid-term and final exam, and attendance at an orientation session. Additional review sessions may be scheduled. It is recommended that students take no more than two Home Study Courses per semester. Further

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information regarding the Home Study Program is available at the Office of Academic Affairs and at all campuses. Courses which have been offered through the Home Study Program include:

SOCL/CJDF 284 Crime and Justice in America PHIL/PSYN 285 Death and Dying: Challenge and Change* BHSC 285 Working: Changes and Choices BHSC/PSYN 283 The Nation's Health BHSC/PSYN/ 295 Contemporary Issues: Sports Psychology SOCL/SOWK

* Students may not receive credit for both PHIL/PSYN 285 and PHIL/PSYN 317 Perspectives on Death.

White Plains Weekend Program

The White Plains Campus of Mercy College offers a Weekend Program where students can earn their Bachelor's degree in Accounting and in Business Administration with Specializations in Management and Office Information Systems and Technology. The Program also offers courses in other majors as well as courses in the general education curriculum. The White Plains Weekend Program meets for ten weekends in the Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters. Students may take from one to four courses in the Weekend Program. For additional information please contact the White Plains Campus at (914) 948-3666 or the Office of Admissions.

Paralegal Studies Certificate Program

Approved by the Standing Committee on Paralegals of the American Bar Association, the Paralegal Studies Certificate Program consists of over three hundred hours of intensive training designed to prepare the student for a career in the paralegal profession. All courses are taught by practicing attorneys or paralegals who are specialists in their fields. Students may complete either the Day Program (5 months) or the Evening Program (9 months). The program is general in nature and is designed to develop versatility in a broadly based curriculum of legal studies. To be considered for admission, the prospective student must have at least an Associate Degree. Students with 60 college credits may also be considered for admission. Students in this program may qualify for Financial Aid. Please call (914)948-3666 for information. Curriculum Introduction to the Paralegal Profession Legal Research and Writing Computers and the Law Ethics for the Paralegal Litigation and Trial Preparation Business Organizations Real Estate Matrimonial Law Probate, Trusts and Estates Criminal Law Career Planning Seminars Notary Public Seminar Advanced Seminar All inquiries should be addressed to: Paralegal Studies Certificate Program Mercy College 277 Martine Avenue White Plains, New York 10601 (914) 948-3666 ext. 3328

Graduates of the Paralegal Studies Certificate Program with a grade point average of C or better will be granted (upon matriculation into a Mercy College undergraduate program) 24 credits toward their degree. If the student becomes a Paralegal Studies or

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Legal Studies major, 18 of those credits will be applied toward the major and six credits toward general electives.

PROGRAMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST

Legal Nurse Consultant Program

The Mercy College Legal Nurse Consultant Program can open doors to a new and exciting career for the experienced Registered Nurse. Legal Nurse Consultants (LNCs) practice in a variety of settings including law firms (plaintiff and defense), hospitals and other healthcare facilities (private or public), insurance companies or in independent practice. Approved by the American Bar Association, the Legal Nurse Consultant Program consists of over three hundred hours of intensive training designed to prepare the registered professional nurse for a career in Legal Nurse Consulting. All courses are taught by practicing nurses, legal nurse consultants, nurse attorneys, attorneys, judges or paralegals. Students may complete either the Day Program (5 months) or the Evening Program (9 months). To be considered for admission, the prospective student must have attained an Associate's or Bachelor's Degree or, in some special cases a student with at least 60 college credits may be considered for admission. Candidates for admission into the Legal Nurse Consultant Program would also be a registered professional nurse with a minimum of 2000 hours of recent clinical practice and possess a current registered professional nurse license. Students in this program may qualify for Financial Aid. Please call (914) 948-3666 for information. Curriculum Seminars Introduction to the Paralegal Profession Introduction to Legal Nurse Consultant Seminar Legal Research and Writing Advanced Seminar in Legal Nurse Consulting Advanced Seminar in Litigation and Trial Preparation Computers and the Law Litigation and Trial Preparation Elective: Notary Public Seminar Health Law Module 1 Medical Malpractice Module 2 Administrative Law Module 3 Risk Management Module 4 Alternative Dispute Resolution Legal Ethics for the Paralegal/Legal Nurse Consultant Business Organizations Career Planning Probate, Trusts and Estates All inquiries should be addressed to: Legal Nurse Consultant Program/Paralegal Studies Certificate Program Mercy College 277 Martine Avenue White Plains, New York 10601 (914) 948-3666 ext. 3328

The Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program

College students who are considering study beyond the baccalaureate level can realize their dreams through the McNair Scholars Program at Mercy College. The program was established by the United States Department of Education in 1989 and named for astronaut and Challenger crew member physicist, Dr. Ronald E. McNair.

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The Mercy College McNair Scholars Program began in 1995 and targets low-income, first-generation students and those who are from groups under represented in graduate education. The purpose of the program is to provide enriching experiences that prepare eligible students for doctoral study. One of the most exciting aspects of the McNair Program is the opportunity for undergraduate students at the junior and senior levels to participate in research experiences. Program participants receive a stipend to conduct research and engage in other scholarly activities with faculty mentors from the areas in which they hope to pursue graduate study. McNair Scholars also attend professional conferences with their mentors, go to graduate school fairs, prepare for graduate school entrance exams, receive guidance for the graduate school application process and obtain information on securing fellowships, graduate assistantships, and loans. Participants learn about graduate school life, advanced library skills, and effective ways to present their work. At the completion of the research projects McNair scholars make formal presentations of their research to faculty and peers at local and national conferences and submit papers summarizing their work, for publication in our journal, "The Challenger."

Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Science

Mercy College and the Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Science have an articulation agreement whereby matriculated students at Mercy College majoring in Biology and are interested in going to medical school are secured placement at the Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Science in Poland. Students do 90 credits of undergraduate course work at Mercy College and must maintain a "B" average (3.0) throughout their matriculation at the College. Upon completion of the undergraduate course work students begin a four-year medical program at the University in Poznan, Poland. All courses taken at the University are taught in English. For information regarding admission to the program please contact Dr. Stanislaw Wiktor, Division of Social and Behavioral Science or the Office of Admissions at 1-800-MERCY-NY

First Year Clusters Program

The First Year Clusters Program is designed to insure that full-time, first-year students make a successful adjustment to college life. The most vulnerable period in a student's college career is the first weeks of his/her first semester. However, new students have many and varied questions, but do not know where to go or whom to ask for answers. They have common and even groundless fears, yet are unaware that these can usually and sometimes even easily be allayed. They often feel lost in a maze without a guide. The First Year Clusters Program helps new students to get answers by finding knowledgeable and concerned mentors from among faculty, staff members, and peers with whom they interact and increase their self confidence through initial success in all areas of college life­academic, social, etc. Making new friends, successfully developing new skills, and accessing new services are all crucial to the success of this initial period. Both nationwide statistics and those regarding the First Year Clusters Program here at Mercy College demonstrate that when students feel part of a small community with a shared sense of identity, a common goal, and a genuine commitment to learning, academic performance is greatly enhanced. A "cluster" is a small group of students assigned together to several of the same classes which are taught and closely monitored by carefully selected faculty and staff members.

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Support Services

Learning and Assessment Services

Learning and Assessment Services is the umbrella for the Learning Centers, Tutoring Office, and Testing Office. The overall purpose of this Office is to provide Mercy College students with the academic support necessary to meet the challenges of higher education. The Learning Centers and Tutoring Office are an outgrowth of Mercy's mission to support the academic development of student with their full range of diversity in language, scholastic background, levels of communications skills, and general academic sophistication. The services of these offices are available to all students who want to improve or enhance their learning skills, including the academically talented and graduate students. Both the Learning Centers and Tutoring Office are inviting and open facilities that encourage students, faculty, and staff to visit for assistance, to take advantage of the available resources, and to discuss issues related to their classes. The Learning Centers The Centers are designed to support the Writing and Math labs and teaching and learning at the College. They offer assistance in the four "C"s: · Communication Skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening); · Critical Thinking · Computation Skills; and · Computer Assistant Instruction. The Centers are available at all campuses and Extension Center Sites; however, hours vary at each location, as determined by the student body population. Mercy students have access to all Centers regardless of home campus. Students interested in taking advantage of this service should call (914) 674-7402. Tutoring Program: The Tutoring Program supports students in content specific areas. Many qualified peers, graduate students, and faculty members are on staff to help students succeed. Group, supplemental instruction and individual tutoring are available as well as workshops on a variety of life & study skills. Students interested in taking advantage of this service should call (914) 674-7427. Testing Office: The Testing Office, located in the Main Building on the Dobbs Ferry campus, administers all placement examinations to incoming new and transfer students. The examinations are administered by proctors trained by the staff of the Tutoring Office and are offered at all campuses, extension centers and designated sites. The purpose of the placement examination is twofold; to determine student readiness for college admission and to determine the appropriate level of course work for a student. Students can contact this office by calling (914) 674-7358.

SUPPORT SERVICES

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The Mercy College Speech and Hearing Center

The Mercy College Speech and Hearing Center offers diagnostic and remedial services for children and adults who have speech, language, and/or hearing disorders. In addition, the center serves as a laboratory for students studying speech, language, and hearing disorders and working toward New York State Provisional Certification as Teachers of the Speech and Hearing Handicapped.

Studies Abroad

Mercy College encourages students to enrich their educational experience by spending some time studying abroad in approved programs. Academic credit is given for a program of foreign study, that is planned prior to departure, approved by Mercy College, and is successfully completed. Information and assistance in planning a program of foreign study may be obtained through the Office of Academic Advising.

Coordinated Program in Pre-chiropractic Studies

Mercy College, along with the New York Chiropractic College, the Los Angeles Chiropractic College, or Palmer College of Chiropractic, offers a six-year coordinated program leading to the bachelor of science and Doctor of Chiropractic degrees. For details concerning this program and curriculum, see Interdisciplinary Studies under the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION

Mercy College provides an opportunity for students to take the first step toward a professional career. A broad scope of disciplines from the arts, humanities, and sciences are offered to form the academic preparation for the competitive admissions tests required for law school, medical school, dental school, and other professional training.

Pre-Professional Advising Committee

For students interested in areas such as Dentistry, Medicine, Optometry, Osteopathy, and Podiatry, the Division of Natural Science and Veterinary Technology has a Pre-Professional Advising Committee. This committee, chaired by Dr. Sherry Downie, assists students in curriculum planning and provides information and counseling about the professional areas. Students who have taken at least six (6) semesters of the pre-health prerequisites at Mercy College may request an evaluation by the Committee at the end of the Spring semester of their Junior year, after all the pre-med required courses have been completed. Applicants must formally request a review by the Committee by April 15 of the junior year in order to be eligible for an evaluation, recommendation, or high recommendation. A grade point average of "B" or higher (3.0) is generally required for a review. Some general information about each of these programs follows.

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Pre-Dentistry

Training for dentistry usually involves three to four years of pre-professional college education and four years of dental school. Pre-dental education should stress courses in the physical and biological sciences, with additional background in the social sciences and humanities. In selecting students, dental schools emphasize high academic standing in college and the scores earned on the nationwide Dental School Admissions Test. Students should contact the Pre-Professional Advising Committee within the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

Pre-Medicine

Any student preparing for medical school should register with a Pre-Professional Advisor within the Division of Natural Science and Veterinary Technology. Premedicine students are advised to elect a B.A. curriculum with a concentration in Biology. As many basic sciences and liberal arts courses as possible should be completed by the end of the junior year, since the MCAT exam is given at this time. The basic courses required by most schools include one year of general Chemistry, one year of Organic Chemistry, one year of biological sciences, and one year of Physics. Advanced courses in these areas are recommended. Students should contact the Pre-Professional Advising Committee with the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

SUPPORT SERVICES

Pre-Optometry

The Doctor of Optometry degree requires a minimum of seven years of training consisting of a four-year professional degree program preceded by at least three years of college or, preferably, a B.S. degree. Requirements for admission to optometry college usually include courses in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, as well as courses in the social sciences and humanities. Some schools have specific course requirements. Students should contact the Pre-Professional Advising Committee within the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

Pre-Osteopathy

Training for the pre-osteopathic student is very similar to that of the pre-medicine student. Pre-osteopathic students are advised to elect a B.A. curriculum with a concentration in Biology. As many basic science and liberal arts course as possible should be completed by the end of the junior year, since the MCAT exam is given at this time. The basic courses required by most schools include one year of general Chemistry, one year of Organic Chemistry, one year of biological science and one year of Physics. Advanced courses in these areas are recommended. Students should contact the Pre-Professional Advising Committee within the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

Pre-Podiatry

The Doctor of Podiatry degree requires a minimum of six years of training, consisting of a four-year professional degree program preceded by at least two years of pre-professional study in college. Requirements for admission to podiatry college usually include courses in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, as well as courses in the social sciences and humanities. Some schools have specific course requirements. Students should contact the Pre-Professional Advising Committee within the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

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Pre-Law

For students interested in attending law school, a Pre-Law Advising Committee has been established at Mercy College to assist those students. The Committee consists of faculty from several divisions and is under the direction of the Program Director for Legal Studies. Any student preparing for law school should register with the Program Director for Legal Studies. The Committee assists students in curriculum planning and makes information available about options and opportunities in the field of law. For further information, contact the Program Director for Legal Studies at (914) 674-7546. General Information about Law School: To become a lawyer, a student must complete four years of college and three years of law school. Law schools seldom specify college subjects that must be included in the student's pre-legal education. However, a solid liberal arts background, with English, Political Science, History, Philosophy, Logic, Mathematics, Oral Communication Skills, and Economics is important for the prospective lawyer. Students interested in a particular aspect of the law may find it helpful to take related courses in that field. Admission to law school is based on the results of the Law School Aptitude Test (LSAT) and your undergraduate grade point average (GPA).

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Graduate Studies

Graduate Advisement

Students who are interested in applying to graduate schools should seek the assistance of their division chairperson. Division chairpersons will help students gather the necessary information for application to graduate schools. In addition, students may utilize the reference library maintained by the Career Development Center, which provides graduate school data and catalogues and which will assist students in applying for graduate fellowships and assistantships.

Graduate Studies for Seniors

Undergraduate students who have completed at least 90 credits with a cumulative grade point index of 3.0 or above and who satisfy other admissions requirements may enroll in one graduate course per semester for a total of six credits during their senior year. Graduate courses may not count towards the residency requirement for the major or program honors. Students who meet the eligibility requirements must fill out the Graduate Studies Authorization Form (available in the Office of the Assistant Provost at the Dobbs Ferry campus) and obtain the approval of the Chairperson of the student's undergraduate major division and the Program Director for the graduate program they are applying to take the course in. The completed Graduate Studies Authorization Form must then be submitted to the Assistant Provost for review and approval before the student can register for the graduate course. Such students must file an application for admission at least one month prior to the term in which they hope to take a graduate course. Students who receive permission to take graduate courses will be charged the graduate tuition rate for that course in addition to the charges for the undergraduate courses. Students receiving financial aid in the form of grants and/or loans should ensure that the additional charges will be covered by their aid by speaking to a financial aid counselor. Mercy College offers the following Graduate Programs and Advanced Certificate Programs. For additional information concerning Graduate Programs at Mercy College please refer to the Mercy College Graduate Catalogue.

GRADUATE STUDIES

The Four-Plus One Option

The English Program's Four-Plus-One option offers a unique opportunity to qualified undergraduates in English Literature who wish to pursue their Masters at an accelerated pace. If they meet the admissions criteria for the Masters Program in English, including a 3.0 GPA, they may apply in the first semester of their junior year to the MA in English at Mercy College. If accepted, they will take an introductory research seminar, English 400: Introduction to Critical Approaches to Literature in the second semester of their junior year. These students may then take three graduate credits each semester of their senior year (a total of six credits), which will apply to both their undergraduate and graduate degrees. Upon completing their Bachelors in English these students will be able to complete their Masters in English within a single academic year. Undergraduate English Majors who opt for the Four-Plus-One Program must take the GRE achievement test in English by the second semester of their senior year in order to establish a benchmark for their progress in the Masters Program.

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Four-Plus-One students who are interested in teaching should complete their training in Education for Elementary or Secondary as they pursue their Bachelors. Graduates will be recommended for provisional certification after the awarding of the Bachelor's degree in English. Master Graduates will be recommended for permanent teacher certification upon completing the Master of Science in English Literature and two years of teaching. DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING · Master of Business Administration · Master of Science in Banking · Master of Science in Direct Marketing · Master of Science in Human Resource Management · Master of Science in Internet Business Systems · Master of Science in Organizational Leadership · Master of Science in Public Accounting · Master of Science in Securities DIVISION OF EDUCATION · Master of Science in Childhood Education, Grade 1-6 · Master of Science in Early Childhood Education, Birth-Grade 2 · Master of Science in Middle Childhood Education, Grades 5-9 or Master of Science in Adolescence Education, Grades 7-12 · Master of Science in Bilingual Education · Bilingual Extensions to a Teaching Certificate · Bilingual Extensions to a Certificate as Specialist in Library Media and Educational Technology · Master of Science in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) · Master of Science in Teaching Literacy · Master of Science in Learning Technology · Master of Science in School Administration and Supervision (Advanced Certificate in School Administration and Supervision) DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS · Master of Professional Studies in Physician Assistant Studies · Master of Science in Communication Disorders · Master of Science in Nursing ­Adult Nurse Practitioner Post Master's Certificate ­Nursing Administration ­Family Clinical Nurse Specialist Post Master's Certificate ­Nursing Education ­Family Clinical Nurse Specialist ­Nursing Administration Post Master's Certificate ­Nursiing Education Post Master's Certificate ­Adult Nurse Practitioner · Master of Science in Occupational Therapy · Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies · Master of Science in Physical Therapy DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION · Master of Arts in English Literature DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS · Master of Science in Internet Business Systems DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES · Master of Public Administration in Health Services Management (MPA) · Master of Science in Health Services Management · Master of Science in Counseling · Master of Science in Psychology · Master of Science in School Psychology

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Student Life

Students should consult the Mercy College Student Handbook for a more detailed view of student life.

Athletics

Mercy College sponsors intercollegiate competition in men's golf, cross-country, soccer, basketball, baseball, and tennis. Women's intercollegiate sports include volleyball, basketball, softball, soccer, and cross-country. Mercy College's teams attract a great deal of attention throughout the area. The men's basketball team has traditionally been one of the highest scoring teams in the area. The women's basketball team has been champion of the Hudson Valley Women's Athletic Conference five times. The Mercy College soccer team counts an ECAC championship among its successes. The women's volleyball team has received one NCAA post-season bids in recent years. The Mercy baseball team is one of the best in the metropolitan New York area. The cross-country team has competed in 4 consecutive NCAA Eastern Regional Championships. The College started a women's soccer program in Fall 2000. Students may arrange to make recreational use of all the College's athletic facilities, which include a baseball diamond, softball diamond, outdoor handball and basketball courts, running track and soccer field, as well as the gymnasium and five tennis courts. The Mercy College athletic teams (at the Dobbs Ferry Campus only) are members of the following: · · · · · · New York Collegiate Athletic Conference (NYCAC) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II Eastern Collegiate Athletic Association (ECAC) Division II Metropolitan Collegiate Tennis Conference Intercollegiate Soccer Association of America (ISAA) Collegiate Track Conference

Campus Ministry

The religious atmosphere of Mercy College is non-denominational. Spiritual counseling is available to all students through the services of a minister, priest, or rabbi, who are available to discuss religious and personal matters with interested students. Chaplains are invited to speak at various College events throughout the year. The Office of Student Affairs may be contacted for additional information.

STUDENT LIFE

Campus Safety and Security

The Mercy College Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide, upon request, all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. These statistics may also be found on the Department of Educations website at http:// ope.ed.gov/security/ and on the Mercy College website at http://www.mercy.edu/ safety/crimestats.htm. This information is also available from the Mercy College Safety Department; contact Mr. Peter DeCaro, Director of Security, at (914) 674-7225.

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Career Services

The Career Services staff at Mercy College is available to assist students with all aspects of career and educational planning. Students are encouraged to see a career counselor for assistance in choosing a major and for exploring future employment opportunities. Assessment inventories are available to assist students to make informed and realistic career choices. Instruction in resume writing, interviewing strategies, and job hunting techniques is available. A Resume Referral Service affords students the opportunity to have their resumes sent to employers in application for full-time positions. Most of these services are available online. Career Services sponsored events include part-time Job Fairs, Career Days and Employer Panels. Seniors may register for senior programs that include on-campus recruiting and resume projects. Career Services assist students in gaining the valuable practical experience related to their major through the Cooperative Education Program. The services of the office are available to all students and alumni free of charge. For further information about any of these services please call (914) 674-7203 or email [email protected]

Complaint/Grievance Procedures

Students with a complaint are encouraged to discuss their concerns informally with the appropriate office or individual. For academic concerns, students are encouraged to communicate with their instructors and/or academic advisors early in the semester to resolve concerns and to allow time for appropriate actions and referrals. Students wishing to file an official grievance should do so in writing. For academic concerns, the grievance should be addressed to the Undergraduate Dean. Non-academic grievances should be addressed to the Associate Dean of Students. A copy of college grievance procedures may be obtained in either office or in the office of the Campus Dean. Appeals of academic dismissal are made directly to the Committee on Academic Standing. See page 387 or for further information regarding complaint procedures or page 35 for academic grievance procedures.

Counseling Services

Counseling Services are available to all students from all campuses offering the following: short term personal counseling and crisis intervention for concerns such as depression, anxiety, relationships, and substance abuse; assessments and referrals to licensed mental health professionals for specific issues which require a specialist; workshops on themes relating to college success (time and stress management, selfesteen, etc.); a resource library of pamphlets and videos pertaining to mental health wellness; presentations on dormitory and community living concerns and student safety awareness, including date violence, sexual assault, date rape; counseling in English and Spanish. Online psychological services, including email Q&A and self-support chat room are available. For information, please call (914) 674-7233 or stop by Room 116.

Health Services

The following health services, at no cost, are available at the main campus during the hours scheduled each semester: emergency first aid treatment, blood pressure screening, weight and diet information, and referral services. The College provides various "health awareness weeks" and information sessions throughout the school year at our various locations.

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New York State Department of Health Bureau Immunization Program

All students born after January 1, 1957, are required to show proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella. Please see page 11 for details.

Non-Discrimination Policy

The policy of Mercy College, both historically and currently, is that discrimination against any individual for reasons of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, or handicap is specifically prohibited. Accordingly, equal access to educational programs, employment opportunities, housing, and all other College activities are extended to all eligible students. As the College's mission statement indicates, the College promotes equal opportunity through a positive and continuing affirmative action program. Information concerning non-discrimination policies, including complaint procedures, may be obtained from the following individuals:

· For Students: Ms. Terri Rich, Associate Dean of Students, Room 235, Main Hall, Dobbs Ferry Campus, (914) 674-7416. · For Faculty and Administration: Interim Provost, Room 31, Verrazzano Hall, Dobbs Ferry Campus, (914) 674-7501. · For Staff: Mr. David Browne, Director of Human Resources, i-park Externsion Center, 28 Wells Avenue, Yonkers, NY (914) 375-5570 · For Handicapped Services: Ms. Terry Rich, Director of Disabilities Services, Room 235, Main Hall, Dobbs Ferry Campus, (914) 674-7416.

Off-Campus Housing

In order to assist students in securing other suitable accommodations, the College maintains a list of rooms and apartments available in the surrounding area. Locating apartments, rooms, or houses is an ongoing process. The Office of Student Activities and Residential Life functions as a resource to help the students find proper housing. The Associate Dean maintains a rental listing service that includes up-to-date information on rental availability and fees. The office also provides information on interviews and references, roommates, security deposits, general landlord and tenant responsibilities, and apartment condition checklists. For further information on the Residential Life program or off-Campus Housing, or to apply for a room in the Residence Hall, contact: Office of Student Activities and Residential Life Mercy College 555 Broadway Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 (914) 674-7277 [email protected]

STUDENT LIFE

Orientation

Students entering Mercy College for the first time are invited to orientation sessions at which they receive information on various offices and services of the College.

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Public Information Policy

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 specifically provides that a school may provide what is termed "directory information" to third parties when a legitimate request is made in writing. Mercy College may occasionally release "directory information," and only this information, without the student's consent. Directory information includes the following: the student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended. Any student who wishes any or all of his/her directory information to remain confidential may inform the Office of Registrar of his/her request in writing, at any time. In addition, The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act guarantees all students access to their own academic records. Detailed information concerning specific points regarding confidentiality of students' records can be found in the Mercy College Student Handbook, or can be obtained by inquiring at the Office of the Associate Dean of Students.

Residential Life

In 1995, the College opened a 200-bed residence hall on campus. The Residential Life Program is designed to provide students with living facilities and programs that enhance their formal classroom education. The program is structured to promote students' social, cultural, personal, and intellectual development. Living in a residence hall offers an environment in which students can live independently and develop a greater sense of personal identity within a community setting. It is expected that residents will learn the values of responsibility and sharing. The Residence Hall consists of furnished single and double occupancy rooms. There are also a limited number of furnished triple and quadruple occupancy rooms available. The rooms are wired for internet and cable television access. A computer lab, washers & dryers, and kitchenette are located in the facility. For further information on the Residential Life program or to apply for a room in the Residence Hall, contact: Office of Student Activities and Residential Life Mercy College 555 Broadway Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 (914) 674-7277 [email protected]

Student Association/Student Government Organizations

It is the responsibility of the Student Association/Student Government Organizations to represent the student body at Mercy College. It provides a liaison between students, faculty, and administrators. The SA/SGOs, in conjunction with the College Council for Student Affairs, make policy recommendations with regard to student behavior. In addition, they administer the activities' money and approve budgets for student organizations and clubs whose existence they have authorized. In order to have a voice in campus affairs, students are invited to participate in college governance through various college committees. Students participate on Board of Trustees' Subcommittees on, Finance Investment, and the Development Committee.

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Student Conduct and the Judicial System

Each student of the Mercy College community should conduct herself/himself in a responsible, mature manner on campus, compatible with the College's function as an educational institution. It is expected that students will respect their fellow members of the college community and the personal property of others. Any behavior contrary to the general welfare of Mercy College and the community is subject to appropriate disciplinary action. The Code of Conduct, which includes the disciplinary procedure, is printed in the Mercy College Student Handbook.

Students with Disabilities

Mercy College is committed to the availability of its academic offerings to all qualified students. Special services for students with disabilities, including the provision of auxiliary aids, counseling, etc., are coordinated by the Dean of Students in Room 235, Main Hall, on the Dobbs Ferry Campus at (914) 674-7416. Students or applicants at all campuses are urged to call or visit that office to discuss the services available. Faculty members and staff are also urged to refer students to Student Affairs for assistance and information. All students with learning disabilities should contact Terry Rich, Director of Disabilities Programs and Services, at (914) 674-7218. To assist students who provide documentation of sight, hearing, speech, or physical challenges, Mercy College will provide appropriate aids to those individuals throughout their tenure at the College.

Substance Abuse and Alcohol Policy

Mercy College is required by the United States Department of Education to implement the provisions of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989. Annually, the College distributes, in writing, the following information concerning the possession, use, or distribution of alcohol, and illicit drugs at the College:

1. Mercy College's policies on substance abuse and alcoholic beverages; 2. College sanctions for violation of these policies; 3. Criminal sanctions for the illegal possession or distribution of drugs and alcohol; 4. Health risks of drugs and alcohol; 5. Places where one can receive help concerning the illicit use and abuse of alcohol and drugs.

In addition, Mercy College provides a variety of programs and services for the education of its students in the critical area of alcohol and controlled substance abuse.

STUDENT LIFE

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Certificate Programs

Admission

Certificate Programs are designed to meet the career needs of self-directed, mature students who are interested in acquiring knowledge and skills which will promote their professional objectives. They are open to all qualified applicants whose academic preparation and/or appropriate work experience indicate potential for successful completion of the program. Applicants seeking admission to Certificate Programs must have a high school diploma. Applicants seeking admission to Certificate Programs in Computer Science, General Business Administration, Accounting, Management and Marketing must also pass the Mathematics Placement examinations at the MATH 105 level. Applicants seeking admission to Certificate Programs should contact the Office of Academic Advising. Matriculated students need only submit a formal application. A student who has completed the requirements for a Certificate may not apply for that Certificate after graduation.

Registration

Upon admission to the program, applicants for Certificate Programs may register for courses on a part-time basis at the Dobbs Ferry Campus, or at any of the four other campuses in the New York metropolitan area.

Requirements for the Certificate Program

All students, both matriculated and non-matriculated, must apply for admission into the Certificate Program. All students are required to maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in the Certificate Program being pursued. Upon successful completion of the specific curriculum requirements for a given program, students must apply for the actual certificate. All credits earned in a Certificate Program are applicable toward the Associate's and Bachelor's degrees. A maximum of six credits in transfer will be allowed toward a certificate. Ordinarily students pursuing a degree program in a related area will not be allowed to use the courses taken in such a program to satisfy the requirements for a certificate.

Certificate Program Fees

· Application Fee ( Non-Matriculated students only) .............. $10.00 · Certificate Completion Fee (per Certificate) ........................... $15.00 Certificates are issued in February, May, and August.

Certificate Programs Offered

All certificate programs are offered at the main campus in Dobbs Ferry (DF). In addition, certain certificates are offered at the branch campuses in Yorktown Heights (YH), the Bronx (BX), White Plains (WP) and Manhattan (MT).

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MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING I (5002) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Ten courses (30 credits) ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II ACCT 250 Cost Accounting ACCT 410 Advanced Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics I FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance MATH 116 College Algebra Prerequisite: None. A maximum of 15 transfer credits can be accepted for the Management Accounting Certificate Program. However, as to Accounting courses, transfer credits can be accepted only for Introduction to Financial Accounting (ACCT 120), Introduction to Management Accounting (ACCT 121), and/or Intermediate Accounting I (ACCT 240). GENERAL ACCOUNTING I (5002) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Six courses (18 credits) ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II ACCT 340 Introduction to Federal Income Taxation MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software Prerequisite: None. A maximum of 6 transfer credits can be accepted for the General Accounting I Certificate Program. However, as to Accounting courses, transfer credits can be accepted only for Introduction to Financial Accounting (ACCT 120). GENERAL ACCOUNTING II (5002) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Six courses (18 credits) ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ACCT 250 Cost Accounting ACCT 330 Advanced Accounting ACCT 341 Advanced Federal Income Taxation LAWS 120 Business Law I LAWS 340 Business Law II Prerequisite: General Accounting I Certificate or equivalent. A maximum of 6 transfer credits can be accepted for the General Accounting II Certificate Program. However, as to Accounting courses, transfer credits can be accepted only for Introduction to Management Accounting (ACCT 121). PUBLIC ACCOUNTING (5002) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Ten Courses (30 credits) ACCT 320 Governmental, Not- for-Profit and Other Special Topics ACCT 420 Auditing ACCT 430 Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ECON 220 Macro-Economics ECON 221 Micro-Economics FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

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and two additional 3 credit courses with a prefix of ACCT (Accounting), LAWS (Law), FINC (Finance), MGMT (Management), and/or MKTG (Marketing). Cooperative Education courses may not be used toward the Public Accounting Certificate. Prerequisites: General Accounting I and General Accounting II Certificates or equivalent. A maximum of 15 transfer credits can be accepted for the Public Accounting Certificate Program. However, as to Accounting courses, no transfer credits can be accepted. CHILD CARE (5503) (DF, BX) Nine courses (30 credits) PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology PSYN/EDUC 254 Child Psychology BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 244 Social Psychology EDUC/PSYN/SOCL 173 Perspectives on Parenting PSYN/SOCL 202 Ethics and the Family PSYN/EDUC 257 Psychology of the Special Education Child PSYN/BHSC 267 Strategies for Child Care Providers and one of the following six credit field experiences: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 399 Internship in the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 380-381 Cooperative Education in Psychology I & II SOCL 380-381 Cooperative Education in Sociology I & II

PC HARDWARE/NETWORKING (5104) (DF, YH, WP, BX, MT) Five Courses ( 15 Credits) The Certificate in PC Hardware/Networking is intended for students who want to update their computing skills and knowledge or are seeking a change in their career. It covers specific professional skills/concepts that are much in demand in business and industry. The Certificate in PC Hardware/Networking is designed to provide the students with a wide range of vendor and product neutral networking technologies as well as the required knowledge needed to configure and install the TCP/IP client and work in the networking field as an entry-level technician. It includes all of the material required to pass the Network+ and A+ Certifications from the Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).

CISC/MATH 120 CISC 230 CISC 257 CISC 335 Introduction to Computers and Application Software PC Hardware Local Area Networks Data Communications

Elective course: Any other CISC course from the Mercy College Undergraduate Catalog for which the student has the required prerequisite.

Students taking Computer Information Science courses will have to spend time outside of class

working with computers.

OFFICE COMPUTER SYSTEMS (5199) (DF, YH, WP, BX, MT) Five Courses (15 Credits) The Certificate in Office Computer Systems is designed to provide the office clerical worker with the computer skills necessary to move to the next level in the organization. The student will learn computer basics, the skilled use of desktop applications such as word processor, spreadsheet, and database software and fundamental

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Internet concepts as well as the use of Web browser software. An option to learn either production of high quality documents with desktop publishing software, or to improve the quality of the student's writing is provided. At the end of this program, students will be encouraged to take the Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Certification in Access.

CISC/MATH 120 CISC 220 CISC 353 Introduction to Computers and Application Software Database Applications Software and Hardware for the Office, Evaluation and Use

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Elective courses (student will choose two of the following): CISC 240 Desktop Publishing COCM 200 Writing for the Organization I Any other CISC course from the Mercy College Undergraduate Catalogue for which the student has the required prerequisite.

Students taking Computer Information Science Courses will have to spend time outside of class working with computers.

WEB DESIGN (5104) (DF, YH, BX, WP, MT) Five Courses (15 Credits): The Certificate in Web Design program is intended for students who want to update their computing skills and knowledge or are seeking a change in career. It covers specific professional skills/concepts that are much in demand in business and industry. This certificate is designed to provide the student with knowledge sufficient to develop Web sites and participate in the maintenance of Internet, Intranet and Extranet infrastructure and services. It includes all of the material required to pass the i-Net+ Certification from the Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).

CISC/MATH 120 CISC/CART 219 CISC 220 CISC/CART 259 CISC 359

working with computers. * Students with prior knowledge of computers may omit this course and take an additional CISC course numbered 130 or above upon approval of the division chairperson.

Introduction to Computers and Application Software* Web Design I Database Applications Web Design II Web Site Administration

Students taking Computer Information Science Courses will have to spend time outside of class

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (5505) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Five courses (15 credits)** CRJU 102 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System CRJU 104 Introduction to Corrections CRJU 301 Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice and two CRJU courses numbered 120 or above.

** Optional internships are available in appropriate subject areas as indicated.

FIRE SCIENCE (5507) (DF) Five courses (15 credits) EVHS 131 Introduction to Fire Science EVHS 205 Arson Investigation and three EVHS courses numbered 140 or above.

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GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (5001) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Ten courses (30 credits) ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ECON 220 Macro-Economics ECON 221 Micro-Economics FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra MGMT 225 Principles of Management MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing GERONTOLOGY (5506.2) (DF, BX, YH) Nine courses (30 credits) PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology PSYN/SOCL 202 Ethics and the Family PSYN 315 Aging and Mental Health PSYN 239 Personality Development in Adulthood SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology SOCL 244 Social Psychology SOCL 271 Medical Sociology: Health Care in Modern Society BHSC/PSYN/SOCL/SOWK 325 Strategies for Elder Care Providers and one of the following six credit field experiences: BHSC/PSYN/ SOCL 399 Internship in Behavioral Science PSYN380-381 Cooperative Education in Psychology SOCL380-381 Cooperative Education in Sociology

HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT (5299) (BX, DF, YH) Eleven Courses (36 credits)

PSYN 101 SOCL 101 BHSC/SOCL/PSYN 244 BHSC/SOCL/PSYN 226 BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 366 BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 271 BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 308 MGMT/PSYN 345 and Two Of The Following: ACCT 120 ACCT 121 BHSC 310 BHSC 285 BHSC/PSYN/SOCL/SOWK 295 BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 370 BHSC/CRJU/PSYN/SOCL 264 PSYN/PHIL 317 PSYN/SPCM 219 PSYN 340 PSYN/SPCM 250 MGMT 225 MKTG 220 Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Sociology Social Psychology Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Medical Ethics Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society Health Care Organization and Management Industrial Psychology Introduction to Financial Accounting Introduction to Management Accounting Epidemiology Working: Changes and Choices Contemporary Issues Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Science Alcohol, Drugs, and Behavior Perspectives on Death Group Experience Psychology of Crisis Psychology of Communication Principles of Management Principles of Marketing

Certificate Programs / 79

FINC 320 MGMT 340 CISC/MGMT 353 MGMT 442 MGMT/PSYN 446 MGMT 460 AND BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 399

Principles of Business Finance Organizational Behavior Software and Hardware for the Office: Evaluation and Use Management Information Systems Human Resource Management Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures Internship in Social and Behavioral Sciences--6 credits

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

HUMAN BEHAVIOR (5622) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Six courses (18 credits) PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology Two courses: (6 credits) in Psychology numbered 120 and above. Two courses: (6 credits) in Sociology numbered 120 and above. JOURNALISM AND MEDIA (5008) (DF) Eight courses (24 credits) ENGL 111 Written English and Literary Studies I ENGL 112 Written English and Literary Studies II JOUR 130 News Reporting I and five of the following: JOUR 132 Copy Editing and Graphics JOUR 134 The Feature Article I JOUR 145 Media in America JOUR 230 News Reporting II JOUR 234 The Feature Article II JOUR 240 Magazine Editing and Production JOUR 251 Sports Reporting JOUR 295 Topics in Journalism and Media JOUR 397 Independent Study in Journalism LIBERAL STUDIES (5649) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Eight courses (24 credits) Two courses: (6 credits) in English numbered 111 and above. Two courses: (6 credits) in History, Economics, Political Science, Psychology and/or Sociology. Two courses: (6 credits) in Mathematics and/or Natural Sciences Two courses: (6 credits) in Art, Music, Foreign Languages, Philosophy and/or Religion. MANAGEMENT (5004) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Eleven courses (33 credits) ECON 122 Statistics MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior MGMT 345 Industrial Psychology MGMT 442 Management Information Systems MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing MKTG 348 Sales Management MKTG 442 Marketing Management PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology

80 / Certificate Programs

MARKETING (5004) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Eleven courses (33 credits) ECON 122 Statistics MATH 116 College Algebra MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing MKTG 344 Advertising MKTG 348 Sales Management MKTG 440 Marketing Research MKTG 442 Marketing Management MKTG 449 Current Marketing Thought OSHA: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (5508) (DF) Five courses (15 credits) EVHS 102 Introduction to Safety Management EVHS 150 OSHA EVHS 301 Organization and Administration of Environmental Health and Safety Programs and two EVHS courses numbered 140 or above. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (5004) (DF, BX, WP, YH) Six courses (18 credits) MGMT 225 Principles of Management PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology PSYN 219 Group Experience PSYN 345 Industrial Psychology and two of the following: MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior PSYN 340 Psychology of Crisis PSYN 250 Psychology of Communication ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY FACILITATION (5299) (DF) Six courses (18 credits) PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology VETC 275 Applied Animal Behavior VETC 277 Animal Assisted Therapy VETC 397 Internship in Animal Assisted Therapy and one of the following: PSYN 207 Psychology of Learning PSYN 257 Psychology of Students with Disabilities PSYN 315 Aging and Mental Health PRIVATE SECURITY (5005) (DF, BX, WP) Five courses (15 credits) CRJU 130 Security Management and Loss Control CRJU 213 Legal Aspect of Private Security and three of the following: CRJU 156 Principles of Criminal Investigation CRJU 205 Arson Investigation CRJU 301 Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice LAWS 234 Criminal Law

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

PUBLIC SAFETY (5501) (DF) Five courses (15 credits) EVHS 102 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety Management EVHS 130 Security Management and Loss Control and three EVHS courses numbered 140 or above. SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELING (5506) (DF) Nine courses (30 credits) PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology PSYN 232 Health Psychology PSYN/BHSC/SOCL/CRJU 262 Alcohol, Drugs and Behavior PSYN/CRJU 223 Deviation and Therapy PSYN/SOCL 202 Ethics and the Family PSYN/BHSC/SOCL/ SOWK 324 Strategies of Alcohol/Substance Abuse Providers PSYN/SOCL/BHSC 244 Social Psychology SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology and one of the following six credit field experiences: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 399 Internship in the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 380-381 Cooperative Education in Psychology I & II SOCL 380-381 Cooperative Education in Sociology I & II

82 / Associate's Degrees

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

Associate in Arts ..................................................................... 83 Associate in Science ................................................................ 84 Accounting............................................................................... 85 Banking .................................................................................... 87 Business .................................................................................... 90 Human Services ...................................................................... 92 Information Technology ........................................................ 98 Music Industry & Technology ............................................ 100 Occupational Therapy Assistant Studies .......................... 102 Physical Therapist Assistant ............................................... 108 Television Production .......................................................... 111

Associate's Degrees / 83

Major Concentration

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

General Education Requirements ................................... 48 credits Liberal Arts and Science Electives ................................... 12 credits Total .................................................................................... 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Arts Must Complete:

ENGL 111 Written English and Literary Studies I ENGL 112 Written English and Literary Studies II SPCM 110 Oral Communication SPAN 115 Beginning Spanish for Communication SPAN 116 Communicating in Spanish Choose ONE ADDITIONAL course from the listings in ART/FOREIGN LANGUAGE/MUSIC/ PHILOSOPHY/RELIGION Choose ONE course from the following: MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts MATH 116 College Algebra Choose ONE course from the following: SINC 110 Principles of Science I CHEM 110 Introduction to Chemistry PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics PHSC 110 Introduction to Geology PHSC 111 Introduction to Astronomy BIOL 110 Introduction to Human Biology BIOL 111 Introduction to Human Genetics BIOL 112 Introduction to Environmental Science BIOL 113 Introduction to Evolution BIOL 116 Plants and People BIOL 117 Introduction to Nutrition BIOL 130 Human Anatomy & Physiology I BIOL 160 General Biology I CHEM 160 General Chemistry I PHYS 160 General Physics I

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Choose TWO courses from two different areas:

AREA: EUROPEAN HISTORY HIST 101 European History to 1500 HIST 102 European History since 1500 AREA: AMERICAN HISTORY HIST 105 American History through 1877 HIST 106 American History since 1877 AREA: NON-WESTERN HISTORY HIST 117 Introduction to Asian History HIST 118 Introduction to African History HIST 119 Introduction to Latin American History Choose THREE courses from the following: ECON 115 Economy, Jobs and You POLS 101 Political Power in America PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology Choose ONE course from the following: PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 112 Logical Thinking RELG 109 Introduction to Religion RELG 111 Judaism, Christianity, Islam RELG 112 Far Eastern Religions Choose ONE course from the following: ARTT 107 Art History Survey MUSI 107 Music Appreciation Choose ONE course from the following: FREN 115 Beginning French for Communication FREN 116 Communicating in French ITAL 115 Beginning Italian for Communication ITAL 116 Communicating in Italian

Choose TWO ADDITIONAL courses from the following: Only ONE computer course may be included; Any natural science course from the above list or numbered 161; Any mathematics course numbered 117122, 201, 212, 244, 260 or 261; Any liberal arts computer science course numbered 120 or higher. Choose 12 credits in Liberal Arts and Science Electives

84 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 48 credits Open Electives .................................................................... 12 credits Total .................................................................................... 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Science Must Complete:

ENGL 111 Written English and Literary Studies I ENGL 112 Written English and Literary Studies II SPCM 110 Oral Communication Choose TWO courses from two different areas: AREA: EUROPEAN HISTORY HIST 101 European History to 1500 HIST 102 European History since 1500 AREA: AMERICAN HISTORY HIST 105 American History through 1877 HIST 106 American History since 1877 AREA: NON-WESTERN HISTORY HIST 117 Introduction to Asian History HIST 118 Introduction to African History HIST 119 Introduction to Latin American History Choose THREE courses from the following: ECON 115 Economy, Jobs and You POLS 101 Political Power in America PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology Choose ONE course from the following: PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 112 Logical Thinking RELG 109 Introduction to Religion RELG 111 Judaism, Christianity, Islam RELG 112 Far Eastern Religions Choose ONE course from the following: ARTT 107 Art History Survey MUSI 107 Music Appreciation Choose ONE course from the following: FREN 115 Beginning French for Communication FREN 116 Communicating in French ITAL 115 Beginning Italian for Communication ITAL 116 Communicating in Italian SPAN 115 Beginning Spanish for Communication SPAN 116 Communicating in Spanish

Choose ONE ADDITIONAL course from the listings in Art/Foreign Language/ Music/Philosophy/Religion

Choose ONE course from the following: MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts MATH 116 College Algebra Choose ONE course from the following: SINC 110 Principles of Science I CHEM 110 Introduction to Chemistry PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics PHSC 110 Introduction to Geology PHSC 111 Introduction to Astronomy BIOL 110 Introduction to Human Biology BIOL 111 Introduction to Human Genetics BIOL 112 Introduction to Environmental Science BIOL 113 Introduction to Evolution BIOL 116 Plants and People BIOL 117 Introduction to Nutrition BIOL 130 Human Anatomy & Physiology I BIOL 160 General Biology I CHEM 160 General Chemistry I PHYS 160 General Physics I

Choose TWO ADDITIONAL courses from the following:

Only ONE computer course may be included; Any natural science course from the above list or numbered 161; Any mathematics course numbered 117-122, 201, 212, 244, 260 or 261; Any liberal arts computer science course numbered 120 or higher.

Choose 12 credits in Open Electives

Associate's Degrees / 85

Major Concentration

ACCOUNTING

Lucretia S. Mann, M.B.A., C.P.A., Program Director

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE General Education Requirements* .................................. 24 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Related Courses .................................... 30 credits Business/General Education Electives .............................................................................. 6 credits Total .................................................................................... 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Science in Accounting Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

ENGL 109 ENGL 110 SPCM 110 PSYN 101 SOCL 101 POLS 101 ECON 115 MATH 114 MATH 115 Fundamentals of Exposition* Elements of Exposition* Oral Communication Introduction to Psychology OR Introduction to Sociology OR Political Power in America The Economy, Jobs & You Applied Mathematics for Business Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR College Algebra Introduction to Computers & Application Software

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES:

ECON 220 ECON 221 FINC 320 LAWS 120 MGMT 225 MKTG 220 Macro-Economics Micro-Economics Principles of Business Finance Business Law I Principles of Management Principles of Marketing

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II

MATH 116 MATH 120

Business/General Education Electives:

Students choose any two courses for which they have prerequisites. Students who anticipate continuing toward a four-year degree will be advised to use their electives to fulfill General Education requirements and/or Business Foundation courses.

*

Completion of ENGL111 AND ENGL112 will satisfy the requirements for ENGL109 AND ENGL110 in this program. A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Science in Accounting Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College.

86 / Associate's Degrees

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Science Degree In Accounting

First Semester

Fundamentals of Exposition ........ The Economy, Jobs & You ............ Applied Mathematics for Business .............................. Introduction to Financial Accounting .............................. Principles of Management ............ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Oral Communication .................... 3 credits Intermediate Accounting I ........... 3 credits Principles of Business Finance ..... 3 credits Macro-Economics .......................... 3 credits Introduction to Computers & Application Software ..................................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

Elements of Exposition ................. 3 credits Introduction to Management Accounting ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology OR Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR College Algebra ............................ 3 credits Introduction to Sociology OR Political Power in America ........... 3 credits Principles of Marketing ................ 3 credits Total 15 credits

Fourth Semester

Business Law I ................................ 3 credits Intermediate Accounting II ......... 3 credits Micro-Economics ........................... 3 credits Choose any TWO additional 3 credits courses from the Business and/or General Education curriculum for which you have the prerequisite(s) ......... 6 credits Total 15 credits

Associate's Degrees / 87

Major Concentration

BANKING

Robert Boccino, M.B.A., Program Director, Manhattan Frederick Collett, M.S., Program Director, Westchester

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 24 credits Major Concentration and Related courses ..................... 33 credits Open Electives .................................................................... 3 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Total .................................................................................... 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Applied Science in Banking Must Complete: General Education Requirements

ENGL 109 ENGL 110 SPCM 110 PSYN 101 Fundamentals of Exposition Elements of Exposition Oral Communication Introduction to Psychology OR SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology OR POLS 101 Political Power in America ECON 115 The Economy, Jobs & You MATH 114 Mathematics for Business MATH 120 Introduction to Computers & Application Software BIOL 112 Environmental Science OR other approved natural science course and SIX credits of open electives

Major Concentration & Additional Requirements are listed on the following page.

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Applied Science in Banking Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College.

88 / Associate's Degrees

Banking And Related Courses

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business PSYN 120 Career & Life Planning BANK 112 Principles of Banking and SEVEN courses from one of the following five tracts:

Track 3 - Personal Financial Services

BANK 113 Consumer Bank Products: Sales & Service BANK 160 Law & Banking 1 MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing BANK 261 Law & Banking 2 BANK 323 Principles of Real Estate BANK 325 Life Insurance BANK 485 Consumer Credit

Track 1 - Operations/Supervision

BANK 119 Bank Payment Systems MGMT 225 Principles of Management BANK 160 Law & Banking I BANK 261 Law & Banking II MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior BANK 498 Bank Internal Control & Audit and ONE Banking course elective

Track 4 - Commercial Financial Services

ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 220 Macro-Economics FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance ECON 344 Money & Banking FINC 345 Financial Statement Analysis BANK 483 Consumer Lending and one Banking course elective

Track 2 - International Banking

BANK 119 ECON 220 BANK 250 ECON 344 BANK 353 BANK 455 Bank Payment Systems Macro-Economics International Banking Operations Money & Baking Financing International Trade Foreign Exchange Theory & Practice and ONE Banking course elective

Track 5 - Securities Industry

BANK 181 Introduction to Securities Industry ECON 220 Macro-Economics BANK 286 Securities Analysis FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance ECON 344 Money & Banking BANK 488 Securities Processing FINC 442 Investment Management

Associate's Degrees / 89

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Applied Science In Banking

FIRST YEAR First Semester

BANK 112 ....................................... 3 credits ECON 115 ....................................... 3 credits ENGL 109* ......................................... credits MATH 105** ................................... 3 credits PSYN 101 ......................................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 114 ...................................... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BIOL 112 .......................................... PSYN 120 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

*

Students who place at a higher level of English should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112.

** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 114.

90 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

Thomas Milton, Ph.D., Program Director ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 24 credits Major Concentration ......................................................... 27 credits Business/General Education Electives ........................... 9 credits TOTAL ................................................................................ 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Applied Science in Business Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION

BIOL 112 ECON 115 ENGL 109 ENGL 110 PSYN 101 SOCL 101 POLS 101 MATH 114 MATH 120 SPCM 110 Environmental Science The Economy, Jobs, and You Fundamentals of Exposition Elements of Exposition Introduction to Psychology OR Introduction to Sociology OR Political Power in America Applied Mathematics for Business Introduction to Computers Oral Communication

BUSINESS

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 220 Macro Economics LAWS 120 Business Law I MGMT 225 Principles of Management INBU 250 International Business MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing PSYN 120 Career and Life Planning

BUSINESS / GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES

Students choose any three courses for which they have prerequisites. Students who anticipate continuing toward a fouryear degree will be advised to use their electives to fulfill General Education Requirements and/or Business Foundation courses.

To enter the A.A.S. Degree in Business Program a student must place into ENGL 109. If the student places into ENGL 111 then he/she may take ENGL 111 & ENGL 112 for the General Education requirement instead of ENGL 109 & ENGL 110.

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Applied Science in Business Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College.

Associate's Degrees / 91

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Associate in Applied Science in Business

FIRST YEAR First Semester

BIOL 112 .......................................... ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... MGMT 225 ...................................... Electives*** ...................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 114 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ INBU 250 ......................................... MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 120 ......................................... Electives*** ...................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

*

Students who place at a higher level of English should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112.

** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 114. *** Students who intend to pursue a bachelor's degree should use electives to take courses that will apply to that degree.

92 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

HUMAN SERVICES

With Specialization: CHILD CARE

Hind Rassam Culhane, Ed.D., Child Care Program

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 33 credits Major Concentration Human Services With Child Care Specialization ......... 27 credits TOTAL ................................................................................ 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Science in Human Services with the Specialization in Child Care Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

BIOL 112 ENGL 109 ENGL 110 MATH 115 PSYN 101 SPCM 110 SOCL 101 Environmental Science Fundamentals of Exposition Elements of Exposition Math for the Liberal Arts Introduction to Psychology Oral Communication Introduction to Sociology

CHILD CARE SPECIALIZATION

BHSC 120 Career & Life Planning BHSC 323 Strategies for Child Care Providers BHSC 399 Internship: Child Care EDUC 154 Childhood Education PSYN 228 Psychology of the Preschool Child PSYN 173 Perspectives on Parenting PSYN 202 Ethics & the Family SOCL 244 Social Psychology

GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES Choose any FOUR General Education courses for which they have the prerequisites*

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Science in Human Services Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College. These courses cannot include ENGL 006, or MATH 105.

*

Associate's Degrees / 93

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Science In Human Services With Child Care Specialization

First Semester

Fundamentals of Exposition ........ Mathematics for the Liberal Arts ............................... General Education Elective .......... Intro. to Sociology .......................... Intro. to Psychology .................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Psychology of the Preschool Child ........................ Perspectives on Parenting ............ Strategies for Child Care Providers ................................... Internship in the Social & Behavioral Sciences .................. Oral Communication .................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

15 credits

Second Semester

Environmental Science .................. Career & Life Planning ................. Intro. to Computers & Application Software ............... Elements of Exposition ................. Social Psychology ........................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Fourth Semester

Childhood Education .................... Ethics & the Family ....................... General Education Elective .......... Internship in the Social & Behavioral Sciences .................. General Education Elective ........ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

94 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

HUMAN SERVICES

With Specialization: SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Authur P. Sullivan, Ph.D., Substance Abuse Program

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 33 credits Major Concentration Human Services with Substance Abuse Specialization .................................................... 27 credits TOTAL ................................................................................ 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Science in Human Services with the Specialization in Substance Abuse Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

BIOL 112 ENGL 109 ENGL 110 MATH 115 PSYN 101 SPCM 110 SOCL 101 Environmental Science Fundamentals of Exposition Elements of Exposition Math for the Liberal Arts Introduction to Psychology Oral Communication Introduction to Sociology

SUBSTANCE ABUSE SPECIALIZATION

BHSC 120 Career and Life Planning BHSC 324 Strategies for Alcohol/ Substance Providers BHSC 399 Internship: Alcohol/ Substance Abuse CRJU 302 Deviation & Therapy PSYN 232 Health Psychology PSYN 262 Alcohol, Drugs & Behavior PSYN 202 Ethics & the Family SOCL 244 Social Psychology

GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES Choose any FOUR General Eduaction courses for which they have the prerequisites*

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Science in Human Services Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College. These courses cannot include MATH 105 or any non-degree credit courses.

*

Associate's Degrees / 95

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Science In Human Services With Substance Abuse Specialization

First Semester

Fundamentals of Exposition ........ Mathematics for the Liberal Arts ............................... General Education Elective .......... Introduction to Psychology .......... Introduction to Sociology ............. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Alcohol, Drugs, and Behavior ..... 3 credits Strategies for Alcohol/Substance Abuse Providers ................................... 3 credits Internship in the Social & Behavioral Sciences .................. 3 credits Oral Communication .................... 3 credits General Education Elective .......... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Second Semester

Environmental Science .................. Career and Life Planning .............. Introduction to Computers & Application Software ........... Elements of Exposition ................. Social Psychology .......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Fourth Semester

Deviation and Therapy ................. Ethics and the Family .................... Internship in the Social & Behavioral Sciences .................. Health Psychology ......................... General Education Elective .......... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

96 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

HUMAN SERVICES

With Specialization: ELDER CARE

Lynn M. Tepper, Ed.D., Elder Care Program

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 33 credits Major Concentration Human Services with Elder Care Specialization .......... 27 credits TOTAL ................................................................................ 60 credits

Students Who Choose the Associate in Science in Human Services with the Specialization in Elder Care Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

BIOL 112 ENGL 109 ENGL 110 MATH 115 PSYN 101 SPCM 110 SOCL 101 Environmental Science Fundamentals of Exposition Elements of Exposition Math for the Liberal Arts Introduction to Psychology Oral Communication Introduction to Sociology

ELDER CARE SPECIALIZATION

BHSC 120 Career & Life Planning BHSC 325 Strategies for Elder Care Providers BHSC 399 Internship: Elder Care PARA 205 Aging & The Law PSYN 202 Ethics & the Family PSYN 315 Aging & Mental Health SOCL 244 Social Psychology SOCL 271 Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society

GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES Choose any FOUR General Education courses for which they have the prerequisites*

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate of Science in Human Services Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College. These courses cannot include MATH 105 or any non-degree credit couses.

*

Associate's Degrees / 97

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Science In Human Services With Elder Care Specialization

First Semester

Fundamentals of Exposition ........ Mathematics for the Liberal Arts ............................... General Education Elective .......... Introduction to Sociology ............. Introduction to Psychology .......... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Aging & the Law ............................ Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society ........................ Strategies for Elder Care Providers ................................... Internship in the Social & Behavioral Sciences .................. Oral Communication .................... Total 3 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

15 credits

Second Semester

Environmental Science .................. Career & Life Planning ................. Introduction to Computers & Application Software ........... Elements of Exposition ................. Social Psychology .......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Fourth Semester

Aging and Mental Health ............. Ethics and The Family ................... General Education Elective .......... Internship in the Social & Behavioral Sciences .................. General Education Elective .......... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

98 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Nagaraj Rao, Ph.D., Program Director

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE General Education Requirements* .................................. 21 credits Major Concentration Information Technology and Related Courses ........... 39 credits Total .................................................................................... 60 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Applied Science Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

CISC 120 ECON 115 ENGL 110 ENGL 111 SPCM 110 PSYN 119 MATH 114 Introduction to Computers and Application Software The Economy, Jobs & You Elements of Exposition Written English and Literary Studies I Oral Communication The College Experience Business Mathematics

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY:

CISC 220 CISC 230 CISC 238 CISC 240 CISC 257 CISC 337 CISC 370 Database Applications PC Hardware Graphical User Interface Application Development Desktop Publishing and Web Page Design Local Area Networks Database Management Systems Systems Analysis and Design

BUSINESS COURSES:

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting

And three major Elective Courses selected from the following:

CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS COURSE:

COCM 200 Writing for the Organization

CISC 31 CISC 231 CISC 301

Foundations of Computing I Foundations of Computing II Information Systems within Organizations CISC 380/381 Cooperative Education I & II* CISC 335 Data Communications: Principles and Applications

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Applied Science in Information Technology Degree. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College. With approval of Division Chairperson.

*

Associate's Degrees / 99

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Applied Science In Information Technology

First Semester

Elements of Exposition ................. Introduction to Financial Accounting ................................ The College Experience ................ Business Mathematics ................... Introduction to Computers and Application Software ............... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Writing for the Organization ....... Graphical User Interface Application Development ...... PC Hardware .................................. Local Area Networks .................... Major Elective ................................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Second Semester

Written English & Literary Studies I ..................................... Oral Communication .................... The Economy, Jobs and You ...................................... Database Applications .................. Introduction to Management Accounting ................................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Fourth Semester

Systems Analysis and Design ...... Database Management Systems ...................................... Desktop Publishing and Web Page Design ..................... Major Electives ............................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

15 credits

15 credits

100 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

MUSIC INDUSTRY & TECHNOLOGY*

Paul Steinman, M.A., Program Director ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 18 credits Music Industry and Technology ..................................... 51 credits Total .................................................................................... 69 credits Students Who Choose the Associate in Applied Science in Music Industry & Technology Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (18 credits)

CISC 120 ENGL 111 ENGL 112 MATH 115 MUSI 107 SPCM 110 Introduction to Computers and Application Software Written English & Literary Studies I Written English & Literary Studies II Mathematics for the Liberal Arts Music Appreciation Oral Communication

MUSIC INDUSTRY & TECHNOLOGY (30 credits)

MTEC 100 Music Industry Structure & Practices MTEC 101 Audio Production I MTEC 110 MIDI Systems I MTEC 201 Audio Production II MTEC 210 MIDI Systems II MTEC 220 Recording Studio Workshop I MTEC 301 Digital Audio Systems I MTEC 302 Digital Audio Systems II MTEC 320 Recording Studio Workshop II MTEC 200 Music Business I Select four courses from the following:

MUSIC (9 credits)

MUSI 103 MUSI 104 MUSI 201 Theory & Musicianship I Theory & Musicianship II Theory & Musicianship III

(12 credits)

MTEC 230 Audio Systems Design and Installation MTEC 310 Advanced Computer Applications and MIDI MTEC 315 Electronic Music Synthesis MTEC 325 Audio for Video MTEC 330 Recording Studio Production Techniques MTEC 340 Techiques of Underscoring

· ·

Students must apply directly to the Music Industry and Technology program. Students must be formally accepted and receive an acceptance letter from the director prior to declaring the major and/or enrolling in any major courses. (Admission policies and procedures are available through the department) Students must complete MUSI 107, MUSI 101, CISC 120 and MATH 115 their freshman year. Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in all major courses and/or pre-requisites. Students must maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.75 in major courses. Students must pass a comprehensive proficiency exam before graduation.

· · · ·

Associate's Degrees / 101

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Applied Science In Music Industry And Technology

First Semester

Written English & Literary Studies I .................................... Music Industry Structure & Practices ..................................... Audio Production I ....................... Mathematics for the Liberal Arts ............................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Oral Communication .................... Theory and Musicianship II ......... Audio Production II ...................... MIDI Systems II ............................. Recording Studio Workshop I ..... Guided Electives ............................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

18 credits

12 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Second Semester

Written English & Literary Studies II .................................... Introduction to Computers and Application Software ...... MIDI Systems I ............................... Theory and Musicianship I .......... Music Appreciation ....................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Fourth Semester

Theory and Musicianship III ........ Music Business I ............................ Recording Studio Workshop II .... Guided Electives ............................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 9 credits

18 credits

15 credits

102 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT

Judith A. Parker, M.S., O.T.R./L., Program Director ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................... 34 credits Major Concentration Occupational Therapy ...................................................... 38 credits Total .................................................................................... 72 credits GENERAL EDUCATION

BIOL 130 CISC 120 ENGL 111 ENGL 112 HIST HLSC 205 HLSC 210 HLSC 225 PHYS 110 PHIL 112 PSYN 101 SPCM 110 SOCL 101 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Introduction to Computers Written English & Literary Studies I Written English & Literary Studies II Any History Course Standard Safety Precautions for the Health Care Professional Overview of OT Practice Intro to Health Professions' Literature & Scientific Writing Introduction to Physics Logical Thinking Introduction to Psychology Oral Communication Introduction to Sociology

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM

OCTR 201 OCTR 203 OCTR 204 OCTR 206 OCTR 207 OCTR 209 OCTR 210 OCTR 214 OCTR 218 OCTR 260 OT Practice for the Assistant: An Overview OT Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities I OT Practice for the Assistant: Medical Conditions OT Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities II OT Practice for the Assistant: A Synopsis OT Practice for the Assistant: Advanced Clinical Education I OT Practice for the Assistant: Advanced Clinical Education II (PSYN214) OT Practice for the Assistant: Adulthood and Maturity (PSYN218) OT Practice for the Assistant: Interaction Skills (PSYN260) OT Practice for the Assistant: Childhood & Adolescence

The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. ACOTE's phone number is (301) 652-AOTA. Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the National Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapy Assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note: A felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure. NOTE: All Occupational Therapy Assistant students are required to complete Level II Fieldwork within 18 months following completion of academic coursework.

Associate's Degrees / 103

To take Program on a Full Time or Part Time Basis: Admission Criteria/Procedure · Students are admitted on an ongoing basis until class is full. · Submit a completed application form and return it to the Occupational Therapy Assistant Office. · Submit 3 references on the Mercy College Occupational Therapy Assistant Recommendation Form; (at least one from a registered occupational therapist or work supervisor and one from faculty of a prerequisite course). The recommendations must be recent ( not over 6 months old). All references must be in a sealed envelope with the reference's signature over the seal. · Submit official transcripts from all colleges attended. · Complete a written on-site essay. · A personal interview with the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program Director or faculty. · Have a minimum of a 2.1 grade point average. · Placement at the ENGL111 level. · Submit an application to Mercy College.

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

104 / Associate's Degrees

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM STANDARDS 1. Students must earn a C or better in all occupational therapy assistant courses and maintain an average of 2.5 in the OTA Program. 2. Any student who received a C- or below in the same course twice will automatically be dismissed from the program. 3. If a student's GPA falls below a 2.5 they are placed on academic probation for one semester and required to meet with their faculty advisor to develop a plan of action. 4. Students must take all courses in the sequence as designed by the Program. 5. If a student must repeat a course they must wait to do so until the course is taught the following academic year. 6. A grade of F in any occupational therapy assistant course is grounds for dismissal. 7. Students who receive an unsatisfactory in any category in the Fieldwork I Experience during any semester will have their records reviewed by the Occupational Therapy Assistant faculty. The faculty will decide if a student may repeat the experience, and/or be placed on probation or be dismissed from the program. Students may not take any Fieldwork II experiences until they have successfully completed all Fieldwork I experiences. 8. Should a student fail Fieldwork II, the student may be given an opportunity to repeat the fieldwork experience. The faculty will discuss the failure and a decision will be made as to whether the student will be given an opportunity to repeat the experience. If this is granted the student must register to repeat the failed course (OCTR 209 or 210). Reasons for the faculty decision will be shared with the student. A corrective plan of action must be written by the student and submitted to the Associate Director for review and approval before the student can repeat the failed Fieldwork experience. 9. Failure in any two Fieldwork experiences, Fieldwork I or II, will automatically result in dismissal from the program. 10. Students are evaluated by the full faculty on their Professional Behavior throughout the Program. Feedback is provided to students via The Professional Behaviors Checklist. If a student receives an O (occasionally) in any category, they will be required to meet with their faculty advisor. 11. If a student receives an O twice in the same category they will be dismissed from the program. 12. Students are encouraged not to work more than twenty hours (20) per week. During clinical fieldwork experiences, student work schedules may not interfere with the hours they spend at the fieldwork site.

Associate's Degrees / 105

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate in Applied Science Degree In Occupational Therapy Assistant on a Full Time basis following completion of all General Education Courses

Summer Semester

HLSC 205 Standard Safey Precautions for the Health Care Professional ....... 1 credit HLSC 210 Overview of OT Practice ..................................... 1 credit HLSC 225 Intro to Health Prof. Literature and Scientific Writing ................... 1 credit Total .................................................. 3 credits

Spring Semester

OCTR 206 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities II .................................. 3 credits OCTR 207 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Synopsis .......... 3 credits OCTR 214 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Adulthood & Maturity ................................ 6, 1 credits OCTR 218 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Interaction Skills ............................................... 3 credits Total ................................................ 16 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Fall Semester

OCTR 201 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: An Overview ................................. 3 credits OCTR 204 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Medical Conditions ...................... 3 credits OCTR 205 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities I ................................... 3 credits OCTR 260 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Childhood & Adolescence ............................. 6,1 credits Total ................................................ 16 credits

Clinical Fieldwork with *

OCTR 209 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Advanced Clinical Education I .................................... 3 credits OCTR 210 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Advanced Clinical Education II ................................... 3 credits Total ................................................ 6 credits

*

All OTA students are required to complete Level II Fieldwork within 18 months following completion of academic coursework. One credit is applied to Fieldwork I Experience

106 / Associate's Degrees

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate in Applied Science Degree In Occupational Therapy Assistant Full Time Two Year Program: (For students with no General Education courses and qualifies for English 111)

Summer Semester:

HLSC 210 Overview of Occupational Therapy Practice. .......................... 1 credit SPCM 11O Oral Communication 3 credits CISC 120 Introduction to Computers .......................................................... 3 credits Total ................................................ 7 credits

Fall Semester:

OCTR 260 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Childhood and Adolescence ........................... 6, 1 credits OCTR 203 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities I ................................. 3 credits PHIL 112 Logical Thinking .......... 3 credits Total .............................................. 13 credits

Fall Semester:

OCTR 201Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: An Overview 3 credits OCTR 204 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Medical Conditions ................................... 3 credits HLSC 205 Standard safety Precautions for the Health Care Professional. ..... 1 credit BIOL 130 Anatomy & Physiology I .......................................................... 4 credits ENGL 111 Written English and Literary Studies I ....................................... 3 credits HLSC 225 Introduction to Health Professions' Literature and Scientific Writing ........................................... 1 credit Total .............................................. 15 credits

Spring Semester:

OCTR 214 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Adulthood and Maturity .................................. 6, 1 credits OCTR 207 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Synopsis ........ 3 credits OCTR 206 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities II ................................ 3 credits HIST ................................................. 3 credits Total .............................................. 16 credits

Clinical Fieldwork*:

OCTR 209 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Clinical Education I .................... 3 credits OCTR 210 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Clinical Education II .................. 3 credits Total ................................................ 6 credits

Spring Semester:

OCTR 218 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Interaction Skills ....................................................... 3 credits PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics 3 credits ENGL 112 Written English and Literary Studies II ...................................... 3 credits PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology ....................................................... 3 credits SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology .......................................................... 3 credits Total .............................................. 15 credits

*

All OTA students are required to complete level II Fieldwork within 18 months following completion of academic coursework. One credit is applied to Fieldwork I Experience

Associate's Degrees / 107

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For the Associate in Applied Science on a part time basis when all general education courses have been completed:

Summer Semester (First year)

HLSC 210 Overview of OT Practice .............................................................. 1 credit HLSC 205 Intro to Health Prof. Literature and Scientific Writing ................... 1 credit HLSC 225 Standard Safety Precautions for the Health Care Professional ....... 1 credit Total .................................................. 3 credits

Fall Semester (Second year)

OCTR 260 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Childhood and Adolescence .......................... 6,1 credits*** OCTR 203 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Modalities I 3 credits*** Total ................................................ 10 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Fall Semester (First year)

OCTR 201 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: An Overview .......................................................... 3 credits** OCTR 204 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Medical Conditions ...................................................... 3 credits** Total .................................................. 6 credits

Spring Semester (Second Year)

OCTR 214 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Adulthood and Maturity ................................ 6,1 credits**** OCTR 206 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Therapeutic Modalities II ....................................................... 3 credits**** OCTR207Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: A Synopsis ...... 3 credits**** Total ................................................ 13 credits

Spring Semester (First year)

OCTR 218 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant: Interaction Skills ......................................................... 3 credits Total .................................................. 3 credits

Clinical Fieldwork*

OCTR 209 Advanced Clinical Education I ............................................................. 3 credits OCTR 210 Advanced Clinical Education II ............................................................. 3 credits Total .................................................. 6 credits

*

All OTA students are required to complete Level II Fieldwork within 18 months following completion of academic coursework. 1 credit is applied to Fieldwork I experience.

**, ***, **** Must be taken at the same time. ALL COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN SEQUENCE AS OUTLINED ABOVE.

108 / Associate's Degrees

Major Concentration

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT

Annlee Burch, M.S., P.T., M.P.H., Program Director ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE * General Education / Technical Support Requirements .................................................................... 25 credits Major Concentration Physical Therapist Assistant** .......................................... 44 credits Total .................................................................................... 69 credits

GENERAL EDUCATION ENGL 111 Written English & Literary Studies I ENGL 112 Written English & Literary Studies II SPCM 110 Oral Communication PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology HIST American History (elective) TECHNICAL SUPPORT: BIOL 130 Human Anatomy & Physiology PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics HLSC 205 Standard Safety Precautions for the Health Care Professional BIOL 200 Medical Terminology TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY: PHTA 200 Introduction to Physical Therapy PHTA 205 Functional Anatomy for the PTA PHTA 210 Physical Disabilities PHTA 215 Physical Therapy Procedures I PHTA 220 Clinical Orientation PHTA 225 Neurology & Pathology PHTA 230 Therapeutic Exercise I PHTA 235 Kinesiology for the PTA PHTA 240 Physical Therapy Procedures II PHTA 245 Clinical Experience I PHTA 250 Therapeutic Exercise II PHTA 255 Rehabilitation PHTA 260 Psychosocial Aspects of PT PHTA 265 Clinical Experience II PHTA 270 Clinical Experience III

*

The Program admits students into the spring and summer semesters each year. In addition to the required coursework, students admitted to the Program in the spring may complete any of the required general education/technical support courses offered that semester.

** As of November 1st, 2000, the Mercy College Physical Therapist Assistant Program is Accrediated Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association. Additional information is available by contacting the APTA at 1-800-9992782 or write: APTA, Department of Accreditation, 1111 N. Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA. 22314, or on the web at HYPERLINK "http://www.APTA.org". NOTE: Students are encouraged not to work more than twenty (20) hours per week. During clinical affiliations, student work schedules may not interfere with the hours they spend affiliating at the clinical site.

Associate's Degrees / 109

Admission Criteria for the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

To be considered for admission into the Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Mercy College a student must have: 1. Submit a complete PTA Program Application to the Admissions / PTA Office on or before the stated deadline. 2. Successful completion of all previous coursework which may or may not include program requisites with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.85 (4.0 scale). 3. A grade of "C" or above in all required requisite course work. Note the following requirements related to requisite course work: · Successful completion of ENGL 111 Written English and Literary Studies I or Placement at the ENGL 111 level. · A single course may not be used to fulfill more than one (1) requisite requirement. · All course work must be taken for a grade. Pass/fail, credit/non-credit or satisfactory/unsatisfactory scores are not acceptable, however, CLEP or Advanced Placement courses are acceptable. · If a requisite course must be repeated or has been taken more than once (even at different schools), all coursework must be reported and grades averaged. 4. Written verification of a minimum twenty (20) hours of observation in the physical therapy health care field, with a majority of those hours occurring in an inpatient hospital setting (may be volunteer or work time), documented on the appropriate form within the application packet. 5. Three (3) recommendations documented on the appropriate form within the application packet. One (1) recommendation must be from a physical therapist or physical therapist assistant (may not be more than six (6) months old). 6. Submission of a written essay describing your reasons for pursuing a degree in physical therapist assistant as well as personal qualities you feel provide the potential for success within the program and field.

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Admission Procedures for the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

1. All potential applicants to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program must file applications to both Mercy College and the PTA Program. A separate application packet for the PTA Program must be submitted by the stated deadline. 2. An application packet and general information regarding the eligibility for admission requirements into the Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant Degree Program may be obtained from the Admissions / PTA Office or the Yorktown Campus. Questions pertaining to this process may be addressed by the PTA Program Director. 3. Prospective students are required to meet with an admissions counselor for evaluation of transfer credits (if applicable) prior to submitting an application for admission into the Physical Therapist Assistant Program. 4. Applicants selected for interviews, being rank ordered based upon the program selection criteria, will be notified and asked to arrange for interviews with the representatives of the PTA Program. 5. Upon completion of all requirements and interviews, each applicant's records will be presented to the Admissions Committee of the program. Candidates will be evaluated on the basis of their interview presentation, written essays, academic achievement, experience and recommendations. All candidates will be notified as to the status of their application. 6. Applications are valid only for the academic year stated. Students deferring admission or those not selected for admission must reapply the next year in order to be eligible for consideration.

110 / Associate's Degrees

Required Curriculum Sequence for the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

Spring Semester (1)

*BIOL 130 Anatomy & Physiology I ............................... 4 Total ......................................................................... 4 Credits

Summer Semester (2)

#BIOL 130 Anatomy & Physiology I ............................... 4 *#BIOL 200 Medical Terminology .................................... 2 *#PHTA 200 Intro to Physical Therapy ............................. 3 Total ..................................................................... 5-9 Credits (3 hr lecture)

Fall Semester (3)

PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics ................................. 3 PHTA 205 Functional Anatomy for the PTA ........................................................................... 3 PHTA 210 Physical Disabilities ....................................... 3 PHTA 215 PT Procedures I .............................................. 3 PHTA 220 Clinical Orientation ........................................ 1 Total ......................................................................... 13 Credits (2 hr lecture / 3 hr lab) (3 hr lecture) (2 hr lecture / 3 hr lab) (1 day per week x 5 weeks)

Spring Semester (4)

ENGL 111 PHTA 225 PHTA 230 PHTA 235 PHTA 240 Written English & Lit. Studies I ................... 3 Neurology & Pathology ................................ 3 Therapeutic Exercise I ................................... 3 Kinesiology for the PTA ................................ 3 PT Procedures II ............................................. 3 (3 hr lecture) (2 hr lecture / 3 hr lab) (2 hr lecture / 3 hr lab) (2 hr lecture / 3 hr lab)

Total ......................................................................... 15 Credits

Summer Semester (5)

PSYN 101 ENGL 112 PHTR 245 Intro to Psychology ........................................ 3 Written English & Lit. Studies II .................. 3 Clinical Experience I ...................................... 2 (5 days per week x 3 weeks)

Total ......................................................................... 8 Credits

Fall Semester (6)

SPCM 110 PHTA 250 PHTA 255 PHTA 260 Oral Communication ..................................... 3 Therapeutic Exercise II .................................. 3 Rehabilitation .................................................. 3 Psychosocial Aspects of PT ........................... 3 (2 hr lecture / 3 hr lab) (2 lecture / 3 hr lab) (3 hr lecture)

Total ..................................................................... 12 Credits

Spring Semester (7)

HIST HLSC 205 PHTA 265 PHTA 270 American History (elective) .......................... 3 Standard Safety for Health Professional ..... 1 Clinical Experience II ..................................... 3 Clinical Experience III ................................... 5 Merlin TBA (5 days per week x 5 weeks) (5 days per week x 8 weeks)

Total ...................................................................... 12 Credits Total Credits for A.A.S. Degree: ..................... 69 Total Clinical Education Hours: ..................... 680 Note: Students are admitted into either the Spring (1) or Summer (2) semester. *: denotes spring admission sequence #: denotes summer admission sequence

Associate's Degrees / 111

Major Concentration

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Louis J. Grasso, M.A., Program Director

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE General Education Requirements ................................. 21 credits Major Concentration Television Production ....................................................... 39 credits Total .................................................................................... 60 credits

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREES

Students Who Choose the Associate in Applied Science in Television Production Must Complete: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

BIOL 112 Environmental Science ECON 115 The Economy, Jobs and You ENGL 111 Written English & Literary Studies I ENGL 112 Written English & Literary Studies II MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology OR SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology OR POLS 101 Political Power in America SPCM 110 Oral Communication

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

JOUR 145 Media in America RDTV 115 Fundamentals of TV Production RDTV 120 Television Studio Production RDTV 200 Television Performance RDTV 201 Voice Development & Interviewing Techniques for TV and Radio Broadcasting RDTV 215 Videotape Editing Workshop RDTV 220 Advanced Television Production RDTV 303 Broadcast Journalism RDTV 320 Television Field Production RDTV 350 Producing the Television Documentary RDTV 399 Internship in Journalism & Media And two additional courses in RDTV or JOUR.

A minimum of at least 30 credits must be taken in residence at Mercy College for the Associate in Applied Science in Television Production. A minimum of one half of the credits in the area of the major concentration must be taken in residence at Mercy College.

112 / Associate's Degrees

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Associate In Applied Science In Television Production

First Semester

Written English & Literary Studies I ..................................... Fundamentals of TV Production ................................. TV Studio Production ................... Media in America .......................... The Economy, Jobs & You ............ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Third Semester

Voice Dev. & Interviewing Tech for TV & Radio Broadcasting ............................. Broadcast Journalism .................... Television Field Production ......... RDTV or JOUR Elective ................ Mathematics for the Liberal Arts ............................... Total

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

Written English & Literary Studies II .................................... Television Performance ................ Videotape Editing Workshop .................................. Advanced Television Production ................................. Oral Communication .................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Fourth Semester

Producing the Television Documentary ............................ Internship in Journalism & Media ......................................... RDTV or JOUR Elective ................ Introduction to Psychology OR Introduction to Sociology OR Political Power in America ........... Environmental Science .................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

Bachelor Degree Programs Division of Business and Accounting / 113

BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS

Division of Business and Accounting .......................................... 114 Division of Civic and Cultural Studies ........................................ 147 Division of Education..................................................................... 159 Division of Health Professions ..................................................... 169 Honors Program ............................................................................. 180 Interdisciplinary Studies................................................................ 182 Division of Libraries ....................................................................... 184 Division of Literature, Language, and Communication ........... 185 Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science ................................................ 197 Division of Natural Sciences andVeterinary Technology ......... 204 Physical Education ......................................................................... 214 Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences ................................. 215

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

114 / Division of Business and Accounting

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

Thomas Milton, Ph.D., Division Chairperson Wayne L. Cioffari, M.A., M.B.A., Associate Division Chairperson Lucretia S. Mann, M.B.A., C.P.A., Program Director for Accounting Thomas Milton, Ph.D., Program Director for Business Andrew Joppa, M.B.A., Program Director for Organizational Management Christina Cashin, Manager, Small Business Development Center The Division offers the following major concentrations and specializations: · Accounting (A.S.) · General Accounting (B.S.) · General Accounting with specialization in Computers and Information Systems, Financial Accounting, and Taxation (B.S.) · Management Accounting (B.S.) · Management Accounting with specialization in Computers and Information Systems (B.S.) · Public Accounting (B.S.) · Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accounting · Banking (A.A.S.) · Business (A.A.S.) · Business with specializations in Banking, Direct Marketing, Finance, General Business, International Business, Management, and Marketing (B.S.) · Organizational Management (B.S.) Honor Society: National Honor Society in Business, Delta Mu Delta Timothy Allport, M.B.A., Moderator Business courses with 100 numbers should be taken in the Freshman year. Business courses with 200 numbers should be completed in the Sophomore year. Business courses with 300 numbers should be completed in the Junior year. Business courses with 400 numbers should be completed in the Senior year. All Business majors must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. Students in all Business courses must fulfill the college's requirements for the successful completion or waiver of MATH 105 before taking any Business course numbered 200 or above.

Division of Business and Accounting / 115

Major Concentration

GENERAL ACCOUNTING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 39 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 21 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in General Accounting Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing

CONCENTRATION

ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II Any three additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT) courses except ACCT 380 or ACCT 381, Cooperative Education in Accounting I or II.

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

Any two additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT), Business Law (LAWS), Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), International Business (INBU), and/or Marketing (MKTG) courses.***

* These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement. *** All of the College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Gereral Accounting must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381.

The major concentration in General Accounting meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination. The major concentration in General Accounting does not meet the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination.

116 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration

GENERAL ACCOUNTING

With Specialization: COMPUTER & INFORMATION SYSTEMS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 36 credits Specialization ..................................................................... 9 credits Subtotal Accounting and Business ............................ 45 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 15 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Computers and Information Systems Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing Any two additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT) courses except ACCT 380 or ACCT 381, Cooperative Education in Accounting I or II. Any two additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT), Business Law (LAWS), Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), International Business (INBU), Marketing (MKTG), and/or Computer Information Systems (CISC) courses.***

SPECIALIZATION

ACCT 261 Computer Applications for Accountants CISC 220 Database Applications and one of the following courses: CISC 238 CISC 301 CISC 337 Graphical User Interface Application Development Information Systems within Organizations Database Management Systems

CONCENTRATION

ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II

*

These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements.

** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement. *** All of the College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of General Accounting with a Specialization in Computers and Information Systems must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381.

The major concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Computers and Information Systems meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination. The major concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Computers and Information Systems does not meet the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination.

Division of Business and Accounting / 117

Major Concentration

GENERAL ACCOUNTING

with Specialization: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 33 credits Specialization .................................................................... 9 credits Subtotal Accounting and Business ............................ 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Financial Accounting Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing Any TWO additional 3 credit Accounting (ACCT) courses except ACCT 380 or ACCT 381, Cooperative Education in Accounting I or II. Any one additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT), Business Law (LAWS), Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), International Business (INBU), and/or Marketing (MKTG) courses.***

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

SPECIALIZATION

ACCT 320 Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics ACCT 330 Advanced Accounting and ONE of the following courses: FINC 321 FINC 345 FINC 442 Managerial Finance Financial Statement Analysis Investment Management

CONCENTRATION

ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II

* These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement. *** All of the College's 15 credit residency requirement in the major concentration of General Accounting with a Specialization in Financial Accounting must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381.

The major concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Financial Accounting meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination. The major concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Financial Accounting does not meet the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination.

118 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration

GENERAL ACCOUNTING

With Specialization: TAXATION

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 33 credits Specialization ..................................................................... 9 credits Subtotal Accounting and Business ............................ 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in General Accounting With a Specialization in Taxation Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing Any two additional 3 credit Accounting (ACCT) courses except ACCT 380 or ACCT 381, Cooperative Education in Accounting I or II. Any one additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT), Business Law (LAWS), Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), International Business (INBU), and/or Marketing (MKTG) courses.***

SPECIALIZATION

ACCT 340 Introduction to Federal Income Taxation ACCT 341 Advanced Federal Income Taxation and one of the following courses: FINC 345 Financial Statement Analysis LAWS 340 Business Law II

CONCENTRATION

ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II

*

These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements.

** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement. *** All of the College's 15 credit residency requirement in the major concentration of General Accounting with a Specialization in Taxation must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381.

The major concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Taxation meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination. The major concentration in General Accounting with a Specialization in Taxation does not meet the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination.

Division of Business and Accounting / 119

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The General Accounting Major*

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

Mathematics for the Liberal Arts OR College Algebra ............................. English 111 ...................................... History ............................................. Introduction to Financial Accounting ................................ Speech 110 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Accounting ..................................... General Education ......................... Junior Seminar ............................... Principles of Management ............ Principles of Marketing ................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Business Law I ................................ Open Electives (a) .......................... Principles of Business Finance ..... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... History ............................................. Introduction to Management Accounting ................................ Open Elective ................................. Statistics ........................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ......................... Intermediate Accounting I ........... Introduction to Computers and Application Software ............... Macro-Economics .......................... Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

Fall Semester

Accounting ..................................... Accounting ................................ General Education ......................... Open Elective ................................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester Spring Semester

General Education ......................... Intermediate Accounting II .......... Micro-Economics ........................... Open Elective ................................. Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits Accounting/Business Law/Finance/ Management/Marketing (b) .. 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .......................................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

*

The Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the General Accounting Major with a Specialization in Computers and Information Systems, or Financial Accounting, or Taxation is the same as the Recommended Curriculum Schedule shown above, except for the following:

(a) replace Open Electives (6 credits) with Specialization (3 credits), Open Elective (3 credits). (b) replace Accounting/Business Law/Finance/Management/Marketing (3 credits) with Specialization (3 credits).

120 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 48 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 12 credits Total ................................................................................ 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Management Accounting Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management

CONCENTRATION

ACCT 240 ACCT 241 ACCT 250 ACCT 261 ACCT 320 ACCT 330 ACCT 340 ACCT 341 ACCT 420 ACCT 450 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Cost Accounting Computer Applications for Accountants Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics Advanced Accounting Introduction to Federal Income Taxation Advanced Federal Income Taxation Auditing Advanced Management Accounting (or ACCT 410 Accounting Information Systems or ACCT 430 Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting)

*

These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements.

** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

All of the College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Management Accounting must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381. The major concentration in Management Accounting meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination. The major concentration in Management Accounting does not meet the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination.

Division of Business and Accounting / 121

Major Concentration MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

With Specialization: COMPUTER & INFORMATION SYSTEMS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 45 credits Specialization ...................................................................... 9 credits Subtotal Accounting and Business ............................ 54 credits Open Electives ..................................................................... 6 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Management Accounting with a Specialization in Computers and Information Systems Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management ACCT 320 Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics ACCT 330 Advanced Accounting ACCT 340 Introduction to Federal Income Taxation ACCT 341 Advanced Federal Income Taxation ACCT 420 Auditing ACCT 450 Advanced Management Accounting (or ACCT 410 Accounting Information Systems or ACCT 430, Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting)

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

SPECIALIZATION

ACCT 261 CISC 220 CISC 238 CISC 301 CISC 337 Computer Applications for Accountants Database Applications Graphical User Interface Application Development Information Systems within Organizations Database Management Systems

CONCENTRATION

ACCT 240 ACCT 241 ACCT 250 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Cost Accounting

and one of the following courses:

*

These courses fulfill liberal arts and science requirements.

** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement. All of the College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Management Accounting with a specialization in Computers and Information Systems must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381. The major concentration in Management Accounting with a specialization in Computers and Information Systems meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination. The major concentration in Management Accounting with a specialization in Computers and Information Systems does not meet the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination.

122 / Division of Business and Accounting

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Management Accounting Major*

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

College Algebra ............................. English 111 ...................................... History ............................................. Introduction to Financial Accounting ................................ Speech 110 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ....................... Advanced Accounting .................. Junior Seminar ............................... Principles of Business Finance ..... Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

General Education ......................... 3 credits Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics ................ 3 credits Business Law I ................................ 3 credits Managerial Finance ....................... 3 credits Open Elective (a) ............................ 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... History ............................................. Introduction to Computers and Application Software ............... Introduction to Management Accounting ................................ Statistics ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ......................... 3 credits Auditing ......................................... 3 credits Computer Applications for Accountants .............................. 3 credits Introduction to Federal Income Taxation .................................... 3 credits Open Elective ................................ 3 credits Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ......................... Cost Accounting ............................ Intermediate Accounting I ........... Macro-Economics .......................... Liberal Arts & Sciences Elective .. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester Spring Semester

General Education ......................... Intermediate Accounting II .......... Micro-Economics ........................... Principles of Management ............ Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits General Education ......................... 3 credits Advanced Federal Income Taxation ..................................... 3 credits Advanced Management Accounting, or Accounting Information Systems or Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting .. 3 credits Open Elective ................................. 3 credits Open Elective (a) ............................ 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

*

The Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the Management Accounting major with a specialization in Computers and Information Systems is the same as the Recommended Curriculum Schedule shown above, except for the following change: (a) replace with Specialization.

Division of Business and Accounting / 123

Major Concentration

PUBLIC ACCOUNTING

The stand-alone B.S. Public in Accounting Program is no longer a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) licensure-qualifying program in New York State. The Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accounting is now the only CPA licensure-qualifying program. (See Catalog description for details). During this transitional period prior to August 1, 2009, students may complete and apply for the CPA examination with only the B.S. in Public Accounting degree; however, students wil have to self-certify their eligibility and academic credentials with the New York State Education Department Office of the Professions. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................. 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 57 credits Accounting and Business Electives .................................. 3 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Public Accounting Must Complete:

and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ECON 220 Macro-Economics * ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I LAWS 340 Business Law II MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers

CONCENTRATION

ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT 240 241 250 261 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Cost Accounting Computer Applications for Accountants Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics Advanced Accounting Introduction to Federal Income Taxation Advanced Federal Income Taxation Accounting Information Systems Auditing Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting

ACCT 320 ACCT 330 ACCT 340 ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT 341 410 420 430

Any one additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT), Business Law (LAWS), Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), International Business (INBU), and/or Marketing (MKTG) courses.

* These courses fulfill liberal arts and science requirements. ** This course fulfills part of the General Education requirement.

All of the College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Public Accounting must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381. The major concentration in Public Accounting meets the educational requirements for candidates applying to take the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination.

124 / Division of Business and Accounting

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Public Accounting Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

College Algebra ............................. English 111 ...................................... History ............................................. Introduction to Financial Accounting ................................ Speech 110 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ......................... Junior Seminar ............................... Advanced Accounting .................. Business Law I ................................ Principles of Business Finance ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... History ............................................. Introduction to Computers and Application Software ....... Introduction to Management Accounting ................................ Statistics ........................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Spring Semester

General Education ......................... Business Law II .............................. Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics ........ Managerial Finance ...................... Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ......................... Cost Accounting ............................ Intermediate Accounting I ........... Macro-Economics .......................... Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ......................... Accounting Information Systems Accounting/Business Electives ... Introduction to Federal Income Taxation ....................... Liberal Arts/Science Elective ....... Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

General Education ......................... Intermediate Accounting II .......... Micro-Economics ........................... Principles of Management ............ Total

15 credits

Spring Semester

Advanced Federal Income Taxation ..................................... General Education ......................... Computer Applications for Accountants ................................ Accounting/Business Electives ... Auditing .......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Division of Business and Accounting / 125

Major Concentration

COMBINED B.S./M.S. IN PUBLIC ACCOUNTING

Purpose

The 150 Hour Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accounting Program is for highly qualified students who wish to enter the profession of Public Accountancy. The Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accounting is the only licensure-qualifying program commencing at the undergraduate level at Mercy College. Upon completion of the Combined Program, students will meet the academic requirements for admission to the CPA Examination in New York State and will satisfy the licensure requirements with one year of professional experience.

Objectives

Graduates of the Combined Program are prepared for employment in a dynamic profession. Undergraduate students are equipped with a strong liberal arts foundation, professional accounting and business curriculum. Graduate students experience an integration of advanced accounting research and studies in graduate business courses which provide depth and breadth to the learning experience.

Admission Requirements

Requirements for matriculation and admission into the Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accounting include:

A. Undergraduate Program Admission:

· Freshman 1. High school GPA: 80 or higher; 2. Acceptable SAT or ACT score, if available; 3. Written permission of the Program Director is required for entrance into this Program based on review of admission requirements. · Transfers from other post secondary institutions 1. Overall and accounting GPA: 3.0 or higher; 2. Written permission of the Program Director is required for entrance into this Program based on review of admission requirements; 3. Accounting credits more than five years old will not be accepted in transfer in fulfillment of the major. They may be used for elective credits only.

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

B. Graduate Program Admission:

1. During the last year of undergraduate study, students apply for the B.S. Public Accounting degree. Students who meet graduate admission criteria will continue into the graduate portion of the Combined B.S./M.S. Public Accounting Program. Program continuation will be granted to candidates who show promise of success in graduate studies. 2. Criteria used to evaluate acceptance into the M.S. Public Accounting Program portion of the Combined B.S./M.S. Public Accounting Program are: · Students must have earned at least a 3.0 overall and accounting gpa in undergraduate courses taken at Mercy College. · Students who possess minimum requirements may have to take and

126 / Division of Business and Accounting

achieve an acceptable score on the GMAT prior to admission to the M.S. in Public Accounting Program. · An interview with the Director may be required.

Curriculum

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................. 60 credits Major Concentration Accounting and Business ................................................ 57 credits Accounting and Business Electives .................................. 3 credits Total Bachelor of Science ............................................. 120 credits MASTER OF SCIENCE Accounting ........................................................................ 15 credits Business .............................................................................. 15 credits Total Master of Science .................................................... 30 credits Total Combined B.S./M.S. ........................................... 150 credits

Students Who Are Enrolled in the B.S. in Public Accounting Portion of the Combined Program Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 122 Statistics ECON 220 Macro-Economics * ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance LAWS 120 Business Law I LAWS 340 Business Law II MATH 116 College Algebra MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software** MGMT 225 Principles of Management CONCENTRATION ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II ACCT 250 Cost Accounting ACCT 261 Computer Applications for Accountants ACCT 320 Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics ACCT 330 Advanced Accounting ACCT 340 .. Introduction to Federal Income Taxation ACCT 341 Advanced Federal Income Taxation ACCT 410 Accounting Information Systems ACCT 420 Auditing ACCT 430 Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting

Any one additional 3-credit Accounting (ACCT), Business Law (LAWS), Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), International Business (INBU), and/or Marketing (MKTG) courses. * These courses fulfill liberal arts and science requirements. ** This course fulfills part of the General Education requirement. All of the College's undergraduate 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Public Accounting must be met with Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 to 450, excluding ACCT 380 and ACCT 381.

Division of Business and Accounting / 127 Students Who Are Enrolled in the M.S. in Public Accounting Portion of the Combined Program Must Complete: ACCOUNTING COURSES: ACCT 510 Global Financial Statement Analysis ACCT 520 Contemporary Auditing Issues ACCT 530 Advanced Accounting Theory and Applications (Capstone) ACCT 540 Advanced Business Entity Taxation ACCT 550 Advanced Controllership BUSINESS COURSES: FINC 703 Corporate Financial Policy or FINC 710 Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions MBAA 504 Marketing Systems MBAA 507 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis MBAA 535 Communication Processes MBAA 602 Managerial Economics

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

128 / Division of Business and Accounting

Schedule of Courses for the Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accounting 150 Hour CPA Licensure-Qualifying Program

FIRST YEAR - UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Fall Semester ACCT 120 ........................................ 3 credits ENG 111 .......................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences ............. 9 credits Total 15 credits Spring Semester ACCT 121 ........................................ ENG 112 .......................................... Liberal Arts and Sciences ............. MATH 116 ...................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR - UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Spring Semester Fall Semester ACCT 241 ........................................ 3 credits ACCT 240 ........................................ 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences ............. 9 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences ............. 6 credits MNGT 225 ...................................... 3 credits MATH (CISC) 120 .......................... 3 credits SPCM 110 ........................................ 3 credits Total 15 credits Total 15 credits THIRD YEAR - UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Fall Semester ACCT 250 ........................................ ACCT 320 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits Spring Semester ACCT 261 ........................................ ACCT 330 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... FINC 321 ......................................... Liberal Arts and Sciences ............. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

FOURTH YEAR - UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Spring Semester Fall Semester Liberal Arts and Sciences ............. ACCT 340 ........................................ 3 credits ACCT 341 ........................................ ACCT 410 ........................................ 3 credits ACCT 420 ........................................ ECON 122 ....................................... 3 credits ACCT 430 ........................................ LAWS 120 ....................................... 3 credits LAWS 340 ....................................... ACCT or Bus Elective .................... 3 credits Total 15 credits Total

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

Summer Quarter 1 MBAA 504 ....................................... 3 credits MBAA 535 ....................................... 3 credits Total 6 credits

FIFTH YEAR - GRADUATE PROGRAM (5 Quarters) Fall Quarter 2 ACCT 520 ........................................ 3 credits MBAA 507 ....................................... 3 credits Total 6 credits

Winter Quarter 3 ACCT 510 ........................................ 3 credits ACCT 540 ........................................ 3 credits Total 6 credits

Spring Quarter 4 ACCT 530 ........................................ 3 credits MBAA 602 ....................................... 3 credits Total 6 credits

Summer Quarter 5 ACCT 550 ........................................ 3 credits FINC 703 or FINC 710 ................... 3 credits Total 6 credits

Division of Business and Accounting / 129

THE ACCOUNTING PROGRAM

Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Professional Examination Candidates holding any baccalaureate degree meet the educational requirements to take the CMA Examination. Students can prepare for the CMA Examination by enrolling in one of the BS or General Management Accounting Degree Programs, and taking FINC 345, Financial Statement Analysis, and MGMT 340, Organizational Behavior. Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Professional Examination The Combined B.S./M.S. in Public Accouting is a 150 hour CPA licensurequalifying program. Students who complete this program are eligible to sit for the CPA examination and become licensed in New York State with one year of appropriate professional experience. Accounting Program Bulletins

You may obtain a current copy of any of the following Bulletins by writing or telephoning the Secretary, Accounting Program, Mercy College, 555 Broadway, Dobbs Ferry, New York 10522, (914) 674-7490. No. 1 Why Individuals Choose Accounting for Their Bachelor's Degree No. 2 Why You Should Choose Mercy College for Your Accounting Degree No. 3 Quality Control in Our Accounting Program No. 4 The Accounting Program Faculty No. 5 Order Form for Accounting Program Bulletins No. 6 Selection Guide for Accounting Degree Programs No. 7 Planned Schedules of Future Accounting Classes No. 9 Selection Guide for Certificate Programs in Accounting No. 10 Advising Supplement -- Certificate Programs in Accounting No. 14 Career Opportunities in Accounting No. 16 How to Prepare a Professional Resume No. 17 Career Development Assistance No. 19 The Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Examination No. 20 The Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination No. 21 Tasks Assigned to New Staff Members in Public Accounting Firms No. 24 Continuing Professional Education Credits for CPAs and PAs No. 25 Answers to Questions About Accounting and Accounting Degrees No. 40 The Barry Kuchinsky Memorial Award in Accounting No. 43 How Studying Accounting Can Increase Employers' Interest In You No. 44 Specializations with the B.S. General Accounting Degree No. 45 Use of Credits from Non-U.S. Schools to Meet CPA Requirements No. 46 Goals for Bachelor of Science Degree Programs in Accounting No. 47 Taking Accounting Courses via Distance Learning No. 48 The James M. Elting Memorial Award in Accounting

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

Other

The faculty recommends that students earn at least a grade of "C+" in prerequisites for all accounting courses before continuing. Accounting Program policy prohibits making any exceptions to corequisite or prerequisite requirements, except upon written application to the Program Director from nonmatriculated students with relevant experience. Because of the nature of the subject, and the availability of advance schedules, tutorials are not offered for accounting courses.

130 / Division of Business and Accounting

SELECTION GUIDE FOR ACCOUNTING DEGREES

BS General Accounting Degrees Next Career Objective, and Prepatory Degrees Graduate-level academic work Non-accounting position in business where a knowledge of accounting is desirable Accounting position in small or medium-size business Professional accountant in the management accounting functions of business Professional Examinations in Accounting Certified Management Accountant (CMA) Graduates eligible to take the exam Graduates prepared to pass all parts of the exam with reasonable review Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Graduates eligible to take the exam Graduates prepared to pass all parts of the exam with reasonable review Locations and Times These Degrees are Offered Dobbs Ferry Campus (B.S.) 16-week day A Terms Saturday A Terms Dobbs Ferry Campus (M.S.) 10-week evening Q Terms Bronx Campus (B.S.) 8-week evening B and C Terms Manhattan Campus 16-week evening A Terms White Plains Campus (B.S.) 8-week evening B and C Terms 10-week weekend J Terms Yorktown Campus (B.S.) 16-week evening A Terms Semester Hour Credits Credits required to graduate Credits required in accounting courses Accounting and business elective credits Open elective credits Maximum credits available for life achievement Credits of the College's undergraduate 15-credit residency requirement which must be fulfilled by Accounting courses numbered 240 to 450, except ACCT 380 and ACCT 381 120 18 to 24 0 to 6 21 to 24 15 120 33 to 36 0 to 6 6 to 12 6 to 12 120 33 to 36 0 to 6 0 0 120/30 36/15 0 to 3 0 0 Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Management Public Combined Accounting Accounting B.S./M.S. in Degrees Degrees Public Accounting

No Until 8/1/09 No Yes

15

15

15

15

Division of Business and Accounting / 131

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

With Specialization: BANKING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................................ 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................................. 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................................ 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences .......................................... 60 credits Major Concentration Business ............................................................................................ 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................................. 18 credits

Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in Banking Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 ACCT 121 BANK 160 ECON 120 ECON 122 ECON 220 ECON 221 FINC 320 FINC 321 INBU 250 MATH 116 MATH 120 MGMT 225 MGMT 455 MGMT 460 MGMT 465 MKTG 220 Introduction to Financial Accounting Introduction to Management Accounting Law & Banking I The World of Business Statistics*** Macro-Economics* Micro-Economics* Principles of Business Finance Managerial Finance International Business* College Algebra** (or MATH201, 212, 260, or 261) Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** Principles of Management Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures OR Entrepreneurship I Principles of Marketing

TRACK II ­ INTERNATIONAL BANKING

BANK 112 Principles of Banking BANK 119 Bank Payment Systems BANK 250 International Banking Operations ECON 344 Money & Banking* BANK 353 Financing International Trade BANK/ECON 455 Foreign Exchange Theory & Practice* (c)

TRACK III ­ PERSONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES

BANK 112 Principles of Banking BANK 113 Consumer Bank Products BANK 261 Law & Banking II BANK/ECON323 Principles of Real Estate* BANK 325 Life Insurance BANK 485 Consumer Credit (c)

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

TRACK IV ­ COMMERCIAL FINANCIAL SERVICES

BANK 112 Principles of Banking BANK 119 Bank Payment Systems ECON 344 Money & Banking* FINC 345 Financial Statement Analysis BANK/ECON 483 COMMERCIAL Lending* FINC 449 Problems in Financial Management (c) BANK BANK BANK ECON BANK FINC 112 181 286 344 488 442 Principles of Banking Introduction to the Securities Industry Securities Analysis Money & Banking* Securities Processing Investment Management (c)

and one of the following five tracks:

BANK BANK BANK MGMT MGMT BANK 112 119 261 340 345 498 Principles of Banking Bank Payment Systems Law & Banking II Organizational Behavior Industrial Psychology* Bank Internal Control & Audit (c)

TRACK I ­ OPERATIONS/SUPERVISION TRACK V ­ SECURITIES INDUSTRY

There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business.

* These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

132 / Division of Business and Accounting

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in Banking

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... FINC 321 ......................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... 3 credits BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... BANK SPECIALIZATION ........... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total

*

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Students who place at a higher level of English

should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112. ** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

Division of Business and Accounting / 133

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

With Specialization: DIRECT MARKETING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Business .............................................................................. 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in Direct Marketing Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 122 Statistics *** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance INBU 250 International Business* LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra** (for MATH 201, 212, 260 or 261) MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies and Procedures OR MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing

SPECIALIZATION IN DIRECT MARKETING

MKTG 341 Fundamentals of Direct Marketing and E-Commerce MKTG 342 Creative Basics for Direct Marketing MKTG 343 Strategic Media Planning for Direct Marketing MKTG/ECON 424 Direct Marketing Measurement, Testing, and Analysis * MKTG 425 Database Development and Marketing (c) MKTG 426 Fulfillment and Customer Service in Direct Marketing

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

The Division of Business and Accounting recommends that ECON 115 be taken as part of the General Education requirement.

All Direct Marketing specialization students must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business which must be satisfied by Business courses numbered 340 or above. * These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather that MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

134 / Division of Business and Accounting

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in Direct Marketing

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

MKTG 342 ....................................... MKTG 342 ....................................... FINC 321 ......................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

MKTG 343 ....................................... 3 credits MKTG 424 ....................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

MKTG 425 ....................................... MKTG 426 ....................................... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total

*

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Students who place at a higher level of English

should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112. ** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

Division of Business and Accounting / 135

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

With Specialization: FINANCE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences .............................. 60 credits Major Concentration Business ......................................................................... 42-45 credits Open Electives .............................................................. 15-18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in Finance Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 122 Statistics *** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance INBU 250 International Business* LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra** (or MATH 201, 212, 260, or 261) MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures OR MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship I MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing

(TRACK I) FINANCE/ACCOUNTING SPECIALIZATION

ACCT 240 ACCT 241 ACCT 250 FINC 449 ECON 344 FINC 345 FINC 442 FINC 447 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Cost Accounting Problems in Financial Management (c) Money and Banking* Financial Statement Analysis Investment Management International Finance OR

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

and two of the following four courses:

(TRACK II) FINANCE/ECONOMICS SPECIALIZATION

ECON 344 FINC 345 FINC 442 FINC 447 FINC 449 MGMT 442 Money and Banking* Financial Statement Analysis Investment Management International Finance Problems in Financial Management (c) Management Information Systems

The Division of Business and Accounting recommends that ECON 115 be taken as part of the General Education requirement. All Finance specialization students must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business which must be satisfied by Business courses numbered 340 or above and Accounting courses numbered 240 or above. * These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

136 / Division of Business and Accounting

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in Finance/Accounting (Track I)

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 240 ........................................ FINC 321 ......................................... FINC 345 or FINC 447 ................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

ACCT 241 ........................................ 3 credits ECON 344 or FINC 442 ................. 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 250 ........................................ FINC 449 ......................................... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

*

Students who place at a higher level of English should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112.

** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

Division of Business and Accounting / 137

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in Finance/Economics (Track II)

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

FINC 321 ......................................... FINC 345 ......................................... MGMT 442 ...................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

ECON 344 ....................................... 3 credits FINC 442 ......................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

15 credits

Second Semester

FINC 447 ......................................... FINC 449 ......................................... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ 3 credits ECON 221 ....................................... 3 credits ENGL 112 ........................................... credits MKTG 220 ....................................... 3 credits PSYN 101 ......................................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

*

Students who place at a higher level of English

should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112. ** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

138 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

With Specialization: GENERAL BUSINESS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Business ......................................................................... 48-51 credits Open Electives .............................................................. 9-12 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in General Business Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 122 Statistics *** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance INBU 250 International Business* LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra** (or MATH 201, 212, 260, or 261) MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures OR MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing SPECIALIZATION

Eight additional courses:

Three courses numbered 340 or higher, with one course selected from each of the areas of Finance (FINC), Management (MGMT), and Marketing (MKTG) AND Five additional courses numbered 340 or higher selected from Economics (ECON)*, Finance (FINC), International Business (INBU), Management (MGMT), or Marketing (MKTG). These courses may include up to two Accounting (ACCT) courses numbered 240 or higher.

The Division of Business and Accounting recommends that ECON 115 be taken as part of the General Education requirement. All General Business specialization students must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business which must be satisfied by Business courses numbered 340 or above which may include a maximum of two Accounting courses numbered 240 or above. * These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

Division of Business and Accounting / 139

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in General Business

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... FOREIGN LANGUAGE ............... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... FINC 321 ......................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 225 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... BUSINESS SPECIALIZATION .... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

*

Students who place at a higher level of English should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112.

** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116.

140 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

With Specialization: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Business .............................................................................. 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in International Business Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 122 Statistics*** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance INBU 250 International Business* LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra** (or MATH 201, 212, 260, or 261) MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures OR MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing

SPECIALIZATION

INBU 370 INBU 375 INBU 444 INBU 447 INBU 451 International Relations* International Marketing International Management International Finance Problems in International Business and one Business or Economics Elective numbered 340 or higher.

The Division of Business and Accounting recommends that ECON 115 be taken as part of the General Education requirement. All International Business specialization students must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business which must be satisfied by Business courses numbered 340 or above. Students specializing in International Business are expected to attain a certain level of proficiency in a second language and to use their open electives for courses that extend their knowledge of other countries. * These courses fulfill Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements. ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

Division of Business and Accounting / 141

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business major with specialization in International Business

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

FINC 321 ......................................... INBU 370 ......................................... INBU 375 ......................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

BUSINESS ELECTIVE ................... 3 credits INBU 444 ......................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

15 credits

Second Semester

INBU 447 ......................................... INBU 451 ......................................... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

* Students who place at a higher level of English should start at that level and continue taking the

English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112. ** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

142 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

with Specialization: MANAGEMENT

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Business .............................................................................. 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in Management Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 122 Statistics *** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance INBU 250 International Business* LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra** (or MATH 201, 212, 260 or 261) MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures OR MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology***

SPECIALIZATION

MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior MGMT 345 Industrial Psychology* MGMT 442 Management Information Systems MGMT 446 Human Resource Management* (c)

and two of the following three:

MGMT 348 Sales Management MGMT 444 International Management MKTG 442 Marketing Management

The Division of Business and Accounting recommends that ECON 115 be taken as part of the General Education requirement. All Management specialization students must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business which must be satisfied by Business courses numbered 340 or above. * These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** These courses fulfill part of the General Education requirement.

Division of Business and Accounting / 143

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in Management

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

FINC 321 ......................................... MGMT 340 ...................................... MGMT 345 ...................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

MGMT 442 ...................................... 3 credits MGMT 444 OR MGMT 348 .......... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

15 credits

Second Semester

MGMT 446 ...................................... MKTG 442 ....................................... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

* Students who place at a higher level of English

should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112. ** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

144 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration

BUSINESS

With Specialization: MARKETING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................. 9 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................ 60 credits Major Concentration Business .............................................................................. 45 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 15 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Business with a Specialization in Marketing Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting ECON 120 The World of Business ECON 122 Statistics *** ECON 220 Macro-Economics* ECON 221 Micro-Economics* FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance FINC 321 Managerial Finance INBU 250 International Business* LAWS 120 Business Law I MATH 116 College Algebra** (or MATH 201, 212, 260 or 261) MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*** MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems (c) OR MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures OR MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing

SPECIALIZATION

MKTG 341 Fundamentals of Direct Marketing and E-Commerce MKTG 344 Advertising MKTG 348 Sales Management MKTG 375 International Marketing MKTG 440 Marketing Research (c) MKTG 442 Marketing Management

The Division of Business and Accounting recommends that ECON 115 be taken as part of the General Education requirement. All Marketing specialization students must complete at least one computer component (c) course within their program of study. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Business which must be satisfied by Business courses numbered 340 or above. * These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements. ** Business majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. *** This course fulfills part of the General Education requirement.

Division of Business and Accounting / 145

Recommended curriculum schedule for the Business Major with specialization in Marketing

FIRST YEAR First Semester

ARTT 107 or MUSI 107 ................. ECON 115 ....................................... ENGL 109* ...................................... MATH 105** ................................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR First Semester

ECON 122 ....................................... FINC 320 ......................................... Junior Seminar ............................... INBU 250 ......................................... LAWS 120 ....................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Second Semester

CISC 120 .......................................... ECON 120 ....................................... ENGL 110* ...................................... MATH 116 ...................................... HISTORY ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

FINC 321 ......................................... MKTG 341 ....................................... MKTG 344 ....................................... General Education ......................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR First Semester

ACCT 120 ........................................ ECON 220 ....................................... ENGL 111 ........................................ MGMT 225 ...................................... SPCM 110 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR First Semester

MKTG 348 ....................................... 3 credits MKTG 375 ....................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING

15 credits

Second Semester

MKTG 440 ....................................... MKTG 442 ....................................... MGMT 455/460/465 ..................... General Education ......................... Open Electives*** ........................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Second Semester

ACCT 121 ........................................ ECON 221 ....................................... ENGL 112 ........................................ MKTG 220 ....................................... PSYN 101 ......................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

* Students who place at a higher level of English

should start at that level and continue taking the English sequence without interruption until they have completed ENGL 112. ** Students who place at a higher level of Mathematics should take MATH 116. *** Students who do not have full-time jobs should try to use their Open Electives for Co-op Education courses or internships.

146 / Division of Business and Accounting

Major Concentration:

ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 45 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Subtotal Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................. 48 credits Major Concentration Organizational Management .......................................... 39 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 33 credits Total ......................................................................... 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Organizational Management Must Complete: MODULE 1 -- Establishing Values

CISC 340 Information Sources and Systems PSYN/SPCM 250 Psychology of Communication PSYN 280 Philosophy and the Social Sciences* PSYN 310 Career/Life Assessment and Ethics

MODULE 2 -- Assessing Opportunities

ECON 225 ECON 430 MKTG 445 SOCL 420 The Economic Environment* The International Dimension* Market Assessment Society and Social Change: Science and Technology

MODULE 3 -- Effecting Change

HUMN 320 MGMT 425 MGMT 465 MGMT 490/495 Interdisciplinary Humanities* Managerial Behavior­Leading in Modern Organizations Entrepreneurship Integrative Project - Part I/II

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Organizational Management. * These courses fulfill Liberal Arts and Science requirements.

Division of Civic and Cultural Studies / 147

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

Peter G. Slater, Ph.D. Division Chairperson Program Director for History Course Coordinator for Philosophy, for Political Science, and for Religion Jeffrey Bellantoni, M.F.A. Program Director for Computer Arts and Technology and Digital Media Production Joshua Berrett, Ph.D. Course Coordinator for Music Barbara Dodsworth, Ph.D. Course Coordinator for Art Paul Steinman, M.A. Program Director for Music Industry & Technology The Division offers major concentrations in: Computer Arts and Technology (B.F.A.) History (B.A., B.S.) Interdisciplinary Studies with Specialization in Digital Media Production (BA) Music Industry and Technology (A.A.S., B.S.) The Division offers courses in Art, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, and Religion.

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

148 / Division of Civic and Cultural Studies

COMPUTER ARTS + TECHNOLOGY

Digital technology pervades our culture, empowering individuals to transform the way we look at the world. The Computer Arts and Technology program at Mercy College investigates the creative capacity of digital technology to improve communication, develop creative self-expression, and explore perception and interaction among people, objects, and ideas. The Computer Arts + Technology (CART) program offers a comprehensive four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree supported by the highest quality resources and facilities. After a sequence of intensive core foundation courses, students focus their studies by choosing from electives in Animation, Gaming, and Digital + Interaction Design. Students are also encouraged to take courses from the cognate programs of Film Studies, Journalism and Media, Radio and TV, Music Industry, and Computer Information Systems. Writing, reading, and critical thinking assignments are a regular part of all courses. Combined with Mercy College's strong liberal arts and science curriculum, CART prepares students to play a significant and meaningful role in society as digital artists and designers. Aware that graduates will be practicing in this complex and ever changing world, CART strives to empower students to be creative, ethical, and technically proficient computer artists and designers who can rise to meet the myriad challenges they will face. CART enables students to become problem solvers and seekers who effectively and appropriately educate, inform, and entertain. CART believes that an academic program in computer arts should balance conceptual development, practical skills, and complex technical preparation, but should be--most of all--fun and rewarding. The CART facilities, located within the Center for Digital Arts at Mercy College, include an art studio and three Macintosh and Windows platform digital media studios, with two- and three-dimensional animation, digital video, color printing, and DVD/CD-R authoring capabilities.

Division of Civic and Cultural Studies / 149

MAJOR CONCENTRATION

COMPUTER ARTS + TECHNOLOGY

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS General Education Requirements .................................. 39 credits Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits 42 credits Major Concentration * Computer Arts and Technology ..................................... 63 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 15 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students who choose the Major Concentration in Computer Arts + Technology must complete:

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ENGL 111 Written English & Literary Studies I ENGL 112 Written English & Literary Studies II SPCM 110 Oral Communication CISC 120 Introduction to Computers & Application Software MUSI 107 Music Appreciation Select ONE Math course from the following: MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts MATH 116 College Algebra Select TWO courses from two different HISTORY areas: AREA: EUROPEAN HISTORY HIST 101 European History to 1500 HIST 102 European History since 1500 AREA: AMERICAN HISTORY HIST 105 American History through 1877 HIST 106 American History since 1877 AREA: NON-WESTERN HISTORY HIST 117 Introduction to Asian History HIST 118 Introduction to African History HIST 119 Introduction to Latin American History Select TWO courses from the following: ECON 115 Economy, Jobs and You POLS 101 Political Power in America PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology Select ONE course from the following: PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 112 Logical Thinking RELG 109 Introduction to Religion RELG 111 Judaism, Christianity, Islam RELG 112 Far Eastern Religions Select ONE course from the following: FREN 115 Beginning French for Communication FREN 116 Communicating in French ITAL 115 Beginning Italian for Communication ITAL 116 Communicating in Italian SPAN 115 Beginning Spanish for Communication SPAN 116 Communicating in Spanish Select ONE course from the following: CHEM 110 Introduction to Chemistry PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics PHSC 110 Introduction to Geology PHSC 111 Introduction to Astronomy BIOL 110 Introduction to Human Biology BIOL 111 Introduction to Human Genetics BIOL 112 Introduction to Environmental Science BIOL 113 Evolution BIOL 116 Plants and People BIOL 117 Nutrition

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

150 / Division of Civic and Cultural Studies FOUNDATION REQUIREMENTS (18 CREDITS) CART/ARTT 200 Drawing I CART/ARTT 214 Drawing II CART 220 Computer Arts Seminar CART 225 Design + Color in Two Dimensions CART 230 Digital Photography + Imaging CART 231 Visual Thinking I MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (30 CREDITS) CART/ARTT 215 History of Art I CART/ARTT 216 History of Art II CART 233 Three-Dimensional Design CART 240 Sequence, Time + Space CART 245 Sound Design CART 300 Drawing III CART 320 Kinetic Imagery I CART 495 Senior Studio Select ONE course from the following: CART 315 Issues in Computer Arts: Animation CART 316 Issues in Computer Arts: Design Select ONE course from the following: FILM 211 The Language of Film JOUR 145 Media in America MAJOR ELECTIVES (15 CREDITS) Select FIVE courses from the following: CART/CISC 219 Web Design I CART/CISC 259 Web Design II CART 232 Visual Thinking II CART 315 Issues in Computer Arts: Animation CART 316 Issues in Computer Arts: Design CART 325 Kinetic Imagery II CART 425 Animation Techniques CART 340 Digital Animation I CART 345 Digital Animation II CART 440 Digital Animation III CART 350 Digital Media + Interaction Design I CART 355 Digital Media + Interaction Design II CART 450 Digital Media + Interaction Design III CART 360 Game Design I CART 365 Game Design II CART 460 Game Design III CART 395 Special Topics in Computer Arts CART 399 Internship in Computer Arts

OPEN ELECTIVES (18 CREDITS) The remaining 15 credits, considered open electives, may be fulfilled in the following ways: approved transfer credits from another institution; courses selected from the list of Computer Arts Major Electives; and courses from any Mercy College program (although it is highly recommended that majors take courses in the cognate programs of Film Studies, Journalism and Media, Television Production, Music Industry and Technology, and Computer Information Systems

* There is an 21-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Computer Arts + Technology.

REQUIREMENTS In order to admitted into the Computer Arts major, students must: · Place at the Math 115/116 level or complete Math 105 · Submit an essay and portfolio of work to be reviewed by the Portfolio Review Admission Committee. Visit the website www.mercy.edu/cda or contact the White Plains campus for portfolio review procedures. Students who are not prepared to submit a portfolio may enroll in CART 200, CART 220 and CART 225 with permission of the program director. Work from these courses may be used to complete the portfolio review. Students will not be allowed to take additional CART courses until the portfolio review has been satisfactorily completed. Once accepted into the Computer Arts major, students whose overall GPA in the major is less than 2.33 will have a formal assessment of their aptitude for the subject matter and standing in the program. This assessment will occur at the end of the first semester of the sophomore year for those who entered as freshman, and at the end of the first year at Mercy College for those who entered as transfers. This assessment will determine whether or not the student in question will be allowed to remain in the program.

Division of Civic and Cultural Studies / 151

Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the Computer Arts + Technology Major *

FIRST YEAR Fall semester

ENGL 109, 110, or 111 ................... CISC 120 .......................................... CART 200 ........................................ CART 220 ........................................ CART 225 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall semester

General Education ......................... 6 credits CART 315 or 316 ............................ 3 credits CART Electives .............................. 6 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Spring semester Spring semester

ENGL 110, 111, or 112 ................... General Education ......................... CART 214 ........................................ CART 230 ........................................ CART 231 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits General Education ......................... 6 credits CART Electives .............................. 6 credits Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall semester

ENGL 111 or 112, or General Education ................... CART 215 ........................................ CART 233 ........................................ CART 240 ........................................ CART 300 ........................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall semester

General Education ......................... 6 credits CART Electives .............................. 3 credits CART or Open Electives ............... 6 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Spring semester

General Education ......................... 3 credits CART 495 ........................................ 3 credits CART or Open Electives ............... 9 credits

Spring semester

ENGL 112 or General Education ................... CART 216 ........................................ CART 245 ........................................ CART 320 ........................................ FILM 211 or JOUR 145 .................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Total

15 credits

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

15 credits

152 / Division of Civic and Cultural Studies

* Computer Arts Majors should carefully select their Open and Major Electives under the advisement of the Program Director. The Computer Arts Program has identified "zones" of creative activity to help students map the territory of their creative interests in the computer arts by making visible relationships between courses offered in the major and across campus. While the proposed zones are intended to help students identify courses relevant to their interests, they do NOT represent required sequences of courses and students are not limited to taking courses from within a single zone. Rather, the zones are intended to help students see potential connections between areas of computer arts expertise as it relates to their own interests and the Computer Arts major. The recommended curriculum schedule for these zones can be found in the program literature. Zone 1: Technology + Design and Communication Study in this zone would be intended primarily to serve students interested in design and the communication arts, including motion graphic design, typography, digital photography and image-making, and web design. Zone 2: Technology + Interactivity and Information | Gaming Study in this zone would be intended primarily to serve students interested in the design of interactive experiences, including web design, interface design, and game design. Zone 3: Technology + Animation and Visual Narrative Study in this zone would be intended primarily to serve students interested in digital animation and other forms of visual storytelling.

Division of Civic and Cultural Studies / 153

Major Concentration

HISTORY

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ............................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ....................................... 9 credits Major Concentration History ............................................. 30 credits Open Electives ................................ 30 credits Total .............................................. 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .............................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Major Concentration History ............................................. 30 credits Open Electives ................................ 39 credits Total ............................................. 120 credits

Students who Choose the Major Concentration in History Must Complete: Ten (10) major history courses numbered 230 and above which must include at least four major courses designated as BROAD and at least two (2) major courses listed as FOCUS and the Senior Seminar in History (HIST 495) which is required as is Historiography and Historical Method (HIST 320). Those courses listed as BROAD are more comprehensive both chronologically and topically than the FOCUS courses which emphasize greater depth within a specific topic of historical interest. The FOCUS courses are listed as HIST 295 Topics in History.

BROAD:

HIST/ENGL 239 HIST/ENGL 263 HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST 301 304 307 308 309 323 324 327 333 336 344 351 355 358 359 379 American Studies I The Black Atlantic: Literature/History The World of Antiquity Medieval Culture and Society Early Modern Europe Europe from the French Revolution to the Great War Europe In Upheaval: 1914 to the Present America in Crisis and Change, 1898-1941 History of the United States Since 1941 Modern Russia Asia in Revolution Africa: Colonialism and Independence Slavery and the Civil War African-American History American Cultural and Intellectual History History of Women American Business History History of the Family in America

FOCUS: (For illustrative purposes only.)

HIST HIST HIST 295 Topics in History: America and the Vietnam War 295 Topics in History: Witchcraft in the Middle Ages 295 Topics in History: The Middle East from World War I to the Present 295 Topics in History: Black Leadership in America 295 Topics in History: The Holocaust

HIST HIST

And required courses:

HIST HIST 320 Historiography and Historical Method 495 Senior Seminar in History

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of History.

154 / Division of Civic and Cultural Studies

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The History Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 109, 110, or 111 ................. PSYN 119 ......................................... POLS 101 ......................................... General Education: History ......... General Education ........................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits History Major Courses .................. 6 credits General Education And/Or Liberal Arts and Sciences And/Or Open Electives ................................ 6 credits Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

English 110, 111, or 112 ................. MATH 105, 115, or 116 .................. SPEECH 110 ................................... General Education: History ......... General Education ........................ Total

Spring Semester

History Major Course ................... 6 credits General Education And/Or Liberal Arts and Sciences And/Or Open Electives ............................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester English 111 or 112 .......................... MATH 115 or 116 ........................... History Major Course .................. General Education ........................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Fall Semester Historiography & Historical Method ...................................... 3 credits HistoryMajor Course .................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Or Open Electives ............................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

ENGL 112 ........................................ 3 credits History Major Course ................... 6 credits General Education ......................... 6 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Senior Seminar in History ............ 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Or Open Electives .............................. 12 credits Total 15 credits

Division of Civic and Cultural Studies / 155

The BA program in Digital Media Production is an interdisciplinary program that focuses on technical production in visual and audio media creation, including digital animation, digital graphics and sound design.

Major Concentration

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

With Specialization: DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Science Electives .................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Digital Media Production ................................................ 45 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 21 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students who choose the major concentration of Interdisciplinary Studies with a specialization in Digital Media Production Must Complete: CART 200(ARTT200) Drawing I DIGI 210 Digital Imaging and Graphics DIGI 215 Audio Production and Sound Design I DIGI 220 3-D Digital Graphics DIGI 225 Audio Production and Sound Design II DIGI 310 2-D Animation Production DIGI 315 Audio Production and Sound Design III DIGI 320 3-D Digital Modeling and Textures DIGI 325 Audio Production and Sound Design IV DIGI 330 3-D Animation Production I DIGI 340 3-D Digital Lighting and Rendering DIGI 350 3-D Animation Production II DIGI 360 Digital Post-Production DIGI 370 3-D Digital Character Rigging DIGI 495 Digital Media Production Portfolio

Requirements: Students must complete the following requirements before taking any Digital Media Production courses: * Placement at Math 115/116 level or acceptable completion of Math 105. * Students who have not taken a College-level drawing course that is accepted in transfer must take ARTT/CART200, Drawing I in their first semester as a Digital Media Production major. This requirement may be waived by the program director if the student can prove a drawing competency. Students whose overall GPA in the major is less than 2.33 will have a formal assessment of their aptitude for the subject matter and standing in the program. This assessment will occur at the end of the first semester of the sophomore year for those who entered as freshmen, and at the end of the first year at Mercy College for those who entered as transfer students. This assessment will determine whether or not the student in question will be allowed to continue in the Digital Media Production Program There is a 21-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Interdisciplinary Studies with a specialization in Digital Media Production.

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

156 / Division of Civic and Cultural Studies

MUSIC INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

Mercy College offers both a Bachelors of Science and an Associates Degree in Music Industry and Technology. These programs are offered exclusively at the White Plains campus in dedicated recording studios and production facilities within the larger integrated Center for Digital Arts. The program is designed to prepare students for a successful career in the Music Industry with an emphasis on Music Production, Recording Engineering, Music Business and other industries that require skilled audio professionals. Through a "Hands On" project oriented curriculum, students develop practical production and technical skills while acquiring the essential theoretical foundation needed to adapt to future technologies. Students are encouraged to take available courses in related media technologies such as web design, game development, digital animation, and post production within the Center for Digital Arts with the intention of expanding career opportunities. Elective courses in music performance are available to music technology majors through the Music Conservatory of Westchester, which is within walking distance, and included within the Mercy college full-time flat tuition.

Admission Requirements:

Students must apply directly to the Music Industry and Technology Program. Admission policies and procedures are available through the program or at the website www.mercy.edu./cda/ The Music Industry and Technology program admits a limited amount of students each academic year. Students should submit an application and support materials before May 1 for acceptance into the next academic year which begins in the fall. Official notification of admission is made by June 1 (earlier if requested). Applications received after May 1 will be considered only if space remains. Students must be formally accepted and receive an acceptance letter from the director prior to declaring the major and/or enrolling in any major courses.

General Requirements:

· Students must take a Music theory placement exam. Students may be required to complete the rudimentary Elements of Music (MUSI 101). · Students must complete MUSI 101, MUSI 107, CISC/MATH 120, and MATH 115 in their freshman year. · Students must pass a comprehensive proficiency exam before graduation. · Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in all major courses and/or prerequisites. · Students must achieve and maintain a minimum overall G.P.A of 2.75 in major courses.

Division of Civic and Cultural Studies / 157

Major Concentration

MUSIC INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts & Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration * Music Industry and Technology and Related Courses ................................................................ 60 credits Open Electives ..................................................................... 9 credits Total ............................................................................... 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Music Industry and Technology Must Complete: MUSIC REQUIREMENTS (9 credits):

MUSI 103 Theory and Musicianship I MUSI 104 Theory and Musicianship II MUSC 201 Theory and Musicianship III

MAJOR ELECTIVES (18 credits): Select six courses from the following:

MTEC 225 Sound Reinforcement MTEC 230 Audio Systems Design & Installation MTEC 295 Topics in Music Technology MTEC 310 Advanced Computer Applications and MIDI MTEC 315 Electronic Music Synthesis MTEC 325 Audio for Video MTEC 330 Recording Studio Production Techniques MTEC 340 Techniques of Underscoring MTEC 397 Independent Study in Music Industry and Technology MTEC 399 Internship in Music Industry and Technology Some courses in Music, Computers, Business and Radio & Television may be substituted under advisement.

MUSIC INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY (33 Credits):

MTEC 100 Music Industry Structure and Practices MTEC 101 Audio Production I MTEC 110 MIDI Systems I MTEC 200 Music Business I MTEC 210 MIDI Systems II MTEC 201 Audio Production II MTEC 220 Recording Studio Workshop I MTEC 301 Digital Audio Systems I MTEC 302 Digital Audio Systems II MTEC 320 Recording Studio Workshop II MTEC 335 Survey of Production Styles

* · ·

There is a 21 credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Music Industry and Technology.

DIVISION OF CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES

Students must apply directly to the Music Industry and Technology program. Students must be formally accepted and receive an acceptance letter from the director prior to declaring the major and/or enrolling in any major courses. (Admission policies and procedures are available through the department) Students must complete MUSI 107, MUSI 101, CISC 120 and MATH 115 their freshman year. Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in all major courses and/or pre-requisites. Students must maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.75 in major courses. Students must pass a comprehensive proficiency exam before graduation.

· · · ·

158 / Division of Civic and Cultural Studies

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Music Industry And Technology Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

Theory & Musicianship I .............. Music Appreciation ....................... English 111 ...................................... Math 115 .......................................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Recording Studio Workshop I .... Digital Audio Systems I ................ Survey of Production Styles ......... General Education ......................... Junior Seminar ............................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Theory & Musicianship II ............. English 112 ...................................... Introduction to Computers and Application Software ............... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

Spring Semester

Recording Studio Workshop II ... Digital Audio Systems II ............. Major Elective ................................. General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

Audio Production I ........................ MIDI Systems I ............................... Industry Structure & Practices ..... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Major Electives ............................... 9 credits Open Electives ................................ 3 credits General Education ......................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Audio Production II ...................... MIDI Systems II ............................. Theory and Musicianship III ........ Music Business I ............................ General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

Spring Semester

Major Electives ............................... 6 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

18 credits

Division of Education / 159

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

William C. Prattella, Ph.D., Division Chairperson Marni Siff-Korpi, Ed.D., Coordinator of Special Education Mary Theresa McVicar, Ed.D., C.T.R.S., Program Director for Therapeutic Recreation Peter J. Schneckner, Ed.D., Coordinator of Professional Reading Methods The Division offers a major concentration in Therapeutic Recreation (B.S.) (For students qualifying for "initial", Birth ­ Twelveth grade, teaching certificates, after February 2, 2004.) The Division of Education at Mercy College, in recognition of the importance of a liberal arts education in producing effective teachers, requires all teacher education candidates to complete a major concentration in the liberal arts and sciences and an additional 51 credits in general liberal arts and science courses. Students are also required to demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills and be able to incorporate media and other technologies to enhance the teaching/learning relationship. This preparation culminates in the integration of theory and practice through varied practica and field experience in the pre-school, elementary, middle or high school classroom, as appropriate. Mercy College offers matriculated students the opportunity to obtain New York State "initial" teacher certification, effective September 1, 2000. Education students are advised to check with the Division Chairperson, prior to registering for courses for the Fall Term 2004. "Initial" certificates are offered in the following individual, integrated, and/or comprehensive programs of study, as follows: Single Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood, Birth - Grade Two · Childhood Education, Grades One - Six · Middle Childhood Education, Grades Five - Nine · Adolescence Education, Grades Seven ­ Twelve Integrated Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Birth - Grade Two · Childhood Education and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Grades One - Six · Early Childhood and Childhood Education, Birth - Grade Six · Middle Childhood and Adolescence Education, Grades Five - Twelve

160 / Division of Education

Comprehensive Certificate Programs: · Early Childhood, Childhood Education and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Birth ­ Grade Six · Middle Childhood, Adolescence Education, and Teaching Students with Disabilities, Grades Five ­ Twelve The Division of Education offers Master of Science Degrees in: Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Bilingual Education, Special Education, Reading, Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL), Learning Technology, School Administration and Supervision, and School Business Administration. (See the Mercy College 2004-2005 Graduate Catalogue for more information.)

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Even though students have been admitted to Mercy College, to be eligible for teacher certification programs, they must apply for admission into the Education Program during the semester that they are registered for EDUC 158 - Education in the United States, or EDUC 140 ­ Reading Methods, or EDUC 144 ­ Reading through the Content Areas. This procedure includes the filing of an application with the Division of Education, accompanied by all transcripts reflecting college academic work and a written career goals' statement. Prospective candidates should simultaneously declare an academic major in a liberal arts or science subject. They must have completed a minimum of 30 college credits prior to applying for admission with a minimum grade point average of 2.7. Students are required to have a speech assessment during the course of EDUC 140 and must be interviewed by an Education Faculty Advisor and/or the Chairperson of the Division of Education. The Chairperson of the Division reserves the right to use his discretion in making appropriate exceptions for individual cases. a. Students wishing to register for the Student Teaching Certification Requirement must present a LAST score of 220 or better. Students not accepted to the Division of Education may not register for the Student Teaching experience. b. Students requesting a waiver of the student teaching experience must present written documentation of equivalent experience accompanied by documentation of successful participation in the LAST and ATS-W. c. International students may be exempt from the above. Once accepted into the program, the students will be assigned a Faculty Advisor who will meet with them on a regular basis to mentor and monitor their academic progress. Students are expected to maintain a G.P.A. of 2.7 throughout the duration of the program. Students who do not satisfy this requirement, will be placed on probation initially, offered academic support, and be subject to dismissal, if the situation is not rectified. Students transferring to Mercy from other colleges must see an Education Advisor prior to registration for any courses within the education sequence. Courses completed at another institution, with a grade of B or better, will be evaluated on the basis of official transcripts and catalogue course descriptions.

Division of Education / 161

Non-Degree seeking students attending Mercy, may be allowed to register for courses as resources permit. They must meet with an Education Faculty Advisor and present current student transcripts prior to registration. The Division of Education offers a number of undergraduate professional studies programs that are registered with the New York State Education Department. Students planning to teach must select a major concentration in one of the arts and sciences and complete the program requirements for the particular "initial" certificate program. Students must complete their student teaching experience during their final semester of study, prior to graduation. Upon meeting the certificate requirements, students must also apply for the New York State "Initial" Certificate in their cognitive and developmental area of interest. In order to qualify for New York State "Initial" Certification, students must receive qualifying scores on the LAST-Test of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the ATS-W-Written Assessment of Teaching Skills, and the respective Content Specialty Test. The Division of Education offers preparation courses for students who plan to take these tests. *The scores for all campuses for the 2002-2003 academic year are listed below: LAST Pass Rate ATS-W Pass Rate Yorktown 96% 98% Dobbs Ferry 89% 95% Bronx 81% 83% Recommendation for Certification** Only United States Citizens, or those who declare their intention to become United States Citizens are eligible for New York State Certification. In order to become recommended for certification, a student must pursue the following course of action: 1. Complete the approved programs and have an overall 2.7 index or better. 2. Complete two-hour workshop in Child Abuse Identification and Violence Prevention . 3. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness in the area of Drug and Substance Abuse Prevention. 4. Have passing scores on the appropriate tests of the New York State Teacher Certification Examination Program (NYSTCE). 5. Submit to the Registrar the completed Graduation Application Form, four (4) months prior to the expected graduation date. 6. Have an exit conference with the Chairperson of the Division of Education.

**Note: Applicants for New York State Teacher Certification are now required to declare their status regarding child support payments. Applicants who may have a criminal record are advised to seek legal counseling before deciding to apply and enroll in education courses. For further information, contact the Division of Education.

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

KAPPA DELTA PI Kappa Delta Pi is the Education Division's undergraduate honor society. Membership in the society is available to outstanding sophomore, junior and senior students. Contact the Division of Education for further information.

162 / Division of Education

"Initial" Certificate Requirements ­ Students seeking New York State Certification in Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Childhood, Adolescence Education, Teaching Students with Disabilities and/or Teaching Students with Speech and Language Disabilities must meet the following minimum qualifying factors: I General Education Core - 51 credits, as noted below: Art 107 ­ Art History Survey and/or Music 107 ­ Music Appreciation ...................................... 3 credits Economics 115 ­ Economy, Jobs and You ....................... 3 credits English 111 and English 112 ­ Written English and Literary Studies I and II ................................................ 6 credits Foreign Language ............................................................... 6 credits Government/Political Science 101 ­ Political Power in America ........................................... 3 credits Humanities - Philosophy/Religion .................................. 3 credits Information Retrieval/Computer Science 120 Introduction to Computers .......................................... 3 credits Mathematics ­ MA 115 and MA 116 ................................ 6 credits Natural and Environmental or Physical Science ........... 6 credits Psychology 101 ­ Introduction to Psychology ............... 3 credits Social Sciences ­ History 101 ­ European History to 1500 and ............. 3 credits History 105 ­ American History through 1877 ......... 3 credits Speech 110 ­ Oral Communication .................................. 3 credits II Major Concentration Core ­ Candidates must complete a minimum concentration of 30 credits in the subject to be taught, in accordance with the State Learning Standards for students, as prescribed in Part 100 of Commissioner's Regulations and leading to a B.A. or B.S. degree. III Pedagogical Core 24 credits Reading Methods/Reading through the Content Areas Education in the United States Introduction to Teaching Students with Disabilities Reading Practicum/Reading and Math Remediation in 5th through 12th grade and for Students with Disabilities EDUC 215/230 Teaching English Language Arts in Early Childhood, Childhood and to Students with Disabilities/Teaching English as a 2nd Language EDUC 216 Computers and Other Technology, Birth ­ 12th grade and to Students with Disabilities PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology EDUC 499 Professional Symposium IV Field Experience ­ 6 credits - The above courses require extensive field experience totaling over 200 clock hours. All students are required to also complete a sixteen week long student teaching experience in a variety of communities and across the range of student developmental levels applicable to the individual certificate title, including the opportunity to work in high need schools. Additional practica are required for those candidates preparing for more than one certificate title. EDUC 140/144 EDUC 158 EDUC 170 EDUC 210/275

Division of Education / 163

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

EDUC 497 ­ Supervised Student Teaching I EDUC 498 ­ Supervised Student Teaching II EDUC 499 ­ Supervised Student Teaching III, when additional semester of student teaching is required Plus V Specific program initial certificate pedagogical and field experience requirements 1. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, Birth ­ Grade 2 EDUC 145 Creative Arts for Children, Birth ­ 6th EDUC 154 Childhood Education, Birth ­ 2 & for Students with Disabilities EDUC 212 Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 243 Testing and Assessment from Birth ­ 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities CMDS 264 Normal Speech and Language Development PSYN 173 Perspectives on Parenting 2. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION and TEACHING STUDENTS with DISABILITIES, Birth­Grade 2 EDUC 145 Creative Arts for Children, Birth ­ 6th EDUC 154 Childhood Education, Birth ­ 2 & for Students with Disabilities EDUC 212 Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 225 Curriculum and Methods in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 243 Testing and Assessment from Birth ­ 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities CMDS 264 Normal Speech and Language Development PSYN 173 Perspectives on Parenting 3. CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, Grades 1 ­ 6 EDUC 145 Creative Arts for Children, Birth ­ 6th EDUC 212 Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 213 Teaching Science in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 218 Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 243 Testing and Assessment from Birth ­ 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities

164 / Division of Education

4. CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, and TEACHING STUDENTS with DISABILITIES, Grades 1 ­ 6 EDUC 145 EDUC 212 EDUC 213 EDUC 218 EDUC 225 EDUC 243 CMDS 264 EDUC 390 5. Creative Arts for Children, Birth ­ 6th Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Teaching Science in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Curriculum and Methods in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Testing and Assessment from Birth ­ 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities Normal Speech and Language Development Supervised Student Teaching - Field Experience III

EARLY CHILDHOOD and CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, Birth ­ Grade 6 EDUC 145 Creative Arts for Children, Birth ­ 6th EDUC 154 Childhood Education, Birth ­ 2 & for Students with Disabilities EDUC 212 Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 213 Teaching Science in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 218 Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities EDUC 243 Testing and Assessment from Birth ­ 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities CMDS 264 Normal Speech and Language Development PSYN 173 Perspectives on Parenting

6. EARLY CHILDHOOD, CHILDHOOD EDUCATION and TEACHING STUDENTS with DISABILITIES, Birth ­ Grade 6 EDUC 145 EDUC 154 EDUC 212 EDUC 213 EDUC 218 EDUC 225 EDUC 243 CMDS 264 PSYN 173 EDUC 390 Creative Arts for Children, Birth ­ 6th Childhood Education, Birth ­ 2 & for Students with Disabilities Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Teaching Science in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Curriculum and Methods in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities Testing and Assessment from Birth ­ 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities Normal Speech and Language Development Perspectives on Parenting Supervised Student Teaching - Field Experience III

Division of Education / 165

7.

MIDDLE CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, Grades 5 ­ 9 EDUC 249 Language Acquisition & Literacy in Multicultural, Adolescence Education EDUC 256 Assessment and Content Area Testing EDUC 259 Early and Middle Adolescent Development EDUC 268 Early and Middle Childhood Education EDUC 325 Methods and Materials in Grades 5 ­ 12

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

8. ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION, Grades 7 - 12 EDUC 249 Language Acquisition & Literacy in Multicultural, Adolescence Education EDUC 256 Assessment and Content Area Testing EDUC 263 Psychology of Adolescence EDUC 325 Methods and Materials in Grades 5 ­ 12 9. MIDDLE CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION, Grades 5 ­ 12 EDUC 249 Language Acquisition & Literacy in Multicultural, Adolescence Education EDUC 256 Assessment and Content Area Testing EDUC 257 Psychology of the Student with Disabilities EDUC 259 Early and Middle Adolescent Development EDUC 263 Psychology of Adolescence EDUC 268 Early and Middle Childhood Education EDUC 325 Methods and Materials in Grades 5 ­ 12 10. TEACHING STUDENTS with DISABILITIES, and Middle Childhood and Adolescence Education, Grades 5 ­ 12 EDUC 249 Language Acquisition & Literacy in Multicultural, Adolescence Education EDUC 256 Assessment and Content Area Testing EDUC 257 Psychology of the Student with Disabilities EDUC 259 Early and Middle Adolescent Development EDUC 263 Psychology of Adolescence EDUC 268 Early and Middle Childhood Education EDUC 325 Methods and Materials in Grades 5 ­ 12 EDUC 390 Supervised Student Teaching - Field Experience III

166 / Division of Education

Major Concentration

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION***

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Major Concentration Therapeutic Recreation and Related Courses .............. 49 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 23 credits Total ................................................................................ 120 credits Students who Choose the Major Concentration in Therapeutic Recreation Must Complete:**

THRC 265 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation THRC 366 Program Design in Therapeutic Recreation THRC 370 Process and Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation THRC 471 Issues and Contemporary Problems in Therapeutic Recreation THRC 253 Field Studies in Recreation THRC 368 Recreation Programming and Leadership THRC 369 Recreation Administration THRC 372 History and Philosophy of Recreation/Leisure THRC 495 Therapeutic Recreation Practicum

and the following support courses:

BIOL 110 Introduction to Human Biology* OR BIOL 130 Human Anatomy and Physiology I* AND PSYN 233 Developmental Psychology PSYN 312 Abnormal Psychology AND three courses from the areas of Psy-

chology, Sociology, Special Education, Human Services, Biological or Physical Sciences, or Adaptive Physical Education.

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Therapeutic Recreation.

* This course fulfills three credits of the General Education Requirement.

** It is recommended that a student with little or no knowledge of Art Techniques complete EDUC 145 Creative Arts for Children. *** All THRC Courses number 265-372 must be completed before taking THRC 495 Practicum in the Therapeutic Recreation

Division of Education / 167

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

The Therapeutic Recreation Program Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science Degree Program in Therapeutic Recreation are eligible to sit for the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification Exam after graduation. The eligibility requirements set by the NCRTC to take the exam are: 1. Successful completion of the Therapeutic Recreation course of study outlined in this catalogue. 2. Have no physical, intellectual or psychological problems that would impair competent and objective professional performance of therapeutic recreation services and/or jeopardize public health and safety. 3. Have no criminal record regarding not limited or rape, sexual abuse of children, violent behavior, or distribution or sale of a controlled substance. Applicants to the program who may have a criminal record or disqualifying intellectual, physical or psychological problems are advised to seek legal and psychological counseling before applying or enrolling in the program. Admission to the Therapeutic Recreation Major Students wishing to apply for admission to the Therapeutic Recreation Program must do the following: 1. File an application for admission to the Program with the Director of the program during the semester they register for THRC 253 or THRC 265. 2. Have an overall grade point average of 2.5 and should preferably be in their sophomore year.

168 / Division of Education

Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the Therapeutic Recreation Major

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ........................... 6 credits Speech 110 ....................................... 3 credits History ............................................. 6 credits General Education ....................... 15 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

General Education ......................... Abnormal Psychology .................. Support Courses ............................ Recreation Programming and Leadership ......................... Recreation Administration ........... History and Philosophy of Recreation/Leisure ............. Field Studies in Recreation ........... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ....................... 12 credits Anatomy & Physiology I .............. 4 credits Support Courses ............................ 6 credits Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation .................................. 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 6 credits Total 31 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Program Design in Therapeutic Recreation ........... 3 credits Process and Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation .............. 3 credits Issues and Contemporary Problems in Therapeutic Recreation ........... 3 credits Therapeutic Recreation Practicum .................................. 9 credits Open Electives .............................. 11 credits Total 29 credits

Division of Health Professions / 169

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Patricia M. Chute, Ed.D. Division Chairperson Annlee Burch, M.S.P.T., M.P.H., Program Director for Health Sciences Annlee Burch, M.S.P.T., M.P.H., Program Director for Physical Therapist Assistant

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Alayne Fitzpatrick, Ed.D., R.N. Program Director for Undergraduate Nursing Joan C. Kosta, Ed.D., Program Director for Communication Disorders Richard MacIntyre, Ph.D., R.N. Department Chair, Nursing Judith A. Parker, M.S., O.T.R./L, Program Director for Occupational Therapy Assistant The Division offers major concentrations in the following areas: · Communication Disorders (B.A., B.S.) · Health Sciences (B.S.) · Nursing, Upper Division (B.S.)* · Occupational Therapy Assistant (A.A.S.)** · Physical Therapist Assistant (A.A.S.)***

*

The Baccalaureate Nursing major has been granted accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

** The Associate in Applied Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant Program has been granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). *** The Associate in Applied Science, Physical Therapist Assistant Program, has been granted Accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) as of 11/2000.

170 / Division of Health Professions

Major Concentration

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

The Undergraduate Program offers a B.S./B.A. degree in Communication Disorders (CD). This degree is comparable to an undergraduate degree in speechlanguage pathology/audiology. Upon completion of the degree, graduates demonstrate proficiencies in speech-language pathology, speech and hearing science and audiology in preparation for graduate study. The major goal of the Program is to provide a scientific/clinically-based curriculum as preparation for graduate studies. A master's degree is mandatory as entry level into the professions of both speech-language pathology (SLP) and audiology (A). *As of 2007, the entry level for Audiology will be the doctorate degree. In addition to the professions noted above, the CD undergraduate degree is also useful for students continuing their graduate studies in education, special education, teachers of the deaf and hearing impaired, psychology, social work, and recreational therapy.

Major Requirements:

Students planning to major in Communication Disorders must demonstrate the following: completion of at least 30 credits of the General Education curriculum with a Grade Point Average of at least 2.75; a grade of at least "B" in ENGL 112 or its equivalent; and a grade of at least "B" in SPCM 110. Students must complete 6 credits of a foreign language (3 credits can be in American Sign Language), BIOL 110 Introduction to Human Biology and one of the following courses (PHYS 110, CHEM 110, PHSC 111 or PHSC 110) as part of their General Education requirements. In addition, students must complete BHSC 370, Statistics for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major. Proficiency in oral and written communication will be assessed during the student's first semester. Basic competencies are continuously assessed throughout the student's tenure as a Communication Disorders major. Competency in both oral and written communication is required in order to obtain a degree in Communication Disorders. Students who require additional assistance in oral and written communication skills will be directed to the appropriate sources including courses, the Learning Center, or the Speech and Hearing Center. Students planning to enter the major must contact the Mercy College Communication Disorders Undergraduate Coordinator for an eligibility interview. All students are assigned to a faculty advisor in Communication Disorders and are required to see the advisor each semester. To maintain satisfactory academic standing as a major, students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.75 in the major. A student who receives a grade below "C" in any major course will be required to repeat the course and will not be permitted to continue in the major course sequence until an adequate grade is achieved. Students may repeat a major course once. Any exceptions to Department guidelines require approval by the Department Director.

Division of Health Professions / 171

Major Concentration

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ................................ 12 credits Major Concentration Communication Disorders .............................................. 48 credits Open Electives .................................................................... 9 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ................................. 48 credits (see page 48 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 3 credits Major Concentration Communication Disorders .............................................. 48 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Communication Disorders Must Complete:

BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social & Behavioral Sciences CMDS 210 Clinical Process I CMDS 215 Clinical Process II CMDS 220 Multicultural Issues in Communication Disorders CMDS/SPCM 230 Voice and Diction CMDS 240 Phonetics CMDS 256 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms CMDS 257 Introduction to Audiology CMDS 258 Introduction to Communication Disorders CMDS/PSYN 264 Normal Speech and Language Development CMDS 270 Speech and Hearing Science CMDS/PSYN 300 Language Disorders CMDS 310 Communication Disorders--Organic CMDS 340 Aural Rehabilitation CMDS/EDUC 350 Organization of a Speech and Hearing Program CMDS 498 Clinical Process III

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Communication Disorders.

172 / Division of Health Professions

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Communication Disorders Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester English 111 ............................... 3 credits History ...................................... 3 credits Speech 110 ................................ 3 credits Math 115 OR Math 116 .......... 3 credits Biol 110 ..................................... 3 credits

Total 15 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester Introduction to Communication Disorders ............................. 3 credits Phonetics .................................. 3 credits Normal Speech & Language Development ...................... 3 credits Clinical Process I ..................... 3 credits Introduction to Audiology .... 3 credits

Total 15 credits

Spring Semester English 112 ............................... 3 credits History ...................................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ... 3 credits PHYS 110, CHEM 110, PHSC 111 or PHSC 110 ........................ 3 credits General Education .................. 3 credits

Total 15 credits

Spring Semester Aural Rehabilitation ............... 3 credits Language Disorders ............... 3 credits Clinical Process II ................... 3 credits Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms .. 4 credits Junior Seminar ....................... 3 credits

Total 16 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester General Education ................ 15 credits

Total 15 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester Organization of a Speech and Hearing Program ............... 3 credits Communication Disorders Organic ................................. 3 credits Clinical Process II ................... 2 credits Open Electives ...................... 6 credits

Total 14 credits

Spring Semester Speech and Hearing Science .... 3 credits Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ........... 3 credits Voice and Diction ................... 3 credits General Education .................. 3 credits Open Electives ......................... 3 credits

Total 15 credits

Spring Semester Liberal Arts and Science Elective ................................................... 3 credits Multicultural Issues in Communication Disorders .... 3 credits Open Electives ......................... 9 credits

Total 15 credits

Division of Health Professions / 173

Major Concentration

HEALTH SCIENCES

The baccalaureate degree in health sciences provides a foundation in liberal arts and sciences required for professional practice and graduate study. The major builds on the 48-credit general education requirement and includes 36 additional credits in the Natural Sciences, the Social Sciences and the Health Sciences. Students preparing to enter graduate programs in the Health Professions should coordinate their plan of study with their advisor. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................. 48 Credits Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration .................................................. 31-32 Credits Open Electives ............................................................. 37-38 Credits Total ................................................................................ 120 Credits

Students who Choose the Major Concentration in Health Sciences Must Complete: BIOLOGY Two courses selected from the following (6-8 credits): BIOL 110 through BIOL 117 BIOL 160 General Biology I BIOL 161 General Biology II BIOL 222 Pathophysiology BIOL 226 Elements of Biochemistry BIOL 265 Microbiology BIOL 302 (HLSC 302) Pathology for Rehabilitation BIOL 314 (HLSC 314) Clinical Kinesiology OR BIOL 316 Kinesiology BIOL 317 Neuroscience CHEMISTRY/PHYSICS One course selected from the following (3-4 credits): CHEM 110 Introduction to Chemistry CHEM 160 General Chemistry I PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics PHYS 120 Physics for the Health Sciences PHYS 160 General Physics I ACOM 510 Biophysics ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Two courses selected from the following (7-8 credits): BIOL 130 Human Anatomy and Physiology I AND BIOL 131 Human Anatomy and Physiology II OR BIOL 303 Human Anatomy with Cadaver AND BIOL 305 Human Physiology with Cadaver or BIOL 302 (HLSC 302) Pathology for Rehabilitation OR BIOL 309 Human Physiology for Biomedical Sciences AND PHAS 500 Gross Anatomy or ACOM 500 Gross Anatomy

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

174 / Division of Health Professions PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY One course selected from the following (3 credits): PSYN 233 Developmental Psychology SOCL 271 Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society STATISTICS/RESEARCH METHODS One course selected from the following (3 credits): MATH 122 Statistics BHSC 348 Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 276 Advanced Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ACOM 562 Research Methods and Concepts MAJOR ELECTIVES: Nine additional credits selected from the following: Any Biology, Chemistry or Physics course numbered 160 or above Any Health Science course numbered 200 or above BHSC 366*, BHSC 280*, BHSC 426*, PSYN 210*, PSYN 315, PHIL 317. CONCENTRATION: Six credits selected in consultation with program director or advisor. There is an eighteen credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Health Sciences

*

Recommended for the General Health Sciences Major.

Division of Health Professions / 175

Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the Health Sciences Major

All students preparing to apply to graduate programs in the Health Sciences should consult the appropriate graduate catalogue and coordinate their plan of study with their faculty advisor. FIRST YEAR Fall Semester English 111 ............................... 3 credits History ...................................... 3 credits Speech 110 ................................ 3 credits Math 115 or 116 ....................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ... 3 credits

Total 15 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester Biology requirement ............... 3 credits Physiology requirement ........ 4 credits Major Elective .......................... 3 credits Statistics or Research Methods .............. 3 credits Open Elective .......................... 3 credits

Total 16 credits

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Spring Semester English 112 ............................... 3 credits History ...................................... 3 credits Sociology .................................. 3 credits Computer Science 120 ............ 3 credits General Education .................. 3 credits

Total 15 credits

Spring Semester Chemistry or Physics Requirement ........................ 3 credits Major Elective .......................... 3 credits Junior Seminar ........................ 3 credits Open Elective .......................... 6 credits

Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester General Education ................ 12 credits Open elective ........................... 4 credits

Total 16 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester Concentration .......................... 3 credits Open Electives ....................... 12 credits

Total 15 credits

Spring Semester Biology requirement ............... 3 credits Anatomy requirement ........... 4 credits Developmental Psychology or Medical Sociology ......... 3 credits Major Elective .......................... 3 credits

Total 13 credits

Spring Semester Concentration .......................... 3 credits Open Electives ....................... 12 credits

Total 15 credits

176 / Division of Health Professions

Major Concentration

NURSING

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 45 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Lower Division Nursing .................................................. 33 credits Lower Division Sciences .................................................... 8 credits Upper Division Arts and Sciences ................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Upper Division Nursing .................................................. 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 122 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Nursing Must Complete: FOUNDATION COURSES

Lower division nursing courses are not offered by the College. Degree candidates must be able to validate at least 19 credits in lower division behavioral and natural sciences courses which must include: CISC 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software*

UPPER DIVISION NURSING

NURS 330 Philosophical Bases of Nursing NURS 331 Pathophysiology and Clinical Reasoning for Nurses NURS 332 Therapeutic Interactions in Nursing NURS 333 Research Process in Nursing NURS 334 Nursing Process with Individuals NURS 344 Nursing Process with Small Groups NURS 345 Nursing Process with Families NURS 346 Nursing Practicum with Families NURS 354 Nursing Process with Communities NURS 355 Nursing Practicum with Communities NURS 360 Power Bases of Nursing

Any General Education, Biology, Natural Science course PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology * SOCL 101 Introduction to Sociology* Anatomy and Physiology (Transfer credit or RCE)* Microbiology (Transfer credit, N.L.N., or CLEP)*

UPPER DIVISION ARTS AND SCIENCES

PSYN 370 Statistics for Behavioral Science

* These courses fulfill up to 15 credits of the General Education requirement.

Division of Health Professions / 177

The Major Concentration in Nursing provides an upper division degree program for registered nurses with diploma or associate degree education. The Nursing Major is designed to prepare a professional practitioner who (a) is accountable for the nursing care of individuals, families, small groups, and communities; (b) collaborates in leadership roles within the changing health care delivery system; (c) participates in the process of inquiry; (d) is prepared for graduate study in Nursing. Eligibility for Matriculation The Program has been designed for registered nurses. Each student must: 1. be a graduate of a diploma or associate degree program; 2. have an average of 2.75 (C+) or above in both the cumulative grade point average and in the lower division nursing courses. Students may be admitted conditionally with grade point averages of 2.5 to 2.74. Conditionally admitted students must achieve a grade point average of 2.75 (C+) in their first 12 credits of general education courses to gain full matriculation; Eligibility for Admission to Clinical Nursing Courses To be admitted to the clinical nursing courses: NURS 345 and NURS 354, the student must have passed the NCLEX exam and hold a valid license to practice as a registered nurse in the U.S. Transfer Credit Previously earned college credit in the liberal arts and sciences may be accepted in transfer by Mercy College. Additional academic credits can be earned by passing RCE or CLEP examinations. Lower division science requirements may be fulfilled as follows: Anatomy and Physiology New York State Regents Examination (RCE) Chemistry Earned by credit only Microbiology College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or National League for Nursing Achievement Exam (NLN) Introduction to Psychology and Introduction to Sociology College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Matriculation in the Nursing Major is required to earn credit for the lower division nursing (30 credits). ORGANIZATION OF THE PROGRAM This program has been designed for the part-time or full-time student. A student may enroll for 2-16 credits a semester. Courses are scheduled for a combination of evenings, days, and/or weekends. A variety of schedule patterns and teaching-learning methods are utilized. Nursing courses are offered at the Dobbs Ferry and Manhattan Campuses. Courses other than Nursing can be taken at the branch campuses in Yorktown, White Plains or the Bronx and selected off campus locations in addition to the main campus in Dobbs Ferry. Admissions Procedure 1. Obtain an application form and general information regarding your eligibility for the nursing program from the Admissions Office at the main campus or any of the branch campuses. If you have any questions, faculty in the Nursing Program will be happy to talk with you via phone or in person by appointment.

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

178 / Division of Health Professions

2. All applicants for the nursing program must submit the following to the Office of Admissions: a. An application for Admission, accompanied by the $35 application fee. (The application fee will be waived for students who are presently matriculated at Mercy College). b. An official transcript of record from each diploma school, college, or university previously attended. c. Evidence of current license as a registered nurse. 3. Upon receipt of transcripts by the Admissions Office, all applicants must arrange an appointment with the transfer counselor for a pre-admission interview and the Director of Undergraduate Nursing for program planning. 4. Qualified applicants will be admitted to the nursing major based upon available space in clinical nursing courses at the time of projected student's eligibility. 5. Upon acceptance to the Nursing Major, the student will be assigned an academic advisor from the nursing faculty. Articulation with Cochran School of Nursing Cochran School of Nursing, St. John's Riverside Hospital in Yonkers, New York and Mercy College have established an articulation that permits a seamless progression from the associate to baccalaureate degree in nursing. Lower division nursing courses are taken at Cochran School of Nursing and lower division arts and sciences may be taken at Mercy College. Upon graduation from Cochran School of Nursing and licensing as a registered professional nurse, graduates of Cochran may matriculate with advanced standing into the baccalaureate nursing program at Mercy College. Articulation with Westchester Community College Westchester Community College (WCC) in Valhalla, New York and Mercy College have established an articulation that permits 75 credits to be transferred from WCC toward the Bachelor's degree in Nursing at Mercy College. Students are given brochures on the Mercy requirements in their freshman year to avoid taking courses that would not meet the general education requirements for Mercy College. Additionally, they may transfer in NLN and CLEP exams. Full-time students can earn their Associate's and Bachelor's degree in Nursing in four years. Articulation with the Borough of Manhattan Community College The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) located in lower Manhattan has established an articulation to facilitate career mobility for their A.A.S. nursing students. Sixty-five credits from BMCC are accepted toward the BS at Mercy College. The nursing program at Mercy's Manhattan campus is particularly convenient for BMCC graduates. Articulation with Dorothea Hopfer School of Nursing Dorothea Hopfer School of Nursing (DHSON) located in Mt Vernon, Westchester has established an articulation that permits 60 credits from DHSON, 15 from any community college and an additional 15 credits from a 4 year college to be transferred to Mercy College thus allowing a full-time student to finish the BS in nursing in one year.

Division of Health Professions / 179

Recommended Upper Division Curriculum For Full-time Students (Two-year Plan)

JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester Pathophysiology and Clinical Reasoning for Nurses .............. 3 credits Statistics for Behavioral Science .................................. 3 credits Philosophical Bases of Nursing ............................ 3 credits Therapeutic Interactions in Nursing ................................ 2 credits Gereral Education .................... 3 credits

Total ................................................ 14 credits

SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester Introduction to Computers and Application Software ......... 3 credits General Education ................... 3 credits Nursing Process with Families ............................... 3 credits Nursing Practicum with Families ............................... 3 credits Nursing Practicum with Families ................................ 2 credits

Total ................................................ 14 credits

DIVISION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Spring Semester Research Process in Nursing .. 3 credits Health Assessment with Individuals ................................ 3 credits Nursing Process with Small Groups ...................... 3 credits General Education ................... 3 credits Junior Seminar ......................... 3 credits

Total ................................................ 15 credits

Spring Semester General Education ................... 3 credits Nursing Process with Communities ....................... 3 credits Nursing Practicim with Communities ....................... 2 credits Power Bases of Nursing .......... 3 credits

Total ................................................ 11 credits

180 / Honors Program

HONORS PROGRAM

Nancy A. Benson, Ph.D., Director

Mercy College Honors And Scholars Program

Students selected on the basis of motivation and achievement, as demonstrated by previous experience in high school or college, are invited to join the Mercy College Honors Program. The Program offers extra enrichment in class and out of class, and in return asks student participation. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their education through planning for and being a part of Honors Club activities as well as through classroom participation in the seminar-style classes. Honors classes are designed to fulfill some, but not all, general education requirements in ways particularly suited to students who wish to make the most of their college years. The use of primary sources, an historical perspective, emphasis on interrelated ideas and the development of critical skills characterize honors classes. Outside activities are scheduled to enrich the curriculum. Wherever possible, courses are coordinated across disciplines to stimulate students to make connections between areas of knowledge. Students in the Honors Program have the opportunity to learn at a pace commensurate with their abilities, to work among an interesting and stimulating group of people, and to experience the challenge of in-depth college work. Participation in the Honors Program enhances the college student's life and career in years to come.

Membership

Students who participate in the program are provisional members until they have taken three honors courses and achieved a 3.2 index. Students who have taken at least three honors courses and achieved a 3.2 index are recognized as official members of the program.

Recognition and Awards

Courses which count toward honors credit may consist of honors General Education courses, interdisciplinary electives, or selected major courses. The Christie Scholar award is given to students who take nine honors courses and maintain a 3.2 index. Other awards include recognition for scholarship, leadership and academic development.

Honors Program / 181

College Scholars

Students who demonstrate excellence in completing course work toward their general requirements and in the study of a particular discipline, can be nominated to be College Scholars. Each College Scholar works with a faculty advisor in designing and implementing a six-credit senior-level project (490-491 Thesis Workshop I, II). College scholar projects give students the opportunity to explore in-depth an area of special interest. College scholars who successfully complete their projects graduate "With Distinction". For more information about the Mercy College Honors Program or the College Scholars Program, please contact Dr. Nancy A. Benson, Maher Hall, Mercy College, 555 Broadway, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522, (914) 674-7432.

HONORS PROGRAM

182 / Interdisciplinary Studies

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

The College offers a major concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies. Model programs in Interdisciplinary Studies exist in the following areas: American Studies Digital Media Arts Women's Studies Ethnic Studies Third World Studies Pre-Chiropractic Studies Students may also develop individually designed programs in areas such as Philosophy and Religion.

Major Concentration

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ........................ 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ................................... 6 credits Major Concentration Interdisciplinary Studies .... 36 credits* Open Electives ....................... 30 credits Total ..................................... 120 credits

*Must be Liberal Arts and Sciences courses Requirements for an Interdisciplinary Studies Major with an Individually Approved Program -- Students must file a proposal for an Interdisciplinary Studies Major in

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ........................ 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Major Concentration Interdisciplinary Studies .... 36 credits* Open Electives ....................... 36 credits Total ..................................... 120 credits

conformity with the following conditions: 1. The student must state the objectives of the proposed program of studies and the reason why these objectives cannot be met through existing programs. 2. The proposed major must be made up of a coherent program of studies of at least 36 credits involving course work in at least two different departments. 3. The major must include no more than nine (9) credits of independent study, a major portion of which should be of an integrated nature, i.e., contribute to the interrelationships of the disciplines studied. Off-campus experience undertaken as part of the program and with supervision from members of the faculty is encouraged.

Interdisciplinary Studies / 183

Procedure to be followed by students wishing to pursue an Interdisciplinary Studies Major:

A student must: 1. Have completed at least thirty (30) credits of college work and not more than seventy-five (75) credits. 2. Develop a proposal conforming to the requirements above. 3. Secure the approval of at least two faculty members from different departments offering courses included in the proposal, one of whom agrees to act as the student's major advisor. 4. Submit the signed proposal to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Administration for review and referral to the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee for approval. 5. Upon completion of the proposed major, submit to the same committee the following: A. A request that the student be approved for the degree. B. Either a portfolio of work prepared during the course of studies (included in major); such a portfolio might include examinations, papers, and other projects, which will manifest the development of the central theme of the major; C. Or a major paper or project which represents a culminating experience and an effort to synthesize in an interdisciplinary manner various aspects of the theme which have been pursued. Three credits can be assigned to this project. Such credits are considered independent study.

OR

Student may consult one of the existing models formulated between various departments such as American Studies, Women's Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Third World Studies. Changes in Program: Changes which do not substantially alter the nature of the program may be approved by the Faculty Advisor. Substantial changes, i.e., those changes which alter the direction or theme of the major, must be approved by the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

184 / Library and Information Science Program

DIVISION OF LIBRARIES

W. Bruce Fulton, Division Chairperson Srivalli R. Rao, Coordinator of Library and Information Science Program

The Division offers open elective courses for credit in Library and Information Science. Some of these courses are of an interdisciplinary nature and can be taken by students who meet the prerequisites, to complement the courses in their major concentration. The Division does not offer a major concentration in Library and Information Science. Courses will also complement the existing catalog description of the information literacy competency by equipping students with the necessary skills to: 1. recognize and articulate the need for information; 2. access information from appropriate sources; 3. critically analyze and evaluate information and its sources; 4. organize and process information; 5. apply information for effective and creative decision-making; 6. generate and effectively communicate information and knowledge; 7. develop skills in using information technologies; 8. understand and respect the ethical, legal, and sociopolitical aspects of information and its technologies; and 9. develop attitudinal objectives that lead to the appreciation of lifelong learning.

LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Students may choose the following electives:

LISC 101 Information Use and Library Research LISC 260 Using Electronic Resources for Research LISC 295 Topics in Information Studies

Division of Literature, Language, and Communication / 185

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

Sean Dugan, Ed.D., Division Chairperson Frances Biscoglio, Ph.D., Associate Chairperson and Program Director for English Literature Paul Trent, M.F.A., Program Director for Speech Maria Enrico, Ph.D., Program Director for Modern Foreign Languages Sean Dugan, Ed.D., Program Director for English As A Second Language Judith C. Mitchell, M.A., M.B.A., Program Director for Corporate Communications Louis Grasso, M.A., Program Director for Journalism and Media Louis Grasso, M.A., Program Director for Television Production TBA Program Director for Film Studies The Division offers major concentrations in: · English Literature (B.A., B.S.) · Film Studies (B.A., B.S.) · Interdisciplinary Studies with a Specialization in Corporate Communications (B.S.) · Journalism and Media with Specializations in Journalism, Radio and Television Production, and Communication Studies (B.S.) · Spanish (B.A., B.S.) · Television Production (A.A.S.) see pages 102-103 for curricular distribution Honor Societies: Phi Sigma Iota National Honor Society in Modern Foreign Language Sigma Tau Delta International Foreign Language Honor Society The Four-Plus-One Program The English Program's Four-Plus-One Option offers a unique opportunity to qualified undergraduates in English Literature who wish to pursue their Masters at an accelerated pace. If they meet the admissions criteria for the Masters Program in English, including a 3.0 GPA, they apply in the first semester of their junior year to the M.A. in English at Mercy College. For further information see page 215 of the Graduate Catalogue.

186 / Division of Literature, Language, and Communication

Major Concentration:

CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Science Electives .................................... 9 credits Major Concentration Corporate Communications & Related Courses .......... 48 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 12 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Corporate Communications Must Complete:

COCM 154 (JOUR 154) Publicity Writing COCM 200 Writing for the Organization I COCM 210 Introduction to Business Practice COCM 220 Internal Communications COCM 230 Writing for the Organization II COCM 240 External Communications and Marketing COCM/ENGL 266 Writing for the Web COCM 300 Publication Design COCM 356 Practicum: Corporate Communication Technologies COCM 365 Practicum: Newsletter Preparation COCM 370 Effective Presentations COCM 390 Project Management COCM 398 Corporate Communications Research Methods COCM 400 Capstone: Research Seminar in Corporate Communications JOUR 252 The Practice of Public Relations PSYN/SPCM 250 Psychology of Communication

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Corporate Communications.

Division of Literature, Language, and Communication / 187

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

Major Concentration

ENGLISH

BACHELOR OF ARTS

General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ............................ 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ....................................... 3 credits Major Concentration English Literature ........................ 36 credits Open Electives .............................. 30 credits Total 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ............................ 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Major Concentration English Literature ........................ 36 credits Open Electives ............................. 33 credits Total 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in English Literature Must Complete:

ENGL 200 Poetics: An Introduction to Literary Texts ENGL 205 Survey of English Literature I ENGL 206 Survey of English Literature II Majors must take at least one course from the following four categories: Classical Texts, Social and Cultural Context, Literary Genres, and Historical Periods. The remaining fifteen credits may be taken from any of these four categories, or from the fifth category, Language and Writing. No more than two Topics in Literature (ENG 295) maybe used to complete the major. Two Humanities courses numbered 212 or above may be used to fulfill major requirements (see Humanities course descriptions). In addition, English Literature majors must complete six credits of Foreign Language.* It is recommended that the six credits in foreign language be in the same language. CLASSICAL TEXTS: ENGL 225 Classical Literature: Greek and Roman Literature ENGL 230 The Bible as Literature ENGL 305 Chaucer ENGL 315 Shakespeare ENGL 320 Milton ENGL 385 Masterpieces of European Literature SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT: ENGL 234 Literature by Women ENGL/HIST 239 American Studies I ENGL 257 Latin American Literature ENGL/HIST 263 The Black Atlantic World: Literature/History ENGL 352 Contemporary African Literature ENGL 353 African-American Literature ENGL 357 Contemporary Nobel Laureates in Literature LITERARY GENRES: ENGL 220 The Short Story ENGL 235 Biography and Autobiography ENGL 270 British Novel: 1750­1900 ENGL 271 Modern British Novel: 1900­Present

*

ENGL 280 ENGL 281 ENGL 285 ENGL 400

History of Drama Modern Drama Modern Poetry Critical Approaches/Advanced Research Methods

HISTORICAL PERIODS: ENGL 275 Modern American Fiction ENGL 300 Medieval Literature ENGL 310 Renaissance Poetry and Prose ENGL 325 The Seventeenth Century: Poetry and Prose ENGL 330 The Eighteenth Century: Comedy and Satire ENGL 335 The Major English Romantics ENGL 340 The Major Victorians ENGL 360 American Colonial Writings ENGL 365 American Romanticism ENGL 370 American Realism LANGUAGE AND WRITING: ENGL 217 Introduction to Creative Writing ENGL 266 (COCM 266) Writing for the Web ENGL 402 Applied English Grammar ENGL 404 Structure and Form of English ENGL 406 World Englishes

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of English Literature.

Three credits of this six credit Foreign Language requirement may count toward the general education foreign language requirement.

188 / Division of Literature, Language, and Communication

Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the English Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 111 ...................................... Math 115 or Math 116 ................... History ............................................. Speech 110 ....................................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

English Electives ............................ 6 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Electives ................................ 6 credits Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... 3 credits History ............................................. 3 credits General Education ........................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

English Electives ............................ 6 credits Open Electives .............................. 9 credits Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

Poetics: An Introduction to Literary Texts ........................... 3 credits Survey of English Literature I ............................... 3 credits General Education ........................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

English Electives ............................ 6 credits Open Electives .............................. 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Survey of English Literature II .................................. 3 credits English Elective .............................. 3 credits General Education ....................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

English Electives ............................ 6 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

Division of Literature, Language, and Communication / 189

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

Major Concentration

FILM STUDIES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Film Studies ....................................................................... 24 credits English Literature ............................................................... 6 credits Journalism and Media ........................................................ 6 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits BACHELOR OF ARTS General Education Requirements ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 3 credits Major Concentration Film Studies ....................................................................... 24 credits English Literature ............................................................... 6 credits Journalism and Media ........................................................ 6 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Film Studies Must Complete:

FILM 210 FILM 211 FILM 300 FILM 400 Film and Culture The Language of Film Internship in Film Studies* Senior Seminar in Critical Theory

And four additional Film Studies courses selected from the following:

FILM 212 FILM 213 FILM 214 FILM 220 FILM 230 FILM 240 FILM 250 FILM 295 The Western Movie Studios, Stars, and Spectacle in Hollywood's Golden Age, 1930-1950 The Dark Genres: Film Noir, Science Fiction, Horror, and the Gangster Film Masters of Film: Griffith, Welles, and Hitchcock Film and Gender New Frontiers in African Film European Trends in Film Topics in Film Studies

And two courses from English numbered 200 and above. And two courses from Journalism and Media. There is an 18 credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Film Studies.

* May be taken more than once, at the discretion of the Program Director.

190 / Division of Literature, Language, and Communication

Recommended Curriculum Schedule for the Film Studies Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 111 ...................................... College Algebra ............................. History ............................................. Speech 110 ....................................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Film Elective ................................... Junior Seminar ............................... Open Electives ................................ Journalism and Media Elective ...................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... Film and Culture ............................ History ............................................. Film Elective ................................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Spring Semester

Internship in Film Studies ............ 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Literature Elective ......................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

Journalism & Media Elective ....... 3 credits Language of Film ........................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Senior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Film Elective ................................... 3 credits Open Elective ................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Film Elective ................................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Open Electives .............................. 12 credits Literature Elective ......................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

Division of Literature, Language, and Communication / 191

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

Major Concentration

JOURNALISM AND MEDIA

With Specialization: COMMUNICATION STUDIES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 9 credits Major Concentration Journalism and Media ...................................................... 48 credits Open Electives ................................................................ 12 credits Total ............................................................................... 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Journalism and Media with a Specialization in Communication Studies Must Complete:

JOUR 145 JOUR 399 Media in America Internship in Journalism and Media

SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS:

JOUR 385 The Communication Revolution

And fifteen credits selected from the following:

PSYN/SPCM 219 Group Experience JOUR 231 SPCM 249 JOUR 386 JOUR 397 Propaganda Persuasion Media Criticism Independent Study in Journalism and Media

PSYN/SPCM 250 Psychology of Communication JOUR/RDTV 295 Topics in Journalism and Media

And twelve credits in a concentration of TV/Radio Production or Journalism or Performing Arts chosen in conjunction with the Program Director. And twelve credits in major electives (may include up to 6 credits from major English courses numbered 200 or above). There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Journalism and Media.

* These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements.

192 / Division of Literature, Language, and Communication

Major Concentration

JOURNALISM AND MEDIA

With Specialization: JOURNALISM

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 3 credits Major Concentration Journalism and Media ...................................................... 48 credits Open Electives ............................................................... 18 credits Total ................................................................................ 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Journalism and Media Must Complete:

JOUR 134 JOUR 145 JOUR 399 Feature Article I Media in America Internship in Journalism and Media JOUR 255 JOUR/LAWS 261 JOUR/ARTT 275 JOUR/RDTV 295 JOUR 387 JOUR 397 Creative Advertising Media and the Law Photojournalism Topics in Journalism and Media The Problems of American Journalism Independent Study in Journalism and Media

SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS:

JOUR 130 News Reporting I And eighteen credits selected from the following: JOUR 132 Copy Editing and Graphics JOUR 230 News Reporting II JOUR 234 Feature Article II JOUR 240 Magazine Editing and Production JOUR 251 Sports Reporting JOUR 252 The Practice of Public Relations

and twelve credits in a concentration of TV/Radio Production or Communication Studies, or Performing Arts chosen in conjunction with the Program Director. And six credits in major electives (or major English courses numbered 200 or above).

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Journalism and Media. *These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences electives.

Division of Literature, Language, and Communication / 193

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For the Journalism and Media Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

College Algebra ............................. English 111 ...................................... History ............................................. Speech 110 ....................................... General Education ....................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Copy Editing and Graphics .......... The Practice of Public Relations* . Foundation Elective ....................... Junior Seminar ............................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... History ............................................. Media in America .......................... General Education ....................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

Spring Semester

Magazine Editing and Production* ............................... Concentration Elective .................. Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ..................................... General Education ......................... Open Electives ................................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

News Reporting I ........................... The Feature Article I ...................... Foundation Elective ....................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Concentration Electives ................ Photojournalism* ........................... Writing for Television and Film* . Major Electives ............................... Total 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

News Reporting II* ........................ 3 credits The Feature Article II* ................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Concentration Elective .................. 3 credits Internship in Journalism and Media* ........................................ 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

* These courses are suggested ways to fulfill the major electives. Actual electives should be chosen in consultation with the major advisor.

194 / Division of Literature, Language, and Communication

Major Concentration

JOURNALISM AND MEDIA

With Specialization: RADIO AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 3 credits Major Concentration Journalism and Media ...................................................... 48 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 18 credits Total ................................................................................ 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Journalism and Media with a Specialization in Radio and Television Production Must Complete:

JOUR 134 Feature Article I JOUR 145 Media in America JOUR/RDTV 399 Internship in Journalism and Media Specialization Requirements: RDTV 115 Fundamentals of Television Production RDTV 110 Radio Production I OR RDTV 120 Television Studio Production I

And fifteen credits selected from the following:

RDTV 110 RDTV 120 RDTV 200 RDTV 201 Radio Production I Television Studio Production Television Performance Voice Development and Interview Techniques for Broadcasting RDTV 210 Advanced Radio Production RDTV 215 Videotape Editing Workshop RDTV 220 Advanced Television Workshop RDTV/JOUR 295 Topics in Journalism and Media RDTV 303 Broadcast Journalism RDTV 310 TV and Radio News Writing and Production RDTV 320 Television Field Production

And twelve credits in a concentration of Journalism or Communication Studies or Performing Arts chosen in conjunction with the Program Director. And six credits in major electives (or major English courses numbered 200 or above). There is an 18 credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Journalism and Media.

* These courses fulfill liberal arts and sciences requirements.

Division of Literature, Language, and Communication / 195

DIVISION OF LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Journalism and Media Major with Specialization in Radio and Television Production

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

College Algebra ............................. English 111 ...................................... History ............................................. Speech 110 ....................................... General Education ........................ Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Advanced Radio Production ................................. Foundation Elective ....................... Junior Seminar ............................... General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... History ............................................. Media in America .......................... Radio Production I ........................ General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Spring Semester

Videotape Editing Workshop* ................................ 3 credits Foundation Elective* ..................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................................... 3 credits Open Electives ............................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

News Reporting I ........................... The Feature Article I ...................... Television Studio Production I .............................. General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Seminar in Media Criticism* ........ Advanced Television Workshop* ................................ Radio & Television or Journalism Elective .................. Major Electives ............................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Television Field Production* ............................... 3 credits Oral Performance of Literature* ................................. 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Broadcast Journalism* ................... 3 credits Internship in Journalism and Media* ................................ 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

* These courses are suggested ways to fulfill the major electives. Actual electives should be chosen in

consultation with the major advisor.

196 / Division of Literature, Language, and Communication

Major Concentration

SPANISH

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts And Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................. 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ........................................ 9 credits Major Concentration Spanish Language and Literature .. 30 credits Open Electives ................................. 30 credits Total 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .............................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................. 3 credits Major Concentration Spanish Language and Literature .. 30 credits Open Electives ................................. 39 credits Total 120 credits

The Division recommends that a major in Spanish be combined with a concentration in French or Italian to maximize career opportunities. Those seeking certification as Foreign Language teachers should contact the Division of Education for certification requirements. Students who choose the Major Concentration in Spanish Must Complete: SPAN 230 La Gramatica Espanola (recommended for non-native speakers of Spanish) OR ENGL 402 Applied English Grammar (recommended for non-native speakers of English) AND FORL 233 Comparative Romance Literatures SPAN 238 Introduction to Literary Criticism for Hispanic Studies SPAN 301 Masterworks in the Spanish Language* AND Six (6) major Spanish courses numbered 231 above which must include three (3) major courses designated as Broad and three (3) major courses designated as Focus. The courses listed as Broad are more comprehensive topically than the Focus courses which emphasize greater depth within a specific topic. Broad: SPAN 235 Spanish Culture SPAN 236 Spanish-American Culture SPAN 237 "Preceptiva Literaria" for Hispanic Studies SPAN 256 Spain Today SPAN 258 Spanish-America Today SPAN 265 Reading and Composition SPAN 311 Main Currents in Spanish Civilization I* SPAN 312 Main Currents in Spanish Civilization II* SPAN 349 Contemporary Spanish Literature* SPAN 351 Main Currents in SpanishAmerican Civilization I* SPAN 352 Main Currents in SpanishAmerican Civilization II* SPAN 372 Spanish Conversation* Focus: SPAN 240 Aspects of Caribbean Culture SPAN 241 Main Currents in Puerto Rican Civilization SPAN 305 Cervantes and His World SPAN 344 Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature* SPAN 346 "Modernismo" in Spain and Spanish-America* SPAN 359 Spanish-American Black Literature* SPAN 397 Independent Study in Spanish*

* These courses are offered in Spanish.

There is a fifteen credit residency requirement in the Major Concentration in Spanish.

Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 197

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

Nagaraj Rao, Ph.D., Division Chairperson Carole Bergen, M.A.T., Assistant Chairperson and Program Coordinator for Math Basic Skills Elaine Paris, Ed.D., Assistant Chairperson Gordon Feathers, Ph.D., Program Coordinator for Mathematics Delia Marx, Ph.D., Program Coordinator for Computer Science Narasim Banavara, M.B.A., Program Coordinator for Computer Information Systems Donald Little, M.B.A., Director of Computer Certificate Programs The Division offers the following major concentrations: · Computer Information Systems (B.S) · Computer Science (B.S) (This major is also offered completely on-line) · Mathematics (B.S) · Information Technology (A.A.S.) The Division also offers the following programs: · Certificate Programs in Web Design, Office Computer Systems, and PC Hardware/Networking. · Cisco Certification courses. Mercy College is a Cisco Network Academy (CCNA). · M.S. in Internet Business Systems Students minoring in Computer Information Systems are advised to choose from CISC 131, CISC 220, CISC 231, CISC 257 and CISC 301.

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

198 / Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science

Major Concentration

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Computer Information Systems and Related Courses ......................................................... 57 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 12 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Computer Information Systems Must Complete:** FOUNDATION COURSES

CISC 123 CISC 131 CISC 220 CISC 231 CISC 238 CISC 257 MATH 122 MATH 244 ACCT 120 ACCT 121 Concepts of Computer Information Sciences Foundations of Computing I*** Database Applications Foundations of Computing II*** Graphical User Interface Application Development Local Area Networks Statistics Discrete Structures Introduction to Financial Accounting Introduction to Management Accounting CISC 335 CISC 337 CISC 370 CISC 421 CISC 470 Data Communications: Principles and Applications Database Management Systems Systems Analysis and Design Operating Systems Information Systems Development and Implementation

and two major courses in Computer Information Science selected from the following:

CISC 327 CISC 333 CISC 339 CISC 341 CISC 359 CISC 385 CISC 395 CISC 397 CISC 411 Computer Graphics*** Programming Languages Artificial Intelligence Computer Architecture Web Site Administration Cryptography & Computer Security Special Topics in Computer Information Science Independent Study in Computer Information Science Objects, Structures, and Algorithms II

MAJOR COURSES

CISC 301 CISC 311 Information Systems within Organizations Objects, Structures, and Algorithims I

Mercy College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentrations of Mathematics, Computer Science, or Computer Information Systems must be satisfied by courses numbered 200 or above.

* Computer Information Systems majors who have not had their Mathematics core requirement waived should complete MATH 116 and MATH 201 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement.

** CISC 120 is a prerequisite for introductory courses in Computer Information Science, but may be waived with division approval. *** Any one of these CISC courses (or CISC 120) fulfills part of the General Education requirement. Any of these MATH courses fulfills part of the General Education requirement.

Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 199

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Computer Information Systems Major

FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester English 111 ...................................... General Education ......................... Speech 110 ....................................... College Algebra ............................. Introduction to Computers and Application Software .............. Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR

Fall Semester Information Systems within Organizations ........................... 3 credits Graphical User Interface Application & Development ........................ 3 credits Objects, Structures, and Algorithims I ............................. 3 credits General Education ......................... 6 credits Total 15 credits

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

15 credits

Spring Semester English 112 ...................................... Concepts of Computer Information Sciences ............... General Education ......................... Statistics ........................................... Pre-Calculus .................................. Total

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Spring Semester Data Communications: Principles & Applications .............................. 3 credits Database Management Systems .. 3 credits Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 3 credits Open Electives .............................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester Foundations of Computing I ........ Database Applications .................. Introduction to Financial Accounting ................................ General Education ......................... 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Fall Semester Operating Systems ........................ Systems Analysis & Design ........................................ Computer Science Elective ........... Open Electives .............................. General Education ......................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Total .............................................. 15 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Foundations of Computing II . 3 credits Discrete Structures ................. 3 credits Local Area Networks ............ 3 credits General Education ................ 6 credits

Total .............................................. 15 credits

Spring Semester Information Systems Development and Implementation ........................ 3 credits Computer Science Elective ........... 3 credits Open Electives .............................. 9 credits Total 15 credits

200 / Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science

Major Concentration

COMPUTER SCIENCE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Computer and Related Courses ..................................... 53 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 16 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Computer Science Must Complete:** FOUNDATION COURSES

CISC 123 Concepts of Computer Information Sciences CISC 131 Foundations of Computing I*** CISC 231 Foundations of Computing II*** MATH 244 Discrete Structures*** MATH 260 Calculus I*** MATH 261 Calculus II*** and two courses in Computer Information Science selected from the following: CISC 301 CISC 327 CISC 337 CISC 339 CISC 359 CISC 370 CISC 385 CISC 395 CISC 397 Information Systems within Organizations Computer Graphics*** Database Management Systems Artificial Intelligence Web Site Administration Systems Analysis & Design Cryptography & Computer Security Special Topics in Computer Information Science Independent Study in Computer Information Science

MAJOR COURSES

CISC 311 Objects, Structures & Algorithms I CISC 333 Programming Languages CISC 335 Data Communications: Principles & Applications CISC 341 Computer Architecture CISC 411 Objects, Structures & Algorithms II CISC 421 Operating Systems CISC 471 Software Engineering MATH 350 Probability: Theory and Applications

and one course from the following: MATH 307 Number Theory MATH 315 Linear Algebra MATH 329 Numerical Analysis MATH 351 Statistics: Theory and Application MATH 362 Differential Equations MATH 365 Algebraic Structures MATH 417 Mathematical Modeling

Mercy College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentrations of Mathematics, Computer Science, or Computer Information Systems must be satisfied by courses numbered 200 or above.

* Computer Science majors who have not had their Mathematics core requirement waived should complete MATH 116 and MATH 201 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement.

** CISC 120 is a prerequisite for introductory courses in Computer Information Science, but may be waived with division approval. *** Any one of these CISC courses (or CISC 120) fulfills part of the General Education requirement. Any of these MATH courses fulfills part of the General Education Requirement.

Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 201

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Computer Science Major

FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester English 111 ...................................... General Education ......................... Speech 110 ....................................... College Algebra ............................. Introduction to Computers and Application Software ............... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR

Fall Semester Data Communicatins: Principles & Applications .............................. 3 credits Objects, Structures & Algorithms I . 3 credits Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits General Education ........................ 6 credits Total 15 credits

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

15 credits Spring Semester Computer Architecture ................. Programming Language .............. Objects, Structures & Algorithms II Open Electives ............................... Total

Spring Semester English 112 ...................................... Concepts of Computer Information Sciences ............... General Education ......................... Pre-Calculus .................................. Total

3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

15 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester Discrete Structures ........................ Calculus I ........................................ Foundations of Computing I ........ General Education ........................ Total 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 6 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Fall Semester Operating Systems ........................ Computer Science/ Mathematics Elective ............... Probability: Theory & Applications Open Electives ............................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

16 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester Foundations of Computing II ...... 3 credits Calculus II ....................................... 4 credits General Education ........................ 9 credits Total 16 credits

Spring Semester Computer Science or Mathematics Electives ............ 6 credits Software Engineering .................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 4 credits Total 13 credits

202 / Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science

Major Concentration

MATHEMATICS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Mathematics ...................................................................... 48 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 21 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Mathematics Must Complete:** FOUNDATION COURSES

MATH 123 Concepts of Computer Information Sciences MATH 131 Foundations of Computing I*** MATH 231 Foundations of Computing II*** MATH 244 Discrete Structures*** MATH 260 Calculus I*** MATH 261 Calculus II*** MATH 360 Calculus III MATH 365 Algebraic Structures MATH 417 Mathematical Modeling and three course in Mathematics selected from the following: MATH 307 MATH 327 MATH 329 MATH 362 MATH 395 MATH 460 MATH 461 Number Theory Computer Graphics Numerical Analysis*** Differential Equations Special Topics in Mathematics Advanced Calculus I Advanced Calculus II

MAJOR COURSES

MATH 315 Linear Algebra MATH 350 Probability: Theory and Applications MATH 351 Statistics: Theory and Applications

Mercy College's 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentrations of Mathematics, Computer Science or Computer Information Systems must be satisfied by courses numbered 200 or above.

* Mathematics majors who have not had their Mathematics core requirement waived should complete MATH 116 and MATH 201 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement.

** MATH 120 may be waived with division approval. *** Any one of these CISC courses (or MATH 120) fulfills part of the General Education Requirement. Any of these MATH courses fulfills part of the General Education Requirement.

Division of Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 203

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Mathematics Major

FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester English 111 ...................................... General Education ......................... Speech 110 ....................................... College Algebra ............................. Introduction to Computers and Application Software ..... Total 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR

Fall Semester Algebraic Structures ...................... Calculus III ...................................... Mathematics Elective .................... General Education ......................... Junior Seminar ............................... Total 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

15 credits

16 credits

Spring Semester English 112 ...................................... 3 credits Concepts of Computer Information Sciences ...................................... 3 credits Pre-Calculcus .................................. 3 credits General Education ......................... 6 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester Probability: Theory and Applications .............................. Mathematics Elective .................... Gerneral Education ....................... Open Electives ................................ Junior Seminar ............................... Total

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

15 credits

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester Calculus I ........................................ Discrete Structures ........................ Foundations of Computing I ........ General Education ........................ Total

FOURTH YEAR

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits Fall Semester Mathematics Elective .................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 9 credits Statistics: Theory and Applications .............................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

16 credits

Spring Semester Calculus II ....................................... General Education ......................... Linear Algebra ............................... Foundations of Computing II ...... Total

4 credits 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Spring Semester Mathematics Modeling ................. 3 credits Open Electives ............................. 12 credits Total 15 credits

16 credits

204 / Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES & VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

James F. Melville, Ph.D., Division Chairperson and Program Director for Natural Sciences Sherry Downie, Ph.D., Assistant Chairperson Hassan A. N. El-Fawal, Ph.D., Assistant Chairperson Jack Burke, D.V.M., Program Director for Veterinary Technology Jean Burke, M.A., Assistant Program Director for Veterinary Technology The Division offers major concentrations in the following programs: · Biology (B.A., B.S) · Medical Technology (B.A., B.S) · Biology with a specialization in Pre-Health Professional Studies (B.S) · Interdisciplinary Studies with a Specialization in Pre-Chiropractic Studies (B.S) · Veterinary Technology (B.S) · Veterinary Technology with a Specialization in Pre-Veterinary Medicine (B.S) The Division offers, for the post-baccalaureate student, Pre-Health Profession courses. The Division also offers courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Physical Science for the non-major. Coordinator for Medical Technology, xxxxxxxxxxxx Coordinator for Pre-Chiropractic, Henry Knizeski, Ph.D. Coordinator for Pre-Professional Programs, Sherry Downie, Ph.D.

Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 205

Major Concentration

BIOLOGY

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ........................ 48 credits (see page 52 for description) Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Major Concentration Natural Science ....................... 45-46 credits Open Electives ....................... 23-24 credits Total 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ......................... 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Major Concentration Natural Science ....................... 48-49 credits Open Electives ........................ 20-21 credits

Total 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Biology Must Complete:* CHEM 161 General Chemistry II** CHEM 260 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 261 Organic Chemistry II

NATURAL SCIENCE CORE BIOL 160 General Biology I** BIOL 161 General Biology II** CHEM 160 General Chemistry I** BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION BIOL 240 BIOL 241 BIOL 244 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Developmental Biology Ecology

BIOL 354 BIOL 355 BIOL 360 BIOL 460

Biochemistry Molecular Biology of the Cell Genetics Coordinating Seminar in Biology Kinesiology Neuroscience Cooperative Education in Biology I (Natural Science) Independent Study in Biology Seminar in Current Topics in Biology

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

and at least one major course in Biology selected from the following:

BIOL 265 BIOL 280 BIOL 303 BIOL 305 BIOL 310 Microbiology Histology Human Anatomy with Cadaver Human Physiology with Cadaver Immunology BIOL 316 BIOL 317 BIOL 380 BIOL 397 BIOL 430

The Division recommends that students with a major concentration in Biology complete six credits in Mathematics. The Division recommends that students planning to enter graduate school, medical school, or research take: MATH 260-261 PHYS 160-161 Calculus I General Physics I, II

Biology majors should begin taking Biology and Chemistry courses in their first semester in order to complete course sequence in four years. There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Biology that must be completed with courses numbered BIOL 230 and above.

* Biology majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirements. ** These courses fulfill up to six credits of the General Education requirements.

206 / Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology

Major Concentration

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences

General Education Requirements* ...................... 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ............................ 3 credits Major Concentration Natural Science .................... 44-45 credits Medical Technology ................. 24 credits Open Electives ............................... 1 credit Total ..................................... 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences

General Education Requirements* ...................... 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar ............................ 3 credits Major Concentration Natural Science .................... 44-45 credits Medical Technology ................. 24 credits Open Electives ............................... 1 credit Total ..................................... 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Medical Technology Must Complete:* NATURAL SCIENCE CORE

BIOL 160 BIOL 161 CHEM 160 CHEM 161 CHEM 260 CHEM 261 General Biology I** General Biology II** General Chemistry I** General Chemistry II** Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION

BIOL 240 BIOL 241 BIOL 265 BIOL 310 BIOL 354 BIOL 355 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Developmental Biology Microbiology Immunology Biochemistry Molecular Biology of the Cell

and one major course in Biology selected from the following: BIOL 244 Ecology BIOL 280 Histology BIOL 360 Genetics BIOL 380 Cooperative Education in Biology I (Natural Science) BIOL 397 Independent Study in Biology BIOL 430 Seminar in Current Topics in Biology BIOL 460 Coordinating Seminar in Biology ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED COURSES: PHYS 160-161 General Physics I, II There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Medical Technology which must be completed with courses numbered BIOL 230 and above.

* Medical Technology majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement.

** These courses fulfill up to six credits of the General Education requirement.

The student attends Mercy College for three years and completes a minimum of 96 credits. During the third year the student applies, under the auspices of Mercy College, to a medical facility that has a 12-month Medical Technology Program approved by the Council on Medical Education (CME) of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP). Mercy College is affiliated with the School of Medical Technology, St. Vincent's Hospital in Manhattan. Students will normally apply here, but may also apply to any CME--ASCP approved school of Medical Technology. Acceptance into the fourth year of the program is conditional upon hospital requirements, college performance, practical experience, and space availability. Students must have at least a 2.5 index overall and

Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 207 in science to be eligible for this program. Students cannot present "D" grades in science courses. Once accepted by the Hospital School of Medical Technology, the student must register for BIOL 428-429. The student pays the College a fee equivalent to the cost of three credits per term. Some hospitals charge an additional fee. Students should pay this to the College, which will remit it to the Hospital Program. Upon written notification of successful completion of this course of study (24 credits granted by Mercy College) and at the completion of all other graduation requirements, the student will be awarded the bachelor of science in Medical Technology. Examination and certification are given by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the ASCP. The Clinical Program will consist of a 37 1/2-hour week of classes and corresponding instruction during the 12-month Clinical period. Students considering the program in Medical Technology should note that acceptance by an approved hospital school is required for program completion and that Mercy College cannot guarantee such acceptance.

Major Concentration

BIOLOGY

With Specialization: PRE-HEALTH PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences* General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Natural Science ............................................................ 56-57 credits Pre-Health Professional Program** .......................... 15-16 credits

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

Total ................................................................................. 123 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Biology with Specialization in Pre-Health Professional Studies Must Complete:*

NATURAL SCIENCE CORE

BIOL 160 BIOL 161 CHEM 160 CHEM 161 CHEM 260 CHEM 261 PHYS 160 PHYS 161 BIOL 265 BIOL 280 BIOL 310 General Biology I*** General Biology II*** General Chemistry I*** General Chemistry II*** Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II General Physics I*** General Physics II*** Microbiology Histology Immunology

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CORE

BIOL 240 BIOL 241 BIOL 244 BIOL 354 BIOL 355 BIOL 360 BIOL 460 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Developmental Biology Ecology Biochemistry Molecular Biology of the Cell Genetics Coordinating Seminar in Biology

and at least one major course in Biology**** selected from the following: BIOL 380 BIOL 397 BIOL 430 Cooperative Education in Biology I (Natural Science) Independent Study in Biology Seminar in Current Topics in Biology

There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Biology that must be completed with courses numbered BIOL 230 and above.

* ** Biological Science majors must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirement. To complete the bachelor of science degree at Mercy College, three trimesters of full-time work with a grade point average of 2.5 are required either at New York Chiropractic College, Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, or Palmer College of Chiropractic. Details of the courses of study for these trimesters are available through NYCC, LACC, or Palmer C.C.

208 / Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology

*** These courses fulfill up to six credits of the General Education requirements. **** For students who continue their health professional studies at New York Chiropractic College, Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Palmer College of Chiropractic, or another approved professional school, the requirement for a major elective Biology course for the degree of Biology at Mercy College will be fulfilled by completing a course in Histology at New York Chiropractic College or Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Palmer College of Chiropractics or a comparable course at another approved professional school.

SIX-YEAR COORDINATED PRE-CHIROPRACTIC PROGRAM Henry M. Knizeski, Jr., Ph.D., Program Coordinator

Students complete three years of undergraduate course work to fulfill the requirements for either the major in Biology with a specialization in Pre-Health Professional Studies (page 191), or the major in Interdisciplinary Studies with the specialization in Pre-Chiropractic Studies (page 193). Students who successfully complete their first three years at Mercy, and who comply with the requirements for admission to either New York Chiropractic College, Los Angeles College of Chiropractic or Palmer College of Chiropractics, will receive preferred admission status. Students must maintain a minimum of 3.25 grade point average with a minimum grade of "C" in all undergraduate courses required by the chiropractic college. An application for admission should be submitted to the chiropractic college at the beginning of the student's final year at Mercy College along with requisite faculty recommendations. In addition, the student must successfully complete a personal interview with a member of the admissions committee of the chiropractic college. Students who successfully complete a specified set of courses offered during the first three trimesters of the chiropractic college with a grade point average of 2.5 or higher and all of the requirements of Mercy College, as previously outlined, will receive the bachelor of science degree from Mercy College upon submission of an official transcript from the chiropractic college and completion of an application for graduation from Mercy College. For further information concerning the six-year coordinated program leading to the bachelor of science and the doctor of chiropractic degrees, please see the Program Coordinator or the Chairperson of the Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology.

Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 209

Major Concentration

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

With Specialization: PRE-CHIROPRACTIC STUDIES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements* ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Natural Science ................................................................. 45 credits Chiropractic Program ...................................................... 24 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies with a Specialization in Pre-Chiropractic Studies Must Complete:*

NATURAL SCIENCE CORE BIOL 160 General Biology I** BIOL 161 General Biology II** CHEM 160 General Chemistry I** CHEM 161 General Chemistry II** BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CORE BIOL 240 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy BIOL 241 Developmental Biology BIOL 354 Biochemistry BIOL 355 Molecular Biology of the Cell and at least two courses from the following: BIOL 244 Ecology BIOL 265 Microbiology BIOL 280 Histology BIOL 310 Immunology BIOL 360 Genetics BIOL 380 BIOL 397 BIOL 460 Cooperative Education in Biology I (Natural Science) Independent Study in Biology Coordinating Seminar in Biology

CHEM 260 CHEM 261 PHYS 160 PHYS 161

Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II General Physics I** General Physics II**

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Interdisciplinary Studies with a specialization in Pre-Chiropractic Studies that must be completed with courses numbered BIOL 230 and above.

* Interdisciplinary Studies majors with a specialization in Pre-Chiropractic Studies must complete MATH 116 (rather than MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirements.

** These courses fulfill up to six credits of the General Education requirements.

Three trimesters of full-time work with a grade point average of 2.5 or above are required at New York Chiropractic College, Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, or Palmer College of Chiropractic to complete the bachelor of science degree at Mercy College. Details of the courses of study for these trimesters are available through New York Chiropractic College, Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, or Palmer College of Chiropractic.

210 / Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology

Major Concentration

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Veterinary Technology .................................................... 46 credits Related Courses ................................................................ 20 credits Open Electives ..................................................................... 3 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Veterinary Technology Must Complete: VETC 101 Introduction to Veterinary Science VETC 140 Veterinary Management VETC 161 Physiology of Domestic Animals VETC 220 Pharmacology and Toxicology VETC 224 Clinical Laboratory Techniques VETC 241 Small Animal Diseases: Principles of Treatment and Nursing VETC 247 Surgical Nursing and Radiography VETC 260 Principles of Large Animal Medicine VETC 395 Externship I VETC 396 Externship II VETC 445 Fundamentals of Animal Research

and the following related courses in Natural Science and Mathematics: BIOL 160 BIOL 161 BIOL 256 BIOL 265 CHEM 160 General Biology I* General Biology II* Anatomy of Domestic Animals Microbiology General Chemistry I* CISC 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software* MATH 116 College Algebra** MATH 122 Statistics*

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES: VETC 275 Applied Animal Behavior VETC 277 Animal Assisted Therapy BIOL 280 Histology BIOL 310 Immunology There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Veterinary Technology.

* These courses fulfill up to nine credits of the General Education requirements. ** Veterinary Technology majors must complete MATH 116 (rather MATH 115) as part of their General Education requirements.

Students in the Veterinary Technology Program must have a 2.5 cumulative index and complete each prerequisite course with a minimum letter grade of "C-" for admittance into upper level clinical courses VETC 224, VETC 241, VETC 247, VETC 260, VETC 395, VETC 396, and VETC 445. Students enrolled in the Veterinary Technology major or the Veterinary Technology major with the Pre-Veterinary Medicine specialization may not repeat a course required in the major curriculum more than once.

Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 211

Recommended Upper Division Curriculum Schedule For Veterinary Technology Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 111 ...................................... Introduction to Veterinary Science ....................................... General Biology I ........................... General Chemistry I ...................... College Algebra ............................. Total 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Fundamentals of Animal Research1 ................................... Clinical Laboratory Techniques . General Education ......................... Junior Seminar ............................... Total 3 credits 5 credits 3 credits 3 credits

14 credits

17 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... 3 credits Speech 110 ....................................... 3 credits General Biology II .......................... 4 credits General Education ......................... 3 credits Introduction to Computers ......................... and Application Software ....... 3 credits Total 16 credits

Spring Semester

Small Animal Diseases: Principles of Treatment and Nursing2 ............................. 4 credits Surgical Nursing and Radiography2 ............................ 4 credits Externship I .................................... 6 credits Total 14 credits

SUMMER SESSION SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

Anatomy of Domestic Animals ... Microbiology .................................. General Education ......................... Physiology of Domestic Animals .................................... Total 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 4 credits Principles of Large Animal Medicine3 ................................... 4 credits Total 4 credits

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Externship II ................................... 6 credits Statistics ........................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 3 credits Total 12 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Pharmacology and Toxicology .... 4 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Total 13 credits

Spring Semester

Veterinary Management ............... 3 credits General Education ......................... 9 credits Open Electives ................................ 3 credits Total 15 credits

NOTE: Course is given at New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York. Courses taken at New York Medical College are charged at the college's prevailing rate for tuition and fees. 2 Courses are given off-campus. 3 Course is given off-campus during summer semesters.

1

212 / Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology

Major Concentration

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

With Specialization: PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements** ............................... 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Veterinary Technology .................................................... 34 credits Related Courses ............................................................... 39 credits Total ................................................................................. 125 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Veterinary Technology with a Specialization in Pre-Veterinary Medicine Must Complete:** VETC 101 Introduction to Veterinary Science VETC 140 Veterinary Management VETC 161 Physiology of Domestic Animals VETC 220 Pharmacology and Toxicology VETC 224 Clinical Laboratory Techniques VETC 241 Small Animal Diseases: Principles of Treatment and Nursing VETC 247 Surgical Nursing and Radiography VETC 260 Principles of Large Animal Medicine VETC 445 Fundamentals of Animal Research

and the following related courses in Natural Science and Mathematics: BIOL 160 BIOL 161 BIOL 265 BIOL 354 CHEM 160 CHEM 161 General Biology I* General Biology II* Microbiology Biochemistry General Chemistry I* General Chemistry II* CHEM 260 Organic Chemistry I* CHEM 261 Organic Chemistry II* PHYS 160 General Physics I* PHYS 161 General Physics II* MATH 122 Statistics* MATH 201 Pre-Calculus

Recommended Electives: BIOL 256 Anatomy of Domestic Animals BIOL 280 Histology BIOL 310 Immunology BIOL 360 Genetics There is a 15-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Veterinary Technology.

* These courses fulfill up to 7 credits of the General Education requirements.

** MATH 116 is a prerequisite for Natural Science and Mathematics courses required for the Veterinary Technology Pre-Veterinary Medicine major but may be waived with division approval.

Students in the Veterinary Technology Program must have a 3.2 in each prerequisite course for admittance into upper level clinical courses VETC 224, VETC 241, VETC 247, and VETC 445. Students enrolled in the Veterinary Technology major or the Veterinary Technology major with the Pre-Veterinary Medicine specialization may not repeat a course required in the major curriculum more than once.

Division of Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 213

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For Veterinary Technology With Specialization In Pre-veterinary Medicine

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 111 ...................................... Introduction to Veterinary Science ....................................... General Biology I ........................... General Chemistry I ...................... Pre-Calculus ................................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Clinical Laboratory Techniques .. 5 credits Biochemistry ................................... 4 credits General Education ......................... 6 credits Total 15 credits

17 credits

Spring Semester

Small Animal Diseases: Principles of Treatment and Nursing2 ............................. 4 credits Surgical Nursing and Radiography2 .................................................. 4 credits Junior Seminar ............................... 3 credits Pharmacology and Toxicology .... 4 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ...................................... Speech 110 ....................................... General Biology II .......................... General Chemistry II ..................... Total 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits

14 credits

Summer Semester SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

Organic Chemistry I ...................... Microbiology .................................. Physiology of Domestic Animals ..................................... General Education ......................... Total 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits Principles of Large Animal Medicine3 ................................... 4 credits Total 4 credits

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Fundamentals of Animal Research1 ................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 6 credits General Physics I ........................... 4 credits Total 13 credits

15 credits

Spring Semester

Organic Chemistry II ..................... 4 credits Veterinary Management ............... 3 credits General Education ......................... 8 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

General Physics II .......................... Statistics ........................................... Open Electives ................................ General Education ......................... Total 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

13 credits

Division recommendation will depend upon a minimum cumulative index of 3.2.

NOTE:

1

Course is given at New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York. Courses taken at New York Medical College are charged at the college's prevailing rate for tuition and fees. Courses are given off-campus. Course is given off-campus during summer semesters.

2 3

214 / Physical Education

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Neil D. Judge, M.S., M.Ped., Director of Athletics The College offers courses for credit in Physical Education

In addition to intramural and intercollegiate sports, the College offers courses for credit in physical education. (See Physical Education Course Description.) Up to six credits of Physical Education in the non-liberal arts elective area may be applied toward degree requirements.

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 215

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

DIVISION OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Diana D'Amico Juettner, J.D., Division Co-Chairperson Mary Knopp Kelly, Ph.D., Division Co-Chairperson Naomi P. Gitterman, M.S.W., Program Director for Social Work Diana D'Amico Juettner, J.D., Program Director for Legal Studies Mary C. Kraetzer, Ph.D., Program Director for Behavioral Science Ellen F. Sperber, Ph.D., Program Director for Psychology Arthur P. Sullivan, Ph.D., Director of Human Services Programs Robert C. Tash, Ph.D., Program Director for Sociology Joseph Victor, Ed.D., Program Director for Criminal Justice and Environmental Health & Safety Management The Division offers the following major concentrations and specializations: · Behavioral Science (B.A., B.S.) · Behavioral Science with Specializations in Community Health, in Gerontology, and in Health Services Management (B.A., B.S.) · Criminal Justice (B.S.) · Environmental Health & Safety Management (B.S.) · Human Services with Specializations in Child Care, Substance Abuse, and Elder Care (A.S.) · Legal Studies (B.A., B.S.) · Legal Studies with a Specialization in Paralegal Studies (B.A., B.S.) · Legal Studies with a Specialization in Political Science (B.A., B.S.) · Psychology (B.A., B.S.) · Psychology with a Specialization in Computer Applications (B.A., B.S.) · Social Work (B.S.) · Sociology (B.A., B.S.) · Sociology with a Specialization in Computer Applications (B.A., B.S.) A minor concentration in Social Work is also offered, composed of 15 credits of Social Work Theory with no more than 3 credits in Social Work Practice. The Social Work major is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Mercy College is a member of the American Association for Paralegal Education. The Legal Studies major with a specialization in Paralegal Studies is approved by the standing Committee on Legal Assistants of the American Bar Association.

216 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mary Knopp Kelly, Ph.D., Division Director for Educational Technology Lynn M. Tepper, Ed.D., Division Director for Internship Programs Valerie Ross Homan, M.S.W., Fieldwork Coordinator for Social Work Joseph Victor, Ed.D., Program Director for Internship Programs in Criminal Justice Diana D'Amico Juettner, J.D., Program Director for Cooperative Education in Legal Studies Honor Societies: National Honor Society in Social Work, Phi Alpha Naomi P. Gitterman, M.S.W., Moderator National Honor Society in Social Sciences, Pi Gamma Mu Dorothy C. Balancio. , Ph.D., Moderator National Honor Society in Paralegal Studies, Lambda Epsilon Chi Diana D'Amico Juettner, J.D., Moderator National Honor Society in Psychology, Psi Chi Mary Knopp Kelly, Ph.D., Moderator National Honor Society in Gerontology, Sigma Phi Omega Lynn M. Tepper, Ed.D., Moderator Director, The Mercy College Institute in Gerontology National Honor Society in Criminal Justice, Alpha Phi Sigma Joanne Naughton, J.D., Moderator

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 217

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements ................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 6 credits Major Concentration Criminal Justice ................................................................. 36 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 27 credits Total ............................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Criminal Justice Must Complete:

CRJU 102 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System CRJU/LAWS 234 Criminal Law CRJU 301 Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice CRJU 399 Internship in Criminal Justice CRJU 401 Coordinating Seminar in Criminal Justice

In addition, students must select any five courses in total from Criminal Justice numbered 130 or above and CRJU/LAWS 250, LAWS/JOUR 261, and two of the following:

PARA 260 PSYN 206 PSYN 213 PSYN 229 PSYN 244 PSYN 312 PSYN 340 SOCL 201 SOCL 203 SOCL 206 SOCL 212 SOCL 236 SOCL 246 Legal Research and Writing I Deviation and Therapy Psychology of Personality Stress Management in the Criminal Justice System Social Psychology Abnormal Psychology Psychology of Crisis Law, Order, and Justice Juvenile Delinquency Sociology of Violence Criminology Social Deviance Death Penalty in America

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Criminal Justice.

* PSYN 101 is a prerequisite for all PSYN courses numbered 120 and above. SOCL 101 is a prerequisite for all SOCL courses numbered 120 and above. PSYN 101 and SOCL 101 fulfill part of the General Education requirements. All the courses in this category fulfill Liberal Arts requirements.

218 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Criminal Justice Major

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 111 ........................................ 3 credits History ............................................... 3 credits Mathematics for the Liberal Arts .................................. 3 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits Introduction to the Criminal Justice System .............................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ........................... 6 credits Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice ........................... 3 credits Internship in Criminal Justice ........ 3 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ........................................ 3 credits History ............................................... 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Criminal Law ................................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Criminal Justice Electives ............... 6 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective .......................................... 6 credits Open Electives .................................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ........................... 9 credits Criminal Justice Electives ............... 6 credits Total 15 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Criminal Justice Elective ................. 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 12 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

General Education ........................... 9 credits Criminal Justice Electives ............... 6 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Coordinating Seminar in Criminal Justice ........................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 12 credits Total 15 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 219

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

LEGAL STUDIES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ................................ 12 credits Major Concentration Legal Studies* .................................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 21 credits Total ................................................................................ 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Legal Studies Must Complete:

LAWS 130 Introduction to Legal Studies LAWS 255 Managing Human Conflict I PARA 260 Legal Research and Writing I LAWS/POLS 361 Constitutional Law and Policy and five additional courses in Legal Studies numbered 203 or above or Paralegal Studies Courses numbered 201 or above. And three courses from the following: LAWS 220 The Art of Legal Reasoning LAWS 235 Argumentation, Debate and the Court Room LAWS 380/381 Cooperative Education in Legal Studies ENGL 402 Applied English Grammar ENGL 404 The Structure and Form of English Any Political Science course numbered 300 or above. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Legal Studies.

* Note: No more than Twelve Credits of Paralegal Studies courses may be taken for the Legal Studies Major.

220 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major Concentration

LEGAL STUDIES

With Specialization: PARALEGAL STUDIES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 9 credits Major Concentration Paralegal Studies ............................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 24 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Legal Studies with a Specialization in Paralegal Studies Must Complete:

MGMT 225 LAWS 130 PARA 260 PARA 300 PARA 206 PARA 302 PARA 410 Principles of Management Introduction to Legal Studies Legal Research and Writing I Legal Research and Writing II Substantive Law and Document Drafting Litigation Advanced Seminar in Paralegal Studies

And two courses in Paralegal Studies numbered PARA 201 through PARA 303 and three additional courses from Paralegal Studies numbered 201 or above, Law numbered 203 or above or CRJU 301 Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice.

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Legal Studies with a specialization in Paralegal Studies.

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 221

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Legal Studies Major With A Specialization in Paralegal Studies

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

FIRST YEAR Fall Semester

English 111 ........................................ 3 credits History ............................................... 3 credits Mathematics for the Liberal Arts .................................. 3 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits General Education ........................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

General Education ........................... 3 credits Paralegal ............................................ 3 credits Litigation ........................................... 3 credits Open Electives .................................. 3 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

English 112 ........................................ 3 credits History ............................................... 3 credits Introduction to the Legal Studies .. 3 credits Introduction to Computers and Application Software .......... 3 credits General Education ........................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Paralegal ............................................ 6 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ........................................ 9 credits Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR Fall Semester

Legal Research and Writing I ........ 3 credits Substantive Law and Document Drafting ..................... 3 credits General Education ........................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Paralegal ............................................ 3 credits Paralegal Elective ............................. 3 credits Open Electives .................................. 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Legal Research and Writing II ....... 3 credits Paralegal ............................................ 3 credits General Education ........................... 9 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Advanced Seminar in Paralegal Studies .......................................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 12 credits Total 15 credits

222 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major Concentration

LEGAL STUDIES

With Specialization: Political Science

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives .................................. 9 credits Major Concentration Legal Studies* .................................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 24 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Legal Studies with a Specialization in Political Science Must Complete:

LAWS 130 Introduction to Legal Studies LAWS 255 Managing Human Conflict I LAWS/POLS 361 Constitutional Law and Policy PARA 260 Legal Research and Writing I And five courses in Political Science numbered 282 or above. And three courses from the following: LAWS 220 The Art of Legal Reasoning LAWS 235 Argumentation, Debate and the Court Room LAWS380/381 Cooperative Education in Legal Studies ENGL 402 Applied English Grammar ENGL 404 The Structure and Form of English

One Legal Studies course numbered 203 or above.

* There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Legal Studies with a Specialization in Political Science.

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 223

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Science General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal arts and Science Electives ..................................... 2 credits Major Concentration Environmental Health and Safety Management and Related Courses ........................................................... 46 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 21 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Environmental Health and Safety Management Must Complete:

EVHS 02 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety Management BIOL 130 Human Anatomy and Physiology I CHEM 160 General Chemistry I* CHEM 161 General Chemistry II* CHEM 260 Organic Chemistry I And eleven courses selected from the following: EVHS 110 Risk Management EVHS 131 Introduction to Fire Science EVHS 200 Human Behavior in Hazard Control EVHS 201 Safety Codes and Standards EVHS 204 Construction Safety and Loss Control EVHS 205 Arson Investigation EVHS 206 EVHS 209 EVHS 210 EVHS 212 Safety Engineering Industrial Fire Protection Ergonomics Motor Transportation Fleet Safety EVHS 301 Organization and Administration of Environmental Health and Safety Programs EVHS 303 Principles of Industrial Hygiene EVHS 304 Emergencies and Disasters EVHS 305 Advanced Industrial Hygiene EVHS 306 Worker Compensation EVHS 315 Environmental Management EVHS/LAWS 401 Survey of Environmental Law EVHS 380/381 Cooperative Education in Environmental Health and Safety Management I & II

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Environmental Health and Safety Management.

* Any two of these courses fulfill general education requirements.

224 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Environmental Health And Safety Management Major

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Mathematics for the Liberal Arts .................................. 3 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 12 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

Safety Electives .............................. 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ...................................... 12 credits Open Electives .................................. 3 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ......................... 18 credits Safety Electives .............................. 12 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Safety Electives .............................. 12 credits Open Electives ................................ 18 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 225

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

PSYCHOLOGY

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Psychology ......................................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................................................... 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Psychology ......................................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Psychology Must Complete:*

PSYN 210 Modern Psychology in Historical Perspective PSYN 226 Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 320 Psychobiology PSYN 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 372 Experimental Psychology I: Methodology PSYN 426 Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

And six major elective courses in Psychology numbered 200 or above.

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Psychology.

* PSYN 101 is a prerequisite for the major courses in Psychology and fulfills part of the General Education requirements.

226 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Psychology Major

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Psychology Elective ........................ 3 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

General Education ........................... 6 credits Psychology Electives ..................... 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective .................. 3 credits Open Electives .................................. 6 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ......................... 15 credits Psychology Electives ..................... 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective ................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Psychology Electives ....................... 9 credits Open Elective ............................... 21 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 227

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

PSYCHOLOGY

With Specialization: COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Psychology ......................................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Psychology ......................................................................... 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Psychology with a Specialization in Computer Applications Must Complete:*

PSYN 210 Modern Psychology in Historical Perspective PSYN 226 Computers for the Social & Behavioral Sciences PSYN 261 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis PSYN 276 Advanced Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 320 Psychobiology PSYN 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 372 Experimental Psychology I: Methodology PSYN 390 Internship in Computer Applications for the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 426 Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

And any three major courses in Psychology numbered 200 or above. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Psychology.

* PSYN 101 is a prerequisite for the major courses in Psychology and fulfills part of the General Education requirements.

228 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Psychology Major With A Specialization In Computer Applications

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Psychology Elective ....................... 3 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

General Education ........................... 6 credits Psychology Electives ..................... 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Electives ................. 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 6 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ......................... 15 credits Psychology Electives ..................... 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective .................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Psychology Electives ....................... 9 credits Open Elective ............................... 21 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 229

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

SOCIOLOGY

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 6 credits Major Concentration Sociology ............................................................................ 33 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 30 credits Total ................................................................................ 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Science General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Sociology ............................................................................ 33 credits Open Electives ................................................................. 36 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Sociology Must Complete:*

SOCL 244 SOCL 226 SOCL 348 SOCL 426 Social Psychology Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

And seven major courses in Sociology numbered 200 and above. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Sociology.

* SOCL 101 is a prerequisite for the major courses in Sociology and fulfills part of the General Education requirement.

230 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Sociology Major

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Sociology Elective ........................... 3 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

General Education ........................... 6 credits Sociology Electives ........................ 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective .................. 6 credits Open Electives ................................ 3 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ......................... 15 credits Sociology Electives ........................ 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective ............... 3 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Sociology Electives .......................... 6 credits Open Electives ................................ 24 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 231

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

SOCIOLOGY

With Specialization: COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Sociology ............................................................................ 36 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Sociology ............................................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Sociology With a Specialization in Computer Applications Must Complete:*

SOCL 226 SOCL 261 SOCL 276 SOCL 348 SOCL 370 SOCL 390 Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Computer-Assisted Data Analysis Advanced Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Internship in Computer Applications for the Social and Behavioral Sciences SOCL 426 Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

And any five other major courses in Sociology numbered 200 or above. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Sociology.

* SOCL 101 is a prerequisite for the major courses in Sociology and fulfills part of the General Education requirements.

232 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Sociology Major With A Specialization In Computer Applications

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Sociology Elective .......................... 3 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

General Education ........................... 3 credits Sociology Electives ........................ 12 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Electives ................ 6 credits Open Electives ................................. 6 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ......................... 18 credits Sociology Electives ........................ 12 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Sociology Electives .......................... 9 credits Open Electives ................................ 21 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 233

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................. 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Behavioral Science Must Complete:*

BHSC 244 BHSC 226 BHSC 348 BHSC 426 Social Psychology Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

And eight elective courses selected under advisement from the major offerings in Psychology and/or Sociology numbered 200 and above. At least two major courses in Psychology and two major courses in Sociology must be completed in residence at Mercy College. BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school.

There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Behavioral Science.

* PSYN 101 and SOCL 101 are prerequisites for the major courses in Psychology and Sociology and fulfill part of the General Education requirements.

234 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Behavioral Science Major

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education .......................... 6 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences .................... 3 credits Social Psychology ............................ 3 credits Major Electives ................................. 9 credits Open Electives .................................. 9 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

General Education ......................... 18 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Electives ................. 6 credits Major Electives ................................. 6 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Major Electives ............................... 9 credits Open Electives ................................ 18 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 235

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

With Specialization: COMMUNITY HEALTH

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Behavioral Science with a Specialization in Community Health Must Complete:*

BHSC 244 BHSC 226 BHSC 271 BHSC 348 BHSC 426 PSYN 232 SOCL 308 SOCL 366 Social Psychology Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Health Psychology Health Care Organization and Management Medical Ethics

and four elective courses selected under advisement from the major offerings in Psychology and/or Sociology numbered 200 and above. At least two major courses in Psychology and two major courses in Sociology must be completed in residence at Mercy College. BHSC 310 Epidemiology, is strongly recommended for the specialization in Community Health. BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Behavioral Science.

* PSYN 101 and SOCL 101 are prerequisites for the major courses in Psychology and Sociology and fulfill part of the General Education requirements.

236 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Behavioral Science Major With A Specialization In Community Health

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Social Psychology ............................ 3 credits Major Electives ................................. 9 credits Open Electives .................................. 9 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

Medical Sociology ............................ 3 credits Health Psychology ........................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 18 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Electives ......................... 6 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Health Care Organization and Management ........................ 3 credits Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Medical Ethics .................................. 3 credits Major Electives ................................. 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 18 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 237

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

With Specialization: GERONTOLOGY

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives .................................................................. 30 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................. 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Behavioral Science with a Specialization in Gerontology Must Complete:

BHSC 244 Social Psychology BHSC 226 Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 348 Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 399 Internship in the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 426 Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 232 Health Psychology PSYN 315 Aging and Mental Health OR PSYN 239 Personality Development in Adulthood SOCL 271 Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society SOCL 366 Medical Ethics

And three elective courses selected under advisement from the major offerings in Psychology and/or Sociology numbered 200 and above. At least two major courses in Psychology and two major courses in Sociology must be completed in residence at Mercy College. BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Behavioral Science.

* PSYN 101 and SOCL 101 are prerequisites for the major courses in Psychology and Sociology and fulfill part of the General Education requirements.

238 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Behavioral Science Major With A Specialization In Gerontology

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education .......................... 6 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Social Psychology ............................ 3 credits Health Psychology ........................... 3 credits Major Elective ................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective ........................ 3 credits Open Electives .................................. 9 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

Medical Sociology ............................ 3 credits Aging and Mental Health OR Personality Development in Adulthood ................................... 3 credits General Education ......................... 18 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Elective ................. 6 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Internship in the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Medical Ethics .................................. 3 credits Major Electives ................................. 6 credits Open Electives ................................ 15 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 239

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

With Specialization: HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT

BACHELOR OF ARTS General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives ............................................................................. 12 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 21 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Behavioral Science ............................................................ 36 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 33 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Behavioral Science with a Specialization in Health Services Management Must Complete:*

BHSC 244 Social Psychology BHSC 226 Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 348 Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences BHSC 426 Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYN 345 Industrial Psychology SOCL 271 Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society SOCL 308 Health Care Organization and Management SOCL 366 Medical Ethics And any two of the following: ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance MGMT 225 Principles of Management MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior MGMT 353 Software and Hardware for the Office: Evaluation and Use MGMT 442 Management Information Systems MGMT 446 Human Resource Management MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures

And two elective courses selected under advisement from the major courses in Psychology and/or Sociology numbered 200 or above. BHSC 370 Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school. There is an 18-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Behavioral Science.

* PSYN 101 and SOCL 101 are prerequisites for the major courses in Psychology and Sociology and fulfill part of the General Education requirements.

240 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recommended Curriculum Schedule for The Behavioral Science Major With A Specialization In Health Services Management

FIRST YEAR

English 111 & 112 ............................. 6 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits College Algebra ............................... 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education ........................... 6 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR

Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................... 3 credits Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences ......................... 3 credits Social Psychology ............................ 3 credits Major Elective ................................... 6 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Liberal Arts and Sciences OR Open Electives ................... 12 credits Total 30 credits

SECOND YEAR

Medical Sociology ............................ 3 credits General Education ......................... 18 credits Major Electives ................................. 6 credits Open Elective ................................... 3 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR

Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences ......................... 3 credits Medical Ethics .................................. 3 credits Industrial Psychology ..................... 3 credits Health Care Organization and Management ................................ 3 credits Open Electives ................................ 18 credits Total 30 credits

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 241

Major Concentration

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

SOCIAL WORK

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE General Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements .................................. 48 credits (see page 53 for description) Junior Seminar .................................................................... 3 credits Major Concentration Social Work ........................................................................ 42 credits Open Electives ................................................................... 27 credits Total ................................................................................. 120 credits Students Who Choose the Major Concentration in Social Work Must Complete:

SOWK 311 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I SOWK 312 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II SOWK 314 Issues of Diversity in Social Work Practice SOWK 322 Social Work Practice I SOWK 332 Social Work Research SOWK 342 SOWK 423 SOWK 424 SOWK 426 Social Welfare Policy and Services Social Work Practice II Social Work Practice III Influencing Communities, Organizations and Social Policy SOWK 431 Field Practicum I SOWK 432 Field Practicum II

And two elective courses: one social work elective (SOWK 435 Social Work with Children and Adolescents or SOWK 436 Social Work in Health and Mental Health Services).

and the following related courses:

BIOL 110 PSYN 101 SOCL 101 CISC 120 Introduction to Human Biology ** Introduction to Psychology ** Introduction to Sociology ** Introduction to Computers and Application Software*

Students majoring in social work should consult with their social work advisor regarding the proper sequencing of courses and the selection of electives to meet major requirements. Students must maintain a 2.66 grade point average in major courses and achieve a grade of "C" or better in Field Practicum I and II in order to continue in the social work major. There is a 24-credit residency requirement in the major concentration of Social Work. There is a five-year statute of limitations on required Social Work courses. Exceptions may be approved by the director of the program.

* CISC120 fulfills part of the general education requirement. Waiver is available.

** These courses fulfill 12 credits of the General Education requirements.

242 / Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Social Work majors should complete the following General Education requirements prior to beginning the major: English 111 and 112, Speech 110, Psychology 101, Sociology 101, Political Science 101 or Economics 115, and Biology 110. Students are also expected to complete additional General Education requirements prior to beginning the major, including at least 3 credits in History, 6 credits in Philosophy, Religion, Foreign Language, Art and Music, and 3 credits in Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Computer Science. Admission to the Major: Students who plan to major in Social Work or who want to explore their interest in this field are encouraged to consult with the Director of the Social Work Program. Students must declare their major in Social Work by the end of their sophomore year. They should contact the Director of the Social Work Program for information and application procedures for admission to the major. Transfer students are encouraged to contact the social work program for application materials at the same time they are applying for admission to the College. Students should have a 2.6 grade point average or better for admission to the major. Students usually enter the social work program at the beginning of their junior year, in the fall semester, following completion of the application process and acceptance for admission to the program. Accreditation: Mercy College offers a B.S. degree in Social Work that is approved by the New York State Department of Education. The Social Work Program has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences / 243

Recommended Curriculum Schedule For The Social Work Major

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

FIRST YEAR

English 111 and 112 ......................... 6 credits Speech 110 ......................................... 3 credits History ............................................... 6 credits Mathematics for the Liberal Arts .................................. 3 credits Introduction to Psychology ............ 3 credits Introduction to Sociology ............... 3 credits General Education .......................... 6 credits Total 30 credits

THIRD YEAR Fall Semester

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I .................. 3 credits Social Work Research ...................... 3 credits Social Welfare Policy and Services ......................................... 3 credits Open Electives .................................. 3 credits Junior Seminar ................................. 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Human Behavior and the Social Environment II ................. 3 credits Issues of Diversity in Social Work Practice ................... 3 credits Social Work Practice I ..................... 3 credits Open Electives ................................. 6 credits Total 15 credits

SECOND YEAR

Political Power in America OR The Economy, Jobs and You .......... 3 credits Introduction to Human Biology .... 3 credits General Education ......................... 12 credits Open Electives ................................ 12 credits Total 30 credits

FOURTH YEAR Fall Semester

Social Work Practice II .................... 3 credits Social Work Elective ........................ 3 credits Field Practicum I .............................. 6 credits Open Elective ................................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

Spring Semester

Social Work Practice III ................... 3 credits Influencing Communities, Organizations, and Social Policies .......................................... 3 credits Field Practicum II ............................ 6 credits Open Elective ................................... 3 credits Total 15 credits

244 / Course Descriptions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Business & Accounting .................................................................. 245 Civic & Cultural Studies ................................................................ 258 Education ......................................................................................... 279 Health Professions .......................................................................... 286 Honors Program ............................................................................. 294 Library and Information Science .................................................. 297 Literature, Language & Communication .................................... 298 Mathematics and Computer Information Science ..................... 321 Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology ............................ 329 Physical Education ......................................................................... 337 Social and Behavioral Sciences ..................................................... 338

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Business and Accounting / 245

BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTING ACCOUNTING Course Offerings

ACCT 120 Introduction to Financial Accounting: Explains the users and uses of financial statements. Extensive attention will be placed on the accounting cycle, which includes preparation and analysis of financial statements for external reporting (income statement, balance sheet, retained earnings, and cash flows statements). Generally accepted accounting principles will serve as the basis of financial statement preparation. Business majors should take this course in their sophomore year. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 121 Introduction to Management Accounting: Provides students with an understanding and hands-on application of those concepts fundamental to management accounting. Focuses on decision making using critical evaluation and analysis of information in the areas of: management planning and control; cost accounting systems; cost behavior patterns; absorption and variable costing; cost-volumeprofit analysis; short-range planning and budget preparation; responsibility accounting; performance reporting for cost, profit, and investment centers; accounting approaches to special decision making; and the use of accounting information in the cash flow statement. Prerequisite: ACCT120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 240 Intermediate Accounting I: Reviews the fundamentals of financial accounting and accounting standards, conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, and the accounting information system; explores the theory, accounting, and disclosure requirements for the statements of income and retained earnings, the balance sheet and statement of cash flows through the study of the time value of money, cash and receivables, valuation of inventories, acquisition and disposition of property, plant, and equipment, depreciation, impairments and depletion, intangible assets, and current liabilities and contingencies. Prerequisites: ACCT120, MATH116, and ENGL110 or placement at ENGL 111 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 241 Intermediate Accounting II: Explores the theory, accounting, and disclosure requirements for long-term liabilities; stockholders' equity: contributed capital, and retained earnings; dilutive securities and earnings per share calculations; investments; revenue recognition; accounting changes and error analysis; and the statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT240. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 250 Cost Accounting: Reviews the fundamentals of management accounting, cost accounting terms and uses; new topics include cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis, job-order and process costing systems; activity based costing (ABC); flexible budgets and variance analysis; allocation of costs related to department and factory overhead; joint products and by-products; use of accounting information to value inventories and determine net income; and use of cost information in decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT121. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 261 Computer Applications for Accountants: Introduces Microsoft Excel as the accountant's productivity tool. Basic spreadsheet concepts will be emphasized; graphs, charts, pivot tables, and macros will be explored as well as other Excel features. Basic Windows file management will be reviewed. This course is taught hands-on in a computer classroom. Prerequisites: ACCT241 and CISC/MATH120 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. Note: register early, classroom space limited. ACCT 320 Governmental, Not-for-Profit and Other Special Topics: Explores the following topics: accounting for employees benefits and leases. Introduces accounting for not-for-profit organizations, principles of fund accounting, accounting for state and local governmental units and non-government non-business organizations subject to FASB or GASB accounting standards. Prerequisite: ACCT241. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

246 / Business and Accounting ACCT 330 Advanced Accounting: Discusses the accounting theory and practice involving the following financial accounting and reporting areas: business combinations, consolidated financial statements, foreign currency transactions, translation of financial statements of foreign affiliates, and partnerships. Prerequisite: ACCT241. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 340 Introduction to Federal Income Taxation: Studies the basic principles and concepts of federal income taxation and their applications to individual income tax returns; determination of the federal income tax liability of individuals, including determination of gross income, exclusions, deductions, credits, property transactions, and calculation of tax. Includes tax planning, tax research, and a written tax research project. Prerequisite: ACCT240. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT341 Advanced Federal Income Taxation: The basic principles and concepts of federal income taxation and their applications to individuals, partnerships, and corporations; determination of the federal income tax liability of individuals, including determination of gross income, exclusions, deductions, credits, property transactions, and calculation of tax. Includes tax planning, tax research, and a written tax research project. Prerequisite: ACCT340. 3 sem hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 380-381 Cooperative Education in Accounting I, II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Accounting include CPA firms, corporations, small businesses and non profit organizations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. Prerequisite: ACCT 240. Open Elective credit only. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 410 Accounting Information Systems: Examines the definition and documentation of accounting information systems using data flow diagrams. A business process approach to examining transaction cycles is employed. Covers internal controls for information technology environments and the avoidance of computer crime through the application of controls and ethical behavior. Studies the techniques used in auditing computerized accounting information systems including test data, general audit software and automated work paper software. Real world cases are assigned to enhance applications of the covered topics. Prerequisites: ACCT261 and ACCT330. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 420 Auditing and Assurance Services: Explains the generally accepted auditing standards and procedures employed by CPAs in their independent audits of corporate financial statements; the nature, importance, and use of internal controls; techniques and procedures used to gather audit evidence; computer auditing techniques; form, content, and meaning of the independent auditor's report in published financial statements; assurance services; the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct and the legal liabilities of CPAs. Integrated audit cases are used to help students apply auditing concepts. An oral presentation is required. Prerequisites: ACCT410 and ECON/ MATH122. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 430 Topics from Professional Examinations in Accounting: Bridges the gap between academic courses and the accounting specific parts of the CPA professional examination by providing in-depth review of highly tested material; updating students on recent developments and important changes; and developing approaches to answering multiple choice, other objective format, essay, and (long) computational questions under simulated professional examination conditions. Prerequisites: ACCT250; ACCT330. Corequisite: ACCT320. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 450 Advanced Management Accounting: This course will emphasize the use and analysis of accounting data to provide meaningful information to various levels of management as well as to groups outside the organization. Techniques for using written and oral communications to effectively present accounting-based information will be discussed, using contractual and interpersonal negotiations as a primary example. Prerequisites: ACCT 250; ECON/ MATH 122; MGMT 225. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Business and Accounting / 247

Note: 500 level Accounting courses may only be taken by students admitted to the M.S. in Public Accounting Program.

ACCT 510 Global Financial Statement Analysis Approaches International Accounting Standards (IAS) and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) prepared financial statements from a user perspective. Discusses the concepts necessary to interpret domestic and international corporate financial statements. Analytic techniques and valuation models are used to assess profitability, cash flows, and quality of earnings. A comprehensive real-world financial statement analysis project helps students to apply learned techniques. Prerequisite: ACCT 330 and FINC 321. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 520 Contemporary Issues in Auditing Based on contemporary issues in auditing, comprehensive factual scenarios are used to discuss the Professional Roles of Independent Auditors. Topics examined include: internal control issues, use of analytical procedures and audit planning, auditing high risk accounts, large scale earnings manipulations schemes, coping with complex or unique client transactions, ethics, auditor independence and legal liability issues. Requires students to address actual situations that auditing practitioners have coped with in the past. Extensive research, group projects, oral presentations, and an audit risk analysis project are required. Prerequisite: ACCT 420. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 530Advanced Accounting Theory and Applications This capstone course provides students with a solid foundation in accounting theory and research to enable them to function more effectively in their employment situations, make meaningful contributions to the accounting profession, and meet the challenges of lifelong learning. The course begins with an in-depth study of accounting theory, moves on to the instruction of accounting research sources and methodologies including the Financial Accounting Research System (FARS), and applies both theory and structure to a variety of current applications in financial reporting. Application of appropriate research tools and methodologies aide in the completion of written case assignments and a research paper. Prerequisite: ACCT 330. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 540 Advanced Business Entity Taxation Provides the students with a working knowledge of advanced business entity taxation. Students will be able to apply sophisticated tax principles in employment situations as well as communicate this information to their clients and the public. The Internal Revenue Code and Tax Regulations are applied to a research project involving current tax matters. Utilizes research tools to apply critical thinking skills used to discuss and interpret tax issues. Provide a working knowledge of international and entity tax issues along with the termination issues facing businesses. State compliance issues such as multi-state taxation and sales and use taxes will be covered as well as succession planning and exempt entity taxation. Prerequisite: ACCT 341. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ACCT 550 Advanced Controllership Focuses on current approaches to management accounting by examining strategic cost management, activity-based management, strategic-based control, quality cost management, productivity measurement and control, measurement and control of environmental costs, inventory management, and international issues in cost management. Encourages students to increase their understanding of the relationship between controllership theory and practice. Requires students to complete independent research projects. Prerequisite: ACCT 250, or its equivalent, and MBAA 535. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

248 / Business and Accounting

BANKING Course Offerings

BANK 112 Principles of Banking: The course examines the role of a commercial bank in today's economy and the regulatory environment in which it exists. Topics include the deposit and payment function; bank loans and investments; non-credit financial services (cash management, international banking services, fiduciary services, and technology-based services); new customer products; the Federal Reserve System and Governmental supervision. The definition and correct use of banking terminology are stressed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 113 Consumer Bank Products: The course examines banking floor products/services (CDs, Money Market Accounts, Savings, Loan Transaction Accounts, IRAs, Direct Deposit, ATMs, Linked Accounts, Relationship Banking, etc.) and the personal skills and attitudes required for sales, quality customer service, and cross-selling in a banking floor environment. Effective customer relations are discussed in depth. Extensive use is made of video cassettes, special course materials, and case studies. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 119 Bank Payment Systems: The objective of this course is to provide students with a working knowledge of wholesale and retail payments systems and the role that banks and other institutions play in their performance and efficiency. Government and institutional rules and regulations are examined as they pertain to payment systems. Topics include deposits and depositories; regulatory structures and constraints; check clearing operations; electronic funds transfer systems (Aches, ATMs, SWIFT, CHIPS, FedWire, etc.) as well as trends and developments including daylight overdrafts. Prerequisite: BANK 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 160 Law & Banking I: The course examines common and statutory law and the court system; bank-related torts and crimes; legal entities - individuals, proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, governments, and estates; the Uniform Commercial Code; personal and real property; bankruptcy and liquidation; truth in lending; equal credit opportunity. Prerequisite: BANK 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 181 Introduction to the Securities Industry: The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the securities industry. Topics include key terminology, analysis of common stocks, preferred stocks, the borrowing procedures of the U.S. government and its agencies, mutual funds, margin accounts, and options. The operations of exchange markets and over-the-counter securities markets are also examined. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 250 International Banking Operations: The course surveys the role of international banking in world trade and international banking operations and functions in a commercial bank. Topics include international correspondent banking relationships; foreign trade; international payment mechanisms; credit and non-credit services; letters of credit, their presentment and processing; banker' acceptances; foreign exchange; Eurodollar operations; and international lending agencies. Prerequisite: BANK 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 261 Law & Banking II: The course examines commercial paper - drafts, checks, notes, and CDs; negotiability and holder in due course (Article 3, Uniform Commercial Code); bank collections (Article 4, UCC); check losses and frauds; letters of credit (Article 5, UCC and UCP); and secured transactions (Article 9, UCC). Prerequisite: BANK 160. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 286 Securities Analysis: The objective of this course is to provide students with a working knowledge of the bond and stock markets. The course examines the features and benefits of various types of securities. Topics include associated risk and the interpretation of financial and economic data. Prerequisite: BANK 181. (Previously titled: The Bond and Stock Markets) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Business and Accounting / 249 BANK 323 (ECON 323) Principles of Real Estate: The course is an introduction to the legal and financial fundamentals of residential real estate investment and mortgage financing as practiced by commercial banks and thrift institutions. Topics include real estate contracts, deeds, mortgages, property ownership, title searches, closing, appraising, and all aspects of real estate brokerage and governmental regulations. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 325 Life Insurance: The course is an introduction to the principles, structure, and practices of the life insurance industry. Topics include the various types of policies; terms of the life insurance contract; values and benefits; selection risk; life insurance as an investment; and the planned settlement of the life insurance estate. Upon successful completion of this course, students are eligible to take the New York Life Insurance Agent Examination. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 353 Financing International Trade: The course provides a comprehensive study of letters of credit, their purposes, functions, and methods of operation. The various methods of handling documentary collections of import credits, export credits, government credits, and stand-by credits are detailed; the various methods of refinancing collections and letters of credit, such as advances and acceptances, are examined. The subject is approached in the framework of the day-to-day processing of collections and letters of credit by banks. Prerequisite: BANK 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 399 Internship in Banking: Students majoring in business are given an opportunity to supplement classroom learning with on-the-job experience. The Division assists students in finding appropriate compensated opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits, a minimum index in the major of 3.0 and the approval of the Division Chairperson. This course may not be counted as a major level business course. Open elective credit only. 3 crs. BANK 455 (ECON 455) Foreign Exchange Theory & Practice: (computer component) The course provides a comprehensive view of the foreign exchange market, including dealing techniques of a bank's trading room. The course also covers such topics as spot trading; hedging; covered interest arbitrage; swap transactions; the effect of derivative products; the interaction between the foreign exchange market and the Eurodollar market; and accounting for foreign exchange transactions. Prerequisite: BANK 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 483 (ECON 483) Commercial Lending: The course examines the important role that lending plays in the banking industry and the economy. Topics include types of commercial loans; credit analysis; loan documentation and support; loan pricing; and measurement of risk. The course also examines the organization and management of the commercial lending function. Various regulations pertaining to the commercial lending function are also examined. Prerequisites: BANK 112, FINC 320. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 485 Consumer Credit: (computer component) The course examines the principles, practices, and operations of a bank's consumer credit department. Starting with a review of the history of consumer lending, the course covers such topics as the formulation of lending policies; the qualifications of a good credit risk; techniques of loan interview; the development of credit information; investigation and the credit decision; servicing and collections; and business development. Prerequisite: BANK 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 488 Securities Processing: The objective of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of securities processing. The course emphasizes the operational aspects of various securities and the administration of consumer and corporate trust accounts. Prerequisite: BANK 181. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BANK 498 Bank Internal Control & Audit: (computer component) The course provides a thorough analysis of the ways of organizing a bank for maximum protection against fraud. Topics include thrift and commercial bank internal control and auditing procedures; bank frauds, both non-concealed and concealed; EDP auditing and internal controls. Case studies of fraud and its detection are used to illustrate sound internal control practices. Prerequisite: ACCT 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

250 / Business and Accounting

ECONOMICS Course Offerings

ECON 115 The Economy, Jobs, and You: This course will introduce the student to the ways different economists view the free market economy of the American society and help solve its problems; and an understanding of the variety of economic policies and their impact on public policy issues. A knowledge of diverse economic approaches to public questions ranging across the political spectrum will help the student critically evaluate the diversity of opinion on today's economic issues. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 120 The World of Business: This course introduces students to the world of business. The course presents the methods and practices that are used not only in business organizations but also in healthcare, education, government, and other organizations. With its coverage of management, marketing, finance, and information systems, the course provides a broad foundation for further study of these areas as well as useful knowledge for the workplace. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 122 (MATH 122) Statistics: A survey of statistical material and techniques, with special reference to economic and business data. Methods of collecting, charting and analyzing statistical data; frequency distributions; discrete probability; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal curve analysis; linear correlation and regression; introduction to time series and index numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or 116 and CISC/MATH 120 and placement at the ENGL 109 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 190 Honors Economics and Public Policy: This course will introduce students to the ways different economists view the free market economy in America and to the variety of economic policies and their impact on public issues. A knowledge of diverse economic approaches to public policy questions ­ ranging across the political spectrum ­ will help students critically evaluate the diversity of opinion on today's economic issues. This is an interactive course in which students analyze the economics of social and political issues. In an open classroom forum students present, discuss, and defend their positions. Admission by permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 220 Macro-Economics: A study of the modern mixed American economy, national income, employment, output, price levels, economic growth and fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policies, current events relating to the American economy. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 221 Micro-Economics: A study of the foundation of the economic analysis including markets, the price system, production costs, allocation of resources, organized labor and collective bargaining, monopoly power, distribution of income, international trade and finance. Prerequisites: ECON 220; MATH 116. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 225 The History of Macro-Economic Theory: Implications for 21st Century Leadership: An exploration of the ideas and forces that shaped the economic development of the world's economic communities. Particular emphasis will be placed on success or failure as historical applications are reviewed. Projections will be offered as to the differences to be anticipated within the 21st century and an analysis will be used to determine if past economic events are relative to the new world that lies ahead. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 250 (INBU 250) International Business: An introduction to international business. Topics include the international environment, international trade, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange, regional economic integration, the role of the multinational corporation, and business strategies. Prepares students for a changing world. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 323 (BANK 323) Principles of Real Estate: The course is an introduction to the legal and financial fundamentals of residential real estate investment and mortgage financing as practiced by commercial banks and thrift institutions. Topics include real estate contracts, deeds, mortgages, property ownership, title searches, closing, appraising, and all aspects of real estate brokerage and governmental regulations. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Business and Accounting / 251 ECON 344 Money and Banking: A study of the nature and functions of money and credit; structure of financial institutions and the Federal Reserve system; current theories of monetary analysis; the dynamics of a rapidly changing banking system. Prerequisite: ECON 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 399 Internship in Economics: Students majoring in business are given an opportunity to supplement classroom learning with on-the-job experience. The Division assists students in finding appropriate compensated opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits, a minimum index in the major of 3.0 and the approval of the Division Chairperson. This course may not be counted as a major level business course. Open elective credit only. 3 crs. ECON 424 (MKTG 424) Direct Marketing Measurement, Testing, and Analysis: This course focuses on the methods of measuring, testing, analyzing, and increasing the effectiveness of direct marketing. Topics include breakeven projections; testing offer, price, lists, media, and product; testing, analyzing R/F/M, and implementing results; identifying winners; using spreadsheets; determining the lifetime value of a name; and budgeting and forecasting. Prerequisite: MKTG 341. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 430 The International Dimension: The objective of this course is to expand the perspective of students by examining the international dimension of the knowledge acquired in previous courses. The course emphasizes the opportunities for organizations that arise from the process of globalization. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 455 (BANK 455) Foreign Exchange Theory & Practice: The course provides a comprehensive view of the foreign exchange market, including dealing techniques of a bank's trading room. The course also covers such topics as spot trading; hedging; covered interest arbitrage; swap transactions; the effect of derivative products; the interaction between the foreign exchange market and the Eurodollar market; and accounting for foreign exchange transactions. Prerequisite: BANK 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 483 (BANK 483) Commercial Lending: The course examines the important role that lending plays in the banking industry and the economy. Topics include types of commercial loans; credit analysis; loan documentation and support; loan pricing; and measurement of risk. The course also examines the organization and management of the commercial lending function. Various regulations pertaining to the commercial lending function are also examined. Prerequisites: BANK 112, FINC 320. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

DIRECT MARKETING Course Offerings

MKTG 341 Fundamentals of Direct Marketing and E- Commerce: This course introduces students to the basic principles and practices of direct marketing as well as the interactive strategies of e-commerce. Topics include the users of direct marketing and e-commerce; the roles of various service providers in direct marketing and e-commerce; the products and services that sell best through direct marketing and e-commerce; the use of customer databases for targeted marketing; techniques for measuring the effectiveness of marketing campaigns; and policies for coordinating fulfillment and customer service. Prerequisite: MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 342 Creative Basics for Direct Marketing: This course focuses on the process of creating and producing direct marketing campaigns, beginning with the selection of a product or service based on market research. The course covers offer development; creative concept to mailing (direct mail packages, solos, catalogs, coops, card decks, PIPS, blow-ins, space ads); working with the creative team (direct response agencies, graphic artists, copywriters, creative consultants); elements of sales promotion mix (tokens, coupons, sweepstakes, contests); and scheduling production with computer service bureaus, printers, and lettershops. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

252 / Business and Accounting MKTG 343 Strategic Media Planning for Direct Marketing: This course focuses on the media of direct marketing. Topics include the functions of list brokers, list managers, media buyers, and alternative media brokers; types of mail lists (consumer/B-T-B, response/compiled, buyers/inquirers, TV generated, space generated, direct mail sold, subscribers); criteria and techniques for list selection (geo/ demo/ psychographics, house file/rental files, segmentation, CPM, testing, interfacing with database segmentation and modeling capabilities); placing different types of media; merge/ purge criteria and processing (house file, rented lists, suppression files); list hygiene; and list rentals. Prerequisite: MKTG 341. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 424 (ECON 424) Direct Marketing Measurement, Testing, and Analysis: This course focuses on the methods of measuring, testing, analyzing, and increasing the effectiveness of direct marketing. Topics include breakeven projections; testing offer, price, lists, media, and product; testing, analyzing R/F/M, and implementing results; identifying winners; using spreadsheets; determining the lifetime value of a name; and budgeting and forecasting. Prerequisite: MKTG 341. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 425 Database Development and Marketing (Computer Component): This course focuses on the development and use of databases in direct marketing. The course covers creating and updating databases (in-house or out); market segmentation and application; relationship marketing and customer retention; finding, developing, and working with proprietary "hidden" databases; and modeling techniques. Prerequisite: MKTG 341. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 426 Fulfillment and Customer Service in Direct Marketing: This course focuses on fulfillment and customer service in direct marketing. Topics include dealing with fulfillment houses; timeliness and measurement of customer satisfaction; product versus publication fulfillment; inquirer conversion analysis (dollars versus numbers); tabulating and using backend fulfillment reports to enhance current customer satisfaction; developing ancillary or offshoot products to create new customers and revenues; online order processing; and inventory management. Prerequisite: MKTG 341. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

FINANCE Course Offerings

FINC 110 Personal Finance: A course designed to familiarize the student with individual and family financial management. Some of the topics surveyed are: savings and checking accounts, household budgeting, home ownership, insurance policies, consumer contracts, stock and bond investment. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 320 Principles of Business Finance: A study of the functions of business finance. Topics include: financial statement analysis, funds flow and break-even concepts; tax and other organizational considerations in forming business; current and long term asset management; types of instruments of corporate finance; stock and bond markets and their regulation; investment banking; short and long term financing decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 321 Managerial Finance: A course designed to train students in the techniques of financial analysis and decision making in the areas of capital budgeting, risk analysis, business expansion and contraction, and financial planning and forecasting. Cost of capital, discounted cash flow analysis, leasebuy decisions and the use of probability theory in decision making will be presented and applied, along with various approaches in the valuation of the firm, and the analysis of acquisition candidates. Prerequisites: ACCT 120 and FINC 320. Corequisite: ACCT 121. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 340 Information Sources and Systems: This course provides a working knowledge of information sources and systems and the Internet. Systems include financial accounting and data base systems used by organizations. The course emphasizes the process of evaluating and integrating information from different sources from the purpose of effecting organizational change. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Business and Accounting / 253 FINC 345 Financial Statement Analysis: Practical application of the techniques of financial statement analysis; analytical methods used for various disclosures; interpretation and understanding of characteristics of financial statements; industry reporting standards; contemporary reporting and analysis problems; examination of actual published statements. Prerequisites: ACCT 120, ACCT 121 and FINC 320; MATH 114, 115, 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 380-381 Cooperative Education in Finance I & II: Places students in beginning-level and advanced-level, salaried positions, related to the academic program in finance, which offer opportunities to improve technical, interpersonal and professional development skills; develops an understanding of the relationships between the theoretical and practical aspects of finance; increase levels of maturity, selfconfidence, and independence; and explore and evaluate career options. Students must complete both FINC 380 and FINC 381. Open elective credit only. Division approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 399 Internship in Finance: Students majoring in business are given an opportunity to supplement classroom learning with on-the-job experience. The Division assists students in finding appropriate compensated opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits, a minimum index in the major of 3.0 and the approval of the Division Chairperson. May not be used as a major level business course. Open elective credit only. 3 crs. FINC 442 Investment Management: The investment of funds by individuals, institutions, and investment bankers. Subjects covered include the analysis of types of investments, the mechanics of investing, and forecasting of market trends. Prerequisites: ACCT 120, ACCT 121 and FINC 320. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 447 (INBU 447) International Finance: The international dimensions of finance. Topics include the environment of international finance, foreign exchange markets, exchange rate determination, managing foreign exchange exposure, financing international trade, international cash management, multinational capital building budgeting, and long-term financing. Prerequisite: ECON/INBU 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FINC 449 Problems in Financial Management: (Computer Component) Advanced Finance course which intensively surveys financial techniques and decisions pertinent to the attainment of corporate financial policy objectives. Topics included are current and capital asset management, risk analysis, financing techniques, and dividend policy decision. The course will make extensive use of the case study method, decision simulation, and microcomputer analytical tools. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; ECON/MATH 122; CISC/MATH 120; FINC 321. Course should be taken in senior year. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Course Offerings

INBU 250 (ECON 250) International Business: An introduction to international business. Topics include the international environment, international trade, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange, regional economic integration, the role of the multinational corporation, and business strategies. Prepares students for a changing world. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. INBU 370 (POLS 370) International Relations: The international system. Topics include historical background, East-West and North-South conflicts, international organizations, economic power, environmental issues, nongovernmental organizations, international law and diplomacy, negotiation, war, military power, disarmament, regionalism and integration, and ideology. Case studies are used to illuminate problems. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

254 / Business and Accounting INBU 375 (MKTG 375) International Marketing: The international dimensions of marketing. Topics include the international environment of international marketing, international market research, product adaptation, pricing strategies, promotion, channels of distribution, and marketing organization. Focus is first on export marketing and then on multinomial marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 220, ECON/ INBU 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. INBU 380-381 Cooperative Education in International Business, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in International Business include corporations and small businesses. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. Open Elective credit only. INBU 399 Internship in International Business: Students majoring in business are given an opportunity to supplement classroom learning with on-the-job experience. The Division assists students in finding appropriate compensated opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits, a minimum index in the major of 3.0 and the approval of the Division Chairperson. This course may not be counted as a major level business course. Open elective credit only. 3 crs. INBU 444 (MGMT 444) International Management: The international dimensions of management. Topics include the environment of international management, strategic planning, managing political risk, organizing international operations, decision making, control, human resource management, communication, and motivation. Gives special treatment to the problems of intercultural management. Prerequisite: MGMT 225, ECON/INBU 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. INBU 447 (FINC 447) International Finance: The international dimensions of finance. Topics include the environment of international finance, foreign exchange markets, exchange rate determination, managing foreign exchange exposure, financing international trade, international cash management, multinational capital budgeting, and long-term financing. Prerequisite: ECON/INBU 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. INBU 451 Problems in International Business: Capstone course for students specializing in international business. Uses case studies to examine problems faced by companies wanting to export or to manufacture in foreign countries. Integrates marketing, management, and finance functions. Focuses on real world situations giving students experience at dealing with problems they are likely to encounter in their careers. Corequisites: ENGL 112; INBU 375, INBU 444, INBU 447. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

MANAGEMENT Course Offerings

MGMT 225 Principles of Management: The managerial principles and techniques underlying the 'successful' organization are examined. Emphasis is placed on the basic functions of planning for future organizational growth, organizing and staffing for efficient operation. Effective leadership and motivational techniques, and practical methods of control. This course forms the base for all management course offerings. (Previously Numbered: MGMT120). Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 340 Organizational Behavior: This management course focuses on people, the human resource of the firm. Individual and group behavior are explored. Motivational theory and techniques will be examined. Case studies and incidents analysis are used. Prerequisite: MGMT 225. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Business and Accounting / 255 MGMT 345 (PSYN 345) Industrial Psychology: Introduction to industrial and organizational psychology including personnel selection and training; assessment of aptitude, ability, and attitude; employee relations and motivation; work environment; advertising; and consumer research. Prerequisites: MGMT 225; PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 348 (MKTG 348) Sales Management: The managing of a sales force including sales organization; sales force recruitment, selection, and training; compensation, supervision, and motivation of the sales organization; sales planning; sales analysis and control. Prerequisites: MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 380-381 Cooperative Education in Management, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Management include corporations, small businesses, banks, and financial institutions. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. Open Elective credit only. MGMT 399 Internship in Management: Students majoring in business are given an opportunity to supplement classroom learning with on-the-job experience. The Division assists students in finding appropriate compensated opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits, a minimum index in the major of 3.0 and the approval of the Division Chairperson. This course may not be used as a major level business course. Open elective credit only. 3 crs. MGMT 425 Managerial Behavior ­ Leading in Modern Organizations: An exploration of the ideas and forces that shape the process of management in the world's communities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the managerial decision making process and its linkage to subsequent behaviors in the organization and/or the larger society. Leadership will be introduced as a necessary subset of effective organizational role. The major dynamic of this course will be dedicated to ensuring a student outcome where leadership and management are not seen as separable nor practiced independently. Topics will include: globalization, intercultural management, dealing with diversity, project management, separating the important from the trivial and the effective resolution of conflict. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 444 (INBU 444) International Management: The international dimensions of management. Topics include the environment of international management, strategic planning, managing political risk, organizing international operations, decision making, control, human resource management, communication, and motivation. Gives special treatment to the problems of intercultural management. Prerequisites: MGMT 225, ECON/INBU 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 446 (PSYN 446) Human Resource Management: (Computer Component) Introduction to the theory and practice of personnel management including manpower planning, recruitment and selection, training and development, wage and salary administration, employee benefits, employee relations, and EEO compliance. Emphasis is placed upon the proper utilization of each human resource function as a means for motivating employees to achieve organizational objectives. Prerequisites: MGMT 225; PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. All Business majors must complete one of the following three capstone courses (MGMT 455, 460 or 465): MGMT 455 Software Solutions for Business Problems: (Computer Component) This senior level course will serve to supplement the problem solving techniques learned in previous business courses. Business software packages will integrate the theory, the practice and the application needed in today's solution oriented environment. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; ECON/MATH 122; ECON 220-221; FINC 320; MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

256 / Business and Accounting MGMT 460 Management: Issues, Policies, and Procedures: A senior level capstone course designed to unify the mosaic of previous course work and, building on the base of previous knowledge, to develop analytical and decision-making ability; review and synthesis of past material as the base for case discussion and problem solving. Use of analytical and logical skills. Various facets of the firm and their interrelationship in decision-making. Course should be taken in the senior year. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; ECON/MATH 122; ECON 220-221; FINC 320; MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 465 Entrepreneurship: A senior level course in which students will learn the technique of developing and evaluating new business ventures. Actual projects will be examined. The world of venture capital will be studied. Entrepreneurial abilities of the students will be developed. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; ECON 220, ECON 221, ECON 122; FINC 320; MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 490 Integrative Project - Part I: This project, which is carried out under the guidance of a faculty mentor, is a paper in which the student integrates the knowledge acquire in the program and applies it to a real world situation, In Part I the students selects and researches a topic, then presents a detailed outline with the sources of information used. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 495 Integrative Project - Part II: This project, which is carried out under the guidance of a faculty mentor, is a paper in which the student integrates the knowledge acquired in the program and applies it to a real world situation. In Part II the student writes the paper that was researched and outlined in Part I. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

MGMT 440 Seminar for Office Information Systems and Technology: A capstone course for those specializing in Office Information Systems and Technology; project, under direction of the faculty, includes current readings and experience in the analysis, design, and implementation of office information systems. Corequisite: MGMT/ PSYN 345. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MGMT 442 Management Information Systems: The methods and procedure used to control and analyze business information are offered to the student. The design and implementation of systems in sales, optimum inventory levels, credit, and production will be surveyed. Prerequisites: MGMT 225; CISC/MATH 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

MARKETING Course Offerings

MKTG 220 Principles of Marketing: An introduction to marketing as a functional area of business enterprise, and an analytical survey of the problems encountered in developing, pricing, promoting and distributing goods and services. Emphasizes the role of the consumer in the marketplace. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 341 Fundamentals of Direct Marketing and E- Commerce: This course introduces students to the basic principles and practices of direct marketing as well as the interactive strategies of e-commerce. Topics include the users of direct marketing and e-commerce; the roles of various service providers in direct marketing and e-commerce; the products and services that sell best through direct marketing and e-commerce; the use of customer databases for targeted marketing; techniques for measuring the effectiveness of marketing campaigns; and policies for coordinating fulfillment and customer service. Prerequisite: MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Business and Accounting / 257 MKTG 344 Advertising : Managerial analysis of principles and practices in advertising. Topics include the relationship of advertising to public relations and publicity; creation and production of advertising; advertising budgeting and evaluation; demand stimulation; media selection and market research. Prerequisite: MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 348 (MGMT 348) Sales Management: The managing of a sales force including sales organization; sales force recruitment, selection, and training; compensation, supervision, and motivation of the sales organization; sales planning; sales analysis and control. Prerequisites: MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 375 (INBU 375) International Marketing: The international dimensions of marketing. Topics include the international environment of international marketing, international market research, product adaptation, pricing strategies, promotion, channels of distribution, and marketing organization. Focuses first on export marketing and then on multinomial marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 220, ECON/ INBU 250. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 380-381 Cooperative Education in Marketing, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Marketing include corporations, small businesses, non profit organizations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. Open Elective credit only. MKTG 399 Internship in Marketing: Students majoring in business are given an opportunity to supplement classroom learning with on-the-job experience. The Division assists students in finding appropriate compensated opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits, a minimum index in the major of 3.0 and the approval of the Division Chairperson. This course may not be used as a major level business course. Open elective credit only. 3 crs. MKTG 440 Marketing Research: (Computer Component) The design, implementation, and analysis used by marketing research is discussed. Market identification, surveys, sampling procedures, sales parameters, product and consumer information are topics that are investigated. Prerequisites: ECON/MATH 122 or PSYN 370; MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 442 Marketing Management: This course is concerned with the theory and policy of the marketing manager and will include topics in promotion, distribution, pricing, and product management. Cases, together with a computer-based marketing simulation exercise, will be used to develop decision making skills. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; ECON/MATH 122; MGMT 225; MKTG 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MKTG 445 Market Assessment: This course examines market structures and marketing research techniques that are used to identify and assess opportunities. Students use these techniques to assess markets, select products or services to meet the needs of targeted customers, and develop appropriate marketing strategies. The course emphasizes the value of making connections between fields in order to identify market trends. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

258 / Civic and Cultural Studies

CIVIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES ART Course Offerings

ARTT 107 Art History Survey: A one-semester survey of the history of art from cave-painting to the modern era; the understanding and appreciation of style; the social, religious, political, and literary conditions influencing artistic trends. Lectures, discussions, films, slides. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 144 (SPCM 144) Understanding Movies: A basic overview of the historical development of film with an emphasis upon the aesthetic elements of cinema, its particular terminology and interrelationships with other arts. Students will discover how to read films through selected readings, screenings, and written reports. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 190 Honors History of Art I: This course will study issues in the history of art in a more detailed and in-depth fashion than in the usual ARTT 107. The class will take full advantage of our proximity to New York City, planning several museum trips as part of the curriculum. Students will understand art as a vital part of history that links our modern culture with earlier eras. We will emphasize the sociological, historical, religious, and other cultural meanings of art as well as focusing on the formal aspects. Admission by permission of instructor. May replace General Education course ARTT 107. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 191 Honors History of Art II: Particular topics of specialized interest in the history of art will be the main material of the course. Students will participate in a series of museum trips and will be expected to make connections between material learned in other Honors courses and the information presented in this one. Students will get an enriched experience in understanding art as part of a wider world view. Admission by permission of instructor. May replace General Education course ARTT 107. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 200 (CART200) Drawing I: An introduction to basic principles and processes of drawing, with an emphasis on direct observation. Students work from still life, nature, and the imagination towards an understanding of the perceptual aspects of visual forms. Prerequisite: Portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. ARTT 214 (CART214) Drawing II: Further exploration and understanding of drawing elements with an emphasis on drawing process, pictorial structure, and personal expression. The course includes an introduction to drawing the human form. Prerequisites: CART 200 and portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. ARTT 215 (CART 215) History of Art I: This course is the first half of a year-long survey of the history of art, with specific emphasis on the examination of the representation of ideas in terms of the science of interpretation (hermeneutics) and the language of signs (semiotics). This examination is specifically geared to those for whom the study of the history of art is a prelude to a life of design. The course also covers the history of the development of style, from early cave paintings to the beginnings of the Renaissance. Students develop a visual vocabulary and an acute awareness of style as a function of historical conditions; they also learn to decode images in a way which enables them to be more sophisticated designers of visual communication material. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 259 ARTT 216 (CART 216) History of Art II: This course is the second half of a year-long survey of the history of art, with specific emphasis on the examination of the representation of ideas in the terms of the science of interpretation (hermeneutics) and the language of signs (semiotics). This examination is specifically geared to those for whom the study of the history of art is a prelude to a life of design. The course also covers the history of the development of style, from the early Renaissance to the modern era. Students develop a visual vocabulary and an acute awareness of style as a function of historical conditions; they learn to decode images in a way which will enable them to be more sophisticated designers of visual communication material. Prerequisites: ENGL 110 & CART/ARTT 215. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 244 (SPCM 244) Topics in Film: The study of selected film topics through viewing, in-class analysis, and discussion. Topics range from significant directors, producers, and cultural issues reflected in various films, to historical periods and special film genres. Prerequisite: Placement at ENGL 111 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ARTT 245 (SPCM 245) Film and Videotape Production: A practical course in film making; introduction to the techniques and vocabulary of film production. Each student produces, directs, and edits a short film of his or her own design. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 275 (JOUR 275) Photojournalism: This course consists of two principal components: a historical and topical survey of approaches to photojournalism in newspapers and magazines from the time of the perfection of the halftone process to the present; field assignments involving coverage of local events and, where possible or appropriate, part-time work on a local newspaper or magazine. Students must supply their own 35 mm cameras. Estimated cost for materials: $75. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ARTT 380-381 Cooperative Education in Art, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COMPUTER ARTS + TECHNOLOGY Course Offerings

CART 200 (ARTT 200) Drawing I: An introduction to basic principles and processes of drawing, with an emphasis on direct observation. Students work from still life, nature, and the imagination towards an understanding of the perceptual aspects of visual forms. Prerequisite: Portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 214 (ARTT 214) Drawing II: Further exploration and understanding of drawing elements with an emphasis on drawing process, pictorial structure, and personal expression. The course includes an introduction to drawing the human form. Prerequisites: CART 200 and portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 215 (ARTT 215) History of Art I: This course is the first half of a year-long survey of the history of art, with specific emphasis on the examination of the representation of ideas in terms of the science of interpretation (hermeneutics) and the language of signs (semiotics). This examination is specifically geared to those for whom the study of the history of art is a prelude to a life of design. The course also covers the history of the development of style, from early cave paintings to the beginnings of the Renaissance. Students develop a visual vocabulary and an acute awareness of style as a function of historical conditions; they also learn to decode images in a way which enables them to be more sophisticated designers of visual communication material. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

260 / Civic and Cultural Studies CART 216 (ARTT 216) History of Art II: This course is the second half of a year-long survey of the history of art, with specific emphasis on the examination of the representation of ideas in the terms of the science of interpretation (hermeneutics) and the language of signs (semiotics). This examination is specifically geared to those for whom the study of the history of art is a prelude to a life of design. The course also covers the history of the development of style, from the early Renaissance to the modern era. Students develop a visual vocabulary and an acute awareness of style as a function of historical conditions; they learn to decode images in a way which will enable them to be more sophisticated designers of visual communication material. Prerequisites: ENGL 110 & CART/ARTT 215. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 219 (CISC 219) Web Design I: This course presents an introduction to basic Web design and information architecture. It introduces concepts of good design and usability in theory and practice by exploring and comparing existing sites. Elements of page and site design and structure are discussed, including color, typography, simple image manipulation, links, and site organization. The course has a strong hands-on component where students will be introduced to elements of HTML and use up-to-date image manipulation software and a web-authoring tool. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. $180.00 Lab Fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 220 Computer Arts Seminar: An introduction to the basic vocabulary and principles of communication and media theory, including the various roles, tools and techniques of the computer arts industry. Prerequisite: Portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 225 Design + Color in Two Dimensions: The fundamentals of two-dimensional visual composition, including color theory and its application. The course will explore digital and non-digital production techniques and concepts for image construction in the two-dimensional realm. Prerequisite: Portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 230 Digital Photography + Imaging: The fundamental techniques and aesthetics of digital photography and image-making, with an emphasis on concept development, composition, and production. The course will explore techniques and ethics of digital image manipulation. Prerequisites: CART 225 and portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 231 Visual Thinking I: An introduction to the creative process and methods associated with the computer arts. Students will be introduced to practical models that explore the interrelationships between content, meaning, form and structure, while emphasizing conceptual analysis and multiple approaches to creative visualization. Prerequisites: CART 225 and portfolio review admission into major or permission of the Program Director. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 232 Visual Thinking II: Further exploration and understanding of creative methodologies, presentation methods, and creative thinking, with an emphasis on identifying and using a language common to all areas of the computer arts. Prerequisites: CART 214, CART 230, and CART 231. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 233 Three-Dimensional Design: The fundamentals of three-dimensional concepts, form, and structure, including materials, methods, and production techniques. Prerequisites: CART 214, CART 230, and CART 231. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 240 Sequence, Time + Space: A study of narrative structures and spatial compositions as they relate to time and sequence. Students will be introduced to the principles of time-based computer arts, with an emphasis on research, critical analysis, and concept development. Various production methods such as

Civic and Cultural Studies / 261 story boarding and scoring will be introduced. Prerequisites: CART 214, CART 230, and CART 231. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 245 Sound Design: An introduction to basic principles and production of sound as it applies to computer arts. The course explores the structural and conceptual relationships between sound and image. Prerequisite: CART 240. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 259 (CISC 259) Web Design II: This course presents advanced design techniques for web site development and information architecture. The overall structure, flow, and organization of the web site are discussed. The concepts and criteria introduced in Web Design I are utilized with added sophistication to page layout, image manipulation and typographical design. The use of tables and frames is described as well as several special effects, like rollovers and tweening, and elementary animation techniques. The course has a strong hands-on component where, in addition to the software packages used in Web Design I, students will be introduced to DHTML and the use of animation software. Prerequisite: CISC/CART 219. $180.00 Lab Fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 300 Drawing III: Advanced study of drawing with an emphasis on representation of the human figure, exploring anatomy, proportion, expression, and movement. Prerequisite: CART 214. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 315 Issues in Computer Arts: Animation: A study of historical and contemporary issues in Animation, Gaming and Computer Graphics. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 316 Issues in Computer Arts: Design: A study of historical and contemporary issues in Visual Communication Design. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 320 Kinetic Imagery I: An introduction to visual narrative and the fundamental techniques and aesthetics of the moving image utilizing two-dimensional digital animation. Critical analysis and concept development will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CART 240. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 325 Kinetic Imagery II: Further exploration of visual narrative and the moving image utilizing digital video and audio. The course will cover basic camera techniques, editing, compositing, and visual effects. Critical analysis and concept development will be emphasized. Prerequisites: CART 245 and CART 320. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 340 Digital Animation I: An introduction to the principles of two- and three-dimensional digital animation. Project content will focus on character design and scene development. Methods for analysis and production of animation will be introduced. Prerequisites: CART 232, CART 233, and CART 320. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 345 Digital Animation II: Further exploration of the principles and methodologies associated with two- and threedimensional digital animation. Project content will focus on story narrative and character development. Methods for analysis and production of animation will continue to be emphasized. Prerequisite: CART 340. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 350 Digital Media + Interaction Design I: An introduction to the principles of interactivity, typography, and design for a range of digital media, including the concepts of interface, information design, play, and an understanding of the relationships between image, typography, and sound. Students will explore the basic concepts surrounding the creation of time-based and interactive experiences, with an emphasis on how these experiences relate to design for games and the world wide web. Methods for analysis and production will be introduced. Prerequisites: CART 232, CART 233, and CART 320. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

262 / Civic and Cultural Studies CART 355 Digital Media + Interaction Design II: Further exploration of the principles and methodologies associated with digital media and interaction design, including complex multi-media presentations and applications for the world wide web. Students will study human-factor variables of design. Utilizing time-based and interactive design processes, the course explores design as a social, political and cultural activity. Methods for analysis and production will continue to be emphasized. Prerequisite: CART 350. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 360 Game Design I: An introduction to the principles of game design, including an understanding of games as formal, social, and cultural systems. The course will emphasize rapid prototyping and playtesting of game concepts, as well as introduce methods for game analysis and production. Prerequisites: CART 232, CART 233, and CART 320. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 365 Game Design II: Further exploration of the principles and methodologies associated with the design of games. The course will cover concepts of narrative theory, social play, complexity, emergence, and designed interaction. Prototyping and playtesting will continue to be emphasized. Prerequisite: CART 360. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 395 Special Topics in Computer Arts: An investigation of special topics within the computer arts industry depending on student interest. The course may be repeated when topics vary, with permission of the program director. Prerequisites: variable depending on topic. Lab Fee: variable depending on topic. Hours: variable depending upon topic. 3 crs. CART 399 Internship in Computer Arts: A supervised internship of a minimum of 72 hours within the Computer Arts industry. Prerequisites: Minimum of 36 credits and 3.0 GPA in the major, and permission of the Program Director. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CART 425 Animation Techniques: An exploration of animation as a means of storytelling and communication using various classical animation techniques. Prerequisites: CART 245 and CART 320. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 440 Digital Animation III: Advanced study of two- and three-dimensional digital animation through self-directed projects that support Senior Studio, and are structured in such a way as to allow students to refine their personal creative process and develop the ability for critical analysis of their work. Prerequisite: CART 345. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 450 Digital Media + Interaction Design III: Advanced study of digital media and interaction design through self-directed projects that support Senior Studio, and are structured in such a way as to allow students to refine their personal creative process and develop the ability for critical analysis of their work. Prerequisite: CART 355. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 460 Game Design III: Advanced study of game design through self-directed projects that support Senior Studio, and are structured in such a way as to allow students to refine their personal creative process and develop the ability for critical analysis of their work. Prerequisite: CART 365. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CART 495 Senior Studio: A self-directed senior project developed under faculty advisement. The course covers interview and job search skills, and professional portfolio presentation, to assist the student after graduation. This course should be taken in the final semester of study. Prerequisite: CART 345 or CART 355 or CART 365. $180.00 Lab Fee. 2 sem. hrs. & 2.5 hrs. lab. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 263

HISTORY Course Offerings

HIST 101 European History to 1500: An overview of European history from antiquity to 1500: the rise and fall of Greece and Rome; the Middle Ages; the Italian and Northern Renaissance; the beginning of the Reformation. Extensive map work is required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 102 European History Since 1500: An overview from the Reformation to the present: Luther, Calvin, the Counter Reformation; the Age of Discovery; absolutism and parliamentarianism; the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era; the development of political and economic ideologies; World War I; the Russian Revolution; the emergence of Fascism and Totalitarianism; World War II and its aftermath. Extensive map work is required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 105 American History Through 1877: A general survey from the Age of Discovery through the end of Reconstruction, covering such major developments as the emergence and growth of the 13 colonies; the founding and organization of the nation state; changing political, social, and economic patterns; and the origins and impact of the Civil War. Extensive map work is required 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 106 American History Since 1877: A general survey from the end of Reconstruction to the recent past. Major themes will be the development of American domestic politics; the nation's emergence as a world power; changes in American society, economy, and culture; and the influence of past events on contemporary life. Extensive map work is required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 117 Introduction to Asian History: An overview of the main periods of Asian history: ancient, traditional, and modern; exploration of political, social, economic, and cultural developments; emphasis on China, India, and Japan. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 118 Introduction to African History: This course examines the rise of African civilizations, outside influences on African societies, the period of European colonization, the independence movements, and some of the challenges facing the continent today. Pre or Corequisite:: ENGL110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 119 Introduction to Latin American History: An overview of Latin American history: the pre-Columbian past; European conquest and colonial rule; the independence movements; and subsequent internal and external challenges to nation building in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 195 Honors History I: Selected historical occurrences are studied in terms of how they illuminate themes basic to an understanding of historical processes. Admission by permission of the Director. May replace General Education History requirement. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 196 Honors History II: Continued study of selected historical occurrences in terms of how they illuminate themes basic to an understanding of historical processes. Admission by permission of the Director. May replace General Education History requirement. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 239 (ENGL 239) American Studies I: An interdisciplinary approach to American character and culture, treating such themes as the frontier tradition; the American hero; the impact of popular culture; the significance of race, ethnicity, and gender; and national values and ideals. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 263 (ENGL 263) The Black Atlantic: Literature/History: This course examines the historical background of the Third World, the rise of nationalist movements, and the issues that face these nations today. The course follows an interdisciplinary approach that includes the study of Third World literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Previously titled: Third World Cultures)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

264 / Civic and Cultural Studies HIST 295 Topics in History: This offering will vary from term to term, allowing for the coverage of new subject matter or the opportunity to make available an instructor's special knowledge. Prerequisite: ENGL110 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 301 The World of Antiquity: An examination of the significance of the cultures and societies of ancient Greece and Rome. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 304 Medieval Culture and Society: An examination of the elements that contributed to the formation of Western culture and society; the innovations and ideas of the "High Middle Ages"; and the interplay of popular culture and the critical spirit. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 307 Early Modern Europe: The transition of economics, institutions, society and culture, c.1300-c.1500; the "new monarchies"; reform and revolt, c.1500-c.1650; social patterns and popular culture; the "Scientific Revolution." 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 308 Europe from the French Revolution to the Great War: The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era; the rise of liberalism, Marxism, and other forms of socialism; Italian and German unification; imperialism; the background of the Great War. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 309 Europe in Upheaval: 1914 to the Present: The causes, course and results of the two world wars; the Russian Revolution; Hitler and Mussolini, the Cold War; Europe's role in the contemporary world. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 320 Historiography and Historical Method: An introduction to historiography and historical method through guided readings in primary sources and secondary literature. This course is organized around topics which will give the student experience in the recognition, critique, and writing of historical narrative. Use of the computer in historical research will be stressed. This required course for History majors is to be taken junior or senior year. Prerequisite: ENGL 111 and division approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 323 America in Crisis and Change, 1898-1941: The crisis of the 1890s and emergence of reform; Theodore Roosevelt and the Square Deal; Woodrow Wilson and the New Freedom; war and disillusionment; the Great Depression; Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 324 History of the United States Since 1941: An intensive study of the recent past. The course considers such subjects as America and World War II; the development of the Cold War and the Vietnam involvement; the nature of the Eisenhower era, the Kennedy years, and the protest period of the 1960s, and the difficulties of the Nixon-Ford-Carter administrations of the 1970s; the Reagan era of the 1980s and the aftermath. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 327 Modern Russia: The decline of Imperial Russia; the Russian Revolution; Leninism, Stalinism, World War II; the post-Stalin Era; the breakup of the Soviet Union. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 333 Asia in Revolution: A study of the gigantic upheavals in society and culture that comprise Asia's ongoing response to the challenge of Western power. Highlighted will be Gandhian nonviolent resistance, Maoist guerilla warfare, Japanese militarism, and the subsequent economic counter-challenge of the Japanese-led Pacific rim. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 336 Africa: Colonialism and Independence: The composition of colonial rule and systems of administration; the rise of nationalist movements and the emergence of independent nations; the new nations of Africa and current social, political, and environmental problems. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 344 Slavery and the Civil War: The question of slavery; States' Rights; the coming of war; Lincoln's Presidency; the issues of Reconstruction and Republican policies. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 265 HIST 351 African-American History: The African origins and life of black people in America and their relationships to white society, from colonial slavery to contemporary movements in the black community. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 355 American Cultural and Intellectual History: This course examines life styles and values, attempting to discover both how common people coped with their everyday worlds and how intellectuals interpreted the American experience. Developments will be traced in social thought, religion, science, and cultural complexes such as Puritanism, Romanticism, Victorianism, and Modernism. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 358 History of Women: A history of the roles played by women, the treatment accorded women, as those modes have changed in America. In some terms, women in other countries will also be studied. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 359 American Business History: A study of the role of business transformation of America from an agricultural colony into a modern industrial nation. The course will cover such topics as the careers of prominent businessmen; changes in business organization and techniques; and, the sources and nature of economic growth and depression. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 365 (POLS 365) The American Presidency: A review of the office and its occupants covering the legal, constitutional, and political development of the Executive Branch, as well as the contributions of several major presidents. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 367 (POLS 367) American Foreign Policy: The development of the political, military, economic, and cultural relations of America with the rest of the world. How United States foreign policy is made. Traditional institutions and means of diplomacy and newer techniques. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs HIST 379 History of the Family in America: This course will study the evolution of the family in America from Colonial times to the present. It will be concerned with such aspects as child rearing, husband-wife relationships, and the family unit as a social, cultural, and economic institution. As part of the required work, each student will write the history of his or her own family. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 380-381 Cooperative Education in History I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in History include Federal, state and local government offices, museums and non-profit organizations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 397 Independent Study in History: A course designed to take into account the individual student's historical and/or governmental interests. Offered under the direction of a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: ENGL111. 3 crs. HIST 399 Internship in History: The History and Government Programs are interested in making available learning experiences in non-classroom settings. Under the Intern Program, qualified juniors and seniors receive academic credit for work done in historical societies, archives, museums, and restorations. The programs assist students in finding appropriate opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. Standards: 60 college credits, a minimum overall index of 2.75, a minimum index in the student's major of 3.0, and at least six credits in History. II. Credit Options: A) Internships in the local area require a supervisory faculty member and usually will be worth three credits B) A maximum of six credits may be applied toward a History major; a maximum of three credits may be applied toward a Government major; and a maximum of three credits toward a History minor. Additional credits I.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

266 / Civic and Cultural Studies may be applied toward the general requirements in Social Science, or may count as Liberal Arts and Sciences electives, or as Open Electives. III. Procedures: Interested students should contact the Director of the History Program or the Director of the History Intern Program. The application process requires a transcript, a letter of recommendation from a faculty member, the written consent of the student's advisor, and a departmental interview. The decision of the Programs on whether to allow a student to hold an internship may be appealed to the Office of the Associate Dean of Academic Administration on procedural issues, but not on the matter of the Program's judgment. HIST 495 Senior Seminar in History: The Senior Seminar in History, a required course for History majors, is to be taken during the senior year. There are several aspects to this course: the comprehensive assessment of what has been learned in the major course of study, the writing of research papers under the supervision of a faculty mentor, and the discussion of research methods and results in a supportive collegial environment. (Previously numbered: HIST 395 Senior Seminar in History). Prerequisite: ENGL 112; HIST 320. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES With specialization: Digital Media Production Course Offerings

DIGI 210 Digital Imaging and Graphics: An introduction to two-dimensional composition and color theory using vector-based software, and two-dimensional photographic imaging capture, manipulation, and production using Adobe Photoshop. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 215 Audio Production and Sound Design I: An introduction to the theory and application of audio production for video, film, animation, radio, and other forms of media. Students will study theoretical concepts and develop practical skills while completing individual projects using audio production software. Topics include the aesthetic functions of audio in media, the physics of sound, analog to digital conversion, audio file formats, audio interfaces, the mixer, microphones and connectors. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH120. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 220 3-D Digital Graphics: An introduction to the principles of building three-dimensional objects and environments-first employing traditional techniques and then realizing them in digital form. Topics include modeling techniques, rendering, lighting and color, concepts of three-dimensional space, and geometric transformation. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 225 Audio Production and Sound Design II: A second-level audio and sound design course that expounds on theoretical concepts and skill developing projects introduced in DIGI 215. Topics include precision stereo-editing and synchronization, field recording, editing and recording dialogue, and sound effects. Prerequisite: DIGI 215. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 310 2-D Animation Production: An introduction to digital animation production, emphasizing storyboarding and 2-D animation techniques such as keyframing, transition and metamorphosis, timing, and expression using Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects. Prerequisites: DIGI 210, DIGI 220. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 315 Audio Production and Sound Design III: A third-level audio and sound design course with new theoretical concepts and further development of skills with increasing sophistication. Topics include multi-track recording and mixing, equalization, dynamic time and pitch processing. Prerequisite: DIGI 225. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 267 DIGI 320 3-D Digital Modeling and Textures: An introduction to modeling, texturing, and rendering for 3-D digital objects and environments. Concepts of three-dimensional space and geometric transformation will be reviewed. Topics include modeling techniques such as polygonal modeling, patch modeling, subdivision surfaces, and NURBS; and methods for creating textures including procedural methods and photo manipulation techniques, shading models, solid and surface mapping types, and UV's. This course will be taught with 3dsmax or Maya. Prerequisites: DIGI210, DIGI220. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 325 Audio Production and Sound Design IV: A final project-oriented sound design course. Students complete a substantial sound design project for both the purpose of skill development and portfolio presentation. Topics include automated mixing, advanced processing, the business aspects of sound design, the production chain, and a survey of industry equipment, software and facilities. Prerequisite: DIGI 315. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 330 3-D Animation Production I: A continuation of digital animation production, emphasizing 3-D animation techniques such as keyframing and pose-to-pose, controllers and constraints, forward and inverse kinematics, motion paths, function curves and graphs, animated parameters, modifiers, and hierarchies. This course will be taught with 3dsmax or Maya. Prerequisite: DIGI 210, DIGI 220. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 340 3-D Digital Lighting and Rendering: An exploration of lighting and rendering techniques for 3-D objects, environments and animation. Topics in lighting will include basic three-point lighting techniques, shadow maps, ray traced shadows, area shadows, and radiosity. Advanced lighting techniques, specific to the software being used in the course, will also be explored. Topics in rendering will include cameras, rendering to layers, depth of field effects, and safe zones. This course will be taught with 3dsmax or Maya. Prerequisite: DIGI 210, DIGI 220. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 350 3-D Animation Production II: A further continuation of digital animation production, emphasizing 3-D animation techniques such as constraints, morphing/blending shapes, dynamics, particle systems, and scripting. This course will be taught with 3dsmax or Maya. Prerequisite: DIGI 330. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 360 Digital Post-Production: This course will introduce creating visual effects, utilizing particle systems, and compositing and editing for digital animation and audio files using a variety of software. Prerequisite: DIGI 330. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 370 3-D Digital Character Rigging: An exploration of rigging methodologies for 3-D digital character animation. Topics include character setup, inverse kinematics, joints and bones, skinning, and deformers. This course will be taught with 3dsmax or Maya. Prerequisite: DIGI 330. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. DIGI 495 Digital Media Production Portfolio: In this course students develop a final project and compile their final portfolio of work under faculty advisement. The course will cover interview skills, job search skills and professional portfolio presentation to assist the student after graduation. Prerequisites: DIGI 315, DIGI 340. $180 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MUSIC Course Offerings at Mercy College

MUSI 101 The Elements of Music and Developmental Musicianship: A foundation course covering clefs; the notation of pitch and rhythm; time and key signatures; introduction to scales, intervals, and chords and rhythmic drills. Analysis of brief and simple compositions. Concert attendance strongly recommended. Open to all college students; required for pre-Theory majors. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

268 / Civic and Cultural Studies Majors who do not qualify for MUSI 103 Theory and Musicianship I must register for MUSI 101 The Elements of Music: Developmental Musicianship Practicum the first semester of their freshman year. (Non-major credit) MUSI 103 Theory and Musicianship I: An overview of fundamental concepts of music theory and their basic applications: acoustics, rhythm, melody, solfege, harmony, counterpoint, form, and orchestration. Exercises in simple part-writing, from two to four parts; simple figured bass and analysis. Concert attendance and reports required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 104 Theory and Musicianship II: More advanced study of Theory I topics. The major and minor triads and their inversions; the simple diminished chord; secondary chords; introduction to modulation; aspects of texture, harmonic rhythm, timbre, instrumentation, and form. Concert attendance and reports required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 107 Music Appreciation: This course serves as an introduction to the diverse styles and traditions of music of the world, drawing selectively on the United States, Western Europe, and other areas of the globe. It is within this context that the course aims to teach the fundamentals of listening, the basic elements of music, and the capacity to think critically about the nature of music in its vast cultural diversity. Directed listening, lectures, videos, and readings. 3 sem. hrs. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 crs. MUSI 195 Topics in Honors Music: This course will vary from year to year depending on student interest and concurrent honors program offerings. Subjects to be studied might include issues in the international music scene, comparisons of "art" music and popular music, western and non-western music, or music and political censorship. May replace General Education course MUSI 107. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 201 Theory and Musicianship III: Continuation of MUSI 104, including further study of modulation, chromaticism, and bimodality. Borrowed chords, the Neapolitan sixth chord, and augmented chords. Implications for texture, harmonic rhythm, timbre, instrumentation, and form. Concert attendance and reports required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 203 Theory and Musicianship IV: Continuation of topics in MUSI 201, including chords of the 9th, 11th, and 13th. Ambiguous harmonies, whole-tone usage, polytonality, and other pitch resources; compositional technique and process in various genres and styles; different modes of analysis. Independent projects. Concert attendance and reports required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 218 History of Jazz: A survey of the major movements in jazz from Dixieland through Bop, including the avantgarde movement of the late '60s and early '70s. Focus on the major jazz artists: Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and John Coltrane. A consideration of the social and psychological implications of jazz. Lectures, recordings, readings, and performances when possible. (Required for Jazz Specialization.) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 260 The Influence of African Americans on American Popular Music: A survey of American popular music since 1900 with an emphasis on the influence African Americans and Hispanics have had on its development. Analysis of musical styles and trends including their social and political significance and impact on society worldwide. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 271 The World of Baroque Music: A survey of the revolutionary changes in music and ideas that occurred in Italy in the early 1600s; later spreading to such countries as Germany, France, and England. The characteristic techniques and forms of Baroque music will be traced through representative works of such composers as Monteverdi, Corelli, Vivaldi, Purcell, Lully, Rameau, Handel, and J.S. Bach. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 269 MUSI 272 Music of the Classical Era: These giants of Viennese music present fascinating differences in personal attitude and music style. Representative masterpieces of each, many of them widely performed today, will be examined against the background of general social change, including the French Revolution and its after effects. (Previously titled: MUSI 272 The World of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 295 Topics in Music: This course will vary from term to term, dealing with a subject not covered by existing courses. Topics can range from the intensive study of a single composer or work to the examination of a whole musical genre or milieu. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 306 Music of the Romantic Period: Survey of the composers and major compositions of the 19th century. Music of Schumann, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Brahms, Wagner, Verdi, and many others will be heard and discussed. Emphasis on the musical style and the influences (literary, political, artistic) that helped shape the music. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 307 Music in the Twentieth Century: Surveys of significant trends in 20th century music: the decline of tonality; impressionism, neoClassicism and neo-Romanticism; serial composition, electronic and aleatory music; recent developments. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MUSIC INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY Course Offerings

MTEC 100 Music Industry Structure and Practices: An overview of how the various aspects of the music business function and interact with one another. An introduction to the many legal and business issues involved in creating, manufacturing, distributing, and promoting a musical Product. Topics include the basics of copyright law, publishing, standard recording contracts, performance rights organizations, producers, artists, record companies, radio stations, and unions. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 101 Audio Production I: Introduction to fundamental audio concepts including the physics of sound, multi-track recording technology and its evolution. An overview of equipment operation within the recording studio. Students complete assigned projects in the multi-track recording lab. Prerequisites: ENGL 109 and MATH 115. $180.00 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 110 MIDI Systems I: An introduction to the fundamental concepts and applications of MIDI in music production. Through assigned projects in the computer music lab, students will learn the basics of equipment interfacing and develop skills with sequencing software. Prerequisites: MUSI 101 and CISC/MATH 120. Lab fee $180.00. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 200 Music Business I: This course will provide the student producer/ artist/ engineer with an understanding of the various processes and legalities involved in the release of a musical product. Prerequisite: MTEC 100. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 201 Audio Production II: More advanced audio concepts, with a detailed study of recording console operation and signal flow, signal processors, microphone applications as well as recording studio procedures and production techniques. Students complete assigned projects in the multi-track recording lab. Prerequisite: MTEC 101 or Division approval. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 210 MIDI Systems II: Students will further study the theoretical concepts introduced in Introduction to MIDI Systems I. Through individual project assignments in the computer music lab, students will further develop their skills with MIDI sequencing, basis synthesizer programming, and the interfacing of associated hardware. Prerequisite: MTEC 110. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

270 / Civic and Cultural Studies MTEC 220 Recording Studio Workshop I: Practical application of the knowledge acquired in Audio I and II. Students further develop their skills in equipment operation and production techniques through full length recording sessions in recording studio A, including pre-production, set-up procedures, studio documentation and general recording studio protocol. An introduction to studio design and maintenance. Prerequisite: MTEC 201. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 225 Sound Reinforcement: This class will explore the technical requirements, processes, and produces necessary for remote recording and sound reinforcement. Topics will include pre-production, problems with varying acoustic environments, equipment set-up, and power requirements for various location applications. Prerequisite: MTEC 220 or Division approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 230 Audio System Design and Installation: Students are introduced to basic electronic theory and equipment maintenance, including studio wiring and installation. Prerequisite: MTEC 220 or Division approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 295 Topics in Music Technology: This course addresses special and specific topics beyond that which is covered within ordinary courses. The course will be offered on an occasional basis with varying topics as determined by student interest. 3 sem. hrs. 3 credits. MTEC 301 Digital Audio Systems I: An overview of digital audio theory and applications. Students learn the principles of digital audio and develop skills in digital editing and processing using a computer based system. Prerequisite: MTEC 201, MTEC 210. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 302 Digital Audio Systems II: A continuation of Digital Audio Systems I, this course will further develop the student's knowledge of digital audio theory and applications. Special attention will be given to Digital Audio Workstations and their use in mastering, editing and signal processing. 3 sem hrs. 3 credits. MTEC 310 Advanced Computer Applications and MIDI: Through lecture demonstration and assigned projects, students will explore advanced applications in MIDI, including integrated digital audio and sequencing software, editor/librarian and file management, MIDI controlled mixing, system design, and MIDI synchronization. Prerequisite: MTEC 210 or Division approval. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 315 Electronic Music Synthesis: Students study the theory and practice of sound synthesis. Topics include subtractive and frequency-modulation techniques, elements of signal flow, and the nature of modules (oscillator, filter, amplifier, envelope generator, etc.). Students complete individual projects in the MIDI/Synthesizer Lab. Prerequisite: MTEC 310 or Division approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 320 Recording Studio Workshop II: A continuation of Recording Studio Practicum I, with an emphasis on more complex production techniques including mixing techniques, CMDS mastering, and the interfacing of MIDI and computer applications in the recording studio. Prerequisite: MTEC 220. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 325 Audio for Video: Overview of the theory and practice of audio for video post production. Topics include the aesthetic principles of sound design, the elements of a soundtrack, and the theory and applications of SMPTE and MIDI based synchronization systems. Prerequisite: MTEC 301. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 330 Recording Studio Production Techniques: An advanced course in music production focusing on the effective and creative use of the recording studio. Topics include advanced mixing, signal processing, and special effects used for specific styles of music. Additional topics include communication with talent, project planning, and time management in the recording studio. Prerequisites: MTEC 310 , MTEC 320. $180.00 Lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 271 MTEC 340 Techniques of Underscoring: Students will be introduced to the art of composing music and sound design for film and television. Emphasis is placed upon the use of current technologies including: MIDI/SMPTE synchronization, MIDI sequencing, synthesis, and effects processing. Students will score a segment of a film using MIDI workstations. Prerequisites: MTEC 210, 325; and MUSI 104. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 397 Independent Study in Music Technology: This course is designed to allow certain students develop special skills and conduct advanced research in topics beyond that found within regular course offerings. Through guided readings, research, and practical projects, students may pursue various subjects. Prerequisite: Division approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MTEC 399 Internship in the Music Industry: Students will do a supervised internship at a company involved in the music industry. Students will be required to keep a written log to document the work they performed and the skills they acquired. Prerequisite: MTEC 320 and MTEC 310 or Division approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course Offerings at the Music Conservatory of Westchester

MUSC 106-109 Jazz Theory and Harmony I-IV: The subtleties of harmony that cannot be covered in usual harmony courses, such as the manifold applications of harmonic rhythm, placement, frequency, voicing, distribution, density of chords, and use of harmonic color as structural force. 3 crs. per sem. MUSC 110 Form and Analysis I: Analysis of music literature, especially Classical and Romantic motive development, phrase forms, binary, ternary and five-part forms, classic theme and variations, the sonata. Prerequisite: MUSI 104. 3 crs. MUSC 112 Counterpoint I: An overview of the origins of notated polyphony in the Western tradition; some comparisons with other styles and cultures; an introduction to 16th century species counterpoint. 3 crs. MUSC 113 Counterpoint II: Introduction to imitative counterpoint in 2-4 parts; fugue, fugato, and invertible counterpoint from the Baroque to the present. 3 crs. MUSC 118 Solfeggio I: Training in the aural, visual, and singing aspects of all melodic and harmonic intervals; training in rhythm, sight-singing in both clefs, both as single melodic lines and in harmony. 1 cr. (NonLiberal Arts credit.) MUSC 119 Solfeggio II: Continuation of skills learned in Solfeggio I, including singing counterpoint, modulations, chromaticisms, etc. 1 cr. (Non-Liberal Arts credit.) MUSC 120 Developmental Musicianship Practicum: Applications of pre-Theory course MUSI 101 and must be taken concurrently with that course. Practical experiences at the keyboard and vocally. 2 crs. MUSC 121 Keyboard Harmony & Ear Training I: Intensive work in sight-singing, solfeggio, practical experience at the keyboard; must be taken concurrently with MUSI 103. 2 crs. MUSC 122 Keyboard Harmony & Ear Training II: Increased facility in areas listed above; harmonic awareness. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 104. 2 crs. MUSC 123 Keyboard Harmony & Ear Training III: Increased facility in areas listed above; sight-singing in both clefs; modulations, chromaticism. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 201. 2 crs.

272 / Civic and Cultural Studies MUSC 124 Keyboard Harmony & Ear Training IV: Mastery of areas listed above. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 203. 2 crs. MUSC 125-126 Rhythms Seminar I, II: Study of notation, meter, and rhythmic organization. The student's sense of rhythm is developed by drills that move gradually from simple to complex rhythmic patterns including syncopation and various subdivisions of the beat, finally combined with changing pulses and polyrhythms. For singers, guidance in the adaptation of syllables to the rhythmic pattern of the vocal line. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 127-128-129 Composition I, II, III: Open only to students demonstrating sufficient ability and capacity for original work. Prerequisite: Recommendation by Theory instructor and acceptance by Composition instructor. 3 crs. per sem. MUSC 132 Composition Seminar I: Open exploration of key problems in compositional thinking; development of ideas; genesis of style; handling of tension, design, and form; structure and function of a piece based on any premise whatsoever; shaping musical materials; compositional analysis of crucial masterworks. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 134-135 Orchestration I, II: The possibilities and limitations of the commonly used instruments. Conventions of notation. Considerations of balance, sonority, doubling, registration, attack, decay effects, stylistic features, scoring for various ensembles. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 136 Conducting: Both choral and orchestral conducting are included in this course, which deals with both manual and baton technique and the analysis and preparation of scores for performance. 2 crs. MUSC 138 Italian Diction: Fundamentals of Italian phonetics and sound production as applied to reading and singing. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 139 English Diction: The study of the sounds, structure, and stress patterns of speech as applied to the art of singing. 1 cr. per sem. MUSC 140 German Diction: Fundamentals of German phonetics and sound production as applied to reading and singing. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 141 French Diction: Fundamentals of French phonetics and sound production as applied to reading and singing. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 142-143 The Art of Accompaniment I, II (for piano majors): A performance class comprising practical study of vocal and instrumental standard repertory and the problems of accompanying. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 144-145 Secondary Piano I, II: Training to give non-piano majors the ability to read keyboard music, harmonically and melodically. This course comprises fundamentals of piano technique, elementary keyboard harmony, sight-reading, pedal, aids to memorization. 2 crs. per sem. (Non-Liberal Arts credit.) MUSC 147-150 General Piano Technique I-IV: For jazz improvisation majors. A course in developing pianistic skills and reading ability simultaneously with improvisational skills. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 151-157 Jazz Improvisation I-VII: The art of improvising at the instrument, essential for organists and many other instrumentalists. Prerequisite: Skill in applied harmony and knowledge of form and compositional techniques. Permission of the instructor required. 2 crs. per sem.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 273 MUSC 158-159 Secondary Instrument I, II: A required course for Theory and Composition majors as well as Music Education majors. A rudimentary knowledge of an instrument other than the major. Selection is up to the student, but Music Education majors should include one stringed instrument and one wind instrument as a matter of course. Five hours of practice required weekly. 2 crs. per sem. (Non-liberal arts credit.) MUSC 160-165 Orchestra I-VI: Participation in the Conservatory Symphony Orchestra is required of those who play orchestral instruments. Two hours' rehearsal weekly plus several performances, at times to be arranged during the year. More than two unexcused absences from rehearsals eliminates credit. 1 cr. per sem. (Non-Liberal Arts credit.) MUSC 166-167 Pedagogy I-II: Discussion of technique principles applied to students of elementary and intermediate levels, together with consideration of suitable repertoire. Observation of actual teaching included. 2 crs. per sem. (Non-Liberal Arts credit.) MUSC 170 Orchestra and Ensemble Auditory Participation: Required of Theory and Composition majors. This course offers the opportunity to observe and hear capabilities and limitations of the various instruments. Attendance at ensemble and orchestra rehearsals is required. 1 cr. MUSC 171-176 Jazz Workshop I-VI: Practical exploration of on-the-spot ensemble improvisation, emphasizing give-and-take of melodic-rhythmic ideas, control of dissonance, shaping of a musical identity, variation in the flow of musical energy, ability to instantaneously imitate and modify an imitation. 2 crs. per sem. (Non-Liberal Arts credit.) MUSC 177-178 Jazz Arranging I-II: Focuses on the special problems of orchestral combination of small to moderate jazz ensembles through the large jazz recording orchestra. Considerations of balance, sonority, doubling, registration, attack, decay effects, stylistic features, recording techniques, etc., will be pursued in detail. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 183-186 Repertoire I-IV: Study of vocal music appropriate to different voices. 2 crs. per sem. MUSC 187-192 Ensemble I-IV: Chamber music ensembles, such as quartets, trios, duos, and other groupings. Open only to students with adequate preparation in their primary instruments. 1 cr. per sem. (Non-Liberal Arts credit.) MUSC 197 Instrumental Techniques I: Designed especially for those interested in teaching, this course can be invaluable for composers, vocalists and instrumentalists desirous of expanding their musicality. In-depth study of the history and literature of percussion; the best ways to make mallets; the techniques of playing unusual and exotic percussion instruments; and scoring, writing, and performance of class percussion efforts. This class will introduce all the brass instruments: trumpet, French horn, trombone, and tuba, and will teach elementary technique through playing. Emphasis will be on how to teach a beginning student. Students will also be made aware of literature for each instrument solo and in various combinations, as well as where each is featured in the orchestral literature. 3 crs. MUSC 199 Instrumental Techniques II: For the music education major. The focus is on the special attributes of string playing, emphasizing its particularly individual tonal sensitivity and technical demands. Students will acquaint themselves by learning to play the violin and cello, experiencing the learning process with others, and observing the procedures and skill training through the Suzuki String program. Emphasis is on being familiar with group class procedures and training as well as individual learning process. The focus is on the special attributes of woodwind instruments­ bassoon, flute, clarinet, saxophone, oboe­with emphasis on tone production, reeds, care, and minor repair of instruments; transposition; teaching techniques. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

274 / Civic and Cultural Studies MUSC 205 Composition and Orchestration: The use of development devices and particular design elements of classical composition with specific application to jazz (small and large forms). Orchestration will focus on the small group (four to seven players) and the large jazz orchestra (14 to 20 players) and include heretofore non-jazz instrumental colors, such as French horn, bass clarinet, bassoon. 3 crs. Each of the following courses in voice or major instrument requires 15 hours of practice weekly and confers two credits upon the successful completion of each semester's work. They are not applicable toward graduation as Liberal Arts courses. MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC 211-219 221-229 231-239 241-249 251-259 261-269 271-279 281-289 291-299 301-309 311-319 321-329 331-339 341-349 351-359 361-369 371-379 381-389 391-399 401-409 411-419 421-429 431-439 Voice I-IX Piano I-IX Organ I-IX Jazz Piano I-IX Double Bass I-IX Trumpet I-IX Harp I-IX Percussion I-IX Drum Set I-IX Jazz Drum Set I-IX Guitar I-IX Harpsichord I-IX Violin I-IX Viola I-IX Cello I-IX French Horn I-IX Flute I-IX Oboe I-IX Clarinet I-IX Bassoon I-IX Jazz Guitar I-IX Trombone I-IX Tuba I-IX OR Baritone Horn I-IX 441-449 Saxophone I-IX 451-459 Electric Bass I-IX

PHILOSOPHY Course Offerings

PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy: An introduction to philosophy through contemporary readings of some of Plato's classic dialogues, including the Republic, with focus on major issues in ontology, the theory of knowledge, ethics, and politics. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PHIL 112 Logical Thinking: An introduction to logic, both deductive and inductive, with emphasis on the ways it is most commonly useful: the identification of arguments in context; common fallacies in argument; deductive validity; categorical propositions and their interpretation; the categorical syllogism in standard form and its interpretation; disjunctive and hypothetical syllogisms and other common argument forms; the nature of inductive arguments; reasoning from analogy; Mill's canons; scientific method. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ENGL 109 or placement at the ENGL 110 level or higher. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PHIL190 Honors Philosophy I: Selected topics in philosophy studies for ways in which they illustrate important contributions of individual thinkers at a given time in history, or significant changes in attitudes toward the human condition, or new ways of answering the perennial questions of philosophy. Admission by permission of the Director. May replace general education course PHIL110. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 275 PHIL191 Honors Philosophy II: Continued study of selected topics chosen in terms of how they illustrate the philosophical method of problem solving. May replace general education course PHIL110. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. PHIL 217 (PSYN 217) Perspectives on Death: An interdisciplinary approach to death as at once a known and an unknown phenomenon: what science can tell us about death; what philosophers have said about death; examination and critique of recent research concerning the needs of the dying person, the bereavement experiences of the survivors, and children's understanding of death; the significance of death as it relates to human dignity and autonomy. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PHIL 294 Live Issues in Philosophy: An investigation of some topic of philosophical interest that is currently much discussed, but not the focus of an existing course; topic(s) are announced specifically when the course is offered. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PHIL 397 Independent Study in Philosophy: Readings and research individually arranged with an instructor. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

POLITICAL SCIENCE Course Offerings

POLS 101 Political Power in America: The use of political science theory and method to investigate American political institutions: executives, legislature, judiciaries, bureaucracies, mass media, parties, interest groups, elites, and publics; comparisons with foreign political institutions, including their relationship to American institutions as manifested in foreign politics and international relations; the importance of political institutions, American and foreign, to the lives of students. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 190 Honors Political Science: Selected topics in political science, studied in terms of how they illuminate themes basic to an understanding of political processes: i.e., the various ways power is employed to influence the allocation of values in the public domain and the consequences of such employment. Admission by permission of the Director. May replace General Education course POLS 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 255 (LAWS 255, PSYN 255, SOCL 255) Managing Human Conflict I: This course introduces the student to the field of conflict analysis and resolution through the examination of theory and role play. Major theories of conflict studies are considered and the student will explore whether these theories are useful in the resolution of conflict. The student will be introduced to the resolution of conflict. The student will be introduced to the various forms of conflict resolution such as negotiation, mediation and arbitration. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 256 (LAWS 256, PSYN 256, SOCL 256) Managing Human Conflict II: This course continues the study of the theories utilized in conflict resolution. The language of conflict management will be explored and the active listening skills of the student will be developed. The theory and application of negotiation will be studied and applied through role play. Prerequisite: LAWS/PSYN/SOCL/POLS 255. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 282 Comparative Politics: An exploration of selected Democratic, Communist, and Third World political systems, showing both the great variations in the ways nations are governed and the practices that all share. The course will compare legislative, executive, bureaucratic, and judicial institutions and processes, and the behavior of parties and interest groups in various countries, such as England, France, Russia, China, Mexico, and Tanzania. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

276 / Civic and Cultural Studies POLS 295 Topics in Government: This offering will vary from term to term, allowing for the coverage of new subject matter, or the opportunity to make available an instructor's special knowledge. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 300 Modern Political Ideas: The origin and development of major Western political theories from the rise of the nationstate, including the works of such key thinkers as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Marx, Mill, and Lenin; their priorities and views on relevant political themes, such as liberty and equality, the individual and the community, ends of political action and means of achieving them; the expression of these ideas in political theories such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and communism. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 301 (CRJU 301) Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice: Analysis of the leading U.S. Supreme Court and State Court decisions impacting Criminal Justice. The historical development of the Bill of Rights and its application to the states through the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Prerequisite: Six credits in Criminal Justice. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 330 Approaches to Political Science: This course will offer a history of the discipline of political science. The essential differences among the diverse subfields of political science: philosophy, public administration, public policy, comparative politics, international relations, etc. will be explored. In addition, different schools of thought (pluralism, neo-Marxism, anarchism, etc.) and their roles in shaping what will be studied will be discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 350 Public Administration: Competing theories of bureaucracy, organization, and accountability; managerial versus political aspects of governing; budgeting and other decision making; policy planning, implementation, and evaluation. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 355 (LAWS 355, PSYN 355, SOCL 355) Mediation Theory and Practice: This course examines the theory and practical application of mediation. Integration of ethical and policy issues and application through role play. Study of how the various applications affect the mediation process and the court's role in the development of mediation. Role play is an important component of this course. Prerequisite: LAWS/PSYN/SOCL/POLS 255. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 360 (LAWS 360, PSYN 360, SOCL 360) Practicum in Conflict Resolution: This course assists students in bringing together the theoretical and practical skills developed in the program through case studies and field projects. Co/Prerequisites: LAWS/PSYN/ SOCL/POLS 256 or PSYN/SOCL/POLS 355. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 361 (LAWS 361) Constitutional Law and Policy: An examination of major constitutional problems in the United States; analysis of Supreme Court decisions concerning federalism; separation of powers; individual rights. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 363 American Political Parties: The colonial and revolutionary background of the development of parties; the emergence of the Federalists and Democratic Republicans; party struggles of the Jacksonian era; the influence of the Civil War; the role of third parties in the 19th and 20th centuries; the impact of social, economic, and ideological forces on the two-party system in modern America. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 364 Community, State, and Regional Politics: Structure and function of subnational governments in the United States; politics of intergovernmental conflict and cooperation, including emerging developments in federalism; problems of policy formulation and administration, involving such issues as taxation, transportation, education, welfare, and population shifts. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 365 (HIST 365) The American Presidency: A review of the office and its occupants covering the legal, constitutional, and political development of the Executive Branch, as well as the contributions of several major presidents. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Civic and Cultural Studies / 277 POLS 366 Race, Gender, and Ethnicity in American Politics: History and political status of race, sex, and ethnicity in the United States; the relationship of such groups as blacks, Hispanics, Jews, Italian-American, Irish-Americans, and women to the larger political environment; application of theories in political science, such as pluralism and class analysis; the rise of political action and consequent social change. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 367 (HIST 367) American Foreign Policy: The development of the political, military, economic, and cultural relations of America with the rest of the world. How United States foreign policy is made. Traditional institutions and means of diplomacy and newer techniques. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs POLS 370 (INBU 370) International Relations: The international system. Topics include historical background, East-West and North-South conflicts, international organizations, economic power, environmental issues, non-governmental organizations, international law and diplomacy, negotiation, war, military power, disarmament, regionalism and integration, and ideology. Case studies are used to illuminate problems. Prerequisite: ENGL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 372 International Organization/United Nations: This course involves participation in the National Model United Nations. Each spring, colleges and universities send delegations of students to represent countries in a series of meetings modeled after those held by the United Nations. Preparation is extensive. It involves thorough studies of the country to be represented; the United Nations; delegate behavior; and, especially, the past actions of the delegation to be represented. The course culminates in a five-day stay in New York, during which time the Mercy delegation participates in meetings in or near U.N. headquarters. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 373 International Organization/Case Studies: A study of the United Nations and other international and transnational organizations through the analysis of selected cases. The focus on peacekeeping, economic development, human rights themes will enlarge the student's understanding of global politics. The course will be offered in alternate years with POLS 372 International Organization/United Nations and will include student participation in the National Model United Nations as part of its requirements. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 375 Communism, Fascism, and Dictatorship: Repressive regimes: the psychosocial dynamics of their rise, duration, and demise. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 380-381 Cooperative Education in Political Science, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Political Science include Federal, state and local government offices. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 385 Third World Politics: Students will probe the dynamic processes of political thought and action in developing countries, particularly those in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. In addition to treating widespread phenomena such as Islam, Marxism, ethnic conflict, and foreign policies within these regions, the course will undertake case studies of influential Third World states. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. POLS 397 Independent Study in Political Science: A course designed to take into account the individual student's political science and/or historical interests. Offered under the direction of a faculty member. 3 crs. POLS 398 Applications of Political Science to Society and Economy: A senior seminar demonstrating how empirical and normative methods of political science inquiry are broadly applied to the needs of society and the private and public sectors of the economy. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

278 / Civic and Cultural Studies POLS 399 Internship in Political Science: The History and Political Science Programs provide students with creative and useful personal development opportunities outside of the classroom. Under the Intern Program qualified juniors and seniors receive academic credit for work done in political and governmental offices at the local, state, and national levels. The programs assist students in finding appropriate opportunities and insuring that the actual work is a meaningful supplement to the undergraduate classroom experience. Some internships would give those qualifying a chance to live and work in Albany; Washington, D.C.; or abroad. Please contact Division for specific criteria and requirements.

RELIGION Course Offerings

RELG109 Introduction to Religion: The course is an introduction to the academic study of religion. The initial part of the course takes up definitions and theories. A wide variety of the world's religions are then discussed, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Emphasis is placed on each religion's origins and historical development, concepts of the divine, world view, sacred texts, main doctrines, and modes of teaching and worship. The course utilizes a number of approaches, namely, the philosophical, the theological, the historical, and the anthropological. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RELG111 Judaism, Christianity, Islam: This course introduces students to the central beliefs and practices of three world religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, which are also known as the Abrahamic religions. These religions deeply share in the faith of the Patriarch, Abraham, and this affinity encourages a comparative approach. The course covers each religion's origins and historical development, concepts of the divine, world view, sacred texts, main doctrines, and modes of teaching and worship. The course also takes up the diverse cultural contexts of each of the three religions, and the ways in which they have produced remarkable traditions of God, scripture, ethical codes, authority and ritual practices. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RELG 112 Far Eastern Religions: The living religions of the Far East in classical and contemporary forms: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RELG 294 Contemporary Issues in Religion: An investigation of some topic of religious interest that is currently much discussed, but not the focus of an existing course; topic(s) are announced specifically when the course is offered. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RELG 397 Independent Study in Religion: Reading and research individually arranged with an instructor. 3 crs.

Education / 279

EDUCATION

EDUCATION Course Offerings

EDUC 002 Reading Strategies: This course will work on the development of reading proficiency. Attention will be given to advanced word study and vocabulary. Both literal and figurative comprehension will be stressed. Attention will also be given to useful strategies for study and test taking. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Non-degree credit)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EDUC 101 Critical Reading and Analytical Techniques: The goal of this course is to raise the reading efficiency and analytical ability of each student to a level that enables him or her to deal effectively with the complex material he or she encounters as a college student. Instruction will be individualized. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 140 Reading Methods: This survey course presents an overview of reading methods, techniques, and materials used in Childhood Education, grades 1-6, and with Early Childhood language learners from birth through grade 2. Language foundations of reading and writing instruction are studied as well as the elements of a balanced reading program in classrooms. Diagnosing and prescribing for a "Clinical Teaching Style" is studied; this includes assessment evaluation, instructional materials and techniques for regular education and "at risk" students are presented. NYS Learning Standards for the English Language Arts are emphasized throughout the course. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 144 Reading in the Content Areas, Middle Childhood and Adolescence Education and for Students with Disabilities: An overview of methods for teaching reading and writing in secondary school content area classrooms, for middle childhood and adolescence education. Instructional strategies for teaching pupils efficient and meaningful textbook reading across all content area subjects, study skill instructional techniques, literacy assessment of diverse pupils in content classrooms, application of NYS Learning Standards relevant to content literacy instruction and other topics are considered. Co-requisite: EDUC 158. 3sem. hrs. 3crs EDUC 145 Creative Arts for Children, Birth - 6th grade: Current theory and studio experience in methods, techniques and resources for teaching the visual arts to special education, early childhood, and elementary school children. Knowledge of educational values of art in growth and development; needs of exceptional children; cultural forces that shape artistic communication; nature and scope of the creative process. (Previously Titled: EDUC145 Creative Arts for Children). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 154 Early Childhood Education, Birth - 2 and for Children with Disabilities: A study of the processes of social, emotional, cognitive, linguistic, physical, and aesthetic growth and development in early childhood. Significant emphasis placed on the young child from birth through school age, grade two. Presents an overview of theories of development, and examines the psychosocial cultural context for early learning readiness experience. Attention given to meeting the individual special needs of children. Includes types of programs, models, strategies for teaching, concept building, curriculum designs and implementation, assessment, parental involvement, and fieldwork activities. (Previously Titled: EDUC154 Childhood Education). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

280 / Education EDUC 158 Education in the United States: Overview of American education as an introduction to the teaching profession. Historical, sociological, philosophical, and psychological aspects of education are examined as related to current issues, problems, and trends in education, curriculum, programs, and teaching throughout the school years. The role and preparation of teachers, ethics, and future perspectives on education are examined. Reviews the legal foundation of special education and laws governing the lives of students with disabilities. Includes opportunities for research in education and field observation activities. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 159 Children's Literature: Analysis of children's books from the literary point of view; selecting, evaluating, and presenting literature to children; developing the literature program for the elementary school classroom. 3 sem hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 170 Introduction to the Education of Students with Disabilities: Students will examine and discuss the historical, social and legal foundations of special education and the developmental and learning characteristics of individuals with disabilities. Topics include discussions about cognitive and emotional disabilities arising in childhood and adolescence, mental retardation, learning disabilities, and behavior disorders, as well as the problems of etiology and treatment. This course will provide an overview of the educational services including assistive and instructional techniques which are effective in helping youngsters achieve their full academic potential and obtain gainful employment and independence. Students will examine the supportive community services needed to strengthen families. Field observations. Prerequisites: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 173 (PSYN 173, SOCL 173) Perspectives on Parenting: The course examines the parenting process and the tasks parents carry out as they raise children from birth through adolescence. The focus will be on effective parenting skills with the responsibility of fostering a stimulating learning environment and open channels of communication. Current family issues will be addressed. Field work required. (Previously Numbered PSYN/SOCL 170). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 207 (PSYN 207) Psychology of Learning: Basic learning concepts reviewed: classical and instrumental conditioning, extinction, reward, motivation, personality; along with a general survey of the major theorists: Pavlov, Skinner, Hull, Tolman, et. A. Prerequisites: PSYN 101. 3 sem hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 210 Reading Practicum: Diagnostic testing and teaching of individual or small groups of students with disabilities and school children, in grades K - 6. Application of the methods, techniques, and materials of reading instruction. Preparation of a case study. Prerequisites: EDUC 140. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 212 Teaching of Mathematics in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities: Review of mathematics concepts and skills based on the New York State Learning Standards and Performance Assessments. Ways of diagnosing a child's development of these mathematics concepts and skills. Teaching methods, materials and lesson planning for these mathematics concepts and skills to early childhood, childhood and to students with disabilities. Overview of contemporary trends of teaching these mathematics concepts and skills. Diagnostic testing and teaching of individuals or small groups. Prerequisites: EDUC 140; EDUC 158; EDUC 215. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 213 Teaching of Science in Early Childhood, Childhood, sand to Students with Disabilities: An overview of the curriculum content and approaches for teaching science in pre-school, elementary, and special education. Current pedagogical practices will be discussed with the focus on understanding relationships, processes, mechanisms and applications of scientific concepts along with the specific, corresponding performance assessments, and materials for teaching science in early childhood, childhood and to students with disabilities. The course includes hands-on experiments and field trips. Pre-requisites: EDUC 140; EDUC 158. Should be taken concurrently with EDUC 216. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Education / 281 EDUC 215 Teaching English Language Arts in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities: Study of language acquisition and theories of language development and literacy as related to native English speakers, and English language learners from birth through grades six. Presents an overview of materials and strategies for the creative teaching of language arts skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, as well as thinking, for learners in early childhood, childhood and students with disabilities. Examines ways of establishing environments for learning. Review of instructional procedures, assessment techniques, guidelines for parent involvement, lesson observations, lesson planning, simulations and demonstrations, and field experiences. Prerequisites: EDUC 158, EDUC 140. Should be taken concurrently with EDUC 218. 3 sem hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 216 Computers and Other Technology in Early Childhood, Childhood, Adolescence Education, and for Students with Disabilities: Students will learn to use computers and other technology to teach the mathematics, science and teaching curricula as reflected in the New York State Learning Standards. Integration of technology and other school subjects for early childhood, childhood, and special education students. Included are ways of using the Internet, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software and effective ways of integrating multimedia technology across the curriculum. The course includes a supervised laboratory period. Prerequisites: EDUC 212. Course should be taken concurrently with EDUC 213. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 218 Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities: An overview of content and techniques for teaching social studies in pre-school through 6th grade and to students with disabilities. The course incorporates the New York State Learning Standards of Social Studies and includes: History of the United States and New York State, World History, Geography, Economics, Civics, Citizenship, and Government. Current pedagogical practices, are discussed along with specific methods and materials for teaching Social Studies including use of community resources, computer and internet applications, field trips, working with students with disabilities and parents. Prerequisites: EDUC 158. Should be taken concurrently with EDUC 215. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 225 Curriculum and Methods in Early Childhood, Childhood, and to Students with Disabilities: Students will examine recent legislation, current issues and trends in the light of the NYS Learning Standards. They will explore effective assessment and instructional practices including accommodations, enrichment and remediation. Students will acquire skills in planning and managing teaching and learning environments and examine issues in cultural diversity and career development. They will explore ways to promote the development of positive social interaction skills; discuss successful transition practices and techniques to strengthen family partnerships. Field observations. Prerequisites: ED 140; ED 158; ED 170; and ED 212. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 228 (PSYN 228) The Psychology of the Preschool Child: A study of the child between birth and six years of age. Topics will include physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, social relationships, and day care as it affects the developmental processes. (Previouly numbered: EDUC/PSYN 129). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 229 Teaching of English as a Second Language in Early Childhood, Childhood and to Students with Disabilities: Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching English as a Second Language from birth through sixth grade will be presented. The course will offer an in-depth treatment of various effective strategies, methods, and materials for teaching ESL. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

282 / Education EDUC 230 Teaching English as a Second Language in Adolescence Education, Grades 5 - 12: Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching English as a second language from birth to adulthood. Topics include historical and current theories of child and adult second language acquisition, as well as effective practices and models that have implications for second language development. Students will be able to identify, diagnose and develop appropriate instructional plans, and recommend materials for classroom use. Prerequisites: EDUC 140 or 144; EDUC 158, and EDUC 170. (Previously Titled: EDUC 230 Teaching of English as a Second Language, 7-12 Secondary). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 231 Teaching Spanish as a Second Language, Birth - 6th grade: Methods and materials in teaching listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to students in early childhood and childhood classes. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 232 Bilingual - Bicultural Education: A study of both theoretical and practical aspects of bilingual - bicultural education, focusing on the United States. An examination of the history and laws of bilingual - bicultural education in this country and of the controversial issues raised for contemporary society by implementation of bilingual - bicultural programs. Lectures and visits to area programs. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 233 (PSYN 233) Developmental Psychology: A consideration of human development and behavior throughout the life span: childhood, adolescence, and the adult years; emphasis on normal growth and development focusing on the critical issues involved in each stage of development including cultural influences. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 236 Sociolinguistics and Education: An examination of the relationship between language and society as it affects contemporary American education. The course will include a study of the sociological background of the speaker and listener as factors in determining the way language is used in the classroom. Topics such as social class, age, sex, and ethnic background, will be investigated. Survey and research report required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 240 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing in Bilingual Classrooms: The course will present current research, theory, and practice related to the teaching of literacy skills in the bilingual class. Teachers will be introduced to instructional strategies that facilitate full use and development of all language skills in their students. Finally, teachers will be exposed to a great variety of reading materials. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 242 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Bilingual Classrooms: The course will develop the participants' expertise in a problem-solving approach to mathematics instruction. The use of manipulatives and computer software will be emphasized providing participants with hands-on experiences with math manipulatives. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 243 (PSYN243) Testing and Assessment for Birth through 6th grade and for Students with Disabilities: Theory and practice in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of tests and measurements, to include hands on experiences in the implementation of the New York State content area performance indicators as they apply to improved student performance. Students will develop an understanding of the application, administration, and interpretation of psychological and intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest, personality and educational tests used in Early Childhood and Childhood Education, Birth - 6th grade, including those used with students with mental, learning, and emotional disabilities. Field Experience Required. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 244 Teaching Native Language Arts, Birth - 6th Grade: This course will examine theories of first language acquisition. Participants will have the opportunity to practice techniques that foster the development of all four language skills in the native language. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Education / 283 EDUC 246 Methods, Materials and Evaluation in Bilingual Education: Examination, analysis, and application of effective instructional methods, and materials within the bilingual curriculum. It is expected that participants will be able to use these materials within their present classrooms. Students will also examine the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of methods of assessment and develop an understanding of the relationship of assessment to curriculum goals and the needs of the bilingual mainstreamed and exceptional learner. 3 sem hrs 3 crs. EDUC 248 Linguistic Perspectives on Bilingualism in the Classroom: This course will explore the fundamental principles of language theory, language description and language learning through the core areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology syntax, semantics and pragmatics. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 249 Language Acquisition and Literacy in Multicultural, Adolescence Education: This course explores the issues and topics of education that is multicultural in relation to its theoretical concepts and historical background, as well as in its practical application, as it regards first and second language acquisition and literacy development, both in the ESL and mainstream classroom. Students will examine language policy and dialects of English so as to develop lessons that address the needs of, and which include seminal literary works of linguistic and ethnic minorities in the Untied States. Prerequisite: EDUC 230. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 254 (PSYN 254) Child Psychology: Consideration of theories and research findings with respect to physical growth, sensorimotor, emotional, and intellectual development; and cultural influences in the individual prior to adolescence. Developmental, psychoanalytic, and cognitive theories are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 256 Assessment and Content Area Testing in Middle Childhood and Adolescence Education and for Students with Disabilities: The course explores basic measurement theories, focusing on administration, scoring and interpretation of intelligence, personality, academic achievement, motivation and interest measures, as well as teacher made criterion referenced tests, utilizing performance indicators and rubrics, so as to help the prospective teacher with test development and interpretation and the ability to integrate assessment results in decision making when planning for instruction. EDUC 257 (PSYN 257) Psychology of Students with Disabilities: Consideration of the cognitive and emotional disorders arising in childhood and adolescence. Topics include: mental retardation, inclusion, learning disabilities and behavior disorders, as well as problems of etiology and treatment. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 259 (PSYN 259) Early and Middle Adolescent Development: A study of human growth, development and behavior during early adolescence. Theories pertaining to physical, emotional, social and intellectual development will be explored. Analyses of the impact of the nature of the middle school, early secondary education experience, programs, teaching, and assessment, on the early adolescent will be examined. Includes views on the significance of multi-cultural variables, gender, relationship, family, friends, learning styles, and individual special needs of the emerging adolescent in today's society. EDUC 263 (PSYN 263) Psychology of Adolescence: A study of human development and behavior during adolescence; emphasis on anatomical and functional interrelationships and cultural influences and their significance for psychosocial development. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 264 (CMDS 264, PSYN 264) Normal Speech and Language Development: A study of normal language development including phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic features; exploration of the cognitive linguistic communicative relationship. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

284 / Education EDUC 268 (PSYN 268) Early and Middle Adolescence Education and for Students With Disabilities: Instruction will focus on the learning needs of the early and middle adolescent child. Students will be presented with opportunities to complete in depth work integrating the middle school curriculum, effectively bridging the gap between elementary and secondary school. Strategies on the adaptation of material to meet the needs of students with disabilities will be presented. Interdisciplinary studies, cooperative learning, block scheduling and team teaching will be emphasized throughout the course. Emphasis will be placed on establishing effective learning environments relating knowledge, skills, values and attitudes to the specific content area and the use of curriculum and assessment standards to improve content area instruction and student performance. Prerequisites: EDUC158, EDUC170, PSYN259. 3sem. hrs. 3crs. EDUC325 Methods and Materials in 5th ­ 12th Grade and for Students with Disabilities: The content, techniques and strategies in teaching English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in grades 5 and 6, and 7 ­ 12. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills on establishing effective learning environments which focus on learner/teacher dynamics, group process, and classroom management which encourages reflective teaching. Issues, problems and strategies for teaching specific content area subjects that are aligned to the New York State learning standards and emphasize problem solving and critical thinking, in a multicultural setting will be examined. Prerequisites: Completion of all requirements, other than student teaching (EDUC497, 498, 499). 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. EDUC 350 (CMDS 350) Organization of a Speech and Hearing Program: Organization and development of a speech and language program. Areas of interest include the role of the speech-language pathologist in the schools, caseload identification, scheduling, physical needs of the program, records and reports, relationship of the SLP to other school personnel, current issues relative to the school environment. Prerequisite: CMDS 258. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 390 Independent Study in Education: Academically distinguished students work independently with an Education Division faculty member on special projects. May also be used to provide additional field experiences to meet NYS certification requirements. 1 - 4 crs. (Approval of the Education advisor is required.) EDUC 497 Supervised Student Teaching Field Experience I: The first of a 16 week (80 days) supervised, professional field experience in which the student is observed in a preschool, or in a K - 12th grade student teaching situation. One eight week experience is in a "high-need" district. This experience is specific to the area of the initial certificate being sought and includes observations and individual planning conferences with the supervising college teacher, as well as with the cooperating school teacher. Prerequisites: completion of all other required Education courses. Students must register concurrently for EDUC 498 and EDUC 499. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EDUC 498 Supervised Student Teaching Field Experience II: The second of a 16 week (80 days) supervised, professional field experience in which the student is observed in a preschool, or in a K - 12th grade student teaching situation. One eight week experience is in a "high-need" district. This experience, which is specific to the area of the initial certificate being sought, and includes observations and individual planning conferences with the supervising college teacher, as well as with the cooperating school teacher. Prerequisites: completion of all other required Education courses. Students must register concurrently for EDUC 497 and EDUC 499. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. EDUC 499 Professional Symposium A three hour weekly symposium with the college supervisor. The symposium includes seminar modules on current issues in education (including Child Abuse Identification and Reporting, Drug and Substance Abuse Prevention Education, Personal Health and Safety, Family Planning, Classroom Management and Discipline, Portfolio Presentation, Gifted Education, the Integration of Technology into all Curricula, Corporal Punishment, Physical Education Concepts, the New Standards, and Proper Procedures for Parental Interaction, Consumer Education, Career Planning, Curriculum Review, Group Discussions, Evaluation of Classroom Situations) and Analysis of Videotapes and Field Experiences. Prerequisites: All other required Education courses. Students must register concurrently for EDUC 497- 498. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Education / 285

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION Course Offerings

THRC 253 Field Studies in Recreation: An off-campus 120-hour field studies experience for the student in a recreation and therapeutic recreation setting. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 265 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation: A study of theories, philosophies, principles, and practices involved in therapeutic recreation. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 366 Program Design in Therapeutic Recreation: A study of procedures involved in planning, implementing, documenting, evaluating, organizing, and managing the program. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 368 Recreation, Programming, and Leadership: A study of the theories of leadership, programming, organization, implementation, promotion, and evaluation of and an overview of program activity areas. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 369 Recreation Administration: A study of the procedures, practices, and policies in administration of private, public, and commercial recreation; legislation contracts, budgets, records, public relations, personnel practices, and legal aspects will be considered. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 370 Process and Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation: A study of the theoretical framework, differentiating among psychoanalytic, behavioristic, growth psychology, and other theories and therapeutic approaches related to these theories. Technical knowledge and skills involving safety procedures, use of mechanical aids, assisting techniques, etc., will also be reviewed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 372 History and Philosophy of Recreation/Leisure: Examination of recreation/leisure as a social phenomenon. The philosophical, historical, political, and economic aspects as well as the social institutions concerned, i.e. family, community, politics, and professional recreation services will be studied. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 471 Issues and Contemporary Problems in Therapeutic Recreation: An analysis of current questions and issues in therapeutic recreation in regard to philosophy, professionalization, practice, national and international. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. THRC 495 Therapeutic Recreation Practicum: A minimum of 480 hours, 12-week field work practicum in which the student is observed and evaluated in a clinical, residential, or community based therapeutic recreation program by a full-time on-site agency CTRS supervisor and a college supervisor. Students must have previous supervised experience with special populations and must have completed all other required major courses. 9 sem. hrs. 9 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

286 / Health Professions

HEALTH PROFESSIONS COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Course Offerings

CMDS 210 Clinical Process I: An introduction to the clinical process that focuses on supervised observations and issues relating to the clinical experience. 3 sem. hrs. 2 hr. lect., 1 hr. clinic lab. 3 crs. CMDS 215 Clinical Process II: Continuation of the clinical process that focuses on clinical assessment and therapeutic methods, report writing, and the clinician-client relationship. Prerequisite: CMDS 210. 3 sem. hrs. 2 hr. lect., 1 hr. clinic lab. 3 crs. CMDS 220 Multicultural Issues in Communication Disorders: This course addresses the impact of cultural, ethnic, and linguistic diversity on communication development, communication patterns, and communication disorders. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 230 (SPCM 230) Voice and Diction: Study and practice of the skills needed for control of voice production and diction (articulation, pronunciation, intonation). Emphasis will be placed on phonetics and ear training. Tape recordings will be used for evaluation and study. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 240 Phonetics: Detailed analysis of the production of the sounds of the English language; basic intonation patterns and linguistic rules; extensive practice in phonetic transcription with emphasis on ear training. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 256 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms: Structure and function of the speech mechanism; muscular and neural control of the speech organs; respiration, phonation, resonation and articulation. (With Cadaver) Prerequisite: BIOL 110. 4 sem. hrs., 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. lab. 4 crs. CMDS 257 Introduction to Audiology: Anatomy and physiology of the ear; acoustics; ear pathologies; audiologic evaluation; rehabilitation of the hearing-impaired child and adult. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 258 Introduction to Communication Disorders: An introduction to the study of articulation, voice and rhythm disorders and the anatomy and physiology that relate to these disorders. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 264 (EDUC 264, PSYN 264) Normal Speech and Language Development: A study of normal language development including phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic features; exploration of the cognitive linguistic communicative relationship. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 270 Speech and Hearing Science: A study of the psychological and acoustical aspects of speech production and perception; principles of the physics of sound; psychoacoustics and acoustic phonetics. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 300 (PSYN 300) Language Disorders: The nature of language disorders relative to normal speech and language development and the impact on the ability to communicate in the environment. Prerequisite: CMDS 264. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Health Professions / 287 CMDS 310 Communication Disorders -- Organic: A study of speech disorders caused by physical disability with special attention given to problems associated with cleft palate, cerebral palsy, aphasia, and organically based voice disorders. Prerequisites: CMDS 256; CMDS 258. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 340 Aural Rehabilitation: A study of the effects of hearing loss on the speech, language, academic, and communication abilities of children and adults; principles and techniques of rehabilitation, including the use of counseling, hearing aids, cochlear inplants, lip-reading, and auditory training; and implications for educational and vocational development. Prerequisite: CMDS 257. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 350 (EDUC 350) Organization of a Speech and Hearing Program: Organization and development of a speech and language program. Areas of interest include the role of the speech-language pathologist in the schools, caseload identification, scheduling, physical needs of the program, records and reports, relationship of the SLP to other school personnel, current issues relative to the school environment. Prerequisite: CMDS 258. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CMDS 498 Clinical Process III: A preliminary clinical experience in the Mercy Speech and Hearing Center. Students will participate in the development and implementation of the treatment plan for communication disordered clients. Course topics will include a review of communication disorders, professional report writing, session planning, standardized test review, and sharing a client with a graduate student clinician. (Previously titled CMDS 498 Clinical Practicum). Prerequisites: CMDS 210 and CMDS 215. 2 sem. hrs. 2 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

NURSING Course Offerings

NURS 330 Philosophical Bases of Nursing: Introduction to the nature of professional nursing practice, education, and research with emphasis on nursing theories and issues in the profession and, health care delivery. Content focuses on development of the professional self, conceptual approaches to health, and the professional nursing process. Accountability, leadership, and research in the nursing process are emphasized. The roles of the advocate, consumer of research, teacher, and leader are explored. 3 hrs. lect; 3 crs. NURS 331 Pathophysiology and Clinical Reasoning for Nursing: Basic principles and processes are introduced early in the course, including descriptions of cellular biology; genes and genetic diseases; forms of cell injuries; fluid and electrolytes and acids and bases; immunity; and tumor biology. Knowledge of these processes is applied to the pathophysiology of common diseases. The presentation of each disease/disorder entity includes relevant risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and a brief review of treatment. Clinical reasoning will be augmented by applying models for nursing clinical judgment to clinical case studies. Prerequisites: NURS 330, BIOL 130, BIOL 265; Co-requisite or Prerequisite NURS 331, NURS 332. 3 hrs. lect; 3 crs. NUR 332 Therapeutic Interactions in Nursing and Self Care: The nurse's relationship with self is seen as the prerequisite for satisfying and productive work, and for effective communication with clients and co-workers. The personal strength that arises from the understanding, awareness and management of self from the foundation for sustaining the nurse through the complexities of nursing practice, especially as the health care industry restructures. Theoretical components of therapeutic communication are explored and practiced in simulated laboratory experiences. Emphasis is placed on the development of a self care philosophy in the nurse that has the potential to reduce the personal and interpersonal stress often inherent in nursing practice and to increase the effectiveness of the nurse-client relationship through the integration of empathy, genuineness and respect. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 330. 2 hrs. lect; 2 crs.

288 / Health Professions NURS 333 Research Process in Nursing: This course provides students the opportunities to understand: (1) the research process; (2) the relationship between theory and research; (3) the relationship between nursing research and nursing practice and; (4) ethical aspects of nursing research. Content focuses on the steps in nursing research and the process of critiquing research studies for use in clinical practice. Classroom experiences provide the student opportunity for collaboration with peers and faculty in understanding research concepts and critiquing nursing research. Prerequisites: NURS 330. 3 hrs. lect. 3 crs. NUR 334 Nursing Process with Individuals: The assessment aspect of the nursing process is emphasized. Cognitive, interpersonal, and psychomotor skills are utilized to gather data for the nursing process with individuals. Weekly readings and exercises allows the student practice in relating theory and assessment data in order to arrive at nursing outcomes and to prioritize among them. Laboratory experiences include the college learning lab for simulating practice. Prerequisites: NURS 330. Corequisite or Prerequisite: NURS 331, NURS 332. 2 hrs. lect; 2 hrs. lab. 3 crs. NURS 344 Nursing Process with Small Groups: The course focuses on the application of nursing process to professional small groups and to small groups of clients. Theory, research and behavioral process basic to all groups are identified and their application in the professional use of the nursing process with small groups is observed, analyzed and synthesized. Emphasis is on the role development and leadership skills, on promotion of group process skills and accountability for outcomes. Issues that effect groups in the health care delivery system are explored. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 330; NURS 332. 3 hrs. lect. 3 crs. NURS 345 Nursing Process with Families: The course focuses of the development of the student's ability to communicate, think critically, and apply research as components of the professional nursing process with families. Content relative to professional nursing, accountabilty for leadership as a client advocate in interaction with families and various health care delivery systems is offered. Corequisite or Prerequisites: NURS 344. 3 hrs lect. 3 crs. NURS 346 Nursing Practicum with Families: This course focuses on the application of family theory and research to the professional nursing process with families. Content is relative to professional nursing and accountability for leadership as a client advocate in interaction with families. Corequisite or Prerequisite: NURS 345. 1 hr. sem., 3 hrs. clinical. 2 crs. NURS 354 Nursing Process with Communities: The student is guided in the application of the nursing process in studying a selected community. The student is assisted in the process of collecting data about people, environment and resources. Through the synthesis of collected data, nursing diagnoses of community needs are identified. As a selected group in the community, the student implements and evaluates the nursing process for a health promotion program. Seminars and clinical experience serve as the modes for extending the scope of knowledge, developing communication, applying nursing research and critical thinking skills with peers, clients, and faculty. Prerequisite: NURS 345 abd NURS 346. 1 hrs. seminar, 3 hrs. clinical. 3 crs. NURS355 Nursing Practicum with Communities: The student is guided in the application of the nursing process in studying a selected community. The student is assisted in the process of systematically collecting data about the people, their environment, the resources and the interactional aspects of these variables. Through the synthesis of collected data, nursing diagnosis of community needs will be identified. Through the leadership role of client advocate in a selected aggregate of the larger community, the student will implement and evaluate the nursing process for a health promotion program. The student evaluates outcomes of the health promotion program. Seminars and clinical experience serve as the modes for extending the scope of knowledge, developing communication, applying nursing research and critical thinking skills with peers, clients and faculty. Prerequisite or co-requisite: NURS 354. 1 hr. seminar; 3 hrs. clinical. 2 crs.

Health Professions / 289 NURS 360 Power Bases of Nursing: This course provides the student opportunities to synthesize, utilize and evaluate sources of professional power. Social, political, legal, economic, ideological and cultural influences on decision-making in the health care delivery system are analyzed. Strategies for effective intra- and interdisciplinary relationships in shaping policies and workplace conditions are explored. Identification of theories regarding power, influence, empowerment, change and communication within human systems provide students with the background to assume a position of client advocate with a sense of professional responsibility and accountability. Learning activities are directed toward the RN's integration of legitimate professional power to advance own career development, shape public health policy, and expand own professional sphere of influence. Prerequisite: NURS 344. 3 hrs. lect. 3 crs.

HEALTH SCIENCES Course Offerings

HLSC 101 Orientation to Health Services: This didactic and hands on learning experience will help the participants explore the current roles of health care practitioners as well as the environments they work in. Careers in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, therapeutic recreation, nursing, acupuncture, oriental medicine, physician's assistant, social work, psychology, and other allied professions will be presented. Participants will also work on developing observational and note writing skills key to the successful practice of health care. 1 cr. HLSC 200 Issues in Personal Health: The purpose of this course is to promote holistic health for all Mercy College students and to enable them to take charge of their health. Concepts include: essential ideas for the promotion of personal health; assessment of risk behaviors; cultural beliefs and health behaviors; role of diet and exercise in promotion of wellness and longevity; the healthy diet; guide to fitness exercises; self-care; holistic health strategies; and personal health challenges in the life cycle. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 placement. (Previously numbered HLSC 120). 3 hours classroom dialogue. 3 crs. HLSC 203 Practicum in Physical Therapy*: Students are provided with an introduction to the field of physical therapy through observational experiences and small group discussions. Students observe health care workers, including physical therapists, in various health care settings and complete assignments within the context of observational experiences. The course has an on-line and in-class component and is required for students accepted into the professional program who are not physical therapist assistants. 2 sem. Hrs. 2 crs. HLSC 205 Standard Safety Precautions for the Health Care Professional: This course presents an overview of universal/standard precautions recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), reviews the Office of Safety and Health Administration's bloodborne pathogen regulations, and covers prevention of transmission of various infectious diseases. Responding to emergency situations (fire, medical codes, chemical exposures, etc. ) will be covered. 1 sem. hr. 1 cr. HLSC 210 Overview of Occupational Therapy Practice: The role of occupational therapy within an interdisciplinary team and within different age groups and practice settings is introduced through observational experiences, lectures, small group discussions, and assignments. Students will observe pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric rehabilitation programs. Through classroom discussions and readings, they will develop a personal definition of occupational therapy, be introduced to the current literature in the field, professional organizations, and some current issues facing the practice of occupational therapy. 1 sem. hr., 1 cr.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

290 / Health Professions HLSC 225 Introduction to Health Professions' Literature and Scientific Writing This course will cover the basics of professional literature searches and scientific writing including where and how to access peer reviewed scientific journals as well as the basic structure of scientific publications. At the completion of the course the student will be able to locate various types of scientific publications by using multiple databases and search engines, and will be able to summarize the structure of these articles in preparation for a complete literature review and synthesis. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. Corequisite: ENGL 112. 1 sem. hr.; 1 cr. HLSC 295 Topics in Health Sciences: An analysis of the current theory, research or clinical practice issues in the health sciences. Specific topics such as complementary and alternative medicine, group work, HIV/AIDS, are announced each semester by the Division. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HLSC 300 Philosophy & Ethics in the Health Sciences: This course introduces students to the philosophical, ethical and economic foundations that support research, theory development and clinical practice in the health sciences. Theoretical and practical definitions of quality in the health care delivery system are explored from a historical perspective. The course emphasizes cultural constructions of health and illness and cross cultural health practices. Achievement is determined through measures of reading comprehension, class participation and a written term paper. Prerequisite: Completion of 90 credits. 3 sem. hrs., 3 crs. HLSC 302 Pathology for Rehabilitation: This course examines the effects of pathological conditions on individuals across the lifespan. It explores pathology as it relates to the rehabilitation potential for patients with disorders of the cardiopulmonary, endocrine, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, hepatic, integumentary, musculosketal and renal systems. Students will investigate the etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, medical and surgical management of patients with pathologies of the systems outlined above and the impact of the disorders on rehabilitation management. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HLSC 314 (BIOL314) Clinical Kinesiology: This course is designed to study and analyze human movement in a person environment context. It will emphasize an understanding of movement when it is integrated into real-life activity and applied to individual environments. Kinesiology of the upper and lower extremities and trunk will be examined, and will include clear explanations of both normal kinesiologic function and pathokinesiology of the upper extremity. Laboratory experience will give the student a practical experience for better understanding one component integral to occupation ­ human movement. Prerequisites: PHYS110 or PHYS120 and BIOL303. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HLSC 344 Group Process for Health Professionals: The course focuses on the application group process theory to work within professional groups, as well as to therapeutic client groups. Theory, research and behavioral process basic to all groups are identified and their application in the professional use in health care small groups is observed, analyzed and synthesized. Emphasis is on role development, leadership skills, and promotion of decision-making and accountability as a member of professional groups and leader of therapeutic groups. Group process issues that affect health care delivery are explored. Health promotion with clients in small groups is a central goal. Prerequisites: ENGL 112, SPCM 110, and PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HLSC 380-381 Cooperative Education in Health Science, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Health Science include hospitals, medical facilities, small and large physical/occupational therapy practices. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. per sem.

Health Professions / 291 HLSC 400 Health Sciences Capstone: This course explores the concept of health promotion and serves as a synthesis experience for the major. Students choose a topic in health care, review relevant literature, interview community members, and develop, implement and evaluate a health promotion project. Achievement is determined through an annotated bibliography, class presentations and a written summary of the health promotion project. Prerequisite: HLSC 295 or HLSC 300. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. HLSC 402 Scientific Writing: Health Care Practitioners need to recognize factual information and logical arguments and apply critical analysis to other forms of acquiring knowledge such as authority, rationalization and intuition. Additionally, they need to become informed consumers of the scientific literature, with the ability to process and synthesize scientific information. The course is designed as an introduction to critical thinking and to allow the student to be able to search, summarize, synthesize and process the scientific literature. The course should help students to think more critically about the arguments of others and to understand logical and persuasive arguments in science. Prerequisites: ENGL 111, ENGL 112, HLSC 225 or permission of the instructor. 2 sem. hrs. 2 crs. HLSC410 Applied Neuroscience for the Rehabilitation Professional: This course will focus on the application of neuroscience theory and clinical principles of nervous system function to behavioral outcomes in sensation, movement, perception and cognition as typically seen by rehabilitation professionals. Anatomy and function of the human nervous systems will be taught with emphasis placed on its role in development, movement and motor learning, the sensory system, cognition, perception and behavior for the purpose of understanding rehabilitation principles and intervention. Components of normal function and dysfunction of the peripheral and central nervous systems will be reviewed from the perspective of the rehabilitation specialist. Nervous system components including the spinal cord, brainstem, cerebrum and the auditory, visual and vestibular systems will be reviewed. Primary roles and functions, knowledge of the physical structures involved and the neural pathways that link systems will be reviewed. This course will review disorders and dysfunction of these systems and the impact of deficits on function, behavior and the rehabilitative process. Application of concepts and knowledge will be linked to clinical problems and case studies from a therapist's perspective through the study of the sensory systems, motor learning, neurobehavioral presentations and an introduction to neurological assessment. Prerequisite: BIOL303. 4 sem. hrs. 4 crs. HLSC 420 Introduction to Occupational Therapy:* The scope of occupational therapy practice is introduced through observational experiences, small group discussions, lectures, and assignments. Students learn the of historical events on the practice of occupational therapy and the importance of professional values and ethics in the development of a therapeutic sense of self and sensitivity to multicultural issues. Emphasis is placed on the role of purposeful activity and engagement in occupations in promoting health, growth and fulfillment of human needs within a developmental framework. Additional topics include occupational therapy uniform terminology, medical terminology, occupational therapy literature, and the structure of occupational therapy professional organizations. Students are oriented to the problem-based learning philosophy of the program, strategies for self-directed learning, and information searching. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. * These courses are required for students who have been accepted into either the Occupational Therapy or Physical Therapy Graduate Program but who have limited work experience. Please see the 20042005 Mercy College Graduate Catalogue for further details.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

292 / Health Professions

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT Course Offerings: No student may take an Occupational Therapy Assistant course without first being admitted to the program.

OCTR 201 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : An Overview: The foundations of the practice of occupational therapy will be explored via didactic and activity based learning. Areas discussed include the history of the profession, OT philosophy, scope of practice, ethics, standards of practice and uniform terminology as well as cultural diversity and its impact on health care. OTR/COTA/OT aide roles are defined and participants are introduced to the concept of professionalism. Corequisite: OCTR 204. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. OCTR 203 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Therapeutic Modalities I: A practicum in the most current treatment modalities commonly used with children and adolescents to ameliorate dysfunction and maximize adaptation in play, school and self care skills. Corequisite: OCTR 260. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. OCTR 204 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Medical Conditions: This course focuses on developing an understanding of basic medical conditions affecting individuals throughout their life-span. Topics such as spina bifida, heart disease and strokes will be examined from the perspective of the Occupational Therapy Assistant. Corequisite: OCTR 201. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. OCTR 206 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Therapeutic Modalities II: A practicum in the most current treatment modalities commonly used with adults and the elderly to ameliorate dysfunction and maximize adaptation in work, leisure, and activities of daily living. Corequisite: OCTR 207 and OCTR 260. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. OCTR 207 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Synopsis: Concepts relevant to the operation of Occupational Therapy Services will be explored via didactic and activity based learning as well as through independent group and individual resource review. Topics included in this course are: Human Resource Functions, Program Evaluation and Quality Improvement. In addition, Management and Leadership Theory and Legal Issues will be addressed. Students will also gain valuable information about Regulatory Agencies, Professional Organization, Research and Wellness. Corequisite: OCTR 214 and OCTR 206. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. OCTR 209 & 210 Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Advanced Clinical Education I & II: Supervised full time internships in various approved agencies following the second year of course work. Must have completed all diadetic Occupation Theraphy Assistant Program coursework. 3 crs. per fieldwork. OCTR 214 (PSYN 214) Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Adulthood and Maturity: The study of the "passages" the adult must negotiate to attain maturity and the elements which contribute to the aging process: the health related disorders commonly associated with these stages; and the roles of the health-care provider in serving adults and the elderly. 1 credit is given to Fieldwork I placement. Corequisite: OCTR 206 and OCTR 207. 7 sem. hrs. 6 crs. + 1 cr. OCTR 218 (PSYN 218) Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Interaction Skills: Through experiential and didactic learning, this course will explore human interaction from solitary activities, simple one-to-one experiences and group experiences. Prerequisite: OCTR 201 and OCTR 204. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. OCTR 260 (PSYN 260) Occupational Therapy Practice for the Assistant : Childhood and Adolescence: The study of the developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. Addresses the most prevalent pediatric and adolescent disorders; the appropriate assessment and intervention strategies; and the roles of the health-care provider in serving this population. 1 credit is given to Fieldwork I placement. Corequisite: OCTR 203. 7 sem. hrs. 6 crs. + 1 cr.

Health Professions / 293

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT Course Offerings

PHTA 200 Introduction to Physical Therapy: History, philosophy, ethics, settings, and trends in Physical Therapy. Delineation of roles of the health care team, and of Physical Therapy personnel, with interpersonal skills needed to function as a health care provider and team member. Principles and procedures of basic patient care documentation. 3 sem. hrs.; 3 hrs. theory. 3 crs. PHTA 205 Functional Anatomy for the PTA: A supplementary study of the human body's structure and function as these relate to the practice of Physical Therapy. Emphasis will be placed on musculoskeletal, circulatory, and nervous systems. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory: 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs. PHTA 210 Physical Disabilities: A study of selected anatomical, physiological and pathological factors which relate to specific clinical conditions seen in physical therapy. Emphasis on basic treatment therapy. 3 sem. hrs.; 3 hrs. theory; 3 crs. PHTA 215 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES I: Basic principles and techniques of positioning, draping, bed mobility, transfers, ambulation, stair negotiation, massage, hydrocollator packs, ice packs and cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation. Emphasis on physiological changes and effects in commonly see diagnoses and in response to treatments. Laboratory practice with emphasis on basic functional skills, gait training, and positioning. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory; 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs. PHTA 220 CLINICAL ORIENTATION: Supervised clinical experience (35-40 hrs, based upon clinic) involving observation of physical therapy services to include an orientation to treatment, preparation and assistance to the Physical Therapist and introduction to medical issues, documentation and professional development. 1 sem, hr.; 1 cr. PHTA 225 NEUROLOGY & PATHOLOGY: Neurology - a comprehensive review of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system and the musculoskeletal system. Pathology -- a study of the structural and functional changes in tissue and organs of the body in conditions seen in the practice of Physical Therapy. 3 sem. hrs.; 3 hrs. theory; 3 crs. PHTA 230 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE I: General and specific exercises for conditions commonly referred to physical therapy. Principles involved in the theory and practical applications of specific therapeutic exercise and mechanical appliances. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory, 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs. PHTA 235 KINESIOLOGY for the PTA: A study of anatomical structures and movement as related to physical therapy procedures. The basic principles of the relationship between joint motion and mechanical action. Application of principles with emphasis on the analysis and biomechanics of all human motion. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory, 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs. PHTA 240 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES II: Theory, physiology, and application of heat, cold, light, water, electricity, and mechanical compression/distraction in therapeutic treatment. Overview of medical physics. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory, 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

294 / Health Professions PHTA 245 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE I: Supervised clinical experience (120 hrs, based upon clinic) including observation and application of physical therapy services. 2 sem. hrs.; 2 crs. PHTA 250 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE II: Continuation of Therapeutic Exercise I to include additional theory and application of exercise techniques, with emphasis on treatment of long-term disabilities. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory, 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs. PHTA 255 Rehabilitation: A study of principles of advanced movement during bed mobility, transfer training, gait training and activities of daily living. Emphasis on SCI and amputee populations. Theory and therapeutic application of the following rehabilitative equipment: slings, walkers, splints, canes, wheelchairs, crutches, orthotics and prosthesis. 3 sem. hrs.; 2 hrs. theory, 3 hrs. laboratory; 3 crs. PHTA 260 PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS of PT: A survey course explaining the psychological and sociological effects of Physical Therapy intervention on patients with various physical disabilities. Provides for discussion of program specific legal issues and the medical/ethical implications surrounding the field and an opportunity for a general review of therapeutic/non-therapeutic communication skills. 3 sem. hrs.; 3 hrs. theory; 3 crs. PHTA 265 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II: Supervised clinical experience (200 hrs, based upon clinic) in observation and application of physical therapy services. 3 sem. hrs.; 3 crs. PHTA 270 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE III: Supervised application of physical therapy procedures (320 hrs, based upon clinic) in the treatment of patients at a variety of selected physical therapy clinics. 5 sem. hrs.; 5 crs.

Honors Program / 295

HONORS PROGRAM

HONORS PROGRAM Course Offerings

(Courses for students in the Honors Program or by permission of the director) ARTT 190 Honors History of Art I: This course will study issues in the history of art in a more detailed and in-depth fashion than in the usual ARTT 107. The class will take full advantage of our proximity to New York City, planning several museum trips as part of the curriculum. Students will understand art as a vital part of history which links our modern culture with earlier eras. We will emphasize the sociological, historical, religious and other cultural meanings of art as well as focusing on the formal aspects. May replace general education course ARTT 107. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 190 Topics in Honors Biology: A seminar approach to basic biological concepts and scientific methodology. Topics range from current trends in biotechnology to human evolution and environmental issues. Admission by permission of instructor. May replace a general education biology course numbered 113 or below. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 190 Honors Cultural Anthropology: This course introduces students to the questions anthropologists ask and the ways they go about trying to answer them. Included is an investigation of what anthropologists mean by culture. Specific topics include social, political, and economic organizations, clanship, marriage, labor, and religion. Students have the opportunity to engage in small field work projects. May replace general education PSYN 101 or SOCL 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ECON 190 Honors Economics and Public Policy: This course will introduce students to the ways different economists view the free market economy in America and to the variety of economic policies and their impact on public issues. A knowledge of diverse economic approaches to public policy questions ­ ranging across the political spectrum ­ will help students critically evaluate the diversity of opinion on today's economic issues. This is an interactive course in which students analyze the economics of social and political issues. In an open classroom forum students present, discuss, and defend their positions. May replace general education requirement ECON 115. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 191 Honors English I: A close reading of selected literary texts that have interpreted human experience through a variety of worldviews. Includes field trips to museums and other cultural events. Development of skills in the writing of expository prose including the research paper. May replace general education requirement ENGL111 or ENGL112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 192 Honors English II: Further readings of masterpieces in literary traditions of the past and present views. Further development of research and writing skills. Includes field trips to museums as well as other cultural events. Admission by permission of instructor. May replace general education requirement ENGL 111 or ENGL 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FORL 19X: An introduction to various languages not regularly available at the college. In the past the Honors Program, by student request, has offered Latin, German and Chinese. Fulfills general education foreign language requirement. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HIST 195 Honors Topics in History I: Selected historical occurrences are studied in terms of how they illuminate themes basic to an understanding of historical and political processes. May replace general education history requirement. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

296 / Honors Program HIST 196 Honors Topics in History II: Continued study of selected historical occurrences in terms of how they illuminate themes basic to an understanding of historical processes. May replace general education history requirement. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 398 Honors Topics in Humanities: An interdisciplinary course on varied topics, open to students who have already fulfilled part of their core requirements. The course considers subjects from a literary, historical, artistic, scientific, and social perspective. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 385 Honors Journalism: The Communication Revolution: Students take a historical trip from ancient Greece to modern America. Examination of the impact that major media inventions--the alphabet, the printing press, television, and the computer--have had on these cultures. Students will also consider major communications theories as derived from anthropology, psychology, and linguistics. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MUSI 195 Honors Music: This course will vary from year to year depending on student interest and concurrent honors program offerings. Subjects to be studied might include issues in the historical or international music scene, comparisons of "art" music and popular music, western and non-western music, or music and political censorship. May replace general education course MUSI 107. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PHIL190 Honors Philosophy I: Selected topics in philosophy studies for ways in which they illustrate important contributions of individual thinkers at a given time in history, or significant changes in attitudes toward the human condition, or new ways of answering the perennial questions of philosophy. Admission by permission of the Director. May replace general education course PHIL110. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. POLS 190 Honors Political Science: Selected topics in political science, studied in terms of how they illuminate themes basic to an understanding of political processes: i.e., the various ways power is employed to influence the allocation of values in the public domain and the consequences of such employment. May replace general education course POLS 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 195 Honors Psychology: Specific conceptual focuses for the course have included the mindbody question, and concepts of the self, gender and society. Primary readings include the works of early philosophers whose ideas led to the development of psychology, the works of important historical figures in psychology, and modern theorists. May replace general education course PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 190 Honors Speech: This course examines the physical and physiological features of voice and speech production and factors related to active listening. It will provide practice in organizing and presenting speeches for various purposes, including persuasion. Aristotelian principles of rhetoric will be applied to contemporary controversial issues, identified and analyzed by students. May replace general education requirement SPEC 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. College Scholar Thesis Workshops are open only to students selected as College Scholars. The departmental prefix is determined by the student and the project advisor. 490 Thesis Workshop I: Participants in the workshop will design and draft a senior-level project in conjunction with a project advisor. During the semester students registered for the workshop will meet periodically with their advisors and with other College Scholars, where appropriate, to discuss methodologies and results. Open only to students selected as College Scholars. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. 491 Thesis Workshop II: Students who successfully completed Thesis Workshop I register for this course to complete their project. During the semester, students registered for the workshop will meet periodically with their advisors and with other College Scholars, where appropriate, to share their findings and make proposals to strengthen each other's work. Open only to students selected as College Scholars. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Library and Information Science Program / 297

LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

LISC 101 ­ Information Use and Library Research This course introduces students to a variety of information resources and services useful in college and the workplace. The course emphasizes locating and using these resources, as well as the basic information skills required for research on any subject. 1 sem. hr. 1 cr. LISC 260 Using Electronic Resources for Research: This course is offered exclusively online (Distance Education - MerLIN). The objective of this course is to learn how to use the Internet as a research tool. Students will learn the basics of the Internet, develop search strategies, evaluate web sites, learn to cite web resources, and apply this knowledge to finding quality information in various fields such as Health, Business, Social Sciences, Education, and so on. Students will also be introduced to the online indexes/ databases Mercy College Libraries subscribes to. Other issues such as copyright, intellectual property, plagiarism, security of information, and so on, will be explored. At the end of the course, the students will be able to use the Web and the online indexes/databases to find quality information. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG110 or placement in ENG111 and CISC120 or Division Placement Exam for a waiver of this course. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LISC 295 Topics in Information Studies: Special course offered on an occasional basis in response to student and faculty interest in the field of Information Studies. Topics covered will vary each time the course is offered, allowing for coverage of new subject matter or to provide an opportunity for an instructor with special discipline-specific knowledge to teach a course. Special topics to be covered will be announced by the Library Division. Topics could include Oral History and Tradition, Storytelling and Folk Literature, History of Printing and Publishing, Information Policy and Intellectual Freedom, Knowledge Management, Records and Information Resource Management, Instructional Design and Development, and so on. Prerequisite: ENG111 or placement in ENG112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

298 / Literature, Language, and Communication

LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND COMMUNICATION AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE COURSE OFFERINGS

AMSL 115 Introduction to American Sign Language: Introduction to American Sign Language is designed to introduce the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) with particular attention to the grammar of the language and the culture of American Deaf persons. It is a course for students with little or no previous knowledge of ASL. This course will create a foundation of basic conversational skills and a command of the essential grammatical practices of the language. Not open to students with native or near native fluency. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. AMSL 116 Intermediate Sign Language: Intermediate American Sign Language is designed to develop the student's expressive and receptive abilities with regard to signing and finger spelling, extended signing vocabulary, and foster fluency, to aid manual communication both quantitatively and qualitatively with the Deaf population. Prerequisite: AMSL115. Not open to students with native or near native fluency. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS COURSE OFFERINGS

COCM 154 (JOUR 154) Publicity Writing: This course covers the variety of persuasive writing forms and techniques used by the public relations professional to invite media coverage of corporate/client events and activities, to promote awareness and use of products and services, and to encourage consumer/audience support of corporate issues. Students will learn how to prepare press releases, pitch letters, press kits, public service announcements, and copy for brochures and promotional materials. Prerequisite: ENGL111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 200 Writing for the Organization I: This course is designed for business communicators who are required to research and prepare corporate correspondence for external and internal publications. Emphasis is placed on the precise use of language, understanding appropriate style in business writing, and the effective reporting of information. Documents such as memos, letters, short reports, and proposals will be practiced. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 210 Introduction to Business Practice: This course reviews the economic, behavioral and legal factors affecting organizations and how they function. Topics include diversification in the workforce, government regulation, understanding the management function, the language of business and the global marketplace. The legal ramifications of organizational communication will also be examined. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 220 Internal Communications: This course examines the flow of information within the business environment. The special information needs of employees will be examined, an understanding of informal and formal channels of communication will be discussed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of communication techniques such as meetings, one-on-one conferences, telephone, e-mail, etc. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 299 COCM 230 Writing for the Organization II: This course introduces business writing at the management level, including the planning, writing and producing of documents and publications designed to interpret the organization's activities and goals to both internal and external audiences. Students will practice writing a variety of business documents including policy statements, executive summaries, meeting minutes, longer reports and proposals. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 240 External Communications and Marketing: This course covers the special information needs of external corporate constituencies, including customers, stockholders, suppliers, and industry regulators. The role of communication in achieving perceived value will be explored, with emphasis on the communication function of sales, marketing, customer service and advertising. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 266 (ENGL 266) Writing for the Web: This course prepares students to develop, manage and evaluate meaningful and functional text for organizational websites and intranets. The unique character and physical nature of website usage will be covered, the development of web-friendly text will be practiced, formatting and layout as a function of Web Communication will be included, and the use of web copy as a marketing tool and human resource function will be discussed. Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and CISC/MATH 120. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. COCM 300 Publication Design: This course examines the relationship between art and editorial material. Through practical training and in-class instruction students will learn how to design, edit, specify type, select color, stock, and the appropriate production process. Students will practice designing typical organizational publications such as newsletters, annual reports and collateral material. The principles of design as applied to exhibits and displays will also be covered. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 356 Practicum: Corporate Communication Technologies: This course provides the student with exposure to and hands-on practice with current, popular wireless, web-based, satellite, cellular and desktop technologies that corporations rely on for the management and delivery of communication to employees, customers, the media and the general public. Students will research, experience and learn the advantages, and disadvantages of webcasting, video conferencing, teleconferencing, net meetings, and PDA's and will explore the applications of these technologies in the fields of marketing, communications, employee relations, public relations, media relations, investor relations and management. Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and CISC/MATH 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 365 Practicum: Newsletter Preparation: This course will produce professional quality newsletters or similar material, either for units of Mercy College or for outside business. Students will learn how to design newsletters, write text, do layout, negotiate with printers, and develop mailing lists. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 370 (SPCM 370) Effective Presentations: This course focuses on the principles and techniques of preparing and delivering oral presentations. Students will practice a variety of speech forms and styles used in business and will have the opportunity to critique their own videotaped performance. The preparation and effective use of accompanying visuals will also be covered. Prerequisite: SPCM 110 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. COCM 390 Project Management: This course reviews the most practical and productive management techniques for the planning and implementation of projects on time and within budget. Emphasis will be placed on time management, skill-building, goal-setting, resource allocation and the reporting of results. Case histories will be examined and principles of team building and motivation will also be discussed. COCM 398 Corporate Communications Research Methods: This course examines the use of research techniques, measurement tools and resources to inform corporate communication planning and programming decisions. The course focuses on types, sources and uses of primary and secondary data, examines methods of conducting research, and reviews processes used in the corporate communications profession to

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

300 / Literature, Language, and Communication evaluate program success and performance. Prerequisite: ENGL 111; MATH 115 or MATH 116 or ECON/MATH 122. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. COCM 399 Internship in Corporate Communications: An appropriate in-field experience arranged through the Division of Literature, Language, and Communication. 1-3 sem. hrs. 1-3 crs. COCM 400 Capstone and Research Seminar in Corporate Communications: Students will work on a substantial original project of their own choosing. Students may work together on team projects as long as the lines of responsibility are clearly defined. The projects will serve as a means of assessing student competency levels, and showcasing student abilities for the job market. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

ENGLISH LITERATURE COURSE OFFERINGS

NOTE: Placement in the appropriate level is by examination. Students must take the course designated by the placement exam and all subsequent courses in the English composition sequence through ENGL 112, Written English and Literary Studies II. ENGL 006 Introduction to Academic Writing: This course is an integrated approach to the mastery of basic writing and grammar skills for the purpose of developing proficiency in academic writing. Emphasis will be on correct sentence structure, the mechanics of grammar and punctuation, and vocabulary development from selected readings. Students will learn to organize, develop, write, and revise paragraphs and short essays. Prerequisite: Mercy College Placement Exam. There is a uniform Exit Examination. 4 sem. hrs.; 4 crs. (Non-Degree Credit) ENGL 109 Fundamentals of Exposition: Introduction to the expository writing process. Students write and revise short essays and are required to pass a uniform exit examination in which they are asked to write an essay on one of several assigned topics. There is a uniform Exit Examination. 3 sem. hrs. 2 hrs. lab per week. 3 crs. ENGL 110 Elements of Exposition: Organization, writing, and editing of expository essays. Introduction to the use of basic library reference works. Students are required to pass a uniform exit examination in which they are asked to write an essay on one of several assigned topics. 3 sem. hrs. 2 hrs. lab per week, 3 crs. ENGL 111 Written English and Literary Studies I: The writing of expository prose, particularly in the analysis of literature. Students read and analyze representative plays and write essays on assigned topics. Introduction to critical essays and research methods. There is a uniform Exit Examination. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 112 Written English and Literary Studies II: Critical analysis of fiction and poetry. Students read and analyze major literary works and compose a full-length research paper on an assigned topic. There is a uniform exit exam. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. The Learning Centers at Mercy College provide students with individual assistance in writing. The writing tutors at the Learning Centers are professional instructors, and their help is provided free of charge for all registered students. Currently, Learning Centers are operating at the Dobbs Ferry, Bronx, Yorktown, and White Plains campuses, and at every extension center. ENGL191 Honors English I: A close reading of selected literary texts that have interpreted human experience through a variety of worldviews. Includes field trips to museums and other cultural events. Development of skills in the writing of expository prose including the research paper. May replace general education requirement ENGL 111 or ENGL112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 301 ENGL192 Honors English II: Further readings of masterpieces of Western culture from the Renaissance to the present. Includes field trips to museums, concerts, plays and lectures. Admission by permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 112 is a prerequisite for all English courses numbered 200 and above. ENGL 200 Poetics: Introduction to Literary Texts: An analysis of literary texts. Students examine the use of words, images, metaphors and symbols to create the structures basic to the verbal imagination. English majors should take this course as early as possible. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 205 Survey of English Literature I: A survey of the traditions in structure and content that shaped English literature from the Old English period through the Age of Enlightenment. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 206 Survey of English Literature II: A survey of the traditions in structure and content that shaped English literature from the beginnings of the Romantic Movement through the 1950s. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 217 Introduction to Creative Writing: Students define the nature and range of creative writing in fiction and poetry, and explore the particular writing forms by examining the texts of established writers. Workshop format. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 220 The Short Story: An introduction to the historical and structural development of the short story, as well as to the major practitioners of the craft. Students should acquire a critical lexicon so that they can examine, evaluate, and appreciate the art of the short story. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 225 Classical Literature: A study of epic, lyric, and satiric works of Greek and Roman writers selected for their pervasive influence and present vitality. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 230 The Bible as Literature: An examination of the major themes, characters, and genres of the Old and New testaments. Students read the Bible as a work of literature and gain awareness of it as a source of inspiration for literature and all of the other arts. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 234 Literature by Women: An exploration of traditions in writing by women; of the relationships between writing by women and the male tradition. At the discretion of the instructor, the course can be organized by genre, period, nationality, or theme. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 235 Biography and Autobiography: An examination of selected autobiographies by twentieth-century authors. Issues such as the factual and/or fictional aspects of autobiographies, the relationship between an author's autobiography and his/her literary works, and the relationship between an author's autobiography and his/her society will be discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 239 (HIST 239) American Studies I: An interdisciplinary approach to American character and culture, treating such themes as the frontier tradition; the American hero; the impact of popular culture; the significance of race, ethnicity, and gender; and national values and ideals. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 257 Latin American Literature: This is an introductory, survey course that introduces students to the work of some of the major writers from different countries of Latin America. In this course students will learn about critical issues that are part of the Latin American experience, and explore how different writers have explored these issues via different literary techniques, at different times in Latin American history, and in different Latin American countries. Prerequisite: ENGL112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

302 / Literature, Language, and Communication ENGL 259 (SPCM 259) Oral Performance of Literature: Principles of and practice in the oral presentation of prose, poetry, and drama with a focus on understanding and control of voice production and diction. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 263 (HIST 263) The Black Atlantic World: Literature/History: A study of the historical background of the Third World, the rise of nationalist movements, and the issues that these nations face today. The course follows an interdisciplinary approach that includes the study of Third World literature. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 266 (COCM 266) Writing for the Web: This course prepares students to develop, manage and evaluate meaningful and functional text for organizational websites and intranets. The unique character and physical nature of website usage will be covered, the development of web-friendly text will be practiced, formatting and layout as a function of Web Communication will be included, and the use of web copy as a marketing tool and human resource function will be discussed. Prerequisites: ENGL111 and CISC/MATH120. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 270 British Novel: 1750 to 1900: This course traces the development of the novel form in English from its varied prose origins, and examines representative authors, such as Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, and Hardy, selected for their contribution to the history of the novel. The role of the individual and of society, and of men and women are subjects considered throughout the semester. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 271 Modern British Novel: 1900 to Present: A study of Anglo-Irish novels written between the end of the nineteenth century and the present, and the ways in which works from this period break with the past through changing concepts of time and reality. Symbolism and stream-of-consciousness, the role of the absurd, and the women's movement are some of the developments in form and content analyzed in the works of this era. Students will also explore different critical strategies for approaching texts. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 275 Modern American Fiction: This course defines American literature in the context of a multicultural society. It introduces the student to the major figures in the growth and development of American fiction after 1920, including Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison and Morrison. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 280 History of Drama: An overview of drama from its classical origins in Ancient Greece through the birth of modern drama in the latter part of the nineteenth century. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 281 Modern Drama: An introduction to the major playwrights of the twentieth century beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg to the present including such writers as August Wilson, Athol Fugard, Wole Soyinka, David Henry Wang, and Wendy Wasserstein, among others. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 285 Modern Poetry: The objectives of this course are to acquaint the student with the works of the major modern poets and to work toward an understanding of what is meant by "modern" when applied to poetry. Poets include Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Stevens, and Williams. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 295 Topics in Literature: Offered in response to particular interests of students and faculty. Intensive study of a major work, single author, genre, mode, theme, critical method, or literary period. Recent course offerings have included African-American Women Writers, The Quest, Reclaiming the Other, Morrison and Walker, and the Romance. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 300 Medieval Literature: A study of genres important to the Middle Ages such as lais, fabliaux, bestiaries, dream vision poetry, and Arthurian romance. Continental and English sources, and the influences which shaped these forms, are examined. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 305 Chaucer: An examination of Chaucer's narrative art and poetic technique. Students explore the literary, cultural, linguistic, and rhetorical background to establish the context of Chaucer's work. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 303 ENGL 310 Renaissance Poetry and Prose: This course presents the achievements of sixteenth century British literature with an understanding of its admixture of Medieval and High Renaissance elements. It enables students to understand the historical, religious, and sociological backgrounds of the period. (Previously titled: The Sixteenth Century) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 315 Shakespeare: A critical reading of selected works. Students gain familiarity with the syntax and lexicon of Shakespeare's language, and develop a basic understanding of the cultural and intellectual background in which Shakespeare lived and out of which he practiced his art. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 320 Milton: An intensive study of Paradise Lost. Attention is given to the political, religious and intellectual influences of the period that bear upon the work. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 325 The Seventeenth Century: Poetry and Prose: A study of representative English literature written between 1600 and 1660. Students become familiar with the major literary modes of the period, and consider this literature in relation to the religious, political, social, and economic context of its time. Readings from Donne, Jonson, Marvell, Herbert, Locke, among others. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 330 The Eighteenth Century: Comedy and Satire: Students analyze representative works of prose, poetry and drama written by authors of the period. They identify the neoclassical tenets of decorum, clarity, reason and elegance by attention to the distinctive literary and poetic forms of the age. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 335 The Major English Romantics: A study of the achievements of the major Romantic poets and their contributions to literature and to the history of ideas. Students acquire an understanding of the period in England between 1798 and 1830 (approximately), particularly in terms of its aesthetic concerns. Attention is focused on how these concerns were shaped by the socio-political milieu. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 340 The Major Victorians: An examination of the major writers of poetry and prose in England during the nineteenth century. Students read poems and essays in terms of their style, their role in the history of English literature, and the ways in which they reflect the distinctive historical issues of the period. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 352 Contemporary African Literature: This is an introductory, survey course that introduces students to major post-colonial writers from Modern Africa, including those north of the Sahara. Using multiple genres of works both in English and in English translation, this course examines a number of contemporary issues relevant to Africa. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. ENGL 353 African-American Literature: African American Literature is a survey of twentieth century artists starting with those from the Harlem Renaissance and continuing through the millennium. Focus is on the literature but may also include other art forms. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. 3sem. hrs. 3crs. ENGL 357 Contemporary Nobel Laureates: Contemporary Nobel Laureates introduces students to recent winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature who fall outside of the British/ Western literary tradition. The course will use a cross section of literary forms although the core will revolve around three novels: Naguib Mahfouz' Palace Walk, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon and Gabriel Garcia Marquez" One Hundred Years of Solitude. Prerequisite: ENGL112. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 360 American Colonial Writings: The earliest literary efforts on American soil, including diaries, poetry, autobiography and prose. This course studies the writings of Christopher Columbus, William Bradford, Ann Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Sarah Kemble Knight, Benjamain Franklin, John and Abigail Adams, and others. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

304 / Literature, Language, and Communication ENGL 365 American Romanticism: A study of the prominent works of nineteenth century American literature to see the shape of the European Romantic movement as it crosses the Atlantic and enters American culture. Students may discuss: the Puritan roots of the Transcendental movement; the Radical movement in America; the state of religion in ante-bellum America; the impact of growing industrialization on American society; the artist's reaction to the nervousness and dislocation of the period. Texts include works by Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 370 American Realism: A review of transcendentalism to prepare for contrasting with post-Civil War realism. Readings in Twain, James, Howells will be followed by a consideration of the impact of literary naturalism on the writings of Crane, Dreiser, Wharton. Newly reconsidered narratives are also examined, including those of Chopin, Jewett, Freeman, and American slaves. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 380-381 Cooperative Education in English, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in English include corporations, non-profit organizations, magazines, radio and TV stations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 383 (HIST 383) American Studies II: A culminating seminar during which each American Studies major will work on a substantial project or paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 239. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 385 Masterpieces of European Literature: This course examines a selection of representative works by European masters in translation. The specific content may vary with each instructor; the range from which works are selected spans the Middle Ages to the Post-Modern Era. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 397 Independent Study in Literature: A self-directed course to pursue some literary interest not included in existing English courses. Initiated, designed, and carried out by the student with the approval and guidance of a faculty member. 3 crs. ENGL 400 Critical Approaches/Advanced Research Methods: This course introduces students to the various schools of literary criticism, thereby enabling them to develop and refine their own critical approaches to literary texts. A seminar to be taken toward the end of the English major. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 402 Applied English Grammar: A comprehensive study of the way groups of words function to make meaning in the sentence. Emphasis is placed on learning grammatical constructions and sentence combining as strategies for clear and effective writing. Recommended for Education students . 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 404 The Structure and Form of English: This course familiarizes students with the general concepts of descriptive linguistics, especially as applied to contemporary English. Students learn how linguistics aids in understanding and interpreting works of literature, and are introduced to varieties of English based on geography, ethnicity, and sex. Recommended for Education students. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ENGL 406 World Englishes: An introduction to the English language from its Indo-European origins to the present, including changes in sound, sentence structure, and written form. Students study language policy and dialects of English, including those of the Western hemisphere, Asia, and Africa. Recommended for Education majors. (Previously titled: The History of the English Language) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 305

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COURSE OFFERINGS

NOTE: Placement in the appropriate level is by examination. Twelve credit maximum may be applied toward degree requirements unless otherwise specified. The following sequence of courses is required of all ESL students who matriculate as of Fall 2000. Once a student is placed in the ESL/English composition sequence, he/she must take all the courses at each level, each term until completion of the English composition sequence. Students who enter at the intermediate level will take the following courses: ESLA ESLA HUMN SPCM ESLA ESLA HUMN SPCM ESLA ESLA HUMN SPCM 131 132 101 105 151 152 102 108 171 172 103 109 Intermediate Grammar Intermediate Writing American Culture I Voice and Articulation for Non-native Speakers of English Advanced Grammar Advanced Writing American Culture II Advanced Voice & Articualtion for non-native Speakers of English Transitional Grammar Transitional Writing American Culture III Conversational Speech for Non-native Speakers of English

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

After students successfully complete ESLA 171 and ESLA 122 they will proceed to ENGL 109 Fundamentals of Exposition. SPCM 109 Speech for Non-native Speakers of English may be taken after students have successfully completed ESLA 151 and ESLA 152. All students registered in the ESL program MUST take SPCM 109 Speech for Non-native Speakers of English (unless excused by the speech faculty) before they go on to SPCM 110 Oral Communication. Intermediate Level: ESLA 131 Intermediate Grammar: Building on knowledge of simple sentence grammar, students will master compound and complex sentences, perfect tenses, passive voice, internal sentence punctuation. Students will recognize more subtle errors in syntax, word order, verb use.* 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ESLA 132 Intermediate Writing: Students will produce short compositions of 200-300 words, developing abstract ideas with attention to logic, transition, and arrangement of ideas. Students will expand their vocabulary through an emphasis on usage required for work and everyday situations, as well as through the introduction of words and phrases suitable for college study.* 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. Advanced Level: ESLA 151 Advanced Grammar: Development of ability to use a broad range of English grammatical structures at a level consonant with college study.* Prerequisite: ESLA131 or placement into ESLA 151.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ESLA 152 Advanced Writing: Students will write paragraphs with topic sentence, development, concluding sentence; they will proceed to basic compositions of 300-400 words with introduction, body, and conclusion. Emphasis will be given to helping students function in English in their college classes.* Prerequisite: ESLA131 or placement into ESLA 151. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. Transitional Level: ESLA 171 Transitional Grammar: Developmemt of ability to use a broad range of complex grammatical structures used in college level written English. Prerequisite: ESLA151 or placement into ESLA171. 3 sem., hrs. 3 crs. ESLA 172 Transitional Writing: In this course, students who are non-native speakers of English will refine their writing skills so that they are prepared for college level written English.* Prerequisite: ESLA152 or placement into ESLA 172. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. *There is a uniform Exit Examination.

306 / Literature, Language, and Communication

FILM STUDIES COURSE OFFERINGS:

FILM 210 Film and Culture: An overview. What is a film? Is it a product of the film industry or an expression of a collaborative team of creators? What can we learn from history? Discussion of who made the movies and who censored them. Theory? Introduction to ethnic, class, and gender perspectives on the movies. Aesthetics? Introduction to the development of film genres (types) and the traditions associated with special types of story telling. Introduction to the basics of writing about film. Attention to formal analysis. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 211 The Language of Film: The poetics of film. Close reading techniques; advanced study and application of the essential vocabulary of film study. Advanced study in the reading and interpretation of the film frame, editing strategies; formalist and realist codes of cinematic expression. Attention to the historical/development of filmic; vocabulary and techniques. Attention to cultural variations. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 212 Violence and the Quest for Freedom in Hollywood Western: Dedicated to one of the first and most representative American film genres. Horses, Indians, Cowboys, guns, and epic fights: why do we love them all? The aesthetic, psychological, gender, and semiotic implications of the genre. Introduction to the major texts, directors, and stars central to its creation. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 213 Studios, Stars, and Spectacle in Hollywood's Golden Age, 1930-1950: In-depth study of the formative years of Hollywood as the film capital of the world. The rise of institutional glamour, the star system, the "Hollywood" story and the Hollywood production system. In-depth historical study of the major directors, stars, and genres and developments in cinematic language and technique of the period. May include the work and influence of Greta Garbo, Clark Gable, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Katharine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, William Powell, Myrna Loy, Frank Capra, W. S. Van Dyke, Michael Curtiz. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 214 The Dark Genres: Film Noir, Science Fiction, Horror, and the Gangster Film: Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? Hollywood developed a number of special kinds of storytelling traditions that answered the question. Suspense, outer space, the supernatural, and crime all became metaphors for our worst secrets and nightmares. Study of the psychology, aesthetics, gender and racial issues involved in the traditional Hollywood choices of image, stars, music, and stories for its dark genres. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 220 Masters of Film: Griffith, Welles, and Hitchcock: Comprehensive investigation of the life and works of the three giants of film history: D. W. Griffith, Orson Welles, and Alfred Hitchcock. Attention to the historical period of each and how each represented and shaped the film of that era. Attention to the aesthetic contributions of each. Introduction to the full spectrum of works created by each filmmaker. Attention to the implications of the oeuvre of each for psychological, semiotic, and gender theories, and to cultural studies. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 230 Film and Gender: Is there a woman in this movie? Or just a cultural fantasy? Is the hero forceful or sadistic? Selected films that highlight gender issues. Attention to the gender implications of cinematic language (film frame, sound, shot patterns, narrative structure). Introduction to the major texts of gender criticism, from Laura Mulvey, 1977, to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 235 Screen Comedy And Clowns: The first films ever made included comedies; the world needs to laugh. But comedy gives more than pleasure; it is also a cultural escape valve, allowing us to "joke" about forbidden subjects. Study of the stars and directors who made the world's great film comedies; screening of great comedies from the golden days of silent films, through screwball comedy, the social comedies of the 1940s and 1950s, and the liberation comedies of the 1960ss and 1970s to the present. Discussion of the way comedy permits us to talk about race, gender, and

Literature, Language, and Communication / 307 class; discussion of the relationship between comedy and the unconscious. Possible screenings include the films of Charlie Chaplin, George Melies, Buster Keaton, Mae West, Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello, Frank Capra, the Marx Brothers, the Three Stooges, Marilyn Monroe, Jacques Tati, Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Preston Sturges, Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, Katharine Hepburn, Peter Sellers... Jerry Lewis, Rob Reiner, Spike Lee, Robin Williams, and Jim Carrey. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 240 New Frontiers in African Film: Introduction to the film production of Africa, and of films influenced by African movie makers. Course will focus on four themes: tradition and modernity, politics and government, African popular culture, and the evolving status of Africa women. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 250 European Trends in Film: Survey of the rich traditions of the national film industries across the Atlantic. Analysis of the complicated love-hate relationship between French, British, Italian, German, Russian, Spanish and Scandinavian cinema and Hollywood. (Other European national works may be included.) Introduction to historically important directors, stars, and films. Prerequisite: ENGL 111.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 295 Topics in Film Studies: Breakout course, rotating course content. Venue for experimental courses, and courses of special interest to both faculty and film majors. Possibilities include courses about individual figures like David Lynch, Mae West, Akira Kurasawa, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, and Ernst Lubitsch; theme courses like Violence in Film, and Films of Good and Evil; courses about genres like the screwball comedy, documentary film, and the musical movie. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 300 Internship in Film Studies: Course credit for a semester's work in the industry or allied fields. Placement in major industrial locations, according to individual student interest. To be arranged and supervised by the Film Studies faculty. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FILM 400 Senior Seminar: Capstone Course. Advanced studies in theory. Intensive exploration of the problematic, profound rifts among the different schools of film theorists. Application of theories to current first-run films and to problematic films in cinema history. Each student will produce a senior dissertation. Prerequisite: FILM 210, FILM 211. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FRENCH COURSE OFFERINGS

APPLIED LINGUISTICS

FREN 115 French for Communication: A beginning French course designed to help develop listening and speaking skills in the French language. The course will help students deal with real everyday situations (identifying needs, shopping, seeking medical assistance, gathering information, etc.). The aim of the course is to enable students to understand basic spoken French within the limits of the topics presented in the course, including (but not limited to) business, travel, and social interaction. This course is not open to students who have studied French in high school for more than two semesters or to students who have native or near-native fluency in French. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FREN 116 Communicating in French: This course is a continuation of French 115 and is designed to further the progress made by students who will continue to learn the basic elements of French structure and vocabulary necessary for an ability in this language. A large emphasis of the course is on speaking and understanding French as it is spoken today in France and in over thirty countries throughout the world. Prerequisite: FREN 115 or the equivalent; two years of high school French; or approval of the Language Program Director. Please note that candidates for New York State Teacher Certification and Mercy College English

308 / Literature, Language, and Communication Literature majors must take two courses (six credits) in a second language. These two courses must be in the same second language. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FREN 160 Translation Techniques: This course is designed for students who will be doing translations from French to English and from English to French. These translations can be both written and spoken. Translations can include business, commerce, health care, social work, legal, as well as literary topics. Prerequisities: FREN 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FREN 265 Reading and Composition: Thorough review of essential points of grammar as well as an introduction to more idiomatic constructions leading to the mastery of the French language. Texts selected from short stories and literary writings will be utilized for a stylistic study of modern French. Prerequisite: FREN116 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs., 3 crs.

LITERATURE (OFFERED IN FRENCH) COURSE OFFERINGS

FREN 397 Independent Study in French: The life and works of an outstanding author. Guided readings and discussion of the works of the author chosen by the student after consultation with a mentor; presentation of the results of such study required. Prerequsities: FREN 116 and FREN 265 or permission of instructor. 3 crs.

HUMANITIES

These interdisciplinary, thematic courses are for non-English majors as well as for majors and may be taken as electives or as a minor concentration. Although literature predominates, other media, such as films, recordings, paintings, and music are introduced. ENGL 111 is a prerequisite for all Humanities courses numbered 200 and above. HUMN 006 College Support: Designed specifically for first semester students who are registered in the developmental semester and taught by the learning center faculty and Title V counselors. This course provides students with academic strategies that include: Time Management, Learning Styles, Note Taking, Improving Memory, How to Write an Essay, Effective Reading, Test Preparation and Using Critical Thinking Skills. This course also provides students with a better understanding of the transition to college and assists in empowering students to successfully adapt to the college culture. (non-degree credit). HUMN 101 American Culture I: Students will read and discuss fiction and non-fiction concerning American life and institutions. Open to non-native speakers of English only. Co-requisite: ESLA 131 , ESLA 172, SPCM 105. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 102 American Culture II: The purpose of this course is to increase knowledge of American life and culture, through readings in modern American life, mores and social issues, to students who are non-native speakers of English. An understanding and knowledge of modern American culture will be based on the four competencies: writing, critical thinking, oral communication, and where possible, quantitative reasoning. Prerequisite: HUMN 101 unless placement into ESLA 151/ ESLA 152 or ENLA 151/ENLA 152 level. Open only to non-native speakers of English. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 103 American Culture III: This course introduces students who are non-native speakers of English to everyday topics in modern American life through cross-cultural experience. Students will examine analytical readings of North American fiction. The purpose of the course is to develop active reading skills, and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: HUMN102 unless placement into ESLA171 and ESLA172. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 309 HUMN 212 The Significance of Dreams: Theoretical and imaginative insights into the dream experience and related phenomena important to an understanding of the language of symbol in myth, fairy tale, literature, painting, and music. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 214 The Erotic Impulse: Past and present ideas and images of love and sex in light of conflicting views within Western civilization. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 216 Women: Myth and Reality: Concepts, images, myths, archetypes, and stereotypes pertaining to women in fiction and in theory. What men have said about women in contrast to what women have said about themselves. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 220 Comedy, Wit, and Humor: Comic forms in literature, art, music, film, and cartoon. The origins and development of comedy, and theories of the comic. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 222 Monsters, Nightmares, and the Occult: Ways in which art, magic, science, and religion have tried to account for the "dark" side of human existence. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 226 Business, Values, and Modern America: The emergence of modern forms of business and the relationship of business to society. The socialization process one undergoes upon entering a modern business or corporation. Especially recommended for business students. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 228 Human Dimensions of Health Care: The problems presented by modern health care: 1) inherited attitudes toward the human body; 2) the nature of health-care institutions and the healer/patient relationship; 3) society's stereotypes of health-care professionals. Especially recommended for students in health care. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 240 America as a Foreign Culture: This course will examine the cultures of recent immigrant populations to the U.S. Culturally defined traditions, social mores and values will be explored and compared and contrasted to those of the dominant American culture. "Culture Shock," the "minority experience" and patterns of adaptation, assimilation and integration will be discussed as well as the ways in which individual cultural identity is preserved and retained. The literary and artistic expression and relevant social history of such areas as Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East will be included. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. HUMN 295 Topics in Humanities: Offered in response to particular interests of students and faculty. Intensive study of a theme or topic which lends itself to a humanistic, interdisciplinary approach. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

INTEGRATED SKILLS COURSE OFFERING

INSK 101 Integrated Skills: A diagnostic, prescriptive, integrated approach to the mastery of reading and writing skills for the purpose of developing proficiency in literacy. 4 sem. hrs. 2 hrs. Lab per week. 4 crs.

310 / Literature, Language, and Communication

ITALIAN COURSE OFFERINGS

APPLIED LINGUISTICS

ITAL 115 Italian for Communication: A beginning Italian course designed to help develop listening and speaking skills in the Italian language. The course will help students with real everyday situations (identifying needs, shopping, seeking medical assistance, gathering information, etc.). The aim of the course is to enable students to understand basic spoken Italian within the limits of the topics presented in the course, including (but not limited to) business, travel and social interaction. This course is not open to students who have studied Italian in high school for more than two semesters or to students who have native or near-native fluency in Italian. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ITAL 116 Communicating in Italian: This course is a continuation of Italian 115 and is designed to further the progress made by students in developing basic communication skills in Italian. Students will continue to learn the basic elements of Italian structure and vocabulary necessary for an ability to communicate in this language. A large emphasis of the course is on speaking and understanding Italian as it is spoken today in Italy and in other parts of the world. Prerequisite: ITAL 115 or the equivalent; two years of high school Italian; or approval of the Language Program Director. Please note that candidates for New York State Teacher Certification and Mercy College English Literature majors must take two courses (six credits) in a second language. These two courses must be in the same second language. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ITAL 160 Translation Techniques: English/Italian and Italian/English. This course is designed for people who will be doing literary and technical translation in both languages. Prerequisites: ITAL 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. ITAL 265 Reading and Composition: Thorough review of essential points of grammar as well as an introduction to more idiomatic constructions leading to the mastery of the Italian language. Texts selected from short stories and literary writings will be utilized for a stylistic study of modern Italian. Prerequisites: ITAL 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

LITERATURE (OFFERED IN ITALIAN) COURSE OFFERINGS

ITAL 397 Independent Study in Italian: The life and works of an outstanding author: guided readings and discussion of the works of the author chosen by the student after consultation with the seminar director; a presentation of the results of such study required. Prerequisites: ITAL 116 and ITAL 265 or permission of instructor.3 crs.

JOURNALISM AND MEDIA COURSE OFFERINGS

Journalism offers the student an opportunity to apply his or her writing ability to the challenge of reporting and interpreting events. Technical skill is gained through internships on local newspapers, radio, and television stations. Students also have the opportunity to work on production of the college newspaper and extracurricular television production projects. ENGL 111 is a prerequisite for all Journalism courses except JOUR 145, 240, 275, and all RDTV courses.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 311 JOUR 130 News Reporting I: A basic course dealing with the fundamentals of news reporting and writing, covering the work, goals, skills, and responsibilities of the professional journalist. Emphasis is placed on news structure, writing leads, and news style. Attention is also given to feature writing and techniques of interviewing. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 132 Copy Editing and Graphics: A course designed to familiarize students with the skills of a copy editor, including editing for accuracy, news value, style, and grammar. Attention is also given to newspaper layout, headline and caption writing, and photo scaling and cropping. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 134 The Feature Article I: This course covers the fundamentals of writing feature articles of newspaper length. Close attention is given to organization, style, human interest, the use of quotes, leads, etc., as applied to profiles, sidebars, and service articles. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 145 Media in America: A course that traces the history and development of newspapers, wire services, magazines, radio, television and broadcast networks. Students discuss the trends and current problems in media as well as the role of advertisers, media owners, and the public in affecting the content of the media. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 154 (COCM 154) Publicity Writing: This course covers the variety of persuasive writing forms and techniques used by the public relations professional to invite media coverage of corporate/client events and activities, to promote awareness and use of products and services, and to encourage consumer/audience support of corporate issues. Students will learn how to prepare press releases, pitch letters, press kits, public service announcements, and copy for brochures and promotional materials. Prerequisite: ENGL111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 230 News Reporting II: A continuation of the basic news reporting techniques learned in Reporting I, but with an emphasis on drills, fieldwork, and more advanced concepts. Students learn how stories are planned and then write news copy under newsroom conditions. The course also provides practical experience in preparing for, arranging, and conducting an interview. In addition to reporting techniques, attention is given to journalism ethics and responsibility. Prerequisite: JOUR 130. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 231 Propaganda: This course focuses on the development, principles, techniques, and results of mass persuasion from its beginnings in ancient civilizations to its transformation in the modern technological society. Students study mass persuasion and political propaganda in war and peace, with emphasis on its impact on current-day political affairs. Through readings, viewing of films, and emphasis on its impact on current-day political affairs; through readings, viewing of films and videotapes, examination of graphic and print materials, and class discussions, our objective is to hone our critical reasoning to identify semantic and perceptual techniques used for mass persuasion. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 234 The Feature Article II: Using the basics learned in The Feature Article I, students research and write more advanced nonfiction articles with an emphasis on having work published. In addition to refining writing style and technique, this course studies the magazine marketplace and the method of selecting the right article idea for the right magazine. Prerequisite: JOUR 134. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 240 Magazine Editing and Production: A course designed to develop skills in all aspects of editorial and art magazine production. It includes practical training and instruction in editorial work such as editing, proof-reading, makeup, type-spec, and headline and caption writing. Attention is given to the art side of production: the interrelationship between art and editorial, choosing art, design, print, and layout. This class also examines the historical development of magazines in America. Prerequisite: JOUR 130. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

312 / Literature, Language, and Communication JOUR 246 (SPCM 246) Play Production: Instruction in all aspects of play production, from choosing a script to the finished performance on stage. Areas of investigation include: stage-design, lighting, costuming, movement, makeup, casting, acting, directing, and stage-managing. 3 sem.; hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 251 Sports Reporting: A specialized course in sports writing and reporting. Students learn the mechanics in covering sporting events and in preparing articles for a newspaper format. Attention is also given to certain dynamics in sports reporting: the relationship between reporter and sports personality; the function of the "beat" reporter; and the reporter's responsibilities in dealing with the business arm of the sports establishment. Prerequisite: JOUR 130. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 252 The Practice of Public Relations: A course designed to provide an understanding of public relations in our society: how it is planned, produced and evaluated. The key types of communication required for productive public relations are examined. Weekly writing assignments are required to develop familiarity with the practices of professional public relations. As a final project, students will develop a campaign program, create appropriate materials for the press, and become familiar with the scope of communication channels available for effective public relations. Prerequisite: JOUR 130. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 255 Creative Advertising: A hands-on course that first examines the functions of advertising and how advertising is created, then has students write, develop, and produce advertising scripts for television and radio. The course also provides students with a behind-the-scenes look at corporate advertising. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 258 Fundamentals of Writing for Film and Television: The basic craft of storytelling for the screen. Traditional dramatic structure in a visual medium. Issues addressed include the premise, dialogue, characterization, narrative plot structure. Classwork will include workshop discussion of short writing exercises, the examination of professional scripts, and discussion of exemplary professional films. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 261 (LAWS 261) Free Speech, Media and the Law: A course that explores the shifting relationship between free expression and media technologies. From a philosophical and legal foundation, it immerses students into the technological, social and cultural issues surrounding the First Amendment, including privacy rights, pornography, copyright, and libel. The course challenges students by posing a critical question: Are there any forms of free speech that should be restricted? If so, which ones ­ and who decides? 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 262 (SPCM 262) Introduction to Acting: Students explore the basis of acting in the reality of doing. The course aims to facilitate an encounter between the student-actor and those personal impulses which happen within the collaborative framework of the classroom-theater. Emphasis is placed upon gaining an understanding of the actor's primary instrument for performance, himself, while developing a basic technique for working within the context of a theatrical performance. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 263 (SPCM 263) Scene Study: Provides opportunity for students to learn and practice the skills actors need in order to live truthfully, moment-to-moment in the given imaginary circumstances of a scene. Scenes from the classics and from contemporary dramatists will be studied. Prerequisite: SPCM262 (JOUR262) or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 275 (ARTT 275) Photojournalism: This course consists of two principal components: a historical or topical survey of approaches to photojournalism in newspapers and magazines from the time of the perfection of the halftone process to the present; field assignments involving coverage of local events and, where possible or appropriate, part-time work on a local newspaper or magazine. Students must supply their own 35 mm cameras. Estimated cost $75.00. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Literature, Language, and Communication / 313 JOUR 282 (SPCM 282) Play Directing: Students experience first-hand the process of directing theatrical productions from conception through completion while assimilating the principles that control the manner of their art and craft. 3 sem.; 3 crs. JOUR 295 (RDTV 295) Topics in Journalism and Media: A special course offered on an occasional basis in response to special student and faculty interests in the field of journalism and media. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 310 Media Ethics: This course asks students to make decisions about the myriad of ethical problems that confront professional journalists as they seek to report the news. Using a philosophical base the ideas of Aristotle, Kant, Bentham and Mill, an array of ethical problems are posed problems dealing with journalistic deception; right of privacy; conflicts of interest - and ethical strategies devised by which students can understand and then resolve these problems. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 359 Advanced Writing for Film and Television: Storytelling for the screen. The use of basic visual and dramatic techniques to create short scripts. Issues addressed include use of the step outline and the treatment in drafting half hour film and television scripts. Classwork will include workshop discussion of student scripts, examination of professional scripts. Prerequisite: JOUR 258 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 380-381 Cooperative Education in Journalism I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Journalism include corporations, non-profit organizations, magazines, radio and TV stations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. JOUR 385 Honors Journalism: The Communication Revolution: The central question this course poses is: How has the Electronic Revolution affected American culture? Media Ecology examines modern media from various theoretical perspectives while tracing the origins of language and writing to the electronic age. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 386 Seminar in Media Criticism: This advanced course is based on the premise that our cultural values and system are largely shaped by media technologies. Students will examine the relationship between culture and media, as presented by popular and academic critics such as H.L. Mencken, Neil Postman, and George Orwell. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 387 The Problems of American Journalism By stripping away the myths and assumptions made about "the news," we may come to a deeper understanding about the way in which the journalist perceives the world and selects and writes the news. Using case studies, this seminar examines the problems of American Journalism from four perspectives: professional; historical; political; and technological. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. JOUR 397 Independent Study in Journalism: A self-directed course initiated, designed, and carried out by the student with the consultation and guidance of a faculty member to pursue some special interest in journalism or media. 3 crs. JOUR 399 (RDTV 399) Internship in Journalism and Media: The journalism major is given the opportunity to supplement classroom studies with on-thejob experience in the field of journalism and media. The student works at a newspaper, radio station, or other media facility under employer supervision and reports regularly to a faculty member. Up to three internships are allowable totalling no more than nine credits. Prerequisite: 18 credits in JOUR/RDTV courses and permission of the Journalism and Media Program Director. 3-6 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

314 / Literature, Language, and Communication

RADIO AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION COURSE OFFERINGS

RDTV 110 Radio Production I: Basic techniques for the disc-jockey, newscaster, interviewer, and commercial announcer. Hands-on training provided with broadcast quality consoles, turntables, microphones, cartridge and open reel tape machines, patch panels; a survey of FCC rules and regulations required for many entry-level positions in radio. Studio lab hours assigned. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 115 Fundamentals of Television Production: A theory and discussion course in which students learn the basics of a TV production setting. Discussed are the history and origination of TV, the organizations and business environment in which TV occurs, such as the FCC, networks and affiliate relationships, "above" and "below the line" personnel; program and script formats, basic aesthetic and technical lighting and sound principles, introduction to lenses and the basic principles of shot composition and framing. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 120 Television Studio Production: Through lecture and demonstration, a survey of the principles and techniques of television production and application of this knowledge through five-to twenty-minute shows produced by the students. Feedback and evaluation of videotapes by peers and teachers. Lectures, planning sessions, and studio hours; roles of producers and directors; control room, cameras, lighting, audio and other technical apparatus; roles of crew members; script writing; graphics; set design; television acting; practical application of lecture material in the form of two program tapings. Prerequisite: RDTV 115. $110.00 lab fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 200 Television Performance: A course that emphasizes interviewing on camera, talk show hosting, acting for television commercials, ad libbing, and the production of a television audition tape. 3 sem., hrs., 3crs. RDTV 201 Voice Development and Interviewing Techniques for Broadcasting: Students will learn all aspects of vocal control; vocal production, articulation, enunciation, interpretation of copy and dramatic readings. Further more, this class is where the student will learn interviewing techniques for self evaluation and critique. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. RDTV 210 Advanced Radio Production: Development of skills in recording and editing techniques, preparing and airing shows, timing and formats. Emphasis on developing capable and responsible communicators, producers, and engineers; interpretation of radio copy; remote broadcasting, microphone principles, and the radio broadcast team; auditions for possible assignment to "on-air" shifts and staff positions in production, engineering and management at the campus radio station. Studio lab hours assigned. Prerequisite: RDTV 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 215 Videotape Editing Workshop: Developing and producing videotape programs for possible showing on cable television. Electronic Field Production (EFP) with post-production editing in studio. Emphasis on creative approaches to assigned projects and on development of major skills of planning, writing, and advanced arrangements for remote set-ups. Prerequisite: RDTV 115. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 220 Advanced Television Production: A more detailed study of the areas introduced in Television Studio Production. Set design, lighting, script writing, engineering, hardware (ITV and other), costumes, make-up, props, special effects, graphics, film for television. Prerequisite: RDTV 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 295 (JOUR 295) Topics in Journalism and Media: A special course offered on an occasional basis in response to special student and faculty interests in the field of journalism and media. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 303 Broadcast Journalism: Introduction to radio and television news with emphasis on writing and producing wraps, casts, voicers, and actualities; wire services and other sources; journalistic ethics; documen-

Literature, Language, and Communication / 315 taries; editorials; interviews; formats; radio, television, and cable newscasting technique. Prerequisites: ENGL 110, RDTV 215. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 310 TV and Radio News Writing and Production: A creative writing course for preparing and evaluating copy; spots, commercials, public service, promotion, drama, editorials, and documentaries. Prerequisite: RDTV 110, RDTV 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 320 Television Field Production: A course designed to have students work in teams to cover a variety of assignments in the field. The student will learn how to operate field equipment while working under specific deadline pressures. Prerequisite: RDTV 215. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 350 Video Documentary: An advanced level production course which is a compilation of live studio production, field production and videotape editing. Students will study documentary making and produce documentaries in class. Prerequisites: RDTV 220, RDTV 320 and instructors permission or program director. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. RDTV 399 (JOUR 399) Internship in Journalism and Media: The journalism major is given the opportunity to supplement classroom studies with on-thejob experience in the field of journalism and media. The student works at a newspaper, radio station, or other media facility under employer supervision and reports regularly to a faculty member. Up to three internships are allowable totalling no more than nine credits. Prerequisites: 18 credits in JOUR/RDTV courses and permission of the Journalism and Media Program Director. 3-6 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LINGUISTICS AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSE OFFERINGS

FORL 19X: An introduction to various languages not regularly available at the College. In the past the Honors Program, by student request, has offered Latin, German, and Chinese. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. FORL 233 Comparative Romance Literatures: This course introduces students to the method of comparing the main romance literatures (France, Italy, Spain) through a study of selected themes, genres and periods, and includes a discussion of the relationship of the national literatures to the other arts of these countries. Required of all language majors. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs.

SPANISH COURSE OFFERINGS

APPLIED LINGUISTICS

SPAN 115 Spanish for Communication: A beginning Spanish course designed to help listening and speaking skills in the Spanish language. The course will help students deal with real everyday situations ( identifying needs, shopping, seeking medical assistance, gathering information, etc.). The aim of the course is to enable students to understand basic spoken Spanish within the limits of the topics presented in the course, including (but not limited to) business, travel, and social interaction. This course is not open to students who have studied Spanish in high school for more than two semesters or to students who have native or near-native fluency in Spanish. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 116 Communicating in Spanish: This course is a continuation of Spanish 115 and is designed to further the progress made by students in developing basic communication skills in Spanish. Students will continue to learn the basic elements of Spanish structure and vocabulary necessary for an ability to

316 / Literature, Language, and Communication communicate in this language. A large emphasis of the course is on speaking and understanding Spanish as it is spoken today in twenty countries in Europe and in the Americas. Prerequisite: SPAN 115 or the equivalent; two years of high school Spanish; or approval of the Language Program Director. Please note that candidates for New York State Teacher Certification and Mercy College English Literature majors must take two courses (six credits) in a second language. These two courses must be in the same second language. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. SPAN 160 Translation Techniques: This course is designed for students who will be doing translations from Spanish to English and from English to Spanish. These translations can be both written and spoken. Translations can include business, commerce, health care, social work, legal, as well as literary topics. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. SPAN 225 Spanish for Community Services: This course has been designed for police, firemen, social workers, hospital personnel, and teachers. Practice in the language skills and vocabulary necessary for communication with Spanish-speaking people in a variety of everyday situations. Prerequisite: 1 or 2 years of high school Spanish or SPAN 115 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 230 La Gramática Española: An intensive review of grammar with application to writings accomplished by students and to materials furnished by the instructor. Oral presentations will also be required of the student. The course is taught entirely in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 265 Reading and Composition: A course designed to facilitate composition in various types of Spanish styles. Geared especially for native speakers but may also be elected by Spanish majors. Prerequisites: SPAN 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 275 Beginning Spanish for Business: This course exposes students to the Spanish language used in business, including the terminology and idioms of Spanish business language in special oral and written communication. Emphasis is placed on the structure and content of Spanish business correspondence. Authentic materials are used to give students a contemporary view of business as it is conducted in hispanic society. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 276 Intermediate Spanish for Business: This course is devoted to the continued development of business language skills, with a focus on the accurate use of business vocabulary and business style. Emphasis is on preparing students to function in Spanish in a business setting via practice of receptive and productive linguistic skills. This course also provides training in cross-cultural communication skills and is designed to help students achieve levels of proficiency to meet foreign language needs for business and international trade. Prerequisite: SPAN 275. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 305 Cervantes and His World: This course introduces the student the life and times of Cervantes by a reading of his major works: Novelas Ejemplares and Don Quixote. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 350 International Business in Spanish: An introduction to international business. Topics, which will be studied in English and Spanish, include the international environment, international trade, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange, regional economic integration, the role of the multinational corporation, and business strategies. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 355 Introduction to Business Environment in Spanish: An introduction to the major components of the business world. Topics, which will be studied in English and Spanish, include marketing, management, accounting, economics,

Literature, Language, and Communication / 317 finance, and their interrelationships. Students will learn how business relates to them in both their personal and professional lives. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of the instructor.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 372 Spanish Conversation: A course designed to improve oral expressions; geared toward everyday conversation and speech patterns. Material includes topics such as fashion, student life, mass media, cuisine, theater and current events. Personality approach through emphasis upon the students' area of interest. Written work reinforces oral expressions. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

CULTURE COURSE OFFERINGS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SPAN 233 The Culture of the Spanish Golden Age: A study of the many aspects of the sixteenth-and seventeenth-century culture of Spain and its strong influence in the European and Spanish-American world. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 235 Spanish Culture: The student is introduced to the main ideas which have shaped the cultural climate of Spain by readings in the literature and through an appreciation of the art of the country. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 236 Spanish-American Culture: The student is introduced to the main ideas which have shaped the cultural climate of Spanish America by readings in the literature and through an appreciation of the art of the country. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor.3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 237 "Preceptiva Literaria" for Hispanic Studies: A required course for all Spanish majors designed to equip the students with the nomenclature of the morphology, syntax, literary genres and figures of speech to get a better appreciation of language and literature in prose and poetry. Practical analysis, related readings and literary reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 238 Introduction to Literary Criticism for Hispanic Studies: A required course for all Spanish majors to serve as an introduction to equip the student with methods and ways to comment on a literary text in literature. Students' literary reports and practical commentaries of text. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 240 Aspects of Caribbean Culture: A study of the main aspects of the Caribbean civilization with emphasis on the literature, art, and folklore of the Dominican Republic. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 241 Main Currents in Puerto Rican Civilization: A consideration of the main trends in the literature, art, and music of Puerto Rico from the time of the discovery up to the contemporary period. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 256 Spain Today: A course designed to explore the profile of modern day Spain with discussions about the actual scene in the economic, social, and art worlds. Audio-visuals will be used to enhance class lectures. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 258 Spanish-America Today: A course designed to explore the profile of modern day Spanish-America societies with discussions about the actual scene in the economic, social, and art worlds. Audio-Visuals

318 / Literature, Language, and Communication will be used to enhance class lectures. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

LITERATURE (OFFERED IN SPANISH) COURSE OFFERINGS

SPAN 301 Masterworks in the Spanish Language: Selected readings from works of outstanding Spanish writers such as Fernando Rojas, Cervantes, Calderon, Inca Sarcilaso, Jose Hernandez, Gabriela Mistral, Neruda, Borges; with a view of their influence in Spanish-American and world literary movements. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 311-312 Main Currents in Spanish Civilization I, II: A course designed to instill a sense of the richness of Spanish civilization through a consideration of its major ideals, from its beginnings to the present day, by readings in and discussion of its history and literature, and references to its art and music. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 325 The Golden Age: An insight into the general characteristics of the period by means of intensive study and analysis. The works of representative authors of the essay, the novel, poetry, and theater will be read with emphasis given to the mystical writer. Prerequisites: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 344 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature: Readings and discussions of the romantic, post-romantic, realist and naturalist periods in the literature of Spain. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisites: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 346 "Modernismo" in Spain and Spanish-America: A view of the modern movement in Spanish and Spanish-American letters; its characteristics and its most representative writers, with special attention given to Ruben Dario. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 347 The Generation of 1898: Readings and discussion of the works of Unamuno, Ganivet, Baroja, Azorin, Machado, ValleInclan, among others. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 348 The Generations of Ortega Y Gasset and Garcia Lorca: Readings and discussions of the works of Ortega y Gasset, Garcia, Lorca, and authors of their respective generations. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 349 Contemporary Spanish Literature: A study of the development of Spanish literary movements in the areas of the novel, the theater, and the short story. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 351-352 Main Currents in Spanish-American Civilization I, II: A consideration of Spanish-American geography, history, literature, art, music, religion and folklore, from prehistoric times to the present day, with lectures, readings, motion pictures relating to the cultural contribution of Spanish-America to Western Civilization. Collateral readings and reports. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 359 Spanish-American Black Literature: A study of the black poetry and prose of Spanish-Americans with an emphasis on the works of Luis Pales Matos, Nicholas Guillen, Anselmo A. Suarez, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, and others. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPAN 397 Independent Study in Spanish: The life and works of an outstanding author. Guided readings and discussion of the works of the author chosen by the student after consultation with the seminar director; a presenta-

Literature, Language, and Communication / 319 tion of the results of such study required. Prerequisite: SPAN 116 and SPAN 265 or permission of the instructor. 3 crs.

SPEECH COMMUNICATION COURSE OFFERINGS

SPCM 105 Voice and Articulation for Non-Native Speakers of English: An introduction to the sounds of American English, the production of these sounds; stress and rhythm; intonation. In addition, the course will focus on two important aspects of spoken English: the production and the discrimination of the sound system. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or Mercy College placement exam. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 108 Advanced Voice and Articulation for Non-Native Speakers of English: Students are drilled in the sounds of spoken English with ear-training exercises for word and sentence stress, intonation, blending and phrasing, and pronunciation. Oral reading and extemporaneous speaking are practiced. Required of all non-native speakers of English prior to taking SPCM109, unless excused by Speech Communication Faculty. Prerequisite: SPCM105 or placement by instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 109 Conversational Speech for Non-Native Speakers of English: Practice in conversation, oral reading and speech presentation. Students are introduced to the elements of extemporaneous and formal public speaking theory and practice. Required of all non-native speakers of English prior to taking SPCM110, unless excused by Speech communication Faculty. Prerequisite: SPCM108 or Placement by Instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 110 Oral Communication: Study of the nature of speech, sound production, and communication production, and communication process; practical experience in the skills of the oral communication process. Prerequisite: Placement at ENGL 111 level; SPCM 109 for the non-native speakers of English, unless excused by the Speech Faculty. Online SPCM 110: Student must verify legal residence outside 100 mile radius of Mercy College campus during semester in which enrolling for the course. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 110 is a prerequisite for all Speech courses numbered 210 and above. CMDS 210499 and SPCM 230-250 are major level courses. SPCM 219 (PSYN 219) Group Dynamics: This course is conducted partially as a workshop to promote interaction, leadership, solidarity, and problem solving. Along with actual group experience, the course addresses the theory and research of groups. Prerequisites: SPCM 110; PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 230 (CMDS 230) Voice and Diction: Study and practice of the skills needed for control of voice production and diction (articulation, pronunciation, intonation). Emphasis will be placed on phonetics and ear training. Tape recordings will be used for evaluation and study. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 249 Persuasion: Study and practice in the art of persuasive techniques. How to reinforce or change the existing attitudes or beliefs of the listener. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 250 (PSYN 250) Psychology of Communication: The course will examine the nature of the communication process in terms of its ultimate purpose of social control. Emphasis will be placed on self-awareness and the "gap" quality of communication. Values, self-concept, listening, verbal and nonverbal language, and perceptions will be evaluated as communicating agents. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 259 (ENGL 259) Oral Performance of Literature: Principles of and practice in the oral presentation of prose, poetry, and drama with a focus on understanding and control of voice production and diction. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

320 / Literature, Language, and Communication SPCM 295 Topics in Speech Communication: Issues selected from the broad field of Speech and Communication Arts in response to particular interests of students and faculty. Providing an opportunity for examination of subjects not already the focus of other courses, and to make available an instructor's special knowledge. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 370 (COCM 370) Effective Presentations: This course focuses on the principles and techniques of preparing and delivering oral presentations. Students will practice a variety of speech forms and styles used in business and will have the opportunity to critique their own videotaped performance. The preparation and effective use of accompanying visuals will also be covered. Prerequisite: SPCM110. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs.

THEATRE AND FILM COURSE OFFERINGS

SPCM 144 (ARTT 144) Understanding Movies: A basic overview of the historical development of film with an emphasis upon the aesthetic elements of cinema, its particular terminology and interrelationships with other arts. Students will discover how to read films through selected readings, screenings, and written reports. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 244 (ARTT 244) Topics in Film: The study of selected film topics through viewing, in-class analysis and discussion. Topics range from significant directors, producers, and cultural issues reflected in various films, to historical periods and special film genres. Prerequisite: Placement at ENGL 111 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 245 (ARTT 245) Film and Videotape Production: A practical course in film making. Introduction to the techniques and vocabulary of film production. Each student produces, directs and edits a short film of his own design. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 246 (JOUR 246) Play Production: Instruction in all aspects of play production, from choosing a script to the finished performance on stage. Areas of investigation include: stage-design, lighting, costuming, movement, makeup, casting, acting, directing, and stage-managing. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 262 (JOUR 262) Introduction to Acting: Students explore the basis of acting in the reality of doing. The course aims to facilitate an encounter between the student-actor and those personal impulses which happen within the collaborative framework of the classroom-theater. Emphasis is placed upon gaining an understanding of the actor's primary instrument for performance, himself, while developing a basic technique for working within the context of a theatrical performance. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 263 (JOUR263) Scene Study: Provides opportunity for students to learn and practice the skills actors need in order to live truthfully, moment-to-moment in the given imaginary circumstances of a scene. Scenes from the classics and from contemporary dramatists will be studied. Prerequisite: SPCM262 (JOUR262) or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SPCM 282 (JOUR282) Play Directing: Students experience first-hand the process of directing theatrical productions from conception through completion while assimilating the principles that control the manner of their art and craft. 3 sem. 3 crs. SPCM 397 Independent Study: Practical "experience-oriented" projects in theatre or film. Students may elect to study acting, directing, set-design, lighting, costume design, construction, film production, writing for film or theatre, publicity and management of theatre, fund-raising and producing the play or film, or in-depth study of outstanding theatrical or film personalities (director, authors, performers). Independent study projects may also be done in conjunction with Mercy College Players, and in certain instances a written and/or oral report may be required by the instructor to supplement the work done in performance by the student. 3 crs

Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 321

MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE COMPUTER SCIENCE AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Course Offerings

Students enrolling in all major courses must earn at least a letter grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses. MATH 116 requires a minimum grade of "B" in MATH 105 as a prerequisite. Prospective Computer Science, Computer Information Science or Mathematics majors who have significant computer experience are encouraged to seek departmental approval for a waiver of CISC/MATH 120. Students enrolled in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems majors may have to spend substantial time outside of class to complete their coursework. Students in these majors are required to take a programming proficiency test in CISC 231.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CISC/MATH 120 Introduction to Computers and Application Software: An introduction to computers and computing including the fundamentals of computer nomenclature, particularly with respect to personal computer hardware and software and the World Wide Web; develop an understanding of why computers are essential components in the business world and society in general; focus on the computer as a valuable productivity tool; present strategies for purchasing, and maintaining a personal computer system. This course has a wide-ranging hands-on lab component, which includes an introduction to and actual use of; word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and Internet Browser software. Prerequisites: MATH 105 or placement at MATH 114, MATH 115 or MATH 116 level and ENGL 109 level or departmental approval. 3 sem. hrs; 3 crs. CISC 123 (MATH 123) Concepts of Computer Information Sciences: A comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of computer information sciences, including the terminology, the history of computing, and the different layers of computer information systems. Using an integrated lab component of the course, students' critical thinking, problem-solving and algorithm design skills are strengthened, preparing them for subsequent programming courses. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120 and MATH 115 or MATH 116 and placement at ENGL 110 . 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. CISC131 (MATH131) Foundations of Computing I: An introduction to the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming, including classes, objects, and basic program control flow statements. Using the programming language Java, students are introduced to principles of software design and reuse. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH123 and MATH116 or departmental approval. 2 sem. hrs. & 2 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CISC 219 (CART 219) Web Design I: This course presents an introduction to basic Web design and information architecture. It introduces concepts of good design and usability in theory and practice by exploring and comparing existing sites. Elements of page and site design and structure are discussed, including color, typography, simple image manipulation, links, and site organization. The course has a strong hands-on component where students will be introduced to elements of HTML and use up-to-date image manipulation software and a web-authoring tool. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. $175.00 Lab Fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

322 / Mathematics and Computer Information Science CISC 220 Database Applications: This course is a hands-on introduction to building a simple information management system using commercial relational database management software such as Microsoft Access. Students learn to build application systems using simple design tools and are exposed to database programming tools and the relational database model. Students design and build tables, forms, reports, queries and data access pages. Students complete a term project where they develop a functioning database application. Prerequisite: CISC/ MATH120. 3 sem. hrs.3 crs. CISC 230 PC Hardware: Students will study the fundamentals of modern PC hardware: including standard interfaces, ports, bus structures, architectures and interconnection methodologies. At the end of the course the student will be able to identify the principal components of microcomputers, assemble systems, upgrade memory, install cards and hard drives. The student will have hands on laboratory experience centered on installation, configuration and troubleshooting of PC's with emphasis on current Windows Operating systems. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs CISC 231 (MATH 231) Foundations of Computing II: This course continues the exploration of fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming using the programming language Java. Students are introduced to the principles of basic data structures, elementary file input/output and exception handling and GUI. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 131 or departmental approval. 2 sem. hrs. & 2 hrs. lab. 3 crs. CISC 238 Graphical User Interface Application Development: The student is introduced to application development using a graphical user interface (GUI). Topics include: graphics user interface design, properties of interface objects, attaching code to interface objects, developing and running entire applications using graphics and drawing, and building and updating databases. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 220 or CISC/MATH 231. CISC 240 Desktop Publishing: The student is introduced to text processing and graphic concepts, tools and techniques. The student will learn the basics of page design and layout and will be able to produce complex documents that include text and multiple types of graphical representation. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 250 Operating Environments: Students will be provided with the opportunity to examine different hardware platforms and operating systems. IBM compatible computer systems with DOS, Windows, and Windows 95 will be studied and compared to Macintosh and UNIX systems. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH 220 or CISC 230 or CISC 231. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 257 Local Area Networks: The course centers around the basic data communication concepts involved in Local Area Networks. The ethernet, token ring, and token bus topologies are analyzed and compared. Relating the OSI model and TCP/IP to Microsoft's NT, and Novell's NetWare will also be of major interest. The lab will be centered on implementation, configuration, and troubleshooting of a LAN, in particular Windows NT. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH131 or CISC 220. 3 sem. hr. 3 crs. CISC 259 (CART 259) Web Design II: This course presents advanced design techniques for web site development and information architecture. The overall structure, flow, and organization of the web site are discussed. The concepts and criteria introduced in Web Design I are utilized with added sophistication to page layout, image manipulation and typographical design. The use of tables and frames is described as well as several special effects, like rollovers and tweening, and elementary animation techniques. The course has a strong hands-on component where, in addition to the software packages used in Web Design I, students will be introduced to DHTML and the use of animation software. Prerequisite: CISC/CART 219. $175.00 Lab Fee. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 323 CISC 301 Information Systems within Organizations: A comprehensive introduction to the concepts and theories that explain and/or motivate methods and practices in the development and use of information systems (IS) in organizations. The concepts and theories will include systems, management and organization, information, quality and decision making. The relationship of information systems to corporate planning and strategy and concepts relating information technology (IT) to competitive advantage and productivity are explored and explained. The concepts and practices underlying the use of information technology and systems in improving organizational performance, as well as the roles of management, users and Information Systems professionals are presented. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH 220 and ACCT 120. 3 sem hrs. 3 crs. CISC311 Objects, Structures and Algorithms I: This course builds upon the Foundations of Computing courses and presents concepts and techniques essential for working in a modern software development environment. These include object-oriented programming, exception handling, algorithmic analysis, linear and nonlinear data structures, and data structure libraries. Software engineering and object-oriented design concepts are discussed using case studies and software projects. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH231 & MATH244. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 327 (MATH 327) Computer Graphics: Introduction to the principles behind the science of computer graphics; fundamental graphics algorithms techniques with emphasis on algorithms suitable for raster display devices; representation and transformations of objects in 2 and 3 dimensions; clipping; projections; ray tracing; color and shading. Prerequisites: MATH 260 and CISC/MATH 231. 3 sem. hr. 3 crs. (Offered in Spring only) CISC 333 Programming Languages: A study of the historical evolution of programming languages. An introduction to the fundamental concepts, examining the design issues of the various language constructs and critically comparing the alternatives. Languages such as Pascal, Ada, FORTRAN, ANSI C and C++ are used to exemplify the concepts and constructs of imperative languages. Functional, logic and object-oriented programming models are described and discussed as alternative programming methodologies. Prerequisite: CISC 311. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Nonliberal arts credit). CISC 335 Data Communications: Principles and Applications: An introduction to the design, implementation, and management of communication networks, including topics such as network architectures, transmission media, communication hardware, analog and digital services, transmission standards and protocols, network management, and data security. Applications will focus on a packet switching internetworks employing open systems, layered protocols such as TCP/IP and OSI. Prerequisite: CISC/ MATH 231 or CISC 257. 3 sem. hr. 3 crs. CISC 337 Database Management Systems: Introduction to the basic concepts of database management systems, including data representation, conceptual data modeling, entity relationship diagrams, the relational model, normalization, and database design and implementation. Concepts of data integrity, security, privacy, and concurrence control are introduced. Students implement a major database application project. Prerequisite: CISC 301. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 339 Artificial Intelligence: A study of how computers can emulate the processes by which humans use logic and knowledge to solve problems. Topics include expert systems, intelligent databases, robotics, game-playing programs and formal proofs. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 231. CISC 341 Computer Architecture: This course provides the basic knowledge necessary to understand the hardware operation of digital computers, introduces digital components and details the steps necessary to create a design for an elementary basic computer. The organization and architecture of the separate functional units of the digital computer, as well as the assembly level machine organization, are examined. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH 231 and MATH 244. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Non-liberal arts credit). (Offered in Spring only)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

324 / Mathematics and Computer Information Science CISC 353 Software and Hardware for the Office: Evaluation and Use: The evaluation and use of information management software and computer hardware designed for the office environment, including word processing, spreadsheet, database, desktop publishing, graphics, communication, utility, integrated software packages, computers, modems, printers, scanners, telecommunication systems and data communication net works. Techniques for evaluating software packages and hardware components to determine the suitability for the office environment; assimilation of software and hardware into existing business systems; cost-benefit analysis including lease vs. buy options. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH120 and ACCT 120 or CISC 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. CISC 359 Web Site Administration: This course focuses on the server-side implementation of a Web site. It provides an overview of what is required to build and maintain a Web site, including hosting, server administration, security, user interactivity and database integration. The students will implement a server, develop user and file security policies, design the server configuration, and understand the server interaction with search engines. Given a previously designed GUI, the students will develop scripting programs that implement the appropriate business logic and interpret the user's input in order to access the database. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 220. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 370 Systems Analysis and Design: Introduction to the steps required to complete an analysis and design of a computer information system with emphasis on mastering the methods and procedures used in structured systems analysis. These include various techniques of information requirements gathering, data flow diagrams, data dictionaries, process and program specifications. Working in teams, students learn the information systems development process by completing a significant term project. Prerequisite: CISC 301. 3 sem. hrs 3 credits CISC 380-381 Cooperative Education in Computer Science I, II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in CIS include corporations, small businesses, non-profit organizations and schools. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. Division approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. per sem. CISC 385 Cryptography & Computer Security: Introduction to the concepts and applications of cryptography and computer security. Included are the basic building blocks of network security, such as conventional and publickey encryption techniques, authentication and digital signatures. Important network security and web security tools and applications, including S/MIME, IP security, Kerberos, SSL/ TLS, and Secure Electronic Transactions (SET), as well as methodologies for countering hackers and computer viruses are explored. The language of modern cryptography is primarily number theory, and various tools of number theory, including modular arithmetic, primality, and hash functions are developed as needed. Prerequisites: CISC335 or CISC257 and MATH244. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 395 Special Topics in Computer Information Science: This course will introduce students to the future implications (both technical and social) of present trends in the computer science or data processing field. Presentations will be offered on such topics as cybernetics, Ada, and distributed processing. Prerequisites: Variable, depending upon topic. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Non-liberal arts credit). CISC 397 Independent Study in Computer Information Science: Individual projects or readings undertaken in a specific area of Computer Information Science. Registration with the permission of Instructor, the Division Chairperson, and the Associate Dean for Academic Administration. 3 crs. (Non-liberal arts credit).

Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 325 CISC 411 - Objects, Structures and Algorithms II: This is a project-oriented course in programming. Students learn basic and advanced concepts of a second object-oriented programming language, such as C++, highlighting the major commonalities and differences between this new language and the one they have used earlier (such as Java). Applying modern software development principles, students design and implement substantial programming projects building on different high-level data structures introduced in previous courses. Prerequisites: CISC 311. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 421 Operating Systems: Process concepts, asynchronous concurrent processes, concurrent programming, deadlock, real storage, virtual storage organization, virtual storage management, job and processor scheduling, multiprocessing, disk scheduling, file and database systems, performance measurement, networks and security are covered. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH 231 and MATH 244. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Non-liberal arts credit). CISC 470 Information Systems Development and Implementation: In this capstone course for Computer Information Systems majors, students will apply techniques for analyzing, designing and implementing a computer information system. Systems development life cycle methodologies, CASE tools, project management techniques, and database development techniques will be used by project teams as they develop and implement a new computer information system. Prerequisites: CISC 337 and CISC 370. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CISC 471 Software Engineering: In this capstone course for Computer Science majors, students will learn to work as a team in the development of small to medium scale software systems. Topics to be covered include software design and processes, requirements and specifications, software validation and testing strategies, software evolution, project management, documentation and quality assurance. Upon completion of the course, students should have a fundamental understanding of the software life cycle and the processes involved in the design, development, implementation and maintenance of complex software systems, and the associated documentation of design, program and training materials, as well as an understanding and development of the interpersonal and communication skills required for a career in computer science. Prerequisite: CISC 311. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Non-liberal arts credits)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MATHEMATICS Course Offerings

Students enrolling in Mathematics courses must earn at least a letter grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses except for MATH 115 and MATH 120. MATH 116 requires a minimum grade of "B" as a prerequisite. Students taking MATH 120, 131, 231, 317, 327, and 329 will have to spend substantial time outside of class working with computers. MATH 105 Mathematics: Concepts and Applications: An introduction to the power and utility of mathematics; relating mathematics to the real world in a setting of problem-solving challenges. Practical applications of estimation and arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, graphing, and introductory statistics. Calculators will be used. Prerequisite: Mathematics placement exams. 4 sem. hrs. 2 hrs. Math Lab per week. 4 crs. MATH 113 Geometry for Graphic Design: Students will learn geometry concepts needed to understand computer graphics and to use intelligently the available software tools. They will learn how to fix the position of a pixel on the computer screen using the screen coordinate system, how to find the closest point to a given point, middle point of two given points, and the centroid of a set of points. The students will know how to describe the elementary geometrical shapes, rectangles, ovals, and

326 / Mathematics and Computer Information Science polygons in two dimensions, and spheres and parallelepipeds in three dimensions. They will also be introduced to basic properties: center, area, surface area, and volume. The behavior of the graphic shapes under translation, rotation, reflection, and scaling will be explained. Students will learn how to draw shapes satisfying certain constraints, like making a picture the mirror image of another. Prerequisites: MATH105 and CISC/MATH120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 114 Applied Mathematics for Business: This course is designed to give the student exposure to a wide range of current mathematical procedures they may later encounter in business. Introductory level topics will be chosen from areas of accounting, finance, insurance, inventory, simple and compound interest, financial reports and securities, sinking funds, amortization, consumer issues and other business-related subjects. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or mathematics placement exams. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 115 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts: This course in an introduction to mathematical applications in the real world as they relate to the liberal arts, stressing logical thinking and problem solving. Topics include mathematical ways of thinking, number sequences, functions and their graphs, counting methods, probability, and statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 105 with a grade of C or better or by mathematics placement exams. 3 sem. hrs.+ 2 hrs Math Lab per week. 3 crs. MATH 116 College Algebra: This course is intended for business, computer, mathematics and science majors. Emphasis is placed on varied methods and manipulations. Algebraic techniques that have applications in the student's anticipated area of specialization are studied. Topics will include: linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, graphing, polynomials, factoring, operations with rational and irrational expressions, systems of linear equations and others. Prerequisite: MATH 105, a minimum grade of "B", mathematics placement exams or MATH 114 or MATH 115. 3 sem. hrs. 2 hrs. Math Lab per week. 3 crs. MATH 120 (CISC 120) Introduction to Computers and Application Software: An introduction to computers and computing including the history of computers, the role of computers in a technological society, descriptions of computers and associated hardware, binary and hexadecimal number systems, and the use of a word processor, spreadsheet and database as tools in problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or placement at MATH 114, MATH 115 or MATH 116 level and ENGL 109 level or division approval. (There is a Division placement test for a waiver of this course). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 122 (ECON 122) Statistics: A survey of statistical material and techniques, with special reference to economic and business data. Methods of collecting, charting, and analyzing statistical data; frequency distributions; introduction to discrete probability; normal curve analysis; introduction to hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; linear regression and correlation; index numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 116, CISC/MATH 120 and placement at the ENGL 109 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 123 (CISC 123) Concepts of Computer Information Sciences: A comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of computer information sciences, including the terminology, the history of computing, and the different layers of computer information systems. Using an integrated lab component of the course, students' critical thinking, problem-solving and algorithm design skills are strengthened, preparing them for subsequent programming courses. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120. MATH 115 or MATH 116 and placement at ENGL 110. 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. MATH131 (CISC131) Foundations of Computing I: An introduction to the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming, including classes, objects, and basic program control flow statements. Using the programming language Java, students are introduced to principles of software design and reuse. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH123 and MATH116 or departmental approval. 2 sem. hrs. & 2 hrs. lab. 3 crs.

Mathematics and Computer Information Science / 327 MATH 201 Precalculus: An introduction to real-valued functions and their graphs including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Functions will be represented symbolically, numerically, graphically, and verbally. Real-world applications will be used to introduce the concepts. Graphing calculators will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH 116 or a minimum grade of "B" in high school intermediate algebra. 2 sem. hr. and 2 hrs. lab, 3 crs. MATH 212 Calculus for Business and the Life Sciences: A course in calculus for pharmacy, business, and social science majors. Analytic geometry, derivatives, the definite integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, applications. Students who wish a more thorough treatment of calculus should take MATH 260 and MATH 261 instead of MATH 212. Prerequisite: MATH 201 or the equivalent. 4 sem. hrs. 4 crs. MATH 231 (CISC 231) Foundations of Computing II: This course continues the exploration of fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming using the programming language Java. Students are introduced to the principles data structures, as well as elementary file input/output and exception handling and GUI. Prerequisite: MATH/CISC 131 or departmental approval. 2 sem. hrs. & 2 hrs. lab. 3 crs. MATH 244 Discrete Structures: Introduction to the mathematical foundation of computer science. Logic, set theory, switching circuits, Boolean algebra, finite state machines, induction, combinatorics, graphs and trees are some of the topics that will be covered. Prerequisite: MATH 201. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 260 Calculus I: A review of elementary functions using numerical, graphical and algebraic techniques; limits; derivative and its definition; interpretation of derivatives and their application to problems of optimization. Particular emphasis is given to the use of technology to understand the concepts and to solve real-world problems. Prerequisite: MATH 201 or the equivalent. 4 sem. hr. 4 crs. MATH 261 Calculus II: The definite integral, its definition and interpretation; antiderivatives; The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; techniques of integration; numerical methods; improper integrals; applications of the integral to problems to real world problems; a brief introduction to ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 260 4 sem. hr. 4 crs. MATH 307 Number Theory: This course covers divisibility theory in the integers, prime numbers, congruences, some number theoretic functions, and Diophantine equations. The material is especially useful for students interested in teaching high school mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH201. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 315 Linear Algebra: Vector spaces; matrices; algebra of matrices; systems of linear equations; linear transformations in vector spaces; characteristic vectors and roots; similarity; congruence; bilinear and quadratic forms. Prerequisite: MATH 260. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Offered in the spring only) MATH 327 (CISC 327) Computer Graphics: Introduction to the principles behind the science of computer graphics; fundamental graphics algorithms techniques with emphasis on algorithms suitable for raster display devices; representation and transformations of objects in 2 and 3 dimensions; clipping; projections; ray tracing; color and shading. Prerequisites: MATH 260 and MATH/CISC 231. 3 sem. hr. 3 crs. (Offered in Spring only) MATH 329 Numerical Analysis: Solutions of equations and systems; interpolation and approximation; numerical integration; curve fitting; solutions of ordinary differential equations; Monte Carlo methods; computer applications. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 131. Corequisite: MATH 261. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Offered in Fall only)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

328 / Mathematics and Computer Information Science MATH 350 Probability: Theory and Applications: Combinatorial methods; discrete and continuous probability; probability distributions and densities; excepted value and moments; special probability distributions and densities. Prerequisite: MATH 261. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. MATH 351 Statistics: Theory and Applications: (Previously titled Mathematical Statistics II) Descriptive statistics; sampling distributions; point and interval estimation; hypothesis testing, theory and applications; regression and correlation. Prerequisite: MATH 261; 350 or departmental approval. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Offered in Spring only) MATH 360 Calculus III: Functions of several variables; partial derivatives; multiple integrals; infinite series; vector calculus. Graphing calculators and/or Maple will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH 261. 4 sem. hrs. 4 crs. (Offered in Fall only) MATH 362 Differential Equations: An introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: first order linear equations; higher order equations, method of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters, Laplace transform, power series solutions, Fourier Series and solution of partial differential equations by the method of separation of variables. Prerequisite: MATH 261. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Offered in Spring only) MATH 365 Algebraic Structures: This course introduces the student to the major topics of group theory and it also includes an introduction to rings and integral domains. Some of the group theory topics which are covered are permutations, cyclic groups, direct products, isomorphisms, normal subgroups and homomorphisms. Prerequisite: MATH 315. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Offered in Fall only) MATH 380-381 Cooperative Education in Mathematics I, II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Math include corporations, small businesses, nonprofit organizations and schools. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. per sem. MATH 395 Special Topics in Mathematics: A special area of mathematics depending on student interest. Topics include applied mathematics; point set topology; history of mathematics; complex variables, differential equations; number theory; geometry. Prerequisite: Variable depending on topic. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Offered in spring only) MATH 397 Independent Study in Mathematics: Individual projects or readings undertaken in a specific area of Mathematics. Registration with the permission of the Instructor, the Department Chairperson, and the Associate Dean for Academic Administration. Prerequisite: Variable depending on topic. 3 crs. MATH417 Mathematical Modeling: This is the capstone course for the math majors. It integrates all the mathematical concepts learned in earlier courses to solve real-world problems. Aspects of model construction and selection will be taught along with the analysis of existing models. Topics may include discrete dynamical systems, model fitting, simulation models, continuous optimization models, and probabilistic models. Prerequisites: CISC/MATH231 and MATH350 or MATH360. MATH 460-461 Advanced Calculus I, II: A systematic, rigorous approach to calculus. Topics include: the real number system; limits; continuity; differentiability; integration theory; point set theory. Prerequisite: MATH 360. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. per sem.

Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 329

NATURAL SCIENCES AND VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY BIOLOGY Course Offerings

It is strongly recommended that students enrolling in Natural Science courses earn at least a letter grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses. It is also recommended that students be at the level of English 111 when enrolling in Natural Science courses. BIOL 110 Introduction to Human Biology: A study of the basic biological concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the human organism. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 111 Introduction to Human Genetics: A study of the basic biological concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the mechanisms of human heredity including structure, function, and transmission of genetic information; genetic diseases; genetic counseling; and genetic engineering. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 112 Environmental Science: A study of the basic biological concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the present-day environmental problems such as air and water pollution, food control and population, and their effects on humans. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 113 Evolution: A study of the basic biological concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the processes of evolution and the factors that cause evolutionary change. Influences and ramifications on the human population are also discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 116 Plants and People: A study of the basic biological concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the plant kingdom and characteristics unique to plants. Special emphasis is given to the specific uses and benefits we derive from plants, with practical input on growing plants. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 117 Nutrition: A study of the basic biological concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the materials comprising the human diet: energy sources, vitamins, minerals, and other essential molecules, and how dietary needs reflect physiological conditions ranging from aging to exercise to disease. Prerequisite: BIOL 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 130 Human Anatomy and Physiology I: The course will provide students with a sound working knowledge of the structure of the human body and how the various organ systems function. The relationships between structure and function will be stressed, as will the coordination of function between the different systems. Material covered includes body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, nervous systems, and sense organs. Laboratory will deal with dissection, observation, and experimentation, and will relate to lecture material. 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 131 Human Anatomy and Physiology II: A continuation of the first semester. Students will continue their survey of the organ systems of the body, which will include circulation, immunity, digestion, respiration, osmoregulation, hormones, reproduction, and development. Laboratory sessions will relate to material covered in lectures and will include dissection, observation, and experimentation. Prerequisite: BIOL 130. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

330 / Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology BIOL 160 General Biology I: A study of the basic principles affecting all levels of life, with primary emphasis at the molecular and cellular levels. Prerequisite: Placement at MATH 116 level or the equivalent. 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 161 General Biology II: A study of the structure and function of living organisms with primary emphasis on multicellular organisms and their interactions. Prerequisite: BIOL 160. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 190 Honors Biology: A seminar approach to basic biological concepts and scientific methodology. Topics range from current trends in biotechnology to human evolution and environmental issues. Prerequisite: For Honors students only. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 200 Medical Terminology: Introduction to the specific language of medicine, including of medicine, including concepts and terms used to describe disease, to analyze tests and test results, and to describe the structure and function of the body. 2 sem. hrs. 2 crs. BIOL 222 Pathophysiology: A study of disordered body function, compensatory responses, and principles underlying therapeutic intervention. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology; Microbiology; CHEM 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Not applicable for major credit.) BIOL226 Elements of Biochemistry: An introduction to the different biological molecules: proteins, nucleic acids, vitamins, lipids, and carbohydrates in terms of their structure, transformation and function. Their role in normal physiology and pathophysiology are highlighted. The consequences of deficiencies and toxicities are also discussed. This course is required for all students in the PrePhysician Assistant and Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine programs. Prerequisites: BIOL160/161 and CHEM 160/161. 3 sem. hrs. 3crs. (Not applicable for major credit.) BIOL 160­161 or the equivalent is a prerequisite for all other Biology courses numbered 230 and above. Fifteen credits in courses numbered BIOL 230 or above must be taken in residence to fulfill the major department residency requirement. These statements do not apply to BIOL 316 and BIOL 317. BIOL 240 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy: A comparative study of the structure and function of the classes of vertebrates; laboratory dissection of representatives of the classes. The laboratory will include the comparative study of vertebrate organisms to fulfill the requirement of the Biology, Medical Technology, and Pre-Chiropractic major or the in-depth anatomical study of feline and other representative groups to fulfill the requirement of the Veterinary Technology major. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 241 Developmental Biology: An integrated biochemical, genetic and morphologic study of developmental stages in organisms including topics like cell differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, gastrulation and organogenesis. (Previously titled BIOL 241 Embryology.) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 244 Ecology: A study of how the forces acting at the organismal and populational level between living systems and their environments determine the temporal and spatial distribution and survival of these systems. (Offered Fall semester only) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 256 Anatomy of Domestic Animals: This course will provide students with a sound working knowledge of mammalian anatomy. Topographical, applied and clinical anatomy of the cat and dog will be presented and emphasis placed on the relationship between anatomical structure and function. Functional adaptation in mammals will be explored by comparative study of common domestic animals: cat, dog, cow, and horse. A review of avian species will provide further understanding of structure and function. In the laboratory students will study skeletal materials from the five species above and will complete dissection of the cat. Prerequisites: BIOL160 and BIOL 161. 3 hrs. lab; 3 hrs. lect.; 4 crs.

Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 331 BIOL 265 Microbiology: A study of the classification, morphology, metabolism, genetics, and ecology of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria. Discussion of aspects concerning control, disease, and immunity. Prerequisites: CHEM 160-161. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 280 Histology: A microscopic study of the fundamental tissues of the animal body; the fundamentals of histological techniques. (Offered Spring and Summer semesters only) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 301 Pharmacology for the Physical Therapist: This is a lecture-based course to provide the physical therapy student with knowledge on how drugs interact with the human body. Basic concepts of pharmacokinetics will be introduced. The major classifications of drugs commonly prescribed to patients referred to physical therapy will be covered along with possible side effects and implications for rehabilitation. Special emphasis will be placed on drugs affecting the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system and musculoskeletal system. 1 sem. hr. 1 cr.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BIOL 302 (HLSC 302) Pathology for Rehabilitation: This course examines the effects of pathological conditions on individuals across the lifespan. It explores pathology as it relates to the rehabilitation potential for patients with disorders of the cardiopulmonary, endocrine, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, hepatic, integumentary, musculosketal and renal systems. Students will investigate the etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, medical and surgical management of patients with pathologies of the systems outlined above and the impact of the disorders on rehabilitation management. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 303 Human Anatomy with Cadaver: A study of the human body with cadaver. The course emphasizes the structure of those organ systems important to body movement. A detailed study of the skeleton will be followed by an examination of the muscular and nervous systems. Laboratory will deal with dissection of cadavers. Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or BIOL 131 or BIOL 161 or BIOL 240 or completion of college level course with dissection experience. Pre-Occupational Therapy students must complete PHYS 110 and BIOL 110 before taking this course. Pre-Physical Therapy students must complete BIOL 160/161, CHEM 160/161, and PHYS 160/161 before taking this course. $247 lab fee. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 305 Human Physiology with Cadaver: A continuation of human anatomy. Students will continue their detailed study of the human body, dealing in this semester with the remaining organ systems of the body: digestion, respiration, circulation, immunity, urinary and osmoregulation, hormone secretion and function, and reproduction. Laboratory will deal with dissection of cadavers. $247 lab fee. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 4 crs. BIOL 309 Human Physiology for Biomedical Sciences: This course provides an in-depth integrative understanding of human physiology. Beginning with cellular physiology and the regulation of the intercellular environment, the course takes a systemic approach to understanding control systems: the nervous and endocrine systems, systems of maintenance and defense: blood, lymphatic and cardiovascular; systems of metabolism, acid-base balance and elimination: respiratory, digestive and urinary: systems of reproduction. Integration of all systems in the well-being of the human organism is emphasized. Types of physiological measurements and their interpretation will also be discussed. This course will form the basis for the understanding of organ system pathophysiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 160/161; CHEM 160/161. 4 hrs. lect., 4 crs. BIOL 310 Immunology: A study of the immunological mechanisms of the vertebrate body including antigen structure and types, antibody structure and formation, and antigen/antibody reactions. Discussion of tolerance, autoimmunity, cellular and humoral immunity, hypersensitivity, and suppression. Prerequisites: CHEM 160-161. Corequisite: BIOL 265 or BIOL 355. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

332 / Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology BIOL 314 (HLSC 314) Clinical Kinesiology: This course is designed to study and analyze human movement in a person environment context. It will emphasize an understanding of movement when it is integrated into real-life activity and applied to individual environments. Kinesiology of the upper and lower extremities and trunk will be examined, and will include clear explanations of both normal kinesiologic function and pathokinesiology of the upper extremity. Laboratory experience will give the student a practical experience for better understanding one component integral to occupation ­ human movement. Prerequisites: PHYS120 and BIOL303. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 316 Kinesiology: This course will provide students with a sound working knowledge of several aspects of theoretical and clinical kinesiology including osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, biomechanics, bone and muscle palpation, goniometry and manual muscle testing. Joint structure and function as well as properties of muscle function (e.g., synergists, agonists, antagonists, active and passive insufficiency, length/tension relationship) will be stressed. Students will learn a variety of techniques for evaluating and testing human motion and, in the laboratory portion of the course, will practice surface anatomy and palpation and measurement of range and quality of normal motion. Abnormal or compensatory movement due to injury or disease will be studied by viewing video tapes of patients. Principles of biomechanics will be presented and tested in handson activities and problems that include calculations of torque, composition and resolution of forces. Prerequisites: BIOL303, PHYS120 or PHYS160. $123.00 Lab Fee. 4 sem. hrs. 4 crs. BIOL 317 Clinical Neuroscience: This course will enable the student to be conversant in the structure and function of the nervous system, with emphasis on sensorimotor mechanisms and neuromuscular function. An overview of types and consequences of neuronal lesions will be addressed. These will be illustrated in a multidisciplinary fashion, i.e., morphology, physiology, biochemistry, and their clinical manifestations. Examples of pathological, occupational, and environmental causes of neurological disease will be used to highlight the different approaches in understanding physical impairment, an essential component of devising effective therapy. Prerequisites: BIOL 303 and BIOL 305 or permission of instructor. (Previously titled: Neuroscience). 4 sem. hrs. 4 crs. BIOL 354 Biochemistry: An intensive problem-solving approach to the study of macromolecular structure and function. Emphasis is on proteins as regulatory and catalytic molecules, bioenergetics, and the integration of cellular metabolism. Laboratory work introduces basic analytical and biochemical techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 116; BIOL160/161; CHEM 160/161, CHEM 260/261. (Offered Fall semester only) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 4 crs. BIOL 355 Molecular Biology of the Cell: The study of how cells function with an emphasis on the macromolecular structure of cells and the underlying mechanisms governing celluar functions. Additional emphasis is on proteins as regulatory and catalytic molecules, and nucleic acids as informational molecules. Laboratory work continues the analytical techniques in BIOL 354 and introduces techniques in cell and molecular biology. Prerequisites: MATH 116; BIOL 160/161; BIOL 354; CHEM 160/161; CHEM 260/CHEM 261. (Offered Spring semester only) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 4 crs. BIOL 360 Genetics: A study of the fundamental principles of heredity and variation as applied to eucaryotes, procaryotes, and viruses with equal emphasis on the molecular aspects of gene structure, function, mutation, and regulation. Prerequisites: MATH 116; BIOL 160/161; CHEM 160/161 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 260 or permission of the instructor. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 4 crs. BIOL 380-381 Cooperative Education in Biology I, II (Natural Science): This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Biology include corporations, hospitals, medical facilities and research organizations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 333 BIOL 397 Independent Study in Biology: Individual readings and research undertaken in a specific area of biology. Registration with the permission of the instructor and the chairperson of the department. 3 crs. BIOL 428-429 Practicum in Medical Technology: Theory and laboratory practice in such areas as parasitology, serology and immunology, microbiology, hematology, clinical microscopy and urinalysis, clinical chemistry, and laboratory management; completed in residence in a hospital school of Medical Technology approved by the ASCP. Prerequisites: Completion of Mercy College requirements; acceptance into an approved hospital; recommendation by the department. 12 crs. per semester. BIOL 430 Seminar in Current Topics in Biology: Research and discussion of contemporary topics and problems; technology and findings in Biology. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BIOL 460 Coordinating Seminar in Biology: A seminar required of all majors in their senior year; readings, reports, discussions, project completed under direction of the faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 15 credits in Biology courses numbered 230 and above, including BIOL 355 Molecular Biology of the Cell or the equivalent. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 360. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PHYSICAL SCIENCE Course Offerings

PHSC 110 Introduction to Geology: A study of the basic concepts in physical science and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the fundamental concepts in physical and historical geology, origin and geological history of earth and life; geological land formation. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PHSC 111 Introduction to Astronomy: A study of basic concepts in physical science and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the fundamental concepts in astronomy; the universe; modern theories of stellar evolution; techniques of astronomical observation; physical characteristics of planets, satellites, and comets. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CHEM 110 Introduction to Chemistry: A study of basic concepts in physical science and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of the fundamental concepts in chemistry with practical applications; theories, atomic, and molecular structures; bondings; stoichiometry; discussions of nuclear, organic, and biochemistry; discussion of topics in science and society. Some mathematical applications will be discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CHEM 160-161 General Chemistry I, II: Fundamental laws and theories; a systematic development of the principles of modern chemistry; application of these principles to the chemistry of the elements and their compounds; laboratory workshop with illustration of the chemical properties studied. Prerequisite: MATH 116 or the equivalent. CHEM 160 is a prerequisite for CHEM 161. 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab. per sem. 4 crs. per sem. CHEM 260-261 Organic Chemistry I, II: Survey of the major types of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including structure, properties, class reactions, and mechanisms; laboratory experiments involving use of modern techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 160-161; CHEM 260 is a prerequisite for CHEM 261. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. per sem. 4 crs. per sem. PHYS 110 Introduction to Physics: A study of the basic physical concepts and scientific methodology as exemplified in the study of those principles that are applicable in everyday situations: motion, force, energy, waves, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

334 / Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology PHYS 160-161 General Physics I, II: Introduction to the general physical principles in the fields of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, electricity, atomic and nuclear physics, and problem-solving techniques. Prerequisite: MATH 201 or the equivalent; PHYS 160 is a prerequisite for PHYS 161. 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab per sem. 4 crs. per sem. SINC 110 The Principals of Science I: The Principals of Science I course is designed specifically for prospective elementary school teachers emphasizing content from the major science disciplines of earth science, biology, chemistry and physics. This course is intended for non-science majors to enhance their general knowledge, skills, and confidence associated with teaching science in the elementary school. Two semesters will be required in order to adequately cover the basic information, concepts and materials associated with each of the sciences mentioned. Some problem solving is necessary and participants should be familiar with the simple or basic math taught in the elementary grades. The laboratory component will consist primarily of "hands-on" investigations and activities appropriate for inclusion (with modification) into any grade at the elementary level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. SINC 111 The Principals of Science II: The Principals of Science II course is designed specifically for prospective elementary school teachers emphasizing content from the four major science disciplines of earth science, biology, chemistry and physics. This course is intended for non-science majors to enhance their general knowledge, skills, and confidence associated with teaching science in the elementary school. Two semesters will be required in order to adequately cover the basic information, concepts, and material associated with each of the sciences mentioned. Some problem solving is necessary and participants should be familiar with the simple or basic math taught in the elementary grades. The laboratory component will consist primarily of "hands-on" investigations and activities appropriate for inclusion (with modification) into any grade at the elementary level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY Course Offerings

Students must maintain at least a 2.5 cumulative index and achieve a minimum letter grade of "C-" in each prerequisite course for admittance into the upper level clinical courses (VETC 224, 241, 247, 395, 396, and 445). VETC 101 Introduction of Veterinary Science: This course is an introduction to the veterinary profession. It will provide students with a comparative view of various veterinary careers serving both people and animals. Basic subjects pertinent to all the veterinary sciences will be discussed with primary emphasis on medical terminology, clinical pathology, and fundamentals of disease. Prerequisite: Placement at ENGL 111 level and MATH 116 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. VETC 140 Veterinary Management: Management theory applicable to the small animal hospital; large animal practice, and research laboratory. A study of management techniques, inventory procedures, medical records, personnel management, and the psychology of client relations. Prerequisite: VETC101 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. VETC 161 Physiology of Domestic Animals: A comparative study of the physiological mechanisms, functions, and metabolism of the organ systems within the body. A regional approach will be used to study the various classes of domestic animals including canine, feline, equine, ruminants, swine and poultry. Prerequisite: BIOL 160-161; CHEM 160; VETC101. 4 sem. hrs. 4 crs.

Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology / 335 VETC 220 Pharmacology and Toxicology: A study of pharmacology and its practical application. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic understanding of drugs and other substances used in the treatment of disease. Emphasis is on classification of drugs based on their effects, therapeutic usage, standards and regulations, weights and measures, conversions, posology, labeling and pharmacy maintenance. Includes an introduction to pharmacological toxicology. Prerequisites: BIOL 256; CHEM 160; VETC161 or permission of instructor. 4 sem hrs. 4 crs. VETC 224 Clinical Laboratory Techniques: This course will provide basic understanding of clinical laboratory techniques, particularly blood chemistry, hematology, urinalysis, external and internal parasites. Emphasis will be placed on the performance and interpretation of common laboratory procedures for routine application in practice. Various laboratory equipment will be used by the student in the course. Prerequisites: BIOL 256; BIOL 265; CHEM 160; VETC 161 or permission of the instructor. 3.5 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 5 crs. VETC 241 Small Animal Diseases: Principles of Treatment and Nursing: This course will furnish the skills necessary for the nursing duties of the veterinary technician. Principles of emergency care, intensive care, administration of drugs, fluid therapy, CPR, oxygen therapy, and the placement of indwelling catheters will be discussed. This course will include a general study of diseases, their definition, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Intensive care nursing will include hands-on experience with animals and models. Prerequisites: VETC 220; VETC 224; VETC 445. Corequisite: VETC 247. 3 hrs. lect. 2 hrs. lab. 4 crs. VETC 247 Surgical Nursing and Radiography: Surgical nursing will include in-depth discussion and hands-on experience with hygiene of the surgical suite and surgical prep room, asepsis, surgical instruments, sterilization and surgical assistance. It includes drugs and equipment for anesthetic administration along with management of anesthetic emergencies. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative monitoring and care are covered. The basic principles of radiology will be taught with the student learning to properly position animals expose films, and process radiographs of diagnostic value. Prerequisite: VETC 220; VETC 224; VETC 445. Corequisite: VETC 241. 3hrs. lect., 2hrs, lab. 4 crs. VETC 260 Principles of Large Animal Medicine: The course will include basic principles of large animal medicine including humane care, nutrition, breeding, housing, genetics, and husbandry. The essential tasks relating to handling, restraint, treatment, venipuncture and blood collecting, anesthesia, and administration of drugs and fluids to farm animals will be covered. A study of diseases of these animals with emphasis on disease control, prevention, treatment, and immunization will be included. Common surgical procedures as well as specimen collection and preservation will be performed. Prerequisites: VETC 224; VETC 241; VETC 247; VETC 445. 3 hrs. lect., 2hrs, lab. 4 crs. NOTE: Preference for registration in this course will go to graduating seniors. Students should anticipate taking the course in the summer after completing VETC 241, VETC 247 and VETC 395. VETC 273 Animal Behavior: An investigation of current research, concepts, and issues in the study of animal behavior from the psychological, ethological, and behavioral point of view. The course will include such topics as social systems, courtships and mating behaviors, parental strategies, communications, and learning. Each student will complete a research project of his/her choice based on animal observations. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. VETC 275 Applied Animal Behavior: In this course, the student will learn techniques of animal training including the proper selection and socialization of animals. Instruction will be based on a practical level relying on the use of animals in training and observation of training classes. Behavioral problems, causes and corrections will be discussed. Off-campus facilities of the Center for Animal Behavior and Canine Training will be utilized extensively for instruction. Prerequisite: VETC 101; permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

336 / Natural Sciences and Veterinary Technology VETC 277 Animal Assisted Therapy: This course will investigate the many aspects of animal assisted therapy, including methods of assessing patients needs, selecting suitable animals, introducing an animal into the patient's life, training the animal, animal maintenance, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the therapy. Various patient populations will be included. This course is a prerequisite for individual internships in Animal Assisted therapy. It will be taught off campus at Green Chimneys in Brewster. Prerequisites: VETC 273; VETC 275 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. VETC 297 Internship in Animal Assisted Therapy: Students will be required to spend one semester doing an animal assisted therapy internship. Each student will select a project from the approved list, implement the project and prepare a complete written description of the project. Prerequisites: VETC 273; VETC 275; VETC 277; and two of the following: PSYN 311 or PSYN 315. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. VETC 380-381 Cooperative Education in Veterinary Science I, II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students in obtaining meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in veterinary science include small and large animal veterinary practices. Students' professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. Prerequisites: BIOL 256; CHEM 160; VETC 101, and VETC 161. 3 crs. per sem. VETC 395 Externship I: Students will be required to spend one semester in an approved animal hospital within the metropolitan area. Registration with the permission of the instructor and the chairperson of the program. Prerequisites: BIOL 256; BIOL 265; VETC 101; VETC 161. Corequisites: VETC 220; VETC 224; VETC 241; VETC 247; 360 hrs. 6 crs. per sem. VETC 396 Externship II: Students will be required to spend one semester in an externship in their field of interest; options include laboratory research, wildlife rehabilitation, advanced surgical assisting and anesthesia, critical care monitoring and nursing, animal behavior, emergency medicine, zoo animal medicine, equine practice, et al. Registration with the permission of the instructor and the chairperson of the program. Prerequisite: BIOL 256; BIOL 265; VETC 101; VETC 161 Corequisite: VETC 224; VETC 445. 360 hrs. 6 crs. per. sem. VETC 399 Externship III: This externship may be arranged on a competitive basis for exceptional students pursuing a specific career track who desire advanced specialty training in their chosen area. Prerequisite: VETC 395; VETC 396 or permission of instructor or program director. 24 hrs. per week. 6 crs. per sem. VETC 445 Fundamentals of Animal Research: The study of laboratory animals as integral parts of biomedical research. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, gerbils, rabbits, hamsters, and other animals will be studied in regard to housing requirements, nutrition, handling and restraint, sex identification and marking, breeding, surgical techniques, anesthesia techniques, injections and blood collecting, diseases, and necropsy. Course given at New York Medical College Graduate School, Valhalla, NY. Prerequisites: BIOL 256; BIOL 265; CHEM 160; VETC 161. Corequisites: VETC 220; VETC 224. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

337 / Physical Education

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education Course Offerings

NOTE: Only up to 6 credits in Physical Education in the non-liberal arts area may be applied toward degree requirements. PHED 103 Team Sports: History, rules, fundamentals, team play, strategy, offense, and defense. Care of common athletic injuries, conditioning, massage, taping. Lectures and practice. Included football, soccer, baseball, volleyball, and basketball according to the season and facilities available. 3 crs. PHED 104 Recreational Activities: The study of the history, principles, rules and practical application in various recreational activities. Included are: badminton, tennis, volleyball, platform tennis, bowling, and golf. This course is designed to provide the student with a lifelong recreational activity after the college years are completed. 3 crs. PHED 109 Self-Defense I: This course is designed to aid the student in attaining a level of physical fitness while also gaining fundamental knowledge of the principles and tactics of self-defense, in both theory and practice. 3 crs. PHED 110 Body Conditioning: The purpose of this course is to develop a well-rounded conditioning program covering all phases of motor performance. The course will be used as a guide for a lifetime fitness program designed for each student. While the student uses the course as a starting point, the ultimate goal will be to recognize the hazards of unfitness, obesity, and inactivity after college. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 338

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE Course Offerings

BHSC 120 (PSYN 120, SOCL 120) Career and Life Planning: This course is designed to assist students in matching their college experience to their personal and professional development. Topics range from guidance in selecting a college curriculum to choosing and getting a job. Through processes and group interaction, students learn to assess their workplace competency and are encouraged in their pursuit of career and life planning. 2-4 sem. hrs. 2-4 crs. (Elective credit only.) PSYN 101, SOCL 101 or the equivalent is a prerequisite for all Behavioral Science courses numbered 121 or above. BHSC 136 (CRJU 136) The Judicial System: A detailed study of the jurisdiction of civil and criminal court systems will be explored. Village, city, county, state, and federal judicial courts will be examined critically. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 154 (CRJU 154) Probation and Parole: The two most important non-institutional treatment methods for offenders are probation and parole. Past and present programs will be covered to understand their status, current scope, and future trends and practices. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 190 Honors Cultural Anthropology: This course introduces students to the questions anthropologists ask and the ways that they go about trying to answer them. It will begin with an investigation of what anthropologists mean by culture and consider specific topics such as social, political, and economic organizations, clanship, marriage, labor, and religion. Students will have the opportunity to engage in small fieldwork projects. Admission by permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 202 (PSYN 202, SOCL 202) Ethics and the Family: A philosophical examination of the rights and responsibilities of parents and children, and of the rights and responsibilities of the state toward both, drawing on legal and non-legal case materials, as well as on classic and contemporary philosophical sources, and including a consideration of child abuse, foster care and adoption, divorce, and women`s liberation and its effect on the family. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 215 (CRJU 215, SOCL 215) The Juvenile Justice System: Origins, philosophy and objectives of the juvenile justice system, measures of delinquency, theoretical perspectives on delinquency, legal processes, roles of the actors and current trends within the juvenile justice system. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 226 (PSYN 226, SOCL 226) Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An introduction to computers as a professional tool in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include data collection, data description and data analysis (with statistical software, e.g., SPSS for Windows 6.1), use of the Internet, on-line bibliographic searching, computers in teaching and learning, and computerized techniques in psychological testing. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 233 (CRJU 233) Family Violence: The Criminal Justice Response: Once considered a "hands off" issue, to be dealt with in the privacy of a family, cases of family violence increasingly are brought to the Criminal Courts. Drawing on the latest research, the course gives information about batterers and battering behavior. It reviews current practices, and examines various options available to Criminal Justice personnel handling the problem. (Previouly numbered: BHSC/CRJU 133). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 339 BHSC 244 (PSYN 244, SOCL 244) Social Psychology: A study of behavior, attitudes, and emotions shaped by interpersonal influences and social structures, race, and gender. Topics include aggression, altruism, persuasion, leadership, the self, conformity, human relations and group processes. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 249 (PSYN 249, SOCL 249) Minorities in the United States: Problems of adjustment and assimilation of various ethnic, racial, and religious groups in American society; emphasis given to those groups prevalent in the New York metropolitan area; Blacks, Hispanics, Jews, Asians, Greeks, Italians, and Irish. (Previouly numbered: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 138). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 261 (PSYN 261, SOWK 261) Computer-Assisted Data Analysis: This course is designed to teach students how to use statistical computer packages to perform complex statistical data analysis. Students conduct a study and use statistical packages to perform and understand complex statistical analyses, e.g., correlation, cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, multiple regression, and path analysis. Prerequisite: BHSC 248. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BHSC 262 (CRJU 262, PSYN 262, SOCL 262) Alcohol, Drugs, and Behavior: Principles of pharmacology, neural transmission, behavior, and psychological assessment will be discussed. Specific psychopharmacologic issues will be presented with sedativehypnotic, benzodiazepine, opiate, stimulant, and antipsychotic drugs as primary examples. Other discussion areas include behavioral toxicology, inhalant drugs, drugs and schoolchildren, nutritional and legal aspects to drug use, cigarette smoking, and the effects of drugs on the developing organism (e.g., fetal alcohol syndrome). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 267 ( PSYN 267, SOCL 267) Strategies for Child Care Providers: An introduction to the challenges and opportunities involved in the delivery of child care services in the community and in institutional settings. Emphasis is placed on stimulating awareness, interest and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies and realities of providing meaningful programs for substance clients. Attention will be given to the following issues: Cultural diversity, bioethics, interdisciplinary teams in child care settings, case management, family relationships, functional assessment, client abuse, and environmental impact on functional capacity in work with this population. (Previouly numbered: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 323). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 269 (PSYN 269, SOCL 269, SOWK 269) Strategies for Alcohol/Substance Abuse Providers: An introduction to the challenges and opportunities involved in the delivery of substance abuse services in the community and in institutional settings. Emphasis is placed on stimulating awareness, interest and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies and realities of providing meaningful programs for substance clients. Attention will be given to the following issues: cultural diversity, bioethics, interdisciplinary teams in substance abuse settings, case management, family relationships, functional assessment, client abuse, and environmental impact on functional capacity in work with this population. (Previouly numbered: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 324). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 271 (PSYN 271, SOCL 271) Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society: This course aims to provide the student with an understanding of the ways in which American society promotes (or fails to promote) health as well as copes with illness. The course will examine the following topics: the interaction of social and cultural factors (such as gender, ethnicity, race, and social class) with health and illness; illness (disability) as a social issue; careers in health care; settings in which health care services are delivered; financing health care services; comparisons with the health care services of other countries; and uses and applications of computers/microcomputers in the health field. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 276 (PSYN 276, SOCL 276) Advanced Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: Additional applications of the computer in the behavioral sciences. Topics include use of statistical packages such as SPSS, automated data collection requiring interfacing the computer with stimulus presentation and response recording devices, models of memory, problem-solving, reasoning, and diagnostic mental testing. Prerequisites: BHSC 226 or BHSC 261 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 340 BHSC 280 (PSYN 280, SOCL 280) Philosophy and the Social Sciences: An examination of: the nature of explanation in the social sciences, objectivity and value judgments; human behavior and human actions, methods of investigation and the construction of theories about the human world; ethical standards and principles as they relate to privacy and other issues pertaining to human subjects. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 282 (PSYN 282, SOCL 282) Strategies for Elder Care Providers: An introduction to the challenges and opportunities involved in the delivery of geriatric services in the community and in institutional settings. Emphasis is placed on stimulating awareness, interest and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies and realities of providing meaningful programs for substance clients. Attention will be given to the following issues: cultural diversity, bioethics, interdisciplinary teams in geriatric settings, case management, family relationships, functional assessment, client abuse, and environmental impact on functional capacity in work with this population. (Previouly numbered: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 325). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 295 (PSYN 295, SOCL 295, SOWK 295) Contemporary Issues: An analysis of current questions in behavioral science, psychology, sociology, and social work. Specific topics such as Perspectives on Social Work Practice, Child Abuse in the Family, Music Therapy, Dance Therapy, AIDS and Health Care Delivery, Domestic Violence, Raising Children in Troubled Times are announced each semester by the Division. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 308 (PSYN 308, SOCL 308) Health Care Organization and Management: This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the management process within the context of the health care organization. Topics include study of the environment of the organization, environmental scanning and strategic planning, goal setting, issues of health care financing and reimbursement, the management process, program review and evaluation. Particular emphasis will be placed on issues of organizational effectiveness in an environment of cost containment. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 310 Epidemiology: A study of the occurrence and distribution of disease with emphasis on the natural history of disease and the various levels of prevention. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 345 (LAWS 345) Employment Law: This course will explore the legislation that impacts employer/employee relationships in our society. Emphasis will be placed on the regulatory environment applicable to employment law and will focus on understanding the principles of the most commonly litigated issues such as: discrimination, sexual harassment, whistle blowing/employer retaliation and the impact of these lawsuits in the workplace. Prerequisite: LAWS 120 or permission of Chair. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 348 (SOCL 348) Methodology for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An introduction to the process of doing research in the social and behavioral sciences: literature review, hypothesis formation, research design, techniques of data collection, data analysis, and report writing. Students learn to use the scientific method as a tool to both answer questions and solve problems in the social sciences, social work practice, health services, and education. Course includes qualitative and quantitative approaches to research, computer applications at all stages of the research process, statistical analysis of data, and particular attention to issues of doing research in a multicultural context ­ e.g. ethical concerns (including rights of participants) formulation of questions, and use of findings. Pre or corequisite: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 226. (Perviously numbered BHSC/SOCL248) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 366 (PSYN 366, SOCL 366) Medical Ethics: An examination of ethical questions that arise in health care and in the relationship between health care professionals and those they serve, including: the rights of individuals to selfdetermination and the obligations of health care professionals both to the individuals they serve and to society at large; life as a value and such issues as abortion, euthanasia, and suicide; the questions of mental health and mental illness and the rights of the mentally ill; eugenic programs and the possibilities of genetic engineering; the cost of health care and the delivery of health care as a social and political issue. (Previously numbered: BHSC/PSYN/ SOCL 266) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 341 BHSC 370 (PSYN 370, SOCL 370) Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: A review of the major statistical methods used in summarizing, understanding, and interpreting numerical data and research use of the computer. The course covers a full range of descriptive and inferential statistics including: frequency distributions; measures of central tendency and variability; probability theory; the normal curve model; correlation; and a wide range of statistical tests such as the t test, F test, analysis of variance, and Chi-square. Where appropriate, calculations will be performed by using statistical software packages. Prerequisite: BHSC/PSYN/SOCL 226. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. BHSC 380-381 Cooperative Education in Behavioral Science I, II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in behavioral science include residential centers, after school programs, shelters, substance abuse programs and hospitals. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. 3 crs. per sem.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BHSC 390 (PSYN 390, SOCL 390) Internship in Computer Applications for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: This course teaches the student to use software packages such as statistical software, database management, spreadsheets, word processing, and laboratory interfaces to collect and analyze data. 3 sem. hrs. 3-6 crs. BHSC 399 (PSYN 399, SOCL 399) Internship in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: Practice experience, program planning and/or research provide the student with an opportunity to interact with children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly and become acquainted with the complexities of administering programs in the human service professions. Field placements will be available in a wide variety of locations such as preschools, day care centers, residential and outpatient drug treatment centers, social service agencies, senior centers, nursing homes, municipal housing projects, community outreach services, and hospitals. A minimum of 120 hours of fieldwork for the semester is required for 6 credits. A maximum of 12 credits of fieldwork is allowed toward degree program. Students meet in small groups with faculty on a regular basis. 6 crs. BHSC 426 (PSYN 426, SOCL 426) Classics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: A guided reading seminar in the social and behavioral sciences utilizing primary source material with critical analysis of such authors as: Allport, Durkheim, Freud, James, Jung, Marx, Skinner, Weber. This course should be taken in the final stages of the majors in Psychology, Sociology, and Behavioral Science, as it serves as the Capstone Course for majors in Sociology and in Behavioral Science. Recommended prerequisite: PSYN 210. (Previously numbered: BHSC/PSYN/ SOCL 326)3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE Course Offerings

CRJU 102 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System: Students will be given an overview of the criminal justice system, commencing with a discussion of law, its sociology, its functions, etc.; then moving on into the historical origins of the system, current practices, and prognosis for the future of the criminal justice system. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 104 Introduction to Corrections: A general overview of the subsystems commonly known as corrections. Probation and parole will be covered. The punishment and treatment of offenders will be explored. Visits to federal, state, and city correctional institutions, and an opportunity to discuss correctional problems with ex-offenders will be arranged. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 342 CRJU 130 (EVHS 130) Security Management and Loss Control: A comprehensive survey of the various aspects in the field of private security. Included are the fundamentals of security management, loss control and prevention, and discussions of the various safety programs in business and industry. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 132 Victimology: This course focuses on the central character in a criminal act, the victim. Its objectives are to understand what it means to be victimized and to learn how to offer a victim real help. Special attention will be given to the victims of particular sorts of crimes such as sexual assault; child, adolescent and spouse abuse; victimization of the elderly and of parents; incest; and to the survivors of homicide victims. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 136 (BHSC 136) The Judicial System: A detailed study of the jurisdiction of civil and criminal court systems will be explored. Village, city, county, state, and federal judicial courts will be examined critically. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 154 (BHSC 154) Probation and Parole: The two most important non-institutional treatment methods for offenders are probation and parole. Past and present programs will be covered to understand their status, current scope, and future trends and practices. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 156 Criminal Investigation: This course is designed to familiarize the student with the modern methods of criminal investigation, including not only the various techniques involved, but the problems encountered in crime investigation. Legal issues, interrogation techniques, surveillance techniques, crime scene examination, report writing, and testimony are among the areas covered. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 158 Introduction to Forensic Science: A study of the scientific techniques of criminal investigation evidence gathering. The student will be exposed to actual cases involving physical evidence in an effort to explain how the laboratory analyses are an integral part of the investigation. Prerequisite: CRJU 102 or comparable practical experience. Recommended: CRJU 156. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 205 (EVHS 205) Arson Investigation: An introduction to the problems and techniques of fire investigation; the chemistry of fire and the combustion properties of selected fuels; a discussion of the Arson Laws and types of incendiary fires; determining fire causes; recognizing and pursuing evidence; interrogation of adults and juveniles; and court procedures. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 206 (PSYN 206) Deviation and Therapy: An analysis and exploration of the various treatment processes and techniques employed in a variety of agencies and situations including case work counseling, individual and group therapy, and halfway house techniques. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 207 White Collar Crime: This course will provide an in-depth view of white collar criminality. Comparison will be made between traditional crimes and white collar crimes; various types of white collar crimes will be discussed and analyzed. Organized crime and the problems inherent in white collar crime prosecutions will be dealt with. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 208 Organized Crime Control: An examination into the history and background of organized crime including illegitimate and legitimate activities. Special emphasis will be on the control measures adopted on the local, federal and international levels. The course will analyze the organized crime system in order to counteract its negative effect and harm to society through the use of established and new legislation, and innovative investigative techniques. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 213 (EVHS 213) Legal Aspects of Private Security: A study of the legal status of "private police." Included will be a review of the regulation of private security agencies, interrelations with law enforcement agencies, problems in the area of arrest, searches, privacy, etc. Civil liabilities of private security personnel and the rights of citizens will also be explored. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 343 CRJU 215 (BHSC 215, SOCL 215) The Juvenile Justice System: Origins, philosophy and objectives of the juvenile justice system, measures of delinquency, theoretical perspectives on delinquency, legal processes, roles of the actors and current trends within the juvenile justice system. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 229 (PSYN 229) Stress Management in the Criminal Justice System: By employing numerous experimental situations and evaluation instruments, this course will help the student understand stresses felt by those in the Criminal Justice System-- Police Officers, Correction Officers, Victims, Probation and Parole personnel, etc., what happens to them and what can be done to manage stress. The course deals directly with the causes and prevention of: career frustration; job boredom; supervisory conflicts; family problems; life changes; emotional strain and person-to-person resistance. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 233 (BHSC 233) Family Violence: The Criminal Justice Response: Once considered a "hands off" issue, to be dealt with in the privacy of a family, cases of family violence increasingly are brought to the Criminal Courts. Drawing on the latest research, the course gives information about batterers and battering behavior. It reviews current practices, and examines various options available to Criminal Justice personnel handling the problem. (Previouly numbered: CRJU/BHSC 133). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 234 (LAW 234) Criminal Law: The objective of this course is to acquaint the student with the historical background of Criminal Law, jurisdiction, the mental elements necessary to commit crime, the major crimes and recent changes in the law brought about by court cases. Comparison will be made as to what the law is elsewhere and what the law is in the State of New York. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 246 (PSYN 246, SOCL 246) The Death Penalty in America: This course will discuss the various issues surrounding the death penalty as a punishment in the United States. Areas covered will include the history of the death penalty and legal and constitutional questions. Social, psychological and philosophical issues will also be explored. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 250 (LAW 250) Criminal Procedure: This course will acquaint the student with the criminal procedures that are followed in most states throughout the nation. The path of the criminal will be traced from arrest, to arraignment, to the grand jury, to trial, etc.. The New York Criminal Procedure Law and Court cases that have been defined, limited and interpreted criminal procedure will be discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 262 (BHSC 262, PSYN 262, SOCL 262) Alcohol, Drugs and Behavior: Principles of pharmacology, neural transmission, behavior and psychological assessment will be discussed. Specific psychopharmacologic issues will be presented with sedativehypnotic, benzodiazepine, opiate, stimulant and antipsychotic drugs as primary examples.Other discussion areas include behavioral toxicology, inhalant drugs, drugs and schoolchildren, nutritional and legal aspects to drug use, cigarette smoking and the effects of drugs on the developing organism (e.g., fetal alcohol syndrome). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 295 Contemporary Issues: A discussion of current topics concerning criminal justice, such as search and seizure, court administration, drugs, police administration, jails and prisons. Specific topics to be covered will be announced by the department. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 301 (POLS 301) Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice: Analysis of the leading U.S. Supreme Court and State Court decisions impacting Criminal Justice. The historical development of the Bill of Rights and its application to the States through the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Prerequisite: Six credits in Criminal Justice. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 303 Perspectives in Legal Development: An analysis of the development of the legal process, particularly as it affects Criminal Justice. The philosophy and conflict between needs, ideas, and experiences will be explored through the writings of the great minds of philosophy and law. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 344 CRJU 304 Law, Ethics, and Criminal Justice: This course will study the balance among moral philosophy, law, and criminal justice administration. The course will study the movement toward professional ethics, and the growing emphasis on value questions and policy decisions among scholars, researchers, and practitioners. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. CRJU 380-381 Cooperative Education in Criminal Justice, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible meaningful sites for students in criminal justice include Police Departments, non-profit organizations, treatment centers and governmental offices. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. 3 crs. per sem. CRJU 397 Independent Study in Criminal Justice: A project designed to take into account the individual student's special criminal justice interest. Student must comply with the special instructions for Independent Study Projects as set forth in the Catalogue. 3 crs. CRJU 399 Internship in Criminal Justice: Under Faculty supervision, the pre-service major supplements his classroom studies with practical experience, by engaging in a planned program of observation and participation in selected criminal justice agencies. Prerequisite: Six credits in Criminal Justice. 3 crs. CRJU 401 Coordinating Seminar in Criminal Justice: A seminar required of all majors in Criminal Justice; readings, reports, discussions, project to be completed under the direction of the faculty. Prerequisites: CRJU 102 and at least three other courses in Criminal Justice. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT Course Offerings

EVHS 102 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety Management: A discussion and explanation of the theory of industrial hazard control, the effects of hazards, understanding the control of safety and health hazards, communication techniques in safety and health management, and the role of interfacing management systems in hazard control. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 110 Risk Management: This course will provide the student with the definitions and methods of risk management in the industrial environment. Rationale is developed for establishment of acceptable risk levels and for safety management decision making. Final impact of insurance programs is reviewed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 130 (CRJU 130) Security Management and Loss Control: A comprehensive survey of the various aspects in the field of private security. Included are the fundamentals of security management, loss control and prevention, and discussions of the various safety programs in business and industry. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 131 Introduction to Fire Science: A study of fire hazards and controlling mechanisms, including building construction, fire detectors, alarms and extinguishing systems. Application of physical and chemical effects of combustion to selected problem areas such as high-rise buildings. Professional organizations for fire fighting and fire research. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 200 Human Behavior in Hazard Control: Application of the principles of psychology to the development of safe behavior. Critical factors associated with optimizing task performance while limiting the possibility of injurious consequences in hazardous situations. Emphasis is on problems of behavior and the causes of harmful events. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 345 EVHS 201 Safety Codes and Standards: General Industry codes, standards, and requirements developed as a result of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Discusses the codes, and standards resulting from other safety and health legislation and those created by other public or private agencies that have an impact on the safety professional. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 204 Construction Safety and Loss Control: Emphasizes the primary accident reduction at construction projects to include electrical safety, trenching and excavation, material handling and rigging. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 205 (CRJU 205) Arson Investigation: An introduction to the problems and techniques of fire investigation; the chemistry of fire and the combustion properties of selected fuels; a discussion of the Arson Laws and types of incendiary fires; determining fire causes; reckoning and pursuing evidence; interrogation of adults and juveniles; and court procedures. Prerequisite: CRJU 102 or EVHS 102. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EVHS 206 Safety Engineering: This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and tools necessary for the identification of workplace hazards and the means of correcting them. Topics covered will include areas such as the design of workplace environment, machine guards, noise control, and protective equipment. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 209 Industrial Fire Protection: A study of the theoretical and practical application of industrial fire protection. Areas covered will include industrial fire brigades, risk management, planning, handling and storage of hazardous materials. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 210 Ergonomics: An exploration of the principles which control human performance and its effect upon the safety and reliability of systems. Engineering and anthropometry, biomechanics of motion and work posture, work physiology, and performance measurement are covered under the context of their application in workplace design. Prerequisite: EVHS 102, BIOL 130. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 212 Motor Transportation Fleet Safety: Focuses on the essential elements of comprehension motor transportation fleet safety program as they relate to protecting and conserving organizational resources. Prerequisite: 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 295 Contemporary Issues: A discussion of selected topics concerning safety and fire science. Specific topics to be covered will be announced. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 301 Organization and Supervision of Environmental Health & Safety Programs: Critical analysis of hazard control programs in schools, communities, and industries. Methods of programming safety at all levels. The management aspects of program initiation, evaluation, and modification. Prerequisite: EVHS 102. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 303 Principles of Industrial Hygiene: Basic methods for control of occupational disease, techniques of sampling for gas, vapors, dusts, and other contaminants. Evaluation of potential physical hazards such as excessive radiation, lasers, noise, and stress. Application of engineering controls, governmental regulations, and private standards. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 304 Emergencies and Disasters : An in-depth course of study designed to familiarize the safety manager and public servant with unique but actual situations which could cause severe harm. These are the events that become publicized due to their spectacular natures. The usual result is extensive bodily injury and serious financial loss. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 305 Advanced Industrial Hygiene: Theory and definitive application of principles and concepts for health hazard recognition evaluation, and control strategies and methods. This course should include but is not limited to such current health concerns as asbestos, lead and sick building syndrome. Prerequisites: EVHS 304 , CHEM 260. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 346 EVHS 306 Worker Compensation: An overview of the principles and statutes that govern workers' compensation laws and statutes as they apply to today's work environment. Prerequisite: EVHS 110 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 315 Environmental Management: Examines the recognition, evaluation, control and legislative complacence of hazardous materials and waste through effective environmental health and safety management. Prerequisite: EVHS 102 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. EVHS 380-381 Cooperative Education in Safety Administration I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in Safety Administration include hospitals, corporations, non-profit organizations. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor amd structured assignments based on the work experience.3 crs. EVHS 397 Independent Study in Environmental Health and Safety Management: A project designed to take into account the individual student's special interest in public safety. Subject to the instructions for Independent Study Projects as set forth in the Catalogue. 3 crs. EVHS 401 (LAWS 401) Survey of Environmental Law: A survey of Federal and New York laws relating to environmental protection and hazardous waste materials which are of interest to the safety professional. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

LAW Course Offerings

LAWS 120 Business Law I: Introduction to business law. The nature and sources of law, courts, and court procedure; criminal law and torts; contracts; and the law of sales are the topics explored. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or placement at ENGL 111 level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 130 Introduction to Legal Studies: This course evaluates the methods and processes of the judicial, administrative, and legislative branches of government; the role of the legal assistant in the legal field; the present law concerned with the authorized and unauthorized practice of law; the ethical standards applicable to legal assistants and attorneys in legal terminology. In addition, the student will learn the basic system and procedures used in the legal systems and law offices. (Previously: PARA 130 Introduction to the Paralegal Profession) Pre or Corequisite: ENGL 110 or placement at ENGL III level. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 203 Law of Evidence: The general nature of judicial (and administrative) proof; the common law of evidence; the statutory law of evidence; contemporary procedural evidentiary rules, criminal and civil. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 205 (PSYN 205, SOCL 205) Aging and the Law: This course will introduce students to legal issues affecting older adults. Some of the topics to be covered are: Health Care Proxies, Living Wills, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Benefits, Elder Abuse, Conservatorships, Nursing Homes and Long Term Estates Planning. Prerequisite: PSYN 101, or SOCL 101 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 220 The Art of Legal Reasoning: This course is an introduction to the techniques of legal reasoning. The student will learn how to read statutes and other written laws; the logic of legal precedence; and how to analyze judicial opinions. The techniques of identifying key facts, legal issues, holdings and rules of the law will be explored. The student will also learn how to apply these legal rules to a client's case. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 347 LAWS 234 (CRJU 234) Criminal Law: The objective of this course is to acquaint the student with the historical background of Criminal Law, jurisdiction, the mental elements necessary to commit crime, the major crimes and recent changes in the law brought about by court cases. Comparison will be made as to what the law is elsewhere and what the law is in the State of New York. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 235 (SPCM235) Argumentation, Debate and the Court Room: The study and practice of the art of persuasive techniques used in the courtroom. The student will prepare a case for trial by researching the legal issues, gathering and analyzing evidence, examining witnesses and finally presenting the case for trial. Emphasis is on basic research skills, analytical thinking, preparation and presentation of oral arguments. Prerequisite: SPCM 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 250 (CRJU250) Criminal Procedure: This course will acquaint the student with the criminal procedures that are followed in most states throughout the nation. The path of the criminal will be traced from arrest, to arraignment, to the grand jury, to trial, etc.. The New York Criminal Procedure Law and Court cases that have been defined, limited and interpreted criminal procedure will be discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 255 (PSYN 255, SOCL 255, POLS 255) Managing Human Conflict I: This course introduces the student to the field of conflict analysis and resolution through the examination of theory and role play. Major theories of conflict studies are considered and the student will explore whether these theories are useful in the resolution of conflict. The student will be introduced to the resolution of conflict. The student will be introduced to the various forms of conflict resolution such as negotiation, mediation and arbitration. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 256 (PSYN 256, SOCL 256, POLS 256) Managing Human Conflict II: This course continues the study of the theories utilized in conflict resolution. The language of conflict management will be explored and the active listening skills of the student will be developed. The theory and application of negotiation will be studied and applied through role play. Prerequisite: LAWS/PSYN/SOCL/POLS255. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 261 (JOUR261) Free Speech, Media and the Law: A course that explores the shifting relationship between free expression and media technologies. From a philosophical and legal foundation, it immerses students into the technological, social and cultural issues surrounding the First Amendment, including privacy rights, pornography, copyright, and libel. The course challenges students by posing a critical question: Are there any forms of free speech that should be restricted? If so, which ones ­ and who decides? 3 sem. Hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 295 Contemporary Issues in Legal Studies: An analysis of current topics that arise such as: conflict resolution, technology and the law, health law, privacy rights and other topics. Specific topics to be covered will be announced by the Program Director. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 340 Business Law II: Commercial paper, agency, corporate and partnership law; creditor-borrower relations; secured transactions; insurance; bankruptcy; and property law are some of the areas under study. Prerequisite: LAWS 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 345 (BHSC 345) Employment Law: This course will explore the legislation that impacts employer/employee relationships in our society. Emphasis will be placed on the regulatory environment applicable to employment law and will focus on understanding the principles of the most commonly litigated issues such as: discrimination, sexual harassment, whistle blowing/employer retaliation and the impact of these lawsuits in the workplace. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 348 LAWS 355 (PSYN355,SOCL355,POLS355) Mediation Theory and Practice: This course examines the theory and practical application of mediation. Integration of ethical and policy issues and application through role play. Study of how the various applications affect the mediation process and the court's role in the development of mediation. Role play is an important component of this course. Prerequisite: LAWS/PSYN/SOCL/POLS 255. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 360 (PSYN360,SOCL360,POLS360) Practicum in Conflict Resolution: This course assists students in bringing together the theoretical and practical skills developed in the program through case studies and field projects. Co/Prerequisites: LAWS/ PSYN/SOCL/POLS 256 or PSYN/SOCL/POLS 355. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 361 (POLS 361) Constitutional Law and Policy: An examination of major constitutional problems in the United States; analysis of Supreme Court decisions concerning federalism; separation of powers; individual rights. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. LAWS 380-381 Cooperative Education in Laws, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experience directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in legal studies include dispute resolution centers, courts, law offices, corporations and government offices. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and and structured assignments based on the work experience. Cooperative Education office approval required. 3 crs. per sem. LAWS 401 (EVHS 401) Survey of Environmental Law: A survey of Federal and New York laws relating to environmental protection and hazardous waste materials which are of interest to the safety professional. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

PARALEGAL STUDIES* Course Offerings

For Legal Studies majors, LAWS 130 is a prerequisite or corequisite for all PARA courses numbered 202 or above or consent of Program Director. ENGL 111 or the equivalent is a prerequisite for all PARA courses numbered 300 or above. PARA 201 Family Law: This course will survey the law, procedures and documents involved in domestic relations law practice. Areas covered: cohabitation, marriage, divorce and separation, maintenance, equitable distribution, family offenses. (Previously Titled: Domestic Relations Law) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 202 Business Organizations: This course trains the student to manage the practical aspects of business organizations. A review of the lawyer's role in the formation of business entities with a survey of the fundamental principles of law applicable to each entity and the preparation of the documents necessary to the organization and operation of each. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 206 Substantive Law and Document Drafting: This course will introduce the student to the law of torts, agency, contracts, commercial transactions, tax and bankruptcy. The student will learn how legal documents are structured and the art of drafting them, and will draft documents pertinent to the substantive areas of law covered in this course. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 260 Legal Research and Writing I: An introduction to the study of law which acquaints the students with an analysis and synthesis of cases and other legal materials. The course develops research techniques and basic writing skills designed to put the law into a usable form. The students will develop a familiarity with various methods of legal research including indexes, digests, Shepard's citations, encyclopedias and the West key number system. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 349 PARA 295 Contemporary Issues: A discussion of current topics concerning the paralegal profession elder law, workmen's compensation laws, securities law, use of computers and legislative updates. Specific topics to be covered will be announced by the department. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 300 Legal Research and Writing II: An in-depth study of legal research and writing which prepares a student to develop a mastery of legal writing techniques. The student will learn to prepare and draft various legal documents including a law office and trial memoranda, a trial court brief and an appellate brief. Prerequisite: PARA 260. (Previously Numbered: PARA 200). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 301 Real Property and Mortgages: This course will study the practical aspects involving conveyance from the drafting of purchase and sale agreements to the passing of papers; mechanics of the title examination; the preparation of documents for mortgages, foreclosures, recordings and closings. In addition, attention will be given to the substantive law relating to the ownership, sale, leasing, financing and government regulation of real property. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 302 Litigation: This course offers a basic working knowledge in handling civil litigation. Special emphasis will be placed upon the CPLR covering such topics as organization and jurisdiction of the civil courts of New York; the methods of commencing a lawsuit; the concept of venue; the content, form and use of pleadings; the form, uses and procedures commencing motion practice under CPLR; the pre-trial procedures including bills of particulars and various disclosure devices; the method of placing a matter on the trial calendar and post-trial procedures. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 303 Probate, Estates, and Trusts: This course offers an in-depth analysis of all aspects of handling estates in the Probate Court, including the preparation and filing of the necessary documents with the court and the appropriate taxing authorities. Moreover, the student will be introduced to the basic conceptual aspects of estates and trust law covering such topics as the law of wills, family rights, perpetuities, fiduciary powers, guardians and accountings. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 380-381 Cooperative Education in Paralegal Studies, I & II: This course is designed to link college with the world of work by assisting students to obtain meaningful, academically relevant work experiences directly related to their career goals. Possible placement sites for students in paralegal include attorney offices, courts and governmental offices. Students professional development is enhanced through meetings with a faculty advisor and structured assignments based on the work experience. 3 crs. per sem. PARA 400 Law Office Management: The student will learn how a law office is organized and managed, and will study the impact of the automation revolution on the operation of the law office. The course will also focus on the importance of preventing malpractice, conflict of interest and other ethical issues that arise in day to day law office situations. The use of software tutorials will be included in this course. Prerequisite: PARA 206. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PARA 410 Advanced Seminar in Paralegal Studies: This course is the capstone course for paralegal majors that will assist the student in integrating his/her knowledge of ethical issues, theoretical concepts with the practical applications of legal research, writing and document drafting. Each student will be challenged to take the skills that he/she has learned throughout the paralegal studies major and apply them to assignments presented by the faculty that simulate law office situations. Prerequisites: PARA 300, PARA 206. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. * All courses listed under this section are legal speciality courses as defined by the guidelines of the Standing Committee of Legal Assistants of the American Bar Association.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 350

PSYCHOLOGY Course Offerings

PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology: An introduction to the science of psychology, including a review of major historical perspectives, methods of research, and contemporary theory and knowledge. Major areas of study include the biological basis of behavior, emotion and motivation, learning and conditioning, human development, personality, and abnormal behavior. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 119 The College Experience: Survival/Achievement/Success: Designed specifically for first-semester students and taught by faculty drawn from across the disciplines, this course provides psychological, behavioral, and academic strategies for successful completion of the college program. The student interacts with faculty, peers, and selected professional staff to gain empirical knowledge of campus support systems. The course focuses on the development of critical thinking as well as the positive attitudes and behavior patterns associated with academic success and social satisfaction in college. Learning skills, writing strategies, self-knowledge, decision-making, problem-solving, self-motivation are all topics of interest covered in this course. The current Mercy College Undergraduate Catalogue is required reading. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. (Elective credit only.) PSYN 120 (BHSC 120, SOCL 120) Career and Life Planning: This course is designed to assist students in matching their college experience to their personal and professional development. Topics range from guidance in selecting a college curriculum to choosing and getting a job. Through processes and group interaction, students learn to assess their workplace competency and are encouraged in their pursuit of career and life planning. 2-4 sem. hrs. 2-4 crs. (Elective credit only.) PSYN 101 or the equivalent is a prerequisite for all other Psychology courses numbered 121 and above. PSYN 127 Peer Counseling: A supervised experience in peer counseling of freshman students. Admission only through the Office of the Dean for Student Affairs and the Office of the Department Chairperson. Prerequisite: PSYN 219. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 173 (EDUC173, SOCL173) Perspectives on Parenting: The course examines the parenting process and the tasks parents carry out as they raise children from birth through adolescence. The focus will be on effective parenting skills with the responsibility of fostering a stimulating learning environment and open channels of communication. Current family issues will be addressed. Field work required. (Previously numbered: PSYN 170) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 195 Honors Psychology: Specific conceptual focuses for the course have included the mind-body question and concepts of the self, gender, and society. Primary reading involves the works of early philosophers whose ideas led to the development of psychology, the works of important historical figures in psychology and modern day theorists. Admission by permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 202 (BHSC 202, SOCL 202) Ethics and the Family: A philosophical examination of the rights and responsibilities of parents and children and of the rights and responsibilities of the state toward both, drawing on legal and non-legal case materials. This course will also examine classic and contemporary philosophical sources including a consideration of child abuse, foster care and adoption, divorce, elder care, substance abuse problems, and women`s liberation and its effect on the family. Federal and state laws of confidentiality will be discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 351 PSYN 205 (LAWS 205, SOCL 205) Aging and the Law: This course will introduce students to legal issues affecting older adults. Some of the topics to be covered are: health care proxies, living wills, medicare, medicaid, social security benefits, elder abuse, conservatorships, nursing homes and long term estates planning. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 206 (CRJU 206) Deviation and Therapy: An analysis and exploration of the various treatment processes and techniques employed in a variety of agencies and situations including case work counseling, individual and group therapy, and halfway house techniques. The visitation of agencies and dialogues with rehabilitated deviates is planned. Prerequisite: PSYN 101 or CRJU 102. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 207 (EDUC 207) Psychology of Learning: This course is a basic review of such learning concepts as classical and instrumental conditioning, extinction, reward, motivation, and personality. Also included is a general survey of the major theorists: Pavlov, Skinner, Hull, Tolman, et. al. (Previously numbered EDUC/ PSYN 132.) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 210 Modern Psychology in Historical Perspective: An analysis of the major systematic viewpoints in the history of psychology. This course should be taken early in the major program of study. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 213 Psychology of Personality: The development of personality: contributions of various theorists and their work to the understanding of the normal personality; techniques for assessing personality. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 214 (OCTR 214) Adulthood and Maturity: The study of the "passages" the adult must negotiate to attain maturity and the elements which contribute to the aging process: the health related disorders commonly associated with these stages; and the roles of the health-care provider in serving adults and the elderly. 1 credit is given to Fieldwork I placement. (Only open to OTA Program students) Permission of Program Director required. 6 sem. hrs. 6 crs. + 1 cr. PSYN 218 (OCTR 218) Interaction Skills: Through experiential and didactic learning, this course will explore human interaction from solitary activities, simple one-to-one experiences and group experiences. (Only open to OTA Program students) Permission of Program Director required. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 219 (SPCM 219) Group Experience: This course is conducted partially as a workshop to promote interaction, leadership, solidarity, and problem solving. Along with actual group experience, the course addresses the theory and research of groups. Prerequisite: SPCM 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 220 Psychobiography: Selected autobiographies of individuals from different cultural backgrounds will be used as a foundation of existential material to which psychological concepts and theories are applied. An eclectic approach will be espoused in the search to apply psychological insights to the understanding of life-crises and developmental tasks described in the autobiographies under consideration. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 222 (SOCL 222) The Family in Transition: A cross-cultural examination of family patterns viewed within the context of cultural variation throughout the world: relationship of the family to other institutions; the role of the family in the development of personality. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 226 (BHSC 226, SOCL 226) Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An introduction to computers as a professional tool in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include data collection, data description and data analysis (with statistical software, e.g., SPSS for Windows 6.1), use of the Internet, on-line bibliographic searching, computers in teaching and learning, and computerized techniques in psychological testing. Prerequisite: CISC/MATH 120 or equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 352 PSYN 228 (EDUC 228) The Psychology of the Preschool Child: A study of the child between birth and six years of age. Topics will include physical and perceptual development, cognition and language, social relationships, and day care as it affects the developmental processes. (Previously numbered: PSYN/EDUC 129). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 229 (CRJU 229) Stress Management in the Criminal Justice System: By employing numerous experimental situations and evaluation instruments, this course will help the student understand stresses felt by those in the Criminal Justice System-- police officers, correction officers, victims, probation and parole personnel, etc.--what happens to them and what can be done to manage stress. The course deals directly with the causes and prevention of: career frustration, job boredom, supervisory conflicts, family problems, life changes, emotional strain and person-to-person resistance. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 230 Cognitive Psychology: An investigation of current research, concepts, and issues in the study of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human learning and memory, information processing, reasoning, problem solving, language, and artificial intelligence. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 232 Health Psychology: A study of the relationship between physical and psychological factors in determining health. Topics include: psycho-physiological disorders, responses to stress, Type A behavior, addictive behaviors, responses to illness and treatment settings, behavioral and cognitive strategies for modifying health-impairing responses. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 233 (EDUC 233) Developmental Psychology: A consideration of human development and behavior throughout the life span: childhood, adolescence, and the adult years; emphasis on normal growth and development focusing on the critical issues involved in each stage of development including cultural influence. (Primarily for students not taking PSYN 130, PSYN 131, PSYN 239). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 237 (SOCL 237) Human Sexual Behavior: This course examines physiological, psychological, and cultural factors in human sexuality. Topics include: socialization of the sexes through the life cycle, normal and deviate sexual behavior, sexual dysfunction and therapy. (Previously numbered ED/PY 137) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 238 (SOCL 238) Gender Role Dynamics: Cultural and demographic factors in the definition of gender roles, "femininity," and "masculinity." Topics include: socialization of the sexes in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood; current redefinitions of roles; and projections for the future. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 239 Personality Development in Adulthood: This course emphasizes a developmental approach focusing on the adult years of the life span. Critical issues of adult life considered include: identity and intimacy; cultural influence, work, retirement, and leisure; continuity and change in personality; aging and death. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 241 Religion and Psychology: A study of contemporary psychology in its relation to religion. An analysis of the religious dimension in the thought of such thinkers as Freud, Jung, Maslowe, Frankl and William James as well as an investigation into the scientific study of religion. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN243 (EDUC 243) Testing and Assessment for Birth through 6th Grade and for Students with Disabilities: Theory and practice in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of tests and measurements, to include hands on experiences in the implementation of the New York State content area performance indicators as they apply to improved student performance. Students will develop an understanding of the application, administration, and interpretation of psychological and intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest, personality and educational tests used in Early Childhood and Childhood Education, Birth - 6th Grade, including those used with students with mental, learning, and emotional disabilities. Field Experience Required. Prerequisites: PSYN 101. (Previously Titled: PSYN/EDUC243 Testing and Assessment in Special Education). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 353 PSYN 244 (BHSC 244, SOCL 244) Social Psychology: A study of behavior, attitudes, and emotions shaped by interpersonal influences and social structures race and gender. Topics include aggression, altruism, persuasion leadership, the self, conformity, human relations, and group processes. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 246 (CRJU 246, SOCL 246) The Death Penalty in America: This course will discuss the various issues surrounding the death penalty as a punishment in the United States. Areas covered will include the history of the death penalty and legal and Constitutional questions. Social, psychological, and philosophical issues will also be explored. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 249 (BHSC 249, SOCL 249) Minorities in the United States: Problems of adjustment and assimilation of various ethnic, racial, and religious groups in American society; emphasis given to those groups prevalent in the New York metropolitan area; Blacks, Hispanics, Jews, Asians, Greeks, Italians, and Irish. (Previouly numbered: PSYN/BHSC/SOCL 138). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PSYN 250 (SPCM 250) Psychology of Communication: The course examines the nature of the communication process in terms of its ultimate purpose of social control. Emphasis will be placed on self-awareness and the "gap" quality of communication. Values, self-concept, listening, verbal and nonverbal language, and perceptions will be evaluated as communicating agents. Prerequisite: SPCM 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 254 (EDUC 254) Child Psychology: Consideration of theories and research findings with respect to physical growth, sensorimotor, emotional and intellectual development, and cultural influences in the individual prior to adolescence. Developmental, psychoanalytic, and cognitive theories are emphasized. (Previously numbered EDUC/PSYN 130). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 255 (LAWS 255, POLS 255, SOCL 255) Managing Human Conflict I: This course introduces the student to the field of conflict analysis and resolution through the examination of theory and role play. Major theories of conflict studies are considered and the student will explore whether these theories are useful in the resolution of conflict. The student will be introduced to the resolution of conflict. The student will be introduced to the various forms of conflict resolution such as negotiation, mediation and arbitration. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 256 (LAWS 256, POLS 256, SOCL 256) Managing Human Conflict II: This course continues the study of the theories utilized in conflict resolution. The language of conflict management will be explored and the active listening skills of the student will be developed. The theory and application of negotiation will be studied and applied through role play. Prerequisite: LAWS/PSYN/SOCL/POLS255. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 257 (EDUC 257) Psychology of Students with Disabilities: Consideration of the cognitive and emotional disorders arising in childhood and adolescence. Topics include: mental retardation, inclusion, learning disabilities and behavior disorders, as well as problems of etiology and treatment. Prerequisites: PSYN 101. (Previously titled: EDUC/PSYN257 Psychology of the Special Education Child). 3 sem. hrs. 3 cr. PSYN 259 (EDUC 259) Early and Middle Adolescent Development: A study of human growth, development and behavior during early adolescence. Theories pertaining to physical, emotional, social and intellectual development will be explored. Analyses of the impact of the nature of the middle school, early secondary education experience, programs, teaching, and assessment, on the early adolescent will be examined. Includes views on the significance of multi-cultural variables, gender, relationship, family, friends, learning styles, and individual special needs of the emerging adolescent in today's society. PSYN 261 (BHSC 261, SOCL 261, SOWK 261) Computer-Assisted Data Analysis: This course is designed to teach students how to use statistical computer packages to perform complex statistical data analyses. Students conduct a study and use statistical packages to perform and understand complex statistical analyses, e.g., correlation, cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, multiple regression, and path analysis. Mathematical theory is neither a prerequisite nor a component of this course. Prerequisite: BHSC 348. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 354 PSYN 262 (CRJU 262, BHSC 262, SOCL 262) Alcohol, Drugs, and Behavior: Principles of pharmacology, neural transmission, behavior, and psychological assessment will be discussed. Specific psychopharmacologic issues will be presented with sedativehypnotic, benzodiazepine, opiate, stimulant, and antipsychotic drugs as primary examples. Other discussion areas include behavioral toxicology, inhalant drugs, drugs and schoolchildren, nutritional and legal aspects to drug use, cigarette smoking, and the effects of drugs on the developing organism (e.g., fetal alcohol syndrome). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 263 (EDUC 263) Psychology of Adolescence: A study of human development and behavior during adolescence; emphasis on anatomical and functional interrelationships as well as cultural influences and their significance for psychosocial development. (Previously numbered EDUC/PSYN 131) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 264 (EDUC 264, CMDS 264) Normal Speech and Language Development: A study of normal language development including phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic features; examination of the physical, psychological, and biological contexts of language; exploration of the cognitive-linguistic-communicative process. Prerequisite: SPCM 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 267 (BHSC 267, SOCL 267) Strategies for Child Care Providers: An introduction to the challenges and opportunities involved in the delivery of child care services in the community and in institutional settings. Emphasis is placed on stimulating awareness, interest and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies and realities of providing meaningful programs for substance clients. Attention will be given to the following issues: Cultural diversity, bioethics, interdisciplinary teams in child care settings, case management, family relationships, functional assessment, client abuse, and environmental impact on functional capacity in work with this population. (Previouly numbered: PSYN/BHSC/SOCL 323). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 269 (BHSC 269, SOCL 267, SOWK 269) Strategies for Alcohol/Substance Abuse Providers: An introduction to the challenges and opportunities involved in the delivery of substance abuse services in the community and in institutional settings. Emphasis is placed on stimulating awareness, interest and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies and realities of providing meaningful programs for substance clients. Attention will be given to the following issues: cultural diversity, bioethics, interdisciplinary teams in substance abuse settings, case management, family relationships, functional assessment, client abuse, and environmental impact on functional capacity in work with this population. (Previouly numbered: PSYN/ BHSC/SOCL 324).3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 271 (BHSC 271, SOCL 271) Medical Sociology: Health Care in the Modern Society: This course aims to provide the student with an understanding of the ways in which American society promotes (or fails to promote) health as well as copes with illness. Course will examine the following topics: the interaction of social and cultural factors (such as gender, ethnicity, race, and social class) with health and illness; illness (disability) as a social issue; careers in health care; settings in which health care services are delivered; financing health care services; comparisons with the health care services of other countries; and uses and applications of computers/microcomputers in the health field. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 276 (BHSC 276, SOCL 276) Advanced Computers for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: Additional applications of the computer in the behavioral sciences. Topics include use of statistical packages such as SPSS, automated data collection requiring interfacing the computer with stimulus presentation and response recording devices, models of memory, problem-solving, reasoning, and diagnostic mental testing. Prerequisite: PSYN 226 or PSYN 261 or the equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 280 (BHSC 280, SOCL 280) Philosophy and the Social Sciences: An examination of: the nature of explanation in the social sciences; objectivity and value judgments; human behavior and human actions; methods of investigation and the con-

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 355 struction of theories about the human world; ethical standards and principles as they relate to privacy and other issues pertaining to human subjects. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 282 (BHSC 282, SOCL 282, SOWK 282) Strategies for Elder Care Providers: An introduction to the challenges and opportunities involved in the delivery of geriatric services in the community and in institutional settings. Emphasis is placed on stimulating awareness, interest and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies and realities of providing meaningful programs for substance clients. Attention will be given to the following issues: cultural diversity, bioethics, interdisciplinary teams in geriatric settings, case management, family relationships, functional assessment, client abuse, and environmental impact on functional capacity in work with this population. (Previouly numbered: PSYN/BHSC/SOCL/SOWK 325). 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 295 (BHSC 295, SOCL 295, SOWK 295) Contemporary Issues: An analysis of current questions in behavioral science, psychology, sociology, and social work. Specific topics such as Perspectives on Social Work Practice, Child Abuse in the Family, Music Therapy, Dance Therapy, AIDS and Health Care Delivery, Domestic Violence, Raising Children in Troubled Times are announced each semester by the Division. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 300 (CMDS 300) Language Disorders: Examination of language disorders associated with aphasia, mental retardation, and emotional problems; discussion of language disorders of children with learning disabilities; exploration of restricted linguistic codes and resulting speech patterns. Prerequisite: SPCM 110. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 308 (BHSC 308, SOCL 308) Health Care Organization and Management: This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the management process within the context of the health care organization. Topics include study of the environment of the organization, environmental scanning and strategic planning, goal setting, issues of health care financing and reimbursement, the management process, program review and evaluation. Particular emphasis will be placed on issues of organizational effectiveness in an environment of cost containment. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 310 Career/Life Assessment and Ethics: This course establishes the philosophy of the EDGE program. It links the concept of ethics to career/life assessment and organizational mission. It shows how individual careers are enhanced by adhering to an ethical model. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 311 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence: Behavior disorders of childhood and adolescence, including autism, hyperactive (hyperkinetic) reaction, unsocialized aggressive reaction, runaway reaction, overanxious and withdrawal reactions, stuttering, school phobia, other "developmental" disorders. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 312 Abnormal Psychology: Causes, symptoms, treatments, and prevention of abnormal behavior are surveyed. Different theoretical and cultural perspectives are examined, along with the problems of diagnosis and research. Other topics treated include: history of mental illness, ethical and legal problems, and new approaches to therapy. (Previously numbered: PSYN 212) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 315 Aging and Mental Health: Critical problems of old age: retirement, failing health, loss of others through death; mental illnesses and confused states: symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Mental health and the future of gerontology. (Previously numbered: PSYN 215) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 317 (PHIL 317) Perspectives on Death: An interdisciplinary approach to death as at once a known and an unknown phenomenon: what science can tell us about death; what philosophers have said about death; the examination and critique of recent research concerning the needs of the dying person, the bereavement experiences of the survivors, and children's understanding of death; the significance of death as it relates to human dignity and autonomy. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or permission of the instructor. (Previously numbered: PSYN/PHIL 217) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Social and Behavioral Sciences / 356 PSYN 320 Psychobiology: This course is designed to introduce the human being as a biological organism with special emphasis on neural and hormonal interactions in the initiation and maintenance of behavior. A study of the structure and functional organization of the brain as well as the effect of drugs on behavior will be discussed in relation to learning, language, motivation, therapy, and other human systems and behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYN 101. (Previously numbered: PSYN 224) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 340 Psychology of Crisis: Examination of the theoretical concepts, research results, and specific mechanism for coping with crisis. The course attempts to bring together the points of view of various disciplines in an effort to organize what is known about psychic trauma and its pathological consequences. Such questions as the "typical" reaction to disaster, the factors influencing emotional shock, and the long-term effects of crisis are considered. (Previously numbered PSYN 240) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 345 (MGMT 345) Industrial Psychology: Introduction to industrial and organizational psychology including personnel selection and training; assessment of aptitude, ability, and attitude; employee relations and motivation; work environment; advertising; and consumer research. Prerequisite: MGMT 120. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 355 (LAWS 355, SOCL 355, POLS 355) Mediation Theory and Practice: This course examines the theory and practical application of mediation. Integration of ethical and policy issues and application through role play. Study of how the various applications affect the mediation process and the court's role in the development of mediation. Role play is an important component of this course. Prerequisite: LAWS/PSYN/SOCL/POLS 255. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 360 (LAWS 360, SOCL 360, POLS 360) Practicum in Conflict Resolution: This course assists students in bringing together the theoretical and practical skills developed in the program through case studies and field projects. Co/Prerequisites: LAWS/ PSYN/SOCL/POLS 256 or PSYN/SOCL/POLS 355. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 366 (BHSC 366, SOCL 366) Medical Ethics: An examination of ethical questions that arise in health care and in the relationship between health care professionals and those they serve, including: the rights of individuals to self-determination and the obligations of health care professionals both to the individuals they serve and to society at large; life as a value and such issues as abortion, euthanasia and suicide; the questions of mental health and mental illness and the right of the mentally ill; eugenic programs and the possibilities of genetic engineering; the cost of health care and the delivery of health care as a social and political issue. (Previously numbered: PSYN/ SOCL/BHSC 266) 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 370 (BHSC 370, SOCL 370) Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: A review of the major statistical methods used in summarizing, understanding, and interpreting numerical data and research use of the computer. The course covers a full range of descriptive and inferential statistics including: frequency distributions; measures of central tendency and variability; probability theory; the normal curve model; correlation; and a wide range of statistical tests such as the T test, F test, analysis of variance, and Chi-square. Where appropriate, calculations will be performed by using statistical software packages. Prerequisites: PSYN 101. 3 sem. hrs. 3 crs. PSYN 372 Experimental Psychology I: Methodology: An introduction to experimental methods in psychology, including: the logic and nature of experimental investigation; the basic concepts in the experimental process, such as hypotheses, sampling, bias, and control; a review of simpler experimental designs that statistical methods applied to each design; psychophysical methods and research use of the computer. Students are sensitized to the rights of subjects in