Read Chapter 13 Resource: Energy and Energy Resources text version

Glencoe Science

Chapter Resources

Energy and Energy Resources

Includes:

Reproducible Student Pages

ASSESSMENT

Chapter Tests Chapter Review

TRANSPARENCY ACTIVITIES

Section Focus Transparency Activities Teaching Transparency Activity Assessment Transparency Activity

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES

Lab Worksheets for each Student Edition Activity Laboratory Activities Foldables­Reading and Study Skills activity sheet

Teacher Support and Planning

Content Outline for Teaching Spanish Resources Teacher Guide and Answers

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

Directed Reading for Content Mastery Directed Reading for Content Mastery in Spanish Reinforcement Enrichment Note-taking Worksheets

Glencoe Science

Photo Credits

Section Focus Transparency 1: Jean-Loup Charmet/Science Photo Library/Photo Researchers; Section Focus Transparency 2: Bob Wickley/SuperStock; Section Focus Transparency 3: Macduff Everton/CORBIS

Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission is granted to reproduce the material contained herein on the condition that such material be reproduced only for classroom use; be provided to students, teachers, and families without charge; and be used solely in conjunction with the Energy and Energy Resources program. Any other reproduction, for use or sale, is prohibited without prior written permission of the publisher. Send all inquiries to: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8787 Orion Place Columbus, OH 43240-4027 ISBN 0-07-867172-8 Printed in the United States of America. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 079 09 08 07 06 05 04

Table of Contents

To the Teacher Reproducible Student Pages

iv

Hands-On Activities

MiniLAB: Try at Home Analyzing Energy Transformations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MiniLAB: Building a Solar Collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Lab: Hearing with Your Jaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lab: Use the Internet Energy to Power Your Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Laboratory Activity 1: Energy Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Laboratory Activity 2: Making a Hydroelectric Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Foldables: Reading and Study Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Meeting Individual Needs

Extension and Intervention Directed Reading for Content Mastery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Directed Reading for Content Mastery in Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Reinforcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Note-taking Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Assessment

Chapter Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Chapter Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Transparency Activities

Section Focus Transparency Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Teaching Transparency Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Assessment Transparency Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Teacher Support and Planning

Content Outline for Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T2 Spanish Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T5 Teacher Guide and Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T9

Additional Assessment Resources available with Glencoe Science: · · · · · · · · ·

ExamView® Pro Testmaker Assessment Transparencies Performance Assessment in the Science Classroom Standardized Test Practice Booklet MindJogger Videoquizzes Vocabulary PuzzleMaker at msscience.com Interactive Chalkboard The Glencoe Science Web site at: msscience.com An interactive version of this textbook along with assessment resources are available online at: mhln.com

iii

To the Teacher

This chapter-based booklet contains all of the resource materials to help you teach this chapter more effectively. Within you will find: Reproducible pages for Student Assessment Hands-on Activities Meeting Individual Needs (Extension and Intervention) Transparency Activities A teacher support and planning section including Content Outline of the chapter Spanish Resources Answers and teacher notes for the worksheets

Hands-On Activities

MiniLAB and Lab Worksheets: Each of these worksheets is an expanded version of each lab and MiniLAB found in the Student Edition. The materials lists, procedures, and questions are repeated so that students do not need their texts open during the lab. Write-on rules are included for any questions. Tables/charts/graphs are often included for students to record their observations. Additional lab preparation information is provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Laboratory Activities: These activities do not require elaborate supplies or extensive pre-lab preparations. These student-oriented labs are designed to explore science through a stimulating yet simple and relaxed approach to each topic. Helpful comments, suggestions, and answers to all questions are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section. Foldables: At the beginning of each chapter there is a Foldables: Reading & Study Skills activity written by renowned educator, Dinah Zike, that provides students with a tool that they can make themselves to organize some of the information in the chapter. Students may make an organizational study fold, a cause and effect study fold, or a compare and contrast study fold, to name a few. The accompanying Foldables worksheet found in this resource booklet provides an additional resource to help students demonstrate their grasp of the concepts. The worksheet may contain titles, subtitles, text, or graphics students need to complete the study fold.

Meeting Individual Needs (Extension and Intervention)

Directed Reading for Content Mastery: These worksheets are designed to provide students with learning difficulties with an aid to learning and understanding the vocabulary and major concepts of each chapter. The Content Mastery worksheets contain a variety of formats to engage students as they master the basics of the chapter. Answers are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section.

iv

Directed Reading for Content Mastery (in Spanish): A Spanish version of the Directed Reading for Content Mastery is provided for those Spanish-speaking students who are learning English. Reinforcement: These worksheets provide an additional resource for reviewing the concepts of the chapter. There is one worksheet for each section, or lesson, of the chapter. The Reinforcement worksheets are designed to focus primarily on science content and less on vocabulary, although knowledge of the section vocabulary supports understanding of the content. The worksheets are designed for the full range of students; however, they will be more challenging for your lower-ability students. Answers are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section. Enrichment: These worksheets are directed toward above-average students and allow them to explore further the information and concepts introduced in the section. A variety of formats are used for these worksheets: readings to analyze; problems to solve; diagrams to examine and analyze; or a simple activity or lab which students can complete in the classroom or at home. Answers are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section. Note-taking Worksheet: The Note-taking Worksheet mirrors the content contained in the teacher version--Content Outline for Teaching. They can be used to allow students to take notes during class, as an additional review of the material in the chapter, or as study notes for students who have been absent.

Assessment

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chapter Review: These worksheets prepare students for the chapter test. The Chapter Review worksheets cover all major vocabulary, concepts, and objectives of the chapter. The first part is a vocabulary review and the second part is a concept review. Answers and objective correlations are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section. Chapter Test: The Chapter Test requires students to use process skills and understand content. Although all questions involve memory to some degree, you will find that your students will need to discover relationships among facts and concepts in some questions, and to use higher levels of critical thinking to apply concepts in other questions. Each chapter test normally consists of four parts: Testing Concepts measures recall and recognition of vocabulary and facts in the chapter; Understanding Concepts requires interpreting information and more comprehension than recognition and recall--students will interpret basic information and demonstrate their ability to determine relationships among facts, generalizations, definitions, and skills; Applying Concepts calls for the highest level of comprehension and inference; Writing Skills requires students to define or describe concepts in multiple sentence answers. Answers and objective correlations are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section.

Transparency Activities

Section Focus Transparencies: These transparencies are designed to generate interest and focus students' attention on the topics presented in the sections and/or to assess prior knowledge. There is a transparency for each section, or lesson, in the Student Edition. The reproducible student masters are located in the Transparency Activities section. The teacher material, located in the Teacher Guide and Answers section, includes Transparency Teaching Tips, a Content Background section, and Answers for each transparency. v

Teaching Transparencies: These transparencies relate to major concepts that will benefit from an extra visual learning aid. Most of these transparencies contain diagrams/photos from the Student Edition. There is one Teaching Transparency for each chapter. The Teaching Transparency Activity includes a black-and-white reproducible master of the transparency accompanied by a student worksheet that reviews the concept shown in the transparency. These masters are found in the Transparency Activities section. The teacher material includes Transparency Teaching Tips, a Reteaching Suggestion, Extensions, and Answers to Student Worksheet. This teacher material is located in the Teacher Guide and Answers section. Assessment Transparencies: An Assessment Transparency extends the chapter content and gives students the opportunity to practice interpreting and analyzing data presented in charts, graphs, and tables. Test-taking tips that help prepare students for success on standardized tests and answers to questions on the transparencies are provided in the Teacher Guide and Answers section.

Teacher Support and Planning

Content Outline for Teaching: These pages provide a synopsis of the chapter by section, including suggested discussion questions. Also included are the terms that fill in the blanks in the students' Note-taking Worksheets. Spanish Resources: A Spanish version of the following chapter features are included in this section: objectives, vocabulary words and definitions, a chapter purpose, the chapter Activities, and content overviews for each section of the chapter.

vi

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Reproducible Student Pages

Reproducible Student Pages

Hands-On Activities

MiniLAB: Try at Home Analyzing Energy Transformations . . . . . . . . . 3 MiniLAB: Building a Solar Collector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Lab: Hearing with Your Jaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lab: Use the Internet Energy to Power Your Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Laboratory Activity 1: Energy Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Laboratory Activity 2: Hydroelectric Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Foldables: Reading and Study Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Meeting Individual Needs

Extension and Intervention Directed Reading for Content Mastery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Directed Reading for Content Mastery in Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Reinforcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Enrichment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Note-taking Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Assessment

Chapter Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Chapter Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Transparency Activities

Section Focus Transparency Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Teaching Transparency Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Assessment Transparency Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Energy and Energy Resources

1

Hands-On Activities

Hands-On Activities

2 Energy and Energy Resources

Name

Date

Class

Analyzing Energy Transformations

Procedure

1. Place soft clay on the floor and smooth out its surface. 2. Hold a marble 1.5 m above the clay and drop it. Measure the depth of the crater made by the marble. Record your findings in the data table below. 3. Repeat this procedure using a golf ball and a plastic golf ball. Record your measurements in the data table below.

Data and Observations

Object Marble Golf ball Plastic golf ball Depth of Crater

Analysis

1. Compare the depths of the craters to determine which ball had the most kinetic energy as it hit the clay. Why did this ball have the most kinetic energy?

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

2. Explain how potential energy was transformed into kinetic energy during your activity.

Energy and Energy Resources

3

Hands-On Activities

Name

Date

Class

15 min.

15 min.

Analysis

1. Graph the temperature changes in both setups. 2. Explain how your solar collector works.

4 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Hands-On Activities

Building a Solar Collector

Procedure

1. Line a large pot with black plastic and fill with water. 2. Stretch clear-plastic wrap over the pot and tape it taut. 3. Make a slit in the top and slide a thermometer or a computer probe into the water. 4. Place your solar collector in direct sunlight and monitor the temperature change every 3 min for 15 min. 5. Repeat your experiment without using any black plastic.

Data and Observations

Experiment with Plastic

Time after setup that you recorded the temperature 3 min. 6 min. 9 min. 12 min. Temperature of the solar collector

Experiment without Plastic

Time after setup that you recorded the temperature 3 min. 6 min. 9 min. 12 min. Temperature of the solar collector

Name

Date

Class

Lab Preview

Directions: Answer these questions before you begin the Lab.

1. What materials are needed for this lab? 2. What will you investigate in this lab?

You probably have listened to music using speakers or headphones. Have you ever considered how energy is transferred to get the energy from the radio or CD player to your brain? What type of energy is needed to power the radio or CD player? Where does this energy come from? How does that energy become sound? How does the sound get to you? In this activity, the sound from a radio or CD player is going to travel through a motor before entering your body through your jaw instead of your ears.

Real-World Question

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Procedure

1. Go to one of the places in the room with a motor/radio assembly. 2. Turn on the radio or CD player so that you hear the music. 3. Push the headphone jack into the headphone plug on the radio or CD player. 4. Press the axle of the motor against the side of your jaw.

How can energy be transferred from a radio or CD player to your brain?

Materials

radio or CD player small electrical motor headphone jack

Goals

Identify energy transfers and transformations. Explain your observations using the law of conservation of energy.

Conclude and Apply

1. Describe what you heard.

2. Identify the form of energy produced by the radio or CD player.

Energy and Energy Resources

5

Hands-On Activities

Hearing with Your Jaw

Name

Date

Class

(continued)

Communicating Your Data

Compare your conclusions with those of other students in your class. For more help, refer to the Science Skill Handbook. 6 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Hands-On Activities

3. Draw a diagram below to show all of the energy transformations taking place.

4. Evaluate Did anything get hotter as a result of this activity? Explain.

5. Explain your observations using the law of conservation of energy.

Name

Date

Class

Use the Internet Hands-On Activities

Energy and Energy Resources

Energy to Power Your Life

Lab Preview

Directions: Answer these questions before you begin the Lab.

1. What energy sources do you use at home? 2. Is the food you eat a source of energy? Why?

Over the past 100 years, the amount of energy used in the United States and elsewhere has greatly increased. Today, a number of energy sources are available, such as coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, hydroelectric power, wind, and solar energy. Some of these energy sources are being used up and are nonrenewable, but others are replaced as fast as they are used and, therefore, are renewable. Some energy sources are so vast that human usage has almost no effect on the amount available. These energy sources are inexhaustible. Think about the types of energy you use at home and school every day. In this lab, you will investigate how and where energy is produced, and how it gets to you. You will also investigate alternative ways energy can be produced, and whether these sources are renewable, nonrenewable, or inexhaustible.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Real-World Question

What are the sources of energy you use every day?

Outline a plan for how these alternative sources of energy could be used.

Form a Hypothesis

When you wake up in the morning and turn on a light, you use electrical energy. When you ride to school in a car or bus, its engine consumes chemical energy. What other types of energy do you use? Where is that energy produced? Which energy sources are nonrenewable, which are renewable, and which are inexhaustible? What are other sources of energy that you could use instead?

Data Source

Visit green. msscience.com/ internet_lab for more information about sources of energy and for data collected by other students.

Test Your Hypothesis

Make a Plan

1. Think about the activities you do every day and the things you use. When you watch television, listen to the radio, ride in a car, use a hair drier, or turn on the air conditioning, you use energy. Select one activity or appliance that uses energy. 2. Identify the type of energy that is used. 3. Investigate how that energy is produced and delivered to you. 7

Goals

Identify how energy you use is produced and delivered. Investigate alternative sources for the energy you use.

Name

Date

Class

(continued)

2. How much energy is produced by the energy source you investigated? 3. Is the energy source you researched renewable, nonrenewable, or inexhaustible? Why?

Conclude and Apply

1. Describe If the energy source you investigated is nonrenewable, how could the use of this energy source be reduced? 2. Organize What alternative sources of energy could you use for everyday energy needs? On the computer, create a plan for using renewable or inexhaustible sources.

Communicating Your Data

Find this lab using the link below. Post your data in the table provided. Compare and combine your data with that of other students and make inferences with it. msscience.com/internet_lab. 8 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Hands-On Activities

4. Determine if the energy source is renewable, nonrenewable, or inexhaustible. 5. If the energy source is nonrenewable, how can that energy be produced by renewable sources.

Follow Your Plan

1. Make sure your teacher approves your plan before you start. 2. Organize your findings in the data table on the next page.

Data and Observations

Local Energy Information

Energy Type

Where is that energy produced?

How is that energy produced? How is that energy delivered to you? Is the energy source renewable, nonrenewable, or inexhaustible? What type of alternative energy source could you use instead?

Analyze Your Data

1. Describe the process for producing and delivering the energy source you researched. How is it created, and how does it get to you?

Name

Date

Class

A small stone thrown up into the air has kinetic energy because it is moving. As it rises higher, it slows down and its kinetic energy decreases. At the same time, however, its potential energy is increasing as its position above Earth's surface increases. When gravity causes the stone to stop rising and begin falling, its potential energy decreases as its kinetic energy increases. How can you demonstrate that potential energy can be converted to kinetic energy and vice versa?

Strategy

You will construct a device that changes energy from one kind to another. You will observe and measure the distances the device moves. You will interpret data in terms of energy transformations. 6. Put the lid on the box. 7. Place the strip of masking tape on the floor or a table. Place the box on its side at one end of the tape. 8. Push the box gently, so it rolls along the tape strip. Ask your partner to mark how far the box rolls before it stops and begins rolling back to you. Measure and record this distance in the table. 9. Repeat step 8 two more times, pushing the box with a little more force each time.

Materials

cardboard oatmeal box, with lid *salt box or other round cardboard container with lid scissors *ice pick string, 10 cm large metal washer rubber band toothpicks (2) masking tape, 1 m meterstick

*Alternate materials

Figure 1

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Loop of rubber band

Procedure

1. Use the scissors to punch a small hole in the center of the bottom of the box. 2. Remove the lid and punch another hole in the center of the lid. 3. Use the string to tie the metal washer to the rubber band. Cut off the excess string. 4. From the inside of the box, push part of the rubber band through the hole in the bottom. Put a toothpick through the loop in the rubber band to hold the rubber band in place, as shown in Figure 1. Pull any excess rubber band back into the box. 5. While a partner holds the lid close to the top of the box, stretch the rubber band and push the other end through the hole in the lid. Put a toothpick through the loop to hold the rubber band in place on the lid. Your device should look like Figure 2.

Box bottom Oatmeal box

Toothpick

Figure 2

Oatmeal box

Loop of rubber band Box lid Washer tied to rubber band Toothpick

Energy and Energy Resources

9

Hands-On Activities

1

Laboratory Activity

Energy Transformations

Name

Date

Class

Laboratory Activity 1 (continued) Hands-On Activities Data and Observations

Force applied Light Medium Hard Distance box rolled (cm)

Questions and Conclusions

1. When does the box have kinetic energy?

2. How did the force you applied affect the distance the box rolled?

3. How did the force you applied affect the speed at which the box rolled?

4. How did the strength of the force applied affect the kinetic energy of the box?

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

5. As the box turns, the metal washer prevents the rubber band from turning. Instead, the rubber band twists. What kind of energy does the twisted rubber band have? 6. How does this energy in the rubber band make the box return to you?

Strategy Check

Can you construct a device that changes energy from one kind to another? Can you observe and measure the distances the device moves? Can you interpret data in terms of energy transformations?

10 Energy and Energy Resources

Name

Date

Class

Moving water has energy that you can use. For centuries, waterwheels have been used to turn millstones to grind grain or to run machines in factories. Today, moving water is used to make electricity. Dams along rivers create reservoirs where water is stored and then released when electricity is needed. In this laboratory activity, you can examine the series of energy transformations that occur when moving water is used to generate electrical energy.

Strategy

You will build a model hydroelectric generator. You will build a device to detect the electricity generated. You will demonstrate how the energy of moving water is converted to electrical energy.

Materials

small spool insulated magnetic wire (#28 or finer) metric ruler 7.5-cm nails (2) scissors hammer 7.5-cm 12.5-cm 5-cm wooden block 2.5-cm nails (2) germanium diode (type 1N34A) white glue small bar magnet, 2­3 cm round piece from toy wooden construction set 7.5-cm spokes from toy wooden construction set (8) small paper cups (8) ice pick cardboard strips, approximately 2.5 cm 15 cm (2) small nails (4) electrical tape cardboard rectangles, approximately 12.5 cm 17.5 cm (2) compass alligator clips (2) rubber tubing sink with running water

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Procedure

1. Measure about 10 cm of magnetic wire. Starting beyond the 10-cm mark, begin wrapping the wire around the lower part of one of the 7.5-cm nails. Wrapping up and down the nail, wrap 1,000 turns of wire around the nail. See Figure 1. When you are finished, the coil should be 2 to 3 cm long. Allow another 10 cm of wire to extend at the bottom end of the coil. Cut off any leftover wire.

Figure 1

Energy and Energy Resources

11

Hands-On Activities

2

Laboratory Activity

Hydroelectric Generator

Name

Date

Class

Laboratory Activity 2 (continued) Hands-On Activities

Figure 2

Cardboard Nail Magnet

Tape Wooden block

Diode

9. Glue the bottoms of the paper cups to the spokes. Refer back to Figure 2. 10. Use the ice pick to make a hole in the center near one end of each of the cardboard strips. The holes should be large enough for the shaft of the water wheel to fit through easily. 11. Glue the water wheel onto the shaft (on the end opposite the magnet).

12 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

2. Twist the two ends of the wire together a few times to keep the coil from unwinding. 3. Use a hammer to drive this nail into the center of the wooden block. Drive the two 2.5-cm nails into the wooden block as shown in Figure 2. 4. Remove the insulation from the ends of the two pieces of coil wire. Wrap the ends around the heads of the two 2.5-cm nails. Refer to Figure 2. 5. Hook the diode across the nails. Make sure all connections are secure. 6. Glue one side of the bar magnet to the head of the second large nail. Set it aside to allow the glue to dry. This nail will form the shaft for the water wheel. 7. Put the toy spokes into the holes around the outer edge of the round toy piece. If any do not fit securely, remove them and add a small amount of white glue to the end. Then put them back in the holes. 8. Use scissors to cut out about one-third of the side of each paper cup. See Figure 3.

Figure 3

Name

Date

Class

Laboratory Activity 2 (continued)

12. You will need to bend the unpunched ends of the cardboard strips so they can be attached to the wooden block with nails. You will have to decide where to bend them, based on the proper position of the shaft. When the shaft is placed through the holes, the magnet end of the shaft should be close to the top of the coil nail, but should be able to turn freely without hitting the coil nail. With one person holding the shaft in the proper position, another person should bend the bottom edges of the cardboard at the proper place. 13. Remove the shaft from the cardboard supports and use the small nails to secure the folded ends of the cardboard to the wooden block. Use tape to keep the bend in the cardboard secure. Refer back to Figure 2. 14. Place the water wheel shaft back through the holes. Your completed setup should look like Figure 2. 15. Build a base for the compass by folding the ends of each of two squares of cardboard and stacking them back-to-back, as shown in Figure 4. 16. Place a compass on the base and wind magnetic wire around the north-south axis, making about 100 turns. Allow about 30 cm of wire at each end. Twist the free ends of the wire together a few times to prevent the coil from unwinding. Connect the free ends of the wire to the two alligator clips. Your completed device should look like Figure 4. 17. Connect the alligator clips to the 2 nail terminals on your generator, just below where the diode is attached. Keep the compass at least 25 cm away from the magnet and align the compass needle with the coil of wire around it. 18. Attach the rubber tubing to a sink faucet. Place the generator next to the sink with the water wheel extending over the sink. Use the tubing to direct a stream of water over the water wheel. As the wheel turns, observe what happens to the magnet and the compass needle. 19. Turn the water off and observe what happens to the compass needle.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Figure 4

Energy and Energy Resources

13

Hands-On Activities

Name

Date

Class

Laboratory Activity 2 (continued) Hands-On Activities Data and Observations

1. What happened to the magnet when the water wheel turned?

2. What happened to the compass needle when the water wheel turned?

3. What happened to the compass needle when water was no longer flowing over the water wheel?

Questions and Conclusions

1. A galvanometer is a device that can measure tiny electrical currents. Which part of your apparatus acted as a galvanometer to let you know when electricity was being generated? 2. Describe how your apparatus qualifies as a generator.

3. Describe the energy transformations that took place in your apparatus.

Strategy Check

Can you build a model hydroelectric generator? Can you build a device to detect the electricity generated? Can you demonstrate how the energy of moving water is converted to electrical energy?

14 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Name

Date

Class

Energy and Energy Resources

Hands-On Activities

Energy and Energy Resources

Directions: Use this page to label your Foldable at the beginning of the chapter.

Know? Like to know? Learned?

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

15

Meeting Individual Needs

Meeting Individual Needs

16 Energy and Energy Resources

Name

Date

Class

Directed Reading for Content Mastery

Overview Energy and Energy Resources

light food and fuel

which is produced by

Directions: Complete the concept map using the terms in the list below. position magma power plants nuclear solar

1.

electrical

2.

which comes from

the Sun

chemical

which is stored in

3.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Some forms of energy

4.

are

which is stored in

the nucleus of an atom

geothermal

which comes from

5.

6.

which is an

inexhaustible resource

potential

which is energy of

7.

Energy and Energy Resources

17

Meeting Individual Needs

Name

Date

Class

Directed Reading for Content Mastery

Section 1

What is energy?

Directions: Draw a line between each type of energy on the left to the example of this type of energy on the right. 1. kinetic energy 2. radiant energy 3. nuclear energy energy stored in a bicycle at the top of a hill the heat released by a steaming bag of popcorn the bonds between the protons of a silver atom the bonds between the atoms of a match energy used to power a computer the motion of a skateboard the light of a candle

9. Your body's source of energy is the aecchilm energy in food. 10. Whenever a change in your surroundings occurs, yrngee is being transferred from one place to another. 11. If two roller coasters have the same mass, the one with the greater ceilotvy will have greater kinetic energy. 12. In a light bulb, acceeillrt energy produces thermal energy, which then produces radiant energy.

18 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Meeting Individual Needs

4. thermal energy 5. potential energy 6. chemical energy 7. electrical energy

Directions: Unscramble the terms in italics to complete the sentences below. Write the terms on the lines provided. 8. If two skydivers are the same distance from the ground, the one with the greater mass will have greater aeilnoptt energy.

Name

Date

Class

Directed Reading for Content Mastery

Section 2 Section 3

Energy Transformations Sources of Energy

Directions: Read each step. Then put the steps in order from first to last. Write 1 for the first step, 2 for the second step, and so on. 1. Fossil fuels are burned. The thermal energy of the burning fuel turns water into steam.

3. The turbine turns a generator. The kinetic energy of the generator is converted to electrical energy. 4. Organisms transform the radiant energy in sunlight into chemical energy. 5. The kinetic energy of steam is transferred to a turbine. Directions: Use the words in the list to fill in the blanks below. conservation nonrenewable electrical turbine hydroelectric renewable nuclear photovoltaic

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

6. One problem with using _________________________ energy is that it produces radioactive waste. 7. The _________________________ of a _________________________ power plant is turned by moving water. 8. A _________________________ device converts solar energy directly into _________________________ energy. 9. Windmills produce electricity by using a _________________________ source of energy. 10. The law of _________________________ of energy states that energy cannot be created or destroyed; it can only change form. 11. Coal and oil are examples of _________________________ resources.

Energy and Energy Resources

19

Meeting Individual Needs

2. Over millions of years, the chemical energy in ancient organisms is transformed into the chemical energy of fossil fuels.

Name

Date

Class

Directed Reading for Content Mastery

Key Terms Energy and Energy Resources

Directions: Circle eleven terms in the puzzle and then write the terms in the blanks at the left of their definitions.

R T A E I A K H E N E R G Y E R I G T U R B I N E W L C L

D A N E S A B C A

E E N U C L L

T E R N A I

E A R H D T I V E E I U

5. another name for a renewable energy source 6. form of energy that an object has due to its temperature 7. type of energy that an object has because of its movement 8. device that converts energy of motion into electrical energy 9. type of energy that is stored in an object because of its position 10. wheel composed of a series of blades that is used to turn a generator 11. type of energy source that will eventually be used up

20 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Meeting Individual Needs

N U T

R S T A C E C M L E N T I A L C B L E

A C A R C E S C R

B P O T

A N H O A T H E R M A L N O N R E N E W A B

1. the ability to cause change 2. type of energy stored within an atom 3. form of energy also known as light energy 4. kind of energy that is stored in bonds between atoms

Nombre

Fecha

Clase

Lectura dirigida para Dominio del contenido

Sinopsis Energía y recursos energéticos

luz solar alimento y combustible

Instrucciones: Completa el mapa de conceptos usando los siguientes términos. posición plantas de energía magma nuclear

1.

eléctrica

2.

que viene de

Sol

química

que se almacena en

3.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Algunas formas de energía

4.

son

que se almacena en

el núcleo de un átomo

geotérmica

que viene de

5.

6.

que es un

recurso inextinguible

potencial

que es la energía de

7.

Energía y recursos energéticos

21

Satisface las necesidades individuales

que se produce mediante

Nombre

Fecha

Clase

Lectura dirigida para Dominio del contenido

Sección 1

¿Qué es la energía?

Instrucciones: Une con una línea cada tipo de energía a la izquierda con el ejemplo de este tipo de energía a la derecha. 1. energía cinética 2. energía radiante 3. energía nuclear 4. energía térmica 5. energía potencial 6. energía química 7. energía eléctrica energía almacenada en una bicicleta en lo alto de una colina el calor liberado por una bolsa de palomitas de maíz los enlaces entre los protones de un átomo de plata los enlaces entre los átomos de una cerilla energía que se usa para que funcione una computadora el movimiento de la patineta la luz de una vela

8. Si dos voladores están a la misma distancia del suelo, el que tenga más masa tendrá más energía claipeton. 9. La fuente de energía de tu cuerpo es la energía úimaciq de los alimentos. 10. Siempre que se de un cambio en tus alrededores, se está transfiriendo gaínree de un sitio a otro. 11. Si dos montañas rusas tienen la misma masa, la que tenga mayor covileadd tendrá más energía cinética. 12. En una bombilla, la energía léatreicc produce energía térmica, la cual a su vez produce energía radiante.

22 Energía y recursos energéticos

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Satisface las necesidades individuales

Instrucciones: Ordena las letras de los términos en bastardilla para completar las oraciones siguientes. Escribe los términos en los espacios asignados

Nombre

Fecha

Clase

Lectura dirigida para Dominio del contenido

Sección 2 Transformaciones de la energía Sección 3 Fuentes de energía

Instrucciones: Lee cada paso. Pon luego los pasos en orden desde el primero hasta el último. Escribe 1 para el primer paso, 2 para el segundo paso, hasta el final. 1. Se queman combustibles fósiles. Al quemarse, la energía térmica de los combustibles convierte el agua a vapor.

3. La turbina hace girar un generador. La energía cinética del generador es convertida a energía eléctrica. 4. Los organismos transforman la energía radiante de la luz solar a energía química. 5. La energía cinética del vapor se transfiere a la turbina. Instrucciones: Usa las palabras siguientes para llenar los espacios en blanco. conservación no renovable eléctrica turbina hidroeléctrica renovable nuclear fotovoltaica

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

6. Un problema con el uso de la energía _________________________ es que produce desechos radiactivos. 7. El(La) _________________________ de un(a) _________________________ planta energética se hace girar con agua en movimiento. 8. Un aparato _________________________ convierte energía solar directamente a energía _________________________. 9. Los molinos de viento producen electricidad usando un recurso energético _________________________. 10. La ley de _________________________ de la energía dice que la energía no se crea ni se destruye, solamente cambia de forma. 11. El carbón es un ejemplo de recursos _________________________.

Energía y recursos energéticos

23

Satisface las necesidades individuales

2. Después de millones de años, la energía química de los organismos del pasado se transforma en la energía química de los combustibles fósiles.

Nombre

Fecha

Clase

Lectura dirigida para Dominio del contenido

Términos claves Energía y recursos energéticos

Instrucciones: Encierra en un círculo en la sopa de letras los términos que corresponden a las definiciones siguientes. Escribe los términos en los espacios a la izquierda de las definiciones.

N J P O T E N C I A L V U C L A T R L E N T F G E H R R Y U N I O A W Z T E R I V A V Z Q O L G E E E J A H P C M L D E A N R N D D H Q I K A N R M G W I F S L C U B E Q U I M I C A U A D J R Z L A S A L K J O C U A N O R E N O V A B L E D P B N V T U R B I N A O O C I N E T I C A H Y R

4. tipo de energía que se almacena en los enlaces entre los átomos 5. otro nombre para una fuente de energía renovable 6. forma de energía que tiene un objeto debido a su temperatura 7. tipo de energía que tiene un objeto debido a su movimiento 8. aparato que convierte la energía de movimiento a energía eléctrica 9. tipo de energía que está almacenada en un objeto debido a su posición 10. rueda compuesta de una serie de hojas que se usa para hacer girar un generador 11. tipo de fuente de energía que se agotará

24 Energía y recursos energéticos

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Satisface las necesidades individuales

1. capacidad de causar cambio 2. tipo de energía almacenada dentro del átomo 3. forma de energía también conocida como energía lumínica

Name

Date

Class

1

Reinforcement

What is energy?

Directions: Answer the following questions on the lines provided.

1. What is energy? 2. How can you tell when something has energy?

Directions: Fill in the following table with what kind of energy each of the examples contains.

Example 3. a flying bird 4. a burning candle 5. a battery 6. a hamburger 7. a book on a shelf 8. a green plant 9. a beam of sunlight

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Type of energy

10. a piece of radioactive metal 11. a cup of hot cocoa

Directions: Fill in the blanks with the terms that best complete the statements.

12. ____________________ energy is the energy of motion. 13. A balloon floating in the air has more ____________________ energy than a boulder at the top of a cliff. 14. When you pick up a book, you are ____________________ energy from your hands to the book. 15. The faster an object moves, the ____________________ its kinetic energy. 16. A scooter moving at 10 km/h has ____________________ kinetic energy than a motorcycle moving at the same speed. 17. ____________________ is energy stored due to an object's position. 18. A bowling ball sitting on a shelf has ____________________ potential energy than a basketball on the same shelf. 19. A sock lying on a dresser has ____________________ potential energy than a skateboard on the floor.

Energy and Energy Resources

25

Meeting Individual Needs

Name

Date

Class

2

Reinforcement

Energy Transformations

Directions: Fill in the blanks with the terms that best complete the statements.

1. In every energy transformation, some ____________________ is released. 2. When you climb a rope, you change ____________________ energy into ____________________ energy. 3. Energy can never be created or destroyed, just ____________________ or ____________________. 4. As temperature increases, ____________________ energy increases. 5. Fireworks change ____________________ into ____________________ and ____________________ energy. 6. When a pendulum swings, if it is not continuously pushed, it will stop eventually because some of its energy is changed into ____________________ energy. 7. In the muscle cells in your body, ____________________ energy is changed into ____________________ energy.

9. In most forms of generation of electrical energy in power plants, the last two steps are the same. What are they?

10. Trace the energy transformations from a radio signal to the music you hear.

26 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Meeting Individual Needs

Directions: Answer the following questions on the lines provided.

8. Trace the energy transformations from a hamburger you eat to riding your bike.

Name

Date

Class

3

Reinforcement

Sources of Energy

Directions: Circle the term in parentheses that correctly completes the following statements.

1. (Oil, Wind, Water) is a fossil fuel. 2. As you go deeper into Earth, the temperature (increases, decreases, stays the same). 3. (Coal, Oil, Water) is a renewable resource. 4. (Geothermal energy, Fossil fuels, Hydroelectric energy) cause acid rain.

Directions: Determine whether each of the following statements is true or false. If it is true, write true on the line. If it is false, change the underlined term to make it true.

6. Fossil fuels cause air pollution. 7. Geothermal energy is caused by falling water. 8. A thermal cell produces electricity directly from sunlight. 9. A reflecting panel uses the kinetic energy of moving air.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

10. About 68% of the electrical energy in the United States is produced by nuclear fuel.

Directions: Answer the following questions on the lines provided.

11. Explain why it would be necessary for a home using solar energy to have some type of an energy storage device.

12. Explain how hydroelectric energy works.

13. Give two advantages and two disadvantages of using fossil fuels.

Energy and Energy Resources

27

Meeting Individual Needs

5. A mountainous region would be a likely source for (nuclear, hydroelectric, wind) energy.

Name

Date

Class

1

Enrichment

How much do you use?

In this activity, you will analyze the amount of electrical energy your family uses and estimate the amount used by all U.S. households. Read the information carefully and then answer the questions. You may use a calculator to make your calculations. 1. Ask to see one of your family's electricity bills. Near the top of the bill there should be two meter readings. The difference between the two readings is equal to the amount of electrical energy your family used in units of kilowatt-hours. (Running a dishwasher uses a little more than 1 kilowatt-hour of energy.) a. How many kilowatt-hours of electrical energy did your family use during the month shown by the bill? b. Based on this bill, about how much electrical energy does your family use in one year? c. Do you think your family uses the same amount of electrical energy each month? Explain your answer. 2. The following table shows the amount of electrical energy that can be produced from the chemical energy in three common types of fuel.

Crude oil Natural gas Hard coal

1 barrel (159 L) 1000 L 1 kg

1850 kWh 11.5 kWh 8.75 kWh

a. About how many liters of natural gas are needed to produce the electricity your family uses in one year? b. In 1999, there were an estimated 101,000,000 households in the United States. Suppose each of these households uses as much electrical energy as your family does. About how many kilograms of hard coal would be needed to produce the electricity used by all U.S. housholds for one year? c. About how many barrels of crude oil would be needed to produce the electricity used by all U.S. households for one day? d. Do you think your answer to part c is a good estimate of the amount of fuel that would be needed to generate the total amount of electricity used in the United States in one day? Explain your answer.

28 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Meeting Individual Needs

Electrical Energy Generated from Fuel

Fuel Mass or Volume Electrical Energy

Name

Date

Class

2

Enrichment

Made in the Shade

The canisters become so warm that the lithium fluoride inside them melts.

How is electricity generated on a spacecraft? One common way is by using solar panels. These panels are capable of turning radiant energy from the Sun into electrical energy. This energy is then used to power devices such as computers, lights, or radios.

Releasing Energy

Once the spacecraft enters the shaded part of its orbit, the liquid lithium fluoride begins to lose heat, and it eventually freezes. The thermal energy released during this process is captured and used to generate electrical energy. This electricity powers the spacecraft's instruments during the shaded portion of the orbit.

Passing Through Shadow

When a spacecraft is circling a planet, however, part of its orbit passes through the planet's shadow. As a result, sunlight does not reach the solar panels during this part of the orbit, and the panels are not able to produce electrical energy.

The Cycle Repeats

At about the same time as the lithium fluoride returns to its original temperature and all of its extra thermal energy has been released, the spacecraft moves from the shaded part of its orbit to the sunny part. The solar panels once again begin to convert radiant energy to electrical energy. Meanwhile, the thermal energy of the lithium fluoride crystals begins to increase. This cycle repeats itself during each orbit that the spacecraft makes around the planet.

Thermal Energy Storage

One solution to this problem involves the storage of thermal energy. Canisters filled with certain types of crystals are attached to the spacecraft. One crystal that is often used is called lithium fluoride. During the sunny part of the orbit, the canisters absorb radiant energy. This energy is transformed into thermal energy.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

1. Write the transformation process showing the energy conversions required to turn an electric fan on board a spacecraft during the shaded part of its orbit. Start your process with the radiant energy of sunlight.

2. Could thermal energy stored in lithium fluoride be used to generate electricity on a spacecraft that was always in a planet's shadow? Explain your answer.

3. Do you think that thermal energy stored in lithium fluoride could be used to generate all of the electricity used on Earth at night? Explain your answer. (Hint: On a cloudy day or during the winter, there are more hours of shadow than of sunlight.)

Energy and Energy Resources

29

Meeting Individual Needs

Name

Date

Class

3

Enrichment

Fuel Cells

In fact, the only "waste" products of a fuel cell that uses hydrogen gas are water and heat.

A fuel cell is a device that can produce electrical energy directly from chemical energy. Inside a fuel cell, a chemical reaction takes place between hydrogen and oxygen gas. This reaction generates an electric current. In the future, power plants that rely on fuel cells may come to replace many that rely on fossil fuels. Fuel cells may also be used to power cars that run on electricity.

Fuel Cell Disadvantages

Sometimes, however, hydrogen gas is not practical or affordable to use as a fuel. In such cases, a carbon-based fuel, such as methanol, can be used as a starting material. The carbonbased fuels are broken down in the fuel cell to produce hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). The hydrogen then reacts with oxygen to produce electric current. The amount of carbon dioxide produced from these types of fuel cells is much less than what would be produced by a power plant that burns fossil fuels. A second advantage of fuel cells is that they can generate electrical energy from chemicals that are renewable. Hydrogen gas and methanol, for example, can be produced from chemicals that are not fossil fuels. Some fuel cells even run on gases produced by decaying garbage in landfills.

1. Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells are often used to provide electrical power on human-piloted spacecraft. What is one advantage of using this energy source on such missions? 2. Which do you think is more efficient at generating electrical power: a fossil-fuel power plant or a fuel-cell power plant? Explain your answer. (Hint: In general, the more energy transformations that occur, the less efficient a power plant will be.) 3. The ideas behind fuel cells were developed in 1839. Scientists began using fuel cells in the space program in the 1960s. Why do you think that fuel cells are only recently coming into widespread use?

30 Energy and Energy Resources

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Meeting Individual Needs

Wet and Dry Cells

Fuel cells aren't the only devices that convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy. Wet cells (such as those in automobile batteries) and dry cells (such as flashlight batteries) can do so as well. However, the chemicals used to generate electricity from wet and dry cells are present in fixed amounts. Once these amounts are used up by the chemical reaction, the cells can no longer generate electrical energy.

Refueling Fuel Cells

Fuel cells, by contrast, can be refueled. When a continuous supply of hydrogen and oxygen is pumped into a fuel cell, it can produce electricity almost indefinitely. The supply of reacting chemicals won't be used up because it is constantly being replaced. Fuel cells have several advantages over fossil fuels. One is that fuel cells produce much less pollution than the burning of fossil fuels does.

Fuel Cell Uses

Today, small fuel-cell power plants are being used to provide electricity for some hospitals and hotels. Early models of fuel-cell-powered cars and buses are also being tested. It is likely that everyday uses of fuel cells will grow as supplies of fossil fuels continue to diminish.

Name

Date

Class

Note-taking Worksheet Section 1

Energy

What is energy?

A. _______________ is the ability to cause change. B. Energy from motion is ________________ energy. 1. Kinetic energy increases as an object moves _______________. 2. Kinetic energy increases as the _____________ of an object increases.

D. Energy comes in different ______________. 1. Energy that increases as temperature increases is ________________ energy. 2. _________________ energy--energy stored in chemical bonds 3. ________________ energy--light energy 4. Energy from electricity is ___________________ energy. 5. The nucleus of an atom contains ________________ energy.

Section 2

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Energy Transformations

A. Energy is constantly _________________ from one form to another. B. Law of _______________________________--energy is never created or destroyed; it merely changes form. C. Energy can be ____________________ from kinetic to potential energy and back to kinetic. D. _________________ transform energy from one form to another. 1. Chemical energy can be ____________________ to kinetic, radiant, thermal, or electrical energy. 2. ___________________ energy can be transformed to kinetic, chemical, electrical, or thermal energy. 3. Unlike other forms of energy, thermal energy is not easy to ______________. E. A turbine's kinetic energy is converted to electrical energy by a __________________ at a power plant.

Energy and Energy Resources

31

Meeting Individual Needs

C. Energy stored in an object due to its position is __________________ energy.

Name

Date

Class

Note-taking Worksheet (continued) Section 3 Sources of Energy

A. Energy comes from either the ____________ or from radioactive ______________ in Earth. B. _____________________ include oil, natural gas, and coal. 1. Fossil fuels contain ________________________ from the Sun's radiant energy via photosynthesis. 2. _____________________ resources such as fossil fuels are used up faster than they can be replaced. C. ________________ energy comes from the nuclei of uranium atoms. D. _________________________ from the potential energy of water is a renewable resource. E. ______________________________ of energy may be safer for people and the environment. 1. ______________ energy can be captured in thermal collectors or photovoltaic collectors. 2. ___________________ energy--thermal energy contained in hot magma 3. __________________ generate electricity without polluting the environment. F. ___________________ energy will help prevent energy shortages and allow fossil fuels to last longer.

Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Meeting Individual Needs

32 Energy and Energy Resources

Information

Chapter 13 Resource: Energy and Energy Resources

38 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

532232


You might also be interested in

BETA
untitled
Classroom observation schedule of students: Have our expectations been met
Study Guide for Content Mastery
Chemistry Syllabus 09