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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

Developed by: Robert Hope, Brookville City Schools ­ Language Arts Richard McCollum, Eaton Community Schools ­ Health Becky McCollum, Twin Valley Local Schools ­ Title I Reading Darnice Wilkinson, Miami Valley CTC ­ Early Childhood

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Table of Contents

Page Curriculum Unit Overview - narrative Summary Chart Section One (Characteristics of Anger) #3 #4

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Section Two (Problem-Solving Anger Situations)

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Section Three (Productive Anger Management Alternatives)

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Transfer Activity (Anger Management Jeopardy) Appendix (include handouts, worksheets, data sheets, references, relevant websites, books, articles, or organizations that may serve as student or teacher sources of information or materials)

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#20

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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(Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)) Curriculum Unit Overview

Summary This curriculum unit is designed for both elementary and secondary classrooms. The unit includes lessons for elementary Title I programs and high school language arts, health, and childcare programs. The lessons included in this curriculum are based on experiences by teachers that worked at Family Service Association in Dayton, Ohio during the summer of 2003. The work performed for Family Services Association consisted of creating and marketing an Anger Management Program for public schools. Teachers designed a nineweek plan where clinical counselors will work with identified students that are dealing with anger management problems. Teachers also created a brochure that can be sent to schools explaining the program to the schools. The lessons involved in this curriculum unit have students work with ways to identify mismanaged anger and problem-solve ways to manage anger in a productive manner. Big Picture This curriculum is valuable at home, school, and work to help promote positive problemsolving techniques when students are faced with difficult situations. It will help students succeed in the classroom by being able to handle their anger, rather than blow-up in a disruptive manner. Home relationships will benefit because students will be role-playing situations that may erupt into domestic violence. Students will also role-play possible work situations that encourage constructive ways of handling anger that involves bosses and coworkers. Anger management is a necessary skill for workers to function as a successful team member. Preparation for the Unit The teacher will need to schedule a determined amount of time for this unit based on the type of class schedule. Handouts need to be photocopied, copies of stoies need to be gathered, prompts need to be gathered. Teacher should be familiar with all lessons in unit. Overview On the following page is a summary of the unit including brief summaries of each Authentic Learning Task (ALT). This table provides an overview of the tasks in the unit sections and shows how the activities in the different teaching areas relate to each other.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12) Curriculum Unit Summary

Characteristics of Anger ALT 1 - Brainstorming Anger (K-12) Student-lead discussion of anger ­ Students will discuss destructive ways that anger is identified and create a list. Handouts given to students about destructive anger management. Problem-Solving Anger Situations ALT 2 ­ Identifying Anger Through Role-Playing Students will role-play various characteristics of anger in everyday situations. Productive Anger Management Alternatives ALT 3 ­ Self Assessment Handout #1 (7-12) #2 (K-6) Students will complete selfassessments of their own personal anger management practices. Students will reflect on their answers.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Section One: Characteristics of Anger ALT One: Brainstorming Anger

Summary Students will discuss destructive ways that anger is identified and make an individual book. Activities will be given to students on ways to handle anger. Competencies 1. To identify anger as a normal, healthy emotion experienced by everyone. 2. To identify the kinds of situations which generally provoke anger in one's self and how one typically deals with it. 3. To understand that there are appropriate and inappropriate ways of dealing with anger. 4. To identify the consequences which follow the inappropriate expression of anger in a school or home setting. 5. To practice alternative appropriate ways of expressing anger which do not hurt anyone or anything. Time 45 minutes Materials 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Construction paper (various colors) White paper Writing paper Pens Markers Finger paint Bubble gum Pillow

Instructions 1. Students will make an Anger Booklet using construction paper for the covers and white paper in between. 2. Students will title three of the pages in their books with these titles: Things That Make Me Angry, Ways I Express My Anger, and Appropriate Ways of Expressing Anger.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

3. As a group, students will make a list of things or situations that make them angry. They will record this list on white paper on page two of their book (after the title page) under the heading Things That Make Me Angry. (Alternative: Younger children can do this with pictures) 4. Students will be given a handout on different ways to handle aggression. From the choices given, the students will select one method they would use to handle their aggression. 5. Homework: From the method they chose, the students will report to the group the results of this activity. 6. Students record their results on page three of their Anger Book, under the heading Ways I Express My Anger. 7. After hearing the methods from other students, they will record in their books on page four, the most appropriate way for handling their own anger, and/or methods they would like to try. Evaluation/Assessment of Student's Competency The students will be given a personal chart with appropriate ways they chose to deal with anger. Each time they use an appropriate way, they will be given a star to place on their chart. After the chart is full the student will receive an award certificate. See handout chart. Closure In order to understand their anger feelings, the students must be able to identify ways to solve anger problems.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Section One: ALT One: Personal Anger Management Chart

PERSONAL ANGER MANAGEMENT

Name: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Certificate Date

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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Section One: ALT One: Alternative Ways of Dealing With Anger Group Discussion: A time when I took my anger out on someone who did not do anything to cause it. Materials: Bubble Gum Old Pillows Exercise #1 Bubble Trouble Each student receives a piece of bubble gum. He pretends the gum is the source of his anger. Upon the start signal, he begins chewing, first slowly and then faster and faster. He blows bubbles and pops them. Until the time limit (1-2 minutes) is up, he tries to "chew" the anger out of his bubble gum.

Exercise #2 Push It! The students position themselves against an outside wall of the school. They pretend that the wall is the source of their anger. On signal, they push their hands, arms, shoulders, back, etc. against the wall. They push as hard as they can for 1 full minute.

Exercise #3 Beat It! Taking an old pillow, each student beats with his fists on the pillow in an attempt to beat his anger out of his system. It is advisable for the student to cradle the pillow in his lap while beating to avoid hand injuries which might occur if the pillow is resting on a hard surface such as a floor or table. Time limit: 1 minute.

Exercise #4 The Running Rage Move outdoors to a track or gym field for this activity. The students imagine that the source of their anger is just ahead of them. The students begin to run after that "source." They start slowly and then begin to pick up the pace, until they are running as fast as they can. This activity can be adapted to running in place in which case a one minute time limit might be imposed.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Section Two: Problem-Solving Anger Situations ALT One: Identifying Anger Through Role-Playing

Summary

Students will write and act out two plays dealing with a situation involving anger. One play should have a setting and a conflict that is logical. A resolution must be included that has the anger being managed in a positive way. The other play should have a resolution that has anger being managed in a negative way.

Competencies 1. To identify anger as normal, healthy emotion experienced by everyone.

2.

To identify the kinds of situations which generally provoke anger in one's self and how one typically deals with it. To understand that there are appropriate and inappropriate ways of dealing with anger. To identify the consequences which follow the inappropriate expression of anger in a school or home setting. To practice alternative appropriate ways of expressing anger which do not hurt anyone or anything.

3. 4.

5.

Time 90 minutes per session Materials 1.) Separate students into small groups. 2.) Computers to type the play. 3.) A rubric of how the plays will be graded. Instructions 1.) Separate students into small groups 2.) Discuss or review healthy was of managing anger. 3.) Inform students that they are to write two short plays or skits 4.) Students will perform both plays in front of the class. 5.) Class discussion will follow the negative skits to discuss alternative ways to handle the anger involved. Evaluation/Assessment of Student's Competency

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

PLAY RUBRIC Closure Students will be encouraged to examine through own anger management practices and make necessary changes if anger is handled in a negative way.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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Section Two: ALT One: Rubric ­ Identifying Anger Through Role-Playing

Historical Role Play: Anger: Role Playing

Teacher name: Robert Student Name ___________________ CATEGORY Role 5 Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were consistently in character. Can clearly explain several ways in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters and can clearly explain why. Student included more information than was required. 4 Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were often in character. Can clearly explain several ways in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters. 3 Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were sometimes in character. Can clearly explain one way in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters. 2 Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were rarely in character. Cannot explain one way in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters.

Knowledge Gained

Required Elements

Student included all information that was required. Student uses 1-2 props that accurately fit the period, and make the presentation better.

Student included most information that was required. Student uses 1-2 props which make the presentation better.

Student included less information than was required. The student uses no props OR the props chosen detract from the presentation.

Props/Costume Student uses several props (could include costume) that accurately fit the period, show considerable work/creativity and make the presentation better.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Date Created: 2003-06-19 Copyright. © 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997 ALTec, the University of Kansas

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Section Three: Productive Anger Management Alternatives ALT One: Writing a Short Story of Anger Management

Summary Students will write a short story about a teenager who has anger issues in their life while at school and away from school. The story will show a teenager struggling with issues in their life that leads to anger building up within and how that is affecting their everyday life. The story will then show how this person managed these anger feelings in a constructive manner.

Competencies 1. To identify anger as normal, healthy emotion experienced by everyone.

2.

To identify the kinds of situations which generally provoke anger in one's self and how one typically deals with it. To understand that there are appropriate and inappropriate ways of dealing with anger. To identify the consequences which follow the inappropriate expression of anger in a school or home setting. To practice alternative appropriate ways of expressing anger which do not hurt anyone or anything.

3. 4.

5.

Time 45 minutes per session Materials 1. A general list of unmanaged anger behaviors. 2. A general list of ways to manage anger. 3. A rubric of what should be in the story. Instructions 1. Using the information given the students will write a short story based on a teenagers life. 2. The students will use the rubric as a guide in writing their story.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Evaluation/Assessment of Student's Competency Using the rubric as an evaluation sheet with points given for the story having all the points of emphasis. Closure The teacher will summarize the assignment in class lecture and discussion about the short stories written.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

TIES 2003

Section Three: ALT One: Rubric ­ Writing a Short Story of Anger Management

Story Writing: Anger Short Story

Teacher name: Rick Student Name ___________________ CATEGORY Writing Process 4 Student devotes a lot of time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works hard to make the story wonderful. First paragraph has a "grabber" or catchy beginning. It is very easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem. 3 Student devotes sufficient time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works and gets the job done. First paragraph has a weak "grabber". 2 Student devotes some time and effort to the writing process but was not very thorough. Does enough to get by. 1 Student devotes little time and effort to the writing process. Doesn't seem to care.

Introduction

A catchy beginning was attempted but was confusing rather than catchy. It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face but it is not clear why it is a problem.

No attempt was made to catch the reader's attention in the first paragraph. It is not clear what problem the main characters face.

Problem/Conflict

It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem.

Most of the Some of the Focus on Assigned The entire story is story is story is Topic related to the related to the related to the

No attempt has been made to

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic.

assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic. The solution to the character's problem is easy to understand, and is somewhat logical. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination.

assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic.

relate the story to the assigned topic.

Solution/Resolution The solution to the character's problem is easy to understand, and is logical. There are no loose ends. Creativity The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination.

The solution to the character's problem is a little hard to understand.

No solution is attempted or it is impossible to understand.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination.

There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination.

ALT TWO: Characteristic Behavior of Unmanaged Anger 1. Impatient 2. Name Calling 3. Throwing Things 4. Breaking Things 5. Cursing or Swearing 6. Disrespectful Talk 7. Critical Remarks 8. Hitting

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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9. Kicking 10. Punching 11. Taunting 12. Pulling Hair 13. Spitting

Date Created: 2003-06-19 Copyright. © 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997 ALTec, the University of Kansas

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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Transfer Activity ­ Anger Management Jeopardy

Competencies 1. Students will discuss destructive ways that anger is identified and create a list. 2. Students will play the game of Jeopardy using characteristics of unmanaged and managed anger in the categories of questions and answers. 3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of strategies to manage anger by answering the questions in the Jeopardy game.

Time 90 minutes Materials 1. Pen or Pencil 2. Scissors 3. Poster Board 4. Colored Markers 5. Library Pocket Envelopes 6. Glue or velcro Instructions 1. Divide into groups of four. 2. Review characteristic behavior of unmanaged anger 3. Review techniques of managing anger. 4. Pass out materials. 5. Each group will make a Jeopardy game with categories and answers. 6. Assemble the Jeopardy game onto the poster board. 7. Each group will have the class play their Jeopardy game. Evaluation Students will complete an evaluation of each group's Jeopardy game using a rubric format.

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Dealing With Anger in the Public School System (K-12)

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Transfer Activity Rubric

Catagories Identifying Characteristics of Unmanaged Anger

4 points Identified at least 5 characteristics of unmanaged anger

3 points Identified 4 characteristics of unmanaged anger

2 points Identified 3 characteristics of unmanaged anger

Point 1 point Total Identified 2 characteristics of unmanaged anger

Identifying Strategies Identified at least of Anger Management 5 strategies of ways to deal w/ unmanaged anger

Identified 4 strategies of ways to deal w/ unmanaged anger

Identified 3 strategies of ways to deal w/ unmanaged anger

Identified 2 strategies of ways to deal w/ unmanaged anger

Structure of the Game Neatly prepared and understandable

Neat, but difficult to Not neat and understand difficutl to understand

Did not list categories

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Appendix One: Resources

Landy, Lois. (1998). CHILD SUPPORT Through Small Group Counseling. Kidsrights: Charlotte, North Carolina http://helping.apa.org/warningsigns/reasons.html Student Assistance Journal. (September/October, 1998). An Assessment Tool for Predicting Violent Juvenile Behavior.

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