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© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 1

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F1

Objectives: R4 Versatile reading R12 Independent reading Resources: One piece of sugar paper, glue stick, paper and pens. As a whole group we have: · established the ground rules for guided reading; · looked at effective strategies for reading (starter activity and Strategy check-card). Now you are going to: · Discuss what we learn about one of the characters in the opening pages and predict his future importance in the novel. Group reading Read together pages 1­12. Group task 1. As a group, look at the front cover of the novel and discuss the images you see. Given the font, image and title, what sort of things do you think will happen in the story? 2. Divide into three pairs and each pair to have a piece of paper. · Group A to jot down all the things they learn about the character Herr Resch, with facts in one column and opinions about him in another. · Group B to do the same for the narrator (Fritzchen) and his family. · Group C to do the same for Friedrich and his family. 3. Stick these pieces of paper onto a large sheet of sugar paper and discuss your characters. · Discuss what might be the importance of each character in the novel. 4. In the spaces between the pieces of paper, write down some predictions about what might happen in the novel or what this novel might be about. Homework Read pages 12-25.

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 2 Objectives:

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F2 R4 Versatile reading R12 Independent reading

Resources: Pens and paper. As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available. Now you are going to: · look at the narrative hooks used by the author. Group reading Skim re-read together pages 12­25. Whilst you are reading: · think about the strategies you are using (look at the Strategy check-card); · think about the evidence you may use to support your ideas. Group task 1. Divide into two groups. Group A to look at pages 12­19, Group B to look at pages 19­25. Using the narrative hooks prompt sheet, make a list of all the narrative hooks you can find the author using in your section. Collect evidence for each hook you find by jotting down quotations from the chapters. 2. Share your thoughts with the whole group and then discuss: · Which narrative hooks has the author used successfully in your opinion and why do they work well? 3. What questions about the novel and the characters do you have at this stage of the novel? · Make a list of as many as you can in pairs and then swap your questions with another pair and have a go at making predictions. Keep this for later to see if your predictions are accurate. 4. The novel has reached 1931, two years before Hitler came to power in Germany. Discuss what you know about the situation of the Jews in pre-war Germany and how they were treated once Hitler came to power. i. Does this help/influence your predictions? ii. How has the Schneider family been presented in the novel? iii. What evidence of anti-Semitic (anti-Jewish) attitudes have you already seen in the book? Homework Read pages 26­42.

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 3

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F3

Objectives: R4 Versatile reading Resources: None As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks. Now we will: · explore how characters are introduced and developed. Group reading Skim re-read together pages 26 ­ 42. Group task You are going to investigate how the author uses implication to guide our feelings about the character of Friedrich. 1. Divide into three pairs. · Group A to jot down notes on Friedrich's appearance and actions and suggest what this is supposed to imply / suggest about him. For example, 'with shining eyes' on page 34 shows his excitement at being at the Jungvolk. · Group B to jot down notes on what Friedrich says and what this is supposed to imply / suggest about him. For example, 'We can stand here as long as you can' on page 31 suggests that Friedrich is brave and has confidence. · Group C to jot down how others react towards him. Think about those who know him as a person e.g. Fritzchen, and those who only see him as a Jew, e.g. the woman whose window is broken by the ball on page 39. 2. Discuss your findings as group, quoting and explaining examples of inference (things that imply / suggest) from the text. You may want to use these prompts to help your discussion: i. How has the author used inference to imply what Friedrich is like? ii. Are we on his side or the side of those against the Jews? iii. How has the author managed to make us feel like this without actually telling us to think this? 3. If you have time, read the notes at the back of the book for the year 1933. The author suggests things are getting worse for the Jews in this section without actually telling us they are. What events suggest it is getting harder for them? Homework Read pages 42­59.

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 4

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F4

Objectives: R4 Versatile reading R12 Independent reading Resources: None. As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks; · explored the developing relationships between character and place. Now you are going to: · explore the characterisation in more depth. Group reading Skim re-read together pages 42­59. Group task You are going to focus on the relationship between the Schneiders and the narrator's family as this is a major theme in the novel. 1. Divide into two groups. · Group A is to find examples of racism and events which treat the Schneiders badly. · Group B is to find examples of where the narrator's family tries to support/be kind/ show friendship to the Schneiders. 2. Use this information to discuss the following: i. The good and bad things that have happened to the Schneiders. ii. How Fritzchen's family has tried to help and give support. iii. How have the relationships changed? Think back especially to the 'School Begins' chapter on page 19. iv. How have the fortunes of the two families changed since the start of the book? What do you think are the reasons for this? v. Are there any areas where there might be tension arising between the two families? (Look at pages 58­59.) 3. In your groups, think about this changing pattern of relationships. Can you predict what will happen in the rest of the novel regarding the two families? Homework Read pages 59­74.

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 5

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F5

Objectives: R5 Development of ideas, themes and values. Resources: A3 paper and pens. As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks; · explored the developing relationships between character and place; · begun to explore themes and how the characters contribute towards them. Now you are going to: · continue to trace developments, including themes. Group reading Skim re-read pages 59­74. Group task Last lesson you discussed the theme of changing relationships and how the Schneiders were being treated. You are going to further explore the theme of racist/non-racist views in the novel. 1. As a group, discuss and then list what you consider to be the main themes emerging in this novel. 2. Recap/discuss how the theme of anti-Semitism (racism against Jews) has already been seen in the novel. 3. Today's section of the novel takes us to 1936. Read the notes at the back of the book for the years 1933­1936. Do we see any of these events or the effects of these events, in the novel? 4. Try to identify characters in the novel who would fit each description in the list below. Think about some of the past minor characters you have met as well as major ones: i. is Jewish and suffers racism; ii. hates the Jewish people and treats them badly; iii. wants to help / support Jewish people but is afraid to do this too openly; iv. joins the Nazi Party for own benefit despite not agreeing with all its policies; v. stands up for Jewish people by the words they say publicly. 5. Create a mind-map on A3 paper in which you explore these different aspects in the novel. Use the bulleted points above as main 'trunks', with characters and their views, actions and experiences branching off these. Use colour and small sketches as well as words to make links across your mind-map. Share out the 'trunks' between everyone in the group so that each person is exploring a different aspect in the novel. 6. How do you feel about the actions and difficult decisions of the narrator's father and women like Frau Penk? Do you think they should have acted differently or do you think they acted in a way which was understandable? What do you think you would do in that situation? Homework Read pages 74­88.

© NATE 2006 Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8 Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 6

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F6

Objectives: R4 Versatile reading R12 Independent reading Resources: None. As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks; · explored the developing relationships between character and place; · explored themes and how the characters contribute towards them; Now you are going to: · explore the role of the author. Group reading Skim re-read together pages 74­88. Group task Last lesson you explored the different viewpoints and difficult decisions of the characters. Now you are going to look at the role of the author: does Hans Peter Richter have a view? 1. Look back at the mind-maps created last lesson. Discuss which views you think are those held by Hans Peter Richter the author. You will need to consider which he presents sympathetically and which he doesn't. 2. Why do you think Hans Peter Richter wrote this novel? 3. In pairs make a list of ten questions you would like to ask the author. As a group select the best 20 questions. 4. Hot-seat one member of the group as the author, using the prepared questions. 5. Have a look at information on the site: http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/triumph/index.html to research events in the novel. 6. There is another novel by Hans Peter Richter, called I Was There. In this the author reports that he actually witnessed many of the events in this book. This novel is about why young people joined the Hitler Youth Movement. A note from the author tells us that, `I am reporting how I lived through that time and what I saw ­ no more. I was there. I was not merely an eye-witness. I believed ­ and I will never believe again.' · Discuss what you think the author meant by these words. What do you think were his experiences, thoughts and feelings as he looked back? 7. In the light of your research and thinking, would you add detail or change any of the answers the author might give to your list of questions? Why do you now think he wrote this book? Homework Read pages 88­103.

© NATE 2006 Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8 Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 7

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F7

Objectives: R4 Versatile reading R12 Independent reading Resources: Photocopies of pages 88­95 and highlighter pens; Strategy check-card. As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks, character, setting and mood; · explored the developing relationships between character and place; · explored themes and how the characters contribute towards them. Now you are going to: · think about narrative style. Group reading Skim re-read pages 88­103. Group task 1. Divide into two groups. Focus on the chapter entitled, 'The Pogrom' (which means an organized, violent and racist attack) pages 88­95. Using the photocopies: · Group A is to highlight any words of violence, focusing especially on verbs and actions. · Group B is to highlight any words that reveal Fritzchen's emotions and feelings during this chapter. If time, begin to jot down around the outside of the text the effect of some of these descriptions. 2. Share your findings and discuss: i. How typical of the novel is it to have a character's emotions recorded? ii. Would you say the text is largely unemotional or emotional apart from this section of the novel? iii. What is the effect of recording Fritzchen's changing emotions? iv. What is the effect of using all the words of violence? 3. Discuss the descriptions of the settings in this chapter: the street on pages 88­89; the little basement shop, page 89; the Jewish home of apprentices, page 90; the Schneider's apartment, pages 94­95. Using your strategy check cards, discuss how these settings add to the atmosphere of this chapter. 4. Then discuss the following: i. How did you feel about reading this chapter? Did any of it shock? ii. Discuss the structure of the chapter ­ how tension was built up to a climax at the end. What was the twist at the end? iii. How did you feel about Fritzchen in this chapter? iv. What explanations can you give for his actions? v. What phrases suggest he was caught up in the crowd's mood rather than thinking things through? Homework Read pages 103­128.

© NATE 2006 Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8 Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 8

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F8

Objectives: R4 Versatile reading R12 Independent reading Resources: None. As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks, character, setting and mood, relationships between character and place, emerging themes, narrative style. Now we will look at: · the difference between authorial voice and narrative voice. Group reading Skim re-read pages 103­128. Group task Last lesson you began exploring narrative style and touched on the narrator's voice. Remember that using `I' indicates that the narrative is written in the first person, `he/she' indicates it written in the third person. 1. Discuss the following: i. What person has this novel been written in? Is it an emotional style, recording many feelings and thoughts, or is it reported in a detached, descriptive style, without much comment? Find a couple examples of evidence from the text for your view. ii. How much understanding do you think Fritzchen has of what is happening/the events he is describing? 2. With the stories told by Friedrich and the Rabbi, we get to hear two other voices and their points of view. Divide into two groups. Group A is to focus on the voice of Friedrich, page 109­113. Group B is to focus the voice of the Rabbi, page 119­123. · Summarise what each story is about. Then discuss: i. What is the effect of having a different voice in the text at this point? Do you think it works well / doesn't work well and why / why not? ii. Do we learn anything about the character from what they say? iii. Do we learn anything about the theme of how Jews are treated? 3. The personal voice of Friedrich tells an open and honest story about himself. The Rabbi tells a story that is impersonal and is used to make a point. i. Why do you think the writer included Friedrich's story? ii. What is the point of the Rabbi's story? What does it add to the novel? iii. What do you think the writer is saying about Jewish people and how they are treated? And about human nature in general? Homework Read pages 128­133.

© NATE 2006 Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8 Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 9

Hans Peter Richter

Group card F9

Objectives: R5 Trace the development of themes, values and ideas Resources: Prompt sheet on plot and structure: section on endings As a whole group we have: · revised the range of reading strategies you have available to you; · explored narrative hooks, character, setting and mood, relationships between character and place, emerging themes, narrative style, the difference between authorial and narrative voice. Now we will look at: · the resolution. Group reading Skim re-read pages 128­133. Group task 1. Jot down three questions each that you still want answering. Swap these questions with a partner and try to suggest answers to/make predictions for your partner's questions. 2. Read the ending of the novel, pages 133­138. 3. In your pairs, discuss whether your questions were answered and how. 4. As a group discuss the following questions: i. How accurate were your predictions? ii. Were there any surprises? iii. How did you feel about the ending? iv. How do the last couple of pages relate back to the beginning of the novel? v. If you were summing up the overall message or moral of this story, what would it be? 5. As a group, discuss: i. what you think the remaining characters will do now; ii. which part of the novel you thought was most effective, and why. 6. Read any of the lists of dates and events at the back of the book you have not yet looked at. Discuss how effective this book has been in showing you what it was like to be a Jew living in Germany during Hitler's rise to power.

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 5 Teaching objective(s): Text focus: Teaching sequence: Introduction to text:

Hans Peter Richter

Guided card F1 R5 Development of ideas, themes and values. Friedrich by Hans Peter Richter, pages 59­74. Teacher reminds students of objectives. Recap of story so far and major themes which are emerging. Recap and discuss how the theme of antiSemitism has already been seen in the novel. Look at the notes at the back of the book for the years 1933­1936 and discuss what it was like for Jews living in Hitler's Germany. Which events listed have we seen evidence of in the novel? Discuss the poverty/mood of Germany after WW1 and how this has been seen in the novel e.g. narrator's father's poverty, the anger at Jewish traders, need for a scapegoat. Discuss how there would be different views about Jews in Germany and a lot of fear/ pressure to follow the Nazi Party. Explore how young people joined Jungvolk, for example, and had to listen to the propaganda there. Teacher issues Strategy check-cards to help with task/discussion. Students re-read pages 59­74. They are to focus on the different views, beliefs, fears, actions and experiences of some of the characters in the novel. Remind them they need to find evidence for their responses. They should decide which characters (including minor ones they can remember from other sections) who would roughly fit the following descriptions: · is Jewish and suffers racism; · hates the Jewish people and treats them badly; · wants to help/support Jewish people but is afraid to do this too openly; · joins Nazi party for own benefit despite not agreeing with all its policies; · stands up for Jewish people by the words they say publicly. Encourage discussion of these findings. Remind students of how to mindmap, and on A3 paper students to create a mind-map exploring the above views as main 'trunks' of the mind-map, with characters and their views, actions and experiences branching off these. Tell them to use colour and small sketches as well as words and also feel able to make links between characters and events by using colour and shapes. Students to share out the 'trunks' so all exploring one aspect. Discuss findings. Who do they admire / not admire and why? How do they feel about the actions and moral dilemmas and decisions facing the narrator's father and women like Frau Penk? Do you think they should have acted differently or do you think they acted in a way which was understandable? What do you think you would do in that situation? What about the teacher's response to Friedrich having to leave the school? Encourage students to think about what strategies they have used whilst reading. Homework is to read pages 74 - 88 in preparation for next lesson. Resources: A3 paper and pens

Strategy check: Independent reading and related task:

Return to text: developing response

Review (reading target and next steps):

Evaluation:

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

Friedrich

Lesson 9 Teaching objective(s): Text focus: Teaching sequence: Introduction to text: Strategy check: Independent reading and related task:

Hans Peter Richter

Guided card F2 R4 Versatile reading R7 Independent reading Resources: Photocopies of pages 88­95.

Friedrich by Hans Peter Richter Pages 88­95, chapter called 'The Pogrom'. Teacher reminds students of the objective, particularly focusing on different aspects of narrative style. Explain that they are going to focus on author's style and selection of words to create tension, setting and atmosphere. Issue the prompt card for style and language, setting and atmosphere. Re-read pages 88­95. Divide into two groups and, using the photocopies, Group A should highlight any words of violence, especially verbs and actions; Group B should highlight any of Fritzchen's emotions or feelings in the text. Begin to jot down notes around the outside as to why these phrases are effective. Students share findings and discuss how typical it is to have emotions recorded in this text, which is largely detached in style. Explore through discussion effect of these words and how they help to build up tension. Using the Strategy check cards on setting and atmosphere, look closely at four main settings/descriptions in this chapter: the street (pages 88­89); the little basement shop (page 89); the Jewish home of apprentices (page 90); the Schneider's apartment (pages 94­95). Discuss how these settings add to the atmosphere of this chapter. Discuss how the students felt about reading this chapter. Did anything shock them or were they expecting it? Explore the structure of this chapter and the build up of tension, looking at how the writer achieves this by the language used, the tone adopted and the comparison of Fritzchen's frenzied actions against 'a Jew', when he is caught up in the crowd/mood, with others' actions against the Schneiders. Explore how both actions are the same and discuss how the depersonalising of 'Jews' (not seeing them as individuals) and mood of the crowd meant that Fritzchen could participate in one but be appalled at the other. What point is being made about human nature? How did the students feel about Fritzchen in this chapter? What explanations can they give for his actions? What phrases suggest he was caught up in the mood of the crowd rather than thinking? Think about what strategies were used today in the reading.

Return to text: developing response

Review (reading target and next steps):

Evaluation:

© NATE 2006

Group reading at Key Stage 3 - Extension Pack: Year 8

Theme: The Holocaust

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