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Part 10

SNA/DLSw Configuration

Part 10 SNA/DLSw Configuration

57

Chapter 57

SNA/DLSw Configuration

57.1 Introduction to the SNA/DLSw Protocol

SNA (Systems Network Architecture), published by IBM in 1976, is used by the IBM mainframe system for the storage of many mature applications and databases. The IP network takes a primary part in the global networks. Based on different network structures and communication protocols, the SNA network and the IP network can operate independently. To enable the client to have access to the resources on the SNA mainframe system via the IP network, the SNA network needs to be integrated with the IP network, which can be implemented by many technologies at present to make the two operate in coordination. Data Link Switching (DLSw) is the "SNA over IP" mode. As the standard of the

communication industry, it is supported by many router producers. In addition, various extended functions are added to enhance the performance of the system. As the DLSw can convert data of different mediums, the DLSw terminals can be connected to the network via the Token Ring network, the Ethernet or the Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) protocol. RFC 1795, the standard for the DLSw, describes the Switch-to-Switch Protocol (SSP) for the peer connection between routers, resource location, data transmission, traffic control and error correction. RFC 1795 terminates the data links between peer routers, in another word, the data link locally responds, which terminates the transmission of the link layer response and the keepalive messages in the Wide Area Network (WAN), and prevents the link layer from timing out. The DLSw routers transmit multiple Data Link Control (DLC) over the corresponding Transfer Control Protocol (TCP) channels reliably via the IP network. A TCP connection has to be established before the two routers exchange the SNA or transmit the NetBIOS. After the TCP connection is established, the routers exchange their functional message. It includes the DLSw version number, initial size for the receiving window, SAPs value and supported number of TCP sessions. Meanwhile, the MAC

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address table and the NetBIOS name list are also transmitted. We can also configure the MAC address table and the NetBIOS name list in such a way to prevent their broadcasting. After the exchange of the functional message, the DLSw peers get ready for the SNA link establishment. The terminal link establishment procedure includes: destination resource location (based on the MAC address or the NetBIOS name), and configuration for the terminal data link connection. The SNA control and the NetBIOS control are different. In the Local Area Network (LAN), a SNA equipment delivers a detection frame with a destination MAC address (a TEST fame and/or an exchange identification (XID) frame) to locate other SNA equipment. When a DLSw router receives the detection frame, it sends a canureach frame to every reachable peer router. If a DLSw peer can reach the specified MAC address, it will response with an icanreach frame. The DLSw peer is capable of three connections: data link connection between local SNA-designated system and the router, TCP connections between DLSw peers, and a circuit. Once the link is established, the message can be transferred. LLC2 (IEEE 802.2) provides connection-oriented services. It is widely adopted in the WAN, particularly the IBM communication system.Router series routers support the LLC2 connection over the Ethernet. The SDLC is the link layer protocol adopted by the SNA WAN. The SDLC defines two kinds of network nodes: primary nodes and secondary nodes. The primary node polls the secondary nodes in the pre-defined sequence. If the node has data, it can deliver the data.

57.2 SNA/DLSw Configuration

57.2.1 Configuration Task List

Create a DLSw local peer; Create a DLSw remote peer; Enable the bridging of the Ethernet interface; Configure the link layer protocol encapsulated on the interface as SDLC Configure the SDLC role; Configure the virtual MAC address of SDLC;

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Configure the SDLC address; Configure the SDLC peer end; Configure the XID of the SDLC;

57.2.2 Creating a DLSw Local Peer

Executing the command in the first row of the following table, you can create a DLSw local peer, reboot the DLSw, and define all parameters of the local peer; whereas executing the no command, you can remove the local peer and its parameters. Table 57-1 Configuration command Command dlsw local-peer tcp ip-address [border] [cost cost] [group group-no] [keepalive keepalive-interval][lf if-size] [passive] [promiscuous][init-pacing-window init-size] [max-pacing-window max-size] [vendor-id vendor-id] no dlsw local-peer tcp Description Configure a local peer and its parameters

Remove a local peer and its parameters

57.2.3 Creating a DLSw Remote Peer

A remote peer is created after you execute the command in the first row of the following table. Then you need to configure a TCP connection for the remote peer. A router can be

configured with multiple remote peers. Executing the no command, you can remove the local peer and its parameters. Table 57-2 Configuration command Command dlsw remote-peer tcp ip-address [backup-peer backup-peer-ipaddr] [cost cost] [dmac-output-list dmac-list-no] [dynamic] [keepalive keepalive-interval] [lf lf-size][lsap-output-list lsap-list-no] [tcp-queue-max max-queue-size] [timeout seconds] no dlsw remote-peer tcp ip-address Description Configure a remote peer and its parameters;

Remove a remote peer and its parameters;

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57.2.4 Enabling the Ethernet Interface Bridging

To enable the Ethernet to support SNA, you must enable the Ethernet bridging. Executing the commands in the following table, you can enable or disable it. Table 57-3 Configuration command Command bridge-group b-group-no [input-address-list in-a-list-no] [input-lsap-list in-l-list-no] [input-type-list in-t-list-no] [output-address-list out-a-list-no] [output-lsap-list out-l-list-no] [output-type-list out-t-list-no] [path-cost pcost-val] [spanning-disabled] no bridge-group b-group-no [input-address-list in-a-list-no] [input-lsap-list in-l-list-no] [input-type-list in-t-list-no] [output-address-list out-a-list-no] [output-lsap-list out-l-list-no] [output-type-list out-t-list-no] [path-cost pcost-val] [spanning-disabled] Description Enable the Ethernet bridging;

Remove the Ethernet bridging;

57.2.5 Configuring SDLC as the Link Layer Protocol Encapsulated over the Interface

When DLSw is adopted, the synchronous serial link layer needs to be encapsulated with the SDLC protocol. Executing the command in the following table, you can change the encapsulate protocol to SDLC. By default, the protocol is PPP.

Caution

SDLC cannot be adopted to bear the IP protocol. You should remove the IP-associated commands from the interface before the SDLC encapsulation.

Table 57-4 Configuration command Command encapsulation sdlc Description Configure SDLC as the link layer protocol encapsulated over the interface

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57.2.6 Configuring the SDLC Role

SDLC defines the primary and secondary nodes. The primary node takes a leading role in controlling the whole connecting process while the secondary node is controlled by the former. The SDLC role of the router depends on the SDLC equipment connected to it. If the SDLC equipment is a primary node, you should set the interface of the router to secondary node; on the contrary, if the SDLC equipment is a secondary node, you should set the interface of the router to primary node. In general, the central IBM mainframe is the primary node; while the terminal equipment, such as the Unix host, is the secondary node. Table 57-5 Configuration command Command sdlc role {primary|secondary|prim-xid-poll} no sdlc role Description Configure the SDLC role; Remove the SDLC role;

57.2.7 Configuring a SDLC Virtual MAC address

Executing the command in the following table, you can set or remove the virtual MAC address over the interface. By doing that the source MAC address is provided for the DLSw communication. The source address is the virtual MAC address plus the secondary site address. Table 57-6 Configuration command Command sdlc vmac mac-address no sdlc vmac Description Configure the SDLC virtual MAC address Remove the SDLC virtual MAC address

57.2.8 Configuring the SDLC Address

Executing the command in the following table, you can specify/remove the SDLC secondary node address to which the serial port is connected. As SDLC adopts the imbalance mode, and the connection between the primary and secondary equipment is star-connected, what you only need to do is to specify the SDLC address of the secondary node on the primary mode. Removing the SDLC secondary node address to 57-5

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which the serial port is connected will also remove all parameters related to the address. Table 57-7 Configuration command Command sdlc address address no sdlc address Description Configure the SDLC address Remove the SDLC address

57.2.9 Configuring the SDLC Peer End

Executing the command in the first row of the following table, you can specify the peer end MAC address for a SDLC virtual circuit to be ready for the DLSw connection establishment. Table 57-8 Configuration command Command sdlc partner mac-addr sdlc-addr no sdlc partner mac-addr sdlc-addr Description Specify the SDLC peer end Remove the SDLC peer end

57.2.10 Specifying the XID of the SDLC

XID is used to identify the equipment in the SNA. It is a 4-byte long integer, whose preceding 12 bits are the network ID and the other subsequent 20 bits are the node ID. XID falls under 2 types: PU2.0 and PU2.1. The PU2.1 equipment is configured with the XID to exchange identities during the communication; while the PU2.0 equipment does not exchange the XID at all. The SDLC XID needs to be configured for the PU2.0 instead of the PU2.1. To do this, you can use the following command to specify or remove the SDLC XID. Table 57-9 Configuration command Command sdlc xid sdlc-address xid-number no sdlc xid sdlc-address Description Specify the SDLC XID; Remove the SDLC XID;

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57.3 Maintenance of SNA/DLSw

Using the show, clear and debug command in the following table, you can monitor or maintain SNA/DLSw. For the details of the commands, refer to the following table. Table 57-10 Configuration command Command show dlsw capabilities [ip-address] show dlsw circuits show dlsw peers [ip-address] show dlsw reachability show llc link clear dlsw reachability clear dlsw circuit [circuit-id] debug dlsw debug dlsw event [detail] debug dlsw packet [detail] Description Show the functional exchange information; Show the virtual circuit information Show the remote peer information; Show the MAC buffer information Show the LLC link information Clear the entry buffer of the bridging group; Clear the virtual circuit information; Enable all DLSw debugging information switches; Enable DLSw event debugging; detail decides whether to show such information as the timer or some other details. Enable DLSw packet debugging; detail decides whether to show such information as the timer, or some other details. Enable SDLC event debugging; Enable SDLC packet debugging; Enable LLC2 event debugging; Enable LLC2 packet debugging

debug sdlc event debug sdlc packet debug llc2 event debug llc2 packet

57.4 Typical Examples

57.4.1 Example 1: A simple SDLC-LAN Remote Medium Switching Network

Here we introduce to you a simple SDLC-LAN remote medium switching network. As the following figure shows, SDLC uses multi-point support. PC1 and PC2 are PU2.1 nodes, while PC3 is a PU2.0 node; the routers and the multi-path mutiplexers adopt the Non Return to Zero (NRZ) code and the interfaces of PC3 adopt the Non Return to Zero Inverted (NRZI) code.

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Figure 57-1 SDLC-LAN remote medium switching network

SDLC

IBM AS/400

Ethern et

PC3

SDLC address

Router A

Router B

0xC3

Hub

SDLC

SDLC

PC1

SDLC address

Multi-path multiplexer

P C2

SDLC address

0xC1

Among these, the routers are configured as the following: Configuration for Router A:

routerA(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 110.23.32.11 routerA(config)#dlsw remote-peer tcp 202.23.32.22 routerA(config)#interface ethernet 0/0 routerA(config-if-eth0/0)#bridge-group 3

0xC2

Configuration for Router B:

routerB(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 202.23.32.22 routerB(config)#dlsw remot-peer tcp 110.23.32.11 routerB(config)#interface serial 0/0 routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#encapsulation sdlc routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#baudrate 9600 routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#sdlc role prim-xid-poll routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#sdlc vmac 00:00:12:34:12:00 routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#sdlc addr c1 routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#sdlc partner 00:12:cc:00:54:c1 cl routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#sdlc addr c2 routerB(config-if-serial0/0)#sdlc partner 00:12:cc:00:54:c2 c2 routerB(config)#interface serial 0/1 routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#encapsulation sdlc routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#baudrate 9600 routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#nrzi-encoding routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#sdlc role primary routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#sdlc vmac 00:00:22:22:00:00

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routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#sdlc addr c3 routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#sdlc xid c3 03e00002 routerB(config-if-serial0/1)#sdlc partner 00:12:cc:00:54:c3 c3

57.4.2 Example 2: A Network with Backup Peers

Now we introduce to you a network with backup peers as the following figure shows. The terminal on the right, SAN PU2.0, communicates with the mainframe via Router 4->Router 1->Router. The circuit between Router 4 and Router 1 is the primary circuit; while the circuit between Router4 and Router2 is the backup one. If the primary circuit disconnects, the backup circuit will take its place and connect the terminal to the mainframe.

Figure 57-2 A network with backup peers

Router1

Ethernet LAN

IBM AS/400 Router2 Router3

Internet

Router4

Ethernet LAN

SAN PU2.0

Among these, the routers are configured as the following: Configuration of Router 1: 57-9

Part 10 SNA/DLSw Configuration

router1(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 promiscuous router1(config)#interface eth 0/1 router1(config-if-eth0/0)# bridge-group 23

Configuration of Router 2:

router2(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 2.2.2.2 promiscuous router2(config)#dlsw remote-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 router2(config)#interface eth 0/0 router2 (config-if-eth0/0)# bridge-group 23

Configuration of Router 3:

router3(config)# dlsw local-peer tcp 3.3.3.3 promiscuous router2(config)#dlsw remote-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 router3(config)# interface eth 0/0 router3 (config-if-eth0/1)# bridge-group 23

Configuration of Router 4:

router4(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 4.4.4.4 router4(config)#dlsw remote-peer tcp 2.2.2.2 router4(config)#dlsw remote-peer tcp 3.3.3.3 backup-peer 2.2.2.2 router4(config)#interface eth 0/0 router4 (config-if-eth0/1)# bridge-group 4

57.4.3 Example 3 A Network with Load Balancing

The next example is a network with load balancing. As the following figure shows, the path to the destination resource is repeated as two identical MAC addresses are used to connect to one IBM mainframe. The repeated MAC addresses are allocated to the LAN interface of the IBM Front End Processor (FEP), or to the internal LAN of Cisco CIP. A work station connected via Router 2, after setting up the SNA connection to the FEPA, sends a test frame via the work station connected by Router 3 to locate the mainframe-attached FEP. Once Router 1 receives the test frame, it will check the repeated MAC address in the circuit buffer. In this case, Router 1 first finds the repetition, then checks the active circuit number to each FEP. If FEPA has an active circuit while 57-10

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FEPB dose not, Router 1 will set up a circuit to FEPB with load balancing, allocate the path with FEPB for the work stations connected via Router 3.

Figure 57-3 Load balancing the SNA sessions with repeated MAC addresses on IBM 3745 FEP

FEPA MAC 4000 3745 0001 FEPB MAC 4000 3745 0001 IBM 3745

Eth LAN

IBM 3745

Eth LAN

Router1

Internet

Router3

Eth LAN

Router2

Eth LAN

SNA PU2.0

SNA PU2.0

Among these, the routers are configured as the following: Configuration of Router 1:

router1(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 promiscuous router1(config)#dlsw duplicate-path-bias load-balance router1(config)#interface eth 0/0 router1 (config-if-eth0/0)# bridge-group 1

Configuration of Router 2:

router2(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 2.2.2.2 router2(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 router2(config)#interface eth 0/1 router2(config-if-eth0/1)# bridge-group 2

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Configuration of Router 3:

router3(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 3.3.3.3 router3(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 router3(config)#interface eth 0/1 router3(config-if-eth0/1)# bridge-group 3

57.4.4 Example 4 A Network with Peer Groups and Peer Border

The next example is a network with peer groups and peer border.As the following figure shows, the network is partitioned to 2 groups, Group 1-3 and Group 4-5, and Router 3 and Router 4 are configured as the border of the two groups.

Figure 57-4 A network with peer groups and peer border

Eth LAN Eth LAN

router4

router1

Eth LAN

Internet router3 Internet

router5

router2

Eth LAN

Among these, the routers are configured as the following: Configuration of Router 1:

router1(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 group 123 promiscuous router1(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 3.3.3.3

Configuration of Router 2:

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router2(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 2.2.2.2 group 123 promiscuous router2(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 3.3.3.3

Configuration of Router 3:

router3(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 3.3.3.3 group 123 border promiscuous router3(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 4.4.4.4

Configuration of Router 4:

router4(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 4.4.4.4 group 45 border promiscuous router4(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 3.3.3.3

Configuration of Router 5:

router5(config)#dlsw local-peer tcp 5.5.5.5 group 45 promiscuous router5(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 4.4.4.4

57.4.5 Example 5: An Access Control Network

Here is a network that controls the access.As shown in the following figure, the Netbios user in Eth LAN1 needs to visit the Netbios server using the specialized SAP 0XF0; while the two IBM3174s in Eth LAN2 requires to visit the PEP with its MAC address 0110.3333.4444.

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Figure 57-5 An access control network

MAC 0110 3333 4414

Netbios server

Eth LAN

IBM FEP

Router1

Internet

Router2

Eth LAN

IBM 3174

Router3 Netbios client

Eth LAN

IBM 3174 Netbios client

Among these, the routers are configured as the following: Configuration of Router 1:

router1(config)# dlsw local-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 promiscuous

Configuration of Router 2:

router2(config)# dlsw local-peer tcp 1.1.1.1 router2(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 3.3.3.3 icanreach saps F0

Configuration of Router 3:

router3(config)# dlsw local-peer tcp 2.2.2.2 router3(config)# dlsw remote-peer tcp 3.3.3.3 dmac-output-list 700 router3(config)# access-list 700 permit 01.10.33.33.44.44

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