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ANIMAL PRODUCTION Livestock numbers Approximately 80 % of agricultural land in South Africa is mainly suitable for extensive livestock farming. Livestock are also found in other areas where they are kept in combination with other farming enterprises. Sheep and goat farming occupies approximately 590 000 km2 of land in South Africa. This represents 53 % of all agricultural land in the country. This includes the vast Karoo areas of the Northern and Western Cape Provinces and the mixed veld types of the Eastern Cape Province and the southern Free State. Commercial sheep farms are also found in other areas such as the Kalahari, the winter rainfall area, and the grasslands of Mpumalanga, eastern Free State and KwaZulu-Natal, where other farming enterprises, such as cattle farming, are also practised. As rainfall plays a major role in the availability of fodder and grazing, it is logical that a good correlation would exist between rainfall and the size of the national herd, in particular cattle numbers. Cattle Cattle are found throughout the country, but particularly in the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, the Free State and the northern provinces. Herd sizes vary by farm type. Dairy cattle herd sizes vary between less than 50 up to 300, averaging approximately 110. Beef cattle farms range from fairly small farms (less than 50 cattle) to large farms and feedlots with more than 1 000 cattle per farm. The total number of cattle in South Africa at the end of August 2003 was estimated at 13,5 million, consisting of various international dairy and beef cattle breeds, as well as indigenous breeds such as the Afrikaner and Nguni. The numbers were approximately 0,9 % lower than the estimate of 13,6 million as at the end of August 2002. There are various breeders' organisations representing most international and indigenous cattle breeds. Most of the organisations are affiliated to the South African Studbook and Animal Improvement Association. The Milk Producers' Organisation of South Africa (MPOSA) is the most prominent producer organisation in the South African dairy sector. Cattle numbers per province since 1999 are estimated to be as follows: Province 1999 2000 2001 `000 head (August) Western Cape Northern Cape Free State Eastern Cape KwaZulu-Natal Mpumalanga Limpopo Gauteng North West Total 505 460 2 190 2 951 2 889 1 367 1 167 303 1 748 13 580 509 476 2 148 2 975 2 797 1 344 1 173 287 1 752 13 461 489 464 2 241 3 039 2 736 1 328 1 203 282 1 724 13 506 498 473 2 254 3 125 2 771 1 327 1 165 267 1 754 13 634 494 469 2 235 3 097 2 746 1 315 1 155 265 1 739 13 515 2002 2003

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Distribution of cattle by province: August 2003 (%)

Gauteng 2,0 % Limpopo 8,5 % North West 12,9 % Western Cape 3,7 % Northern Cape 3,5 % FreeState 16,5 %

Mpumalanga 9,7 % KwaZulu-Natal 20,3 %

Eastern Cape 22,9 %

Sheep Although sheep farms are found in all provinces, they are concentrated in the more arid parts of the country. The largest number of sheep is found in the Eastern Cape (29,0 %), Northern Cape (27,3 %), Free State (20, 6%) and Western Cape Provinces (10,9 %).

Distribution of sheep by province: August 2003 (%)

Limpopo 0,7 % Mpumalanga 5,7 % KwaZulu-Natal 3,0 % Gauteng 0,3 % North West 2,5 %

Western Cape 11,0 %

Northern Cape 27,8 %

Eastern Cape 28,8 %

Free State 20,2 %

Sheep are kept mainly for wool and mutton production, and the industry is therefore represented by organisations from the mutton as well as the wool industry. The sheep industry also has various breeders' associations with the Dorper Sheep Breeders' Society of South Africa and Merino SA, being the most prominent. The total number of sheep in South Africa at the end of August 2003 is estimated at 29 million-- approximately 0,10 % lower than the estimated 29,03 million as at the end of August 2002.

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The number of sheep in the various provinces since 1999 is estimated to be as follows: 1999 Province `000 head (August) Western Cape Northern Cape Free State Eastern Cape KwaZulu-Natal Mpumalanga Limpopo Gauteng North West Total Goats Most goats are found in the Eastern Cape, Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal, and North West Provinces. It is estimated that there was a 1,4 % decrease in the number of goats, from 6,7 million in August 2002 to 6,6 million in August 2003.

Distribution of goats by province: August 2003 (head)

North West 746 254 Western Cape 244 329 Northern Cape 512 160 Free State 72 985

2000

2001

2002

2003

3 459 7 337 5 855 8 067 970 1 848 216 92 836 28 680

3 349 7 765 5 831 7 917 887 1 743 206 91 762 28 551

3 261 7 882 5 881 8 154 888 1 694 210 91 725 28 786

3 192 8 061 5 870 8 372 864 1 641 211 84 739 29 034

3 189 8 053 5 864 8 363 863 1 640 211 84 738 29 005

Gauteng 8 531 Limpopo 1 051 148 Mpumalanga 100 886 KwaZulu-Natal 913 946

Eastern Cape 2 951 121

Flocks of goats kept for meat tend to be smaller than sheep flocks, averaging approximately 230 head per farm. Angora goats are primarily kept for mohair production. There are also farmers who have adopted a market differentiating strategy by producing goat milk.

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Pigs Pigs are found predominantly in the Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Mpumalanga. Pigs are kept mainly for pork (95 %). The remainder is kept for breeding purposes. It is estimated that pig numbers decreased by 0,06 % from 1,570 million in August 2002 to 1,569 million in August 2003.

Distribution of pigs by province: August 2003 (head)

North West 159 957 Western Cape 237 329 Northern Cape 16 008 Free State 103 815

Gauteng 172 828

Limpopo 176 487 Mpumalanga 234 495 KwaZulu-Natal 185 671

Eastern Cape 282 931

Red meat The red meat industry is one of the most important industries in the agricultural sector and contributes approximately 11 % to the gross value of agricultural production in the RSA. While sheep farming is mainly extensive, a large percentage of beef animals is derived from feedlots. Slaughtering It is estimated the total number of cattle slaughtered increased by 1,28 % between 2001/02 and 2002/03 and the number of sheep and pigs slaughtered increased by 0,90 and 0,74 %, respectively. Commercial slaughtering of red meat producing livestock types over the past five years is as follows: 1998/99 Year Number Cattle Sheep and lambs Pigs Auction prices The prices for red meat are mainly the result of the interaction between demand and supply, which are influenced by the level of the consumers' disposable income, the price of substitute products and import parity prices. In the case of mutton, for example, the level of wool prices influences the domestic supply of mutton. 1 756 384 4 661 666 1 809 773 2 121 988 4 872 077 1 941 423 1 735 102 4 588 079 1 629 786 1 933 610 4 848 182 1 752 192 1 958 447 4 891 866 1 765 122 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

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The average producer price of beef for 2002/03 amounted to R13,40/kg (average for all classes on all auction markets), which represents a 5,2 % increase compared to the average price of R12,73/kg for 2001/02.

Average producer prices of beef, mutton and pork: 1996/97 - 2002/03

1 900 1 700 1 500 c/kg 1 300 1 100 900 700 500 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 Year Beef Mutton and lamb Pork 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

In view of the ever-stronger influence of international trade on the local mutton industry, both the cyclical and seasonal price patterns for mutton are influenced by imports. The average producer price for mutton and lamb increased by 10,2 % during 2002/03 to R17,97/kg, compared to the average price of R16,31/kg for 2001/02. The average producer price for pork increased by 2,6 % to R9,83/kg during 2002/03, compared to an average of R9,58/kg for 2001/02. Imports While imports of red meat increased by 28 425 tons in 2001/02 to 39 821 tons in 2002/03, they are still below the average tonnage of approximately 50 658 tons for the past five years. Imports of beef amounted to 12 085 tons which remained relatively constant as compared to the five-year average of 13 000 tons. Imports of pork were 11 691 tons for 2002/03, which is relatively higher than the five-year average of 9 795 tons. Imports for mutton amounted to 16 044 tons, which is much lower than the average of 31 674 tons for the previous five years. Imports from outside the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) for 2002 amounted to approximately 4 388 tons of beef, a decrease of 18 % compared to the previous year. During 2002, 43 % of beef imports came from Argentina. Imports of mutton and lamb decreased by 55 %, from 34 194 tons during 2001 to 15 399 tons in 2002. During 2002, 94 % of total mutton imports from outside SACU came from Australia and 6 % from New Zealand.

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Imports of pork decreased by 4,5 %, from 8 579 tons during 2001 to 8 196 tons during 2002. During 2002, 70 % of total pork imports came from the Americas Ex NAFTA, of which 97 % were from Brazil.

Imports of red meat 1998/99-2002/03

60 000 50 000 40 000 Tons 30 000 20 000 10 000 0 1998/99 Beef 1999/2000 2000/01 Year Mutton and lamb 2001/02 2002/03 Pork

Consumption Consumption of beef and veal increased by 0,6 % from 617 000 tons in 2001/02 to 621 000 tons in 2002/03. Consumption of mutton increased by 2,4 % from 163 000 tons in 2001/02 to 167 000 tons in 2002/03. Consumption of pork increased by 0,8 % from 122 000 tons in 2001/02 to 123 000 tons in 2002/03. Imports of red meat accounted for 12,7 % of red meat consumed locally for the period 2002/03. Imports of beef accounted for 8,1 % of beef consumed for 2002/03 and imports of pork accounted for 6,7 % of pork consumed for 2002/03. Imports of mutton represents 34,2 % of mutton consumed for the period 2002/03.

Consumption of red meat 1998/99-2002/03

700 600 500 '000 tons 400 300 200 100 0 1998/99 1999/00 Beef 2000/01 Mutton Pork 2001/02 2002/03

Prospects The import tariffs of R2/kg on mutton, R2,40/kg on beef and R1,30/kg on pork remain unchanged for 2003. Although the value of the Rand has improved in 2003, It is unlikely that imports will increase, as there is currently a surplus of meat. Local producer and retail prices are not expected to increase dramatically because of the surplus. The maize price also dropped during 2003 and this will ease pressure on feedlots, as there are also high stock levels in the feedlots.

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Poultry The poultry industry consists of three distinctly separate branches, namely the day-old chick supply industry, the broiler industry and the egg industry. This article focuses on the broiler and egg industries.

Broiler industry

A small number of large producers handle approximately 66 % of the total broiler production in South Africa. These consist of 4 producers who slaughter more than 600 000 chickens per week and approximately 11 intermediate producers, producing between 50 000 and 600 000 chickens per week. The rest of the production of the estimated 13,3 million broilers being slaughtered per week, is produced by an estimated 93 commercial producers slaughtering less than 50 000 chickens per week and hundreds of small and/or casual producers. The number of small producers varies from time to time as many of these producers enter the commercial trade only when the market is positive.

Number of broilers slaughtered and average producer price 1998/99 to 2002/03

550 540 Million 530 520 510 500 1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01 Year 2001/02 2002/03 1 100 1 000 900 800 700 c/kg

Number of broilers slaughtered

Average producer price

The number of broilers slaughtered by commercial producers during the twelve months up to 30 June 2003 is estimated at 545 million units. This is 1,4 % more than the estimated 538 million units that were slaughtered during the preceding twelve months. The gross value of broilers slaughtered by commercial producers during 2002/03 is estimated at R8 632 million. Imports Imports play an important part in terms of the supply of broiler meat in the country. Approximately 6 to 7 % of poultry meat consumed is imported. A worrying aspect for the broiler industry is the fact that imports are increasing. During the 2003 this percentage increased to approximately 9 % of consumption. The main countries from which poultry meat is imported are Brazil, Canada and Australia. Per capita consumption of chicken meat from 1998/99 to 2002/03 is as follows: 1998/99 Year kg per year Per capita consumption 21,1 22,4 21,8 22,2 23,1 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

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Prices received by producers During the 12 months up to 30 June 2003 prices received by producers of broilers increased by 13,2 % to an average weighted price of R11,40 per kilo. Producer prices of broilers from 1998/99 to 2002/03. 1998/99 Year c/kg. Price of broilers

Egg industry

1999/2000

2000/01

2001/02

2002/03

802

822

879

1007

1140

The average number of layers increased sharply from around 13,8 million in 1995 to around 17,4 million in 2001. During the last two years, the number of layers remained at more of less the same level. Producer prices of eggs (average including all sizes) increased by 20,8 % from 2001/02 to 2002/03.

Production of eggs and prices received by producers 1998/99 to 2002/03

425 000 400 000 '000 doz. 375 000 350 000 325 000 300 000 1998/99 1999/2000 Production 2000/01 Year 2001/02 2002/03 550 500 c/kg 450 400 350 300

Producer price

1998/99 Year

1999/2000

2000/01 c/doz

2001/02

2002/03

Price of eggs

356

360

400

442

534

It is estimated that both the local consumption and per capita consumption of eggs remained virtually unchanged between 2001/02 and 2002/03.

Prospects

The growth in the local broiler industry will depend to some extent on whether the South African Poultry Association's application for the amendment of duties on poultry imports is successful. It is, however, expected that demand for chicken meat will remain strong. Based on the fact that prices of broiler feeds, especially maize, came under pressure during 2003, it can be expected that the broiler industry will look at expansion during 2004. The production of eggs may also increase slightly, mainly because of lower feed costs. As a result, the price of eggs is expected to move sideways. 61

Ostriches The South African ostrich industry was established in 1838 with the export of feathers to Europe. Between 1900 and 1914 the industry flourished during what was referred to as the second ostrich feather boom. Soon afterwards the industry virtually collapsed as a result of changes in world fashion trends. During the 1960s the industry transformed to an intensively managed farming activity. The emphasis shifted from feather production to leather production. More recently ostrich meat became popular because of its low fat content. Since the deregulation of the marketing of agricultural products in South Africa during the 1990s, farming with ostriches not only spread from the Little Karoo region to other parts of South Africa but to several other countries. South Africa, however, remains the foremost supplier of ostrich products to the world, supplying some 67 % of ostrich meat, leather and feathers to international markets. Today all major stakeholders in the industry are affiliated to the National Ostrich Processors of SA and the South African Ostrich Business Chamber, with the object to cooperate in the advancement of the ostrich industry in South Africa. The South African ostrich industry is in the process of becoming more transparent and is implementing proactive steps on matters such as labour, animal welfare and environmental protection.

Estimated number of ostriches slaughtered: 1998­2002

400 000 350 000 300 000 250 000 200 000 150 000 100 000 50 000 1998 1999 South Africa 2000 Year Rest of the world 2001 2002

The number of birds slaughtered worldwide is estimated at 560 000 for 2002, of which 350 000 birds were slaughtered in South Africa. Demand in Europe for ostrich meat remained strong during 2002 and the weak currency during most of 2002 contributed positively to the total realisation per ostrich. However, during the same period prices of ostrich leather dropped sharply. Income from leather varies significantly because of dramatic price differences between raw skin grades. In 2002 a producer earned approximately R1 200 for a first grade raw skin and around R800 for a third grade skin. The average price producers of ostrich meat received during 2002 was approximately R19 per kg and R90 for feathers per bird. On average, South African producers received approximately R960 per raw skin. The improved South African currency has put further pressure on prices paid for ostrich products. Prospects During 2003, the slaughtering of ostriches in South Africa is expected to drop to around 300 000 units. Because of the sharp recovery of the Rand, it is expected that the income of producers will be much lower. The situation may carry over to 2004. Production levels in South Africa will also come under further pressure from production in other countries.

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Milk Milk is produced in nearly all regions of South Africa. However, the coastal areas are more suitable because of mild temperatures and good rainfall. This assures good-quality natural and artificial pastures. In 2002, the Western Cape contributed 24 % to total production, Eastern Cape 20 %, KwaZulu-Natal 17 %, North West 11 %, Free State 14 %, Mpumalaga 9 % and the remaining four provinces 5 %. There are an estimated 5 200 milk producers in the country. Milk production in South Africa makes a very small contribution to world milk production (approximately 0,5 %), but in terms of the value of agricultural production in South Africa, it is the fifth largest agricultural industry in the country. The gross value of milk produced during the 2002/03 production season (March ­ February), including milk that was produced for own consumption on farms, is estimated at R3 862 million. With the exception of the 2001/02 season, the production of milk has decreased since 1999. South Africa traditionally is a producer of milk surpluses and shortages are an infrequent occurrence. This has, however, changed during the last four seasons. Some of the factors that contributed to this are the slow increase in producer prices during the period 1998 to 2001 as well as dramatic increases in the cost of production inputs, especially feed costs for intensive milk production.

Local production and consumption of milk 1998/99­2002/03

2 300

Million litres

2 200 2 100 2 000 1 900 1 800 1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01 Season Production Consumption 2001/02 2002/03

Imports. During 2002, 24 617 tons of concentrated milk and powders, whey, butter and milk fats were imported. It was expected that imports of these products during 2003 would be approximately 24 000 tons. Prices The average producer price for 2002/03 came to 194 c/. 1998/99 Production season c/ Average producer price Prospects It is expected that the production of milk for 2003/04 will be approximately 5 % higher than the previous year. Because of the lower grain prices especially maize, the cost of production inputs should level out. The increase in the producer price of milk from approximately 145 c/ during January 2002, to 200 c/ during July 2003 may also stimulate production. 110,9 113,0 129,0 142,0 194,0 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

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Wool Areas of production Wool is produced throughout South Africa, but the main production areas are situated in the drier regions of the country. On a provincial basis, the Eastern Cape is the largest wool-producing region, having produced 27 % of the national clip during 2002/03, followed by the Free State (22 %), Western Cape (17 %), Northern Cape (13 %) and Mpumalanga (6 %). Production Australia remains the largest supplier of apparel wool to the world textile market, with an estimated production of 500 million kg (greasy) in 2002/03. South Africa, like Australia, produces mainly apparel wool, while the bulk of the production of the other major producers, such as New Zealand, China, Uruguay and Argentina is coarse wool, used for the production of carpets and interior textiles. The main competitors of wool are cotton and manmade fibres such as polyester, nylon and acrylic. Global wool supply has been on a downward trend for many years and is expected to show a further decline in 2003/04 following the devastating drought in Australia, which resulted in a dramatic drop in production to its lowest level since 1950/51. In South Africa production declined to 44,1 million kg in 2002/03 from 47,5 million kg in 2001/02 despite higher price levels. The 2002/03 season saw the raw-wool market reaching its highest price levels in many years. The upswing started in the second half of the 2001/02 season and continued throughout the first half of 2002/03, with the market indicator reaching an all-time high of R49,75 per kg (clean) in October 2002. This price rise has been unprecedented because it was mainly driven by the increasing shortage of Merino wool for apparel and resulted in strong competition on primary processing level for wool to keep mills running. Although supply concerns were the main driving force behind the price rise, exchange rates also played a significant role. The currencies of most of the major wool-exporting countries, but particularly that of South Africa and Australia, fell to their lowest levels ever against the US dollar, which helped to boost prices During the past 5 years, trends in local production of wool by class were as follows: 1998/99 Class Million kg Merino Other white wool Lesotho, Ciskei and Transkei Coarse and Coloured Dead wool and other Total Prices In excess of 90 % of all greasy wool sold in South Africa is traded by means of weekly auctions taking place from August to June. There normally is considerable volatility in prices during and between auctions. The price of wool is determined by a complex set of variables, including the level of the market in Australia on a given day; exchange rate fluctuations; quantities offered for sale at auction; the specific demand for different types of wool at different times; the extent and timing of contract commitments by local buyers for delivery to clients; and economic conditions prevailing in wool-consuming countries. 39,3 5,7 2,8 1,6 4,7 54,1 34,9 5,5 2,7 1,6 4,5 49,4 33,2 5,2 2,9 1,7 5,6 48,6 32,9 4,8 2,9 1,8 4,9 47,5 31,1 4,3 3,7 1,9 3,1 44,1 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 20002/03

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RSA wool production and average prices 1998/99 to 2002/03

60 55 50 45 40 1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01 Season 2001/02 2002/03 35 30 Million kg 25 15 10 5 0 R/kg 20

Production

Average price (greasy)

Average prices (total auction revenue divided by total mass sold per season) for different and all classes of wool from 1998/99 to 2002/03 compare as follows: 1998/99 Class R/kg greasy wool Merino Lesotho, Ciskei and Transkei Other white wool Coarse and coloured Dead wool and other All classes 10,46 4,76 6,33 6,14 5,50 9,51 12,51 8,93 7,34 4,45 7,75 11,02 15,57 11,48 9,59 5,13 9.95 14.13 24,12 20,53 17,40 7.91 12,58 22,77 34,14 21,78 24,66 9,99 10,73 30,79 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

South Africa is mainly producing a Merino clip, which comprises over 80 % of all lots offered for sale. Mean fibre diameter is the major price determinant for Merino wool, with finer micron categories normally commanding a premium over medium and strong wool.

Marketing arrangements

The marketing of wool in South Africa is free from statutory intervention. Wool is traded primarily via the open-cry auction system. Alternative selling mechanisms such as contract growing, forward deliveries and futures, have not yet been established in South African wool industry. The global price for apparel wool is determined in Australia where the largest volumes of wool are traded. South Africa, with its small clip, is therefore a market follower or price-taker. Wool auctions are characterised by many sellers and few buyers. Buyers normally have to compete for wool over a number of auctions to make up processing batches to meet their clients' contract specifications in terms of price, quantity and delivery date. Contracts in foreign currencies, such as the euro or the US dollar, have to be converted to buying limits in Rand and the buyer carries the risk. Cape Wools of South Africa promotes the interests of the South African wool industry. It is a nonprofit company established and owned by farmers and other directly affected industry groups registered with the Wool Forum, the official policy-making body of the industry. The Board of Directors proportionately represents these groups and is selected from the Forum. Cape Wools acts as the executive arm of the Forum and started operating on 1 September 1997. 65

The company has since been granted statutory measures for the collection of statistics for the wool industry, which enables it to create a wool statistics data bank from which a national market indicator and other information regarding the industry can be made available locally as well as internationally. Its service portfolio comprises market information and statistics, research and development, transfer of wool production, and promotion. Cape Wools is funded by the Wool Trust from funds having been transferred from the former Wool Board. Exports Wool is an export product with over 90% of total production exported in either greasy or semi-processed form (scoureds and wool top). The main export destination countries are Italy, France, Germany, the UK, South Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan. Prospects The 2003/04 season opened on a disappointing note both in terms of demand and price levels. There is concern about sluggish global economic growth and its effect on raw wool demand. Business sentiment among leading wool textile mills in Western Europe, Japan, Korea and Taiwan has deteriorated, with generally weaker orders experienced, while stocks have started to build up in some sectors. Throughout the second half of 2003, the stronger Rand exerted downward pressure on wool prices. As a result, the expectations for improved auction prices and trading level remain uncertain. Mohair Production South Africa produces around 60 % of the world mohair production. The Angora goat farmer plays a crucial role in enhancing through selective breeding and farming techniques, the constant availability of quality fibres. South Africa's production figures on mohair showed a downward trend from 5,0 million kg in 2001 to 4,2 million kg in 2002. This downward trend in production occurred in most mohair producing countries including the USA, Argentina and Australia. Production of mohair by South Africa during the period 1998 to 2002 is as follows: 1998 Year Million kg Production 5,0 4,5 4,3 4,2 4,2 1999 2000 2001 2002

Production and prices of mohair 1998­2002

5 500 5 000 '000 kg 4 500 4 000 3 500 1998 1999 2000 Year Production Price 2001 2002 60 50 40 30 20 R/kg

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Prices The average realisation of the South African clip improved quite substantially from R27,85/kg in 1998 to R56,34 /kg in 2002. During 2003, however, prices on average dropped to below R40/kg. This was the result of the improvement in the value of the South African currency, but also the lower demand for certain micron groups. Most of the clip is still traded as a commodity on open cry auctions. Because of the limited number of buyers at these auctions and a lack of effective competition, there has been a general fall in the volume of hair being channelled through these auctions. Average prices for mohair for the period 1998 to 2002 are as follows: 1998 Year R/kg Price Exports Mohair is in essence an export commodity for South Africa. As such it is susceptible to international economic, fashion and lifestyle trends. Because of this, the volume and the prices realised can vary substantially from year to year. During 1997, the total mohair exports reached an unsatisfactory level of 3,5 million kg. Within the next two years, exports increased to 7,5 million kg. During 2002 exports increased to 5,2 million kg from 4,4 million kg that were exported during 2001. Export figures for the period 1998 to 2002: 1998 Year Million kg Exports Prospects With the South African currency remaining strong throughout 2003, it is expected that prices paid for mohair will remain under pressure. Because of renewed interest by spinners, prospects for kid and young goat hair started to pick up towards the end of 2003. It is generally accepted that mohair as noble and versatile fibre will always be sought after by the high-end market for luxury products. To utilise this market will require complete dedication in terms of product quality and an innovative approach to product marketing. 4,9 7,5 5,6 4,4 5,2 1999 2000 2001 2002 27,85 39,46 52,28 44,55 56,34 1999 2000 2001 2002

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