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REPORT ON ASTM PHASE I ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENT HAMDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND SURROUNDING NEWHALL STREET NEIGHBORHOOD HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

by Haley & Aldrich, Inc. Glastonbury, Connecticut

for Town of Hamden Hamden, Connecticut

File No. 27892-400 January 2002 Revised December 2002

UNDERGROUND ENGINEERING & ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS

Haley & Aldrich, Inc. 800 Connecticut Blvd., Suite 100 East Hartford, CT 06108-7303 Tel: 860.282.9400 Fax: 860.282.9500 www.HaleyAldrich.com

20 November 2001 Revised 9 December 2002 File No. 27892-400

Town of Hamden 2372 Whitney Avenue Hamden, Connecticut 06518 Attention: Subject: Mr. Donald Proto ASTM Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Hamden Middle School and Surrounding Newhall Street Neighborhood Hamden, Connecticut

OFFICES

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Ladies and Gentlemen: This report presents the results of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (Phase I) conducted at the above referenced property. This work was performed by Haley & Aldrich, Inc. (Haley & Aldrich) in accordance with our proposal to Town of Hamden dated 2 July 2001 ("Agreement") as authorized by Town of Hamden on 17 August 2001. As indicated in our proposal, this Phase I was conducted using practices consistent with the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard Practice for Environmental Site Assessments: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Process. The goal of this Phase I assessment was to evaluate site history, existing observable conditions, current site use, and current and former uses of surrounding properties to identify the potential presence of "Recognized Environmental Conditions (RECs)" at the site, as defined in the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard. Our conclusions regarding the presence and potential impact of RECs on the subject site are intended to help the user evaluate the "business environmental risk" associated with the site, as defined in the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard and discussed in the Introduction section of this report.

Town of Hamden 20 November 2001 Revised 9 December 2002 Page 2 Thank you for the opportunity to perform these services for you. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or comments. Sincerely yours, HALEY & ALDRICH, INC.

Deborah Motycka Downie, LEP Senior Hydrogeologist

Chris G. Harriman, LEP Senior Environmental Geologist

William F. Kay, Jr., PE, Ph.D., LEP Vice President Enclosures

G:\PROJECTS\27892\400\Report\Ph I ESA FinalRev.doc

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Haley & Aldrich, Inc. has performed a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) of the Hamden Middle School and Surrounding Newhall Street Neighborhood properties in the Town of Hamden, Connecticut. The scope of work is described and conditioned by our proposal dated 2 July 2001. As indicated in our proposal, this Phase I was performed in conformance with the scope and limitations of the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate site history, existing observable conditions, current site use, and current and historic uses of surrounding properties to identify the potential presence of Recognized Environmental Conditions (RECs) in connection with the subject site. Exceptions to, or deletions from, this practice are described in Section I of this report. Our conclusions are intended to help the user evaluate the "business environmental risk" associated with the site, as defined in the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard and discussed in the Introduction section of this report. The subject site is composed of 131 separate properties that have been separated into seven Parcels as shown on Figure 2. One of the Parcels (Parcel 4) is composed of six Town-owned properties, including the Hamden Middle School, Hamden Community Center, Newhall Street Athletic Fields, Rochford Field (baseball fields), Mill Rock Park (Rochford Field Annex), and a sewer pump station. The other six Parcels are comprised of residential properties with single or multi-family homes. RECOGNIZED ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS The goal of the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard practice is to identify Recognized Environmental Conditions (RECs), as defined in the Standard and in Section I of this report. This assessment has revealed no evidence of recognized environmental conditions currently in connection with the property except for the following four RECs listed below. The ASTM E 1527-00 Standard requires an opinion of the potential impacts of REC(s) identified on a site during a Phase I. Our opinion is rendered with respect to a REC's potential (high, medium or low) to require remedial response based on prevailing agency requirements and on our understanding of the sensitive nature of the property use (School, daycare, residential use and Municipal Park or athletic fields). Our opinion is limited by the conditions prevailing at the time our work is performed and the applicable regulatory requirements in effect. During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich identified several RECs associated with the subject site. Our opinion of the potential impacts of REC(s) identified in this Phase I is as follows: REC #1: Former landfill areas that existed on the site during the period from the 1920s through the mid 1950s. Potential Impact: High Explanation: Based on the results of the ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of historic landfills on the subject site. Former industrial waste landfills were located at the site of the Hamden Middle School and associated Newhall Street Athletic Field, and at the site of Rochford Field and may occur on abutting properties to the south. Haley & Aldrich

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encountered evidence that residential refuse waste and unauthorized dumping also occurred in, or immediately adjacent to, this area. Refer to Sections 4.01(A) and 4.01(K) for further details. The area of Mill Rock Park, Bryden Terrace, and the sewer pumping station was reportedly used for dumping of residential rubbish. The area of dumping may have extended southerly to include some or all of Parcels 2A and 2C. Haley & Aldrich also encountered evidence of a private automotive dump in the western portion of Parcel 1. The landfills, or portions of the landfills, apparently operated during the period from the 1920s through the mid 1950s. REC #2: Historic fill that may have included ash, cinders, industrial and residential waste. Potential Impact: High. Explanation: Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of historic, waste-containing fill materials, containing, ash, cinders, and solid waste debris in portions of Parcel 3 and Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) has identified residential properties in Parcels 2B and 2D as being constructed over filled areas. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation that these areas were used as landfills. It is not certain whether the placement of the fill was authorized or consisted of uncontrolled dumping by unauthorized persons or facilities. The impacted materials may have resulted from placement of industrial or residential waste from off-site areas, landowner dumping or on-site burning or a combination of sources. However, it is also possible that historic landfilling activities at Rochford Field extended into Parcel 2B, historic landfilling activities at the current Middle School site extended into the southern portion of Parcel 3, or, that a landfill existed on the northern or western portions of Parcel 3 prior to the 1920s. HISTORICAL RECs AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION The ASTM E 1527-00 Standard also requires that historical RECs (HRECs) and other known or suspect environmental conditions, as defined in the Standard and in Section I of this report are identified in the Phase I. Historic RECs HREC #1: A former 10,000-gallon, steel underground storage tank at the Hamden Middle School was reportedly removed in 1989. Haley & Aldrich encountered a 1987 spill report regarding an overfill of the UST. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter other reports or documentation of the UST removal or results of testing of environmental quality of soils in the UST excavation. The existing 10,000-gallon UST was reportedly installed at the location of the former tank. The existing tank has not been tightness tested, and has not exceeded the standard 30-year life expectancy for fiberglass tanks. Haley & Aldrich conducted Phase II subsurface explorations and chemical testing of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of the existing and former USTs. The UST evaluation was documented in a 5 November 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden Connecticut." Results of the Haley & Aldrich assessment, and previous testing by others, detected Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) at or near the water table on the west side of the school, adjacent to, and in the vicinity of the UST. The source of the petroleum, however, appeared to be related to former landfilling activities as Haley & Aldrich did not detect evidence of releases from the existing or former USTs.

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HREC #2: A former 6,000-gallon, steel UST was removed from the Hamden Community Center in 1989. According to a Town employee that witnessed the UST excavation and removal in 1989, there was no visible evidence of oily soils or leakage from the UST. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation of the removal or results of soil testing from the UST excavation. Haley & Aldrich conducted Phase II subsurface explorations and chemical testing of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of the existing and former USTs. The UST evaluation was documented in a 5 November 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden Connecticut." Results of the assessment did not detect evidence of releases from the existing or former USTs at the Hamden Community Center. Additional Information A. Historic Fill in the Site Vicinity During the ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of areas of debris or ashcontaining fill in the Newhall Neighborhood at locations within and outside the Phase I study area (refer to Figure 4). The potential presence of fill materials at locations outside of the site was identified based on information on file at CTDEP, information obtained during the discovery phase of the Order SRD-128 proceeding from Olin Corporation, CTDEP, the South Central Regional Water Authority, , the Town of Hamden Town Hall, the Miller Library, the Quinnipiack Valley Health District (QVHD), and the results of surveys or questionnaires completed by area residents. Historic areas of filling are common throughout Connecticut, especially in urban areas. The presence of fill is not necessarily an environmental concern. Many current and historic building projects included placement of sand, gravel or other types of "clean fill," including fill containing stone, concrete or asphalt pieces. The placement of fill materials that include contaminated debris could cause environmental problems. These areas are discussed further in Sections 6.03 and 7.03 of the report. B. Structural Settling of Residences Results of a review of regulatory documents, neighborhood surveys and discussions with residents and town employees revealed indications of structural settling problems on properties in Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 as well as several adjacent areas (refer to Figure 2). The settlement of the homes may be related to the compression and ongoing breakdown of landfilled materials or the organic degradation of former wetland soils or sediments that may underlie many locations in the area. DEP has undertaken an evaluation of these residences with Haley & Aldrich and Dewberry-Goodkind, Inc. The results of these investigations are likely to be set forth in reports to DEP and are beyond the scope of this Phase I ESA. PROPOSED REVISIONS TO LIMITS OF STUDY AREA Based on the information reviewed by Haley & Aldrich and documented in this Report, we recommend that the study area be revised as shown on Figure 8 and discussed below. Our information indicates that a zone of fill materials, contiguous to the study area fill material, may extend to the east, south and west, along former wetland corridors.

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Approximate former wetland areas are shown on 1973 and 1993 maps included in Appendix C and on Figures 3 and 4. The mere presence of fill material does not in itself constitute an environmental concern. During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered some evidence of fill placement beyond, and contiguous to the study area, including: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ Referenced 1970's documentation of the placement of up to 15 ft. of industrial and residential waste in the area surrounding Edwards Street (Appendix C, 322), information regarding former public refuse dumps on Shelton and Newhall Streets, south of the site, and on Morse and Columbus Street, west of the site (322, 332, 341, 342), information regarding the presence of fill material on the Southern New England Telephone (SNET) Company property to the west of the site (463), and, information from interviews with former area residents and other information compiled by the CTDEP (463, 477, 478) [Numbers in parentheses refer to attached References]

However, Haley & Aldrich did not encounter direct evidence of contamination in these expanded study areas. Specifically, we believe that study area limits should be extended to include the following areas as shown on Figure 8: ¾ ¾ Properties contained within the blocks bounded by Morse Street, Shelton Avenue, Marlboro Street, Butler Street, Goodrich Street, and St. Mary Street. Historic data indicates that up to 15 ft. of industrial and residential waste fill may have been placed in the first area listed above surrounding Edwards Street (322). Additionally, a historic public refuse dump, former WRA "coke lot" and former City of New Haven asphalt disposal area were reportedly located on Shelton Avenue between Marlboro and Goodrich Streets. Properties contained within the block bounded by Mill Rock Road, Prospect Street, Bryden Terrace, and Wadsworth Street, and along the eastern side of Wadsworth Street, between Bryden Terrace and Morse Street. Properties contained with the block bounded by Morse Street, North Sheffield Street, Goodrich Street, Homeland Terrace, and Prospect Lane, and along the west side of North Sheffield Street. Properties located on the east side of Winchester Avenue. No historic documentation was encountered during the research for this assessment related to actual placement of fill materials in these three areas, listed above, but the data does indicate that these areas may have been part of the former wetlands or associated low lying area. Additionally, information encountered by Haley & Aldrich during a review of CTDEP files, interview transcripts, and telephone logs, included reports of debris or fill material in these areas (463, 477, 478). If fill materials do exist in these areas it is anticipated that the thickness will be less than in the area surrounding Edwards Street.

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Properties located approximately north of the intersection of St Mary Street and Morse Street and east of Columbus Street.

A former pond/wetland was once reportedly located on or near the southern portion of the SNET property (322) and an environmental consultant retained by SNET has also reported encountering ash fill and debris in widespread explorations in that area (463). The fill may be related to a historic public refuse dump located on the east side of Columbus Street, north of Morse Street during the late 1930s and 1940s (362). The specific nature of the fill material encountered on the SNET property is not certain, as such, it is not known if it is similar to the materials encountered at the adjacent Newhall Street Field. In addition to the potential areas of contiguous fill, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of other, localized, non-contiguous area that may have been filled. These include portions of Parcels 3 and 2D and other areas south of the site. Previous filling in Parcel 3 may have been localized and not part of the contiguous wetland filled area south of Mill Rock Road. Historic information reviewed by Haley & Aldrich including aerial photographs and health department records (28, 308) indicate that this filling may have been at isolated locations and occurred primarily west of Remington Street and North of Augur Street. Haley & Aldrich also encountered reports of historic filling, including ash, "coke" and residential rubbish at locations on the east and west sides of Newhall Street, west of Winchester Avenue, south of Morse Street and east of Shelton Avenue/Butler Street, including Parcel 2D. Historic maps showing the limits of wetland and historic aerial photographs appear to indicate that the fill material encountered at these locations may not be part of the contiguous wetland filled area but rather areas of local isolated fill. A 1993 map, reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, suggests that much of this filling may be associated with "waste materials of the Winchester Gun Plant" (322). However, Hamden Board of Health records and newspaper articles from the 1930s also reference a public refuse dump on Newhall Street between Goodrich and Marlboro Streets (341). SUMMARY In summary, Recognized Environmental Conditions were identified during this assessment. Previous environmental evaluations of the site have included several soil exploration, soil vapor surveys, and surficial soil sampling programs to evaluate the nature of historic landfilled materials on the subject site. The majority of these subsurface investigations to date have concentrated on shallow soils. During 2002, investigations of deeper soils and groundwater were performed by certain of the various parties identified in Order SRD-128 and the DEP. The results of the investigations and work performed by or on behalf of the Town of Hamden by Haley & Aldrich, are summarized in the following list of reports: ¾ ¾ ¾ Oversight of U.S. EPA Remedial Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut, 6 November 2002 Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden, Connecticut, 5 November 2002 Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut, 9 December 2002

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Oversight of Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc., Malcolm Pirnie and GZA GeoEnvironmental Investigation Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut, 9 December 2002 Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut , 9 December 2002

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The remainder of this report contains additional information regarding the Phase I work performed, the resulting findings summarized above, and limitations affecting this report.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF ACRONYMS I. INTRODUCTION 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 II. Purpose1 Site Identification Scope of Services Non-Scope Considerations Exceptions and Deviations A. Deviations Limitations i x x xi 1 1 2 3 3 3 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 8 9 9 9 10 11 13 16 18 21 22 23 24 26 26 26 26 33 44

SITE DESCRIPTION 2.01 2.02 Site Ownership and Location A. Site Locus Map Site and Vicinity Description A. General B. Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 C. Parcel 4 Physical Setting A. Topography B. Geologic Information C. Ground Water and Surface Water Information D. Prevailing Regulatory Conditions and Implications for Groundwater and Surface Water

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III. PREVIOUS REPORTS, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS AND REMEDIAL ACTIONS 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 IV. USEPA and Subcontractors HRP Associates, Inc. Facility Support Services Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Subcontractors Metcalf & Eddy, Inc. Indoor Air Quality Testing Health Risk Assessments

SITE HISTORY 4.01 Past Usage of the Site and Adjacent Properties A. General B. Site Area History and Development C. Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Athletic Field D. Rochford Field

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TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont'd) Page E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. V. Hamden Community Center Mill Rock Park Sewer Pump Station Historical Topographic and Property Maps and Atlases Sanborn Maps Photographs City Directories Historic Use of Properties Adjacent to, and In the Site Vicinity Winchester Company Operations in the Pine Swamp, US Repeating Arms Facility and Other Area Properties 47 49 51 51 53 55 61 61 64 70 70 70 70 72 72 72 72 73 75 76 76 77 77 82 82 82 83 91 93 94 95 95 95 97 98 98 98 99

ENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS REVIEW 5.01 Standard Environmental Records Review A. NPL Sites B. CERCLIS Sites C. Federal ERNS List D. RCRA non-CORRACTS TSD Facilities E. RCRA CORRACTS TSD Facilities F. RCRA Generators G. State Sites and State Spill Sites H. Registered Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) I. State Landfills and Solid Waste Disposal Sites J. State Leaking Underground Storage Tanks Additional Environmental Records Review A. Quinnipiack Valley Health District B. Fire Department C. Tax Assessor's Office File Review D. Engineering Department, Building Department, Planning and Zoning Department, Hamden Board of Education File Review E. CTDEP File Review F. United States Environmental Protection Agency G. User-Provided Information

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SITE RECONNAISSANCE AND KEY PERSONAL INTERVIEW(S) 6.01 6.02 General 94 Site Visit Observations ­ Parcel 4 A. General B. Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Field C. Hamden Community Center D. Sewer Pump Station E. Rochford Field F. Mill Rock Park Results of Environmental Surveys and Interviews in the Newhall Neighborhood

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TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont'd) Page VII. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 VIII. Recognized Environmental Conditions Historical Recognized Environmental Conditions and Recommendations for Additional Studies and Investigations Additional Information A. Historic Filling Operations in the Site Vicinity B. Structural Settling of Residences Proposed Revisions to Limits of Study Area Summary 101 101 102 103 103 104 104 106 107 108

CREDENTIALS

REFERENCES

FIGURES APPENDIX A ­ Haley & Aldrich Proposal dated 1 August 2001 APPENDIX B ­ Parcel Reports and Tax Assessor Field Cards (Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3) APPENDIX C ­ Select Historical and Municipal Research Documentation APPENDIX D ­ Database Search Report and Regulatory Records Documentation APPENDIX E ­ Site Photographs APPENDIX F ­ Chronology of Site Development, Significant Events and Previous Environmental Assessments APPENDIX G ­ Additional Exploration Location Plans and Exploration Logs APPENDIX H ­ Haley & Aldrich Survey Questionnaires to Newhall Neighborhood Residents

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LIST OF TABLES Table No. I II Title Summary of Property Owners and Addresses: Parcels 1 through 4 Summary of Debris Questionnaires and Neighborhood Surveys, Newhall Neighborhood

LIST OF FIGURES Figure No. 1 2 3A 3B 4 5 6 7 8 9 Title Site Locus Site Plan Subsurface Exploration Plan Subsurface Explorations Greater than 4 Feet Deep Historic Site Plan Development History 1934 Aerial Photograph 1998 Aerial Photograph Properties Potentially Within Limits of Contiguous Historic Fill Areas of Reported Filling or Dumping

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LIST OF ACRONYMS AOCs: Areas of concern ASTM: American Society of Testing and Materials ATSDR: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Brooks: Brooks Safe and Sound CDM: CDM Federal Programs Corporation CERCLA: Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Act CORRACTS: Corrective Action Report CTDEP: Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection DPH: Connecticut Department of Public Health ECAF: Environmental Condition Assessment Form ECG: Environmental Consulting Group ERI: University of Connecticut Environmental Research Institute ERNS Emergency Response Notification System ESA: Environmental Site Assessment ETPH: Extractable Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons FIRM: Flood Insurance Rate Map FOIA: Freedom of Information Act FSS: Facility Support Services HREC: Historical Recognized Environmental Condition HRP: HRP Associates, Inc. IT: IT Corporation LBG: Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc LEP: Licensed Environmental Professional LUST: Leaking Underground Storage Tank M&E: Metcalf & Eddy Mg/kg: milligrams per kilogram Mg/l: milligrams per liter MP: Malcolm Pirnie Ug/kg: micrograms per kilogram Ug/l: micrograms per liter NFRAP: No Further Remedial Action Planned NGVD: National Geodetic Vertical Datum NHW: New Haven Water Company NPL: National Priorities List NUS: NUS Corporation ORCS: Occupational Risk Control Services PA/SI: Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation PA: Preliminary Assessment PAHs: Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons PCBs: Polychlorinated biphenyls Phase I: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment PMC: Pollutant Mobility Criteria PPM: Parts per million QVHD: Quinnipiack Valley Health District

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LIST OF ACRONYMS (cont'd) RCRA: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RDEC: Residential Direct Exposure Criteria REAC: Lockeed Martin REAC REC: Recognized Environmental Condition RSR: Remediation Standard Regulation SCCRWA: South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority SIP: Site Inspection Prioritization SVOCs: Semivolatile organic compounds SNET: Southern New England Telephone Company SPLP: Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure START: Superfund Technical Assessment and Response Team TCLP: Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure TPH: Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons TSD: Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facility UI: United Illuminating Company USEPA: United States Environmental Protection Agency USGS: United States Geological Survey UST: Underground storage tank VOCs: Volatile organic compounds Weston: Roy F. Weston, Inc. WRA: Winchester Repeating Arms Company XRF: X-ray fluorescence

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I. 1.01

INTRODUCTION Purpose

This Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) was performed in conformance with the scope and limitations of the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate site history, existing observable conditions, current site use, and current and historic uses of surrounding properties to identify the potential presence of Recognized Environmental Conditions (RECs) in connection with the subject site. RECs are defined by ASTM as "the presence or likely presence of any hazardous substances or petroleum products on a property under conditions that indicate an existing release, a past release, or a material threat of a release of any hazardous substances or petroleum products into structures on a property or into the ground, groundwater, or surface water of the property. The term includes hazardous substances or petroleum products even under conditions in compliance with laws. The term is not intended to include de minimis conditions that generally do not present a material risk of harm to public health or the environment and that generally would not be the subject of an enforcement action if brought to the attention of appropriate governmental agencies. Conditions determined to be de minimis are not recognized environmental conditions." In addition, the Standard requires that historical RECs (HRECs) and known or suspect environmental conditions be identified in the Phase I report. The standard defines HRECs as environmental conditions "which in the past would have been considered a recognized environmental condition, but which may or may not be considered a recognized environmental condition currently." The term "additional information" is not specifically defined in the standard, but is used by Haley & Aldrich to highlight environmentally-related information that is not anticipated to adversely affect the subject site and/or does not rise to the level of an REC. Our conclusions are intended to help the user evaluate the "business environmental risk" associated with the site, defined by ASTM as "a risk which can have a material environmental or environmentally-driven financial impact on the business associated with the current or planned use of a parcel of commercial real estate. Consideration of business environmental risk issues may involve addressing one or more non-scope considerations." 1.02 Site Identification

The subject studied site includes 131 individual properties located along Newhall, Augur, Remington, Harris, Newbury, Wadsworth, Morse and Marlboro Streets, Mill Rock Road, Mill Rock Extension, Bryden Terrace and Winchester Avenue in the Town of Hamden, Connecticut (Figure 1, Site Locus). However, DEP has retained the authority to add additional properties to the Site at its discretion. For purposes of this assessment, the site properties have been organized into seven parcels designated as Parcels 1, 2, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 3, and 4. Parcel locations, which are shown on Figure 2, are consistent with those used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Table I summarizes the address, use and current owner of properties included in each of the seven parcels. Generally, Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 include 125 residential lots, most of which contain single or multifamily residences. Parcel 4 includes six properties owned and operated by the Town of Hamden.

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1.03

Scope of Services

In accordance with our 2 July 2001 proposal, Haley & Aldrich performed an ASTM Phase I ESA on the six town-owned properties in Parcel 4. Specifically, Haley & Aldrich performed the following work items for the properties in Parcel 4: 1. Visual observations of site conditions, and of abutting property use, to evaluate the nature and type of activities that have been or are being conducted at and adjacent to the site, in terms of the potential for release or threat of release of hazardous substances or petroleum products. Review of federal and state environmental database information within the ASTMspecified radii from the subject property using a database service to access records. Use of 7.5-minute topographic maps to evaluate the site's physical setting. Review of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) files, historic newspaper articles, information obtained during the discovery phase of the Order SRD-128 proceeding from Olin Corporation, CTDEP, and the South Central Regional Water Authority, , pertaining to the subject site and nearby sites with the potential to impact the subject site. Review of previous reports prepared for the subject site. Review of the following sources of historical use information: Sanborn Fire Insurance maps, City Directories and aerial photographs, historical atlases and topographic maps and historic information on file at the Town of Hamden Miller Library and Town Hall. Contacts with State and local municipal agencies regarding the site and surrounding properties and structures. Interviews with Town employees, property tenant representatives and persons familiar with the site use and history. Interpretation of information and data assembled as a result of the above work tasks, and formulation of conclusions regarding the potential presence and impact of potential areas of concern (AOCs) or RECs as defined by the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard.

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Haley & Aldrich conducted a modified Phase I assessment, consisting of historical research, data reviews, and site observations from public thoroughfares, on the 125 residential parcels (Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3). The modified Phase I work scope included the following: 1. Visual observations of site conditions, and of abutting property use from public thoroughfares, to evaluate the nature and type of activities that have been or are being conducted at and adjacent to the site, in terms of the potential for release or threat of release of hazardous substances or petroleum products.

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Review of federal and state environmental database information within the ASTMspecified radii from the subject property using a database service to access records. Use of 7.5-minute topographic maps to evaluate the site's physical setting. Review of CTDEP and Quinnipiack Valley Health District (QVHD) files pertaining to the subject properties. Review of the following sources of historical use information: Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, City Directories, aerial photographs. Contacts with State and local municipal agencies and selected site residents regarding the site and surrounding properties and structures. Survey of residents of the Newhall Neighborhood regarding the presence of solid waste or other debris or other environmental concerns on site or area properties. Conduct follow-up interviews of selected owners or occupants at properties where solid waste fill or structural settling was reported. Interpretation of information and data assembled as a result of the above work tasks, and formulation of conclusions regarding the potential presence and impact of potential AOCs or RECs as defined by the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard. Non-Scope Considerations

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The ASTM E 1527-00 Standard includes the following list of "additional issues" that are nonscope considerations outside of the scope of the ASTM Phase I practice: Asbestos-Containing Materials, Radon, Lead-Based Paint, Lead in Drinking Water, Wetlands, Regulatory Compliance, Cultural and Historic Risks, Industrial Hygiene, Health and Safety, Ecological Resources, Endangered Species, Indoor Air Quality, Toxic Mold and High Voltage Powerlines. These items were not included in our assessment of the property. A limited assessment of the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is included in the ASTM work scope. Accordingly, our assessment of the presence of PCBs is limited to those potential sources specified in the ASTM Standard as "electrical or hydraulic equipment known or likely to contain PCBs....to the extent visually and or physically observed or identified from the interview or records review." 1.05 A. Exceptions and Deviations Deviations Haley & Aldrich completed the Phase I ESA of Parcel 4 in substantial conformance with the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard. In our opinion there were no exceptions, additions made to or deviations and deletions made from the ASTM work scope in completing the Parcel 4 Phase I. In accordance with our 2 July 2001 Agreement with the Town of Hamden, Haley & Aldrich conducted limited Phase I ESAs of Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3. The limited Phase I ESAs conducted on these Parcels were intended to be used for preliminary, screening purposes and as such, the work scope did not include the full scope as described in the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard.

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Deviations to the ASTM Phase I work scope included the following: ¾ Haley & Aldrich did not visit each one of the 131 residential properties on Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3. During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich viewed the properties from public thoroughfares and visited selected residences. Haley & Aldrich did not interview all of the tenants or owners of the residential properties on Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3. During the ESA, Haley & Aldrich interviewed approximately 40 tenants or homeowners.

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1.06

Limitations

Our work for this project was performed generally consistent with the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard for Phase I Environmental Site Assessments. Several organizations other than ASTM, such as professional associations (e.g. ASFE and AGWSE) have also developed "guidelines" or "standards" for environmental site assessments. The Phase I presented herein is consistent with the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard, which may vary from the specific "guidelines" or "standards" required by other organizations. This Report was prepared pursuant to an Agreement dated 1 August 2001 between Town of Hamden and Haley & Aldrich, which Agreement is attached hereto and is made a part of this Report. All uses of this Report are subject to, and deemed acceptance of, the conditions and restrictions contained in the Agreement. The observations and conclusions described in this Report are based solely on the Scope of Services provided pursuant to the Agreement. Haley & Aldrich has not performed any additional observations, investigations, studies or other testing not specified in the Agreement. Haley & Aldrich shall not be liable for the existence of any condition the discovery of which would have required the performance of services not authorized under the Agreement. This Report is prepared for the exclusive use of the Town of Hamden and its counsel in connection with environmental assessment of site properties. There are no intended beneficiaries other than the Town of Hamden and its counsel. Haley & Aldrich shall owe no duty whatsoever to any other person or entity on account of the Agreement or the Report. Use of this Report by any person or entity other than Town of Hamden and its counsel for any purpose whatsoever is expressly forbidden unless such other person or entity obtains written authorization from the Town of Hamden and from Haley & Aldrich. Use of this Report by such other person or entity without the written authorization of the Town of Hamden and Haley & Aldrich shall be at such other person's or entity's sole risk, and shall be without legal exposure or liability to Haley & Aldrich. Use of this Report by any person or entity, including by the Town of Hamden and its counsel, for a purpose other than for the environmental assessment of the subject properties is expressly prohibited unless such person or entity obtains written authorization from Haley & Aldrich indicating that the Report is adequate for such other use. Use of this Report by any person or entity for such other purpose without written authorization by Haley & Aldrich shall be at such person's or entity's sole risk and shall be without legal exposure or liability to Haley & Aldrich.

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This report reflects site conditions observed and described by records available to Haley & Aldrich as of the date of report preparation. The passage of time may result in significant changes in site conditions, technology, or economic conditions, which could alter the findings and/or recommendations of the report. Accordingly, the Town of Hamden and any other party to whom the report is provided recognize and agree that Haley & Aldrich shall bear no liability for deviations from observed conditions or available records after the time of report preparation. Use of this Report by any person or entity in violation of the restrictions expressed in this Report shall be deemed and accepted by the user as conclusive evidence that such use and the reliance placed on this Report, or any portions thereof, is unreasonable, and that the user accepts full and exclusive responsibility and liability for any losses, damages or other liability which may result.

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II. 2.01

SITE DESCRIPTION Site Ownership and Location

The subject site consists of 131 separate properties. Table I includes a listing of the subject properties and current property owners. For the six properties owned by the Town of Hamden (Parcel 4), the table also includes the name of the tenant or use of the property. A. Site Locus Map The site is located in the Town of Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic map for the site is the New Haven, Connecticut Quadrangle, dated 1967, photorevised in 1984 (see Figure 1). The USGS topographic map was used as the source for site setting information. 2.02 A. Site and Vicinity Description General The subject site includes 131 separate properties, which have been combined into seven parcels (1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 3, and 4). Figure 2 is a Study Area Site Plan of the subject property, showing the Parcel locations and including relevant site and immediately adjoining property features. The subject site is serviced by a public water transmission system operated by the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority (SCCRWA). The Town of Hamden provides public sewers to the area. United Illuminating Company (UI) provides electric service and The Southern Connecticut Gas Company provides natural gas. The area in the vicinity of the subject site is primarily residential although some commercial businesses and industrial facilities are located to the south and west. The Southern New England Telephone Company (SNET) service garage and training facility is located immediately to the west. The Hamden Industrial Park is located to the north/northwest. Water Company properties and residential neighborhoods are located to the north. SCCRWA operates two large water storage tanks to the north of Mill Rock Road, located immediately north of the site. B. Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 are zoned for residential use (R-4 or R-5) and consist primarily of single and multi-family residential properties (302) [Numbers in parentheses refer to attached References]. Information relative to the use, abutters, and history of Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3 is included in Appendix B of this report. The residences in Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3 use public water and sewer systems. Natural gas is available throughout some of the site area. Site residences are heated with oil, gas, or electricity.

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Some buildings were rebuilt at the same location as former structures, some may have been built on existing foundations. A number of these are in Parcel 3 and associated with building destruction as a result of the 1989 tornado. C. Parcel 4 Parcel 4 includes properties owned by the Town of Hamden including the Hamden Middle School and adjacent athletic fields (known as Newhall Street Field), the Hamden Community Center, which includes classrooms and a daycare center, Mill Rock Park, Rochford Field and a sewer pump station. The Town acquired the original Newhall Street School property from People's Bank and Trust on 13 July 1917, and lands to the north for the school addition from the New Haven Water Company (NHW) on 10 December 1924 (516). The Town acquired the Rochford Field property from John M. Morse and Dorothy H. Morse Struck on 28 September 1936 (517) and the Rochford Field Annex property from Thomas and Inez Cleary on 11 September 1939 (514). On 11 November 1947 the Town acquired the eastern portion of the Middle School property from NHW. The western portion of the Middle School property was first acquired by the Town from NHW on 29 March 1950 and transferred to the State of Connecticut the next day. The State returned the parcel to the Town of Hamden on 24 February 1954 (518). The Town-owned properties are zoned R-4 or R-5 (302). Property addresses or locations are shown on Table I. 1. The Hamden Middle School The Hamden Middle School, located at 550-560 Newhall Street, consists of four interconnected brick and steel school buildings constructed in 1956 (302). Portions of the school site not covered with buildings consist of asphalt driveways and parking areas, tennis courts, lawns and areas landscaped with wood chips or trees. The Newhall Street Field includes several soccer fields located immediately west of the Middle School. The Middle School buildings are heated with an oil-fired system; the heating system can also use natural gas. Fuel oil is stored in a 10,000-gallon underground storage tank (UST) which is located outside to the west of the main school building (Figure 2). 2. The Hamden Community Center The Hamden Community Center, located at 496 Newhall Street, includes two interconnected brick buildings, which are used as a community center, overflow classroom space for approximately 100 students from Hamden Middle School and as a daycare facility. Portions of the property not covered by building include paved parking lots and driveways to the north and west of the buildings and concrete walkways and grassy areas to the south and east. The southern portion of the Hamden Community Center was constructed in 1917; the northern portion was added in 1951 (302). The site buildings are heated with an oil-fired system. Heating oil is stored in a 6,000 gallon UST located on the east side of the building, near the Newhall Street entrance (Figure 2).

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3.

Rochford Field Rochford Field is a municipal recreational area located in the block between Newhall Street, Newbury Street, Winchester Avenue, and Mill Rock Road. The property, which was developed in the 1930s (33), includes two baseball fields, dugouts, backstops, and bleachers.

4.

Mill Rock Park (Rochford Field Annex) Mill Rock Park (also known as the Rochford Field Annex), which is located on the south side of Mill Rock Road between Winchester Avenue and Wadsworth Street, was developed in 1941 (36). The Park includes a large grassy area, a smaller asphalt-paved area (in the western end of the Park), benches, a playground, tennis courts and a basketball court.

5.

Sewer Pump Station The sewage pump station is a small, one-story brick structure located at the southeast corner of the intersection of Mill Rock Road and Winchester Avenue. The building, which was constructed in 1952 (366), is situated in the middle of a grass-covered lot, surrounded by a chain link fence.

6.

Parcel 4 Boundaries Parcel 4 is irregularly shaped and disconnected as shown on Figure 2. Generally, the Parcel is bordered as follows: North and Northwest: By the Hamden Industrial Park, SCCRWA watershed property, a residential neighborhood (Parcel 3) and Mill Rock Road and Mill Rock Extension to the north. SCCRWA water storage tanks, Mill Rock and residential properties are located to the north of Mill Rock Road. West: By the SNET garage and service facility and residential homes on Morse Street (Parcel 1). South: Morse Street, Newbury Street, residential properties on Morse Street (Parcel 1), and residential properties on Bryden Terrace (Parcel 2A), border the southern side of the site. Parcels 2A, 2B, and 2C also border Parcel 4 to the southeast. Residential properties are located on the south side of Newbury Street (Parcel 2B) and a mixture of commercial, residential and industrial properties are located south of Morse Street. East: By Wadsworth Street and portions of Winchester and Newhall Streets.

2.03

Physical Setting

Subsurface explorations were not performed for this evaluation; therefore site geology and hydrology were evaluated on the basis of readily-available public information or references, test pit or well logs from previous explorations conducted on the site and/or based upon our experience and understanding of subsurface conditions in the Hamden area.

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A.

Topography Topographically, the site is generally flat and ground surface elevations range from about EL 40 to 50 ft. (referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum [NGVD] of 1929) (94).

B.

Geologic Information A review of the Surficial Geology Map of Connecticut (314) indicates that natural soils in the site vicinity are generally composed of glacial outwash and alluvial deposits, primarily sand and gravel overlying fine grained sediments. Adjacent areas of higher elevations, including Mill Rock to the north and to the east, are underlain by shallow glacial till deposits. Based on a review of published information and previous site explorations, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence that a significant portion of the site was formerly wetlands which were subsequently filled with residential and industrial waste, ash and cinders or sandy fill material. Previous explorations have encountered up to 26 ft. of fill materials in the western portion of Parcel 4 (140,141,182, 304). Fill deposits in borings at the Middle School and Newhall Field sites, were underlain by peat or organic silts (wetland sediments) (182). Figures 3 and 4 show the limits of the wetlands in 1934. Bedrock beneath the site and area is mapped as the New Haven Arkose, a reddish-gray sand and siltstone. Mill Rock is underlain by the West Rock Dolerite (traprock), an igneous, intrusive rock (315).

C.

Ground Water and Surface Water Information Based on surface topography, surface water at the site appears to flow northeasterly or northerly on the western side of the site and northwesterly on the eastern portion of the site. Also based on topography, groundwater flow in the site area anticipated to be generally to the north towards the Pine Swamp and an associated tributary located immediately north of Parcel 4. Due to the history of former wetlands and filling on the site, localized flow variations are likely. During 2002, groundwater investigations were begun by Haley & Aldrich and LBG on the public properties. Haley & Aldrich has reported its results in the "Report on Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002). According to the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for the site, the subject site is not located within a floodplain. The site is serviced by the SCCRWA, which provides potable water to the Town of Hamden. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter evidence of groundwater monitoring or pumping wells on the site. According to SCCRWA, potable water for the site is obtained from the Lake Gaillard Reservoir in North Branford. Prior to use, the water is stored in the Mill Rock Basins Storage Facility on Blake Road, in Hamden (302,304,308). According to published data, the site and surrounding properties are located in the local watershed of Lake Whitney, a former water supply reservoir, which is approximately 4,000 ft. to the northeast and east of the site. SCCRWA plans to put Lake Whitney back into service as a water supply as early as 2004 (304, 392).

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D.

Prevailing Regulatory Conditions and Implications for Groundwater and Surface Water Connecticut's environmental regulations pertaining to site contamination are primarily intended to safeguard human health and the environment through the protection and enhancement of the State's water resources. Surface waters and groundwaters are classified and regulated by the CTDEP according to a system that recognizes the impacts of current and historic land use practices, potential future water resource needs, and a general policy to maintain or improve water quality. Groundwater beneath the site is regulated as "GAA, impaired" by the CTDEP (316). "GAA" areas are regulated for use or potential use as a public drinking water supply. The "GAA, impaired" designation indicates that the area may not be currently meeting the "GAA" standards. The site is located within the watershed of Lake Whitney, a former and potential future water supply reservoir. Public or private water supply wells are not located on or near the site. The subject sites are located within the Mill River Drainage Basin, within the larger South Central Coast Major Basin Drainage Area. The Mill River flows southerly, through Lake Whitney, approximately 4,000 ft. east and northeast of the site. Pine Swamp, which drains into Lake Whitney, is located immediately north of the site. Based on a review of historic New Haven Water Company maps and a 1934 aerial photograph (28, 322, 323), an unnamed tributary to the Mill River formerly flowed through the site, into Pine Swamp (see Figure 4). The tributary and associated wetland areas on the site were filled in the early to mid 1900s. The Mill River continues southerly of Lake Whitney, discharging into New Haven Harbor approximately five miles south of the site. The Harbor discharges into Long Island Sound. The Mill River and Pine Swamp, in the vicinity of the site, have been classified as "AA" resources (316). This designation indicates that CTDEP regulates the surface water body for potential use as a public drinking water supply. Lake Whitney has been classified as "B/AA". This designation indicates that current quality of the water body ("B", suitable for bathing and other recreational uses, agricultural uses, certain industrial uses and as a wildlife habitat) and the CTDEP goal ("AA", restoration of surface water quality for potential use as a public drinking water supply.) The unnamed tributary located on SCCRWA property, north of the site, has not been individually classified, as such, it is considered to be an "A" water body. Class "A" water bodies are regulated for potential use as a water supply without prior treatment. Historic land use and industrial activities have reportedly resulted in environmental impacts to the Pine Swamp and remedial investigations and activities have been conducted in the area north of the site.

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III.

PREVIOUS REPORTS, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS AND REMEDIAL ACTIONS

The site has been the subject of a number of previous environmental evaluation and interim remedial activities conducted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and their subcontractors, NUS Corporation (NUS), Roy F. Weston, Inc., CDM Federal Programs Corporation (CDM) and IT Corporation (IT). Several other consultants have also conducted environmental evaluations of the property under direction from the Town of Hamden or CTDEP (HRP Associates, Inc. [HRP], Facility Support Services [FSS], Metcalf & Eddy [M&E] and GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. [GZA]). CTDEP has conducted environmental investigations at Rochford Field, Mill Rock Park, the Hamden Community Center, the Hamden Middle School, the Newhall Street Field, and within the Newhall Neighborhood. In addition, there have been other environmental assessments, remedial actions or testing performed at the site including indoor air quality assessments and asbestos remediation at the Middle School, and Health Risk Assessments of the Middle School, Newhall Street Field and a residential property at 1067 Winchester Avenue. The scope and results of the previous environmental assessments, based on Haley & Aldrich review of previous reports or data, are discussed below. Locations of previous explorations are shown on Figure 3. The following previous reports were reviewed for this assessment. Information contained in these reports is included herein. USEPA and Subcontractors: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ "USEPA Potential Hazardous Waste Site Preliminary Assessment, Michael J. Whalen Junior High School," prepared for USEPA by CTDEP, 12 September 1985. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Record of Activity, 8 November 1991 and 21 January 1992. "Onsite Reconnaissance and Soil Sampling Report at the Hamden Middle School," prepared for USEPA by NUS Corporation, 3 January 1989. "Final Screening Site Inspection. Newhall Street Field, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for Region 1 USEPA Waste Management Division by NUS Corporation, 23 July 1991. "Removal Program Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation for Newhall Street Field Hamden, Connecticut" prepared for the USEPA Emergency Planning and Response Branch by Roy F. Weston, August 1991. Memorandum on Site Investigation Closure, Newhall Street Field Site," prepared by the USEPA, 25 March 1992. "Final Site Inspection Prioritization Report for Newhall Street Field. Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for CTDEP and USEPA by ARCS I Work Assignment Manager, CDM Federal Programs Corporation, 5 December 1994. "Final Report Site Investigation and Extent of Subsurface Soil Contamination Hamden Site, Hamden Connecticut," prepared by Lockheed Martin REAC, June 2001.

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¾

¾ ¾

¾

HRP ¾ "Evaluation of Newhall Street Screening Study and Recommendations for Subsequent Sample Collection/Analysis," prepared for the Town of Hamden by HRP, Associates, Inc. , February 1993, revised May 1993. "Soil Sampling, South Side of Michael Whalen Middle School," prepared for the Town of Hamden Plant Services by HRP Associates, Inc. 27 October 1993. "Lead Sampling for Michael Whalen Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for Town of Hamden Parks & Recreation by HRP Associates, Inc., 7 June 1995.

¾ ¾

FSS ¾ "Draft Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for the Hamden Middle School," Prepared for Town of Hamden Board of Education by Facility Support Services, LLC, July 2000. "Soil Vapor Survey of Hamden Middle School," Prepared for the Town of Hamden Board of Education and Tai Soo Kim Architects by Facility Support Services, LLC, November 2000. "Environmental Soil Quality Assessment of Hamden Middle School," Prepared for Tai Soo Kim Partners, Architects by Facility Support Services, LLC, November 2000. "Draft Surface Soil Sampling Plan for the Hamden Middle School," prepared by Facility Support Services, LLC for CTDEP, 12 December 2000. "Basement and Crawlspace Air Monitoring of Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden Board of Education by Facility Support Services, LLC, December 2000.

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¾

¾ ¾

Metcalf &Eddy, Inc. ¾ "Operation Plan for Disruption of Former Solid Waste Disposal Area, Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., January 2001. "Limited Surficial Soil Sampling Work Plan, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Permitting, Enforcement and Remediation Division by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 2 May 2001. "Limited Surficial Soil Sampling and Selected Interim Actions Report, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Permitting, Enforcement and Remediation Division by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., June 2001. "Interim Remedial Action Work Plan, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 11 July 2001.

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¾

¾

¾

¾

"Interim Remedial Action Work Plan, Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 2 August 2001.

Health Risk Assessments ¾ "Health Consultation Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data Newhall Street School, Connecticut," prepared by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, January 2001. "Health Risk Assessment of the Hamden Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared by the Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program and Yale University School of Medicine, 23 March 2001. "Health Consultation Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data from Beneath an Asphalt Driveway at 1067 Winchester Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, July 2001. "Health Consultation Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data, Athletic Playing Field Behind Hamden Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, September 2001.

¾

¾

¾

Indoor Air Quality Sampling, Hamden Middle School ¾ ¾ "Radon testing results for the Hamden Middle School," Brooks Safe and Sound, Inc, 20 March 1989. "Air Quality Inspection, Hamden Middle School, 550 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared by Environmental Consulting Group for the Hamden Board of Education, 23 December 1993. Letter to Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, Hamden Board of Education from Brooks Laboratories, 25 April 1997. "Results of Air Quality Testing, Hamden Middle School," Occupational Risk Control Services, 6 December 2000. "Interpretation of Air Sampling for PAHs in the Hamden Middle School," Connecticut Department of Public Health, 27 December 2000. USEPA and Subcontractors

¾ ¾ ¾ 3.01

On behalf of the USEPA, CTDEP conducted a Preliminary Assessment (PA) (using the USEPA PA protocol and assessment forms) of the Hamden Middle School and its grounds in September 1985 (106). The PA included a site visit (perimeter survey), limited regulatory file review, and a review of previous soil sampling results. CTDEP concluded that results of previous (1979 CTDEP) analyses of soil samples from Newhall Street Athletic Field showed "no toxicity in the soil" and stated that that there was no potential for exposure to harmful levels of contaminants from use of the athletic field. CTDEP recommended medium priority for further investigations of the site. In 1988, the Town of Hamden considered expanding the existing Middle School athletic fields into an area west of the Middle School building. Based on reports that the land where the proposed soccer fields were to be placed was once used as an industrial waste "dump,"

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school officials requested that an environmental investigation be performed (122). Under the direction of the USEPA, the NUS Field Investigation Team (NUS) collected soil samples from depths of 0.5 to 1.5 ft. below grade at nine locations at the Hamden Middle School property in November 1989 (110). Locations of the NUS soil samples (NU-03 through NU-10 and NU-12) are shown on Figure 3. Results of the NUS assessment were documented in a 23 July 1991 "Final Screening Site Inspection Report, Newhall Street Field, Hamden, Connecticut " (121). NUS sampled soil from various locations on the Newhall Street Fields, especially in the vicinity of a sunken area in the northwestern corner of the site. The soil samples collected by NUS were tested for metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Results of chemical testing of the soil samples detected concentrations of metals greater than three times the assumed background levels ("reference soil concentrations"). Metals detected in site soils included: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ arsenic (up to 18.5 milligrams per kilogram [mg/kg]) antimony (up to 66.40 mg/kg) cobalt (up to 13.9 mg/kg) barium (up to 458 mg/kg) calcium (up to 6160 mg/kg) chromium (up to 133 mg/kg) copper (up to 1,720 mg/kg) iron (33,100 mg/kg in one sample) lead (up to 56,000 mg/kg) manganese (up to 5,920 mg/kg) mercury (up to 3.2 mg/kg) nickel (up to 72.8 mg/kg zinc (up to 2,850 mg/kg).

Results of the soil testing also detected trace to low levels of some VOCs. The highest concentrations of VOCs detected included the solvents tetrachloroethene (13 mg/kg) and 1,1,1-trichloroethene (24 mg/kg). Based on the results of the soil testing, NUS concluded that due to use of the property as a school athletic field and the proximity of a drinking water supply (watershed area), further environmental assessment was warranted under the Federal Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In August 1991, Roy F. Weston Inc. (Weston), under direction from USEPA, conducted a soil sampling survey as part of a Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) for the Newhall Street Field (at Hamden Middle School). The Weston PA/SI was documented in an August 1991 report titled "Removal Program Preliminary Assessment/ Site Investigation for Newhall Street Field Hamden, Connecticut"(122). Weston collected 20 soil samples from a depth of 4 inches along the northern and southern areas of the playing fields. Locations of the Weston soil samples (S-001 through S-020) are shown on Figure 3. Results of the soil testing detected trace levels of some semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) below the laboratory quantitation limits. The highest estimated concentration was an estimated concentration of 2 mg/kg naphthalene. All other estimated concentrations of SVOCs detected ranged from 0.3 mg/kg to 0.8 mg/kg. VOCs were not detected at or above the laboratory detection limits. Results of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) field screening detected heavy metals, including lead (up to 1,600 mg/kg), nickel (up to 200 mg/kg) and chromium (up to 300 mg/kg). Results of laboratory testing of the soil samples also detected mercury (up to 16.9 mg/kg).

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USEPA requested that the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) complete a health consultation based on the sampling data generated during the PA/SI. ATSDR prepared two health consultations, dated 8 November 1991 and 21 January 1992. The health consultations contained recommendations for further investigation and soil removal in areas of elevated metal concentrations (128,129). In December 1994 the Camp Dresser and McKee Federal Programs Corporation (CDM) Alternative Remedial Contracting Strategy (ARCS) team completed a "Final Site Inspection Prioritization (SIP) Report of the Newhall Street Field" on behalf of the USEPA (151). The SIP report summarized the results of previous environmental investigations conducted at the field and adjacent Hamden Middle School property but did not include conclusions or recommendations for the site. Based on a 26 February 2001 request from CTDEP (242), USEPA contracted with Lockheed Martin REAC (REAC) to investigate environmental conditions in the vicinity of the Hamden Middle School. From 16 to 27 April 2001, (REAC) collected 422 soil samples from 76 residential properties in the vicinity of the Hamden Middle School and from an area along the southern property line of the Middle School/Newhall Field site. REAC summarized the results of the soil testing in a June 2001 report titled "Final Report Site Investigation and Extent of Subsurface Soil Contamination Hamden Site, Hamden Connecticut"(277). General locations of the REAC sampling program are shown in Appendix G. Information on specific sampling locations was not available at the time this report was prepared. At each residential property, REAC collected shallow (0 to 6 inch depth) soil samples from four to five locations. Additional deeper (approximately 18 inches below ground surface) soil samples were collected at several properties where previous REAC sampling had identified soil containing greater than 1,200 mg/kg of lead. Based on the results of the soil testing, USEPA reported that: ¾ ¾ ¾ 8.1 percent (34 of 422) of the soil samples tested contained lead concentrations greater than 1,200 mg/kg, 21.6 percent (91 of 422) contained lead concentrations between 500 mg/kg and 1,200 mg/kg, and 71.3 percent (297 of 422) contained lead concentrations below 500 mg/kg.

Chemical testing detected lead concentrations greater than 1,200 mg/kg in surface soil samples collected from the following four locations: 1. 2. 3. 4. The eastern end of the row of houses on Morse Street abutting Hamden Middle School property and on the adjacent portion of the Middle school site (Parcel 1); The central portion of the area bounded by Wadsworth Street, Morse Street, Winchester Street and Mill Rock Road (Parcels 2A and 2C); The southern portion of Parcel 2D bounded by Winchester Avenue, and Marlboro, Newhall and Morse Streets; and The residences north of the Hamden Middle School on Augur Street (Parcel 3) (2 samples greater than 1,200mg/kg).

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Arsenic was detected in 8 samples; REAC/USEPA concluded that arsenic appeared to occur only in association with lead and in consistently lower concentrations. Based on the results of the assessment, IT concluded that lead is the primary contaminant of concern and that there was no spatial trend of lead concentrations observed from samples collected on the Hamden Middle School property. In July 2001, the USEPA determined that a removal action was appropriate for two main isolated areas in a residential neighborhood where elevated lead levels in surface soils were clearly associated with landfill waste (294). One area called the Rosem Site consisted of properties on Morse Street, west of Newhall Street and abutting Hamden Middle School (area 1 above). The other area called Bryden Terrace and Morse Street Site consisted of affected residential properties within the investigation area east of Newhall Street (areas 2 and 3 above). Locations of the 15 properties identified by USEPA are shown on Figure 2. According to Mr. Gilberto Irizarry of the USEPA, the analytical results from some samples and other field observations suggest that the lead concentrations in excess of 1,200 mg/kg in samples collected in Parcel 3 (item 4 above) and immediately to the west of Parcel 2D (item 3 above) are not the result of landfill waste. These lead concentrations could be the result of residual lead concentrations in soil originating from lead house paint. Therefore, the properties in these two areas were not identified for immediate removal action by the USEPA. USEPA estimated that 350 cubic yards of soil would require removal at the Rosem site and 1,110 cubic yards of soil would be excavated from the Bryden Terrace and Morse Street Site. According to CTDEP, by March 2002 USEPA had reportedly removed 572 tons of impacted soil (approximately 380 cubic yards) from the Rosem site and 782 tons of impacted soil (approximately 520 cubic yards) from the Bryden and Morse Street site (324). IT commenced the removal action in Autumn 2001. Excavation and confirmatory sampling activities continued into early 2002. CTDEP retained GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. to sample soils in and below the base of the IT excavations (approximately 4 ft. below grade). IT/Weston Superfund Technical Assessment and Response Team (START) sampled and characterized the quality of shallow or surficial soils and soils at the base of the remedial excavations (324). Haley & Aldrich has not yet been provided with a copy of the IT/Weston final report. 3.02 HRP Associates, Inc.

In February 1993, the Town of Hamden contracted with HRP to: ¾ ¾ ¾ Review the results of the previous 1991 Weston soil sampling program Perform additional soil sampling and chemical analysis at the Newhall Street Field Develop a remediation plan based on the results of the additional soil testing.

In February 1993, HRP summarized the results of the Weston data review and outlined recommendations for additional soil sampling in a report titled "Evaluation of Newhall Street Screening Study and Recommendations for Subsequent Sample Collection/Analysis" (140). The report was later revised in May 1993 (141). According to HRP, at the time of the 1993 assessment, the soccer field was not being used due to the elevated lead levels detected in soil samples collected by Weston in 1991. HRP stated in their report that the Town of Hamden planned to reconstruct the field, including regrading the area and constructing a track, softball

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fields, and new soccer fields. HRP recommended additional soil sampling at various locations in the field, concentrating on an area in the "northeast portion" (called the "embankment area") where the proposed work plan called for limited soil excavation. Based on a review of the HRP report and associated plans, the "northeast" or "embankment" area appeared to be the sunken area previously reported in the northwestern portion of the site. HRP described the area as a "depressed sand area with wild growth." Based on the recommendation of the May 1993 report, HRP collected 40 soil samples (HRP-1 through HRP-40) from depths ranging from 0 to 0.5 ft. below grade at the Hamden Middle School/Newhall Field site. The sampling area, which is shown on Figure 3, was concentrated in the northeast area of the property. Based on the results of the sampling and chemical analysis, HRP reported elevated levels of lead at random locations over the property. HRP recommended that the field be covered with clean fill then the athletic facilities reconstructed. HRP also recommended installation of an underdrain system on the Newhall Street Field to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. In October 1993 HRP (under contract with the Town of Hamden) performed soil sampling on the south side of the Hamden Middle School to investigate the possibility of excavating the area in association with planned expansion of the school. HRP collected six soil samples from a depth of 0 to 6 inches below grade, and four additional samples from a depth of 2.5 and 3 ft. below grade. All ten samples were analyzed for lead. Results of laboratory analysis detected concentrations of lead ranging from 11.7 mg/kg to 5,680 mg/kg. HRP encountered a "black ash-like material with traces of brick/wood pulp or cinders" at depths greater than 12 inches below grade in each of the four deeper sample locations. (The description of the fill material encountered by HRP is similar to material encountered by Earthtechnology Company/Haley & Aldrich in test pits excavated on the west side of the Middle School in August 2001 (discussed in Section 4.01 B. below) (386) and the fill encountered by LBG/Haley & Aldrich during LBG's investigation in August 2002.) In May 1995, HRP (under contract with the Town of Hamden) collected surface water samples from five catch basins or storm drain outfalls in the athletic fields on the west side of the Hamden Middle School. Samples were tested for total and dissolved lead at a statecertified chemical testing laboratory. Concentrations of total lead ranging from .0012 to .46 mg/L were detected in each of the five samples tested. Dissolved lead was detected in two of the water samples (upgradient samples S-4 and S-5) at .0.12 and .062 mg/L. HRP concluded that the upgradient surface water samples had higher lead concentrations than the downgradient (closer to the school) samples (388). During the period from 1993 to 1996, HRP monitored the placement of an approximately 18 in. thick soil cap at the Newhall Street Field. The cap was placed over an area extending west of the Middle School tennis courts to minimize potential exposure to underlying fill materials. The area was seeded and the fields were reconstructed in 1996 and 1997 (302, 304, 308, 313, 325). Based on information reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, CTDEP was not involved in the planning or placement of the HRP cap. During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich did not encounter "as built" plans showing specifics or details of the cap construction.

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3.03

Facility Support Services

In June 2000, Facility Support Services, LLC (FSS) was contracted by the Town of Hamden Board of Education to perform a Phase I ESA of the Middle School, Newhall Field and Hamden Community Center parcels. The work, which was conducted to assess potential environmental liabilities associated with the properties, included a site visit, regulatory and historical research, and a review of previous environmental reports. Results of the Phase I ESA were documented in July 2000 "Draft Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Report" (179). Among the observations recorded in the FSS report were notations concerning observations of oily staining in the boiler rooms at both the Middle School and Hamden Community Center, and observations of oily sheens and odors on boiler blowdown discharges to the sanitary sewer system. FSS concluded that there was evidence that the site was historically used as a landfill, and that at least one UST was present at each of the two facilities. FSS also concluded that the site was an "Establishment" under the Connecticut Transfer Act. However, the report did not included documentation to back up the rationale for classifying the property as an "Establishment." Based on the results of the Phase I ESA, FSS recommended: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ Phase II subsurface explorations including soil boring at "areas of concern" and testing of soil for heavy metals; A soil gas survey to assess the possible presence of "landfill gases" beneath the site and Middle School building; Tightness testing of the UST systems at Newhall Community Center and the Middle School; An inspection of site buildings for possible lead and asbestos building materials and fluorescent lighting fixtures which may contain PCBs or mercury; Removal of chemical substances and containers found in an old chemistry classroom at Newhall Center; and Consultation with legal counsel knowledgeable in environmental law to interpret the Connecticut "Transfer Act" and its relevance to the site.

In October 2000, FSS was contracted by the Town of Hamden Board of Education to assess subsurface conditions at the Hamden Middle School prior to a planned renovation and construction project. The objective of the FSS assessment was to ascertain possible impacts to soil and groundwater from former and existing fuel oil USTs at the school and from the potential past use of the property as a domestic/industrial landfill (182). The FSS assessment included the drilling of 15 soil borings to depths of 17 to 36.5 ft. below grade at various locations around the Middle School property. The FSS evaluation also included the chemical analysis of selected soil samples from the borings for one or more of the following: total metals, leachable metals, cyanide, VOCs, SVOCs, and extractable Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (ETPH). Locations of the FSS explorations (designated B-1 through B-15) are shown on Figure 3. FSS documented the results of the Phase II assessment in a November 2000 report titled "Environmental Soil Quality Assessment of Hamden Middle School" (182). The copy of the report reviewed by Haley & Aldrich did not include information regarding the rationale for location or the selection of sampling parameters for soils collected from the test borings.

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During the drilling of the test borings for the Phase II assessment, FSS encountered fill materials containing ash, cinders and various solid waste materials (wire, bricks, and oilsoaked wood) in 14 of 15 borings. Fill materials were not encountered in a test boring drilled on the eastern side of the school building near Newhall Street. The waste materials were encountered at depths starting at 2 to 3 ft. below grade and extending to depths ranging from 7 to approximately 26 ft. below grade. Waste materials were overlain at each location by a 2 to 3 ft. layer of red-brown sand and gravel fill material, which did not contain landfill material. At a number of locations, the fill was underlain by peat deposits and organic-rich silt deposits, which likely represented historic wetland sediments. FSS reported groundwater at depths ranging from 10 to 19 ft. below grade. Results of laboratory analysis of soil samples collected during the October/November 2000 FSS assessment detected elevated concentrations of heavy metals, SVOCs, and VOCs within the waste/cinder/ash-containing fill material. ¾ The concentrations of lead detected in 13 soil samples (collected from nine borings) exceeded the CTDEP Remediation Standard Regulation (RSR) Residential Direct Exposure Criteria (RDEC) of 500 mg/kg. The highest concentrations of lead (14,000 mg/kg) were detected in two soil samples collected from 15 to 16 ft. below grade in a boring located approximately 30 ft. west of the school building; and from 2 to 4 ft. below grade in a boring located approximately 25 ft. west of the cafeteria. Chemical test data from the FSS assessment detected other metals at concentrations exceeding applicable RDEC, including arsenic, mercury, antimony, copper and thallium. FSS also reported that the concentrations of antimony, barium, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc detected in one or more soil samples exceeded the GA/GAA Pollutant Mobility Criteria (PMC). Results of chemical testing detected concentrations of several SVOCs in excess of the RDEC including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, and ideno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene. Chemical testing detected elevated concentrations of ETPH in soils located at or near the depth of the groundwater table. ETPH concentrations exceeded the RDEC and PMC in 11 soil samples collected from six borings. The highest ETPH concentration reported (250,000 parts per million [ppm]) was detected in a soil sample collected from a depth of approximately 15-16 ft. below grade in a boring located between the cafeteria and main school buildings, approximately 50 ft. east of the existing 10,000-gallon fuel oil UST.

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Based on the results of the soil quality assessment, FSS recommended additional subsurface testing to evaluate potential health risks at the site, to assess the integrity of the western portion of the 1993 HRP landfill cap and to test the integrity of the existing UST. Following a review of the FSS report on "Environmental Soil Quality Assessment of the Hamden Middle School", CTDEP and the State Department of Public Health (DPH) recommended that the Town of Hamden conduct further shallow soil sampling around the Middle School to assess potential risk from direct exposure to surface soils. The Town of Hamden retained FSS to conduct the additional soil sampling and on 29 November 2000 FSS collected soil samples from 13 locations around the Middle School building (203). Locations of the FSS samples (designated HS1 through HS13) are shown on Figure 3. FSS sampled shallow soils from depths of 0-2 in and .25 to .5 ft. below grade. Twenty-six soil samples were analyzed for total lead, arsenic, and mercury; ten samples were tested for Polynuclear

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Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results of the analyses detected elevated concentrations of PAHs in several surficial soil samples tested; PAH concentrations in excess of RSR DEC were detected in six soil samples (190). Based on the results of the 29 November 2000 FSS sampling event, CTDEP and DPH directed the Town of Hamden to conduct grid sampling of unpaved areas surrounding the Middle School buildings. The Town of Hamden retained FSS to conduct the additional soil sampling (207). On 16 and 17 December 2000, FSS used hand augers to collect shallow soil samples (.2 to .5 ft. and 1 to 1.25 ft. below grade) from approximately 72 locations around the Middle School and Hamden Community Center buildings. Soil samples were tested for total RCRA 8 metals, selected samples were also tested for one or more of the following: PAHs, SVOCs, PCBs, VOCs, ETPH, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) metals. Results of the analyses detected elevated concentrations of lead, arsenic, and PAHs at widespread locations in surface soils on the north, east, and southwest sides of the Middle School. Elevated concentrations of ETPH were detected in one sample, collected on the southeastern side of the main Middle School building (211, 212). Based on the results of the FSS evaluation, CTDEP directed the Town of Hamden to perform interim remedial actions (placement of a geotextile barrier and clean fill cover) at the affected areas in January 2001. The Town of Hamden contracted with Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (M&E) and Earth Technology, Inc. to perform the interim remedial actions, which are discussed in Section 3.05 of this report (225, 226). In October and November 2000, FSS conducted a soil vapor survey of selected locations in and around the Middle School. Results of the soil vapor survey were documented in a November 2000 report titled "Soil Vapor Survey of Hamden Middle School" (181). FSS collected four soil vapor samples inside the school building and ten soil vapor samples outside the building. Soil vapor was drawn from depths of 2 to 3 ft. below grade. Results of field measurements indicated possible elevated concentrations of methane (4.5 percent) and organic hydrocarbon vapors at (36.6 milligrams per liter [mg/L]) below the floor of the Middle School boiler room. The FSS field screening also detected less than one percent oxygen and 20.7 percent carbon dioxide below the floor of the boiler room. During the field-screening program, FSS detected possible elevated concentrations of methane (one percent and 0.1 percent) in the vicinity of the existing and former fuel oil USTs. Results of laboratory analytical testing of samples from below the floor of the boiler room detected elevated concentrations of methane (42,000 mg/L per volume of air). FSS concluded that the elevated concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide indicated possible anaerobic breakdown of landfill materials or organic matter. FSS also concluded that methane and carbon dioxide concentrations detected on the west side of the building and proximal to the USTs could potentially be related to an oil release from the UST or associated piping. Based on the results of the FSS evaluation, the Town of Hamden installed a methane detector with a 24-hour alarm in the Middle School boiler room. Additionally, the Town arranged for the Fire Marshall to visit the school every Monday morning to monitor the air for methane using a portable methane detector and confirm that the methane monitoring system is working (258, 307, 308, 312). In December 2000, the Town of Hamden Board of Education subcontracted FSS to conduct air monitoring of the elevator shaft, basement, and sub-grade crawl spaces at the Middle School. The monitoring was conducted based on the results of the November 2000 FSS soil vapor survey which identified methane in soil vapors beneath the Middle School boiler room floor slab. FSS summarized the results of the air monitoring in a December 2000 report titled "Basement and Crawlspace Air Monitoring of the Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut". FSS collected air samples from 52 locations and tested the samples in the field for concentrations of methane, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Results of

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the monitoring did not detect methane. With the exception of two samples, collected in a crack between the asphalt floor of the main building crawlspace and in a crack in the asphalt floor of the gymnasium crawlspace, FSS reported that oxygen levels were within normal (19 to 22 percent) range. FSS reported detections of carbon dioxide (.1 to 6.4 percent) in 8 samples collected from floor cracks. Based on the results of the monitoring, FSS concluded that the methane detected beneath the boiler room floor slab appears limited to the boiler room proximity. FSS recommended a feasibility study to evaluate remedial alternatives to address the methane beneath the boiler room area (328). 3.04 Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Subcontractors

In December 2000 and January, February and May 2001, CTDEP performed environmental sampling and chemical analysis of soil and soil gas samples at the Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Field, Hamden Community Center, Rochford Field, Mill Rock Park (Rochford Field Annex) and in the Newhall Neighborhood right-of-ways. Locations of the CTDEP soil samples are shown on Figure 3. Haley & Aldrich reviewed the CTDEP sampling plans; maps and laboratory analytical data at the office of the CTDEP and information on the CTDEP environmental programs are included in Section 5.02 E(3) of this report. In April 2001, CTDEP contracted with M&E to perform sampling of bare dirt and sparsely vegetated areas at Rochford Field where CTDEP had previously observed evidence of coal "clinkers" and slag on the ground surface (326). In June 2001, under the direction of CTDEP, M&E collected and analyzed 37 soil samples from 15 areas of concern at Rochford Field for SVOCs and RCRA 8 metals. Two of the soil samples were also tested for disposal characterization (including ignitability/flashpoint, corrosivity, VOCs, ETPH, leachable metals (by TCLP analysis), pesticides, herbicides, cyanide, and PCBs) (279). The 15 areas of concern had been previously identified by CTDEP, DPH and M&E. Soil samples were collected from 0-0.25 ft. below grade. Locations of the M&E explorations (designated T-1 through T-37) are shown on Figure 3. Results of the laboratory analyses detected the following: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ Concentrations of arsenic ranging up to 44.2 mg/kg. With the exception of one sample (T-9), the levels of arsenic detected exceeded RSR criteria. Concentrations of lead ranging from 36.6 mg/kg to 940 mg/kg. PAHs were detected in all samples tested except T-9. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from <1 to 95.2 mg/Kg. Results of the disposal characterization detected trace levels of the VOCs chloromethane and methylene chloride, cyanide (.26 mg/kg) in one sample tested and low levels of the pesticides 4,4'-DDD, 4,4'-DDE and 4,4'-DDT. An elevated concentration of leachable lead (by TCLP) detected in one sample (10.3 mg/kg) exceeding the hazardous waste criterion of 5 mg/L for lead and indicating that materials excavated from the site may require management as hazardous waste. PCBs or herbicides were not detected in either sample and neither sample was found to be ignitable or corrosive.

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Based on the results of the assessment, M&E recommended additional interim remedial actions at high traffic areas such as park entrance gates, baseball dugout benches, and the water fountain. In July 2002, M&E contracted with the Town of Hamden to implement the recommended interim remedial measures at Rochford Field. The interim remedial actions are discussed further in Section 3.05. In 2001, CTDEP retained GZA GeoEnvironmental Inc. (GZA) to observe the USEPA soil removal action in the Newhall Neighborhood and collect confirmatory soil samples from the excavations for chemical laboratory testing. CTDEP also contracted with GZA to perform additional environmental sampling at selected residential properties, identified by CTDEP, to assess the need to expand the EPA soil removal actions. Lastly, CTDEP contracted with GZA to evaluate potential structural settlement and methane gas impacts at selected residential properties. GZA subcontracted the structural settlement and methane monitoring to Haley & Aldrich. In February 2002, CTDEP authorized additional subsurface explorations at selected residential properties. Results of the 2001 and 2002 investigations reportedly revealed the presence of elevated concentrations of metals or PAHs and/or ash or debris fill at some residential properties evaluated and CTDEP recommended further assessment or remediation on some of the parcels (513). Finally, in Fall 2002, CTDEP contracted with GZA to install test pits at certain of the residential properties. Haley & Aldrich observed the excavation of these test pits, which is documented in the "Report on Oversight of Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc., Malcolm Pirnie and GZA GeoEnvironmental Investigation Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002). 3.05 Metcalf & Eddy, Inc.

In January of 2001, the Town of Hamden contracted M&E and Earth Technology, Inc. to implement interim remedial measures at selected areas of the Hamden Middle School, under the direction of CTDEP. The interim remedial action consisted of the placement of an approximately one-foot temporary geotextile and earthen cap in three discrete areas of the school property (Figure 2). The three areas were selected based on the results of previous studies and soil testing conducted by FSS in December 2000 (211, 212, 226). The objective of the interim cap was to reduce the potential for human exposure to elevated levels of lead and SVOCs in surface soils (324). The first area (Area #1) was approximately 42,000 sq. ft. in size, located on the east side of the school building, and extending from the front entrance to the front entrance drive. Area #2, approximately 9,000 sq. ft. in size, included a grass "island" located at the north end of the school property along Mill Rock Road. Area #3, approximately 66,000 sq. ft. in size, was located adjacent to the auditorium and along the southern side of the school academic block. Prior to placing the temporary cap at Area #3, M&E filled that portion of the property with excavated material from Areas #1 and #2 (approximately 250 cubic yards total). Following placement of the temporary cap, M&E spread a layer of wood chips over the three areas as an erosion control measure and as a temporary cover until the areas could be seeded. In August 2001, under the direction of CTDEP, the Town of Hamden contracted with M&E to complete an additional Interim Remedial Action at an area of concern near the Middle School tennis courts. The interim action was conducted because CTDEP had observed coal "clinkers" and identified elevated concentrations of arsenic in sparsely vegetated soils near the tennis courts (324). The interim action consisted of the placement of a geotextile fabric over the entire area, covering the site with an earthen cap comprised of gravel and topsoil, then seeding the area to allow the establishment of a grass cover (298).

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In July 2001, at the direction of CTDEP, the Town of Hamden retained M&E to monitor the placement of asphalt pavement or concrete on several unvegetated, high traffic areas at Rochford Field. The areas that were paved included: locations near the entrance gate, around the dugout areas, under the bleachers and adjacent to the water fountain. M&E reportedly encountered "old batteries" during remedial efforts for the southern dugout area. The interim remedial activities, which were conducted based on the results of previous environmental evaluations of Rochford Field by CTDEP and M&E, also included placing sod in the area of sprinkler lines and grass seed in the vicinity of sprinkler system manifolds and along the fenceline (289). 3.06 Indoor Air Quality Testing

Between February 1989 and December 1993 several analyses of indoor air quality were conducted in the Hamden Middle School building. In February and March 1989, Brooks Safe and Sound (Brooks) tested the air in the Hamden Middle School for radon (111). The Brooks test programs included sampling of five separate areas: the hall in the industrial arts area, the cafeteria, the hall outside room 107, the auditorium and the boiler room. Results of the radon testing detected 4.0 pCi/L of radon (the governmental standard is 4.0 pCi/L) in the sample collected in the auditorium. In May and June 1989, Brooks retested the air in the auditorium for radon and the results were reportedly below governmental standards. Based on the results of the 1989 sampling, Brooks concluded that the radon levels in the air at Hamden Middle School were "below harmful levels." In December 1993, the Environmental Consulting Group (ECG) conducted an air quality analysis of the Hamden Middle School building (145). Air samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, higher-class hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides. Results of the air testing did not detect concentrations of the sought analytes at levels above recommended standards and ECG concluded that the air in the Hamden Middle School was "safe." In April 1997, Brooks tested air quality in the auditorium at the Middle School after reports of an ongoing creosote-like odor. According to a 25 April 1997 letter report prepared by Brooks, the odor had been present since the time of 1989 renovations resulting from tornado damage to the school (168). Brooks reported that the subfloor of the auditorium stage was "saturated with dark brown liquid and covered with tar paper" and suggested that the material had been placed to prevent wood rot in the floor. Results of gas chromatography analysis of a sample of the dark-coated flooring showed the presence of SVOCs similar to creosote. Based on the results of the testing and continued presence of the odor, the Board of Education proposed to upgrade the ventilation system in the auditorium. On 6 December 2000, Occupational Risk Control Services (ORCS) collected air samples from 11 rooms inside the Hamden Middle School after parents complained that students and teachers were having respiratory problems (196). ORCS also collected air samples from the roof of the school building and a location outside the building. The air samples were tested for SVOCs. ORCS reported elevated concentrations of naphthalene (2 micrograms per cubic meter [mg/m3]) and phenanthrene (0.7 mg/m3) in an air sample collected from the auditorium. The Connecticut DPH reviewed the air data and concluded that the SVOCs detected had originated from creosote-soaked timbers beneath the auditorium stage. However, based on a review of the test data, DPH concluded that exposure to the SVOCs detected in the air in the auditorium did not pose a public health threat (214).

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3.07

Health Risk Assessments

On 29 December 2000, CTDEP collected soil samples from nine locations (0 to 0.5 ft. depth) around the exterior of the Hamden Community Center (former Newhall Street School). The locations of the CTDEP samples are shown on Figure 3. The sampling was conducted at the request of the DPH in response to a request by the Town of Hamden Youth Service Bureau and the operator of a daycare center in the Community Center building (220). Soil samples from Hamden Community Center were tested for metals and SVOCs. Results of the testing detected an elevated concentration of arsenic (up to 31 ppm) in two samples tested and elevated concentrations of SVOCs (up to 5.4 ppm), including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, indeno(123-cd)pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene, in six samples tested. According to DPH, a review of historical information did not detect evidence that solid or industrial waste was disposed at the Hamden Community Center site. DPH concluded that the levels of arsenic detected may represent natural background levels in soil and the concentrations of SVOCs detected in the soil samples were within the range for urban soils. According to DPH, the Hamden Community Center does not have a playground area or other similar area where children would be exposed to the arsenic and SVOC-containing soils. As such, DPH concluded that, based on the available data, there was no health risk associated with the soil at the Hamden Community Center, and the DPH did not recommend moving the daycare facility to another location (238, 269). In March 2001, Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program and Yale University School of Medicine performed a "Health Risk Assessment" of the Hamden Middle School on behalf of the Connecticut Education Association and the teachers at Hamden Middle School (249). This report provided an independent health risk assessment of the environmental contamination located on the school grounds and the methane detected in soil gas beneath the boiler room floor. The report concluded that the health risk to teachers and students in the past, the present, and the future from the metals, ETPH, VOCs and SVOCs detected in soil samples collected during the previous environmental assessments of the school was negligible as long as the soil remained undisturbed (249, 264). In January and April 2001, USEPA and CTDEP collected soil samples from beneath an asphalt driveway at a residence at 1067 Winchester Avenue (291, 295). The location of the CTDEP exploration is shown on Figure 3. According to CTDEP, USEPA explorations were located in the immediate vicinity of the CTDEP boring (324). CTDEP collected a shallow soil sample (1 to 4 ft. below grade, designated 1067-WIN on Figure 3) for analysis for metals, ETPH, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs. USEPA collected seven soil samples from five test borings drilled to depths of up to 9 ft. below grade for analysis for SVOCs. Connecticut DPH summarized the results of the sampling and analyses in a July 2001 "Health Consultation Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data from Beneath and Asphalt Driveway at 1067 Winchester Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut" (295). According to DPH, results of the chemical testing detected elevated concentrations of TPH (15,450 mg/kg), lead (701 mg/kg), arsenic (11.3 mg/kg) and a number of SVOCs including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene at concentrations up to 89 mg/kg. PCBs or pesticides were not detected in the soil sample tested by CTDEP. Based on visual observations and the results of the soil testing, DPH concluded that there was potential for chemical exposure due to direct skin contact or accidental ingestion of the tarry material. DPH recommended remediation of the contaminants beneath the driveway and sampling of the tar material during warm weather. Removal of the asphalt and remediation is presently underway by USEPA.

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In September 2001, DPH reviewed soil sampling data for the Newhall Street Field and prepared a report titled, "Health Consultation Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data, Athletic Playing Field Behind Hamden Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut"(305). Based on the data review, and considering the ongoing use of the fields, the DPH concluded that the "clean soil" cap on the field was expected to be adequate to protect users of the field, including young children, from potential exposure to the fill material beneath the soil cap. DPH recommended that the contaminated soils beneath the soil cap be left undisturbed and that the Town of Hamden maintain a cover of wood chips over the walkway area connecting the Hamden Community Center parking lot and the Newhall Street Field.

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IV. 4.01 A.

SITE HISTORY Past Usage of the Site and Adjacent Properties General Past usage of the site was assessed through a review of Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, historical aerial photographs, topographic maps and atlases, Hamden City directories and information on file at the CTDEP, the Miller Library, the Hamden Board of Education and the Town of Hamden municipal offices. Haley & Aldrich also reviewed information obtained during the discovery phase of the Order SRD-128 proceeding from the Town, Olin Corporation, CTDEP, and the South Central Regional Water Authority. Copies of selected historical references reviewed are included in Appendix C. Appendix F includes a chronological summary of significant events associated with the filling, development, and past environmental assessment of the Newhall Neighborhood study area. Appendix F also includes copies of deeds for town owned properties. Historic usage and activities on properties adjacent to the subject site were evaluated through reviews of aerial photographs, topographic maps and atlases and Hamden City Directories. Approximate construction dates of study area structures and approximate locations of historic refuse dumps are shown on Figure 9. The following is a summary of historic use of the site, including the town-owned properties (Parcel 4), residential Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 and surrounding area. Additional information relative to specific usage of the residential properties is included in Appendix B.

B.

Site Area History and Development Prior to the late 1800s, the site area consisted of a number of large farms, including the Goodrich, Davis and Mix Farms. The Goodrich farm reportedly included approximately 122 acres and extended from Mill Rock Road to Lander Road (New Haven) on both sides of Winchester Avenue. On the west side of Winchester, the farm property extended to include Parcel 1, and property between Morse and Marlboro Streets, as far west as Edwards Street and Shelton Avenue, and land between Marlboro and Goodrich Street, as far west as Shepard Street. On the east side of Winchester, the farm extended to Prospect Street, including the areas now occupied by North Sheffield, Homelands and Prospect Court (480). The Mix and Davis Farms, and later the Daddio and Delvechio Farms were located north and west of the site (332). The Goodrich Farm was sold in the 1860s and subdivided as early as 1870 (332, 480). The dates that the other farms were sold and subdivided are not certain. In the early 1900s, the site area began to be converted from farm use and became known as the "Highwood" district (1,2,3,4,5,6). During the ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered an 1870 map showing the proposed subdivision of the southern portion of the site area, the former Goodrich Farm, (including Parcels 1 and 2D) and the area to the immediate south of the site (1). The proposed subdivision map outlined 121 potential building lots in the area between Shelton and Winchester Avenue (then known as Canal Street) and Morse and Marlboro Streets, and the area between

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Shepard Street, Winchester Avenue, Marlboro and May Streets. The map showed former trolley lines on Shelton and Winchester Avenues, ending in the block between Marlboro and Goodrich Streets. A former railroad or trolley station was located on the corner of Shelton Avenue and Goodrich Street. The map showed a former road known as "Old Highway", extending northeasterly towards Mill Rock from the intersection of Morse and Canal Street (now Winchester Avenue). Morse Street ended at that intersection and did not extend through to Prospect (1). Prior to the early 1900s, streams and associated wetland areas occupied the majority of the subject site. The approximate extent of the stream and wetlands is shown in Figure 4. The stream, which may have drained into the northern Pine Swamp, ran generally from the northwestern corner of the intersection of Morse and Wadsworth Streets, northwesterly and westerly, passing beneath Newhall Street and eventually flowing north, beneath Putnam Street, apparently into the Pine Swamp (1,9, 15,17, 340, 463). A second stream or drainage extended southwesterly from an area east of the southwest corner of the intersection of Prospect Street and Mill Rock Road, intersecting with the northwesterly flowing stream in the current Bryden Terrace area (340, 437). Another stream or drainage may have flowed northerly from the vicinity of the intersection of St. Mary and Morse Streets. Large wetland areas historically occupied the area of Bryden Terrace, Mill Rock Park, Rochford Field, and the Hamden Middle School and associated soccer field (Newhall Street Field) (including Parcels 2A, much of 2B and 2D) (17, 28, 340). A pond, known as "Mix Pond", was formerly located near the western end of the large wetland that extended easterly along the rear of residential lots located along the north side of Morse Street from a location west of St. Mary Street to the north of the former Newhall Street School, then northerly through the current Middle School and Newhall Street Field properties (332). Based on historic information (322), the former "Mix Pond" may be located somewhere beneath the southern portion of the SNET property. In, or prior to, the early 1900s, Morse Street was extended to the east and residences were constructed in Parcels 1 and 2D and the southeastern portion of Parcel 2B (Figure 5) (15). Based on results of CTDEP interviews with current or former area residents, who have reported ash, "coke" or "clinkers" in properties in the western portion of Parcel 2D and on the eastern side of Newhall Street, south of Marlboro Street, this area may have been a former low spot or wetland filled prior to the early 1900s (463). A golf course, used by Yale students and others in the early 1900s, was reportedly located on unfilled land south of Morse Street and east of Winchester Avenue (322). The original Goodrich Farm homestead was also located in this area (332). Based on a review of historic maps and documents, Haley & Aldrich identified several other ponds or wetlands in the site vicinity (Figure 4): ¾ ¾ A reported "duck pond" that existed in the area south of Morse Street, east of Winchester Avenue and west of North Sheffield Street in the 1920s (322), A "skating pond", that was reported in the area south of Morse Street, east of St. Mary Street, west of Edwards Street and north of Goodrich Street prior to 1917 (322),

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An approximately 4-acre, area of "marshy ground" reportedly present in the area south of Marlboro Street, west of Newhall Street, east of Butler Street and north of Goodrich Street. This area was reportedly filled with "clean trash and furnace cinders from the Winchester Repeating Arms Factory" in approximately 1915 (332). Two or more historic "springs", one on Goodrich Street (described as "three quarters of the way up the street") and the other "at the bottom of Prospect Street" (463, 478).

¾

Haley & Aldrich did not encounter evidence of additional former waterbodies or wetlands in these areas. In the early to mid 1900s, garbage was collected and handled differently from rubbish. For purposes of this report, garbage is defined as pertrescible waste, including waste from the preparation, cooking and serving of food, market waste from the handling, storage and sale for produce and meat (residential and commercial). Refuse, or rubbish, is generally categorized as combustible (primarily organic) or noncombustible (primarily inorganic). Combustible rubbish included paper, cardboard, cartons, wood, boxes, plastics, rags, cloth, bedding, leather, rubber, grass, leaves, and yard trimmings. Noncombustible waste included metals, tin cans, metal foils, dirt, stones, brick, ceramics, glass, bottles, other mineral refuse, ashes from fires used for cooking and heating buildings and cinders. Reports from the turn of the century indicate that the Highwood district contained a large pigsty, which was the dumping ground for the greater part of the garbage from New Haven (22). During the period from the early 1900s to as late as the 1940s, garbage was collected and used as food for pigs (22, 363, 403, 404, 420, 431). There were reportedly several pigsties in the town, including another large "swine herd" at the Hamden Town Farm (located out of the site area on Brooksvale Avenue) (71, 420). In the 1940s and early 1950s, garbage was also reportedly transported for disposal in adjacent towns (357). The town instituted municipal garbage collection in 1916 (22), and Haley & Aldrich reviewed historic newspaper articles instructing residents on what types of garbage was appropriate for swine feed. The types of materials not accepted for garbage collection included old tinware and other discarded receptacles, or "any disinfectants, refuse, paper wrapping, glass, sea food shells, sharp objects or thing that might be injurious to hogs" (395, 397, 403, 404, 431). . Municipal refuse collection, including those waste materials not suitable for swine feed, was not instituted in Hamden until the 1950s (368). Based on historic documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, rubbish or refuse was historically burned, buried in private yards, and dumped in empty lots, private dumps, or properties referred to as public refuse dumping areas (395, 397). In 1915, the Hamden Health Officer, Dr. Joslin, proposed the establishment of public dumping places for refuse in various sections of town to abate nuisances caused by private dumps and unauthorized dumping (22). Reportedly, many people were accumulating rubbish in their yards or dumping it in empty lots or along roadways. Dr. Joslin noted that "there are many low spots where people might like to have refuse dumped for fill (395)".

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According to the 1917 Hamden Annual Report, by 1917, three public refuse dumps had been established in Hamden and one of these was located in Highwood on Shelton Avenue, between Goodrich and Morse Streets (Figure 9). The other two dumps were located off the site, on the corner of Dixwell and Evergreen Avenues and on the corner of State Street and Merritt Street (22). These dumps were reportedly used for all kinds of rubbish, tin cans, etc., but not for garbage such as dead animals or decaying vegetable matter. However, in the same 1917 Annual Report, it is reported that: "Even more serious is the question of refuse other than garbage, for the collection of which the Town makes no provision at all. Much garbage and decaying animal and vegetable matter is generally mixed in with accumulations of ashes and rubbish in backyards, thereby becoming breeding places for flies and disease germs....These conditions are not creditable to the Town, therefore I would urge that the Board of Finance at its next meeting, appropriate a sum of money for the collection and disposal of refuse." (22) At the time the Board of Health was looking for refuse disposal areas, Hamden was also struggling with numerous cases of malaria. The disease had been linked to mosquitoes, and steps were begun to eliminate potential mosquito breeding areas (396, 436). By 1916, "the New Haven Water Co. (NHW) and Winchester Repeating Arms Co., (WRA) were engaged in draining a large..."malarial-breeding" swamp" (The Pine Swamp) in Hamden (22). According to NHW documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the draining of the Pine Swamp by WRA allowed NHW to begin draining and clearing the Newhall Street Swamp which was located at the site of the current Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Athletic Field (22). Another mosquito breeding place on the corner of St. Mary and Morse Street was also filled in 1916 (22). According to a 30 March 1916 article in the New Haven Register, the NHW had agreed to "fill swamps between Putnam and Newhall". The article also noted that the Hamden Board of Health had indicated that the swamps east of Newhall Street, "now on lands controlled by the Morse Estate", should also be drained (396). Haley & Aldrich did not encounter evidence that the Town of Hamden drained this, or other swamps or was otherwise involved in the draining of these privately-owned properties. During World War I (beginning in circa 1917), the land contained within Morse, Edward, Goodrich, and St. Mary Streets was raised by up to 15 ft. by WRA (322). During or after that time, WRA reportedly began filling swampy areas on the east side of Newhall Street, between Mill Rock Road and Morse Street with black "granule-like, coal ash" and other materials (463, 477, 478). The fill area may have extended as far south as Marlboro Street (478). Up to ten feet of ash and cinder fill was also reportedly placed by WRA on the east side of Newhall Street at the site of the current Christian Tabernacle Church (463). Former area residents also reported to CTDEP that WRA had another "coke lot" between Shelton, Butler and Marlboro Streets prior to 1923 (322, 332, 463, 477, 478). Lastly, Haley & Aldrich encountered a report of an approximately 4-acre area of marshy ground on the west side of Newhall Street, between Goodrich, Marlboro and Butler Streets that was filled with "clean trash and furnace cinders" by WRA (332).

29

The unauthorized filling of low areas continued into the 1920s. In 1925, the annual report of the Hamden Health Officer recognized the issues associated with waste disposal and the number of complaints it receives. Therefore, he performed a study of other towns and arrived at the following conclusions: " 1. 2. 3. 4. This branch of service should be under the supervision of the Department of health, as this is primarily a health problem. Municipal collection, not only of garbage, but ashes, and rubbish also, is the best method, and that the contract system is unsatisfactory at the best. Disposal of garbage by feeding to pigs should be discontinued, as being unsanitary, a public nuisance, and liable to contaminate public water supplies. The establishment of so-called sanitary dumps for wastes of all kinds would be far more sanitary and economical, in that such dumps can be located on waste land, swamps, etc. thereby eliminating mosquito breeding places and creating play-ground and public parks, much needed in this community." (22)

In October 1928, the Yale School of Medicine and the Hamden Health Department conducted a health survey to gain an understanding of diseases and health issues in the Town of Hamden. Malaria continued to be a serious problem in the Newhall Neighborhood area and elsewhere in the town (10, 11, 12, 22). The Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station was the agency tracking and, at times perhaps performing, mosquito control within Connecticut in the early 1900s. During the Phase I, Haley & Aldrich reviewed Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station reports for the years 1925, 1928, 1930 and 1939 (21, 23, 25, 34). According to the reports, chemical spraying, spraying with oil, and or draining and "ditching" were reported as methods used in Connecticut to reduce mosquito populations in the early 1900s. A 1939 Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station report described spraying "...light fuel oil" on the surface of the water to destroy the (mosquito) larvae and pupae (34). According to Agricultural Experiment Station reports lime sulfur sprays may have also been used as fungicides and chemicals containing lead arsenate may have been used for mosquito control in the early 1900s (321). Later experiments have shown that combining lead arsenate and lime sulfur sprays created soluble arsenic. Based on information in Hamden Board of Health meeting minutes, Town Annual Reports and Public Health Surveys prepared in the late 1920s and 1930s, the Town of Hamden used ditching and filling as primary mosquito control measures. During the same time period, the New Haven Water Company and WRA were clearing and draining swamps (9, 10, 11, 22). The Town also reportedly used oiling (spraying with kerosene or light fuel oil) as a temporary measure where needed and when the budget permitted (22, 30, 31, 32, 33, 341, 342, 354). Notwithstanding, whether the Town occasionally used oil, Haley & Aldrich did not find direct evidence that such oil was used by the Town on the Site (or any portion thereof) nor did Haley & Aldrich encounter direct evidence that lime sulfur sprays or lead arsenate compounds were used on or in the vicinity of the site by the Town of Hamden. In the 1937

30

Board of Health meeting minutes, it was recognized that the Town had limited control over private properties as it reads "Dr. Joslin will ascertain from the States Attorney General, what can be done for mosquito drainage over areas of property privately owned" (342). In March 1935, there were reportedly four public refuse dumps in Hamden. Three of the dumps, Oregon Street, School Street, and Welton Street, were located out of the site area. The Mill Rock Road dump was located on the site on land owned by Thomas and Inez Cleary (341, 343, 514). Based on maps and documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the Mill Rock Road dump was located within the block bounded by Mill Rock Road, Morse Street, Winchester Avenue and Wadsworth Street. Haley & Aldrich encountered the earliest reference to the dump in 1934 (398); the dump, or a portion of the dump, operated until May 1941 (421). The Hamden Board of Health meeting minutes from 5 June 1936 include a reference to a problem of unauthorized after-hours dumping at the Mill Rock dump (342). In July 1936, the Board of Health approved an expenditure for one more caretaker to presumably clean and level the Mill Rock dump (342). In March 1937, the Board of Health recommended the closing of the Newhall Street and Mill Rock dumps (342, 350). The northern portion of the Mill Rock dump was apparently closed, however, dumping continued in the southern portion of the area (also referred to as the "Winchester Avenue dump") between Mill Rock, Winchester, Wadsworth and Morse Streets until 1941 (354, 355, 363, 401, 402). In the early to mid 1940s, after the Mill Rock dump was closed, residential development in that area increased significantly. A number of homes were constructed on the north and south sides of Morse Street, between Newhall and Wadsworth Streets. Residences were also built in the adjacent block, bounded by Newhall, Morse and Newbury Streets and Winchester Avenue (Refer to Figure 5). Haley & Aldrich encountered reports of public refuse dumps in 1936 and 1937 located on Treadwell Street (off-site), Fern Street (off-site), Newhall Street, south of Rochford Field, and Morse Street (342, 344, 346, 351, 357). The specific locations of the Newhall and Morse Street dumps are not certain. The Morse Street dump could have possibly been part of the larger Mill Rock Road dump. A 1934 aerial photograph of the site (Figure 6) shows disturbed areas in the northwest and southwest portions of the block between Mill Rock, Morse and Wadsworth Streets and the site of the current Winchester Avenue. The southwestern disturbed area may be the Morse Street dump, the northwestern disturbed area may be the Mill Rock dump. An 11 August 1936 article in the New Haven Register reported recurring dump fires at the Morse Street dump in Highwood (347). Haley & Aldrich reviewed a similar article from July 1936 that referenced similar fires at the Mill Rock dump (402). Documents and newspaper articles reviewed by Haley & Aldrich appear to suggest that in addition to the WRA "Newhall Street dump", there may have been a second refuse disposal site known as the "Newhall Street dump" (342). Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation of the specific location of the second "Newhall Street dump". However, it may have been located on the east side of Newhall Street between Goodrich and Marlboro Streets (341). The first reference to a "Newhall Street dump" (other than the WRA Newhall Street dump) was a 2 May 1936 newspaper article in which the Hamden Health Director was quoted as saying that that "Newhall Street dumps, between Augur and Goodrich Streets and North of the Newhall Street School are in "deplorable condition" (401). This newspaper article is

31

not consistent with other information relative to the location of dumps in the Newhall Neighborhood area. According to 8 January 1937 Board of Health meeting minutes, "real estate men" had approached the Town to inquire if the Newhall Street dump could be closed so that the area could be developed for building purposes (341). The Board of Health noted that "at the rate the dump has been filling up, by May 1, the mosquito breeding place would be filled in, be leveled and the dump discontinued" (342). On 5 March 1937, the Hamden Board of Health announced that the Newhall Street dump would be closed on 1 May 1937 to "accommodate those people engaged in cleaning up their premises during the spring" (342, 350). The Health Director recommended that the dump be conditioned as a "public park or playground" (350). In 1939, a Public Health Survey, conducted by the Yale School of Medicine during the period from August 1938 to January 1939 listed the following public refuse dumps in Hamden: Morse Street, School Street (off-site), Welton Street (off-site), Oregon Avenue (off-site) and Newhall Street (Winchester Avenue) (354). The dumps were described as "enclosed by fences" and having caretakers "present about 10 hours a day during the week." The specific locations of the Morse and Newhall Street (Winchester Avenue) dumps still are not certain. The reason for the identification of the refuse disposal area on Newhall Street as Newhall Street (Winchester Avenue) is also not certain, but suggests that there may have been an access into the area from both streets. The survey also mentioned a City of New Haven dump on Welton Street (off-site) and a dump maintained by the Winchester plant on Newhall Street (the WRA "Newhall Street dump") (354). In May 1941, the town had four public refuse dumps, Oregon Avenue (off-site), Welton Street (off-site), Wadsworth Street (south of Mill Rock Road) (Mill Rock Park and/or Parcels 2A and 2C), and Columbus Avenue (north of Morse Street) (the current SNET property) (362). The closing of the Welton Street dump occurred during 1941 (38). The Oregon Avenue dump closed effective October 1, 1941 (424). In late May of 1941, the Hamden Board of Health announced the closing of the Wadsworth Street dump (also called the Winchester Avenue dump), which was located on privately-owned land and described as being bounded by Mill Rock Road, Winchester Avenue, Morse Street and Wadsworth Street (363). With these dump closings, the Arch Street Dump (off-site), which was established in a former sand and gravel quarry in late 1941, was the only remaining dumping space available for the townspeople (238). The Arch Street dump operated for the subsequent 18 years until it was closed in 1959 (84). After 1959, Hamden residents used landfill facilities in North Haven. In addition to the public refuse dumps, Haley & Aldrich encountered a number of references to private dumps: ¾ ¾ ¾ In 1932, the Hamden Board of Health gave permission "to have an auto graveyard to fill in property to street level" at a private dump at 319 Morse Street (341). In June 1935, the Hamden Board of Health heard a petition to abate nuisance relative to a private dump "on Marlboro Street, west of Newhall Street" (341). In July 1938, the Board of Health investigated a report of dumping of "garbage and refuse" at a private dump on Morse Street which had been posted "No Dumping" (353).

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¾

Haley & Aldrich encountered a report of WRA dumping on private property at 95 Marlboro Street in circa 1957, reportedly at the request of the property owner so he could scavenge scrap metal (463).

According to Board of Health meeting minutes from 1932, persons in town wishing to have property filled were typically given permission for a private refuse dump (341). These dumps were not operated or controlled by the Town of Hamden, although Health Inspectors may have periodically visited the sites to check for nuisance, dust, rodents or other public health concerns. Haley & Aldrich also encountered anecdotal reports of residents digging refuse disposal pits in their backyard (478). C. Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Athletic Field On 17 July 1900, the NHW (now the SCCRWA) purchased 22-acres of swampy land, including frontage on Newhall Street and associated "backland," from the Continental Trust Company of New York (17, 76). On 24 December 1903 the NHW purchased an additional 6 acres including frontage on Newhall Street from Mr. Benjamin Proudfoot (518). The area purchased was described as a "swampy tributary to Lake Whitney," "Newhall Swamp", "Newhall Street Swamp" or "Mix Pond" in various historic documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich (10, 11, 67, 322, 332). The purchase included much of the current Hamden Middle School, Hamden Community Center, and Newhall Street Field properties (See Site Chronology and copies of Deeds in Appendix F). According to water company documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the land was purchased to "protect the Lake Whitney Watershed" (67). According to NHW Monthly Reports of Superintendents, dated 1 February and 1 April 1919, Water Company employees had begun clearing and draining the "30-acre Newhall Swamp (north of Putnam Street)" in January 1919. Work apparently commenced in the portion of the swamp (the "upper end") closest to Newhall Street and moved towards a culvert and dike drainage structure on the "far end" (northern side) of the swamp near Putnam Street (12). During the 1920s, the "Newhall Street Swamp" property was apparently used as a dump. According to a 10 January 1925 NHW document reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, in about 1924, the "Newhall Street dump" "was cleaned and taken by Winchester Factory" (20). The January 1925 document was the earliest reference to a dumpsite on Newhall Street that was encountered during the Phase I ESA. Previous references to the Newhall Street property in the NHW correspondence, noted that the site was a "swamp" and reported on clearing and mosquito control measures (10, 11, 12). In 1924, the Water Company granted the Town of Hamden a right of way through the Newhall swamp for a trunk sewer line (18, 76). The Town subsequently constructed the sewer, which ran above ground, supported on concrete piers through the wetland area north of the Newhall Street School (existing Hamden Community Center) prior to and during the time that that area was being filled. The sewer line remains beneath the Newhall Field and Middle School properties (244). In 1924, the water company also conveyed 1.4-acres of land along Newhall Street to the Town of Hamden in exchange for "two lots on Morse Street" (approximately one acre in area) (17, 19, 76).

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In March 1940, the New Haven Register printed an article about complaints of a "dust nuisance" from the Newhall Street dump (359). Reportedly, 130 local residents signed a petition asking to have something done about the "Winchester and other dumps near the Newhall Street School (358). A subsequent article in the New Haven Register, 27 March 1941, reports the untimely death of a person scavenging in the south side of the Newhall Street dump, "about 100 ft. north of the north side of Morse Street" (361). Haley & Aldrich encountered several reports or anecdotal information relative to persons visiting the WRA Newhall Street dump to scavenge scrap metal, lead shot and even roller skate parts (341, 463, 477, 478), all of which is attributable to WRA's manufacturing operations. Section M of this report describes the products manufactured by WRA. Haley & Aldrich encountered additional references to the "dump site on Newhall Street" being a WRA dump. Correspondence between the Town of Hamden, the NHW, the Hamden Board of Education and WRA during the period from March 1946 to July 1947 all refer to the Hamden Middle School site as a dump under the control and use of WRA (41-43, 47-56, 58-65). According to a February 1947 letter from WRA to the Hamden Board of Education, the property along Newhall Street to the rear of the Newhall Street School, "which the Winchester Repeating Arms Company is now using as a dump, is owned by the New Haven Water Company, who have given us the right to fill it in and use it as a dump" (50). In a March 14, 1946 letter, WRA acknowledges paper being placed at the dump and states that "no more paper should be taken to the ump unless it was burned immediately." The letter goes on to state the "in the future [we] will be taking nothing to the dump which is not dirt or ashes." (42) Further, WRA indicates that they will only maintain the fence that they have installed, but they cannot maintain a watchman on the property all the time to prevent general dumping (42). Documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich also included references to complaints about papers being blown out of the dump and littering the neighborhood, ash and soot seeping in through windows and cracks at the Newhall Street School (358,359) and notations concerning unauthorized public dumping along Newhall Street (42, 43, 45, 59). In a 6 November 1946 Health Inspection Report for the Newhall Street School, the Hamden Health Officer noted that WRA has indicated to the school that the dump will be used for "several years to come". WRA reportedly told school personnel that an incinerator would be operational at the New Haven (WRA) plant within the year and until that time, landfill caretakers would arrange to have the "burning area" located further from the school. According to the inspection report, WRA also indicated that they would fill low spots near school with "heavy materials that would not create a dust nuisance" and dump "fine black ashes" as far from the school as possible. Lastly, the report notes that WRA reported they would hire an exterminator to "go over the dump thoroughly and eliminate the cockroaches"(45). According to the documents reviewed, WRA reportedly ceased burning paper at the dump in April of 1947 after construction of an incinerator to burn paper at the WRA plant (54). Documents on file at CTDEP and QVHD, including historical WRA and Water Company correspondence, newspaper articles and editorial letters, indicate that the former Newhall Street Field/Middle School "dump area" received industrial waste. Industrial waste reportedly disposed at the site included: "war surplus materials," incinerated gunstocks, five volt batteries, sawdust, scrap metal, miscellaneous noncombustible items, sheet metal, copper and zinc, lead shot, and ash and cinders from incinerated paper waste (41, 45, 54, 67, 205, 221, 243, 244, 381). Observations of

34

test pit excavations at the Hamden Middle School by Haley & Aldrich (August 2001) and Legette, Brashears & Graham (LBG) (August 2002) confirmed the presence of the debris containing the materials listed above. Test pit observations and descriptions are documented in a 9 December 2002 Haley & Aldrich report titled "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut". Mr. Louis Landino, a former resident of the Newhall Neighborhood reported playing in the "Winchester Dump" in the 1930s, recalling watching Winchester Company trucks visit the site on a daily basis to dispose of waste materials from manufacturing operations. Mr. Landino recalled running along an elevated concrete pipe (the sanitary sewer line) and jumping into piles of "thousands or maybe millions of shotgun shells" that had been disposed in the swampy area, looking at "long and narrow, c-size batteries and heavier batteries with lead plates" and jumping over "globs of black material that was 12 to 18 inches in diameter." According to Mr. Landino, black metal drums containing "liquid" were also routinely disposed in the area, north of the former Newhall Street School. Mr. Landino recalled observing drums fall off of trucks and noted that the drum seams would open up and "material would ooze out." According to Mr. Landino, the material was green in color "bile green" and the water in the swamp was always "bile green" (463, 477). Mr. Landino also recalled that a portion of the "dump," formerly a deep, swampy area used for ice skating in winter months, was also used by local residents to dispose of household refuse (244, 477). Former resident John Carbrey reported to CTDEP that there was formerly a path along the southern edge of the WRA landfill that ran from the Newhall Street School to the former Hamden Airport (the current Hamden Industrial Park) (400). Former Morse Street resident, Mr. Richard Inzero, recalled seeing "ash, batteries, wood, 40gallon drums of chemicals" and noted that people picked out copper and brass to sell as scrap (390, 463). Another Former Morse Street resident, Aubrey Overby reported to the CTDEP that he lived at 259 Morse Street from 1937 to 1962. According to Mr. Overby, he recalled "batteries, barrels with oil and grease and acids", scrap metal and sand with lead pellets disposed by WRA in the Newhall Street dump. Mr. Overby reported that his family would ask the WRA truck drivers to dump loads of lead shot and scrap metal in the southern portion of the landfill near their home so they could scavenge (463). Prior to early 1947, WRA also disposed of waste papers at the site, however that practice was reportedly discontinued after an incinerator was constructed at the WRA factory in late 1946 or early 1947 (41, 45, 54, 61). The area was also reportedly used for unauthorized public dumping and Haley & Aldrich encountered anecdotal reports that "bags of garbage," tin cans and old boilers being disposed in the swampy landfill (42, 49, 205, 244). However, these reports were not substantiated by the results of subsurface explorations conducted by Haley & Aldrich and LBG at the Middle School property in 2001 and 2001. Test pit observations and descriptions are documented in a 9 December 2002 Haley & Aldrich report titled "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut". Winchester operations also included the installation of a water main into the dump area for use in fire control (68, 69). The water line reportedly originally ran westerly into the landfill area from Newhall Street. The water line was relocated to Morse Street in 1947 when the Town of Hamden acquired the Newhall Street frontage (68, 69, 390).

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In approximately June 1947, WRA constructed a second entrance to the "Newhall Street Dump" on Morse Street (55, 56, 60, 68). WRA had originally requested the second entrance in a letter dated 24 April 1947 from WRA to the New Haven Water Company (55). A letter dated 5 May 1947 from the NHW to WRA states that the entrance to the "Newhall Street Dump" on Morse Street should be constructed at the westerly end of the NHW property as far away from the Newhall Street School as possible (56). The dump entrance was located adjacent to the eastern side of the property at 249-251 Morse Street (364). During the period from 1947 to 1949, the Town of Hamden and the NHW reportedly erected a fence along the north and west sides of the Newhall Street School property to separate a playground at the Newhall Street School from the landfill (60, 61, 70). In January 1947, the Town of Hamden considered approaching the NHW as part of a plan to build more parks in the Town of Hamden. According to a January 1947 article in the New Haven Register (429), Town officials met to discuss whether a municipal swimming pool could be located on "4-acres of land now occupied by Winchester dump on Newhall Street and owned by the New Haven Water Company (429)". The pool was never constructed, however, in November 1947, the Water Company conveyed the remainder of the Newhall Street frontage to the Town of Hamden (approximately 5.8 acres). The parcel conveyed to the town was described as land on the westerly side of Newhall Street up to Mill Rock Road, "extending 400 ft. west of the Newhall Street line" (66-71, 76). The town reportedly planned to level the area and use the land as a parking lot for the recreation field across the street (currently Rochford Field) (67). At that time, the water company retained approximately 15.5 acres of "rear land" extending from the area behind Newhall Street School (496 Newhall Street) to an area south of the "Mill Rock Road Extended" and including 265 ft. of frontage on Morse Street (76). The new entrance to the WRA landfill, which had been constructed by WRA in approximately June 1947, was located at the western end of the Morse Street frontage (364). According to documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the proposed transfer of the 5.8-acre parcel to the town was expected to limit street side access to the dump and eliminate the problem of unauthorized "public dumping" (61). In connection with the property transfer, the NHW renamed the Newhall Street dump "the Morse Street dump" in a letter to WRA dated 21 November 1947 (68). In a 1949 Water Company memorandum reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the Water Company noted that the Town of Hamden was considering the purchase of additional "rear land" which was part of the original purchase, by NHW, from the Continental Land Trust Company and was later used by WRA as a "dump" (76). On 29 March 1950, the Town acquired the remaining approximately 16 acres of Water Company land including the 265 ft. of frontage on Morse Street and the "rear land" extending from Newhall Street School to the extension of Mill Rock Road (79, 80). The next day, on 30 March 1950, the Town of Hamden transferred a total of 21 acres of land on Newhall Street to the State of Connecticut for construction of a regional technical school. According to documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the State of Connecticut owned the 21-acre parcel, which included a portion of the current Hamden Middle School site, during the period from March 1950 to February 1954 (77, 80, 82). The proposal to construct the vocational school at the Hamden site were rejected due to the need for an "expensive foundation" (82, 85) and in 1954, the parcel was conveyed back to the Town of Hamden. In 1953 the town approved plans for a new junior high to be located on the Newhall Street property and in 1956 the school (know as the

36

Michael J. Whalen Junior High School) was opened (29, 84, 85, 90, 92, 313). The School building is actually four separate interconnected structures referred on Figure 2 as Gymnasium, Cafeteria, Classroom, and Auditorium. Construction Progress Reports for the Whalen School (April 1954 through May 1956) reviewed by Haley & Aldrich did not contain descriptions of fill material except for one entry during the week of 23 to 27 May 1955. The report noted that "only one obstruction was encountered during the driving of the piers (for the school). On the position of Pier #36 in the Gymnasium it was found necessary to engage a large clam shell shovel in order to remove about a dozen large concrete blocks weighing around 1 ton each which were found buried in the ground" (370). According to documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the NHW notified the WRA of the Town acquisition of the dump property in February 1950. The WRA apparently continued to use the site as a dump for several more years (371, 380, 381). A 5 April 1955 Memorandum prepared for the Hamden Board of Education relative to the "Newhall Site for Junior High School" asks "how can the Winchester Company continue dumping in this area in view of the construction job for the junior high school going on?" (371). A 19 February 1957 environmental sanitation inspection report at the Michael Whalen School references the former dump area and noted that it had not yet been "taken care of ..covered over with adequate dirt" (89). In the mid 1950s, NHW granted a right of way to SNET and gave permission for the discharge of runoff from roof and parking lot drains from the new SNET facility to the western side of the current Newhall Street Field site. The SNET easement is shown on Figure 4. Subsequently, in the 1960s, testing and inspections of the SNET runoff detected evidence of detergent, antifreeze, "paint solvents", oil and Oakite in a storms drain on the Whalen School property (373). According to the NHW inspection reports, in June 1964 SNET indicated to the NHW that they would eliminate further waste discharges to the drain. However, an October 1964 report indicated that the problem was continuing and noted that the situation was being referred to the Town of Hamden Health Department (373). A February 1966 NHW report did not identify fuel or solvent odors, but did identify the continued presence of "anionic detergent" in the drain (373). According to former Town of Hamden Assistant School Superintendent John Carusone, unauthorized dumping on the Whalen School site continued after the school was constructed. According to Mr. Carusone, when he began working for the Board of Education in 1969, he ordered a dirt access road to the "hole" behind the school (479). Mr. Carusone reported that the "hole" was not a dump, but was a swampy area in the "far corner of the school property", a "good 40 ft. deep with water in it and everything else". Mr. Carusone subsequently noted that people began driving around the timber blockade and he blocked more of the area and stopped the access. However, he noted he later became aware that people were getting in from the Daddio farm property (the current Hamden Industrial Park) (479). Haley & Aldrich encountered several reports of unauthorized dumping behind the Whalen Jr. High School. In July 1971 the Hamden Health Department received a complaint of refuse being dumped behind the Hamden Middle School. The complaint did not indicate who was dumping the refuse, however, it appeared that the material dumped included a load of (household) trash, and did not appear to represent authorized or continuous dumping of industrial or municipal waste (96). A second

37

complaint of unauthorized dumping of trash on the Whalen site adjacent to NHW property was received on 5 October 1973 (376). CTDEP received correspondence from Mr. John Carusone stating that prior to 1976, area residents used the area behind the Middle School as a bulky waste landfill (324). A 10 April 1972 NHW memorandum reviewed by Haley & Aldrich described the western portion of the property as containing a "landlocked pond with no visible outlet" an as an "eyesore" due to "dumping and unauthorized disposal" (374). According to a newspaper articles reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, CTDEP interview documentation and a letter written by a former Mayor of Hamden, the Town of Hamden filled in the area west of the Middle School to expand the existing school athletic fields beginning in 1976 (205, 206, 377). The area was reportedly initially filled with approximately 100,000 cubic yards of "clean fill" excavated during the construction of the West Woods Elementary School in Hamden. Reportedly, additional fill and topsoil was also brought to the property in 1977 (401). In 1977, when the tennis courts were constructed, Mr. Carusone reported that the construction engineer reported that "something was wrong with the soil "(479). Mr. Carusone noted that after he walked through "black, fine, ashy soil" in the vicinity of the tennis courts, the bottom of his shoes became "pockmarked". According to Mr. Carusone, Edgewood Construction Company excavated the area and additional clean fill from "West Woods School and other places" was brought in (479). During and after the field construction, the Town reported problems with a wet area or "sinkhole" in the northwest corner of the field (378). The area reportedly continued settling, and the "construction engineer" recommended "topping the area off every year"(479). According to Mr. Carusone, during the period from 1976 to 1981 additional soil was spread on the field annually. Mr. Carusone noted that most of the settling occurred in the back corner where the former "hole" (40 ft. depth) was located (479). Haley & Aldrich did not encounter other documentation of the filling, or information on the nature or environmental quality of the fill material. After the area was filled and graded, it was seeded and the existing soccer fields were constructed (93, 94, 95, 99, 104). In November 1979 the Quinnipiack Valley Health District (QVHD) received a complaint regarding a sunken area in the Newhall Street Field that was located at the site of a former industrial landfill (100). The complaint was referred to CTDEP who collected three soil samples from the west side of the field (presumably near the sunken area in the northwest corner of the property) on 15 November 1979. CTDEP described the soil samples as "sand grains with opaque black particles" and "sand coated with oily appearing material that when ignited, shed sparks that glowed red" (101). The State Health Department Laboratory report noted that the "black material was likely manganese oxide depolarizer, not carbon from center electrode of flashlight battery" (101). Based on an evaluation of historic battery manufacturing and components, it is possible that the black material encountered by CTDEP was manganese oxide, a common battery component, used as a depolarizer in the area outside of the center, carbon electrode core. Results of laboratory analysis of the soil samples detected metals and trace concentrations of several VOCs (101, 102). Based on a review of the laboratory data, CTDEP concluded in a letter dated 31 December 1979 that based on this sampling, the normal use of the school and athletic fields was not expected to "expose anyone to harmful levels of metals or organics" (103).

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In the early 1980s, the school was renamed the Hamden Middle School (29). In September 1985 the CTDEP conducted a Preliminary Assessment (PA) of the Hamden Middle School and its grounds. CTDEP conducted the work on behalf of the USEPA as part of a statewide program to identify potential hazardous waste disposal sites (106). The Newhall Street Field was included on the CTDEP list based on the previous report to QVHD that the property was a historic landfill and the results of the 1979 CTDEP soil sampling and analysis. The PA included a review of the previous test results, limited research, and a site visit. Based on the results of the PA, CTDEP concluded that the results of the previous soil testing conducted by QVHD had not show significant toxicity of the site soil and as such, potential exposure to harmful levels of contaminants from use of the athletic field was not expected. CTDEP recommended further assessment of the property as a medium priority site under CERCLA, and in 1987 the Hamden Middle School site was included on Connecticut Inventory of Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (303, 304). According to information obtained by Haley & Aldrich from interviews with Hamden Board of Education employees, the existing 10,000-gallon heating oil UST at the Middle School was installed in 1988 or 1989 to replace a former 10,000-gallon UST. The former UST, an unlined steel tank, was installed in the 1950s (109, 310). The existing UST is a fiberglass tank. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation of the tank replacement, information on the quality or disposition of the former UST, or results of chemical testing of soil samples from the UST excavation (303, 304, 306, 308, 310, 311, 312, 313). Interviews with custodians, school personnel and Town employees did not reveal additional information on the condition of the UST during the 1989 excavation (306, 310, 311, 313). Results of subsurface explorations conducted by FSS in the vicinity of the UST detected evidence of petroleum contamination. In 2002, Haley & Aldrich conducted Phase II subsurface explorations and chemical testing of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of the existing and former USTs. The UST evaluation was documented in a 5 November 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden Connecticut." Results of the Haley & Aldrich assessment detected Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) at or near the water table on the west side of the school, adjacent to, and in the vicinity of the UST. The source of the petroleum, however, appeared to be related to former landfilling activities and Haley & Aldrich did not detect evidence of releases from the existing or former UST. In summer 1989, maintenance repairs at the Hamden Middle School required the disposal of 1,700 square feet of asbestos-containing floor tiles. In August 1989, CTDEP approved the disposal of the tiles at the Hamden Landfill (112). In 1989, a tornado passed through the Town of Hamden causing significant damage to the Newhall Street Field, ripping up the school tennis courts and a fence (383). The tornado also damaged portions of the Middle School, resulting in damage to the roof, acoustic ceiling and carpeting in the auditorium. Reportedly, the tornado picked up large wooden cable spools from the adjacent SNET property and deposited the spools on Newhall Street Field, ripping up grass and fill material. The tornado damaged buildings in the Newhall Neighborhood, uprooted trees and caused significant damage to Rochford Field (113, 221, 306, 307).

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In late 1989, USEPA contracted for subsequent sampling and chemical analysis of soils from the Newhall Street Field site. The work was conducted as a follow-up to the previous USEPA assessments. Soil sample locations are shown on Figure 3. Results of the soil testing detected elevated concentrations of lead, arsenic and other metals and low levels of VOCs (120-125, 128, 133). During the period from 1993 to 1996, HRP monitored the installation of a soil cap at the Newhall Field. The remedial work was intended to reduce potential exposure to landfilled materials. Following placement of the cap, the fields were seeded and reconstructed (136-141). Beginning in 1991 (and possibly earlier) officials at the Hamden Middle School received complaints of a creosote odor in the auditorium. The source of the odor was determined to be wood used in the 1989 repairs or construction of the stage that was soaked in creosote to hinder decay. The QVHD recommended that due to the high costs of removing the source, a ventilation specialist be obtained to design a system to prevent exposure. A continuous ventilation system was approved and installed in December 1997 (114, 145, 158-162, 166-174). In December 1994, CDM completed a "Final Site Inspection Prioritization (SIP) Report of the Newhall Street Field" on behalf of the USEPA (151). The SIP report summarized the results of previous environmental investigations conducted at the field and adjacent Hamden Middle School property but did not include conclusions or recommendations for the site. In the 1994 report, CDM included a statement that the "Newhall Street Field site" was classified as a landfill "after a recent excavation to install an elevator at the Middle School exposed domestic waste immediately below the ground surface." During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich did not encounter test pit logs, or other excavation reports related to the reported elevator installation and observations of solid waste (148, 151). Chemical testing of soil samples collected from the Newhall Street Field and adjacent Middle School property continued in the late 1990s, 2000, and 2001. Results of soil testing continue to detect elevated concentrations of heavy metals. Recent analyses have also detected TPH and SVOCs. Results of the environmental testing are summarized in Sections II and IV of this report; exploration locations are shown on Figure 3. Chemical testing at the site has primarily concentrated on shallow soils in an attempt to evaluate potential risks from exposure through the ongoing use of the properties (179, 181-183, 190, 201, 203, 211, 212, 218, 220, 223, 236, 237, 240, 247, 251, 304). Plans to expand the school were halted in 1993 and 2000 after soil testing revealed "hot spots" of contamination at depths of 2 to 4 ft. below grade (132, 133, 135-139). In October 2000, FSS was contracted by Tai Soo Kim Partners, Architects to assess subsurface conditions at the Hamden Middle School prior to a planned renovation and construction project. The objective of the FSS assessment was to ascertain possible impacts to soil and groundwater from former and existing fuel oil USTs at the school and from the potential past use of the property as a domestic/industrial landfill (182). FSS monitored the drilling of 15 soil borings at various locations around the Middle School property. Locations of the FSS explorations (designated B-1 through B-15) are shown on Figure 3. FSS reported fill materials containing ash, cinders, and various solid waste materials (wire, bricks, and oil-soaked wood) in 14 of 15 borings. The waste materials were present at depths of 2 to 3 ft. below grade and extended to

40

depths ranging from 7 to approximately 26 ft. below grade. At a number of locations, the fill was underlain by peat deposits and organic-rich silt deposits, which likely represented historic wetland sediments. Results of chemical testing of soil samples from the FSS explorations detected elevated concentrations of metals, SVOCs, and VOCs within the waste/fill material. Chemical testing also detected elevated concentrations of ETPH in soils located at or near the depth of the groundwater table. The highest ETPH concentration reported (250,000 mg/kg) was detected in a soil sample collected approximately 50 ft. east of the existing 10,000gallon fuel oil UST. In November 2000, CTDEP and DPH recommended that the Town of Hamden conduct further shallow soil sampling around the Middle School to assess potential risk from direct exposure to surface soils. On 29 November 2000 FSS collected soil samples from 13 locations around the Middle School building (203). Locations of the FSS samples (designated HS1 through HS13) are shown on Figure 3. FSS sampled shallow soils from depths of 0 to 2 in and .25 to .5 ft. below grade. Soil samples were analyzed for total lead, arsenic, and mercury; selected samples were also tested for PAHs. Results of the analyses detected elevated concentrations of PAHs in several surficial soil samples tested (190). Based on the results of the 29 November 2000 FSS sampling event, CTDEP and DPH directed the Town of Hamden to conduct grid sampling of unpaved areas around the Middle School buildings. On 16 and 17 December 2000, FSS used hand augers to collect shallow soil samples (.2 to .5 ft. and 1 to 1.25 ft. below grade) from approximately 67 locations around the Middle School buildings. Soil samples were tested for metals, selected samples were also tested for one or more of the following: PAH, SVOCs, PCBs, VOCs, ETPH and leachable metals. Results of the analyses detected elevated concentrations of lead, arsenic, and PAHs at widespread locations in surface soils on the north, east, and southwest sides of the Middle School. Elevated concentrations of ETPH were detected in one sample, collected on the southeastern side of the main Middle School building (211, 212). Based on the results of the FSS evaluation, CTDEP directed the Town of Hamden to perform interim remedial actions (placement of a geotextile barrier and clean fill cover) at the affected areas in January 2001. In October and November 2000, FSS conducted a soil vapor survey of selected locations in and around the Middle School (181). FSS collected four soil vapor samples inside the school building and ten soil vapor samples outside the building. Soil vapor was drawn from depths of 2 to 3 ft. below grade. Results of field measurements indicated possible elevated concentrations of methane and organic hydrocarbon vapors below the floor of the Middle School boiler room. Results of subsequent laboratory testing of soil gas samples from below the floor of the boiler room confirmed the presence of detected elevated concentrations of methane. FSS concluded that the elevated concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide indicated possible anaerobic breakdown of landfill materials or organic matter. FSS also reported possible elevated concentrations of methane near the existing and former fuel oil USTs and concluded that the methane detection in this area may be related to an oil release. Based on the results of the FSS evaluation, the Town of Hamden installed a methane detector with a 24-hour alarm in the Middle School boiler room. Additionally, the Town arranged for the Fire Marshall to visit the school every Monday morning to monitor the air for methane using a portable methane detector

41

and confirm that the methane monitoring system is working (258, 312, 327). According to the Fire Marshal, no methane has been detected during the weekly monitoring. In December 2000, the Town of Hamden Board of Education subcontracted FSS to conduct air monitoring of the elevator shaft, basement, and sub-grade crawl spaces at the Middle School and evaluate the extent of the methane impacts detected beneath the boiler room floor. FSS collected air samples from 52 locations and tested the samples in the field for concentrations of methane, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Results of the monitoring did not detect methane. With the exception of two samples, collected in a crack between the asphalt floor of the main building crawlspace and in a crack in the asphalt floor of the gymnasium crawlspace, FSS reported that oxygen levels were within normal (19 to 22 percent) range. FSS reported detections of carbon dioxide (.1 to 6.4 percent) in 8 samples collected from floor cracks. Based on the results of the monitoring, FSS concluded that the methane previously detected beneath the boiler room floor slab appears limited to the boiler room proximity. FSS recommended a feasibility study to evaluate remedial alternatives to address the methane beneath the boiler room area (328). On 27 and 28 December 2000, CTDEP collected soil gas samples from 10 locations beneath the basement and crawlspace of the Hamden Middle School. CTDEP also arranged for the University of Connecticut Environmental Research Institute (ERI) to collect soil gas samples for chemical testing for VOCs on 28 and 29 December 2000. The work was conducted to verify results of previous soil gas sampling conducted by FSS in November and December 2000. Soil gas samples were initially screened in the field for the presence of VOCs and methane. Results of the CTDEP field screening detected measurable concentrations of methane in two soil gas samples collected beneath the boiler room floor slab (2,470 ppm and 18,700 ppm). CTDEP did not detect methane at the other locations sampled; VOCs were not detected in any location sampled (329). Results of the chemical testing of the summa container air samples detected trace to low levels of several VOCs. CTDEP reviewed the ERI test results and concluded that the compounds tested may not have resulted from decay of the historic landfilled materials beneath the school (329). On 15 February 2001, after members of the local youth soccer organization expressed a concern about possible health risks that might be associated with the continued use of the field, CTDEP drilled 26 geoprobe borings (to depths of 4 ft.) and collected 26 surface soil samples (0 to .5 ft.) at various locations on the soccer fields. CTDEP soil sample locations are shown as SF-01-SF-26 on Figure 3; soil samples were tested for total metals and SVOCs. Exploration logs are included in Appendix G. Results of analyses showed that concentrations of metals and SVOCs were below RSR RDEC (240, 248). On 10 May 2001, CTDEP collected 39 additional shallow (0-3 in.) soil samples (HMS-01 through HMS-33) from locations along the southern boundary of the school grounds adjacent to the rear yards of several Morse Street residences (Figure 3). Soil samples were tested for total lead and arsenic; selected samples were also tested for SVOCs. According to CTDEP, the May 2001 sampling event was conducted to determine the extent of lead contaminated surface soils identified by REAC/USEPA during its residential sampling program (330). Results of chemical testing detected lead in one sample (HMS-16, 1,485 mg/kg) at a concentration in excess of the RSR

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DEC. SVOCs were detected in a number of samples; concentrations of one or more SVOCs were detected in excess of RSR DEC in five samples and in excess of RSR PMC in six samples tested. CTDEP concluded that the SVOC exceedences were "slight" and were not expected to pose an "immediate health threat" (304, 330). During the May 2001 sampling event, the CTDEP also collected shallow soil samples from six locations in the area east of the Middle School tennis courts and west of the school parking lot. The samples were collected in a sparsely vegetated area where CTDEP had previously observed coal "clinkers" and near a location where an elevated concentration of arsenic was detected in shallow soils sampled by FSS in December 2001 (211, 212, 273, 298, 330). The samples, which are designated HMS34 through HMS-39, were tested for total lead and arsenic, selected samples were also tested for SVOCs. Results of the analyses detected concentrations of arsenic (36 and 44 mg/kg) in two samples (HMS-34 and HMS-36) in excess of the RSR DEC of 10 mg/kg. Chemical testing detected SVOCs in excess of RSR DEC and PMC in HMS35, HMS-37, HMS-38 and HMS-39. However, CTDEP concluded that the SVOC exceedences were "slight" and the compounds did not pose an "immediate health threat" (330). CTDEP recommended that the area be covered with either a geotextile barrier and clean soil/seed, or paved (330). At the request of CTDEP, in January 2001, the Town of Hamden contracted with M&E and Earth Technology, Inc. to perform interim remedial measures at three areas of the Hamden Middle School (226). The objective of the interim cap was to reduce the potential for human exposure to elevated levels of lead and SVOCs in surface soils (324). The work included the placement of a one-foot temporary geotextile and earthen cap over previously identified areas of impacted soil. Wood chips were spread over each temporary earthen cap as an erosion control until the areas could be seeded to establish a turf cover. In August 2001, M&E performed a similar interim measure at another area, near the Middle School tennis courts, where elevated concentrations of arsenic and coal "clinkers" had been previously identified by CTDEP (273, 298, 304, 324). At that time, Town of Hamden employees placed wood chips in an area near the southern boundary of the Newhall Street Field, along a pathway between the parking area at the Hamden Community Center and the soccer field area where USEPA and CTDEP identified elevated lead concentrations in surficial soils. In January 2001, Middle School teachers, along with the Connecticut Education Association sent a letter to the Town of Hamden calling for the closure of the Middle School (308). In March 2001, Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program and Yale University School of Medicine performed a Health Risk Assessment of the Hamden Middle School on behalf of the Connecticut Education Association and the Middle School teachers (249, 264). The assessment considered potential impacts from exposure to surficial soils and assessed the methane detected in soil gas beneath the boiler room. The assessment report concluded that the health risk to teachers and students in the past, the present, and the future, from the metals, ETPH, VOCs, and SVOCs detected in soil at the school was negligible as long as the soil remained undisturbed. A subsequent Health Consultation, which was prepared by CTDPH in

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September 2001 for the Newhall Street Athletic Field, concluded that the "clean soil" cap on the field was expected to be adequate to protect users of the field, including young children, from potential exposure to the fill material beneath the soil cap (305). On 10 July 2001, CTDEP issued Order Number SRD-128, which ordered the following potentially responsible parties to take actions related to the Newhall Neighborhood Site: Town of Hamden, Olin Corporation, South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority, and the State of Connecticut Board of Education (287). Olin Corporation became the successor to the WRA beginning in approximately 1931 (WRA history is summarized in Section M of this report). The Order requires investigation and remediation of town-owned properties (including the Hamden Middle School) as well as nearby residential areas (287). On 17 August 2001, Haley & Aldrich monitored the excavation of six test pits (TP101­TP106) in a grassy area west of the school and east of the tennis courts. Test pit locations are shown on Figure 3. The test pits were excavated to depths ranging from 2.5 to 7.3 ft. below grade. The purpose of the test pit excavations was to characterize waste materials under the site prior to installation of the M&E interim remedial cap. During the test pit excavations, Haley & Aldrich observed primarily industrial waste fill materials, including carbon rods, cartridge shells, batteries, WRA labels and cartridge slips, glass tubes and jars and newspapers and other papers dated 1941. In August 2002, LBG, on behalf of the SCCRWA also installed test pits at the Middle School and Newhall Street Field. Haley & Aldrich observed the LBG test pits. Test pit observations and descriptions are documented in a 9 December 2002 Haley & Aldrich report titled "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut". Materials observed in the 2001 and 2002 test pits were similar to those observed by HRP in 1993 and by FSS in 2000 (140, 141, 182). D. Rochford Field Based on a review of aerial photographs, historic maps and Town of Hamden Annual Reports, the former wetland area east of Newhall Street, south of Mill Rock Road and north of Newbury Street (now Rochford Field) was used as a "dump" in the 1920s and early 1930s (28, 33, 55, 205). According to information on file in the Hamden Tax Assessors office and information in the 1936 Hamden Annual Report, the Town of Hamden acquired the property from John M. Morse and Dorothy H. Morse Struck on 28 September 1936 (30, 517) (See Site Chronology and copies of Deeds in Appendix F). At the time that the property was purchased by the Town of Hamden, an article in the New Haven Register described the parcel as "once used as a dumping ground but filled up several years ago" (347). According to documents on file at CTDEP, including notes from interviews with former residents, much of the area between Morse Street and Mill Rock Road, west of Winchester Avenue and east of Newhall Street was used as an industrial landfill and depository for "coke fill" (charcoal residue and ash) (33, 244, 245, 395, 397). Former area residents reported to CTDEP that Rochford Field was a former dump site and recalled drums and old boilers being disposed in swampy portions of the property (205, 244). Mr. Louis Landino reported to CTDEP that the area was "underwater all the time" and called it a "semi-swamp" (477). He noted that a "coke lot extended out about 50 ft. in front of the water area" (477). He also recalled

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that WRA, and possibly others, dumped 20 to 50 gallon drums and "old fashioned water barrels" in the area (477). Mr. John Carbrey reported to CTDEP that Rochford Field was never part of the public refuse dump and was only used for disposal of "coke" and other materials by WRA (478). Results of test pits and subsurface explorations performed by Haley & Aldrich in Rochford Field in 2002 generally confirm Mr. Carbrey's recollections. Mr. Carbrey recalled that the "coke lot" extended southerly to Morse Street. He reported that the "two or three family houses on Morse Street were on solid ground like a peninsula" (478). According to Mr. Carbrey, "coke" fill was located to the north of the homes and between the homes and Newhall Street to the west (478). Mr. Carbrey also stated that the "coke fill" extended southerly towards Marlboro Street (478). In late 1936 and 1937, the area was graded, topped with approximately 6 inches of loam and turned into a recreation field (31, 348). A ¼ mile long cinder running track was constructed on the field in 1938 (32, 33). Rochford Field was officially dedicated on 7 June 1939 (33). In the 1940s, a field house and fence were added (416). In 1989, the tornado that passed through Hamden caused a significant amount of damage in Rochford Field (383). Apparently trees were uprooted exposing ash and cinder fill. According to QVHD personnel, leather and other solid waste materials were observed beneath a number of the uprooted trees (307, 308). The Town contracted for the renovation of Rochford Field in 1992 (134). Haley & Aldrich reviewed a memorandum to the Contractor hired by the Town that cautioned against mixing "cinders and furnace slag material" when stripping topsoil from the field. According to the memorandum, the materials had been used as a running surface for "an old running track that looped the fields" (134). Mr. Frank Cooper of the Town Parks and Recreation Department reported to CTDEP that the town used to get "coke residue" from local plants, crush it, roll it and then run on it. According to Mr. Cooper, the track would be "dressed" each year (463). On 28 December 2000, CTDEP drilled 14 geoprobe borings (SS-21 through SS-34) in Rochford Field and installed temporary microwells in four of the explorations (SS-21, SS-24, SS-27, and SS-30). The borings were completed to depths ranging from 4 to 12 ft. below grade (217, 304). Soil sampling locations are shown in Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. Exploration logs for the borings report fill materials overlying alluvial and glacial meltwater deposits. Results of chemical analysis of composite soil samples (0 to 4 ft. depth) detected ETPH at concentrations ranging up to 1509.68 mg/kg, in excess of RSR DEC and PMC criteria in three of the 14 samples. Chemical analyses also detected lead (in 6 of 14 samples), arsenic (in 11 of 14 samples), and mercury (in 1 sample) in excess of RSR criteria at concentrations up to 2,229 mg/kg, 164 mg/kg and 39.2 mg/kg respectively. Soil analyses also detected several SVOCs, including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, chrysene, fluoranthene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and isophorone, at concentrations in excess of RSR criteria. On 28 December, CTDEP collected groundwater grab samples from microwells SS-21 and SS-27. Samples were tested for cyanide, VOCs, SVOCs, and metals. Results of the chemical testing detected the VOCs 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1.3 ug/l) and dichloromethane (5.0 ug/l) in the samples at concentrations below RSR criteria. A trace level of the SVOC bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (2.51 ug/l) was detected in the

45

groundwater sample from SS-21. Results of chemical testing of the groundwater sample from SS-27 detected 12 SVOCs at concentrations ranging from 2.6 to 35.29 ug/l. Metals were detected in both samples; cyanide was not detected (331). On 24 and 25 January 2001, CTDEP collected an additional 14 shallow soil samples (0 to 6 inches depth) from Rochford Field (237, 304). The shallow soil samples, which were designated RF-21 to RF-34 (Figure 3) were collected from the same locations at SS-21 to SS-34 (28 December 2000). Results of chemical testing of the soil samples detected concentrations of arsenic (ranging up to 59.74 mg/kg), in excess of the RSR RDEC of 10 mg/kg in all 14 samples tested. CTDEP conducted additional soil testing in March 2001 to confirm the presence of the arsenic (254). At that time, CTDEP sampled the bare dirt infields of the two baseball diamonds in Rochford Field. Soil samples, designated RF-35 through RF-44 (Figure 3), were collected from depths of 0 to .5 ft. and were analyzed for total arsenic. Results of the analyses did not detect arsenic at concentrations greater than 1.3 mg/kg (254). The levels of arsenic detected did not exceed CTDEP RSR RDEC. CTDEP also observed pieces of coal and cinders on the ground surface in areas where previous excavations had occurred or where the grass was sparse (beneath the bleachers, near water lines and fence lines). According to information reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, it was not certain if the material represented waste fill or the remnants of a former cinder running track. On 29 March 2001, CTDEP conducted grid sampling of Rochford Field to evaluate the potential presence of arsenic and collect soil samples for health risk assessment purposes. CTDEP collected shallow soil samples (0 to 2 inches and 2 to 6 inches depth) from 20 locations, designated RF-45 to RF-64 on Figure 3. CTDEP analyzed soil samples in the field using XRF. Samples collected from 0 to 2 inch depths were also submitted for confirmatory laboratory testing for total arsenic. Results of the both the XRF and laboratory testing (0 to 2 inch samples) detected relatively uniform, elevated concentrations of arsenic, ranging up to 40 mg/kg, throughout the field (324). In April 2001, CTDEP and Town officials temporarily closed Rochford Field (265). In April 2001, CTDEP contracted with M&E to perform sampling of bare dirt and sparsely vegetated areas at Rochford Field where CTDEP had previously observed evidence of coal "clinkers" and slag on the ground surface (326). In May 2001, under the direction of CTDEP, M&E collected and analyzed 37 soil samples from 15 areas of concern at Rochford Field for SVOCs and RCRA 8 metals. Two of the soil samples were also analyzed for: VOCs, ETPH, total priority pollutant metals, leachable metals and PCBs (279). The 15 areas of concern had been previously identified by CTDEP, DPH and M&E. Soil samples were collected from 0-0.25 ft. below grade. Locations of the M&E explorations (designated T-1 through T-37) are shown on Figure 3. Results of the laboratory analyses detected the following: ¾ ¾ ¾ Concentrations of arsenic ranging up to 44.2 mg/kg. With the exception of one sample (T-9), the levels of arsenic detected exceeded RSR criteria. Concentrations of lead ranging from 36.6 mg/kg to 940 mg/kg. PAHs were detected in all samples tested except T-9. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from <1 to 95.2 mg/kg.

46

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Results of the disposal characterization detected trace levels of the VOCs chloromethane and methylene chloride, cyanide (.26 mg/kg) in one sample tested and low levels of the pesticides 4,4'-DDD, 4,4'-DDE and 4,4'-DDT. An elevated concentration of leachable lead (by TCLP) detected in one sample (10.3 mg/kg) exceeding the hazardous waste criterion of 5 mg/L for lead and indicating that materials excavated from the site may require management as hazardous waste. PCBs or herbicides were not detected in either sample and neither sample was found to be ignitable or corrosive.

Based on the results of the assessment, M&E recommended additional interim remedial actions at high traffic areas such as park entrance gates, baseball dugout benches, and the water fountain. In July 2001, M&E monitored the placement of asphalt pavement or concrete on several unvegetated, high traffic areas at Rochford Field. The areas that were paved included: locations near the entrance gate, around the dugout areas, under the bleachers and adjacent to the water fountain. M&E reportedly encountered "old batteries" during remedial efforts for the southern dugout area. M&E also supervised the placement sod in the area of sprinkler lines and the placement of grass seed in the vicinity of sprinkler system manifolds and along the fenceline (289). The objective of the M&E work was to minimize potential exposure to arsenic-containing soils in high traffic areas (289). Following the M&E remediation, the Town reopened Rochford Field for public use. In 2002, Haley & Aldrich conducted a subsurface exploration program in Rochford Field including test pits, test borings and the installation of monitoring wells. Results of the Haley & Aldrich investigations are documented in a 9 December 2002 reports titled "Report on Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" and "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut". During the investigation, Haley & Aldrich found materials attributable to WRA and consistent with the recollections of Mr. Landino and Mr. Carbrey. E. Hamden Community Center Newhall Street School (now Hamden Community Center, 496 Newhall Street) was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1917 (15, 302). The school was constructed on previously undeveloped land that the Town of Hamden purchased on 13 July 1917 from People's Bank and Trust (See Site Chronology and copies of Deeds in Appendix F) (516). The original school building is currently the southern portion of the community center. The northern extension of the building was constructed in the early 1950s, originally as a gymnasium and auditorium area (78, 81, 86, 90, 92). The extension was constructed on land that the Town of Hamden acquired from the NHW in 1924. Prior to construction of the building expansion, the area north of the school was used as a playground. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter evidence of historic wetlands, waterbodies, or significant filling at the 496 Newhall Street property prior to construction of the school building or the northern addition (1, 13, 15 -18, 41-57, 205, 340). Reports of site filling were limited to disposal of coal ash from the school furnace in a low area along the edge of the woods to the north of the school building and minor amounts of ash from a small, open burning pit for waste paper (426, 478).

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Haley & Aldrich encountered several complaints regarding papers blowing onto the school ground from the adjacent Winchester dump (1946 and 1947) and complaints of ash and dust nuisance from the Winchester dump (1940 and 1941) (357, 358, 359). In 1941, Winchester reported to the Town that they would endeavor to place material as far from the school as possible, and that "during the summer vacation (1941) would fill in the southerly portion of the dump completely" (356, 357). In 1946, the Town Health Director recommended extending the fence at the school around the playground so "the public will not use this area for dumping purposes as they are doing at the present" and to "prevent children from going into the dirty dump during recess" (426). In 1947, Winchester reported they would stop the practice of burning paper at the dump (54). The Newhall Street School was used as an elementary school until about 1980 (29). In the 1980s and early 1990s, the building was used by the Town for office space, and was sometimes called the "Michael Whalen Annex." The building is currently used as a daycare and community center and as a Middle School Annex, for extra classroom space. According to information obtained by Haley & Aldrich from interviews with Town of Hamden employees, the existing 6,000-gallon heating oil UST at the Hamden Community Center was installed in 1988 or 1989 to replace a former 10,000-gallon UST (310, 311). The former UST, an unlined steel tank, was installed in June 1950. Prior to that time, the school used coal to heat the school building (426, 435, 478). The existing UST is a fiberglass tank. A Town of Hamden employee who was present at the time the former UST was removed reported to Haley & Aldrich that the tank did not appear to have been leaking. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation of the tank replacement, information on the quality or disposition of the former UST, or results of chemical testing of soil samples from the UST excavation. In 2002, Haley & Aldrich conducted Phase II subsurface explorations and chemical testing of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of the existing and former USTs. The UST evaluation was documented in a 5 November 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden Connecticut." Results of the Haley & Aldrich assessment did not detect evidence of releases from the existing or former UST. Sanitary sewers have been available in the Newhall Street areas since as early as 1924 (15, 17-19). Haley & Aldrich reviewed a map showing a Town of Hamden sewer right of way that ran northerly from the west side of the Newhall Street School through the Newhall Swamp (18). Haley & Aldrich did not encounter information on the date of the connection of the Newhall Street School to the sanitary sewers. It is possible that prior to 1924, the school may have discharged sanitary sewerage into a cesspool or the wetland area immediately to the north (the current Newhall Street Field). On 16 December 2000, at the request of CTDEP and DPH, FSS collected soil samples from depths of .2 to .5 ft. and 1 to 1.25 ft. at approximately five locations (exploration numbers 57, 58, 54, 68, 69 on Figure 3) around the perimeter of the community center building. Soil samples were tested for total RCRA 8 metals and PAHs. Results of the analyses detected arsenic in excess of RSR criteria in one sample (sample 68) and the PAH benzo(b)fluoranthene in excess of RSR criteria on another sample (sample 64) (212).

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Subsequently, on 29 December 2000, CTDEP collected shallow soil samples (0-0.5 ft. depth) from nine additional locations around the outside of the Hamden Community Center (SS-1 through SS-9 on Figure 3). Soil samples were tested for total arsenic and SVOCs. The sampling program was conducted to address the concern of possible impacts to children attending a day-care center in the Community Center building. Results of the CTDEP soil testing detected arsenic in excess of RSR criteria at one location (20.7 mg/kg and 31.3 mg/kg in the duplicate sample) and SVOCs at concentrations in excess of CTDEP RSR residential DEC in samples from 5 locations (304). CTDEP reported that the type and concentrations of compounds detected were not similar, or detected concentrations were less than those on adjacent Newhall Street Field (218, 220, 231, 236). In a subsequent, 18 April 2001 "Health Consultation for the Newhall Street School" DPH concluded that because the Hamden Community Center did not have a playground or other exposed soil area where the children might be exposed to SVOC contaminants, the contaminants detected in soils at that site did not represent a health risk (268, 269). In December 2000, The Hamden Board of Education contracted with Aquatek Laboratories to sample the potable water supply at the Hamden Community Center. Results of chemical analysis of a drinking water sample did not detect heavy metals at concentrations above laboratory detection limits (194). F. Mill Rock Park The Town acquired Mill Rock Park, also known as the Rochford Field Annex, from Thomas and Inez Cleary on 11 September 1939 (See Site Chronology and copies of Deeds in Appendix F) (514). During the Clearys ownership, the parcel was used as a public refuse dump. When acquired by the Town, it was developed as a park in 1940 (33, 36, 37, 340, 360). Playground equipment, tennis and basketball courts were added to the Annex in 1953 and 1954. In 1954, the Town of Hamden installed a "hard surface" which was flooded in the winter to create a skating pond (364). In 1958, a fence was installed along the rear of the park between Winchester Avenue and Wadsworth Street (372). In 1992, Mill Rock Park was renovated. The renovations included installation of a waterline, placement of approximately 1,300 cubic yards of gravel fill, installation of playground equipment and repairs to the basketball courts (135). The Mill Rock Park parcel was used as a refuse dump in the 1930s. Prior to that time, the parcel was undeveloped (28, 33, 36). An 1870 map of the area showed a former roadway (known as "Old Highway") running through an undeveloped area, and across a stream on the eastern portion of the property (1). A 1913 NHW plan shows a "swamp" with reported surface water elevations of 52.5 to 59 ft. at the approximate location of the Annex (340). The western and southern portions of the park were originally wetland areas. Drainage trenches were observed running east west across a grassy area in the central and eastern part of the property in a 1934 aerial photograph reviewed by Haley & Aldrich. The trenches were likely associated with an area-wide mosquito control program (ditching) (22). During the Phase I, Haley & Aldrich encountered a number of references to a public refuse dump on Mill Rock Street (341, 343, 350, 354, 355, 363, 398). The refuse dump may have been referred to as the "Mill Rock dump", "Wadsworth Street dump", "Winchester Avenue dump", and possibly the "Morse Street dump" at

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various times during the 1930s and 1940s. However, the Morse Street dump may be the WRA dump at the Hamden Middle School site. The New Haven Water Company suggested the name change in 1947 when it conveyed to the Town "a line 400 ft. perpendicularly distant and parallel to the westerly line of Newhall Street" (68). A photograph in the 1939 Hamden Annual Report showed a "public dump" on the Mill Rock Park site (33). A copy of the photograph is included in Appendix C. The public refuse dump, located on land owned by Thomas and Inez Cleary, reportedly originally encompassed the area between Mill Rock Road, Winchester Avenue, Morse Street and Wadsworth Street and operated from the 1920s or early 1930s through 1941 (363). The earliest reference to the Mill Rock dump encountered by Haley & Aldrich was an 19 June 1934 article in the New Haven Register that reported the 18 June 1934 fire at the Mill Rock dump and stated that a watch would be kept at dump in future to prevent other fires (398). The Town of Hamden acquired the land containing the northernmost portion of the refuse dump, including Mill Rock Park, in September 1939 and closed the dump. According to a 14 May 1940 article in the New Haven Register, the Town Selectmen recommended planting a row of shrubbery "on the rear" of the new park to "block the view of the remaining dump area at Mill Rock" (360). The remainder of the dump, located on privately-owned land south of Mill Rock Park (now Bryden Terrace), was closed in May 1941 (363). According to information in the 1942 Hamden Annual Report, by 1942, a dump on Arch Street in Hamden was the only "available dumping space" for Hamden residents (38). On 27 December 2000 CTDEP drilled 15 geoprobe explorations (SS-01 to SS-13, SS16 and SS-17) to depths ranging from 4 to 12 ft. (304) at various locations within Mill Rock Park. CTDEP also installed five temporary microwells in geoprobe explorations SS-01, SS-04, SS-07, SS-09, and SS-11. Sample locations are shown on Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. Explorations generally encountered fill materials overlying alluvium and glacial meltwater deposits. CTDEP collected soil samples from depths of 0 to 4 ft. below grade in the explorations. Soil samples were tested for TPH, VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, cyanide, and metals. Results of the soil analyses detected up to 4,000 mg/kg of ETPH, in excess of RSR DEC and PMC, in 3 of 17 samples tested. Chemical testing detected 29 mg/kg of arsenic, in excess of the RSR DEC, in one sample. Concentrations of lead and antimony exceeded the RSR PMC in several of the soil samples tested, with concentrations up to 0.07 mg/kg and 0.014 mg/kg respectively. The soil analyses also detected elevated concentrations of several SVOCs, at levels in excess of RSR criteria (215, 220). On 28 December, CTDEP collected groundwater samples from microwells SS-01, SS-04, SS-07, SS-09, and SS-11 for chemical analysis for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, and cyanide. Results of the analyses detected metals in all the samples tested. Low levels of the VOCs dichloromethane and chloroform were detected in the water sample from SS-11. Trace to low levels (less than 4 ug/l) of SVOCs were detected in groundwater samples from SS-01 and SS-09; SVOCs (2.5 to 15.45 ug/l) were also detected in the groundwater sample from SS-11. Cyanide was not detected in the groundwater samples tested (331).

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On 17 and 24 January 2001, CTDEP collected an additional 15 shallow soil samples from depths of 0 to 6 inches below grade at the Mill Rock Park. Locations of the soil samples (RF-01 to RF-13, RF-16, and RF-20) are shown on Figure 3. Soil samples were tested for ETPH, SVOCs, PCBs, pesticides, metals, and cyanide. Results of chemical testing of the samples detected up to 28.58 mg/kg of arsenic in three of the samples tested. Laboratory analyses also detected SVOCs, including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene and indeno(1,2,3cd)pyrene, in excess of RSR DEC (237, 253). On 15 March 2001, CTDEP collected samples of playground sand from depths of 0 to .5 ft. below grade at 10 locations in Mill Rock Park. Sample locations are designated as RFA-18 to RFA-27 in Figure 3. The sand samples were analyzed for total arsenic to address concerns relative to the potential presence of arsenic in the shallow soils. Previous analyses of surficial soils in Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park had detected elevated levels of arsenic. Results of the analyses did not detect elevated concentrations of arsenic in the playground sand (304, 324). In 2002, Haley & Aldrich conducted a subsurface exploration program in Mill Rock Park including test pits, test borings and the installation of monitoring wells. Results of the Haley & Aldrich investigations are documented in a 9 December 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" and "Report On Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut." G. Sewer Pump Station The sewer pump station, located at the intersection of Mill Rock Road and Winchester Avenue, was constructed on filled land in 1952 (84). The pump station is on land that was acquired by the Town from Thomas and Inez Cleary on 11 September 1939 (See Site Chronology and copies of Deeds in Appendix F) (514). Town records list the deed for the sewer pump station as the same deed for Rochford Field Annex (Mill Rock Park). Historic aerial photographs show a former wetland on the site of the pump station. Based on a review of historic aerial photographs and other documents, the property and the adjacent Mill Rock Park site may have been used for disposal of residential refuse (28, 33). The site was apparently filled, graded and developed as an open field (part of Mill Rock Park) in 1939 or early 1940 (15, 28, 75, 78, 360). The pump station was constructed as part of the establishment of a sewer district in the Mill Rock area (82). The system was expanded to include the Michael J. Whalen Junior High School in the mid-1950s (84). During record reviews conducted as part of the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich reviewed construction/bid specifications for the pump station (366), but did not encounter construction records, or evidence of previous explorations or chemical testing on the pump station property. H. Historical Topographic and Property Maps and Atlases Haley & Aldrich reviewed a series of historic subdivision plans and similar maps on file at the Town of Hamden municipal offices. The following is a description of several of the plans that contained information pertinent to the Phase I ESA:

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A February 1870 Map showed 121 proposed building lots in New Haven and Hamden including the southern portion of the site. The proposed residential lots were located to the south of Morse Street between Shelton Avenue west of the site and Winchester Avenue (shown on the plan as Canal Street). The map showed Newhall Street (known as Cohansey Avenue) and Mill Rock Road (called Mill Rock Street); Newbury Street, or the residential streets in Parcel 3 (Remington, Harris and Augur Streets) were not present. The map also showed a street called "Old Highway" that branched northeasterly off of Canal Street (Winchester Avenue) in the location of the current Bryden Terrace and Mill Rock Park (1). Morse Street is shown on the map as ending at Canal Street (now Winchester Avenue), Newbury Street or Bryden Terrace area not present. An 1885 Map showed 60 proposed building lots that showed Augur, Harris and Newhall Streets in the northern portion of the site (Parcel 3) and a series of residential building lots on those roadways (2). A June 1910 map showed proposed building lots that included the western and southern portions of the site. The property in Parcel 1 and the site of the Newhall Street School is shown as vacant land on the map. Several residences are present on the south side of Morse Street, near the intersection of Newhall Street. The map showed proposed building lots in Parcel 2D, south of Morse Street, however, existing homes were not shown in that Parcel (5). A 1913 New Haven Water Company map showed the location and elevations of a large wetland/swamp that extended from the east side of the site (Mill Rock Park, Bryden Terrace area), through Rochford Field, and the site of the Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Fields and discharged into a tributary to the Mill River that flowed northerly to the Pine Swamp (340). A February 1916 plan showed residences on Harris Street and the west side of Newhall Street, north of the current Middle School site. Remington Street is shown as "Central Lane" on the plan (7). A September 1924 Plan showed the proposed right of way for the Town of Hamden Trunk Line Sewer. The sewer right of way was shown immediately west of the Newhall Street School between Morse and Augur Streets. The map showed a fence separating Water Company land from a residential area on Harris and Augur Streets (18). A 1947 USGS Topographic Quadrangle Map of New Haven showed: the Newhall Street School (without northern addition), residences on the north side of Morse Street (Parcel 1), several residences on Augur and Harris Streets (Parcel 3), approximately six residences in the south and east portions of Parcel 2B and one structure at the site of the bleachers in Rochford Field. A stream was shown in the area immediately north of the current Middle School site. The Middle School was not present, Bryden Terrace was not present, and the remainder of the site appeared vacant. The site area was sparsely developed, the SNET facility or industrial park were not present. The Mill Rock water tanks to the north of the site and the railroad tracks to the west of the site were present (46).

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A 1949 plan titled "Plan for the Proposed Development ­Trade School" showed topographic features, the edge of the WRA landfill, landfill entrances and the locations of explorations completed for the Trade School design (364). An August 1954 Plan showed the proposed layout of 12 lots north of Bryden Terrace, west of Wadsworth Street. The plan showed two of these lots existing with homes located at the northeast corner of the intersection of Bryden Terrace (proposed road) and Winchester Avenue and at the intersection of the proposed Bryden Terrace and Wadsworth Street (87). A March 1956 Plan shoed the proposed layout of 12 lots south of Bryden Terrace, west of Wadsworth Street. No existing homes were indicated on the plan (88). A 1954 USGS Quadrangle Map showed the Newhall Street School and northern addition to the school. The residential block to the east of the school (Parcel 2B) had been developed. Parcels 1 and 3 appeared similar to the 1947 topographic map. Bryden Terrace was not present. Residences were present on the north side of Morse Street in Parcel 2C. The site of the current Middle School and Newhall Street Fields were shown as wetlands. The SNET facility or industrial park was not present in the area to the west/northwest of the site; the maps show these areas as undeveloped. A topographically low area was shown between North Sheffield and Prospect Lane to the south of the site (86). A 1967 USGS Quadrangle Map showed the site roadways and town-owned buildings similar to the current configuration. A low or wetland area was present to the immediate west of the Middle School, encompassing the majority of the current Newhall Street Field. The wetland corridor west of Parcel 3 was present. The SNET facility was shown to the west of the site, however, the industrial park to the northwest was not present. The topographic low remained in the area between North Sheffield and Prospect Lane south of the site (94). A 1972 USGS Quadrangle Map appeared similar to the 1967 Quadrangle map. The topographic low or wetland area on the western side of the Middle School property appeared smaller than on the 1967 map. The wetland corridor west of Parcel 3 was present. The industrial park, currently located northwest of the site was not present (94).

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I.

Sanborn Maps Haley & Aldrich reviewed Sanborn maps dated 1924, 1950, and 1967 for the site and vicinity (15, 78, 92). Copies of Sanborn maps are included in Appendix C. 1924 Sanborn Map ¾ The 1924 map showed some residential development in the western, southern and northern portions of the site. Map coverage did not extend into the eastern part of the site. Residences were present on the north side of Morse Street, near the intersection with Shelton Avenue and on the south side of Morse Street, across from the Newhall Street School. Residences were also

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present on the west side of Winchester Avenue, south of Marlboro Street and one residence was present at the northwest corner of the intersection of Winchester Avenue and Marlboro Street. Bryden Terrace was not present. Newbury Street was shown on the map as an unnamed, unimproved roadway. The remainder of the central portion of the site was vacant. The Sanborn Map coverage did not extent east of Winchester Street. ¾ On the north side of the site (Parcel 3), the map showed several residences on the west side of Newhall Street, north of Mill Rock Road, two residences on Harris Street, four on Central Lane (now Remington Street) and seven on Augur Street (including 342 Augur). The 1924 map depicted a stream in the area west of Augur, Harris, and Mill Rock Roads and at the site of the current Hamden Middle School. The 1924 Sanborn Map showed the former Newhall Street School building (now Hamden Community Center) as a rectangular structure at the corner of Newhall and Morse Streets. The area immediately west of Newhall Street School between the school and a residence at 259 Morse Street was undeveloped. The areas south, southwest, north, and northeast of the site appeared to be primarily residential.

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1950 Sanborn Map ¾ The western side of the site, including Morse Street (Parcel 1) and the Newhall Street School and the residential area in the northern portion of the site (Parcel 3), appeared relatively similar to the 1924 Sanborn map. There had been limited residential development on Augur and Harris Streets and Central Lane has been renamed Remington Street. The 1950 map showed significant residential development on the east side of the site (Parcels 2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), relative to the 1924 map. Two residences (165-167 and 171-175 Morse Street) had been constructed on the north side of Morse Street between Newhall Street and Winchester Avenue. An additional residence was present on the west side of Newhall Street (484-486 Newhall) near the intersection with Morse Street. Since 1924, six homes had been constructed on the west side of Winchester Avenue (1026, 1030, 1032, 1036, 1042 and 1048 Winchester Avenue), however, the remainder of the area north of Morse Street between Newhall Street and Winchester Avenue remained undeveloped. The 1950 Sanborn Map showed significant residential development in the area south of the Morse Street between Newhall Street and Winchester Avenue relative to the 1924 map. Bryden Terrace was not present on the 1950 map. The 1950 map showed Rochford Field as a "Playground" with bleachers and a toilet facility. The Middle School site and Mill Rock Park remained undeveloped. The sewer pump station was not present. The 1950 map showed significant development of the areas north and south of the site. The Mill Rock Reservoir water tanks are shown to the northeast; the area to the north is generally residential. A Winchester Repeating Arms facility is shown on the north side of Putnam Street at the intersection with Newhall Street, approximately 700 ft. north of the site. The area south of

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Marlboro Street and Morse Street had been developed with residences and commercial buildings. A steam laundry facility was shown at 266 Morse Street, south of the site. 1967 Sanborn Map ¾ The northern and western portions of the site (Parcels 1 and 3) appeared similar to the 1950 Sanborn map although the Mill Rock Mall (condominiums) had been constructed on the north side of Mill Rock Road near Newhall Street. The 1967 map showed that during the period from 1950 to 1967, Bryden Terrace had been constructed and residences were present on the north and south sides of that road Three homes (numbers 46, 52 and 60) were also shown on the west side of Wadsworth Street. Additional residences had been constructed relative to the 1950 map: on the east side of Winchester Avenue between Morse and Mill Rock Streets; and the west side of Winchester Avenue, south of Newbury Street; on the north side of Morse Street, on the south side of Newbury Street, and on the east side of Newhall Street across from Newhall Street School. The 1967 Sanborn Map showed the northern addition (including the gymnasium, auditorium and stage) to the Newhall Street School. The Middle School (shown as the Michael J. Whalen Junior High School) was shown to the north of the Newhall Street School. Rochford Field was shown similar to the 1950 map. The sewer pump station was present at the corner of the Winchester Avenue and Mill Rock Road. Mill Rock Park was not shown on the map, although the park was reportedly developed in the early 1940s. The area to the south of the site had been developed with more commercial buildings. The Steam Laundry at 266 Morse Street had been replaced with an expanded structure labeled as a plumbing, heating and mill supply business. A large, iron building (labeled as vacant) was shown at the southeast corner of the intersection of Marlboro and Shelton. The area north and east of the site had had significant residential development compared to the 1950 Sanborn map.

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Photographs Haley & Aldrich reviewed a series of historic aerial photographs of the site dated 1934, 1946, 1949, 1951, 1963, 1966, 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1990, 1996 and 1998 (28, 75, 81, 90, 91, 95, 99, 104, 107, 113, 163, 165) and two historic photographs in the 1939 Hamden Annual Report (33). Note that an 18 April 1995 aerial photograph is also available at CTDEP Natural Resources Center but was not reviewed for this study. 1934 Aerial Photograph ¾ The 1934 photograph showed approximately 15 residences, on the north side of Morse Street, extending east from the western site property line to the Newhall Street School.

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Two residences were present on the north side of Morse Street in the center of the block between Newhall Street and Winchester Avenue. Three other homes were present on the west side of Winchester Avenue, north of Morse Street. Winchester Avenue ends at the location of current Newbury Street. Newbury Street was present as an apparent path or unfinished roadway. The majority of Parcel 2D, south of Morse Street, appeared developed with residences in the 1934 photograph. The northwestern corner of the Parcel, however, appeared to be an open grass field. The eastern side of Parcel 3, along Newhall Street, north of Mill Rock Road, was also developed with residences. The 1934 aerial photograph showed two large, undeveloped and vegetated wetland areas including the land currently occupied by the Hamden Middle School, Newhall Street Field soccer fields and tennis courts (west wetland) and the land currently occupied by Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park (east wetland). The east wetland area also included Parcel 2A, the northern and western portions of Parcel 2B, including the site of the current Newbury Street, and the majority of Parcel 2C, including the site of the current Bryden Terrace. An apparent stream or surface water feature extended southerly through the area west of Augur Street, through the Middle School property, beneath Newhall Street, across the center of Rochford Field and into the eastern wetland area. Several areas within or adjacent to the wetland areas were observed to be disturbed and appeared to be possible fill material. On the eastern side of the west wetland, at the site of the current Hamden Middle School, the land appeared disturbed and several roads and/or pathways were visible through light vegetation. Two lobes of apparent fill material also extended into the east wetland; one located at the north-central portion and one at the northwestern portion. The area along Morse Street between Parcel 1 (approximately 15 residences) and the Newhall Street School also appeared disturbed. The eastern portion of the area currently occupied by Mill Rock Park appeared to be an open field with apparent drainage ditches running westerly into the wetland area. Winchester Avenue ended in the area where Newbury Street and Bryden Terrace currently exist. A path or unfinished road was observed in the approximate location of Newbury Street. An undeveloped area that does not appear to be wetlands was present north of the intersection of Morse Street and Winchester Avenue. The 1934 photograph showed the area to the west of the site as a mixture of residential properties and agricultural fields. Wetlands extended north of the site via a corridor to the west of Parcel 3. An area of cleared land, that may have been farm fields, was present immediately west of the wetland corridor, at the site of the current industrial park. The area to the east of Parcel 3 and north of the Rochford Field (Mill Rock) was undeveloped. A building in the center of the cleared area may be the former Hamden Airport. Properties to the east of the subject site appeared to be a mix of residential, cleared and undeveloped land. Property to the south of the subject site appeared to be generally residential. An open, disturbed area was observed in the block bounded by Newhall Street, Marlboro Street, Goodrich Street and Winchester Avenue. A large open, grassy area was observed to the south of Morse Street on the east side of Winchester Avenue (at the site of current North Sheffield Street and Prospect Lane).

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Photographs in the 1939 Hamden Annual Report ¾ Two photographs, included in the 1939 Hamden Annual Report, are labeled as Rochford Field, 1939 and former "public dump" 1934. The photograph of Rochford Field, shows the completed athletic field, with a baseball diamond and lawn area. The other photograph shows a dump area, including a pile of burning refuse. During the review of the photographs, Haley & Aldrich noted that the photograph of the dump area appears to have been taken at the same time as the Rochford Field photograph. When placed side by side, the two photographs comprise a wide angle or panoramic view of the Rochford Field and current Mill Rock Park areas. As such, the "public dump" shown in the photograph appears to have been located at the site of the current Mill Rock Park (on the east side of the intersection of Winchester Avenue and Mill Rock Road) in 1939.

1946 Photograph (undated, 1946) ¾ Haley & Aldrich reviewed a 1946 photograph of Rochford Field and vicinity on file at the Town of Hamden Library. The photograph appears to be taken from a similar location as the photograph in the 1939 Hamden Annual Report. The photograph shows a baseball diamond, goal posts and lawn area within Rochford Field. The site of the current Middle School and Soccer Field is visible in the rear of the photograph and appears to have been filled compared to the earlier (1939) photograph. Newhall Street School and residences on the west side of Newhall Street, south of the school are also visible in the photograph. The location of current Mill Rock Park appears to be undeveloped (322).

1949 Aerial Photograph (21 April 1949) ¾ Parcels 1, 2D, and 3 appeared similar to the 1934 photograph. With the exception of an area of disturbed or cleared land near the intersection of Newhall and Morse Street, Parcel 2B also appeared similar to the 1934 photograph. In the 1949 photograph, the former wetland area north of Morse Street, on the east side of Winchester Avenue had been filled and Parcel 2A and the northern portion of parcel 2C appeared to be open grass fields with no indications of a wetland or other water body present. Approximately 8 residences were present on the north side of Morse Street in the southern portion of Parcel 2C. The Newhall Street School was similar to that observed in the 1934 photograph. The western wetland area, north of the school building appeared smaller in size than in the 1934 aerial photograph. An area of disturbed land extended west from Newhall Street into an area where wetlands were present in the 1934 photograph. The disturbed land appeared to contain various roads and paths and based on this and the sharp contrast with the wetland area, appeared to be fill material. The east wetland area that was observed in the 1934 photograph was no longer present. Mill Rock Park was an open grassy field with no indication of a wetland. However, a water filled ditch appears to be located along the

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northern limits of Parcel 2A and ponded water may be located in the area of the future pump station. Rochford Field was present and was separated from Parcel 2B by a roadway (Newbury Street). Winchester Avenue was observed to extend north to its current configuration, ending at Mill Rock Road and separating Rochford Field from the current site of Mill Rock Park and Parcel 2A. The sewer pump station was not present. ¾ Properties adjacent to the subject site appeared similar to that observed in the 1934 aerial photograph, except that a path or unimproved roadway is visible running roughly east to west along the south boundary of the future site of the current Hamden Industrial Park.

1951 Aerial Photograph (2 August 1951) ¾ Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3 appeared similar to the 1949 photograph. With the exception that the open ditch along the northern side of Parcel 2A has been filled. The addition to the Newhall School is under construction Additional filling of the Newhall Street Athletic Field has occurred The future sewer pump station site has been filled. A second path or unimproved roadway is visible running from the southwest corner of the future site of the current Hamden Industrial Park to the center of the parcel.

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1963 Aerial Photograph (3 July 1963) ¾ Generally, the configuration of streets at the subject site in the 1963 aerial photo appeared similar to current conditions. Parcels 1, 2B, 2D, and 3 appeared similar to the 1949 photograph. Parcels 2A and 2C had been developed with residences and Bryden Terrace was shown in its current configuration. Rochford Field appeared similar to the 1949 photograph. Mill Rock Park was present, as was a small building on the south side of Mill Rock Road that appeared to be the current sewer pump house. No prominent wetland areas were observed in the photograph. The 1963 photograph showed the northern addition to the Newhall Street School and the Hamden Middle School buildings. A small playing field and lawn area was present in the area immediately west of the Middle School. A small wetland area was observed at the northwest portion of the Hamden Middle School property. Thick vegetation was shown along the western and the southern boundaries of the Middle School/Newhall Street Field site, near the northern boundary of Parcel 1. The north central portion of the Hamden Middle School Property appeared disturbed and unvegetated and a road or pathway was present leading into the area from Mill Rock Road. The area adjacent to the subject site was observed to be generally similar to previous aerial photographs, except that the SNET facility was observed immediately west of the subject site.

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A third path or unimproved roadway is visible running from the southwest corner of the future site of the current Hamden Industrial Park between the previous two paths to the east side of the parcel. 1965-1966 Aerial Photographs (2 March 1965 and 8 March 1966) ¾ During a review of the 1965 and 1966 photographs, Haley & Aldrich noted that the site and surrounding areas appeared generally similar to the 1963 aerial photograph. Playing fields were noted in the area immediately west of the Middle School buildings, beyond that the property appeared covered in unkempt vegetation. A small wetland, observed in the northwest corner of the Hamden Middle School property, appeared more prominent than that observed in the 1963 aerial photograph. The photographs also appeared to show flooding in several areas of the Middle School playing fields. Areas adjacent to the subject site were similar to previous aerial photos, except that a possible apartment building was observed to the east of Parcel 3.

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1970 Aerial Photograph (1 March and 18 October 1970) ¾ ¾ No significant changes from the 1966 aerial photos were observed at the subject site. Areas adjacent to the subject site appeared similar to previous aerial photographs, except that the area on the north side of Mill Rock Road, north of Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, appeared to be developed with residences.

1975 Aerial Photograph (27 March and 23 April 1975) ¾ The 1975 photograph showed some minor changes to the configuration of tennis and basketball courts on the west side of the Middle School buildings. Additionally, the photographs showed small roads or paths on the Middle School property leading from the playing field areas and along the northern property boundary leading to the vegetated and wetland area. No other obvious disturbance of this undeveloped area was observed. No other significant changes were observed relative to the 1970 aerial photograph. A fourth path or unimproved roadway is visible running from the southeast corner of the future site of the current Hamden Industrial Park roughly west by northwest to Dixwell Avenue.

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1980 Aerial Photograph (6 April 1980) ¾ With the exception of the western portion of the Middle School property, the subject site appeared similar to the 1975 aerial photographs. The vegetation observed at the western half of the Middle School property had been cleared and the area appeared to be as grass playing field. The small wetland area at the northwest portion of the Middle School property was visible in the photograph as a small area of ponded water. Other additions at the Middle School included two possibly paved strips presumably used for track and field events.

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Areas adjacent to the subject site appeared generally similar to previous aerial photographs, except for property to the northwest (the site of the current Hamden Industrial Park). The photographs showed the apparent effects of increased vehicular traffic along several of the roadways on the parcel. 1986 Aerial Photograph (29 March 1986) ¾ The subject site appeared generally similar to the 1980 aerial photo. The ponded water was not observed at the northwest corner of the Middle School property, however, the area appeared slightly darker than the surrounding fields. Areas adjacent to the subject site appeared similar to previous aerial photographs, except for property to the northwest. The roads of the current industrial park are in place and two buildings were being constructed in the portion of the park abutting the SNET facility. A dirt road or pathway connected the Middle School property to the industrial park.

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1990 Aerial Photograph (13 March 1990) ¾ With the exception of two additional residences, which were observed on the eastern portion of Parcel 1, the 1990 photograph showed the site as generally similar to the 1986 aerial photograph. An outline of the former ponded water area was observed at the northwest portion of the Middle School property. Haley & Aldrich also observed evidence of damage to buildings in the site vicinity, reportedly due to a tornado that passed through the area of the subject site several months prior to the date the photograph was taken. Areas adjacent to the subject site appeared similar to previous aerial photographs, except for additional buildings present at the industrial park to the northwest. Debris deposited by the tornado was observed in the wetland area west of Parcel 3.

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1996 Aerial Photograph (24 April 1996) ¾ The 1996 photograph showed what appeared to be the ongoing construction of the HRP soil cap at the Hamden Middle School. The construction/cap area covered the Middle School property west of the school buildings. The photograph also showed additional development at Mill Rock Park, presumably recreational facilities added during the 1992 redevelopment of the Park. The remaining properties at the subject site and in the site area appeared similar to conditions observed in the 1990 aerial photograph.

1998 Aerial Photograph (uncertain date, 1998) ¾ The 1998 photograph appears similar to the 1996 aerial photograph, except for portions of the Hamden Middle School Property. The area of the HRP cap was grass-covered and was being used as playing fields for the adjacent Middle School.

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Areas adjacent to the subject site appeared similar to previous aerial photographs. Haley & Aldrich observed stockpiles of containers or cable spools in the rear of the SNET property adjacent to the east of the subject site.

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City Directories During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich reviewed Hamden City Directories, at approximate 5 year intervals for the period from 1936 to 1998 (29). Refer to Figure 5, Development History, for locations of properties discussed below. ¾ Based on a review of the directories, Parcels 1, 2D, and 3 have been developed with residences since at least the 1930s. The majority of the residences in Parcel 1, on the north side of Morse Street, were present as early as 1936; two residences (249-251 and 253-255 Morse Street) were constructed in approximately 1990. Residences have been present in most parts of the site area since the 1950s. Bryden Terrace and associated residences were constructed in the 1950s. The property at 496 Newhall Street (currently the Hamden Community Center) was listed as the Newhall Street School prior to 1980. In the 1980 City Directory, the property was referred to as the "Michael Whalen Annex." During the period from 1986 to 1998, the property was listed as the "Town of Hamden, the Hamden Department of Fire Services" and in 1991, as the "Harris and Tucker Adventist School." The Hamden Middle School first appeared in the Directory listings in the late 1950s. Prior to 1986, the site was listed as the Michael J. Whalen Junior High School. In 1986, the school was renamed "Hamden Middle School." Rochford Field was listed in City Directories after 1965. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter listings for Newhall Street Field, Mill Rock Park or the sewer pump station during the review of the directories. Information in the City Directories indicated that the properties in Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3 were used for residential purposes during the period from 1956 to 1991. Additional information on the historic usage of the six parcels is included in individual Parcel Reports in Appendix B of this report.

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Historic Use of Properties Adjacent to, and In the Site Vicinity The site, which was historically known as the "Highwood District," is located near New Haven and the historic area of Whitneyville, which was developed prior to the 1800s. The area south of the site has historically been used for residential, commercial and industrial purposes since prior to the early 1900s. The area immediately south of the site, including Morse, Marlboro and Goodrich Streets was developed in the mid to late 1800s or early 1900s (1,2,5,7,15,18,28). Prior to that time, the area was part of a large farm owned by the Goodrich family (480). In the 1800s, trolley lines ran north along Winchester and Shelton Avenues, ending in the block between Goodrich and Morse Streets. A railroad or trolley station was formerly present at the corner of Shelton Avenue and Goodrich Street, near the terminus of the tracks. Several industrial facilities or properties have been historically located in the area south of Morse Street on the western side of the site.

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The Hamden Laundry Company was located at 266 Morse Street in 1950, and became the location of "Mill Supplies" (78, 92). In addition, by 1967 a "plumbing Supplies Warehouse" was located at 308 Morse Street and 208 Morse Street was the location of a "Plumbing and Heating" business (92). Haley & Aldrich encountered anecdotal reports of the historic filling of several areas along Shelton, Butler, Newhall and Edwards Street with coke or cinders (304, 308, 322). In addition, according to documents on file at the Hamden Library, the "entire block" between Edwards, Goodrich, St. Mary, and Morse Streets was "filled in during World War I (beginning in circa 1917) by the Winchester Company" (332). Reportedly, the fill in that area extended to a depth of 15 ft. below "street level" (322). Prior to 1917, a skating pond was located within the Edwards/Goodrich/St. Mary/Morse Street block (322). The location of the former skating pond is shown on Figure 4 and in a map included in Appendix C. Reports from the turn of the century also indicate that the Highwood district contained a large pigsty, which was the dumping ground for the greater part of the garbage from New Haven. The location of the pigsty is not certain. By 1917, three "public dumps" had reportedly been established in Hamden, one of which was located on Shelton Avenue, between Goodrich and Morse Streets. In the 1930s and early 1940s, Haley & Aldrich encountered reports of public refuse dumps on Newhall Street "between Goodrich and Marlboro Streets", and on the east side of Columbus Street, north of Morse Street (341, 362). The dumps were reportedly used for the disposal of household "rubbish," such as tin cans, etc., but not for dead animals or decaying vegetable matter, commonly referred to as "garbage" (362). Haley & Aldrich also encountered a report of a WRA "dump" located in area between Morse Street, Newhall Street, Butler Street and Goodrich Street in approximately 1915 (332) and a dump at Shelton, Marlboro and Goodrich Streets where the City of New Haven reportedly disposed of "asphalt scrapings" (463). During a review of historic records, Haley & Aldrich encountered reports of other public and private dumps near the site including private dumps on Marlboro and Morse Streets (341, 342, 463, 477, 478). Some of the private dumps may have included refuse disposal pits that were dug by residents in the rear yards of some houses to dispose of household rubbish (478). Residential homes and farms have also historically been located to the west and east of the site. The SNET facility, located immediately west of the site was built on previously undeveloped land in the 1960s (178). SNET had owned the property since as early as 1950. The southern portion of the SNET property, currently used as a training area, may have historically been used as a refuse dump. A public refuse dump was reportedly located on the east side of Columbus Avenue, north of Morse Street in the early 1940s (362). The extent of the refuse disposal area is uncertain, but may have extended through to the SNET property. Results of recent explorations at SNET reportedly encountered "asphalt at depths of 4 and 10 ft. near the fenceline with the Newhall Field and "ash, cinders, slag, glass and debris" at depths from 2 to 17 ft. below grade on the western portion of that site (463). Haley & Aldrich did not observe the fill material at the SNET site, and as such, it is not certain if it is similar to that encountered on the subject site.

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The northern portion of the SNET property, and portions of the northerly property that now contains the Hamden Industrial Park, were historically farmland from as early as 1850 through the 1920s (322). The area, which was described as a "level, sandy plain" by one former Highwood resident (Mr. Anthony Cosenza) was reportedly used as a circus lot by Barnum & Baily Circus in the 1930s (322, 332). The area was also used for baseball games by local organizations and civic groups (407, 421) prior to the development of Rochford Field. In the early 1930s, a small airport, known as the Hamden Airport, was present on the industrial park site (28, 81, 322, 405, 407, 412, 421, 477, 478). The airport reportedly consisted of a 33-acre parcel, developed with one or two hangers and grassy landing fields (405, 477). The airport reportedly owned six planes and operations included plane maintenance as well as flights (477). The airport went out of business prior to 1936; the property was sold to the Evergreen Cemetery Association and subsequently resold as an industrial parcel (405). In July 1937, the hangers were demolished (412). The Hamden Industrial Park was developed in the 1980s (104, 107). Haley & Aldrich did not encounter evidence of activities on the airport site, other than recreational and circus use, after the airport was closed and prior to construction of the industrial park. Haley & Aldrich did, however, encounter several anecdotal reports that WRA may have dumped "one or two truckloads of material" at the airport property in the 1920s (463) and that airport maintenance personnel may have dumped waste engine oil in the adjacent swamp or at the airport site (463, 477, 478). A railroad track has been located to the west of the SNET site since the 1800s. Based on a review of historical information for the area, the railroad is located on or near the site of the historic Farmington Canal (320, 322, 332). In, and prior to, the early 1900s, WRA purchased a number of properties that abutted the railroad tracks (480). One of the parcels, which was later sold to Economy Concrete and developed with an office building in 1909, was reportedly sold to WRA in 1890 for "use for the storage of powder" (322). During a review of CTDEP telephone logs from 2001, Haley & Aldrich encountered an additional report regarding the potential presence of a historic WRA powder storage site on or near the SNET property (463). The Economy Concrete site was located on Concrete Street, near the railroad tracks west of the site. Haley & Aldrich encountered a mention of unauthorized refuse disposal on that property in Hamden Board of Health meeting minutes from 1937 (322). The use of the other properties along the railroad by WRA is not certain. During the period from approximately 1900 to 1966, WRA operated a powder storage and disposal facility on Putnam Avenue, north of the site. Portions of this area, which was called the "Powder Farm" or "Pine Swamp," were also reportedly used as a landfill (15, 78). The "Powder Farm" landfill, which had been closed by 1966 was reportedly one of several properties originally considered for construction of the Middle School (221, 369). The Pine Swamp property and other WRA operations in the site area are discussed further in the following section of this report. The area to the south of Morse Street, east of Winchester Avenue included a golf course, used by Yale students and a duck pond. The duck pond, which was located to the west of the current location of North Sheffield Street (Figure 4), was filled prior to the 1940s, when North Sheffield Street and Prospect Lane were developed

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(28, 78, 322). Former "springs" were also reportedly present in this area, as well as at the base of the Prospect Street hill, probably near Mill Rock Road (478). The exact location of the "springs" is not certain. M. Winchester Company Operations in the Pine Swamp, US Repeating Arms Facility and Other Area Properties 1. History of WRA Operations in New Haven, Connecticut The Winchester Repeating Arms ("WRA") Company was formerly established by Oliver F. Winchester on February 20, 1866 (513). Its first products were rifles, particularly the repeater, and ammunition, but its product lines expanded over the years to include a number of different types of rifles and shotguns. The Winchester factory on Winchester Avenue in New Haven operated for over 100 years manufacturing rifles and shotgun, as well as ammunition, sporting goods and other items (515, 519). a. Plant Construction and Operations WRA began manufacturing guns in New Haven in the 1860s (511). By the 1880s, the factory was located on Winchester Avenue and included manufacturing areas, a brass rolling mill, metallurgy, and chemical ballistics laboratories and ammunition storage facilities (495, 512). The brass mill was later expanded in 1916 (512). By 1900, WRA employed more than 2600 workers and manufactured 15 different kinds of guns; the brass mill turned out more than 4 million pounds of metal (495). In 1911, Winchester expanded operations and constructed a nine-story tower to manufacture lead shot (495). During the first world war, the New Haven plant was expanded to produce rifles, bayonets, small arms, ammunition and machine guns for the military and allied forces (496, 511). By 1916, the plant, which had doubled its original size, employed 11,500 workers (495). The construction included two boiler houses and stacks; an incinerator for combustible wastes was added in 1947 (505). Prior to that, combustible wastes were incinerated at the Hamden Middle School site (42, 54). The incinerator was used from the late 1940s to 1970, mainly to burn plant rubbish. According to one document reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, combustible hazardous waste may have also been incinerated. Reportedly, some chemicals from the Chemical Research and Development Group were incinerated in the late 1960s; it is uncertain if chemicals were incinerated prior to that time (500). In 1981, Olin employees interviewed recalled that fly ash and bottom ash were historically removed from the factory in Olin trucks and may have been taken to the Whalen School (Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Field site) (500). In 1949, The WRA plant in New Haven covered nine city blocks and comprised 2,750,000 sq. ft. (511). In the early 1950s (1951 and 1952), Olin established the Olin Central Research and Development Laboratory in New Haven. Laboratory operations included research

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on packaging materials (cellophane and polyethylene) (488), metallurgy, plastics, organic chemicals, petrochemicals, synthetic films, firearms, ammunition and industrial and military explosives (489, 490). Subsequent research at the facility also involved work with inorganic and specialty chemicals, automotive fluids, polyurethane foams, coatings, special purpose monomers and polymers, textile finishing agents, pulp and paper chemicals, organic intermediates, industrial biocides, fluorine, phosphates, nitrogen, sulfur, soda ash, caustic, and chlorine (498). In 1956, Olin Mathieson established a pilot plant to assemble nuclear reactor cores at the Winchester Plant in New Haven (493,494). The New Haven plant assumed full production status in 1958, and by 1959 occupied 206,000 sq. ft of office and manufacturing area (494). Operations in New Haven, which included both manufacturing and a new Nuclear Fuel Research Laboratory, included research, development and production of nuclear fuel elements and nuclear reactor cores (494). According to documents reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, the facility was staffed and equipped for "fuel element fabrication, fuel alloys, nuclear materials, ceramics, powder metallurgy, extractive metallurgy, and fuel element reprocessing" (494). In October 1957, Olin began construction of a plant in Montville, Connecticut specifically designed to assemble nuclear reactor cores (493). The Montville facility was completed in summer 1958 (494). b. WRA Products Although WRA began by producing rifles, its product lines expanded over the years to include a number of different types of guns, ammunition and other items. After World War I, Winchester expanded their line of arms and ammunition and began producing additional products to find ways to use the expanded New Haven factory (495, 511). Beginning around 1918, WRA began manufacturing sporting goods and hardware, including pliers, pocket knives, nickel-plated roller skates, razors, fishing equipment and flashlights (495). By 1920, the WRA product line included batteries (515). In 1926, Winchester also began manufacturing refrigerators and washing machines (495). Such ventures did not prove fruitful, and in 1931, WRA went into receivership (515). In 1931, WRA was purchased by the Western Cartridge Company, which was owned by the Olin family (495, 511, 515). At that time, the less profitable Winchester product lines, including washing machines, refrigerators, fishing tackle and cutlery were discontinued. The new company, Winchester-Western, later Olin Industries, concentrated on manufacturing guns and ammunition, flashlights, batteries, roller skates and radiators. In 1954, Olin Industries merged with Mathieson Chemical Corporation to become Olin Mathieson (495).

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During the Second World War, WRA (Olin) discontinued commercial production and devoted itself to war work, including the development of the Winchester carbine and cartridge and the Garand rifle. Winchester manufactured almost 1 million carbines, 500,000 Garand rifles and five billion pieces of small arms and other ammunition prior to the end of the war in 1945 (495, 511). WRA produced a variety of shotguns, rifles and their component parts requiring engineering and machining of a variety of metals and woods (519, 520, 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 526). For example, the Winchester Model 1200 has over 43 different parts (519). Winchester also manufactured ammunition, which includes shells and cartridges (519). Each shell and cartridge also includes a variety of products to create the appropriate ammunition for each firearm (519). Olin also manufactured radiator tubes, radiators, batteries, ignition cartridges, primers, detonators, bulk powder and explosives, brass and aluminum products for the military (496). Post war manufacturing included sporting arms and ammunition, including things like copper clad BB-shot, flashlights, dry cell batteries for flashlights, radios and hearing aids, roller skates, cartridge core radiators and tubes, commercial brass and brass specialties (487, 511). Brass manufacturing used a variety of alloys containing copper, zinc, silver, lead, antimony, nickel, iron, manganese, and phosphorus (512). Battery production continued until 1957 (382). In 1952, Olin purchased the Ramset Fastening Systems, a manufacturer of fasteners, and hardware. Ramset manufacturing operations were transferred to New Haven in 1959 (495). c. Manufacturing Processes and Waste Products Historically, manufacturing at the WRA New Haven plant included metalworking and woodworking operations. Metal working processes involved zinc and nickel plating, heat treating (including cyanide heat treating), pickling, grinding, cold forming, cutting, drilling, milling, stamping, welding, silver soldering, polishing, cleaning (degreasing), browning and bluing. Brass mill operations included casting, brazing, soldering, welding, blanking, coining, etching, forming, hot forging, hot pressing, knurling, machining, piercing, punching, roll threading, shearing, spinning, stamping, swaging (512). Historically, production of lead shot involved pouring molten lead into sieves at the top of the shot tower and letting the material drop to a water tank 154 ft. below (497). Woodworking operations, used to make gunstocks and boxes, involved wood drying (kilns), general carpentry, cutting, shaping, sanding, checkering, staining and lacquering (506). Battery manufacturing generally consisted of using compressed air operated machinery to tamp depolarizing materials around a carbon rod within a zinc case (487). Typically, dry cell batteries consisted of a zinc container filled with a

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mixture of manganese dioxide (depolarizer) and carbon and wetted with aluminum chloride and zinc chloride solutions. In some batteries, lead and cadmium were added to the zinc can, chromates or mercury were also added as corrosion inhibitors (499). In addition to manufacturing and research and development, facility operations included plant and equipment maintenance, including maintaining equipment, buildings and the massive boilers, test firing, which reportedly involved a minimum of five shots per each gun manufactured (486), shipping, warehousing, gun repair, and office operations (506). Based on employee interviews, prior to the 1960s, carbon tetrachloride was the primary cleaning and degreasing agent at the plant. Degreasing tanks were located throughout the manufacturing and maintenance areas of the facility. Eventually the carbon tetrachloride was replaced with trichloroethane and trichloroethylene due to problems with "fuming vapors" in dip tank areas. Beginning in the 1970s, chlorinated solvents were phased out and detergents were used for degreasing in the product lines (509). Wastes generated during manufacturing and maintenance operations included: metals (scrap, chips and grinding wastes), casting wastes, sawdust, woodchips, waste oils, solvents and laquers, solvent-coated rags, rejected or defective products, general refuse and demolition debris, and large quantities of coal ash, wood ash, fly ash and bottom ash (487, 506, 507). Various wastes were also generated from research and development operations. Boiler operation generated significant volumes of ash and cinders. d. Environmental Evaluations Results of environmental evaluations of soil and groundwater quality at the former WRA New Haven facility, conducted by Malcolm Pirnie, HRP Associates, Inc. and ERL, Inc., detected metals (barium, chromium, lead, mercury and silver), cyanide, VOCs (PCE, TCA, TCE, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, chloroethane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), TPH and PCBs (506). During boiler decommissioning operations, significant quantities of asbestos and asbestos debris were also encountered (505). 2. Pine Swamp History and Environmental Investigations a. Pine Swamp History and Operations During the period from 1889 to 1915, WRA purchased approximately 100-acres of undeveloped land north of Putnam Street in Hamden (485). The area, known as the Pine Swamp, or Powder Farm, was used to store gunpowder and other materials until the 1950s or 1960s. WRA developed the site with 35 earthen bunkers and two firing

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ranges for testing arms manufactured at the New Haven facility (485). Prior to 1966, various industrial wastes, including powder from ammunition manufacturing, coal ash, wood ash and scraps, developmental flashlight batteries and metal scrap, liquid chemical wastes, and "catching sand" from munitions testing were reportedly buried or disposed in the southern part of property (505, 507). Wastes disposed at the Powder Farm reportedly included flashlight batteries, roller skates, concrete testing pads and sand from ballistics testing. The property was also reportedly used for conventional burning of various research and development and other industrial chemical wastes. Historically, there was at least one major powder explosion at the Powder Farm (399). b. Previous Environmental Investigations Results of environmental investigation and remediation at the Pine Swamp conducted by Malcolm Pirnie and Environmental Research and Technology (ERT) have encountered significant volumes of buried batteries, lead-containing "catching sands" and other debris fill. According to the reports reviewed by Haley & Aldrich, waste materials encountered at the Pine Swamp generally consisted of waste products from WRA manufacturing or research, historically disposed by WRA. Previous environmental reports described fill materials encountered in explorations as: ¾ Black stained native material underlying waste fill containing dry cell batteries, wood, metal, glass, mixed debris, rifle butt plates, shell casings, granular earthen materials, empty compressed gas cylinders and masonry (503); Fill containing metal powder canisters, racks from former munitions manufacturing, ballistic catching sands, demolition debris (wood timbers, scrap metal), incinerator ash, empty drums, wood, glass, rubbish, waste gunpowder, solvent chemicals, concrete test pads, empty reagent bottles, fiber pack liners, a metal box (3 ft. by 3 ft), sheet metal, and metal rods (382); Greenish grey sands with metal bullet fragments, empty metal powder canisters, metal canister racks, crushed misc. metal, charred materials with texture similar to charcoal (382); Loose crumbly layers of charcoal, partially burned planks, large nails, sheet metal, armored electrical cable, galvanized wire racks and empty brass powder transfer tubes (3 in. wide and 18 in. long with a screw top), shotgun shells, intact aluminum pharmaceutical ampoules labeled as "streptomycin sulfate" (499);

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Layers of fused glass (dark brown to pale green), broken glass, ground glass stoppers, carbon D-cell battery cores and flash light batteries, steel barrel, old pails, metal lathe cuttings (oily odor), sheet glass, shotgun shells, battery core rods (499); A layered mix of charcoal, glass, black sand and silt, wood fragments, steel, nails, wire and cast iron, with orange and grey mottled soil in some layers (499); Timber planking brick, concrete, sheet metal, pipe, iron fittings, window blinds, tar paper, shingles, wood, and wire (499); Fill comprised of 50% black sand, silt and clay with 50% carbon battery core rods, D-cell flashlight batteries, glass fragments, wire, sheet metal, and electrical wiring scrap (499).

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Based on the descriptions in the previous environmental reports, the materials encountered in test pits and explorations at Hamden Middle School and Rochford Field appear to be similar to the waste materials encountered in subsurface explorations at Pine Swamp, which is where WRA also historically disposed of its industrial waste. Results of chemical testing of soil and groundwater samples collected from various locations at the Pine Swamp site has detected elevated concentrations of VOCs, metals, SVOCs, PCBs and TPH (504). VOCs detected include toluene, chlorobenzene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, TCE, TCA, 1,2- dichloropropane, PCE, methylene chloride, acetone, chloroform, dichlorobenzenes and naphthalene (382, 503). Chemical testing of fill material has detected: lead (up to 58,230 mg/kg), zinc (up to 38,000 mg/kg), manganese (up to 110,144 mg/kg), and cadmium (up to 54 mg/kg), as well as arsenic, barium and mercury (382, 501). The concentration of leachable lead (by EP Toxicity testing) ranged up to 551 mg/l (501). According to Malcolm Pirnie, elevated lead concentrations in fill at the site are likely due to the historic disposal of lead containing "trap sands" from munition test firing ranges whereas, elevated manganese and zinc detections may be related to the disposal of batteries (501). Environmental sampling of fill material, soil and sediment from the Pine Swamp has also detected SVOCs (including di-n-butylphthtalate, pyrene, fluoranthene, bis-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate), PCBs and trace concentrations of pesticides (382,384). According to a 1991 remediation report prepared by Malcolm Pirnie, approximately 380 cu yds of PCB contaminated soil at concentrations ranging from 6.8 to 929 mg/kg was excavated and removed from an area of the Pine Swamp known as the "West Burning Grounds" (384).

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V. 5.01

ENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS REVIEW Standard Environmental Records Review

Haley & Aldrich utilized the electronic database service Vista to complete the environmental record review (303). Based on the large area encompassed by the subject site the ASTMspecified search radii were extended by 0.5 miles. The database search was used to identify properties that may be listed in the referenced Agency records, located within the ASTMspecified search radii plus 0.5 miles indicated below: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ NPL sites: .........................................................................1.5 mile CERCLIS sites:...................................................................1.0 mile CERCLIS NFRAP sites ............................................ Site and Adjoining Federal ERNS: .................................................................. Site only RCRA non-CORRACTS TSD facilities: .....................................1.0 mile RCRA CORRACTS TSD facilities: ...........................................1.5 mile RCRA Generators: .................................................... Site & Adjoining State Hazardous Waste Sites: ...................................................1.5 mile Registered Underground Storage Tanks: .......................... Site & Adjoining State Landfills and Solid Waste Disposal Sites: ............................ 1.0 mile State Leaking Underground Storage Tanks: ..................................1.0 mile

Following is a summary of information provided for each of the above-listed databases. The complete environmental database report is provided in Appendix D. A. NPL Sites The National Priorities List (NPL) is a list of contaminated sites that are considered the highest priority for clean up by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). ¾ ¾ B. The subject site is not listed on the NPL List The database search did not identify NPL sites within a 1.5-mile radius of the subject site.

CERCLIS Sites The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Information System (CERCLIS) list identifies sites which are suspected to have contamination and require additional investigation to assess if they should be considered for inclusion on the NPL. ¾ The subject site is listed on CERCLIS: The Hamden Middle School property is listed as a CERCLIS site (EPA ID #CTD982544355). This property was added to CERCLIS on 30 June 1987. According to the database report, a "Removal Investigation at NPL Sites" was completed on 13 August 1991. A "Screening Site Inspection" was completed on 10 October 1991.

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The removal actions currently underway by CTDEP are also listed on CERCLIS. The Rosem Site (EPA ID#CTN000103142) and the Bryden and Morse Street Site (EPA ID# CTN000103143) are listed as "Removal Only" sites. Both these Sites had Removal Assessments completed on 27 July 2001 (304, 324). ¾ The database search identified three additional CERCLIS sites within a onemile radius of the subject site. Metropolitan Metal Finishing Company or Globe Metal Finishing Company located at 400 Goodrich Street (approximately 0.25 miles west of the subject site) is reported as a CERCLIS site (EPA ID# CTD001183052) where a Removal Action/Remediation was completed on 23 July 1997. The site is described as a job shop. Pine Swamp (Olin Corporation), located at 475 Putnam Avenue (approximately 0.45 miles north of the subject site) is reported as a CERCLIS site (EPA ID #CTD980521082). The Site Discovery for Pine Swamp was recorded on 1 November 1979. A Preliminary Assessment was completed in 1 January 1983 and USEPA recommended additional assessment (high priority). Screening Site Inspection was reported completed on 5 June 1985 with additional assessment or remediation recommended (high priority). Pine Swamp is also listed as a State Equivalent CERCLIS site as a result of the disposal of wastes containing metals, PCBs, acids, and chlorinated VOCs. A Consent Order between DEP and Olin for the Pine Swamp property was entered into on January 10, 1986. A subsequent Consent Order modifying the original was entered into on April 22, 1987. In 1988, Malcolm Pirnie completed a Remedial Investigation of the Pine Swamp. A review of boring logs from the 1988 investigation noted black fill, cinders, wood, battery waste, and demolition debris in subsurface soils at the Pine Swamp, similar to materials reported at the Middle School site (382). In June 1991, Malcolm Pirnie completed an Interim Corrective Measures Report describing some localized excavation and pilot testing at the site (384). The status of current investigation, remedial activities or groundwater monitoring at the Pine Swamp are not certain. However, the Consent Order remains outstanding. Leed Himmel Industries (Himmel Brothers), located at 1409 Dixwell Avenue (approximately 0.84 miles west of the subject site) is reported as a CERCLIS site (EPA ID #CTD001167543). This site was reportedly added to CERCLIS on 1 January 1981. A Preliminary Assessment was reported completed on 1 September 1984 and a Screen Site Inspection was reported completed on 25 July 1985. Based on the results of the assessments additional work was recommended (high priority). The database report did not include additional information on the nature of the release or types of contaminants at the Leed Himmel facility. The direction of groundwater flow at the subject site is generally to the west with a southwesterly shift in the southwestern corner of the Newhall Street Field. According to information in this report, Pine Swamp may well be hydraulically connected to the Hamden site, however, that has not yet been established. The Pine Swamp may also be upgradient of some areas of the site Due to the significant

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distance from the site, it is not expected that releases at Leed Himmel Industries would significantly impact site environmental quality. Metropolitan Metal Finishing Company appears to be located downgradient of the site and as such, operations or releases at that facility are not expected to have adversely impacted site environmental quality. Pine Swamp may be upgradient from the site, and may also be hydraulically connected due to former interconnected surface water bodies or through bedrock fractures. As such, historic operations, waste disposal or releases at the Pine Swamp could potentially have impacted site environmental conditions. C. Federal ERNS List The Federal Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) list tracks information on reported releases of oil and hazardous materials. ¾ D. The subject site is not identified on the Federal ERNS list.

RCRA non-CORRACTS TSD Facilities The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) non-Corrective Action Sites (CORRACTS) Transportation, Storage and Disposal (TSD) Facilities List tracks facilities which treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste and are not associated with corrective action activity. ¾ ¾ The subject site is not listed as a RCRA non-CORRACTS TSD facility The database search did not identify RCRA non-CORRACTS TSD facilities within a one-mile radius of the subject property.

E.

RCRA CORRACTS TSD Facilities The RCRA CORRACTS TSD Facilities list catalogues facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste and have been associated with corrective action activity. ¾ ¾ The subject site is not listed as a RCRA CORRACTS TSD facility The database search identified one RCRA CORRACTS TSD facility within a 1.5-mile radius of the subject property. The Olin Corporation, located at 24 Science Park (approximately 0.75 miles south of the subject site) is reported as a RCRA-TSD CORRACTS site (EPA ID #CTD001451004). Olin Corporation was formerly the Winchester Repeating Arms Company (WRA).

F.

RCRA Generators The RCRA Generator list is maintained by the USEPA to track facilities that generate hazardous waste. ¾ ¾ The subject site is not listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator According to the database report, properties adjoining the subject site are not listed as RCRA Generators. However, during a review of information on file

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at CTDEP, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence that the SNET facility, located immediately west of the site is a "very small quantity generator of hazardous waste." Additional information on the SNET facility is included later in this section. G. State Sites and State Spill Sites The State Sites and State Spill Sites lists are maintained by the CTDEP, in order to track sites where releases of oil or hazardous materials have occurred. ¾ The subject site (Newhall Street Field) is listed as a State Site based on its inclusion on the State Inventory of Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites. Newhall Street Neighborhood was added to the list of State Superfund Sites on 14 September 2001. The SNET garage, 325 Morse Street, located adjacent to the west side of the property is listed as a State Equivalent CERCLIS site. According to information in the database report, a Form III (Connecticut Property Transfer Program) was filed for the SNET property and investigations are ongoing on that property. Additional information on the SNET property is summarized later in this section. The database search identified 23 State Sites and State Spill Sites within a 5/8mile radius of the subject site, including the Pine Swamp site, discussed previously. Information obtained from CTDEP files regarding those sites identified by the database search within the designated search radius of the subject site is summarized in the table below. Note, the CTDEP spills database includes spills reported since 1996. Spills that were reported prior to 1996 have not been added to the database. Haley & Aldrich also reviewed CTDEP Oil and Chemical Spills Unit files during the Phase I ESA, these include older spill files and correspondence and are discussed in Section 5.01 E.

DATE ADDRESS / LOCATION COMMENT 1 gallon of fuel oil spilled due to pump failure. CORRECTIVE ACTION Cleaned Pumped out petroleum Cleaned. STATUS Closed Closed Closed

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03/26/01 Hamden Middle School 550 New Hall Street, Hamden Property on subject site 10/15/00 360 Goodrich Street, Hamden 0.19 miles southwest 10/14/98 03/23/98 08/11/99 09/30/99

12/26/98

40 gallons petroleum spilled inside building due to fuel tank failure 123 Goodrich Street, Hamden Fuel oil release from 0.19 miles southwest container failure inside building. 15 Landers Street, Hamden 1 gallon of fuel oil released 0.20 miles southeast due to tank overfill 431 Shelton Avenue, New Haven 1 gallon fuel oil released to 0.23 miles southwest concrete from hose failure. Report of tank containing a 400 Goodrich Street, Hamden caustic material (Metropolitan Metal Finishing Company) 0.26 miles west 75 Read Street, New Haven 2 gallons of fuel oil 0.27 miles south released from leaking tank.

Applied Speedi-Dri Closed None. Absorbed Closed into concrete. Investigate contents Closed of tank Applied sand Closed

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CORRECTIVE STATUS ACTION 12/26/96 19 Read Street, New Haven 30 gallons of fuel oil inside Contained and Closed 0.29 miles south building due to vandalism. applied Speedi-Dry 05/04/01 14 Giles Street, Hamden 1 gallon of fuel oil released Spill was contained Closed 0.34 miles northeast inside building 10/28/99 46 Barraclough Avenue, Hamden 100 gallons of fuel oil Spill contained and Closed 0.35 miles northeast released inside building removed due to tank leak 02/12/01 369 Shelton Avenue, New Haven 1 gallon of fuel oil released Applied sand Closed 0.35 miles southwest inside building due to container failure 01/21/99 365 Huntington Street, New 40 gallons of fuel oil Spill contained and Closed Haven released due to tank removed 0.37 miles south overfill in basement. None Closed 05/16/01 74 Laurel Road, Hamden Possible lead 0.39 miles east contamination, house power-washed without containment in mid 1990sr 10/18/96 26 Bassett Street, New Haven 3 gallons of fuel oil Applied Speedi-Dri Closed 0.41 miles south released due to tank overfill 03/29/99 224 Bassett Street, New Haven Unknown quantity of waste Contained Closed 0.44 miles southwest oil released to storm drain Investigating Closed 05/26/98 246 Sheffield Avenue, New Various chemical Haven containers (paint thinner, 0.45 miles south stains, strippers) in abandoned building. 08/30/97 19 Orpington Avenue, Hamden 2 gallons fuel oil from a Tank emptied and Closed 0.45 miles northeast leaking basement oil tank spill cleaned 05/06/98 118 Lilac Street, New Haven 1 gallon of fuel oil released Leak repaired Closed 0.46 miles south due to leak in pump gasket Contained Closed 10/20/98 113-115 Ivy Street, New Haven Approx. 100 gallons of 0.53 miles south antifreeze and waste oil disposed to the ground after car repairs 09/01/98 647 Dixwell Avenue, New Leaking drum of waste oil Not reported Closed Haven 0.56 miles southwest 03/25/98 44 Willis Street, New Haven Unknown quantity fuel oil Repaired line. Closed 0.57 miles southwest from line leak in building 01/04/97 65 Willis Street, New Haven 1 gallon of fuel oil released Tank emptied and Closed 0.57 miles southwest inside building Speedi-Dri applied 10/04/96 46 Lilac Avenue, New Haven 50 gallons of fuel oil Tank emptied Closed 0.61 miles northeast released due to hose failure 01/31/01 227 Starr Street, New Haven <0.05 gallons of mercury Contained and Closed 0.62 miles south released from thermometer removed DATE ADDRESS / LOCATION COMMENT

With the exception of the reported spill on the Hamden Middle School property, the spills listed above are not expected to have adversely impacted site environmental quality. The reported release on the school property (one gallon of fuel oil) reportedly occurred inside the school building and was cleaned up. Considering the small volume of the release and the subsequent cleanup, it is not anticipated that the spill significantly impacted environmental conditions at the site.

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H.

Registered Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) The CTDEP maintains a list of USTs registered. ¾ The subject site is listed on the registered UST list. At the time of the VISTA report, the site tank notification forms were incorrect. Since that time, they have been corrected and resubmitted to CTDEP. The Hamden Community Center, 496 Newhall Street: The Hamden Community Center stores fuel oil in a 6,000-gallon, fiberglass UST. The UST was installed in approximately 1989 at the location of a previous 10,000gallon steel tank. The original tank, which was installed 1 June 1950, was also used for heating oil storage. The database report, CTDEP file review, municipal file review or review of information on file at the QVHD, Town of Hamden Fire Marshal's office did not identify reports of spills or leakage from the Hamden Community Center UST (303,304, 306, 307, 308, 312, 313). During the September 2001 site visit, Hamden Community Center custodian Mr. William Parillo reported to Haley & Aldrich that he had been present at the 1989 UST excavation and replacement. According to Mr. Parillo, he did not observe evidence of oily soil or leakage during the tank excavation and the existing UST was placed at the same location as the tank that was removed (311). The Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street: The Hamden Middle School stored heating fuel in a 10,000-gallon, fiberglass UST. The tank was installed in approximately 1989 to replace a previous 10,000-gallon steel tank at the same location. The original tank, which was installed 1 January 1956, was also used for heating oil storage. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter reports of releases or spills from the Middle School UST during a interviews with school custodians, Town personnel, review of the database report or information on file at CTDEP, Hamden municipal offices, the Hamden Board of Education, the QVHD or the Town of Hamden Fire Marshal's office (303, 304, 306, 307, 308, 310, 312, 313). ¾ There are two properties adjacent to the subject site listed on the registered UST list. Pannella Sons, Inc, 258 Morse Street: A. Pannella Sons, Inc, located on the south side of the subject property, stores gasoline in one 2,000-gallon UST and stored waste oil in one 275-gallon UST. The 2,000-gallon UST was reportedly installed on 1 July 1973 and is currently active and the 275-gallon UST was reportedly installed on 1 August 1984 and reported last used on 1 June 1988 and removed. Both USTs were constructed of steel and spills or releases from these tanks were not identified in the database report. SNET Hamden Garage, 325 Morse Street: The Hamden Garage, located on the west side of the subject property, stores heating oil in one active 20,000gallon UST. The tank was installed 1 April 1989. Six additional tanks formerly existed on the property and have reportedly been abandoned or removed as follows:

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Tank 20,000-gallon Heating Oil 6,000-gallon Diesel 550-gallon Waste Oil 550-gallon Waste Oil 10,000-gallon Gasoline 8,000-gallon Diesel

Construction Steel Steel Steel Steel Fiberglass reinforced plastic Steel with piping secondary containment

Install 06/01/62 06/01/67 04/01/89 06/01/67 06/01/87 04/01/89

Status Last used 04/01/89 and removed Last used 04/01/89 and removed Last used 08/08/97 and reported permanently out of use. Last used 04/01/89 and removed Last used 08/01/97 and reported permanently out of use Last used 08/01/97 and reported permanently out of use

The database report did not identify spills or releases from the USTs at the SNET site. I. State Landfills and Solid Waste Disposal Sites The database search did not identify Solid Waste Disposal Sites within a one-half mile radius of the subject site. J. State Leaking Underground Storage Tanks The State Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Sites list is maintained by CTDEP in order to track sites where releases of oil or hazardous materials have occurred from leaking, registered USTs. Based on information from the database report: ¾ ¾ The subject site is not listed as a LUST Site The database search identified 20 LUST sites within a one-mile radius of the subject site.

Information obtained from CTDEP files regarding those sites within the designated search radius of the subject site is summarized in the table below:

DATE ADDRESS / LOCATION COMMENT 750-gallon fuel oil UST removed with 92 c.y. soil. Soil with 6,500 ppm TPH inaccessible. Heating fuel leak from a 1,500-gallon steel UST. Gasoline leak from 1,000gallon UST Fuel oil leak/UST failure. Fuel oil leak 1,000-gal UST. CORRECTIVE ACTION Tank and contaminated soil excavated Contaminated soil excavated Refit fill Not reported STATUS Closed

05/24/99 185 Blake Road, Hamden 0.38 miles east NA Paire Residence, 840 Prospect Street, Hamden 0.36 miles southeast 02/18/93 Agricultural Station, 372 Huntington Street, Hamden 0.38 miles south 02/17/98 449 Putnam Avenue, Hamden 0.48 miles northwest 07/16/99 105 Mill Rock Road, Hamden 0.49 miles east 10/19/00 144 Edgehill Road, Hamden 0.53 miles east

Not reported Not Reported Closed Closed Closed

Tank and contaminated soil excavated Gasoline leak 550-gal UST Tank excavated failure.

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DATE

ADDRESS / LOCATION

COMMENT Fuel oil leak 550-gal UST failure Gasoline leak/UST failure. Fuel oil leak 1,000-gal UST Fuel oil leak 1,000-gallon UST out of service since 1978. Fuel oil leak 20,000-gal UST. Petroleum leak/UST failure Petroleum leak/UST failure Petroleum leak /UST failure Petroleum leak/UST failure Petroleum leak/UST failure Petroleum leak/UST failure Petroleum leak/UST failure An unreported material leak/ 8,000-gallon steel UST Diesel fuel leak/5,000gallon steel UST failure Gasoline leak 12,000gallon steel UST

05/03/01 22 Morris Street, Hamden 0.56 miles east 05/04/99 Hamden Carwash, Hamden 1090 Dixwell Avenue 0.57 miles northwest 07/27/99 82 Edgehill Road, Hamden 0.59 miles southeast 08/20/98 265 East Rock Road, Hamden 0.59 miles southeast 02/17/00 1125 Dixwell Avenue. Hamden 0.60 miles northwest 10/27/00 144 Arch Street, Hamden 0.66 miles west 06/22/99 97 Loomis Street, New Haven 0.70 miles southeast 02/18/01 55 Huntington Street, New Haven 0.73 miles southeast 04/11/00 55 Huntington Street 0.73 miles southeast 01/13/00 710 Sherman Parkway, New Haven 0.77 miles southwest 03/14/01 66 Rochford Avenue, Hamden 0.93 miles northwest 03/24/00 64 Old Hartford Turnpike, Hamden 0.95 miles east 11/08/94 Olin Corporation, New Haven 91 Shelton Avenue 0.97 miles southwest 08/24/92 Laidlaw Bus Co., Hamden 63 Mathers Street 0.97 miles northeast 07/14/92 Laidlaw Bus Co., Hamden 63 Mathers Street 0.97 miles northeast

CORRECTIVE ACTION Tank and contaminated soil excavated Tank and contaminated soil excavated Tank and contaminated soil excavated Tank and contaminated soil excavated Tank and contaminated soil excavated Investigate Tank and contaminated soil excavated Not reported Tank excavated Tank and contaminated soil excavated Tank excavated Tank emptied Contaminated soil excavated Contaminated soil excavated Contaminated soil excavated

STATUS Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed Not reported Not reported Not reported

Based on the locations of the LUSTs listed, it is not anticipated that these off-site releases would have significantly impacted site environmental quality. 5.02 Additional Environmental Records Review

In conformance with ASTM, inquiry was made with representatives of the CTDEP, the QVHD, the Town of Hamden Fire Marshall, and the USEPA as described below. A. Quinnipiack Valley Health District On 17 September 2001, Haley & Aldrich reviewed information on file and interviewed personnel at the Quinnipiack Valley Health District (QVHD) relative to environmental concerns for the subject site. During the file review, Haley & Aldrich

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encountered a significant amount of information on the site properties. Much of the material on file at QVHD was also encountered at CTDEP or the Hamden Town Hall and is discussed elsewhere in this report. The following is a summary of some of the significant reports, chemical test data, complaints, or other relevant information encountered on file at the QVHD: 1. QVHD Inspection Reports Haley & Aldrich reviewed a report of a 6 November 1946 general health inspection of the Newhall Street School (current Hamden Community Center). The report mentions an ongoing school ventilation problem due to blowing dust from the adjacent "dump". The report recommends extending the playground fence to prevent "the public" from "using the area for dumping purposes as they are doing at present". The fence would also prevent "children from going into the dirty dump areas during recess." The report notes that WRA had indicated that the dump "will be used for several years to come, " however, WRA planned to begin operating an incinerator at the WRA factory "within a year." The report notes that paper burning was occurring at the dump, ashes were being dumped near the school creating the dust nuisance and that WRA had promised to fill "low spots near the school" with "heavy material that would not create a dust nuisance" (45). Health Inspection Reports for the Newhall Street School for the period from 1947 to 1960 reference problems with an outside incinerator at the school, used for waste paper burning. In a 17 March 1960 report, the Health Inspector notes that the "open burning pit at the end of the school should be discontinued or replaced by a better incinerator. Improper combustion takes place in these cinder block pits and the end result is usually much smoke and smoldering" (426). A review of a Health Department Inspection Report for the Michael J. Whalen Junior High School, dated 19 February 1957, referenced an "unsightly" dump area "in the rear of the school". The report notes that the Public Works Department had promised to "bulldoze the area and cover it over with adequate dirt" but had not yet done that (89). A review of a Health Department Inspection Report for the Junior High School, dated 27 May 1958, referenced an "outside incinerator" with a smokestack. The incinerator was used for burning combustible waste ("debris and paper") and the Health Department inspector noted that smoke from the stack was entering the school building and recommended that burning be conducted after school hours (89). Subsequent inspection reports, dated 27 May 1958, 17 May 1960, 1 March 1961,1 May 1962,14 May 1963, 5 May 1964 and 8 March 1965, also mentioned the problems related to smoke from an open pit or open incinerator entering classrooms and recommended installation of a taller smokestack (89, 433). The 1963 inspection report also noted sunken areas of standing water on the tennis courts, west of the school and in the front of the school building near the intersection of Newhall Street and Mill Rock Road (89). A March 1994 QVHD inspection noted damaged, potential, asbestos containing materials in the ladies toilet room adjacent to classrooms 119 and 121 (147).

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August 1995 and March 1997 QVHD inspections of the Middle School noted a "creosote" odor in the school auditorium (162, 169). The 1997 report noted that the odor had been present for "10 to 12 years" and noted that the Board of Education had arranged for further indoor air quality testing. The 1997 inspection also noted damaged, potential asbestos-containing material on a pipe near room 119. 2. Complaints A 17 February 1971 letter from the Michael J. Whalen School Parent Teacher Association (PTA) outlines a request to improve conditions at the "school recreation area." According to the letter, the tennis courts and basketball courts have "uplifted" (settled) resulting in broken concrete and pools of stagnant water. A dumping ground of asphalt and concrete blocks was also reported near the recreation field (96). On 16 July 1971, the Hamden Health Department (precursor to the QVHD) received a compliant regarding the dumping of refuse behind the Michael J. Whalen Jr. High School. According to the incident report, the local Sanitarian visited the site and observed a large load of household waste materials. The Health Department notified the Town of Hamden and suggested the "No Dumping" signs be posted in the area to discourage future waste disposal at the site (97). In November 1979, QVHD received a complaint regarding a sunken area on the western side of the Newhall Street Athletic Field (101). The complainant noted that the Hamden Middle School and adjacent Newhall Street Field had historically been used as an industrial waste "dump." QVHD referred the complaint to CTDEP and CTDEP collected three soil samples from the western portion of the Middle School property. The soil samples, which included black, oil-stained sand, were tested for heavy metals and VOCs. Results of laboratory analysis of the soil samples detected: cadmium (up to 1.0 mg/kg); chromium (up to 2.6 mg/kg); copper (up to 95.0 mg/kg); lead (up to 78.0 mg/kg); mercury (up to 1.8 mg/kg); zinc (up to 1,400.0 mg/kg); manganese (up to 390.0 mg/kg); and magnesium (up to 3,200.0 mg/kg) and trace levels of VOCs. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter information documenting the exact locations or depths where these samples were collected. Based on a review of the laboratory data, CTDEP concluded in a letter dated 31 December 1979 that based on this sampling, the normal use of the school and athletic fields was not expected to "expose anyone to harmful levels of metals or organics" (100-103). During the QVHD file review, Haley & Aldrich encountered reports of several resident complaints regarding the historical use of the Middle School or Newhall Field properties as a landfill. In 1992, a resident reported to QVHD that he was "aware of possibly dangerous substances buried years ago" and was concerned about ongoing use of the Newhall soccer fields (138). In 1995, QVHD and CTDEP received a report from a former Hamden soccer coach who noted that in the 1970s there was a "sinkhole" filled with "black, bubbling water with unnatural characteristics" in the northwestern corner of the Newhall Street Field (151-153).

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3.

Testing of Potable Water for Dissolved Lead On several occasions, SCCRWA has tested the potable water supply at the Hamden Middle School for dissolved lead. ¾ In October 1990 SCCRWA tested drinking water collected from drinking fixtures as `morning first-draw samples' (to represent water consumed at the beginning of the day or after infrequent use). Results of the laboratory analyses of the samples detected concentrations of dissolved lead ranging from 0.001 mg/L to 0.028 mg/L. With the exception of one location, the lead concentrations detected did not exceed the USEPA recommended level of 0.02 mg/L for dissolved lead in drinking water. SCCRWA resampled the location with the slightly elevated lead concentration in February 1991. Water samples were collected as a `morning first draw' and after a 30-second flush; analytical testing detected lead concentrations of 0.003 mg/L and 0.007 mg/L respectively. SCCRWA suggested that the original October 1990 test result could probably be attributed to the water being in contact with plumbing fixtures for an extended period of time due to lack of use (119). On 17 November 2000 the SCCRWA tested water at the Hamden Middle School at various locations throughout the building. Water samples were tested for heavy metals, Coliform bacteria, chlorine, pH, and several other parameters. Results of the analyses detected low levels of barium. Lead was detected at two locations (the auditorium drinking fountain and a maintenance water service line) at concentrations above the public drinking water quality standard of 0.015 mg/L. The SCCRWA suggested that these lead concentrations were related to the relative low use of these fixtures; brass-bodied valves can be sources of lead, especially in fixtures that have been idle for as little as six hours. On 29 November 2000, SCCRWA resampled drinking water at the auditorium fountain and maintenance line after flushing water from the fixtures for ten minutes. Result of chemical testing of the samples did not detect lead concentrations in excess of drinking water criteria and SCCRWA recommended flushing water from these fixtures before use (193, 200).

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4.

Indoor Air Quality As early as 1989, QVHD received complaints of odors or other indoor air quality problems in the Hamden Middle School. Complaints included creosote or tar-like odors in the auditorium (1991, 1993, 1995, and 1997) and poor ventilation elsewhere in the school. Results of indoor air quality sampling programs, conducted in 1989 (radon), 1993, 1995, 1997 and 2000 (methane soil vapor testing) were previously discussed in Section II of this report. In addition to the testing discussed previously, additional air sampling was conducted by the QVHD (114, 145, 158-162, 166-175).

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On 16 January 1991, QVHD collected air inside auditorium at the Hamden Middle School; the samples were tested for formaldehyde at the CTDPH laboratory. Results of the analyses did not detect formaldehyde. The sampling was conducted in response to a complaint about a formaldehyde odor in the auditorium. Health Department personnel reported an odor similar to "roofing compound" at the time the sampling was conducted. According to information in the health department file, the tornado that passed through town in 1989 caused considerable damage to the school building, requiring replacement of the auditorium roof, carpeting and ceiling due to wind and water damage (114). Additional complaints registered with the QVHD included: ¾ ¾ A May 1995 complaint of a "tar-like odor" in the auditorium (158, 159). A December 1996 complaint of a "methane" odor at a locker near the boiler room "causing headaches and stomach aches in a 7th grade student" (164) A June 1997 complaint noted continued odors in the Middle School auditorium. The Board of Education retained an industrial hygienist (Brooks) to investigate the odors. Results of the assessment indicated that creosote-coated subfloor boards were likely causing the ongoing odor. Based on the results of additional air testing, the Board of Education installed a ventilation system beneath the stage (166-174). A November 1997 complaint of a sulfur odor in the Middle School boiler room related to the "back up" of the boiler. The Hamden Fire Department inspected the boiler and the system was serviced and the chimney cleaned. Reportedly 20 students and teachers had medical concerns, including: burning eyes, headaches, a bloody nose, and an asthma episode (175). In December 2000, ORS sampled air inside the school building for SVOCs, dust, and other pollutants (carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide, and VOCs). ORS reported elevated concentrations of naphthalene (2 mg/m3) and phenanthrene (0.7 mg/m3) in an air sample collected from the auditorium (199, 214, 229). Between 27 and 29 December 2000, CTDEP and ERI sampled soil gas beneath the academic wing and boiler room of the Middle School. Results of the soil gas sampling did not detect concentrations of contaminants in excess of background or regulatory criteria (223, 229). On 18 May 2001, QVHD conducted carbon dioxide monitoring in five classrooms at the Hamden Middle School. Results of the screening detected concentrations of carbon dioxide at or above the 1,000 carbon dioxide level recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) in three classrooms (Rooms 305, 312, and the room across from the computer library) (278).

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B.

Fire Department In September 2001, Haley & Aldrich submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the Hamden Fire Department, telephoned and visited the Hamden Fire Marshal to review material on file regarding complaints, spills, activities or other incidents that might have occurred on Parcel 4 or elsewhere in the site. A copy of the FOIA request is included in Appendix D. With the exception of Underground Tank Notification Forms for the Hamden Community Center and Hamden Middle School, Haley & Aldrich did not encounter significant information relative to environmental concerns at the subject site during the visit to the Fire Marshal's office (312). During a telephone interview with Hamden Fire Marshall Bob Westerveldt, he stated that the Hamden Middle School is tested for methane every Monday morning that school is in session between the hours of 6:45 and 7:00. Mr. Westerveldt also stated that no methane has been detected during the weekly monitoring. Mr. Westerveldt provided a faxed list of residential addresses in the Middle School area that had been tested for methane (312, 327).

C.

Tax Assessor's Office File Review In August 2001, Haley & Aldrich reviewed maps and field cards for the town-owned properties (Parcel 4) and the residential properties in Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3 in the Town of Hamden Tax Assessor's Office. With the exception of the property at 319 Morse Street, Haley & Aldrich did not encounter evidence that the sites were used for commercial or industrial purposes. A garage located at 319 Morse Street has reportedly been used as a warehouse. The warehouse structure, which is an unheated, three-bay, cinder block garage, approximately 1,705 sq. ft. in area, was constructed in 1960 (302). Property Tax Identification Numbers, names and addresses of property owners are included in the Parcel Reports in Appendix B of this report. Copies of the Tax Assessor Field Cards are also included in Appendix B.

D.

Engineering Department, Building Department, Planning and Zoning Department, Hamden Board of Education File Review On 21 September 2001, Haley & Aldrich submitted a FOIA request to the Hamden Board of Education; a copy of the FOIA request letter is included in Appendix D. In August and September 2001, Haley & Aldrich reviewed information on file at the Hamden Engineering, Building, Planning and Zoning Departments and the Board of Education. During a review of files in the Town of Hamden Building, Engineering and Planning and Zoning Departments, and the Hamden Board of Education Haley & Aldrich did not encounter information relative to environmental concerns at the subject sites other than asbestos containing building materials (302, 309, 313). Haley & Aldrich did not encounter information on construction excavations for the Middle School, pump station or Newhall Street School. Haley & Aldrich reviewed historical sewerage and utility plans in the Hamden Engineering Department. The plans showed the location and cross sectional elevations of the trunk sewer line that runs northerly from Morse Street, across the Newhall Street Field and beneath the Middle School buildings. Haley & Aldrich encountered additional historic subdivision and property maps on file in the Hamden Town Offices. A discussion of the results of the review of the historic maps is included in Section II of this report.

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During a review of Board of Education files, Haley & Aldrich encountered a listing of construction specification plans for the Michael J. Whalen School, however, the actual plans were not present. Haley & Aldrich also encountered a November 1954 report of subsurface investigations performed at a site on Wintergreen Avenue, reportedly an alternate location considered for the junior high school, but did not encounter reports or plans for the Newhall Street site (313). E. CTDEP File Review In August and September 2001, Haley & Aldrich reviewed information on file at the CTDEP regarding environmental conditions on the subject site. CTDEP files reviewed included: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ 1. Oil and Chemical Spills Bureau of Water Management Hazardous and Solid Waste Management Bureau of Air Management Information on File in the Office of Shannon Windisch. Spill Reports and Complaints

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Haley & Aldrich encountered a 2 February 1987 report of a 23 gallon spill due to an overfill of the UST at the Hamden Middle School. According to the report, the school called the oil company for two deliveries during a one-week period. Reportedly, the spill was contained and removed. A copy of the February 1987 spill report is included in Appendix D. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter additional information regarding spills or leakage from the heating oil UST during the CTDEP file review (304). According to information on file at CTDEP, on 30 March 1992, Ann Nyberg of Channel 8 News contacted the CTDEP reporting possible PCB contamination at the Middle School soccer field (Newhall Street Field). According to the complaint report, Ms. Nyberg stated that the PCBs had come from a nearby UI facility. Reportedly, CTDEP contacted UI and the Town of Hamden. UI stated that they had no information regarding recent or historic disposal of PCBs in Hamden. CTDEP subsequently conducted a PCB inspection of the Middle School and Newhall Street Field on 28 May 1992. Results of the inspection were documented in a 1 June 1992 Interdepartmental Memorandum. According to CTDEP, previous evaluations of the site by USEPA had not indicated concerns regarding PCB disposal or contamination. CTDEP concluded that based on existing data, there were no risks of PCB contamination at the Middle School site (304). Copies of the complaint, site inspection report and CTDEP Interdepartmental Memorandum is are included in Appendix D. Haley & Aldrich also encountered a 26 March 2001 spill report related to the release of one gallon of fuel oil inside the Hamden Middle School building. Reportedly, the spill, which resulted from a pump failure in the boiler room, was immediately cleaned up and no

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further action was required (304). A copy of the March 2001 spill report is included in Appendix D. During the CTDEP file review, Haley & Aldrich encountered reports of spills in the vicinity of the subject sites. The spill reports reviewed were similar to the reports encountered during the electronic database search and are included in the database search in Appendix D and discussed earlier in this section of the report. 2. Order 10 July 2001, CTDEP issued administrative order number SRD-128, which ordered the following potentially responsible parties to take action related to the Newhall Neighborhood: Town of Hamden, Olin Corporation, South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority, and the State of Connecticut Board of Education (287). All four respondents appealed the order (324). 3. CTDEP Soil Sampling Programs Haley & Aldrich also reviewed the results of previous sampling programs conducted at the site by CTDEP. To date, a formal report documenting the sampling has not been prepared, however, Haley & Aldrich reviewed exploration plans and laboratory analytical results for the CTDEP evaluations. CTDEP soil sampling locations are shown on Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. a. Hamden Community Center CTDEP collected surface soil samples (0 to 0.5 ft. depth) at nine locations at the Newhall Street School on 29 December 2000. Soil sample locations, designated SS-1 through SS-9, are shown on Figure 3. Samples were tested for total arsenic and SVOCs. Results of the analyses detected 20.7 mg/kg of arsenic in one soil sample at a concentrations greater than the RSR DEC of 10 mg/kg; chemical testing of a duplicate soil sample detected 31.3 mg/kg arsenic. Results of the soil testing also detected elevated levels of SVOCs, including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, indeno(1,2,3cd)pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene at five locations (304). In a 27 December 2000 letter transmitting the results of the Hamden Community Center soil sampling data, CTDEP stated that soils around the former Newhall Street School building present no "apparent public health hazard" (237). Results of a subsequent health consultation conducted by DPH also concluded that the contaminants detected in the Community Center soil soils did not represent a health risk (268, 269). b. Mill Rock Park On 27 December 2000 CTDEP drilled 15 geoprobe explorations to depths ranging from 4 to 12 ft. below grade in Mill Rock Park (Rochford Field Annex). Explorations encountered 4.5 ft. to 9.0 ft.

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deep fill deposits containing a mixture of soil, slag, brick, cinders, glass, paper, wood, coal, ceramic, clinkers and metal. An "oil odor" associated with a black sand and cinder layer was encountered in SS-06 and SS-07. Fill layer thickness generally increases from east to west. The fill layer overlies swamp and glacial meltwater deposits. Exploration locations (SS-01 through SS-13, SS-16, and SS-17) are shown on Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. CTDEP also installed temporary microwells in five of the explorations (SS-01, SS-04, SS-07, SS-09, and SS-11) to collect groundwater "grab samples" (304). According to CTDEP field notes, groundwater was encountered at a depth of approximately 6 ft. below grade in SS-01 (304). Results of chemical analyses of soil samples detected ETPH at concentrations ranging up to 4,000 mg/kg, in excess of RSR DEC and PMC, in 3 of 17 samples tested. Arsenic exceeded RSR DEC in one sample with a concentration of 29 mg/kg. Leachable concentrations of lead and antimony exceeded GA/GAA PMC in 13 of 17 and 3 of 17 samples respectively, with concentrations up to 0.07 mg/L and 0.014 mg/kg respectively. Several PAHs exceeded DEC and/or PMC (237). On 28 December, CTDEP collected groundwater samples from microwells SS-01, SS-04, SS-07, SS-09, and SS-11 for chemical analysis for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, and cyanide. Results of the analyses detected metals in all the samples tested. Low levels of the VOCs dichloromethane and chloroform were detected in the water sample from SS-11. Trace to low levels (less than 4 ug/l) of SVOCs were detected in groundwater samples from SS-01 and SS-09; SVOCs (2.5 to 15.45 ug/l) were also detected in the groundwater sample from SS-11. Cyanide was not detected in the groundwater samples tested (331). On 17 and 24 January 2001 CTDEP collected 15 additional shallow soil samples from a depth of 0 to 6 inches at Mill Rock Park (304). Locations of the soil samples (designated RFA-01 through RFA-13, RFA-16 and RFA-20) are shown on Figure 3. Results of chemical testing of soil samples for ETPH, SVOCs, PCBs, pesticides, metals, and cyanide detected arsenic in three samples with concentrations up to 28.85 mg/kg, in excess of RSR DEC. The chemical testing also detected several SVOCs in the soil samples, including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene and indeno (1,2,3-cd) pyrene. Concentrations of one or more SVOCs detected exceeded RSR DEC (253). On 15 March 2001, CTDEP collected samples of playground sand from depths of 0 to .5 ft. below grade at 10 locations in Mill Rock Park. Sample locations are designated as RFA-18 to RFA-27 in Figure 3. The sand samples were analyzed for total arsenic to address concerns relative to the potential presence of arsenic in the shallow soils. Previous analyses of surficial soils in Rochford Field

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and Mill Rock Park had detected elevated levels of arsenic. Results of the analyses did not detect elevated concentrations of arsenic in the playground sand (304). c. Rochford Field On 28 December 2000 CTDEP drilled 14 geoprobe explorations (SS21 through SS-34) to depths ranging from 4 to 12 ft. below grade at Rochford Field. Explorations encountered 2.75 ft. to 8.5 ft. deep fill deposits containing a mixture of soil, slag, brick, cinders, wood, coal, rubber, cloth, clinkers, concrete and metal pellets. An "odor" associated with a layer of black sand and cinders in SS-26. Fill layer thickness generally increased from southeast to northwest. The fill layer overlies swamp and glacial meltwater deposits. CTDEP installed temporary microwells in four of the explorations (SS-21, SS24, SS-27 and SS-30) (217, 304). Locations of the explorations are shown on Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. Composite soil samples collected from depths of 0 to 4 ft. were submitted for chemical analysis for ETPH, total lead, arsenic, thallium and mercury, leachable metals (by Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure [SPLP]) and SVOCs. Results of chemical testing of the soil samples detected ETPH concentrations exceeding RSR DEC and PMC in 3 of 14 samples with concentrations (up to 1,509.68 mg/kg). Chemical testing also detected lead (up to 2,229 mg/kg in 6 of 14 samples), arsenic (up to 164 mg/kg in 11 of 14 samples), and mercury (39.2 mg/kg) in excess of RSR criteria. Results of the soil analysis also detected SVOCs in excess of RSR criteria, including benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, chrysene, fluoranthene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and isophorone (237). On 28 December, CTDEP collected groundwater grab samples from microwells SS-21 and SS-27. Samples were tested for cyanide, VOCs, SVOCs, and metals. Results of the chemical testing detected the VOCs chloroform (2.6 ug/l) and dichloromethane (5.0 ug/l) in the samples at concentrations below RSR criteria. A trace level of the SVOC bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate was detected in the groundwater sample from SS-21. Results of chemical testing of the groundwater sample from SS-27 detected 12 SVOCs at concentrations ranging from 2.6 to 35.29 ug/l. Metals were detected in both samples, cyanide was not detected (331). On 24 and 25 January 2001 CTDEP collected 14 additional soil samples from a depth of 0 to 6 inches at Rochford Field. The samples, which were designated RF-21 through RF-34, were collected from the same locations as SS-21 to SS-34 (28 December 2000). Results of the chemical testing of the soil samples detected arsenic in excess of RSR criteria. Concentrations detected ranged up to 59.74 mg/kg.

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CTDEP conducted additional soil testing in March 2001 to confirm the presence of the arsenic (247, 254). At that time, CTDEP sampled the bare dirt infields of the two baseball diamonds in Rochford Field. Soil samples, designated RF-35 through RF-44 (Figure 3), were collected from depths of 0 to .5 ft. and were analyzed for total arsenic. Results of the analyses did not detect arsenic at concentrations greater than 1.3 mg/kg (254). The levels of arsenic detected did not exceed RSR RDEC. On 29 March 2001, CTDEP conducted grid sampling of Rochford Field to evaluate the potential presence of arsenic and collect soil samples for health risk assessment purposes. CTDEP collected shallow soil samples (0 to 2 inches and 2 to 6 inches depth) from 20 locations, designated RF-45 to RF-64 on Figure 3. CTDEP analyzed soil samples in the field using XRF. Samples collected from 0 to 2 inch depths were also submitted for confirmatory laboratory testing for total arsenic. Results of both the XRF and laboratory testing (0 to 2 inch samples) detected relatively uniform, elevated concentrations of arsenic, ranging up to 40 mg/kg, throughout the field (324). d. Newhall Neighborhood In January and February 2001 CTDEP conducted a right-of-way sampling investigation in the Newhall Neighborhood to attempt to delineate the limits of the landfill (282). The CTDEP drilled 65 geoprobe explorations to depths ranging from 4 to 12 ft. below grade. Sampling was conducted within the public right-of-way, the grass strips located between the sidewalk and road with the exception of two samples that were collected on residential and church properties. Fourteen borings (1067-WIN, 18-NB, 341-MR, 142-BT, 118-BT, 99BT, 465-NH, 481-NH, 499-NH, 513-NH, 523-NH, 274-MS, 177MS, and 121-MS) contained ash, cinders, slag and/or fill material ranging in thickness from 0.5 ft. to 8.0 ft. in thickness. The greatest thickness of ash and fill materials was located along Bryden Terrace. The water table was encountered at depths ranging from 6.0 ft. to 8.0 ft. below grade (282). Locations of the explorations are shown on Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. Results of analyses were compared to RSR DEC and PMC. Results of the chemical testing of the soil samples collected (282) detected: ¾ ¾ ETPH at concentrations in excess of RSR criteria in two surface samples and one deeper sample. Metals at levels in excess of RSR criteria in 13 samples. CTDEP suggested that elevated arsenic concentrations detected may be a result of historic pesticide application since the highest levels were detected along the northeast corner of the intersection of Bryden Terrace and Wadsworth Street, in borings where no fill materials were observed.

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SVOCs at levels exceeding RSR DEC criteria in 19 samples collected from 17 locations. 21 samples collected from 19 locations contained SVOCs with concentrations exceeding RSR PMC. Pesticides at levels exceeding the RSR DEC and/or PMC were detected in 11 samples collected from 9 locations.

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CTDEP concluded that, based on the results of the sampling program, fill material is present along parts of Newhall Street, Morse Street, Bryden Terrance, Newbury Street and Winchester Avenue and landfill materials may extend beneath residences located on the east side of Newhall Street across from Hamden Middle School (282). CTDEP recognized limitations to sampling in the public right-of-way in that, with the exception of the section of Bryden Terrace between Winchester Avenue and Wadsworth Street, most of the roads were present in 1934. In order to evaluate whether landfill materials may be present in the interior sections of blocks that were not sampled during the right-of-way investigation, CTDEP recommended additional explorations to: ¾ ¾ confirm the presence of landfill materials, and further define the extent and degree of contamination that may be present in the surface and deep soils and groundwater.

In 2002, CTDEP's subcontractor consultant, GZA, conducted additional subsurface explorations in the Newhall Neighborhood. To date, Haley & Aldrich has not been provided with a final report of the results of the additional assessments. e. Hamden Middle School On 27 and 28 December 2000, CTDEP collected soil gas samples from 10 locations beneath the basement and crawlspace of the Hamden Middle School. Soil gas samples were screened for the presence of VOCs and methane. The work was conducted to verify results of previous soil gas sampling conducted by FSS in November and December 2000. FSS has previous reported elevated concentrations of methane beneath the floor slab of the Middle School boiler room. Results of the CTDEP soil gas sampling detected measurable concentrations of methane in two soil gas samples collected beneath the boiler room floor slab. CTDEP did not detect methane at the other locations sampled; VOCs were not detected in any location sampled (329). On 28 and 29 December 2000, ERI used summa containers to collect soil gas samples for chemical testing for VOCs at 9 of the 10 locations sampled by CTDEP. Results of the chemical testing of the summa container air samples detected trace to low levels of several

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VOCs. CTDEP reviewed the ERI test results and concluded that the compounds tested may not have resulted from decay of the historic landfilled materials beneath the school (329). On 15 February 2001, CTDEP collected 26 soil samples (SF-01 through SF-26) from depths of 0 to 0.5 ft. below grade. Soil samples were tested for total metals and SVOCs. Results of the analyses did not detect concentrations of metals or SVOCs in excess of RSR DEC (240, 248). On 10 May 2001, CTDEP revisited the Middle School site to collect an additional 39 surface soil samples (0 to 3 inches depth) (HMS-01 through HMS-33) from locations along the southern boundary of the school grounds adjacent to the rear yards of several Morse Street residences (Figure 3). Soil samples were tested for total lead and arsenic, selected samples were also tested for SVOCs. According to CTDEP, the May 2001 sampling event was conducted to determine the extent of lead contaminated surface soils identified by REAC/USEPA during its residential sampling program (330). Results of chemical testing detected lead in one sample (HMS-16, 1,485 mg/kg) at a concentration in excess of the RSR DEC. SVOCs were detected in a number of samples, concentrations of one or more SVOCs were detected in excess of RSR DEC in five samples and in excess of RSR PMC in six samples tested. CTDEP concluded that the SVOC exceedences were "slight" and were not expected to pose an "immediate health threat" (304, 330). During the May 2001 sampling event, the CTDEP also collected shallow soil samples from six locations in the area east of the Middle School tennis courts and west of the school parking lot. The samples were collected in a sparsely vegetated area where CTDEP had previously observed coal "clinkers" and near a location where an elevated concentration of arsenic was detected in shallow soils sampled by FSS in December 2001 (211, 212, 273, 298, 330). The samples, which are designated HMS-34 through HMS-39, were tested for total lead and arsenic, selected samples were also tested for SVOCs. Results of the analyses detected concentrations of arsenic (36 and 44 mg/kg) in two samples (HMS-34 and HMS-36) in excess of the RSR DEC of 10 mg/kg. Chemical testing detected SVOCs in excess of RSR DEC and PMC in HMS-35, HMS-37, HMS-38 and HMS-39. However, CTDEP concluded that the SVOC exceedences were "slight" and the compounds did not pose an "immediate health threat" (330). Sampling locations are shown on Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. 4. Other Documents Haley & Aldrich reviewed additional correspondence and reports, completed by USEPA, USEPA contractors, or other consultants on file at CTDEP. A number of these documents were previously discussed in Section 3 of this report. Other information on file at CTDEP includes reports or

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correspondence relative to the ongoing Newhall Neighborhood residence structural subsidence evaluation, methane/indoor air sampling of residential properties and reports, data and correspondence relative to additional surface soil investigation of residential properties in the Newhall Neighborhood (conducted by USEPA or others). Haley & Aldrich also reviewed information obtained during the discovery phase of the Order SRD-128 proceeding from the Town, Olin Corporation, CTDEP, and the SCCRWA. 5. Adjacent Properties During a review of information on file at CTDEP, Haley & Aldrich encountered additional information on the SNET garage, located adjacent to the western side of the site (178, 180): ¾ During the period from 1985 to 1999, the SNET garage was listed as a very small quantity generator of hazardous waste (less than 100 kg/month) with an EPA ID No. CTD981068356. In November 1998, SNET filed a Form III and Environmental Condition Assessment Form (ECAF) in conjunction with the transfer of the SNET facility in association with the merger of SNET and SBC Communications. In March 1999, SNET submitted a proposed schedule to the CTDEP for investigating the Morse Street facility. Results of a June 1999, AARON Environmental Phase I ESA of the SNET facility identified several Areas of Concern related to petroleum storage and vehicle maintenance operations at the property. Based on the results of the ESA, AARON recommended Phase II exploration and chemical testing of soil and groundwater from the site (178). In August 2000, AARON conducted a Phase II ESA of the SNET property. Results of the Phase II assessment were documented in an August 2000 report titled "Initial Phase II Environmental Site Assessment" (180).. The Phase II work, which included the installation of 16 soil borings and 3 observation wells, detected evidence of chemical releases near existing or former on-site USTs and fuel dispensers, hydraulic lifts, an electrical generator and floor drains. Explorations generally encountered glacial meltwater deposits comprised of medium to find sand, with subordinate amounts of silt and gravel. Significant fill deposits were not encountered. Locations of the AARON explorations, which were drilled to depths of 12 to 25 ft. below grade, are shown in Figure 3; exploration logs are included in Appendix G. The AARON Phase II work also identified impacted sediment in the site storm water system. According to AARON, the Phase II work and groundwater testing did not detect impacts from the adjacent Newhall Field landfill. A review of soil boring logs from the AARON assessment did not reveal the presence of ash, cinders, or solid waste debris similar to that encountered in the eastern site properties. The locations of the AARON explorations at the SNET facility are shown on Figure 3. Overburden soils encountered in explorations at the SNET facility consisted primarily of sand and

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gravel. Based on the results of the assessment, AARON recommended further Phase III testing and groundwater monitoring (180). ¾ In March 2001, CTDEP conducted a "Redetermination of a Form III ECAF" and recommended verification of the environmental conditions at the SNET facility by a Licensed Environmental Professional (LEP) (303, 304). In 2001, AARON reportedly conducted Phase III explorations at the SNET facility. During telephone conversations with CTDEP on 25 and 26 April 2001, AARON reported encountering "asphalt at depths of 4 and 10 ft. near the fenceline with the Newhall Field and "ash, cinders, slag, glass and debris" at depths from 2 to 17 ft. below grade on the western portion of the SNET property (463). According to AARON, the maximum thickness of fill encountered was 16 ft. Results of chemical testing detected elevated concentrations of PAHs and lead, including a concentration of 6,000 ppm total lead in a sample of "slag material" (463). During a follow-up phone conversation with CTDEP in January 2002, AARON reported that the waste fill in the training area at SNET encompassed approximately 5 to 10 acres and extended from the school fence line to commercial property on the other end of the site (463).

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F.

United States Environmental Protection Agency On 20 August 2001, Haley & Aldrich submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the USEPA. A copies of FOIA letter is provided in Appendix D. To date no responses have been received from the FOIA requests. When a response is received, it will be forwarded and if it affects our conclusions regarding the site, the Town of Hamden and their counsel will be informed verbally and in writing. Haley & Aldrich reviewed a number of reports prepared for, or by USEPA or their subcontractors on file at CTDEP, including the following: ¾ "USEPA Potential Hazardous Waste Site Preliminary Assessment, Michael J. Whalen Junior High School," prepared for USEPA by CTDEP, 12 September 1985. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Record of Activity, 8 November 1991 and 21 January 1992. "Onsite Reconnaissance and Soil Sampling Report at the Hamden Middle School," prepared for USEPA by NUS Corporation, 3 January 1989. "Final Screening Site Inspection. Newhall Street Field, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for Region 1 USEPA Waste Management Division by NUS Corporation, 23 July 1991. "Removal Program Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation for Newhall Street Field Hamden, Connecticut" prepared for the USEPA Emergency Planning and Response Branch by Roy F. Weston, August 1991.

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Memorandum on Site Investigation Closure, Newhall Street Field Site," prepared by the USEPA, 25 March 1992. "Final Site Inspection Prioritization Report for Newhall Street Field. Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for CTDEP and USEPA by ARCS I Work Assignment Manager, CDM Federal Programs Corporation, 5 December 1994. "Final Report Site Investigation and Extent of Subsurface Soil Contamination Hamden Site, Hamden Connecticut," prepared by Lockheed Martin REAC, June 2001. Letter from USEPA to CTDEP regarding Request for State ARARs ­ Rosem Site, Hamden, Connecticut, dated 24 July 2001. Letter from USEPA to CTDEP regarding Request for State ARARs ­ Bryden and Morse Street Site, Hamden, Connecticut, dated 24 July 2001. Letter to USEPA from Connecticut Department of Public Health, dated 25 July 2001. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for a Removal Action at the Rosem Superfund Removal Site Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 1 August 2001. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for a Removal Action at the Bryden and Morse Streets Superfund Removal Site Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 2 August 2001. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for Increase in Scope of Response/Ceiling Increase for a Continued Removal Action at the Rosem Superfund Removal Site in Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 19 October 2001. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for Increase in Scope of Response/Ceiling Increase for a Continued Removal Action at the Bryden and Morse Street Superfund Removal Site in Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 28 November 2001.

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A discussion of the previous USEPA investigations and the ongoing Removal Actions at the Rosem and Bryden and Morse Street sites is included in Sections 3 and 4 of this report. The 19 October and 28 November 2001 Memoranda requesting an increase in scope for the removal action at the Rosem and Bryden and Morse Street sites, indicate that the USEPA has expanded the scope of the removal action to include two additional properties in the Rosem Site (259 and 267 Morse Street) and one additional property in the Bryden and Morse Street Site (124 Bryden Terrace) (338, 339). Reportedly, the additional contamination, which includes elevated lead in surface soils, was identified during the removal actions on adjacent properties (338, 339).

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G.

User-Provided Information The ASTM Standard requires disclosure in the Phase I report whether the user of the report has specialized knowledge about previous ownership or uses of the property that may be material to identifying RECs, or whether the user has determined that the property's Title contains environmental liens or other information related to environmental condition of the property, including engineering and institutional controls and Activity and Use Limitations, as defined by ASTM. As of this report preparation, Haley & Aldrich has not been informed by the user that there are liens or other information about the environmental condition of the property in the Title. In addition, the user has not indicated specialized knowledge about previous ownership or uses of the property that may be material to identifying RECs.

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VI. 6.01

SITE RECONNAISSANCE AND KEY PERSONAL INTERVIEW(S) General

On 8 and 17 August and 17 and 26 September 2001, Deborah Motycka Downie and Chris Harriman conducted site visits to observe conditions. Access to Parcel 4 was provided by the Town of Hamden and the Hamden Board of Education. On Parcel 4, Haley & Aldrich personnel observed accessible interior areas of the site buildings, including common areas, basement areas, mechanical spaces, and tenant spaces. Haley & Aldrich also observed the exterior portions of the property, including the property boundaries, and subsurface conditions during a one-day test pit investigation on the Newhall Street Athletic Field property. For Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3, Haley & Aldrich observed general property conditions from public thoroughfares. No weather-related conditions or other conditions that would limit our ability to observe the site occurred during our site reconnaissance. During the 26 September 2001 site visit, Haley & Aldrich interviewed two Key Site Managers, Mr. Mark Albanese Director of Facilities for the Hamden Board of Education and Mr. William Parillo, Custodian at the Newhall Center. During the period from 31 October 2001 to 12 November 2001, Dr. William F. Kay, Jr. and Elida Danaher of Haley & Aldrich visited selected residential properties in Parcels 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and immediately outside of the current site boundary to observe surficial conditions, including reported structural settlement and, in some cases, evidence of debris-containing fill materials. During the October and November site visits, Haley & Aldrich interviewed property owners or occupants about environmental conditions or concerns. The findings of the site visit and interviews are discussed below. Site photographs are included in Appendix E. Summaries of pertinent observations relative to exterior areas of Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 are summarized in Section 6.02 and in Appendix B. ASTM Section 9.8 requires that, prior to the site visit, the current site owner or Key Site Manager and user, if different from the current owner or Key Site Manager, be asked if there are any helpful documents that can be made available for review. These consist of environmental site assessment reports, audits, permits, tank registrations, Material Safety Data Sheets, Community Right-to-Know plans, safety plans, hydrogeologic or geotechnical reports, or hazardous waste generator reports. We made such a request and were provided with the Underground Storage Tank Notification Forms for the Hamden Middle School and Hamden Community Center and the following previous environmental reports: ¾ "Draft Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for the Hamden Middle School," Prepared by Facility Support Services for Town of Hamden Board of Education, July 2000. "Soil Vapor Survey of Hamden Middle School," Prepared by Facility Support Services LLC for the Town of Hamden Board of Education and Tai Soo Kim Architects, November 2000. "Environmental Soil Quality Assessment of Hamden Middle School," Prepared by Facility Support Services LLC for Tai Soo Kim Partners, Architects, November 2000.

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"Operation Plan for Disruption of Former Solid Waste Disposal Area, Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., January 2001. "Limited Surficial Soil Sampling and Selected Interim Actions Report, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the CTDEP by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., June 2001. "Interim Remedial Action Work Plan, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 11 July 2001. "Interim Remedial Action Work Plan, Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 2 August 2001. Site Visit Observations ­ Parcel 4 General Site features on Parcel 4 properties are shown on Figure 2. Exploration locations are shown on Figure 3. Photographs of pertinent features or areas of concern are included in Appendix E.

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6.02 A.

B.

Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Field 1. Interior Conditions The Hamden Middle School consists of four interconnected, two and threestory, steel and brick buildings. The buildings are connected via enclosed walkways. The Middle School is serviced by the Town of Hamden public sewer system and a potable water supply provided by SCCRWA. The Middle School buildings are heated with an oil-fired system, including three boiler units, located in a boiler room at the northwest corner of one of the buildings (see Figure 2). The Middle School boiler can also operate on natural gas. Heating oil for the Middle School is stored in a 10,000-gallon, fiberglass UST, located outside to the north of the boiler room. The UST was reportedly installed in 1988 or 1989 to replace a former, 10,000-gallon steel UST (310). During the site visit, Haley & Aldrich observed several floor drains and areas of oily staining on the floor of the boiler room. Haley & Aldrich did not note unusual odors or oily sheens in or around the floor drains. According to Mr. Albanese, the floor drains in the boiler room and elsewhere in the school building discharge to the sanitary sewer (310). Haley & Aldrich also observed one 55-gal drum of "Boilerite 100" and two 55gallon drums simply marked "Nutmeg Technologies" in the boiler room, along with numerous 5-gallon pails of "Kill Sludge." According to Mr. Albanese, the chemicals are used for boiler treatment and maintenance.

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During the site visit, Haley & Aldrich observed various paints and chemicals stored in locked cabinets in the Art and Chemistry rooms. Haley & Aldrich observed sinks in various classrooms, including those used for art and chemistry. According to Mr. Albanese, the sinks discharge to the Town of Hamden sanitary sewer system (310). Haley & Aldrich observed containers and drums of maintenance and typical janitorial supplies in two locked storage areas, one on the first floor, one on the second floor. Haley & Aldrich did not observe unusual odors, staining or other evidence of chemical spillage or leakage at the Middle School during the site visit. Hydraulic oil for an elevator at the Middle School is stored in a 300-gallon above ground tank located in the main classroom building near the elevator. Haley & Aldrich did not observe staining, odors or other evidence of a release of hydraulic oil on or around the tank. 2. Exterior Conditions The Middle School buildings are surrounded by paved parking areas and driveways on the west and east, landscaped and lawn areas with trees on the east side of the site. A chain link fence surrounds the property. Tennis courts and athletic fields are located on the west side of the buildings, in an area known as the Newhall Street Athletic Field. Haley & Aldrich observed several catch basins in the field area. Haley & Aldrich did not observe evidence of stained soil, stressed vegetation or unusual odors on the fields, tennis courts or in or around the catch basins. Haley & Aldrich observed the fill and vent pipes for the UST near the northwest corner of the boiler room. Haley & Aldrich did not observe oily staining or other evidence of spillage near the fill pipes. Haley & Aldrich observed five areas where M&E had recently finished soil excavation and remediation activities. In four of the areas, the work sites remain covered with wood chips to minimize exposure to the underlying soils until the areas have established grass. At the time of the September 2001 site visit, Haley & Aldrich observed grass growing in the area on the east side of the tennis courts. On 17 August 2001, Haley & Aldrich, Inc., observed Earth Technology, Inc., excavate six test pits (TP-101 through TP-106) on the Newhall Athletic Field. Three Pits (TP-101 through TP-103) were excavated close to the southern property line with the Morse Street residential properties and three pits (TP104 trough TP-106) were excavated in a grassed area between the Middle School building and the tennis courts. Test pits ranged in depth from 2.5 to 7.3 feet. Test pit locations are shown on Figure 3, several photographs are included on Appendix E, and logs are in Appendix G. Test pits typically encountered two distinctive layers of fill overlying the glacial deposits. The 0.4 ft. to 2.4 ft. thick upper layer of fill contained red brown sand with subordinate amounts of silt, gravel and cobbles. The lower (deeper) layer of fill is black to dark gray fine sand-size to powder-like material containing variable amounts of cinders and ash, slag, fabric, paper

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products primarily marked "Winchester" and/or "Western", broken wooden boxes, metal, brick, glass, small batteries marked "Winchester Super Seal", cartridge casings, possible metal filings. Underlying glacial meltwater deposits (red brown sand with subordinate amounts of gravel) were encountered in TP-101 and TP-102 at depths of 3.5 and 2.5 ft. respectively. In August 2002, the Water Authority performed additional test pit investigations, deep soil borings, and groundwater investigations. The results of these investigations are reported in the Haley & Aldrich "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002) and the "Report on Oversight of Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc., Malcolm Pirnie and GZA GeoEnvironmental Investigation Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002). C. Hamden Community Center The Hamden Community Center site consists of two interconnected, two-story brick buildings with basements. Landscaped, grassy areas surround the buildings; paved parking lots are located on the north and west side of the building. The southern site building, which was constructed in 1917, has a circular walkway that faces Newhall Street. The northern portion of the building was constructed as an addition in 1952. The Town of Hamden public sewer system and a potable water supply provided by SCCRWA services Hamden Community Center (302, 310, 311). The Hamden Community Center building is heated with an oil-fired system, including two boiler units, which are located in the boiler room (refer to Figure 2). Haley & Aldrich did not observe oily staining or other evidence of leakage or spillage in the boiler room during the site visit. Haley & Aldrich observed several floor drains in the boiler room and elsewhere in the building, according to Mr. Parillo, the drains all discharge into the Town of Hamden sanitary sewer system (311). Heating oil for the Hamden Community Center building is stored in a 6,000-gallon, fiberglass UST located outside the eastern part of the original school building, near the circular walkway off Newhall Street. Haley & Aldrich observed the fill and vent pipes for the UST on the eastern side of the building, near the reported UST location. Haley & Aldrich did not observe oily staining or other evidence of spillage near the fill pipes. According to Mr. Parillo, the existing UST was installed at the location of a former 10,000-gallon steel UST in 1988 or 1989. Mr. Parillo reported to Haley & Aldrich that he had worked at the building since 1980, and had observed the UST excavation and installation. According to Mr. Parillo, there was no evidence of oily staining, tank corrosion or leakage during the UST removal (311). During the site visit, Haley & Aldrich observed commercial janitorial products and cleaning supplies stored neatly in a secure basement area located in the southeastern corner of building. According to Mr. Parillo, a former on-site chemistry classroom, described in July 2000 FSS Phase I report was cleaned and the disused chemicals were removed from site. Haley & Aldrich did not observe evidence of significant or inappropriate chemical storage in the Hamden Community Center building (311).

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Sewer Pump Station The sewer pump station is a windowless, one-story brick building surrounded by a grassy lawn area and chain link fence. A natural gas meter is attached to the south wall of the building and large sewer manholes are mounted in a pad on the north side of the building. The ground floor of building houses two electric pump motors and a natural gas powered emergency generator. The pump impellers, control valves, and an overflow alarm mechanism are in the basement. Haley & Aldrich did not observe evidence of USTs, including tank fill or vent pipes on the ground or on the side of the pump station building. Haley & Aldrich did not observe stained soils, drains, odors, stressed vegetation, or other evidence of chemical spillage outside of the building.

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Rochford Field Rochford Field is a large grassy area that occupies the block bordered by Newhall and Newbury Streets to the west and south, respectively; Winchester Avenue to the east and Mill Rock Road to the north. A chain link fence surrounds the recreational facility, which includes baseball fields, backstops, bleachers, and a toilet facility. Haley & Aldrich observed several large trees on the site, other trees were reportedly felled by the 1989 tornado (306, 307). Haley & Aldrich conducted a subsurface investigation in Rochford Field in August 2002. The results of this investigation, which includes boring, test pits and monitoring wells are report in Haley & Aldrich's "Report on Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002) and Haley & Aldrich's "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002).

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Mill Rock Park Mill Rock Park includes a large open, grassy field on the west side of the property, and a playground and tennis courts, on the east side of the property. The playground includes swing sets and other playground equipment, benches and basketball hoops. A sidewalk surrounds the property and well-maintained trees run along Mill Rock Road, on the north side of the site, and Wadsworth Street to the east. Residential properties are located to the north and east across Mill Rock Road and Wadsworth Street. A tree-lined chain link fence runs along the southern site boundary, separating the park from adjacent homes on Bryden Terrace. Temporary trailers and portable toilet facilities, used by USEPA's contractor IT Corporation (IT)/REAC, are located within a chain link-fenced area on western part of the Mill Rock Park property. A temporary electric service with overhead wires and an electric box are immediately outside the chain link fence. Haley & Aldrich did not observe stained soil, unusual odors, stressed vegetation or evidence of chemical handling, storage or release at Mill Rock Park.

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Haley & Aldrich conducted a subsurface investigation in Rochford Field in August 2002. The results of this investigation, which includes boring, test pits and monitoring wells are report in Haley & Aldrich's "Report on Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002) and Haley & Aldrich's "Report on Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002). 6.03 Results of Environmental Surveys and Interviews in the Newhall Neighborhood In September 2001, Haley & Aldrich surveyed residents of the Newhall Neighborhood including the six residential site Parcels (1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3) and residents immediately across the street from the present limits of the study area, regarding the presence of debris fill and/or structural settling concerns. These surveys are found in Appendix H. Based on the results of the initial survey, Haley & Aldrich conducted follow-up visits and interviews at 38 selected properties. During the period from 31 October 2001 through 12 November 2001, Haley & Aldrich visited selected homes in the Newhall Neighborhood (on Parcels 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D)(306). The purpose of the site visits, interviews and surveys was to evaluate the likely extent of the area that was historically used as one or more landfills. Information from the Haley & Aldrich site visits, interviews and surveys was used to supplement findings of the Phase I regulatory file reviews and interviews with the Town Engineer, QVHD and other regulatory officials. Haley & Aldrich observations of surficial conditions on Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 are summarized in Parcel Reports in Appendix B. Highlights of the survey and interview findings are also summarized below and in Table II. In general, we found that a number of the residential properties have experienced settlement of structures and/or ground surface. A number of property owners report historic excavation of debris including ash, cinders, glass, metal and other waste materials. Residences or property with reported or observed debris fill and/or structural settling (based on survey results or information from regulatory file reviews) is shown on Figure 2. Generally, the results of the survey and follow-up interviews revealed widespread debris fill and/or structural settling problems on properties in Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 3 as well as several adjacent areas. Information gained during the Haley & Aldrich site visits generally confirmed results of the regulatory file reviews (302-304, 307-313). During the ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of areas of debris or ashcontaining fill in the Newhall Neighborhood at locations outside the Phase I study area (243, 304). The potential presence of fill materials at locations outside of the site was identified based on information on file at CTDEP and the QVHD, and the results of surveys or questionnaires completed by area residents (243, 304, 307-309). Historic areas of filling are common throughout Connecticut, especially in urban areas. The presence of fill is not necessarily an environmental concern. Many current and historic building projects included placement of sand, gravel or other types of "clean fill," including fill containing stone, concrete or asphalt pieces. Areas where possibly impacted fill material was reported outside the current site include:

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A former "coke lot" and possible coke and ash dumping area on Shelton Avenue and nearby areas on Shelton Avenue and Edwards Street (ash, coke, cinders, household refuse, bottles and "bones" beginning at depths ranging from 18 inches to six ft. below grade) (243, 304, 308). A historic "public dump" area located on Shelton Street, between Goodrich and Morse Streets, circa 1917. The dump was reportedly used for household refuse, including tin cans (304). An area bounded by Edwards, Morse, Goodrich and St. Mary Streets that was reportedly filled "by Winchester Company" (to a depth of 15 ft. below grade) in circa 1917 (304). A reported historic dumping area behind the Christian Baptist Tabernacle Church on Newhall Street, south of Marlboro Street (243). An area on the south side of Morse Street, near the intersection with Edwards Street (solid waste fill including shoes, pans, wire and household refuse) (243). An area on the south side of Morse Street, near the intersection with Newhall Street (fill containing ash, cans, bottles, metal and plastic) (243, 308). The area between North Sheffield Street and Prospect Lane, on the south side of Morse Street (bricks and glass) (243). A residence on the north side of Augur Street, near the intersection with Atlantic and Pacific Streets (ash in shallow soils) (243, 308). The area on in the northeast corner of the intersection of Mill Rock Road and Newhall Street (asphalt in fill material) (243).

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Haley & Aldrich did not encounter direct evidence of contamination in the off-site areas (304, 308). However, during 2002 Olin Corporation performed a geoprobe investigation of selected residential properties and DEP oversaw a test pit excavation conducted by its consultant GZA. Haley & Aldrich observed these investigations, which is reported in the "Report on Oversight of Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc., Malcolm Pirnie and GZA GeoEnvironmental Investigation Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut" (December 2002)

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VII.

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS

Haley & Aldrich, Inc. has performed a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment of the Newhall Neighborhood site in the Town of Hamden, Connecticut. The scope of work is described and conditioned by our proposal dated 2 July 2001. As indicated in our proposal, this Phase I was performed in conformance with the scope and limitations of the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate site history, existing observable conditions, current site use, and current and historic uses of surrounding properties to identify the potential presence of Recognized Environmental Conditions (RECs) in connection with the subject site. Exceptions to, or deletions from, this practice are described in Section I of this report. Our conclusions are intended to help the user evaluate the "business environmental risk" associated with the site, as defined in the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard and discussed in the Introduction section of this report. 7.01 Recognized Environmental Conditions

The goal of the ASTM E 1527-00 Standard practice is to identify Recognized Environmental Conditions (RECs), as defined in the Standard and in Section I of this report. This assessment has revealed no evidence of recognized environmental conditions currently in connection with the property except for the following two RECs listed below. The ASTM E 1527-00 Standard requires an opinion of the potential impacts of REC(s) identified on a site during a Phase I. Our opinion is rendered with respect to a REC's potential (high, medium, or low) to require remedial response based on prevailing agency requirements and on our understanding of sensitive nature of the property use (School, daycare, residential use and Municipal Park or athletic fields). Our opinion is limited by the conditions prevailing at the time our work is performed and the applicable regulatory requirements in effect. During the Phase I ESA, Haley & Aldrich identified several RECs associated with the subject site. Our opinion of the potential impacts of REC(s) identified in this Phase I is as follows: REC #1: Former landfill areas that existed on the site during the period from the 1920s through the mid 1950s. Potential Impact: High Explanation: Based on the results of the ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of historic landfills on the subject site. Former industrial waste landfills were located at the site of the Hamden Middle School and associated Newhall Street Athletic Field, and at the site of Rochford Field and may occur on abutting properties to the south. Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence that residential refuse waste and unauthorized dumping also occurred in, or immediately adjacent to, this area. Refer to Sections 4.01(A) and 4.01(K) for further details. The area of Mill Rock Park, Bryden Terrace, and the sewer pumping station was reportedly used for dumping of residential rubbish. The area of dumping may have extended southerly to include some or all of Parcels 2A and 2C. Haley & Aldrich also encountered evidence of a private automotive dump in the western portion of Parcel 1. The landfills, or portions of the landfills, apparently operated during the period from the 1920s through the mid 1950s.

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REC #2: Historic fill that may have included ash, cinders, industrial and residential waste. Potential Impact: High. Explanation: Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of historic, waste-containing, fill materials, containing, ash, cinders and solid waste debris in portion of Parcel 3 and CTDEP has identified residential properties in Parcels 2B and 2D as being constructed over filled areas. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation that these areas were used as landfills. It is not certain whether the placement of the fill was authorized or consisted of uncontrolled dumping by unauthorized persons or facilities. The impacted materials may have resulted from placement of industrial or residential wastes from off-site areas, landowner dumping, on-site burning or a combination of sources. However, it is possible that historic landfilling activities Rochford Field extended into Parcel 2B, historic landfilling activities at the current Middle School site extended into the southern portion of Parcel 3, or that a landfill existed on the northern or western portions of Parcel 3 prior to the 1920s. 7.02 Historical Recognized Environmental Conditions and Recommendations for Additional Studies and Investigations

The ASTM E 1527-00 Standard also requires that historical RECs (HRECs) and other known or suspect environmental conditions, as defined in the Standard and in Section I of this report are identified in the Phase I. HREC #1: A former 10,000-gallon, steel underground storage tank at the Hamden Middle School was reportedly removed in 1989. Haley & Aldrich encountered a 1987 spill report of an overfill of the UST. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter other reports or documentation of the UST removal or results of testing of environmental quality of soils in the UST excavation. The existing 10,000-gallon UST was reportedly installed at the location of the former tank. The existing tank has not been tightness tested, and has not exceeded the standard 30-year life expectancy for fiberglass tanks. Haley & Aldrich conducted Phase II subsurface explorations and chemical testing of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of the existing and former USTs. The UST evaluation was documented in a 5 November 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden Connecticut." Results of the Haley & Aldrich assessment, and previous testing by others, detected Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) at or near the water table on the west side of the school, adjacent to, and in the vicinity of the UST. The source of the petroleum, however, appeared to be related to former landfilling activities as Haley & Aldrich did not detect evidence of releases from the existing or former USTs. HREC #2: A former 10,000-gallon, steel UST was removed from the Hamden Community Center in 1989. According to a Town employee that witnessed the UST excavation and removal in 1989, there was not visible evidence of oily soils or leakage from the UST. Haley & Aldrich did not encounter documentation of the removal or results of soil testing from the UST excavation. Haley & Aldrich conducted Phase II subsurface explorations and chemical testing of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of the existing and former USTs. The UST evaluation was documented in a 5 November 2002 report titled "Report on Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden Connecticut." Results of the assessment did not detect evidence of releases from the existing or former USTs at the Hamden Community Center.

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7.03 A.

Additional Information Historic Filling Operations in the Site Vicinity During the ESA, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of areas of debris or ashcontaining fill in the Newhall Neighborhood at locations within and outside the Phase I study area. The potential presence of fill materials at locations outside of the site was identified based on information on file at Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) , the Town of Hamden Town Hall and Library, and the Quinnipiack Valley Health District (QVHD), the results of surveys or questionnaires completed by area residents, and a review of information obtained during the discovery phase of the Order SRD-128 proceeding from the Town, Olin Corporation, CTDEP, SCCRWA, and historic documents and Town of Hamden Annual Reports at the Miller Library (322, 332). Historic areas of filling are common throughout Connecticut, especially in urban areas. The presence of fill is not necessarily an environmental concern. Many current and historic building projects included placement of sand, gravel or other types of "clean fill," including fill containing stone, concrete or asphalt pieces. Potentially impacted areas, where evidence of ash or debris-containing fill was encountered, outside the current site include: ¾ A former "coke lot" and possible coke and ash dumping area on Shelton Avenue and nearby areas on Shelton Avenue and Edwards Street (ash, coke, cinders, household refuse, bottles and "bones" beginning at depths ranging from 18 inches to six ft. below grade). An area bounded by Edwards, Morse, Goodrich and St. Mary Streets that was reportedly filled "by Winchester Company" (to a depth of 15 ft. below grade) in circa 1917. A historic "public dump" area located on Shelton Street, between Goodrich and Morse Streets, circa 1917. The dump was reportedly used for household refuse, including tin cans (322). A historic "public refuse dump" located on the east side of Newhall Street between Goodrich and Marlboro Streets (341). A reported historic dumping area behind the Christian Baptist Tabernacle Church on Newhall Street, south of Marlboro Street. An area on the south side of Morse Street, near the intersection with Edwards Street (solid waste fill including shoes, pans, wire and household refuse). An area on the south side of Morse Street, near the intersection with Newhall Street (fill containing ash, cans, bottles, metal and plastic). The area between North Sheffield Street and Prospect Lane, on the south side of Morse Street (bricks and glass). A residence on the north side of Augur Street, near the intersection with Atlantic and Pacific Streets (ash in shallow soils). The area on in the northeast corner of the intersection of Mill Rock Road and Newhall Street (asphalt in fill material).

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An area of "wet ground" southwest of the intersection of Marlboro Street and Newhall Street which was reportedly filled "with waste material from huge furnaces of the Winchester Gun Plant" (322). The former "Mix Pond" located generally north of Morse Street and east of Columbus Street (322). This may have been the location of a former public refuse dump, located on the east side of Columbus Street, north of Morse Street during the late 1930s and 1940s (357).

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In addition, our review of historic maps and aerial photographs suggest that there are three areas contiguous to the Phase I Study Area which may have been historically filled. Refer to Figure 8, "Properties Potentially Within Limits of Contiguous Historic Fill." These areas include: ¾ Properties contained within the blocks bounded by Columbus Street, Morse Street, Shelton Avenue, Marlboro Street, Butler Street, Goodrich Street, and St. Mary Street, Properties contained within the block bounded by Mill Rock Road, Prospect Street, Bryden Terrace and Wadsworth Street, and along the eastern side of Wadsworth Street, between Bryden Terrace and Morse Street, and Properties contained with the block bounded by Morse Street, North Sheffield Street, Goodrich Street, Homeland Terrace, and Prospect Lane, and along the west side of North Sheffield Street.

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These areas are described in further detail in Section 7.04 below. B. Structural Settling of Residences Results of a review of regulatory documents, neighborhood surveys and discussions with residents and town employees revealed indications of structural settling problems on properties in Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3 as well as several adjacent areas. The settlement of the homes may be related to the compression and ongoing breakdown of landfilled materials or the organic degradation of former wetland soils or sediments that may underlie many locations in the area. Haley & Aldrich conducted site visits at these residences to document the nature of the problems and develop recommendations for further assessments. This work was done under contract with a CTDEP Consultant. Subsurface information was also collected to help evaluate the actual cause(s) of the settlement and allow for the development of remedial measures. 7.04 Proposed Revisions to Limits of Study Area

Based on the information reviewed by Haley & Aldrich and documented in this Report, we recommend that the study area be revised as shown on Figure 8 and discussed below. Our information indicates that a zone of fill materials, contiguous to the study area fill material, may extend to the east and south along former wetland corridors. Approximate former wetland areas are shown on 1973 and 1993 maps included in Appendix C, and on Figures 3 and 4. The mere presence of fill material does not in itself constitute an environmental concern. With the exception of the referenced 1970's documentation of the

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placement of up to 15 ft. of industrial and residential waste in the area surrounding Edwards Street (Appendix C, 304, 322), and Board of Health meeting minutes and newspaper articles from the 1930s and 1940s (341, 342, 362), Haley & Aldrich did not encounter direct evidence of landfilling or the presence of contamination in these expanded study areas. However, because the filled wetland areas appear to have been contiguous with the areas of known disposal of industrial and residential waste, additional assessment of these locations is warranted. Results of the additional evaluation will allow for a determination of the presence and nature of the fill used throughout the contiguous former wetland area. Specifically, we believe that study area limits should be extended to include the following areas as shown on Figure 8: ¾ ¾ Properties contained within the blocks bounded by Morse Street, Shelton Avenue, Marlboro Street, Butler Street, Goodrich Street, and St. Mary Street, Properties contained within the block bounded by Mill Rock Road, Prospect Street, Bryden Terrace and Wadsworth Street, and along the eastern side of Wadsworth Street, between Bryden Terrace and Morse Street, and Properties contained with the block bounded by Morse Street, North Sheffield Street, Goodrich Street, Homeland Terrace, and Prospect Lane, and along the west side of North Sheffield Street. Properties located on the east side of Winchester Avenue. Properties located approximately north of the intersection of St. Mary Street and Morse Street and east of Columbus Street.

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Historic data indicates that up to 15 ft. of industrial and residential waste fill may have been placed in the first area listed above surrounding Edwards Street (304, 322). However, no historic documentation was encountered during the research for this assessment related to actual placement of fill materials in the next three areas listed above (i.e., surrounding North Sheffield Street, east side of Winchester Avenue and east of Wadsworth Street), but the data does indicate that these areas may have been part of the former wetlands or associated low lying area. If fill materials do exist in these areas it is anticipated that the thickness will be less than in the area surrounding Edwards Street. A former pond or wetland was once reportedly located on or near the southern portion of the SNET property (322). In addition to the potential areas of contiguous fill, Haley & Aldrich encountered evidence of other, localized, non-contiguous area that may have been filled. These include portions of Parcels 3 and 2D and other areas south of the site. Previous filling in Parcel 3 may have been localized and not part of the contiguous wetland filled area south of Mill Rock Road. Historic information reviewed by Haley & Aldrich including aerial photographs and health department records (28, 308) indicate that this filling may have been at isolated locations and occurred primarily west of Remington Street and North of Augur Street. Historic maps showing the limits of wetland and historic aerial photographs appear to indicate that the fill material encountered at various locations west of Winchester Avenue, south of Morse Street and east of Shelton Avenue/Butler Street, including Parcel 2D, may not be part

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of the contiguous wetland filled area but rather areas of local isolated fill. The nature of the fill material used in these areas is uncertain. A 1993 map suggests that much of this filling may be associated with the "Winchester Gun Plant" (322). Other fill material in this area, especially on the east side of Newhall Street, south of Marlboro Street, may be related to a former public refuse dump located in that area in the 1930s (341, 342). 7.05 Summary

In summary, two Recognized Environmental Conditions were identified during this assessment. Previous environmental evaluations of the site have included several soil exploration, soil vapor surveys and surficial soil sampling programs to evaluate the nature of historic filled and landfilled materials on the subject site. Prior to 2001, the majority of subsurface investigations to date have concentrated on shallow soils. These investigations led to interim remedial measures implemented by the Town on the Hamden Middle School property and Rochford Field. The USEPA implemented interim removal actions, including the excavation of shallow soils, at several residential properties on the site. These evaluations and interim masures have not adequately assessed or addressed impacts to groundwater, deeper soils or surface water from the historic landfill activities. During 2002, deeper subsurface investigations and chemical testing to evaluate the quality and extent of the filled areas were conducted by Haley & Aldrich for or on behalf of the Town of Hamden, LBG on behalf of SCCRWA, Malcom Pirnie (MP) on behalf of Olin, and GZA on behalf of CTDEP. The results of the Town's investigations are documented in the following reports: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ Oversight of U.S. EPA Remedial Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut, 6 November 2002 Phase II Underground Storage Tank Investigation, Hamden Middle School and Community Center, Hamden, Connecticut, 5 November 2002 Phase II and III Environmental Investigations, Rochford Field and Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut, 9 December 2002 Oversight of Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc., Malcolm Pirnie and GZA GeoEnvironmental Investigation Activities, Newhall Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut, 9 December 2002 Test Pit Investigations, Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field & Mill Rock Park, Hamden, Connecticut , 9 December 2002.

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The results of the Water Authority's investigation of Hamden Middle School will likely be included in a report prepared by LBG and the results of the residential investigations would likely be reported by MP to document Olin's 2002 geoprobe investigation and GZA to document the DEP's test pit investigation. Based upon review of the investigation data referenced above, and after consultation with DEP, further investigation may be necessary in some areas to complete the conceptual site model. Once the investigations and conceptual site model are complete, a remedial action plan(s) for the Site will need to be developed and implemented.

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VIII.

CREDENTIALS

This report was prepared by Deborah Motycka Downie, under the direct supervision of Chris Harriman and William F. Kay, Jr., who served as the Project Manager and Officer-in-Charge of this project, respectively. Qualification information for the project personnel is provided below. Dr. Kay is a Registered Professional Engineer and Licensed Environmental Professional in Connecticut as well as Past President of the Environmental Professionals' Organization of Connecticut and Connecticut Section of the American Society of Civil Engineering. He served on the DEP Technical Advisory Group for the "Technical Guidance Document for Site Investigations and Demonstration of Compliance with the Remediation Standard Regulations." In his 20 years of experience with Haley & Aldrich, Inc., Dr. Kay has been responsible for environmental and underground engineering investigations, design, and construction monitoring and regulatory agency negotiations on a variety of projects. Dr. Kay has Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees in Civil Engineering. Dr. Kay is a Vice President and the member of the Board of Directors of the Haley & Aldrich Hartford, Connecticut office. Mr. Harriman is a Licensed Environmental Professional and Certified Soil Scientist, with over 15 years of experience. He has a Bachelors Degree in Geology and Geophysics and a Masters Degree in Environmental Science. Mr. Harriman's diversified experience includes; environmental site assessments and permitting, site suitability studies, wetland delineation and permitting, remedial investigations and construction oversight, and subsurface explorations for various environmental and geotechnical evaluations throughout the United States and abroad. Mr. Harriman's experience on environmental hydrogeologic projects includes: investigations for oil and hazardous materials, design and remediation of contaminated soil/groundwater and hazardous waste, and interaction with various regulatory agencies. He is fully trained in health and safety protocol for work at contaminated sites and in the development of site specific health & safety plans. Ms. Motycka Downie is a Senior Hydrogeologist and Project Manager with over 16 years experience. She has Bachelor of Science degrees in Geology and Biology, a Masters Degree in Geology/Hydrogeology and is a Licensed Environmental Professional in Connecticut. Ms. Motycka Downie's experience includes environmental site assessments and hydrogeologic explorations to determine likelihood and extent of subsurface soil and groundwater contamination. Her experience includes performance of complex hydrogeologic site assessments including evaluation of groundwater flow paths, delineation of contaminant plumes and identification of sources and receptors of contamination; preparation and review of site remediation plans and design and supervision of innovative remedial activities. She has performed over 400 environmental site assessments and third party reviews of other consultant's reports and has managed large, multi-site assessment programs for clients nationwide.

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REFERENCES The reference numbers that are italicized can be found in Appendix C with the corresponding reference number on the copy's upper right corner. 1. "Map of 121 Building Lots in New Haven and Hamden Owned by Gardner Morse, John W. Mansfield, and Timothy T. Dwight," dated February 1870, map no. 219A, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171 - 250. "Map of 60 Building Lots in Hamden, Surveyed for Julius Twiss Esq.," dated March 1885, Map No. 158A, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 76 ­ 170. "Map of Land at Mill Rock," dated 1898, Map No. 203, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171 ­ 250. "Map of 94 Building Lots Owned by Julius Twiss," dated October 1908, Map No. 179B, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171 ­ 250. "Map of Property Formerly Owned by Gardner Morse, John Mansfield, and Timothy Dwight, Including Tract Comprising "Map of 121 Building Lots," dated 29 June 1910, Map No. 187, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171 ­ 250. "Map of 74 Building Lots Situated in the Town of Hamden, Connecticut, Owned by The Federal Realty Co.," dated June 1910, Map No. 199, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171 ­ 250. "Map of Harris Street Straightening," dated 28 February 1916, Map No. 160B, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 76 ­ 170. "Map of Goodrich Street and Morse Street, Hamden, Connecticut," dated 17 June 1917, Map No. 58B, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 1 ­ 75. New Haven Water Company Monthly Report of Superintendent, dated 1 December 1917. New Haven Water Company Monthly Report of Superintendent, dated 1 February 1919. New Haven Water Company Monthly Report of Superintendent, dated 1 March 1919. New Haven Water Company Monthly Report of Superintendent, dated 1 April 1919. "Map of Lots Owned by Elliott H. Morse Est., Hamden, Connecticut," dated March 1920, Map No. 202B, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171 ­ 250. "Map of the Steinert Estate, Whitneyville, Hamden, Connecticut, Section B," dated 1921, Map No. 3, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 1 ­ 75. Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps dated 1924.

2. 3. 4. 5.

6.

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

108

16. 17.

"Map of Tentative Layout No. 2, Hamden, Connecticut," dated March 1924, Map No. 54, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 1 ­ 75. "Map Showing Property Transfers Between Town of Hamden and New Haven Water Company," dated 22 August 1924, Map No. 39, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 1 ­ 75. "Map Showing Trunk Line Sewer Right of Way Over Property of New Haven Water Co., Hamden, Connecticut," dated 25 September 1924, Map No. 10, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 1 ­ 75. Letter from the New Haven Water Co. to New Haven Official, dated 17 November 1924. Walter Connor Report, New Haven Water Company, dated 10 January 1925. Forty-ninth Report of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Connecticut, for the Year 1925, State of Connecticut Public Document No. 24, 1926. Hamden Annual Reports, 1896-1929. Fifty-second Report of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, for the Year 1928, State of Connecticut Public Document No. 24, 1929. Report of Health Officer, Hamden Annual Report, 1930, pp. 12-15. Fifty-forth Report of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, for the Year 1930, State of Connecticut Public Document No. 24, 1930. Minutes for the Regular Meeting of the Board, New Haven, Connecticut, dated 15 April 1931. Report of the Board of Health, Hamden Annual Reports, 1931, 1932, 1934, 1935. Aerial Photograph dated 1934. Haley & Aldrich review of selected Hamden City Directories at approximate 5-year intervals dated 1936 to 1998. Hamden Annual Report, 1936, pp. 6-7. Hamden Annual Report, 1937. Hamden Annual Report, 1938. Hamden Annual Report, 1939. Sixty-third Report of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, for the Year 1939, State of Connecticut Public Document No. 24, 1939. Hamden Annual Report, 1940. Excerpt from article in the New Haven Register, 17 May 1941.

18.

19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

109

37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55.

Hamden Annual Report, 1941. Hamden Annual Report, 1942. "Sanitary Report," dated June 1943. Hamden Annual Reports, 1943, 1946. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Winchester Repeating Arms Co, dated 5 March 1946. Letter from the Winchester Repeating Arms Company to the New Haven Water Company, dated 14 March 1946. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Winchester Repeating Arms Co, dated 15 March 1946. "Layout of Lots, Property of Giordano Construction Co., Hamden, Connecticut," dated 1 November 1946, Map No. 29A, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 1 - 75. "Newhall Street School Health Officer's Report," dated 6 November 1946. Topographic Map, New Haven, Connecticut Quadrangle, United States Geological Survey 7.5-minute series, dated 1947. Letter from Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman to Winchester Repeating Arms, dated 25 January 1947. Letter from the Hamden Board of Education to Winchester Repeating Arms, dated 11 February 1947. Letter from Winchester Repeating Arms to the New Haven Water Company, dated 17 February 1947. Letter from Winchester Repeating Arms to the Hamden Board of Education, dated 17 February 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to the Hamden Board of Education, dated 18 February 1947. Letter from Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, to the New Haven Water Company, dated 27 March 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, dated 29 March 1947. Letter from Winchester Repeating Arms Company to the New Haven Water Company, dated 23 April 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Winchester Repeating Arms Company, dated 24 April 1947.

110

56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74.

Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Winchester Repeating Arms Company, dated 5 May 1947. "Memorandum: Summary of Town Meeting, Hamden, Connecticut," dated 19 May 1947. Letter from the Town of Hamden to the New Haven Water Company, dated 3 June 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, dated 19 June 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Winchester Repeating Arms Company, dated 24 June 1947. Letter from Winchester Repeating Arms Company to the New Haven Water Company, dated 25 June 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, dated 3 July 1947. Letter from Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, to the New Haven Water Company, dated 11 July 1947. Letter from the Town of Hamden to the New Haven Water Company, dated 19 July 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, dated 21 July 1947. Letter from Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman to the New Haven Water Company, dated 18 October 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to the First National Bank and Trust Co., dated 19 November 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Winchester Repeating Arms Company, dated 21 November 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Michael J. Whalen, Town of Hamden First Selectman, dated 21 November 1947. Letter from Winchester Repeating Arms Company to the New Haven Water Company, dated 25 November 1947. Hamden Annual Report, 1947. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Bookkeeper, dated 2 January 1948. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to Bookkeeper, dated 28 January 1948. Report to the Health Department by the Hamden Board of Health, dated 1948.

111

75. 76. 77. 78. 79.

Aerial Photograph #6-203 dated 21 April 1949. Memorandum from the New Haven Water Company, dated 20 September 1949. Hamden Annual Reports, 1949, 1950. Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps dated 1950. Letter from Clark, Hall and Peck, Attorneys and Counselors at Law, describing property transfer at Newhall Street, to the New Haven Water Company, dated 14 February 1950. Letter from the New Haven Water Company to the Hamden Schools Superintendent, dated 15 February 1950. Aerial Photograph #CNE-3H-34, dated 2 August 1951. Town of Hamden Annual Report, 1951, pp. 57-58 and 94­95. Book entitled "Winchester, The Gun That Won The West," by Harold F Williamson, dated 1952. Town of Hamden Annual Reports, 1952-1959. Special Acts and Resolutions of the State of Connecticut with Appendixes, Volume XXVI, Part II, 1953. Topographic Map, New Haven, Connecticut Quadrangle, United States Geological Survey 7.5-minute series, dated 1954. "Proposed Layout of 12 Lots, Vincent Ferrie-Owner," dated 16 August 1954, Map No. 160A, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 76 ­ 170. "Map Showing Property of Vincent Ferrie," dated 5 March 1956, Map No. 205, Town of Hamden Recreated Maps 171-250. Michael J. Whalen Junior High School Annual Inspections for the years 1957, 1958, 1963, 1964, and 1965, Hamden Health Department. Aerial Photographs #CNG-3DD-135 and #CNG-3DD-136 dated 3 July 1963. Aerial Photographs #339 dated 2 March 1965 and #1-186 dated 8 March 1966. Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps dated 1967. Topographic Maps, New Haven, Connecticut Quadrangle, United States Geological Survey 7.5-minute series, dated 1967 and 1972. Topographic Map, New Haven, Connecticut Quadrangle, United States Geological Survey 7.5 minute series, dated 1967, photorevised in 1984. Aerial Photographs #1135 dated 1 March 1970 and #CNG-1LL-59 dated 18 October 1970.

112

80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95.

96. 97. 98. 99.

Letter from the Michael J. Whalen Jr. High PTA to the Superintendent of Hamden Public Schools, dated 17 February 1971. Memorandum from the Hamden Health Department, dated 16 July 1971. "Newhall Area Property Transfer Map," dated 1973. Aerial Photographs Flight Line 42 #1412 dated 27 March 1975 and Flight Line 41 #7542 dated 23 April 1975.

100. Sample Invoice of soil samples collected by Quinnipiack Valley Health District at the Michael J. Whalen Jr. High, dated 15 November 1979. 101. Laboratory results from Connecticut State Department of Health Laboratory Division of soil samples collected by Quinnipiack Valley Health District, dated 6 December 1979. 102. Summary of soil samples collected in November 1979 from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, dated 21 December 1979. 103. Reply from Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Quinnipiack Valley Health District, dated 31 December 1979. 104. Aerial Photograph Flight Line 36 #1690 dated 6 April 1980. 105. Letter from Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Chief Elected Officials and Town Health Officers, dated January 1981. 106. United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Preliminary Assessment of the Michael Whalen Junior High School, dated 12 September 1985. 107. Aerial Photograph Flight Line 36 #6866 dated 29 March 1986. 108. Memorandum from Quinnipiack Valley Health District: "Summary of Previous Investigations at the Hamden Middle School," dated 7 May 1987 and 9 Mar 1988. 109. Underground Storage Tank Notification Form, Hamden Middle School, dated 23 July 1988. 110. "Onsite Reconnaissance and Soil Sampling Report at the Hamden Middle School," NUS Corporation, dated 3 January 1989. 111. Radon testing results for the Hamden Middle School from Brooks Safe and Sound, Inc, dated 20 March 1989. 112. Approval for Special Waste Disposal ­ Asbestos at the Hamden Middle School from Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, dated 8 August 1989. 113. Aerial Photograph Flight Line 36 #120 dated 13 March 1990. 114. Indoor Air Quality Complaint Investigation Request, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 4 January 1991.

113

115. Newspaper excerpt about contamination of Hamden Middle School and Rochford Field Site, 10 January 1991. 116. "Toxicity at Field Studied," New Haven Register, 10 January 1991. 117. Laboratory results for air quality sampling at the Hamden Middle School Auditorium, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 17 January 1991. 118. Complaint Investigation Request of Formaldehyde odor in Auditorium of the Hamden Middle School, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 31 January 1991. 119. Laboratory results for Lead testing of Hamden Middle School drinking water by the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority, 15 March 1991. 120. United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Region I Removal Site Investigation, NUS Screening Site Inspection of Newhall Street Field Site, 18 April 1991. 121. "Final Screening Site Inspection," NUS Corporation, Region 1 United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Waste Management Division, 23 July 1991. 122. "Removal Program Preliminary Assessment/ Site Investigation for Newhall Street Field Hamden, Connecticut" by United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Emergency Planning and Response Branch for Roy F. Weston, Inc. Technical Assistance Team, August 1991. 123. "Health and Safety Plan for Newhall Street Field Site," Weston Major Programs Division, August 1991 (page one only). 124. Memorandum to Newhall Street Field Site File from Roy F. Weston Technical Assistance Team, 20 August 1991. 125. "VOC Sampling Results for Newhall Street Field," United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, 9 September 1991. 126. XRF Screening Report from Dr. T.M. Spittler to Dr. William Andrade, New Hall Street Field Site, 9 September 1991. 127. Quinnipiack Valley Health District Internal Memorandum regarding "Hamden Middle School Playground on Newhall Street: EPA Appraisal," 1 November 1991. 128. "ATSDR Record of Activity for Newhall Street Field," United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, 8 November 1991. 129. "ATSDR Record of Activity for Newhall Street Field," United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, 21 January 1992. 130. "Preliminary Assessment and Site Evaluation, and Health Consultation Memo," Mary Ellen Stanton, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Region 1 Environmental Services Division sent to Bob Ceccolini, Town of Hamden Parks and Recreation Department, 25 March 1992.

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131. Memorandum from Mary Ellen Stanton to David McIntyre, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Region 1 Environmental Services Division, Site Investigation Closure at the Newhall Street Field, 25 March 1992. 132. Letter from Jennifer Kertanis, Department of Health Services Environmental Epidemiology & Occupational Health Section to Marianne Cherniak, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, Potential health effects associated with use of the Newhall Street Athletic Fields, 7 May 1992. 133. Quinnipiack Valley Health District Internal Memorandum regarding "Soccer Field at Hamden Middle School, Newhall Street Hamden, Concerns about Mercury and Lead in soil," 12 May 1992. 134. Rochford Field Redevelopment Files, Town of Hamden, June 1992 to June 1993. 135. Interdepartmental Message of correspondence between Bob Ceccolini, Town of Hamden Park and Recreation Department and Melissa Blais, State of Connecticut, July 1992. 136. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Interdepartmental Memorandum, "Newhall St. Field, Hamden," 1 July 1992. 137. Letter from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Hamden Board of Education, "Hamden Middle School, 550 Newhall Street, Hamden," 13 July 1992. 138. Quinnipiack Valley Health District Internal Memorandum regarding "Hamden Middle School Soccer Field, 10 September 1992. 139. "Town Seeks Help with Lead-laden Playing Fields," New Haven Register, 4 September 1992. 140. "Evaluation of Newhall Street Screening Study and Recommendations for Subsequent Sample Collection/Analysis" HRP Associates, Inc. to Judi Kozak, Purchasing Agent, Town of Hamden, 8 February 1993. 141. "Revised Evaluation of Newhall Street Screening Study and Recommendations for Subsequent Sample Collection/Analysis," HRP Associates, Inc. to Judi Kozak, Purchasing Agent, Town of Hamden, 20 May 1993. 142. Record of Telephone conversation, Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District and Brendan Sharkey, Town of Hamden, 22 June 1993. 143. Record of Telephone conversation, Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District and Belinda Tuhos, 22 June 1993. 144. Letter from Leslie Balch, Director of Health, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Brandon Sharkey, Director, Governmental Operations, Town of Hamden, Pre-testing fill for representative lead levels, 2 July 1993. 145. Air Quality Inspection Results from James Pero, Environmental Consulting Group, Inc. to Michael Ryan, Hamden Board of Education, 23 December 1993.

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146. "Lead Cleanup Near Hamden School could Take Years," New Haven Register, 26 January 1994. 147. Letter from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Hamden Board of Education, "Hamden Middle School, 550 Newhall Street, Hamden," 31 March 1994. 148. "Site Inspection Prioritization Trip Report for Onsite Reconnaissance for Newhall Street Field," Tara Taft, ARCS I Work Assignment Manager, CDM Federal Programs Corporation to Sharon Hayes Works Assignment Manager, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, 10 May 1994. 149. Report of Complaint received by Kevin Sullivan, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 10 August 1994. 150. Memorandum from Doug Zimmerman, Water Management Bureau, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Tom Pregman, Waste Water Management Bureau, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Status update of Newhall Street Field 19 August 1994. 151. "Final Site Inspection Prioritization Report for Newhall Street Field," Tara Taft, ARCS I Work Assignment Manager, CDM Federal Programs Corporation to Doug Zimmerman, Permitting, Enforcement, and Remediation Division, Bureau of Water Management, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 5 December 1994. 152. "Middle School faces Toxic Materials, Overcrowding," Hamden Chronicle, December 1994. 153. Letter from Doug Zimmerman, Supervising Environmental Analyst, Permitting, Enforcement, and Remediation Division, Bureau of Water Management, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Len Tomback, Response to a telephone call regarding Whalen Junior High playing field use in the 1970's, 13 January 1995. 154. Letter From Leonard Tomback to Doug Zimmerman, Supervising Environmental Analyst, Permitting, Enforcement, and Remediation Division, Bureau of Water Management, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 26 January 1995. 155. Letter from John Hirschfeld, Environmental Analyst, Discovery & Assessment Program, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division, Bureau of Water Management, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Leonard Tomback, 8 February 1995. 156. Letter from John Hirschfeld, Environmental Analyst, Discovery & Assessment Program, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division, Bureau of Water Management, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Connecticut Site Assessment Manager, Superfund Support Section (HSS-7), 8 February 1995. 157. Memorandum with comments from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Antoinette Oliveira, Planning Administrator, Hamden Planning and Zoning Commission, 5 April 1995.

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158. Complaint, and response to complaint, about air quality in the auditorium at the Hamden Middle School filed by Caroline Paul, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 9 May 1995. 159. Telephone communication, Hamden Middle School and Quinnipiack Valley Health District, "Request for Services, Check Air Quality in Auditorium," 9 May 1995. 160. Notes on complaint filed by Caroline Paul, and air quality in auditorium of the Hamden Middle School, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 19 June 1995. 161. Meeting Notes, Leslie Balch and Caroline Paul, 19 June 1995. 162. Letter from Sandra Yan, Inspecting Sanitarian, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Alida Begina, Superintendent of Schools, Hamden Board of Education, Deficiencies noted during an inspection of the Hamden Middle School, 1 August 1995. 163. Aerial Photograph Flight Line 35 #966 dated 24 April 1996. 164. Quinnipiack Valley Health District Complaint Form, Hamden Middle School, "Air Quality Level, Daughter gets Headaches, Locker is Near Boiler Room," 10 December 1996. 165. Aerial Photograph dated 1998. 166. Complaint form with notes of action involving odors in the Hamden Middle School, Sandra Yan, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 13 March 1997. 167. Letter from Sandra Yan, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, Hamden Board of Education, HVAC system recommendations in Hamden Middle School Auditorium and a copy of a complaint filed, 3 April 1997. 168. Gas chromatography analysis of treated wood from the Hamden Middle School auditorium, from Mark Granville, Consultant, Brooks Laboratories to Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, Hamden Board of Education, 25 April 1997. 169. Letter from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Hamden Board of Education, "Hamden Middle School, Hamden," 28 April 1997. 170. Proposal request for an Industrial Hygienist to perform ambient air screening in the Hamden Middle School auditorium, Alida Begina, Superintendent, Hamden Public Schools, May 1997. 171. Letter including copies of original specifications and blueprints for the stage flooring in the auditorium at the Hamden Middle School from Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, Leslie Balch, Director of Health, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 27 May 1997. 172. Quinnipiack Valley Health District Complaint Form, Hamden Middle School, "Odors in Auditorium," 2 June 1997.

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173. Letter from Leslie Balch, Director of Health, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Alida Begina, Superintendent, Hamden Public Schools, Recommendation for auditorium, 2 June 1997. 174. Memo regarding odor removal in the Hamden Middle School auditorium, Sandra Yan, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 24 October 1997. 175. Quinnipiack Valley Health District Complaint Form, Hamden Middle School, "Boiler Backup at Middle School, Smell of Sulfur, Air Quality Concern," 25 November 1997. 176. Notes from telephone conversation with Mark Albanese, Hamden Public School, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 24 May 1999. 177. Freedom of Information requests by Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, Hamden Board of Education and Kimberly Hurd, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 11 June 1999 and 19 October 1999. 178. "Phase I Environmental Site Assessment, Southern New England Telephone, Hamden Garage, 325 Morse Street, Hamden, Connecticut," by Aaron Environmental, dated 11 June 2001. 179. "Draft of Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for the Hamden Middle School," prepared by Facility Support Services for Town of Hamden Board of Education, July 2000. 180. "Initial Phase II Environmental Site Assessment, Southern New England Telecommunications, Hamden Garage" prepared by Aaron Environmental, August 2000. 181. "Soil Vapor Survey of Hamden Middle School," prepared by Facility Support Services LLC for the Town of Hamden Board of Education and Tai Soo Kim Architects, November 2000. 182. "Environmental Soil Quality Assessment of Hamden Middle School," prepared by Facility Support Services LLC for Tai Soo Kim Partners, Architects, November 2000. 183. Laboratory report of results from Complete Environmental Testing, Inc. for the Hamden Middle School soil samples collected November 1 & 2, 2000, November 2000. 184. Hamden Middle School/ Newhall Street Field Chronology, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 21 November 2000. 185. Water Analysis Report for water samples from Hamden Middle School taken in November and December 2000. 186. Fax from Shannon Windisch of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Santo Manicone of Field Support Services, Notes, Map, and Site Discovery and Assessment Data Base Information for Newhall Street Field, 28 November 2000.

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187. Letter from Michael Harder, Director, Permitting, Enforcement & and Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Thomas P. O'Brien, Olin Corporation, requesting a review of Olin Corporation files for historical disposal activities, 28 November 2000. 188. Hamden Middle School aesthetic evaluation of drinking water from John Laudano Environmental Inspector from The Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 29 November 2000. 189. Letter from Thomas Barger, Supervisor of Water Quality with the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority to Mark Albanese, Director of Education for the Hamden Board of Education, Summary of water sample collection and Water Quality data from the Hamden Middle School, 30 November 2000. 190. Laboratory report of results for soil samples collected on 29 November 2000 from Hamden Middle School, Complete Environmental Testing, 1 December 2000. 191. "Summary of Aerial Photograph Review," Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 1 December 2000. 192. "Hamden Parents Concerned about Contaminated soil near school," Channel 8 News Report, 2 December 2000. 193. Letter from Thomas Barger, Supervisor of Water Quality with the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority to Mark Albanese, Director of Education for the Hamden Board of Education, Summary of re-collected water samples and Water Quality data from the Hamden Middle School, 4 December 2000. 194. "Results of Water Sampling, Newhall Center," Aquatek Laboratories, 5 December 2000. 195. Hamden Stops on Rehab of School," New Haven Register, 6 December 2000. 196. "Results of Air Quality Testing, Hamden Middle School," Occupational Risk Control Services, 6 December 2000. 197. "Hamden Parents Concerned over Contamination," Channel 8 News Report, 6 December 2000. 198. "Mayor wants to build new Middle School," New Haven Register, 7 December 2000. 199. Governor's Office Tracking Sheet Note, from grandmother of Hamden Middle School student, with concern on possible methane gas in boiler room, 8 December 2000. 200. Letter from Thomas Barger, Supervisor of Water Quality with the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority to Mark Albanese, Director of Education for the Hamden Board of Education, Summary of water sample collection and Water Quality data from the Hamden Middle School, 12 December 2000. 201. Draft Copy of Surface Soil Sampling Plan for the Hamden Middle School from Facility Support Services LLC to Shannon Windisch of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 12 December 2000.

119

202. New Haven Register, 13 December 2000, "Fear of Toxins infiltrates Neighbors". 203. "Plan of sampling locations for Whalen Junior High School," prepared by Facility Support Services LLC, December 2000. 204. "Parents, staff demand answers on school," New Haven Register, December 2000. 205. Letters to the Editor of the New Haven Register from John Carbrey a former resident of the neighborhood, Local history of the Hamden Middle School and Rochford Field area, 15 December 2000. 206. "Outraged Parents Demand Schools Closing," New Haven Register, 15 December 2000. 207. "Plan for Hand Auger Sampling Program for Whalen Junior High School," prepared by Facility Support Services, December 2000. 208. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Interdepartmental Memo from Shannon Windisch to Patricia Cam, FSS sampling, 19 December 2000. 209. "'Sickout' called at School in Hamden," New Haven Register, 20 December 2000. 210. Summary of Hamden Annual Reports 1938 ­ 1957, 20 December 2000. 211. FSS Soil Sampling Results at Hamden Middle School, December 2000. 212. FSS Soil Sample Lab Analyses Report from Complete Environmental Testing, Inc, 22 December 2000. 213. Letter from Michael J. Harder, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Mayor Carl J. Amento, Town of Hamden, Hamden Middle School and Rochford Park Soil Sampling, 27 December 2000. 214. "Interpretation of Air Sampling for PAHs in the Hamden Middle School," prepared by Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health, 27 December 2000. 215. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Field Notes, Rochford Field and Rochford Annex Soil Sampling, 27 December 2000. 216. Letter from Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Barbara Rice Robinson, Director of Youth Services, Hamden, 27 December 2000. 217. Laboratory Reports of Rochford Field Soil Sampling, 28 December 2000. 218. Newhall Street School Soil Sample Chain of Custody's and Location Map, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 29 December 2000. 219. Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, copies of e-mail correspondence, December 2000 to May 2001.

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220. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Soil Sampling Results for Newhall Street School, Rochford Field and Rochford Annex, 27 December 2000 to 29 December 2000. 221. "Why Hamden Built a School on Landfill in the First Place," The Advisor, Letter to the Editor from John Carusone, Hamden, 2 January 2001. 222. "School Toxins galvanize Hamden Parents," New Haven Register, 3 January 2001. 223. VOC results from University of Connecticut Environmental Research Institute for Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 5 January 2001. 224. Solid Waste Authorization from Richard J. Barlow, Bureau of Waste Management, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Carl J. Amento, Mayor, Town of Hamden, 5 January 2001. 225. Request for authorization for the disruption of a former solid waste disposal area at the Hamden Middle School from Karl J. Brazauskas, Metcalf & Eddy, Inc to David McKeegan, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 5 January 2001. 226. "Operation Plan for Disruption of Former Solid Waste Disposal Area, Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., January 2001. 227. "Ready for School in Hamden? NOT SO FAST," New Haven Register, 6 January 2001. 228. Fax of historical data from Dr. Begina, Hamden Board of Education to Andrea Boissevain, Ken Foscue and Leslie Balch, 9 January 2001. 229. "Hamden Middle School Environmental Update," Dr. Alida D. Begina, Superintendent and Andrea Boissevain, M.P.H., Health Risk Consultants, 10 January 2001. 230. Letter from Michael Harder, Director, Permitting, Enforcement & and Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Public, condition of school after limited remedial measures, 11 January 2001. 231. "Frequently Asked Questions to update Residents on the Activities at the Hamden Middle School," Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 11 January 2001. 232. Letter from Leslie A. Balch, Director of Health, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Dr. Alida Begina, Superintendent Hamden School District, opening of Hamden Middle School, 15 January 2001. 233. Email to Brian Toal and Kenny Foscue from Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health, "Samples at Youth Services Building, Hamden," 16 January 2001. 234. "Q & A Report," Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 16 January 2001. 235. "Draft Methane Monitoring Plan at Hamden Middle School," Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 17 January 2001.

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236. "Laboratory results to date from University of Connecticut ERI for Newhall Street School and Rochford Field," 28 January 2001. 237. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Memorandum "Sampling Results, Rochford Field and Rochford Field Annex, Newhall Street School, Hamden, Connecticut," 31 January 2001. 238. "Health Consultation Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data Newhall Street School, Connecticut," prepared by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, January 2001. 239. "Methane Findings and Actions Taken at the Hamden Middle School," Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 14 February 2001. 240. "Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Soil Sampling results at Hamden Middle School Soccer Fields," State of Connecticut Department of Public Health, Division of Laboratory Services, 15 February 2001. 241. Letter from Thomas P. O'Brien, Olin Corporation to Michael J. Harder, Director, Permitting, Enforcement & and Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Olin file review, 26 February 2001. 242. Letter from Michael J. Harder, Director, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to David McIntyre, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, Emergency Evaluation in Newhall Neighborhood area, 26 February 2001. 243. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Correspondence with Public, February 2001 to June 2001. 244. Letter from Louis Landino to Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 21 February 2001. 245. "Parents Reassess School's Closing," New Haven Register, 12 March 2001. 246. Email to Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District from Meg Harvey Connecticut Department of Public Health, "Soccer Field Data ­ Good News!," 14 March 2001. 247. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Press Release, "DEP Releases Preliminary Results on Field in Hamden," 15 March 2001. 248. Letter to Paul Hudak, Hamden Soccer Association from Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 19 March 2001. 249. "A Health Risk Assessment of the Hamden Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut," Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program and Yale University School of Medicine, 23 March 2001. 250. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Emergency Incident Report, Case Number 2001-01828, 26 March 2001.

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251. "Hamden Middle School Soccer Field Soil Sampling Survey, Sampling Conducted by Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection," 26 March 2001. 252. "Environmental Hazards At Hamden Middle School," Connecticut Department of Public Health and Quinnipiack Valley Health District, March 2001. 253. Fax from Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health to Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, Results of Laboratory Analyses for PAHs, 0-6 inches, Mill Rock Park (Rochford Field Annex), 28 March 2001. 254. Fax to Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health from Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, "Rochford Field, Additional Arsenic Results," 22 March 2001. 255. Email from Tom Chaplik, Regional Water Authority to Mrs. J. Lewis, Augur Street, Hamden, "Land near Augur Street," 29 March 2001. 256. Email from Josephine Lewis, Augur Street resident to South Central Regional Water Authority, "RWA Land West End of Augur Street ­ Hamden," 29 March 2001. 257. Fax from Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Tito Irizarry, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, Analytical Criteria, 2 April 2001. 258. Memorandum from Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Bob Westervelt, Hamden Fire Marshal, "HMS Methane Monitoring Plan," 4 April 2001. 259. Email from Gilberto Irizarry, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency to Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, "Hamden Resident(s) information," 5 April 2001. 260. Email to Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health from Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection "Hamden Data," 6 April 2001. 261. United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Press Release, "Contamination in Newhall Street Neighborhood," April 2001. 262. "Newhall Street Neighborhood Update," United Stated Environmental Protection Agency and Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, April 2001. 263. "Quality Assurance/Sampling Plan for Hamden Contamination Site, Hamden, Connecticut," United Stated Environmental Protection Agency / Environmental Response Team Center, Edison, New Jersey, 9 April 2001. 264. "Yale Study Gives School Clean Bill of Health," Hamden Chronicle, 12 April 2001. 265. "Town, state shut down Rochford," Hamden Chronicle, 12 April 2001. 266. "Residential Surface Sampling Schedule," Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 17 April 2001. 267. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection field notes, 23 April 2001.

123

268. Transmittal to Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection from Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Health, Health Consultation for Newhall Street School, Hamden, Connecticut, 2 May 2001. 269. "Health Consultation for Newhall Street School, Hamden, Connecticut," Connecticut Department of Public Health, 2 May 2001. 270. Minutes from Telephone Conference Call United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, Town of Hamden, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, Connecticut Department of Public Health, "Elevated Lead Detected by Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection on School Property," 3 May 2001. 271. Letter from Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Dorothy Williams, resident, Subsurface Soil Sampling Results, 3 May 2001. 272. Memorandum, Facilities Dept. Hamden Middle School, "Results of Tools for Schools Walkthrough," 7 May 2001. 273. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Press Release, "DEP and Hamden to Cap Contaminated Area Adjacent to Hamden Middle School," 9 May 2001. 274. Compilation of United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Field Data Sheets, 11 May 2001. 275. Memo from Michael Harder, Director, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Dominic Spere, Superintendent of Regional Vocational Technical Schools, Former Department of Education Property, Hamden, Connecticut, 16 May 2001. 276. Letter from Hamden Public Schools to Hamden Middle School and Grade Six Parents and Guardians, 17 May 2001. 277. "Final Report Site Investigation and Extent of Subsurface Soil Contamination Hamden Site, Hamden Connecticut," prepared by Lockheed Martin REAC, June 2001. 278. Letter from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Roseanne DellaVentura, Director of School Health, 21 May 2001. 279. "Limited Surficial Soil Sampling and Selected Interim Actions Report, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., June 2001. 280. Interdepartmental Memo, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection from Arthur J. Rocque, Jr., Director to Kimberly Massicotte, Assistant Attorney General, Responsible Parties for Hamden Middle School, Rochford Field, Mill Rock Park and Newhall Street Area, 12 June 2001. 281. Letter from Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health to Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, Newhall Street Neighborhood Surface Soil Sampling, Hamden ­ referral information for lead results, 14 June 2001.

124

282. Memo from Shannon Windisch, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Hamden Middle School / Newhall Neighborhood file, Newhall Neighborhood Rightsof ­Way Sampling Boring Logs and Sampling Tables, 14 June 2001. 283. "Newhall Street Neighborhood Information Meeting Handouts," Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 27 June 2001. 284. Email from Anthony Cipriano/Shannon Windisch to Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health Department, "1067 Winchester Avenue," 29 June 2001. 285. Correspondence from Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health to Gilberto Irizarry, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency, 6 July 2001. 286. Letter from Amy L. Wachs, Husch & Eppenberger, LLC to Thomas W. Riscassi, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Cover letter for records from the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station mosquito eradication efforts in Hamden, 9 July 2001. 287. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Order Number SRD-128, State of Connecticut v. Town of Hamden, South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority, State of Connecticut Board of Education, Olin Corporation, 10 July 2001. 288. Letter from Meg Harvey, Connecticut Department of Public Health to Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, Newhall Street Neighborhood Surface Soil Sampling, Hamden ­ additional referral information for lead results, 10 July 2001. 289. "Interim Remedial Action Work Plan, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 11 July 2001. 290. New Haven Register, "NAACP Brings Home Aid," 14 July 2001. 291. Memo from Gilberto Irizarry, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency to Hamden Landfill Site File, Driveway at 1067 Winchester Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut, 17 July 2001. 292. Letter from Gilberto Irizarry, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency to Dorothy Williams, resident, Property at 1067 Winchester Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut (Parcel 2127-120-00-0000), 19 July 2001. 293. Correspondence from United Stated Environmental Protection Agency to Dorothy Williams, "Property at 1067 Winchester Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut," 19 July 2001. 294. Letter from Gilberto Irizarry, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency to Rosem Site File, Bryden and Morse Streets File, Site Investigation Closure, Hamden Landfill Site, Hamden, Connecticut, 27 July 2001. 295. "Health Consultation, Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data from Beneath Asphalt Driveway at 1067 Winchester Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut," Connecticut Department of Public Health, 30 July 2001.

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296. Letter from Amy L. Wachs, Husch & Eppenberger, LLC to Ann M. Catino, Halloran & Sage, Richard T. Sponzo, Office of the Attorney General, and Gregory A. Sharp, Murtha Cullina, LLP, Partial Settlement Proposal for 7/10/01 DEP Order on Hamden Site, 31 July 2001. 297. Order Number SRD-128, Answer and Request for Hearing, 2 August 2001. 298. "Interim Remedial Action Work Plan, Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut," prepared for the Town of Hamden by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 2 August 2001. 299. David McIntyre, United Stated Environmental Protection Agency to Michael J. Harder, Director, Permitting, Enforcement & Remediation Division, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Disposal Options for the Hamden, Connecticut Superfund Removal Actions, 3 August 2001. 300. "Former Winchester and Hamden Landfill Dump," Letter to the Editor, New Haven Register from Newhall Coalition, 13 August 2001. 301. "Hamden Coalition wants Government to Buy Contaminated Homes," New Haven Register, 20 August 2001. 302. Hamden Tax Assessors Office, Town Clerks Offices, Engineering and Planning and Zoning Departments, review of files by Haley & Aldrich, August 2001 and April 2002. 303. VISTA Information Solutions Database Report, dated 22 August 2001. 304. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Hartford, Connecticut, reviews of files by Haley & Aldrich, Inc., August, September, and November 2001. 305. "Health Consultation, Public Health Evaluation of Soil Data, Athletic Playing Field Behind Hamden Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut," Connecticut Department of Public Health, September 2001. 306. Haley & Aldrich, Inc., site visits conducted by Chris Harriman, Deborah Motycka Downie, Dr. William F. Kay, Jr. and Elida Danaher, August through November 2001. 307. Mrs. Leslie Balch, Quinnipiack Valley Health District, interview with Haley & Aldrich, Inc. 17 September 2001. 308. Quinnipiack Valley Health District, Hamden, Connecticut, review of files by Haley & Aldrich, 17 September 2001. 309. Mr. Edward Saverese, Hamden Town Engineer, telephone interviews with Haley & Aldrich, September 2001. 310. Mr. Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, Hamden Board of Education, interview with Haley & Aldrich, Inc., 26 September 2001. 311. Mr. William Parillo, Custodian, Hamden Community Center, interview with Haley & Aldrich, Inc., 26 September 2001.

126

312. Hamden Fire Marshal, Hamden, Connecticut, telephone communications and review of files by Haley & Aldrich, September 2001. 313. Hamden Board of Education, review of files by Haley & Aldrich, September 2001. 314. "Surficial Material Map of Connecticut", J.R. Stone, et.al., published by the United States Geological Survey, 1992. 315. "The Bedrock Geological Map of Connecticut", John Rogers, State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, 1985. 316. "Adopted Water Quality Classifications Map of Connecticut", Connecticut DEP, February 1993. 317. Letter to Newhall Street Area Residents from Town of Hamden Mayor Carl Amento, undated. 318. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Fact Sheet, "Rochford Field and Rochford Field Annex, Soil Test Results," undated. 319. Hamden Middle School List of Student Questions, undated. 320. "The Face of Connecticut", Michael Bell, State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, Bulletin 110, 1985. 321. "Chemical Investigation of Some Standard Spray Mixtures", Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Connecticut, Bulletin 278, May 1926. 322. Town of Hamden Miller Library Historic Room, review of files by Haley & Aldrich, Inc., September 2001, April 2002. (Same as 332) 323. Map of the New Haven Water Company, Mill River Division Property, revised through 1973. 324. Letter to Mayor Amento from Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection regarding Comments on Draft Report on ASTM Phase I Environmental Site Assessment, Hamden Middle School and Surrounding Newhall Street Neighborhood, Hamden, Connecticut, dated 15 March 2002. 325. Haley & Aldrich telephone communication with Frank Cooper, Town of Hamden Parks and Recreation Department, 11 April 2002. 326. "Limited Surficial Soil Sampling Work Plan, Rochford Field, Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut", prepared for Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., dated 2 May 2001. 327. Haley & Aldrich telephone communication with Mr. Robert Westerveldt, Town of Hamden Fire Marshal, 11 April 2002. 328. "Basement and Crawlspace Air Monitoring of the Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut" prepared for Town of Hamden Board of Education by Facility Support Services, LLC, dated December 2000.

127

329. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Interdepartmental Memo regarding DEP Investigation (Soil Gas Survey) at Hamden Middle School ­ 560 Newhall Street in Hamden, Connecticut, dated 15 May 2001. 330. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Interdepartmental Memo regarding Hamden Middle School, Additional Soil Sampling, May 10, 2001, dated 8 June 2001. 331. "Rochford Field & Annex ­ Groundwater Microwell Data", prepared by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, dated 11 January 2001. 332. Items on file in the Miller Historic Room at the Town of Hamden Library including "Backyard Nature Man, Book One: My Boyhood to Manhood Years in Old Highwood Village", Anthony V. Cosenza, III, dated 1993. (Same as 322) 333. Letter from USEPA to Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection regarding Request for State ARARs ­ Rosem Site, Hamden, Connecticut, dated 24 July 2001. 334. Letter from USEPA to CTDEP regarding Request for State ARARs ­ Bryden and Morse Street Site, Hamden, Connecticut, dated 24 July 2001. 335. Letter to USEPA from Connecticut Department of Public Health, dated 25 July 2001. 336. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for a Removal Action at the Rosem Superfund Removal Site Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 1 August 2001. 337. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for a Removal Action at the Bryden and Morse Streets Superfund Removal Site Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 2 August 2001. 338. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for Increase in Scope of Response/Ceiling Increase for a Continued Removal Action at the Rosem Superfund Removal Site in Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 19 October 2001. 339. USEPA Memorandum regarding Request for Increase in Scope of Response/Ceiling Increase for a Continued Removal Action at the Bryden and Morse Street Superfund Removal Site in Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, dated 28 November 2001. 340. Map of New Haven Water Company Holdings, Blair & Marchant, dated circa 1913. 341. Hamden Board of Health Minute Book, 1931 to 1935. 342. Hamden Board of Health Minute Book, 1935 to 1938. 343. Notice in New Haven Register, dated 8 March 1935. 344. Notice in the New Haven Register, dated 13 July 1935. 345. "Two Boards Take Action on Budget", New Haven Register, 14 July 1936. 346. Notice in the New Haven Register, dated 23 July 1936.

128

347. "Action Urged to Prevent Fires at Town Dump", New Haven Register, dated 11 August 1936. 348. "Town Buys Land For School and Playground Activities," New Haven Register, 30 September 1936. 349. "Work Speeds at Newhall St. Sports Field," New Haven Register, 22 September 1936. 350. "Newhall Street Dump to be Kept Open", New Haven Register, dated 6 March 1937. 351. "Dr. Joslin to Urge Closing of Dump", New Haven Register, dated 6 March 1937. 352. Letter to the Editor, New Haven Register, from George Cromie, March 1937. 353. Report of Hamden Health Officer, July 1938 354. A Public Health Survey of Hamden, Connecticut, prepared by the Yale University School of Medicine and the Hamden Board of Health, 1939. 355. "Large Brush Pile Burned to Avert Blaze at Dump", New Haven Register, 27 July 1939. 356. "Man Threatens Dump Watchman with Big Knife", New Haven Register, 23 August 1939. 357. Hamden Board of Health Minute Book, 1940 to 1944. 358. Report of Hamden Health Officer, February 1940. 359. "Residents Want Action to Abate Dust Nuisance", New Haven Register, 3 March 1940. 360. "New Playground Unit Plans Considered," New Haven Register, 14 May 1940. 361. "New Havener Found Dead in Hamden Dump," New Haven Register, 27 March 1941. 362. "Public Dumps Open in Clean-up Week", New Haven Register, 1 May 1941. 363. "Dump Closed", New Haven Register, 17 May 1941. 364. "Plan of Site for Proposed New Haven Trade School, Hamden, Connecticut" prepared by K. Leighton, dated 12 October 1949. 365. Hamden Board of Health Minute Book, October 1948 to September 1949. 366. "Contract for Furnishing Sewage Pumping Equipment Mill Rock Road Pumping Station Hamden, Connecticut", January 1952. 367. Meeting Minutes, Hamden Recreation Commission, 9 November 1953. 368. Hamden Board of Health Minute Book, January 1954 to November 1956.

129

369. "Olin Refuses to Sell Tract for Junior High School," New Haven Register, dated 7 February 1954. 370. Construction Progress Reports, Hamden Junior High School, Selected reports for the period from 4 April 1955 to 4 May 1956. 371. Report to the Hamden Board of Education: Newhall Site for Junior High School, dated 5 April 1955. 372. Hamden Recreation Commission Annual Report, November 1958. 373. New Haven Water Company Inspection and Laboratory Reports, selected reports, October 1963 to February 1966. 374. Memorandum on Meeting Notes, Meeting at Hamden Town Hall, prepared by J. Novaro, New Haven Water Company, dated 7 April 1972. 375. Hamden Board of Education Building Committee Meeting, 12 June 1973. 376. Letter from Hamden Public Schools to Hamden Town Engineer, dated 5 October 1973. 377. Letter from Helen Street School PTA to Town of Hamden Director of Facilities and Media Services, dated 14 April 1975. 378. Whalen Junior High School Inspection Reports, prepared by Town of Hamden Director of Facilities and Media Services, dated 11 and 24 August 1977. 379. "Olin Doubts Hazardous Waste Dumped on Athletic Fields Site", New Haven Register, 14 November 1979. 380. "Soil Tests Planned at Ex-Olin Dump by Junior High", New Haven Register, 13 November 1979. 381. Olin Corporation "Report on Olin's Uses of the Former Town-Owned Dump at Whalen School Site, Newhall Street, Hamden, CT", dated 27 November 1979. 382. "Olin Pine Swamp Remedial Investigation Report", prepared for Olin Corporation by Malcolm Pirnie, dated July 1988, revised December 1988. 383. Memorandum on Storm Damage from Hamden Department of Parks and Recreation to Town of Hamden Purchasing Agent, 18 July 1989. 384. "Olin Pine Swamp Interim Corrective Measures Report", prepared for Olin Corporation by Malcolm Pirnie, dated June 1991. 385. "Looking for Lead 101," New Haven Advocate, 12 August 1993. 386. "Soil Sampling, South Side of Michael Whalen Middle School," prepared for Town of Hamden Plan Services by HRP Associates, Inc., 27 October 1993. 387. "Hamden Middle School Playing Fields ­ Project Notes," dated 24 May 1995.

130

388. "Lead Sampling for Michael Whalen Middle School, Hamden, CT", prepared for Hamden Parks & Recreation by HRP Associates, Inc., 7 June 1995. 389. Letter from Mesa Excavation and Paving, Inc. to Barakos-Landino Design Group, dated 6 August 1996. 390. "When the Schoolyard is Poisoned", New Haven Advocate, 3 January 2001.. 391. Letter to the Editor, New Haven Register, from John Carbrey, 29 June 2001. 392. South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority, Annual Reports, 1996 to 2001. 393. Notice in New Haven Register, 14 July 1910. 394. "Poor oil dressing for Whitney Ave", New Haven Register, 14 November 1910. 395. Notice in New Haven Register, 15 September 1915. 396. Notice in New Haven Register, 30 March 1916. 397. Notice in New Haven Register, 11 January 1918. 398. Notice in New Haven Register, 19 June 1934. 399. "Hamden Area is Shaken By Powder Blast", New Haven Evening Register, 5 July 1934. 400. "Path Proposed as Shortcut to High School", New Have Register, 26 March 1935. 401. "Meeting Held in Town Hall by Health Board", New Haven Register 2 May 1936.

402. "Fire at the Mill Rock Dump" New Haven Register 11 July 1936. 403. Letter to the Editor, Hamden Times, 17 July 1936. 404. "Garbage Situation is Explained by Joslin" New Have Register, 24 July 1936. 405. Hamden Times and New Haven Register, Classified Advertisements (Properties for Sale), 24 March, 30 June 1935, 14 June and 24 July 1936. 406. "$200 Asked to Control Mosquitoes" and "Use 375,000 Gal of Oil on Streets" , Hamden Times, 31 July 1936. 407. Notice in Hamden Times, 9 August 1936. 408. "Pest Control Measures Held as Tentative", Hamden Times 2 July 1937.

409. Notice in Hamden Times, 24 July 1936. 410. Notice in Hamden Times, 9 August 1936. 411. "Playground Program is Given Start", Hamden Times, 2 October 1936.

131

412. 413.

"New Building Shows Gains During Month", New Haven Register, 30 July 1937. "Dumping Banned on Concrete Street Site", Hamden Times, 13 August 1937.

414. "New Havener Held in Dump Shack Theft", New Haven Register, 13 April 1938. 415. "To Start on Newhall Fence Work Monday", Hamden Times, 20 May 1938. 416. "$22,000 public works program is recommended by Rochford", New Haven Register, 13 March 1940.

417. "Zoning hearing April 22 on St. Mary St. Plea", New Haven Register, 8 April 1940. 418. "Bids called for Newhall School Repair", New Haven Register, 2 October 1940. 419. 420. "Police arrest resident for dumping rubbish" New Haven Evening Register, 13 March 1941. "Health Dept Ordinance Hearing Set" New Haven Evening Register, 14 April 1941.

421. Notice in New Haven Register, 3 May 1941. 422. "Elderly Woman Stricken at Oregon Ave Dump", New Haven Register,16 May 1941. 423. Classified Advertisements (Properties for Sale), New Haven Register, 24 August 1941 424. "Board Votes to close Oregon Ave Dump" New Haven Register, 26 Sept 1941. 425. "Youths make rich find of old rubber at dump" New Haven Register, 1 July 1942. 426. Newhall Street School Health Inspections, Hamden Director of Health, various years, 1946 through 1960. 427. Classified Advertisements (Properties for Sale), New Haven Register, 18 April 1946.

428. "Newhall Street School Teachers Given Reception" New Haven Evening Register, City Edition, 16 June 1946. 429. "Discuss Possibility of Pool on site of Winchester Dump", New Haven Register, 24 January 1947.

430. "Newhall St. School Playground Area to be Enlarged" New Haven Register, 6 June 1947. 431. "Citizens asked to cooperate in disposal of refuse", New Haven Register, 11 July 1947. 432. "Newhall Street Property Bought by Town for $6200; Winchester Co. dump acquired for Recreational purposes by Town" New Haven Register, 11 December 1947.

132

433. Environmental Sanitation Inspection Reports, Whalen Jr. High School, Hamden Board of Health, annual reports from 1957 to 1965 434. Letter from L. Parente, Director of Health to Chairman of the Board of Education,18 October 1957. 435. Hamden Board of Education Budgets, 1958-2000. 436. "History of Hamden, Only the Giant Sleeps", Rachel Hartley, 1959. 437. Property Map of the New Haven Water Company, Mill River Division, revised April 1973. 438. Memorandum from Hamden Housing Code Enforcement Officer to Chief of Environmental Services, regarding "330 Morse Street", 1 October 1990. 439. Letter from Asbestos Abatement and Insulation Services Corporation to Quinnipiack Valley Health District, regarding "Lead Abatement at 319 Morse Street", 18 May 1994. 440. Letter from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Asbestos Abatement and Insulation Services Corporation to Quinnipiack Valley Health District, regarding "Lead Abatement at 319 Morse Street", 10 June 1994. 441. "Results of soil testing for total lead before and after abatement, 319 Morse Street", ChemScope, 29 June 1994. 442. Letter from Town of Hamden Housing and Comm. Development to Joseph and Floriana Ciarleglio re: Lead paint abatement, 319 Morse Street, Final Testing Report, 12 July 1994. 443. Interoffice Memorandum regarding Newhall Street Field, Hamden, 19 August 1994. 444. Various Bid Packages, Status Reports, Invoices, Tabulations of Fill Materials, Receipts for Fill from Quinnipiac College, Site and Grading Plans, related to Middle School Field Improvements, 1995-1997. 445. Memorandum to Hamden Town Attorney from Hamden Town Engineer, regarding Hamden Middle School Work by United Excavating, Bid 744, 27 November 1995. 446. Inter-Office Memorandum, Hamden Board of Education, regarding Hamden Middle School Athletic Field Improvements, 15 May 1997. 447. Fax to Yale University, Payne Interoffice Memorandum regarding Hamden Middle School, Surficial Soil Sampling Results, 22 September 2000. 448. Letter from Quinnipiack Valley Health District to Hamden Public Schools, regarding Water Sampling at Hamden Middle School, November 2000. 449. Proposal to Hamden Board of Education from Health Risk Consultants, 20 November 2000.

133

450. "Report for Indoor Air Quality Evaluation", prepared for Hamden Board of Education by Occupational Risk Control Services, 27 November 2000. 451. "Get to Work on School Building", Editorial, New Haven Register, 29 November 2000. 452. Letters from South Central Connecticut Water Authority to Hamden Board of Education regarding Hamden Middle School Water Quality Testing, 30 November and 4 December 2000. 453. "School's Tests of soil, water, air quality on panel agenda", New Haven Register, 4 December 2000.

454. Letter to Town of Hamden Public Works from J.T. Furrey, Inc., regarding Fill at Hamden Middle School, 5 December 2000. 455. Memorandum from Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities to Superintendent of Schools, regarding Hamden Middle School Water Testing Results, 5 December 2000. 456. Minutes of Meeting, School Building Committee, 15 November, 13 December 2000. 457. Proposal, Invoices, Memorandum related to HVAC/Air Duct Cleaning, Hamden Middle School, December 2000. 458. Letters to Dr. Alida Begina, Superintendent, Hamden Board of Education from Health Risk Consultants, 13 and 18 December 2000. 459. "Surface Soil Sampling Plan, Hamden Middle School, Hamden, Connecticut", prepared for Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection by Facility Support Services, 14 December 2000. 460. Letter from Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Facility Support Services, LLC regarding "Surface Soil Sampling Plan, Hamden Middle School", 14 December 2000. 461. "Soil Tests, Site Studies to cost $412,000", New Haven Register, 14 December 2000. 462. Letter from Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection to Facility Support Services, LLC regarding "Surface Soil Sampling Plan, Hamden Middle School", 15 December 2000. 463. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Telephone Log Books, 15 December 2000-29 July 2002. 464. "Soil Testing", Hamden Journal, 20 December 2000. 465. "Hamden Closing School", New Haven Register, 21 December 2000.

466. Insurance/Invoices and Non-Hazardous Waste Manifests for Asbestos Removal at Hamden Middle School, January 2001.

134

467. "Parents, Staff demand answers on school", New Haven Register, 4 January 2001. 468. Authorization for Disruption of an Historic (Inactive) Solid Waste Disposal Area, Hamden Middle School, 5 January 2001. 469. Letter from Hamden Public Schools to Hamden Education Association, 9 January 2001. 470. "Scientist/Mother Fills Two Roles", The Hartford Courant, 15 January 2001. 471. "A Day of Worries, Assurances", Hartford Courant, 17 January 2001. 472. Methane Findings and Actions Taken at Hamden Middle School, 14 February 2001. 473. USEPA Field Data Sheets, April 2001. 474. Hamden Public School, Bonding Package, April 2001 475. Connecticut Education Association News Release, "Yale Medical Personnel Release Health Risk Assessment of Hamden Middle School", 3 April 2001. 476. Interdepartmental Memorandum regarding Hamden Middle School, 560 Newhall Street, Hamden, Connecticut, Withdrawal of Application for Special Waste Disposal Authorization, 29 May 2001. 477. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Transcript of an interview with Louis Landino, 9 July 2001. 478. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Transcript of an interview with John Carbrey, 9 July 2001. 479. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Transcript of an interview with John Carusone, 9 July 2001. 480. "Draft Findings Report", prepared for the United States Environmental Protection Agency by TechLaw, Inc., 26 September 2001. 481. Inter-Office Memorandum from Hamden Middle School Principal to Mark Albanese, Director of Facilities, regarding Maintenance of Remediated Areas, 1 October 2001. 482. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Hamden Enforcement Log, Book 1, 10 October 2001 to 29 April 2002. 483. Southern Connecticut Gas Company ­ Maps for Newhall Street (#0-525), Morse Street (#0-125 and #126-280), Wadsworth St (#0-100), Winchester (#900-#1048), undated. 484. Methane Monitoring Plan, Hamden Middle School, undated. 485. "Powder Farm Background", undated. 486. "The Making of A World Famous Rifle, The Photographic Story of How a Model 94 Comes into Being.", Outdoor Life, March 1946.

135

487. "Compressed Air at Winchester Arms," Compressed Air Magazine, April 1946, pp. 95-97. 488. Olin Annual Report, 1951. 489. Olin Highlights of the Year 1952. 490. Olin Annual Report, 1953. 491. "Batteries", Winchester Life Magazine, March 1954, pp. 5-7. 492. "Olin Mathieson Progress", December 1958. 493. "Olin Mathieson Progress", January 1959. 494. "Olin Mathieson Progress", May 1959 495. "Olin Progress", January 1966. 496. "A Century of Leadership, Winchester-Weston, 1866-1966, Centennial Press Kit," Olin Public Relations, 1966. 497. Olin Interoffice Memorandum regarding sources of air pollutants and registration forms, dated 4 September 1969. 498. "Olin at New Haven, Location Facts", undated (circa 1969). 499. "Environmental Investigation of Pine Swamp, Hamden, Connecticut", prepared for Winchester Group Olin by ERT, January 1981. 500. "Hazardous Waste Survey, Pine Swamp and New Haven", notes interview with G. King, 5 May 1981. 501. "Olin Corporation, Pine Swamp Property, Battery Waste Area, Supplemental Study", prepared for Olin Corporation by Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., 28 August 1981. 502. Letter from Olin to Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, 26 March 1986. 503. "Investigation Report, Pine Swamp Property East Burning Grounds, Supplemental Studies", prepared for Olin Corporation by Malcolm Pirnie, January 1987. 504. Letter from Olin Corporation to Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, dated 17 February 1987. 505. Olin Interoffice Memorandum regarding "Old Powerhouse, Structural Inspection ­ Buildings #24 and 18F", 14 November 1990. 506. "Subsurface Environmental Assessment of the US Repeating Arms Company, 275 Winchester Avenue Facility, New Haven, Connecticut," prepared for US Repeating Arms Company by ERL, September 1991.

136

507. Draft HMS Background and Talking Points, 16 August 1993. 508. "Emergency Open Burn Area Decommissioning Summary and Certifications, Olin Corporation, Corner of Newhall and Argyle Streets, New Haven, Connecticut", prepared for Olin Chemicals by HRP Associates, Inc., October 1993. 509. "Interim Report for Environmental Site Investigation, US Repeating Arms Company, New Haven, Connecticut", Prepared for US Repeating Arms Company by Malcolm Pirnie, April 1995. 510. "Final Report, Environmental Site Investigation, US Repeating Arms Company, New Haven, Connecticut" prepared for Olin Corporation by Malcolm Pirnie, December 1996. 511. "History of Winchester Repeating Arms Company, a division of Olin Industries, Inc., 1866-1949", undated. 512. "Olin Brass ­ Plants at East Alton, Illinois and New Haven, Connecticut", undated. 513. "Surface Soil Sampling Reports", prepared by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. for Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, November 2002. 514. Haley & Aldrich review of Property Deed for Mill Rock Park. 515. "Standard Catalog of Winchester," David D. Kowalaski, editor, Krause Publications, 2000. 516. Haley & Aldrich review of Property Deed for Hamden Community Center. 517. Haley & Aldrich review of Property Deed for Rochford Field. 518. Haley & Aldrich, Inc review of Property Deed for Hamden Middle School and Newhall Street Field. 519. GUNOLOGY, A Comprehensive Course for Professional Gun Salesmen, Paul M. Doane, published by Winchester-Western (1964) 520. Winchester Rifle and Shotgun Component Parts Price List (Model 94) (Effective Nov. 1, 1922). 521. Winchester Component Parts (Effective Dec. 15, 1950) 522. Winchester Component Parts, Sights, Accessories for Firearms (July 1,1954) 523. Winchester Component Parts, Sights, Assessors for Firearms (December 15, 1956) 524. Sequence of Takedown and Assembly Operations, Winchester, Model 94 Lever Action Carbine (December 1957) 525. Sequence of Takedown and Assembly Operations, Winchester, Model 70 Bolt Action Center Fire Rifle (March 1958)

137

526. Sequence of Takedown and Assembly Operations, Winchester, Model 50 Shotgun (March 1958)

138

TABLE I SUMMARY OF PARCEL: PROPERTY ADDRESSES, OWNERSHIP AND USES HAMDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND SURROUNDING NEWHALL STREET NEIGHBORHOOD HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address PARCEL 1 249-251 Morse Street 253-255 Morse Street 259 Morse Street 263 Morse Street 267 Morse Street 271 Morse Street 275 Morse Street 279 Morse Street 283 Morse Street 287 Morse Street 291 Morse Street 295 Morse Street 299 Morse Street 301 Morse Street 311 Morse Street 315 Morse Street 319-321 Morse Street PARCEL 2A 99 Bryden Terrace 105 Bryden Terrace 113 Bryden Terrace 117 Bryden Terrace 125 Bryden Terrace 131 Bryden Terrace 46 Wadsworth Street 54 Wadsworth Street 60 Wadsworth Street 1061 Winchester Avenue 1067 Winchester Avenue 1071 Winchester Avenue PARCEL 2B 18 Newbury Street 22 Newbury Street 26 Newbury Street 1028 Winchester Avenue 1030 Winchester Avenue 1032 Winchester Avenue 1036 Winchester Avenue 1042 Winchester Avenue 1048 Winchester Avenue 499 Newhall Street 507 Newhall Street 513 Newhall Street 517 Newhall Street 523 Newhall Street 155 Morse Street 161 Morse Street 165-167 Morse Street 171-173 Morse Street 177 Morse Street 185 Morse Street Property Owner Property Use

Page 1 of 3

Hamden Housing Authority Hamden Housing Authority Estate of Helen E. Venson Leo and E. Gladys Griffin Lloyd V. Barret Sr. Barbara Fortes Roosevelt Young Mary Anne Mancini Joel D. Kirkland Samuel Boyd Jr. Lloyd Barham Shirley F. Castaneda Douglas M. Edge Robert L. Miller Agatha and Egbert Wallace Nancy L. Coughlin Joseph and Floriana Ciarleglio

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

Barbara and Bobby Brown Estate of Sidney Gross Edith and Alonzo Cannon Joy and Stanley Williams Vera Myers William H. Taylor Marcia A. Frasier Alice and Oscar Torres Charles McClinton Joan P. Spence Dorothy M. Williams Donna L. Johnson

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

Keith M. Butler Ricky L. Bynum Clevland and Earnestine Bromell Doris Wynn Maxine and William Jones Margie Hodge Eileen and Patrick Carey Charlene P. Webb Debra and Margaret Savage Ruth and Donald Eaton Louise Craig Josephine Neal William Lewis Jimmie Green Joseph E. Langford Frances Masota Doborowicz Alfonza Burgess Jr. Wesley Forbes Elworth Mobley Elsie Nelson

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

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December 2002

TABLE I SUMMARY OF PARCEL: PROPERTY ADDRESSES, OWNERSHIP AND USES HAMDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND SURROUNDING NEWHALL STREET NEIGHBORHOOD HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address PARCEL 2C 84 Bryden Terrace 90 Bryden Terrace 94 Bryden Terrace 106 Bryden Terrace 112 Bryden Terrace 118 Bryden Terrace 124 Bryden Terrace 130 Bryden Terrace 136 Bryden Terrace 142 Bryden Terrace 12 Wadsworth Street 20 Wadsworth Street 1019 Winchester Avenue 1027 Winchester Avenue 1035 Winchester Avenue 95 Morse Street 103 Morse Street 109 Morse Street 115 Morse Street 121 Morse Street 127 Morse Street 135 Morse Street PARCEL 2D 160 Morse Street 164 Morse Street 168 Morse Street 172 Morse Street 176 Morse Street 180 Morse Street 984 Winchester Avenue 994 Winchester Avenue 1002 Winchester Avenue 1006 Winchester Avenue 11 Marlboro Street 17 Marlboro Street 21 Marlboro Street 25 Marlboro Street 29 Marlboro Street 33 Marlboro Street 461 Newhall Street 465 Newhall Street 469 Newhall Street 473 Newhall Street 477 Newhall Street 481 Newhall Street PARCEL 3 596 Newhall Street 602 Newhall Street 606 Newhall Street 610 Newhall Street 618 Newhall Street Property Owner Property Use

Page 2 of 3

Mattie and Gary Lemont Janie L. Clemons John Brillante Carmella and Cosmo Mansi Clarence R. Collins Jr. Catherine Calhoun Lanorma Webb Cornice and Ronald Oliver Marcia and Gregory Walters Elenore and Fred Harris Ida V. Parrella Verneta Mooring Loria Morrison James Smerekanych Mickey and Madie Barrett Jungkasiri and Komkai Sukasame Rose and Peter Pizzuti Ruth and James Ponteau Becky and Earlie Jones Alice and Joseph Panczak Sarah H. Gordon Gloria and Leroy Weston

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

Delores and David Jones Virginia Seay Ella and James Hardee Kelven Howard Ann Clomon Michelle A. Suggs New Rich Development Company LLC James A. West Dorothy C. Johnson Almeta and Ben Brunson Nettie and Douglas Washington May and Joseph Gause Otis Brown Mary and Morris Draughn Carol and James Wyndham Ruby L. Moore Oree McElveen Charles and Mary Crews Barbara and Ezekiel Armstrong Minnie and Paul Drye Mary and Robert Burns Lindsey and Dorothy Haughton

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

Roosevelt and Patrick Mitchell Mary Louis and Harris Harrell Louise Hall Gwendolyn Coppage Venus and William Walker

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

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TABLE I SUMMARY OF PARCEL: PROPERTY ADDRESSES, OWNERSHIP AND USES HAMDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND SURROUNDING NEWHALL STREET NEIGHBORHOOD HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address PARCEL 3 continued 622 Newhall Street 626 Newhall Street 630 Newhall Street 634 Newhall Street 642 Newhall Street 650 Newhall Street 322 Augur Street 323 Augur Street 327 Augur Street 329 Augur Street 331 Augur Street 333 Augur Street 334 Augur Street 337 Augur Street 338 Augur Street 339 Augur Street 342 Augur Street 5 Remington Street 9 Remington Street 22 Remington Street 13 Harris Street 17 Harris Street 20 Harris Street PARCEL 4 550-560 Newhall Street 533 Newhall Street 1099 Winchester Avenue 260 Mill Rock Road 496 Newhall Street Property Owner Property Use

Page 3 of 3

George M. Stanley Ulia Mae Pitts Daphnie J. Thompson Rosa and Jesse Brock Pamela Sheilds Murline Wellesley James Hill Sr. Rena Williams Michael Bagley Paula Ball Abdul and Bonnie Hamid Statewide Investors, LLC Leonardo Melendez Sheila Crumbley Gregory Holmes Edward Bowes Josephine Lewis Yousaf Kashmiri Lucius Wright Frank J. Rizzuti Anthony E. Conte Susan and Mark Schultz John and Hattie Warfield

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

Town of Hamden Town of Hamden Town of Hamden Town of Hamden Town of Hamden

Hamden Middle School Newhall Street Athletic Field Rochford Field Sewer Pump Station Mill Rock Park Newhall Community Center

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TABLE II SUMMARY OF REPORTED DEBRIS FILL AND STRUCTURAL SETTLING AT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES NEWHALL NEIGHBORHOOD AREA HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address/ 1 Contact

PARCEL 1 249-251 & 253-255 Morse Street Hamden Housing Authority 263 Morse Street Leo and Gladys Griffin 275 Morse Street Roosevelt Young 295 Morse Street Shirley Castaneda 319 Morse Street Sherrell Jones PARCEL 2A 1061 Winchester Avenue Joan Spence 1067 Winchester Avenue Dorothy Williams 1071 Winchester Avenue Donna Johnson 54 Wadsworth Avenue Oscar & Alice Torres 60 Wadsworth Avenue Charles McClinton 99 Bryden Terrace Barbara and Bobby Brown 105 Bryden Terrace Sherman Gross 113 Bryden Terrace Alonzo and Edith Cannon 117 Bryden Terrace Stanley and Joy Williams 125 Bryden Terrace Vera Myers H&A S, CTDEP S H&A 15 28 31 S S S S S 31 20 34.5 2 Houses built in 1990

Page 1 of 5

Source of Information

Years at Address

Response to Survey, Questionnaire or Interview

No odors or settlement reported. Debris encountered during construction activities includes ash, bottles Debris fill reported (tin cans). No settlement or debris reported. Settlement reported. No report of debris fill in yard.

Settlement reported. Found bottles and glass in excavations throughout yard. Settlement reported. Tar-like material in driveway. Debris fill reported by CTDEP Debris reported at shallow depth in southeast corner of backyard. Debris includes bottles, glass and metal. Settlement reported. Garage removed due to settlement. Sinkholes and settlement reported in back yard. Ash, bottles, glass and other debris found in shallow excavations throughout backyard. Settlement reported. No ash or debris reported Settlement reported. Ash and debris fill reported in yard. Settlement reported. Fireplace replaced due to settling. Debris in yard at depths of 0-3 ft. including batteries, bricks, ash, car parts, bottles, building materials. Settlement reported. Sinkholes in yard. Debris noted at shallow depth in yard including glass, piece of barrel, metal. Sewage odor in basement. Settlement reported. Debris fill encountered at shallow depth in yard, including ash, vials, broken bottles. Owner reports significant quantity of topsoil brought in over the years to fill settlement in backyard. Settlement reported. Debris fill encountered, including ash, "waste materials", glass and cans.

S S S

18 25 40

S S, CTDEP

27 25

S

16

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TABLE II SUMMARY OF REPORTED DEBRIS FILL AND STRUCTURAL SETTLING AT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES NEWHALL NEIGHBORHOOD AREA HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address/ 1 Contact

PARCEL 2B 499 Newhall Street Donald and Ruth Eaton 507 Newhall Street Louise Craig E E, S, CTDEP 38

Page 2 of 5

Source of Information

Years at Address

Response to Survey, Questionnaire or Interview

Town Engineer reported "severe settlement of house." Ash, clinkers and bottles regularly encountered in backyard during gardening. Settlement reported. Town Engineer reported sinkhole in driveway. Debris fill encountered at shallow depths throughout yard, including ash, glass, mirror pieces, cans, bricks and coal. Owner reports grass will not grow in some areas of backyard. Settlement reported. Significant settlement of ground surface off northeast corner of house. Owner reports finding buried debris throughout backyard. Settlement (cracking and sinking) reported. 1 45 11 28 24 No report of settlement or debris fill. Settlement in yard. No ash or debris fill reported. No settlement or ash/debris fill reported. Settlement reported. Debris fill including batteries and glass in yard observed during excavation. Grass will not grow in west end of back yard. No settlement or ash/debris fill reported

513 Newhall Street Josephine Neal 517 Newhall Street William Lewis 171-173 Morse Street Wes Forbes 185 Morse Street Elsie Nelson 26 Newbury Street Cleveland and Ernestine Bromell 1032 Winchester Avenue Margie Hodge 1036 Winchester Avenue Patrick and Eileen Carey PARCEL 2C 84 Bryden Street Mattie and Gary Lemont 106 Bryden Cosmo and Carmella Mansi 130 Bryden Terrace Ronald and Corncie Oliver 103 Morse Street Peter and Rose Pizzuti 109 Morse Street James Ponteau 115 Morse Street Earlie and Becky Jones 121 Morse Street Joseph and Alice Panczak

E S S S S S S

S CTDEP CTDEP S 42

Owner reports settlement of yard (north, south and west side of house) and sinkhole in driveway. Debris fill containing ash, bottles and a sink and "clinker coal" encountered at depth of 3 ft. Settlement reported, cracks in foundation and basement noted. Debris fill reported in front and back yard including glass, bricks, cinders, bottles. Settlement reported. Debris fill, including glass, leather, metal and coal found at shallow depths and at the surface in the northeastern corner of yard. Reports similar conditions at 109 Morse Street. Settlement reported. Owner digs up cans, bottles, bricks, ash from garden along northerly property line. Coal and ash observed at ground surface in front yard. 24 54 Settlement reported. Settlement reported. Debris fill containing ash, glass, bedsprings and cinderblocks at shallow depth in backyard.

CTDEP

S S

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TABLE II SUMMARY OF REPORTED DEBRIS FILL AND STRUCTURAL SETTLING AT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES NEWHALL NEIGHBORHOOD AREA HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address/ 1 Contact

Parcel 2D 469 Newhall Street Ezekiel and Barbara Armstrong 465 Newhall Street Charles Crew 25 Marlboro Street Mary and Morris Draughn 164 Morse Street Virginia Seay Parcel 3 13 Harris Street Anthony Conte 5 Remington Street Yousaf Kashmir 22 Remington Street Frank Rizzuti 331 Augur Street Bonnie and Abdul Hamid 334 Augur Street 342 Augur Street Josephine Lewis Off-site Properties 92 Morse Street Mark Riccio 222 Morse Street Evalyn Wilson 274 Morse Street Tanner 304 Morse Street Gregory Abdul-Akbar Millrock Condominiums Deborah Conlon, Manager 317 Mill Rock Road Denise Bernabucci 323 Mill Rock Road Deborah Sumpter S S 3 S S S S 13.25 17 13 6.5 3.5 25 S S S CTDEP CTDEP CTDEP 24 1.5 3 32 13 S CTDEP S S 31 15

Page 3 of 5

Source of Information

Years at Address

Response to Survey, Questionnaire or Interview

Settlement reported. Mothball odor in basement. Ash reported and observed in backyard Debris containing cinders, coal, ash, bottles, glass and clinkers found throughout property. Settlement (basement cracks) reported. No settlement or debris fill reported.

Settlement reported. Debris fill reported, including ash, rocks, bottles and "trash" No settlement or debris fill reported. Debris fill reported in yard, includes ash, glass, iron rods. Debris fill reported in rear of property, including glass, ashes and "other debris". Sandy fill on top of debris. House rebuilt after tornado in 1989. After tornado, observed debris fill in yard, noted that it was evident that it was a former dump site. Debris fill at depth of about 2 ft. in southwest side of property and next to house, includes burned rags, bottles, cans, metal rods, "trash".

No settlement reported. Debris fill reported, including glass, batteries, metal. Settlement reported. Debris reported in western part of yard, including cans, bottles, metal, plastic. Sometimes smells gas in basement. Debris noted, including wire, shoes, pans, household refuse, glass and bottles. Asphalt observed in fill during tree trunk removal. Cracks in carport and wall reported. No settlement or debris fill reported.

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December 2002

TABLE II SUMMARY OF REPORTED DEBRIS FILL AND STRUCTURAL SETTLING AT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES NEWHALL NEIGHBORHOOD AREA HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Property Address/ 1 Contact

Off-site continued 345 Mill Rock Road Marion and Eloise Samuel 369 Mill Rock Road Mae Green 377-379 Mill Rock Road Iris Frazier 462 Newhall Street Tracy and Bert Bellamy 643 Newhall Street W. Cooper 466 Newhall Street Mrs. Bellinger 476 Newhall Street 478 Newhall Street Raymond Sins, Sr. 603 Newhall Street Ebonee Little 496 Shelton Avenue John and Ronda Haywood 275 Augur Street Reverend Harry & Deidra Riggs 34 Prospect Lane 35 Edwards Street Kim Miller Corner of Marlboro and Shelton Ave 115 Marlboro Street Sheilah Thompson, Charles Wilkerson 21 Wadsworth Avenue Lecraig Hatcher S S S S S CTDEP CTDEP CTDEP S CTDEP QVHD CTDEP CTDEP CTDEP CTDEP H&A 30 Ash fill reported at shallow depth when gardening in yard. Debris fill (stones, bricks, glass) reported. <1 year 21 <1 20 30 Settlement reported. No ash or debris fill reported. No settlement, odors or debris fill reported

Page 4 of 5

Source of Information

Years at Address

Response to Survey, Questionnaire or Interview

Settlement, sewer drainage problems reported. No ash or debris fill noted. No settlement, odors or debris fill reported No settlement, odors or debris fill reported Reported ashes in fill material in front and back of house. Debris fill reported. Reported ash, cinders and "garbage" in fill at depth of 18 in. to 2 ft. Settlement reported. Sulphur odor in basement. Debris noted at depth of 5-6 ft. in front yard during gas line installation. Debris included black rock, glass bottles and "trash".

Debris fill at about 18 in. below grade, including ash, cinders, glass, coal, coke, leather belts, and bones. Areas of yard where grass will not grow. Reported to be a former Winchester "Coke" lot. Bottles, coal, glass, pipes found throughout backyard.

S

Settlement reported

See note on next page.

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TABLE II SUMMARY OF REPORTED DEBRIS FILL AND STRUCTURAL SETTLING AT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES NEWHALL NEIGHBORHOOD AREA HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT

Page 5 of 5

Notes: 1. Name or person(s) interviewed, or person that completed Haley & Aldrich or CTDEP survey. Individual surveys included in Appendix H. 2. Key to Sources of Information: E: Information provided by Hamden Town Engineer, September 2001. S: Information from Haley & Aldrich survey, September 2001 CTDEP: Information provided to CTDEP, or encountered by Haley & Aldrich during CTDEP file review, September 2001. QVHD: Information encountered by Haley & Aldrich during review of files at Quinnipiack Valley Health District, September 2001 H&A: Information obtained from Haley & Aldrich site visit requested by owner.

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December 2002

27892-400 ASTM PHASE I ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENT HAMDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND SURROUNDING NEWHALL STREET NEIGHBORHOOD FIGURES Figure 1 - Site Locus Figure 2 - Site Plan Figure 3A - Subsurface Exploration Plan Figure 3B - Subsurface Explorations Greater than 4 Feet Deep Figure 4 - Historic Site Plan Figure 5 - Development History Figure 6 - 1934 Aerial Photograph Figure 7 - 1998 Aerial Photograph Figure 8 - Properties Potentially Within Limits of Contiguous Historic Fill Figure 9 - Areas of Reported Filling or Dumping Figure 10 - Regional Areas of Filling or Dumping These figures are provided as separate PDF files from main document.

APPENDIX A Haley & Aldrich proposal dated 1 August 2001

APPENDIX B Parcel Reports and Tax Assessor Field Cards (Parcels 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, and 3)

APPENDIX C Select Historical and Municipal Research Documentation

APPENDIX D Database Search Report and Regulatory Records Documentation

APPENDIX E Site Photographs

APPENDIX F Chronology of Site Development, Significant Events, Deeds and Previous Environmental Assessments

APPENDIX G Additional Exploration Location Plans and Exploration Logs

Information

ASTM Phase I

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