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InsideIllinois

F o r F a c u l t y a n d S t a f f , U n i v e r s i t y o f I l l i n o i s a t

April 4, 2002 Vol. 21, No. 17

U r b a n a - C h a m p a i g n

Historic renovation

each year. "Since prehistory, geology interacted with mythopoeic tendencies in producing legends that have made the site of such immense cultural and religious significance," Sinha wrote. "The hill is perceived as the toe of the goddess Sati that fell on earth when griefmaddened Shiva carried her dead body on his shoulders." Sinha said Champaner-Pavagadh first became a focus of attention by Indian officials in 1987, when the Heritage Trust sponsored a study and international conference on conservation of the site. The resulting report proposed the development of an archaeological park. Sinha said sustained efforts toward that goal have been made in the past, with the latest progress being last year's invitation to the UI team to develop a landscape management plan for the site. The UI proposal, if accepted, would need to be implemented in stages over many years and would be administered by a public body created through legislative channels, she said. But if everything goes according to plan, initial conservation efforts would focus on the revival of the site's traditional waterworks. From there, priorities include restoration of pilgrim paths and construction of heritage trails; restoration and rehabilitation of heritage sites, including the introduction of landscape plantings and water features; construction of visitor and interpretation centers; environmental reclamation of quarried sites; and restoration of a derelict railway. x

UI scholars submit plan to renovate endangered historic site in India

Champaner-Pavagadh Archaeological Park to the Heritage Trust in Baroda. The plan was An overgrown, centuries-old sacred site in developed by Sinha and Kesler and a team of UI the Indian state of Gujarat ­ identified as one of design students who traveled to India last sumthe 100 most endangered monuments on the mer to study the lay of the land and develop a World Monuments Watch List ­ may be in line plan which ­ over time ­ would rehabilitate the for a facelift, thanks to a team of landscape site, once home to Gujarat's capital city, architects from the UI. Champaner. Amita Sinha and Gary Kesler, professors of "The forgotten city of Champaner was `lost landscape architecture, recently submitted a in the jungle,' " Sinha noted in the report, until excavations led by R.N. Mehta master plan for the design of a proposed for the department of archaeology at Maharaja Sayajorao University in 1969-75 revealed numerous mosques, mansions, houses, streets and fortification walls. The rediscovered city was actually the last incarnation of Champaner, which has a multilayered history dating back some 1,200 years. Previous cities were sited on nearby Pavagadh hill, a striking, 830-meter promontory on the landscape that rises up unexpectedly from the surrounding plains. The hill is the main focal point for pilgrims, who photo by Bill Wiegand climb it to reach the goddess Sacred site Amita Sinha and Gary Kesler, UI professors temples on its summit. of landscape architecture, recently submitted a master plan The hill and those temples for the design of an archaeological park. The site is a are the main attraction that centuries-old sacred site in the Indian state of Gujarat ­ draws some 2.5 million pilidentified as one of the 100 most endangered monuments. grims and tourists to the site

By Melissa Mitchell News Bureau Staff Writer

Navigating the future

The Career Center helps students explore their post-graduation options and then assists them in accomplishing their goals. PAGE 2

Happy Birthday

UI Extension celebrates the centennial anniversary of 4-H. PAGE 4

Law professor warned of accounting profession's ethical conflicts

By Mark Reutter News Bureau Staff Writer

Conflict of interest

Richard L. Kaplan, UI professor of law, found serious problems with the dual loyalties that accountants face when auditing firms that are clients of their consulting services. "They must be rigorous in determining the financial statements' reliability but not so rigorous that corporate management seeks out a more compliant firm," Kaplan said.

photo by Bill Wiegand

Staff honors

Seven UI staff members are honored with the Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award. PAGE 6

INDEX

ACHIEVEMENTS BRIEF NOTES CALENDAR DEATHS ON THE JOB 3 5 9 12 3

On the Web

www.news.uiuc.edu/ii

Published 15 years ago, the words sound prescient today: "Conflicts in the critical area of auditor independence must be resolved before significant credibility can be restored to the profession." In a 1987 article, a UI law professor warned that coziness between auditors and managers and pressure to sell consulting services to corporations were distorting the "core standards" of large accounting firms. Unless the profession returned to its "public watchdog" role ­ as mandated by the 1933 Securities Act ­ it risked congressional investigations and "huge" stockholder lawsuits. Richard L. Kaplan reached these conclusions from working for one of the international accounting firms and from teaching a course titled "Accounting Issues for Lawyers." He found serious problems with the dual loyalties that accountants face. "They must be rigorous in determining the financial statements' reliability but not so rigorous that corporate management seeks out a more compliant firm." This conflict of interest is aggravated when accountants lose "the appearance, if not the fact, of independence" by doing consulting work for the very companies they were auditing. The profession's shift from "watchdog to lapdog" accelerated over the next decade,

Kaplan said. In his 1987 article in the Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, he cautioned, "Far too many accountants seem to shun the unglamorous role of skeptical guardian of the public for the more charismatic posture of business adviser and confidante. They apparently see themselves as assisting corporate management, not monitoring them. So if a company needs to get around some accounting pronouncements, the letter of the edict may be twisted to derive a result that is at odds with its spirit."

When a company with an auditors' seal of approval unexpectedly collapses, he continued, the profession is "horrified" that its work is "judged with a result-oriented application of 20/20 hindsight," while "everyone else is incredulous that an audit could possibly satisfy `generally accepted standards' and yet be so deficient in actual fact." Feeding this "trust-me-but-don't-blame-me" mindset, according to Kaplan, were efforts by SEE ACCOUNTING, PAGE 12

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InsideIllinois

oped while in college? What opportunities have they experienced to enhance their decisions to pursue graduate school?" Even students with well-defined goals may not know how to reach those goals successfully. The Career Center encourages students to become more aware of what admission directors and employers may require. Eight full-time counselors are available at the center to help students focusing on graduate education become better informed when developing a strategy to pursue a graduate career. Eighty-three percent of the entering freshman class said that they want to go to graduate school, according to survey data gathered by the Office of Instructional Resources. "Students should not think of graduate education as an alternative, but an integral part of their complete education process," Paulsen said. The Career Center has several resources that students can tap for general career guidance: the Career Library, career counseling, Mock Interview Program, resume review and various presentations. It also provides a Credential File system for students to house their letters of evaluation for graduate/professional school. The Career Library's walls are lined with an array of informational handouts, while also housing references, catalogs and other career books to help students investigate various areas of advanced education. Career counseling helps students consider graduate school by advising them on how much time, academic commitment and money is required to complete an advanced degree. Also, students may have to consider moving. The Mock Interview Program helps students hone their interviewing skills, allowing them to field questions regarding their credentials during an hourlong videotaped

April 4, 2002

Career Center helps students explore options after graduation

By Kesha Green News Bureau Staff Writer

All students begin college with a wide range of career options, but the choices they make while in college will dictate which options are still viable upon graduation. The UI Career Center helps students not only explore those opportunities, but also prepare successfully for them. Karen Paulsen, the associate director of the center, said that there are three doors wide open for graduating seniors: professional school (law or medicine), graduate school and employment opportunities. But "nothing ever shuts until you have shut the door," she said. Students generally practice an "ESS schedule: eat, study and sleep," Paulsen said. "They may grow intellectually, but what transferable skills have they devel-

interview session. "An interview can be made or broken in 10 seconds," Paulsen said. "What's in the [student's] soul may have never been expressed verbally." The interview helps verify "that this is not a whim, but a commitment." The career counselors also encourage students to start a credential file for a onetime fee of $20. The credential file service holds six evaluation letters that can be sent to graduate or professional schools. The file lasts for 10 years, which is advantageous for students who want to begin working after graduation. If a student decides to pursue a graduate program after a few years of employment, the letters remain in the student's file, reflecting academic achievements at UI. Returning to campus for a faculty letter after being gone for some time can result in a mediocre letter, Paulsen said. Students also can glean pertinent graduSEE CAREER CENTER, PAGE 12

Bazzani retiring; Rugg named successor

Stephen K. Rugg has been named vice president for administration and comptroller of the university. The appointment was announced by UI President James J. Stukel in a mass mailing to the campuses. Rugg will replace Craig S. Bazzani, who is retiring on April 30. Rugg has served the university for l7 years, most recently as associate vice president for planning and budgeting. The responsibilities of the vice president for administration and comptroller include overseeing major university functions ­ business and finance, human resources, and administrative computing; serving and working with state agencies on such issues as the Procurement Act and the university's capital budget; and advising the board of trustees on investments. "This position is vital to the university, especially in the current economic climate, and I am extremely pleased to have someone of Mr. Rugg's capabilities serving in this capacity," Stukel wrote. Bazzani has served the university for almost 25 years. "His loyalty to this institution is unwavering," Stukel said, "and all of us who have had the privilege to work with him over the years will miss him. We extend to him our very best wishes and appreciation." x

photo by Bill Wiegand

What now? Karen Paulsen, the associate director of the UI's Career center, says there are three types of opportunities for graduates: professional school (law or medicine), graduate school and employment opportunities. The center helps students not only explore those options, but also prepare successfully for them.

April Fool's Day hoax not so funny to some

By Sharita Forrest Assistant Editor

job market

Academic Human Resources · Suite 420, 807 S. Wright St., MC-310 · 333-6747 Academic Human Resources maintains listings of academic professional and faculty member positions that can be reviewed during regular business hours or online at: Faculty members: http://webster.uihr.uiuc.edu/ahr/jobs/faculty/ahrjobrg1.htm Academic professionals: https://hrnet.uihr.uillinois.edu/cgi/panda/SearchForm3.pl Prospective employees and students can receive e-mail notification of open positions by subscribing to the academic jobs listserve. Look under Career Information at:

http://webster.uihr.uiuc.edu/ahr/default.asp#acjob

McKinley Health Center received numerous telephone calls April 1 as the result of a prank e-mail message announcing a recall of defective condoms purportedly distributed by the health center. The message, which was sent to undergraduate students as an April Fool's Day hoax, was written to appear as if it were a mass e-mail to students generated by a McKinley Health Center assistant director. The message said that McKinley Health Center had been advised of quality control problems with condoms manufactured by Trojan Brand Condoms. The fictitious message said that patrons of McKinley Health Center might have received condoms with microscopic holes in them. Recipients were advised to inspect their condoms and return any unused products bearing a specific lot number to drop boxes at McKinley Health Center and McKinley Resource Center or to deposit them in tuition drop boxes at the

Illini Union or Henry Administration Building. "I want to make it very clear that we have not distributed defective condoms," said Dr. Robert Palinkas, McKinley Health Center director. "I think a lot of people have been caused unnecessary worry and inconvenience by this message. Occasionally there are reports in the media about recalling defective condoms, but we have checked with the manufacturer and the distributor and there are no defective condoms being recalled." Stan Yagi, director of the Computing and Communications Services Office, said that the university officials had determined that the message had been generated from a computer off campus. Despite its misleading appearance, the message had not been generated using the mass mailing feature of the university's e-mail system. University officials were hoping that the Internet service provider used to distribute the message would cooperate with them in identifying the perpetrator of the hoax, Yagi said. x

Personnel Services Office · 52 E. Gregory Drive, MC-562 · 333-3101 The Personnel Services Office provides information about staff employment online at www.pso.uiuc.edu. Paper employment applications or paper civil service exam requests are no longer accepted by PSO. To complete an online employment application and to submit an exam request, visit the online Employment Center at www.uihr.uillinois.edu/jobs.

InsideIllinois

Inside Illinois is an employee publication of the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois. It is published on the first and third Thursday of each month by the News Bureau of the campus Office of Public Affairs, administered by the associate chancellor for public affairs. Distribution is by campus mail. News is solicited from all areas of the campus and should be sent to the editor at least 10 days before publication. Entries for the calendar are due 15 days before publication. All items may be sent to Inside Illinois' electronic mail address: [email protected] The campus mail address is Inside Illinois, 807 S. Wright St., Suite 520 East, Champaign, MC-314. The fax number is 244-0161. The editor may be reached by calling 333-2895 or e-mail to [email protected] Visit us at www.news.uiuc.edu/ii or through the UI home page: www.uiuc.edu Editor Doris K. Dahl Assistant Editor Sharita Forrest Photographer Bill Wiegand Calendar Marty Yeakel Student Assistant Katherine McKenna News Bureau contributors: Jim Barlow, life sciences Craig Chamberlain, communications, education, social work Kesha Green, general assignment James E. Kloeppel, physical sciences Andrea Lynn, humanities, social sciences Melissa Mitchell, applied life studies, arts, international programs, Mark Reutter, business, law

April 4, 2002

InsideIllinois

PAGE 3

Did you have any unusual experiences while you were shooting the photos of the towns? I had lots of them. I was asked for money. I was turned in to the police when I was taking a picture of the Mattoon Journal-Gazette office. They'd been publishing articles about a facility they didn't want in the area, and people at the paper were getting death threats. They saw me taking pictures of their building and thought I was associated with that. I saw someone run out and take a picture of my car as I was driving away but I didn't think much about it. Then the police called me and wanted to know what I was doing. Sometimes I probably did just grab a picture of a place and run because I was in a hurry, and it probably did get some people suspicious. What will be the theme of your next book? I'm going to focus on the Midwest and counties in southern England to give the book a broader appeal. I've already done all the photographs and half the strips. My wife and I took our honeymoon in England, and I did a few pictures then. But for the most part, I've been contacting the tourism departments and seeing what they have on file. I would have loved to have just taken a month off and gone to England and taken all the pictures. What are the challenges of your job at WILL? There's a creative challenge to making sure that the images and the quality are consistent among the three stations. Also it's challenging trying to tie in the graphics created for print with the on-air graphics. What's your favorite part of your job? Probably the chance to do lots of different things. There's always a chance to try anything you want to do, whether that's working in the scene shop or on the set or learning new programs or working as a volunteer in WILL's fund-raising activities. ­ Interview by Sharita Forrest

On the job Don Chambers

Don Chambers, a broadcast animator at WILL, has worked at the UI for eight years. He creates on-air animation, still graphics, Web graphics and billboards. His first book, "Mannequins at Home in Illinois and Western Indiana," published in 2001, features computer-generated 3-D cartoon characters in more than 1,300 photos of Illinois and western Indiana towns. The comic strips debuted in 1994 and have been featured in several newspapers. The current week's strip is at http://mannequinscomicstrip.co.uk. Chambers earned a bachelor's degree in graphic design from Eastern Illinois University.

photo by Bill Wiegand

How did you get started drawing cartoons? I've been drawing cartoons as long as I can remember. The first book I ever remember reading was a Peanuts book. I met Charles Schulz a couple of times, and he called me on the phone one day to talk about a book idea I had based on his characters. He was a very nice person and easy to talk to. Over the years I've met several of the major cartoonists. I've also met and talked several times with Lynn Johnston, who draws "For Better or for Worse." I sent her a copy of my book and she sent me a copy of her new book. She is such a sweet lady. For the most part, a lot of the really big names in cartooning are quite approachable. Why mannequins? I wanted something different. The characters are completely computer-generated. My wife does hair on the side, and she designed all the characters' hairstyles. Where do you get your ideas for the strips and the characters? Just from my life experiences. My friends. Listening to people. When I'm watching television, a word or a phrase may spark an idea. Sometimes my wife will come up with an idea or I'll bounce my ideas off her. If only one of us thinks an idea is funny, then we know it needs more work. Most of the characters are composites of people I've known. The two male characters are based on friends I

had growing up. The book incorporates photos of many towns in this area. Tell me about that. Champaign-Urbana is the center of the universe for the book. I thought people might enjoy seeing some photos of their towns integrated into the comic strip rather than computer-generated backgrounds. When I started out, I was hoping to photograph every single town within an 80-mile radius of Champaign-Urbana, but I had no idea there were so many. There were several towns I didn't photograph, but I didn't purposely leave out any. It took me a year to travel to all these towns and take all the photos. I just wanted to have the book published before I turned 40. The most frequent comment I get is `I never thought I'd see a book with my town in it.'

Close to home Briana and Jon, computer-generated cartoon characters created by Don Chambers, talk

in front of Grainger Engineering Library.

achievements

applied life studies

Ehud Yairi, professor of speech and hearing science, was awarded the 2002 Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Iowa's department of speech pathology and audiology.

A report on honors, awards, offices and other outstanding achievements of faculty and staff members

tember. In recognition of his contributions to its program, Dartmouth Medical School subsequently made Clarkson an adjunct professor in the department of radiology. Thomas Eurell, professor of veterinary biosciences, passed the certification examination and is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. A focus of his research program is the development of alternative in vitro methods for toxicity testing. Rex Hess, professor of veterinary biosciences, was invited to give a workshop on genomic vs. non-genomic steroid actions at the Centre for International Meetings on Biology in Madrid, Spain, in December. John Silbernagel, professor of veterinary clinical medicine, was elected to the American Animal Hospital Association's Board of Directors. The position will become official during the association's annual meeting in March 2002. H. Fred Troutt, professor of veterinary clinical medicine, was elected to serve on the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education, representing large animal clinical science. x

Electrical and Computer Engineering at a Feb. 19 ceremony in Beckman Institute. Woeltge, an electrical engineering alumnus who worked in the avionics and space division at Emerson Electric Co., created the professorship with a $4 million gift.

engineering

David C. Munson Jr., professor of electrical and computer engineering, research professor in the Coordinated Science Laboratory and in the Beckman Institute, was invested as the first Robert C. MacClinchie Distinguished Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering on Feb. 19. MacClinchie, an electrical engineering alumnus, worked 28 years as an engineer for the federal government and then at age 57 changed career paths and decided to join his wife as an educator. He was a high school teacher before becoming a professor of physics and mathematics at Olivet College in Michigan. James J. Coleman, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of materials science and engineering, was invested as the third Franklin W. Woeltge Professor in

liberal arts and sciences

Astronomy professor Jim Kaler won the 2001 award for excellence from the Association of American Publishers' Professional/Scholarly Publishing division in the category of physics and astronomy for his latest book, "Extreme Stars: At the Edge of Creation." "Extreme Stars" is his 12th book. The awards acknowledge excellence in book, journal and electronic publishing in all the disciplines represented by professional, scholarly and reference publishing.

veterinary medicine

Robert Clarkson, professor of veterinary clinical medicine, was part of a National Institutes of Health team sent to review the Center for In Vivo Electron Spin Resonance at Dartmouth Medical School, in Hanover, N.H., in Sep-

PAGE 4

InsideIllinois

April 4, 2002

4-H celebrates centennial with unique `gifts'

in terms of action steps for youth development to meet the country's emerging needs." The National Conversation was the culMore than 1,200 people rallied on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., mination of more than 1,800 similar state Feb. 28 lobbying for the inception of a and local meetings, which were begun in October and involved more than 50,000 national youth development plan. The "Power of YOUth" rally was spon- people. Delegates to the National Conversation sored by the National 4-H Council as part of included youth and adults involved in 4-H its centennial anniversary celebration. The centennial celebration also included as well as representatives from schools, a two-day summit meeting, the National businesses, churches, government and other Conversation on Youth Development in youth organizations. Illinois' delegation was led by Robert the 21st Century, during which delegates from the 50 states and Puerto Rico shared Easter, interim dean of the UI College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmenideas about youth development issues. A delegation will present the final report tal Sciences; and Dennis Campion, associto President Bush, the Cabinet, Congress ate dean, extension and outreach. During Illinois' state conversation, which and other national leaders during a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden was held Dec. 8, 2001, in Tinley Park, participants identified such needs as promoting later this month. "Many groups, when they celebrate a awareness of cultural diversity and tolercentennial, go for a monument," said Janice ance as well as teaching and promoting life Seitz, assistant dean and director, UI Exten- skills such as respect, responsibility, anger sion 4-H Youth Development. "We de- management and problem solving. Participants also recommended estabcided we wanted to give a gift to the nation lishing teen councils to market and recruit youth for community activities. They also suggested forming coalitions of community organizations and schools to pool resources and address common problems. In keeping with 4-H's emphasis on community service, the 4-H centennial Guiding hand Suzi Humphries, 4-H leader and greatgranddaughter of 4-H's founder, William B. Otwell, talks with celebration also included a Power of club members at the Carlinville, Ill. Extension center. Each YOUth volunteerism year, more than 6.8 million youth involved in drive during which 4-H programs nationwide benefit from the guidance and youth and adults friendship of adult and youth volunteer leaders. During pledged hours of ser2001, UI Extension 4-H Youth Development had more than vice work in their 20,600 adult and 4,245 youth volunteer leaders guiding its communities. 371,516 enrolled members and participants.

By Sharita Forrest Assistant Editor

photo by L. Brian Stauffer/UIUC ACES ITCS photo by David Riecks/UIUC ACES ITCS

Traveling cake A cake honoring the centennial anniversary of Illinois 4-H is

displayed at the annual open house of the UI's College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. Wes Seitz, professor of guided individual study, constructed the plywood cake in his garage and drove the cake to Washington, D.C., for display at the national 4-H centennial celebration. The cake's six layers are individually wired with 102 lights, representing Illinois' 102 counties. The cake is 10 feet tall, 12 feet in diameter and topped with a rotating 4-H clover. During the National Conversation, 4-H youth presented a symbolic check to the nation for more than 1.3 million volunteer service hours pledged by more than 100,000 youth and adults. The goal for the Power of YOUth volunteerism drive is 5 million hours of pledges. "Because community service is such a huge part of 4-H, we wanted to emphasize that," Seitz said. "The research is so clear: When you involve young people in community service at an early age, they tend to continue that practice in adulthood." The spirit of community service is exemplified by Illinois 4-H members' annual 4-H Can Make a Difference Food Drive, which collects food for donation to food banks, pantries, shelters and meal programs statewide. The food drive, now in its sixth year, garnered a record-setting 82 tons of food at the 2001 Illinois State Fair. The 4-H Can Make A Difference food drive and Illinois 4-H have been recognized by the Illinois Food Banks/Second Harvest Network, USA Weekend and the U.S. Department of Agriculture for their outstanding service work. More than 6.8 million youth nationwide are enrolled in 4-H, the nation's largest youth development program, which was founded in 1902. Enrollment in Illinois' 4H program has increased steadily the past five years and now stands at more than 371,516 youth and 26,000 volunteer leaders. The Cooperative Extension System conducts the 4-H program throughout the 3,067 counties in the United States, the District of Columbia, the commonwealth of Puerto Rico and five territories. The Cooperative Extension System is an alliance between the U.S. Department of Agriculture, state land-grant universities and county governments. x

4-H: More than just fair ribbons

By Sharita Forrest Assistant Editor

Diverse options

Maureen Crinion feeds a goat at the Champaign County Fair during a 4-H livestock judging contest. Today's 4-H members can choose from among 200 types of projects, including agriculture. Aerospace technology, biology, entomology, leadership and photography also are popular projects. every summer, whether she is consoling the disappointed child or the angry parent whose blue-ribbon dreams went unfulfilled or she is congratulating the lucky winner, she gently reminds each that the self-development a project demanded has more lasting value than any tactile award. Seitz frequently talks with people about their experiences in the 4-H program and said she finds that the awards won fade quickly in people's minds. "They talk about friendships, the fun they had, what they learned and the life skills, not the ribbons they received," Seitz said.

Among the photographs, awards and decorations on Janice Seitz's office wall looms one that seems out of place: a framed white ribbon from an Ohio county fair, a poignant reminder from Seitz's childhood about the critical life skills a humble 4-H project can teach. When it was bestowed by the county fair judge on then-10-year-old Janice for her unevenly stitched skirt, the third-place ribbon evoked disappointment and bitter tears. The garment she'd happily crafted on her grandmother's treadle sewing machine was an utter failure, it seemed. That night at dinner, the sullen little seamstress told her family she would not model the skirt in the fair's fashion pageant, in keeping with the fair's protocol. "And my mother, as she still does today when she wants to make a point, said, `Janice Anne! You will indeed!' " Seitz said, with a laugh. "`I want you to put aside your disappointment and think about what all you've learned from this

project,' and she went on about all the things I'd learned, like making decisions and working with others. I remember distinctly she ended by saying, `And I hope what you really remember is you don't always have to be perfect. Giving your best is all anyone can ever expect of you.' The next day, of course, I was in the fashion show." Although sewing may not have been her forte, Seitz's 4-H independent study project assisting her school's first-grade teacher, led to Seitz's become the school's first pupil to attend a four-year college and to a career in education. When Seitz was receiving her doctorate, she pondered what had contributed to her success and remembered her mother's counsel about the skirt. "4-H has everything to do with who and where I am today," Seitz said. "4-H is all about life skills." Accountability, determination, cooperation and initiative are among the many critical life skills learned from 4-H projects. When Seitz is at the Illinois State Fair

Furthermore, the 4-H program can also be an equalizer, enabling children who are not popular or athletic to enjoy recognition for other talents they have, she said. When the 4-H program began more than 100 years ago, its focus was primarily agrarian and its membership mainly rural. However, more than 35 percent of current 4-H members live in urban areas, and today's members can choose from more than 200 career-related projects besides traditional projects such as cooking and agriculture, including robotics, leadership development and performing arts.x

photo by David Riecks/UIUC ACES ITCS

April 4, 2002

InsideIllinois

PAGE 5

brief notes

Campustown Reconstruction

New three-way stop established

All traffic approaching the intersection of Sixth and John streets is required to stop before proceeding. Motorists and pedestrians are urged to use caution when entering the intersection because not all motorists may be aware of the change. The three-way stop will remain in effect until the completion of the Campustown Infrastructure Reconstruction and Streetscape project, scheduled for Aug. 23. A traffic signal will be installed to replace the three-way stop after construction is complete. For more information and updates on the project, see www.vcadmin.uiuc.edu/Reconstruction.html. Department of political science

Champaign florist Rick Orr is guest curator of the exhibition, which will feature floral arrangements created by regional floral designers in response to works of art selected by Orr from the museum's permanent collection. The gala opening reception takes place at Krannert Art Museum from 6:30-8:30 p.m. April 12. The event will feature floral displays and hors d' oeuvres, wine and music. There will be a silent auction of gift items and a raffle of an original watercolor created and donated by Billy Morrow Jackson, professor emeritus of art. Tickets for the benefit event cost $55, $45 of which is tax deductible. For information, reservations or tickets, call 333-1861. Limited tickets will be available at the door. The "Petals and Paintings" exhibition may be viewed during regular museum hours. International Programs and Studies

Symposium to address terrorism

The impact of external threats on the United States is the topic of an April 4 symposium at the UI. The 2002 Richard G. and Carole J. Cline symposium, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 3 p.m. in the auditorium of the Beckman Institute with a forum on "Terrorism and Public Life: The Legacies of the Sept. 11 Attacks." The symposium and forum's special guest is Theda Skocpol, the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology and director of the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University. Skocpol also will deliver the symposium's keynote lecture at 7:30 p.m. the same day and in the same location. Her topic will be "War and Civic Democracy in America: From the Civil War to the Struggle Against Global Terror." The following day, Skocpol and distinguished alumni of the department will take part in discussions with students in the semesterlong Cline Seminar on Civic Engagement. Forum discussants, who will address a variety of topics, including the impacts of the attacks on American foreign policy and the media and the war, are UI professors of political science Scott Althaus, Ira Carmen, Paul Diehl and Brian Gaines. Peter Nardulli, head of the department of political science, will moderate the forum. The Cline Symposium is an annual event sponsored by the UI department of political science and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Levis Faculty Center

photo courtesy UI College of Veterinary Medicine

Prince of Jordan to speak

Vet Med Open House to be April 6

The 2002 student-run open house for the College of Veterinary Medicine, the state's only veterinary school, will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 6 at 2001 S. Lincoln Ave. The event, which is free and open to the public, will feature more than 40 exhibits and demonstrations, including sheep shearing, horse shoeing and police dog work. The open house also will feature several hands-on activities, including cow and goat milking, a surgery-knot tying practice center and a petting zoo. In addition, visitors can meet and learn about the birds of prey that are permanent residents of the college's Wildlife Medical Clinic. A reptile show, presented by the local herpetology society, will feature dozens of snakes and lizards as well as turtle races. Free parking is available, and there is an on-site cafeteria. Large groups are welcome. For a complete list of exhibits or driving directions, see www.cvm.uiuc.edu/openhouse/. For more information, call the College of Veterinary Medicine at 333-2907. and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend. About 1,100 of the top technical students from around the state are expected to participate in the event, said Chad Stevens, facility manager for the School of Chemical Sciences and site coordinator for the Olympiad. Local schools that qualified for the competition are Edison Middle School and St. Matthew School, Champaign; Tuscola High School; Urbana High School; and Urbana Middle School. A schedule will be available in 161 Noyes Lab. New this year, an information fair for science majors will be held from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Huff Hall. Representatives from many UI science departments and student organizations will be available. Charles F. "Chip" Zukoski, professor and head of the department of chemical engineering at the UI, will be the featured speaker during the awards ceremony, which will be held at 5 p.m. in Huff Hall. Correction His Royal Highness Prince El Hassan bin Talal of Jordan will discuss the future of the Middle East in a public forum at the UI on April 10. El Hassan, the brother of the late King Hussein of Jordan, will frame his presentation around the question, "Is There a New Opportunity for Peace in the Middle East?" The talk, part of the UI's Center for Advanced Study/MillerComm2002 lecture series, is scheduled to begin at 4 p.m. in the Tryon Festival Theater at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. The prince, who is visiting the UI at the invitation of his friend, UI physics professor Munir Nayfeh, is regarded as an intellectual, author, science and technology policymaker, and politician with intimate knowledge of the cultural, religious and political issues of the Middle East and the world beyond. El Hassan's visit to the UI is sponsored by International Programs and Studies and the Office of the Associate Provost for International Affairs in conjunction with the department of physics; Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security; and Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. Additional biographical information about the prince is available at www.princehassan.gov.jo/main/ biography.htm. Ada Doisy lectures

Spring Luau is April 9

Faculty and staff members can celebrate spring's arrival at a luau from 5 to 7 p.m. April 9 on the fourth floor of Levis Faculty Center. Hawaiian-style hors d'oeuvres prepared by Classic Events will be served for $4. Beverage and cocktail service also will be available. The event is sponsored by the Levis Faculty Center Sponsors Inc. Sexual orientation and gender identity

Biochemistry lectures are April 11-12

Two award-winning scientists, including a recent Nobel Prize winner, will deliver the 2002 Ada Doisy Lectures in Biochemistry April 11 and 12 in the Medical Sciences Building Auditorium. Both researchers are known for their research on proteins. Janos K. Lanyi, professor and chair of the department of physiology and biophysics at the University of California at Irvine, will speak on "Crystallographic Structures of the Intermediate States in the Proton Transport Cycle of Bacteriorhodopsin" at 4 p.m. April 11. His research has earned him the Alexander von Humboldt Prize, the Athalie Clark Research Award and the Lauds & Laurel Award for Distinguished Research. Sir John E. Walker, who shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in chemistry, will discuss the "Power of Biology" at noon April 12. Walker is director of the Medical Research Council's Dunn Human Nutrition Unit in Cambridge, England. His research focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which ATP, the universal currency of biological energy, is synthesized. The Doisy Lectures were established by Edward A. Doisy to honor his mother, Ada. Edward Doisy was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine in 1943 for isolating and synthesizing vitamin K. Secretary of State

Ally Network to meet April 5

The Ally Network will host a training session for new members from noon to 3:30 p.m. April 5 in Room 209 Illini Union. The Ally Network is a group of faculty and staff members who work to help all students understand issues of sexual orientation and to improve the experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered students on campus. The April 5 training is open to any faculty or staff member. Current members are encouraged to attend. Those attending should bring their own lunch. Drinks and desserts will be provided. The Network is sponsored and administered jointly by the Sexual Orientation and Diversity Allies Committee of the Counseling Center and the Student Affairs Office for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Concerns. Illinois Science Olympiad

Campus rec memberships on sale

Campus Recreation is selling mid-semester memberships for $52. Memberships will be valid through June 9. Campus Recreation memberships are sold in Member Services, 140 IMPE, during facility hours. For more information, call 333-3806, or see www.campusrec.uiuc.edu. `Petals and Painting' benefit

State finals to be held April 6

The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be April 6 at the UI. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle- and high-school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts

KAM benefit to run April 12-14

The UI Krannert Art Museum Council will host the 10th annual "Petals and Paintings" benefit April 12-14 in support of the upcoming spring exhibition, "Louise Bourgeois: The Early Work," and related programming.

Economic interest forms due April 15

UI employees who are required to file Statements of Economic Interests under the Illinois Governmental Ethics Act must submit completed forms to the UI Ethics Officer, Richard O. Traver, by April 15. Traver will SEE BRIEFS, PAGE 8

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April 4, 2002

Seven honored with Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award

Seven employees have been selected to receive the Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award, which recognizes exceptional performance and service to the UI. This year's banquet will begin at 5:30 p.m. April 15 at Peabody Drive Residence Hall. It was originally scheduled in March but was postponed because of the weather. People planning to attend the banquet should make reservations by April 10 by contacting Cindy Reed at 333-3105 or [email protected] At the honors banquet, each recipient will be awarded $2,000 and a plaque. Recipients' names also are inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Personnel Services Office. Permanent staff employees with at least two years of service or retired employees in status appointments can be nominated for the award by staff or faculty members or students. A committee appointed by the chancellor recommends finalists; the campus director of Personnel Services, the vice chancellor for administration and human resources and the chancellor give final approval. Listings of this year's finalists and previous years' winners are available on the Web at www.pso.uiuc.edu/cdsa.

photo courtesy UI Extension

Steven R. Buck, research technologist III, Committee on Natural Areas

"What Steve Buck has accomplished since he was hired in July 1994 has been nothing short of miraculous," said May Berenbaum in her nomination letter. The mission of the Committee on Natural Areas, according to Berenbaum who also chairs the committee, "is to acquire and maintain land tracts and other natural areas that support field research projects within the life sciences." As the principal staff member of the CNA, Buck manages the sites under the direct supervision of the committee chair. He is responsible for the daily management and physical maintenance of the sites, staffing the office, working with the university community and nearby landowners and conducting research at the sites. "Buck has gone way beyond what the job requires in every conceivable way," Berenbaum wrote. "It's difficult to imagine that there are many people on this campus, or anywhere, for that matter, equally comfortable conducting prairie burns, installing a fence, assembling computer databases, advising students on experimental design and execution (in campus programs ranging from ornithology to landscape architecture), designing and constructing a building, disking a field, repairing a tractor, confronting trespassing hunters, lecturing to classes, keeping accounts and planning budgets, and writing a grant to secure funding for land acquisition." In addition, since his arrival, the collection of sites the Committee on Natural Areas manages has grown from six sites comprising 370 acres to 11 sites totaling 932 acres. And thanks to his resourcefulness, Buck has established two functioning field stations at two of the committee's most important and heavily used sites. x

Elizabeth A. Determan, secretary IV Edwardsville Extension Center UI Extension

"Elizabeth Determan could easily serve as the executive secretary for any CEO in the country," wrote UI Extension educator and center coordinator Robert C. Bellm in his nomination letter. "For 27 years, she has provided outstanding service to UI Extension." As UI Extension secretary IV at the Edwardsville Extension Center, her duties include prioritizing and distributing workflow within an office housing eight Extension professional staff; monitoring the center's core budget, individual professional staff budgets, as well as grants and contracts; compiling statistics for annual reports, plans of work, and special evaluation studies; creating databases and records to facilitate efficient operation of the office; designing and creating diverse types of educational materials in a variety of formats; interviewing, training, coordinating, and evaluating other clerical staff; and assisting the center coordinator in the efficient operation of the center on a daily basis. Wrote Bellm: "Liz uses the latest technology to create high-quality visual aids for the professional staff. She prepares more than 50 major presentations annually, using print, digital, and Web-based media. Her design skills improve the readability and appearance of newsletters, promotional brochures, fact sheets, and PowerPoint presentations. In addition, Determan has taken the initiative to gain proficiency in new technology as it becomes available. She is beginning the process of developing the center's Web page into a readily accessible and useful educational tool for clients. Determan's secretarial skills are so valued that currently, at the request of the associate regional director, she is implementing and evaluating a pilot program to mentor new secretarial staff hired within Extension's southern region. x

Sally A. Eakin, staff clerk Graduate School of Library and Information Science

"For 23 years, Sally Eakin has served as a highly valued staff member of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science," wrote Linda C. Smith, interim dean of GSLIS, and Dorlene A. Clark, assistant to the dean, in their joint nomination. "The scope of [Eakin's] duties and responsibilities has risen almost exponentially, yet Ms. Eakin consistently performs at the highest possible standard while continuously providing unparalleled service and uncompromised product quality. She is flexible, focused, well organized and dedicated to each and every task that is put before her. She is a critical thinker who identifies potential problems, takes proactive measures, and offers positive suggestions," Smith and Clark noted. High on Eakin's list of accomplishments was her assisting the school in two moves ­ first relocating from the Main Library to David Kinley Hall and then to the newly remodeled Library and Information Science Building. "She was instrumental in coordinating the day-today details of a major renovation, lasting nearly two years, which essentially doubled the size of LISB. The complexities of the task were enormous and often required the ability to engage widely disparate groups into united action." In addition, Eakin was called "an extremely positive role model, guided by a strong work ethic and the sense of fairness." Her nominators also note that "Ms. Eakin's heart is large, open to all, and guided by her desire to show kindness to others." They noted that her "high regard for detail amidst constant distraction and interruption shows through in every task she undertakes. Her efforts make GSLIS look professional, sophisticated and inviting," they said. x

Photography by Bill Wiegand

April 4, 2002

InsideIllinois

PAGE 7

more CDSAs ...

Kathleen A. Hahn, secretary IV Development and Alumni Relations College of Applied Life Studies

"[Kathy Hahn] is an integral member of the development and alumni relations team," Sara Kelley, assistant dean for development and alumni relations, wrote in her nomination letter. Hahn assists in the overall management of the Office of Development and Alumni Relations (ODAR) in the College of Applied Life Studies, which serves approximately 13,000 constituents. Her duties include providing clerical support for all alumni/donor events, direct mail and telemarketing campaigns, major gift proposals, making travel and other arrangements for visits to donors, stewardship, and publications. This position has significant contact with other units on campus and with the public. Among her many talents, Hahn was praised for being an excellent editor, being able to juggle many projects at one time and is noted as a tremendous asset for event planning. In addition, she is a key component in helping to gather, track and analyze data about ALS alumni and donors. "Not only can she run specific downloads for correspondence and other mailings, but she is able to research information that helps the college better understand how to engage its alumni in the life of the college," Kelley said. Recently, Hahn has assumed responsibility for generating all donor thank-you letters from the dean and department heads (approximately 1,500 annually). Her expertise has added greatly to the quality of the college's stewardship program. Kelley noted, "My predecessor fondly referred to Kathy as `Radar O'Reilly' [from the television series, M*A*S*H] and there is good reason. She is always one step ahead of me." x

Nancy E. Luker, library technical specialist, University Library John W. Kammin, building service foreman, Division of Operation and Maintenance

"John Kammin's excellent attitude and work ethic have had a positive effect not only on all the employees with whom he comes into direct contact but also, through his many training commitments, it extends to nearly all departments across this campus," wrote Carl R. Townsend, assistant superintendent of building services in his nomination letter. Kammin supervises nine employees who perform the daily custodial work in Wohlers Hall and David Kinley Hall. In addition, for the past 12 years he has been responsible for the initial training of all the building service workers in Building Operations. Kammin also is an integral part of two other training programs. The oldest training program is one that involves training Learner BSWs. Learners are employees who require additional help in mastering the custodial work skills approved by the department. Starting in August, Kammin has been involved in the training of 15 Vietnamese and Laotian Learners. Since only a few of the Learners speak English, John has devoted extra time to train these employees as well as to acclimate them to the U.S. culture and working environment. He also comes in early several days each week to attend an English skills program with these employees. The second of the two training programs is "Strategies for Success" classes, based on Zig Ziglar's program to promote positive attitudes not only on the job but in one's personal life. "His commitment to this program shows his concern that each BSW has an opportunity to excel in his professional and personal life," Townsend said. x "[Nancy Luker] exemplifies the truism that by simply doing the very best job a person can possibly do and caring for the needs of your patrons and co-workers, a ripple of excellence can reverberate through the university," wrote Margaret A. Lewis, library technical assistant, Mathematics Library. As a library technical specialist working in the Technical Services Division of the University Library, Luker is a member of the Serials Cataloging Team with primary responsibility for maintaining journal records and maintaining links between library bibliographic records and library holding records. It is the job of Luker and her coworkers in library cataloging units to create and maintain records in the library's online catalog. "The quality of this information determines how easily our users can find the information resources they need and how well we can track charging and discharging transactions involving our library materials," Lewis said. "Without good bibliographic control, and without correct and accurate links between bibliographic records and circulation records, the resources of the University Library would be impossible to find and use." Lewis noted that she and her coworkers at the Mathematics Library have started calling Luker "The Fix-It-Up Chappy" because of her excellent troubleshooting skills. "She can be interrupted at any time and is always in a good and responsive mood," Lewis said. Although the library system is relatively new, Luker has learned the system thoroughly. "She fixes our cataloging problems, while at the same time recognizing that we need to understand how things work and she takes the time to teach us so we can be more effective in our jobs," Lewis said. x

Kenneth D. Snell, building service worker, Division of Operation and Maintenance

"Kenneth Snell always strives for excellence in his work and is easy to work with," said Tracy Osby, public function supervisor, Building Service Operations in the Division of Operation and Maintenance. "He reflects all the values that O&M looks for in a good employee." Snell was hired as a building service worker in the Building Operations Section at Operation and Maintenance in March of 1989. "Since that time, he has worked with distinction in numerous assignments for our operation," Snell said. "Currently, he is assigned to clean in the Undergraduate Library on the `Deep Night Shift' [11 p.m. to 7 a.m.]. Because of the high traffic in this building, Mr. Snell's job frequently presents one challenge after another." The routine elements of his job include carpet vacuuming, carpet extracting, restroom cleaning, office cleaning and maintaining the high standard of daily maintenance throughout the Undergraduate Library." Snell's perfect seven-year attendance record was only broken when his wife was ill last fall. During part of her illness he continued to work his shift even though he had been at her side at the hospital the entire day and evening. In a letter of support, Mike Sullender, building service foreman, said: "Mr. Snell meets and exceeds the goals and objectives of the Building Operation Section, allowing the UI to achieve its academic mission in a clean and healthy environment. Anytime I ask Mr. Snell to help with a project, he happily completes the project on time and with excellent results. ... He sees what needs to be completed and gets the work done. His knowledge and expertise is a valued commodity." x

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Faculty/Staff Emergency Fund seeks donations

Established in 1992, the Faculty/Staff Emergency Fund assists UI employees on the Urbana campus and their families during times of financial crisis. It is funded fully by donations from faculty and staff members to help colleagues in need. Volunteers are encouraging donations during the program's annual fund drive that will start later this month. "Donations received during last year's fund drive have been spent helping employees in need, and each year we need to replenish the fund," said Kathy Seybert, one of the members of the grassroots employee emergency fund committee. "This is our chance to help colleagues who may experience a financial crisis at one time or another," Seybert said. Since its inception, the fund has provided confidential financial assistance in small grants to more than 250 employees. The fund has assisted employees with a rent or mortgage payment, utilities, medicine or medical bills, and food or clothing during times of crisis such as a serious illness in the family or a house fire. Anyone applying for assistance is screened through the Faculty/ "Your Weather" weeknights at 9:58

April 4, 2002

BRIEFS, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 forward them to the Office of the Secretary of State by the May 1 deadline. Forms can be sent to Richard O. Traver, University Ethics Officer, 505 E. Green St., Suite 206, MC-498. Employees with questions about criteria for filing should call Gloria Ring at 333-0901, or consult the UI Office of Human Resources Web page at http:// hrnet.uihr.uillinois.edu/policy/economic.html or the Office of University Audits Web page at http:// ethics.uillinois.edu/.

WILL-FM

Concert to feature cellist

Cellist Barbara Hedlund will be the featured performer for the WILL-FM Second Sunday Concert April 14, with a program titled "Sung With Strings Attached: Violoncello Bel Canto." The concert, which is free and open to the public, will be at 2 p.m. in the West Gallery of the Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion and will be broadcast live on WILL-FM (90.9/ 101.1 in Champaign-Urbana) with host Roger Cooper. WILL-FM Second Sunday Concerts are a joint venture of WILL-FM, the UI School of MuBarbara Hedlund sic and the Krannert Art Museum. Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies

Staff Assistance Program and reviewed for approval by a separate confidential committee. Contributions of any amount are encouraged. Donations are accepted through payroll deduction, and employees who donated last year and wish to continue donating in this manner may need to renew their pledge for this year. Cash and donations by check also are welcome. Checks should be made payable to UIF/UIUC Faculty/Staff Emergency Fund and mailed to the UI Foundation, 400 Harker Hall, MC-386. A brochure about the program and payroll deduction cards will be sent by campus mail to each employee later this month. Additional information is available from Donna Jessee, 244-3618, chair of the grassroots committee and also of this year's fund drive. Eligible faculty and staff members may apply for emergency assistance at any time. All contacts are confidential and assessments are free. If you or someone you know might be eligible for assistance from the fund, call 244-5312 or write to Faculty/Staff Assistance Program, 121 Observatory, 901 S. Mathews, MC-190.x question-and-answer session, Moore will sign copies of his newest book, "Stupid White Men and Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation," as well as his previous works. Attendees can bring their own copies of his books or can purchase them at the signing. Tickets, which are free, will be available April 9 at the Ticket Central office in the Illini Union and will be distributed two per I-Card. Tickets will be required for admission. Remaining tickets will be available at the door the night of the lecture. Campus photography

WILL-TV to offer local weather

Television viewers will be able to get an in-depth local weather forecast without sitting through the 10 p.m. news. Beginning April 8, public station WILL-TV will offer "Your Weather," a four-minute live weather report at 9:58 p.m. weeknights presented by meteorologist Ed Kieser or weather producer Mike Sola. In addition, Kieser and Sola will provide increased weather coverage on WILL-AM, adding in-depth forecasts at 4:34 p.m. and 5:34 p.m. in addition to 5:35 a.m., 6:35 a.m., 7:35 a.m., 8:35 a.m., 9:35 a.m. and 12:35 p.m. Kieser and Sola will rotate their television and radio duties. In addition to the 9:58 p.m. report, WILL-TV also will air one-minute live weather reports by Kieser or Sola at 7 p.m. and either 8 or 9 p.m. weeknights. Both WILL-TV's and UI-7's weather broadcasts will originate from the Richmond Journalism Teaching Studio adjacent to WILL's Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication. WILL AM-FM-TV

Chinese pop culture examined

When Americans think about China, Kenneth Klinkner believes their mental images may be fairly dated. In an attempt to fast-forward to the present and provide a "refreshing look" at 21st century Chinese life, Klinkner, a visiting professor of political science in the UI's Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, and music professor Isabel Wong, who directs the East Asian Exchange Program, organized the China Pop Culture Conference, set for April 19-20 at the UI. Four sessions will cover the mainstays of current culture: popular literature, mass communications, pop music and popular film. The conference, at the UI's Levis Faculty Center, kicks off at 8 p.m. April 19 with an opening address on trends, tastes and tempers of China today by University of Colorado professor Howard Goldblatt. At the conference, Klinkner will present a talk on Feng Xiaogang, a director who lately has been courted by Hollywood. A screening of Feng's film "The Dream Factory" is also on the program. Other speakers ­ from the UI and from other U.S. and Chinese universities ­ will focus on such topics as "Schizoid News," anti-corruption fiction, female rockers and Tibetaninspired New Age world beat music. More information about the conference, sponsored by the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, is available on the Web at www.eaps.uiuc.edu/Events.htm. Council of Academic Professionals

Book signing is April 13

Don Hamerman will be signing copies of "Insight," a "coffee-table" photography book that features 110 photos of the UI, April 13. He will be at Folletts from 10 a.m. to noon and at the Illini Union Bookstore from 2 to 4 p.m. Pictures in the book range from abstract details to sweeping vistas of campus. Several UI staff members contributed to the production of the book. Anna M. Flanagan, director of external communications for the department of mechanical and industrial engineering, wrote and researched caption information. L. Brian Stauffer, visiting media and communications specialist for the College of Agricultural, Conphoto by Don Hamerman sumer and En- Allerton Park vironmental Sciences, wrote and researched caption information and provided photo production assistance. Alexis Tate, interim executive director for University Public Affairs, researched and co-wrote a short essay about James Newton Mathews, the first student to attend UI. For more information about the book, go to www.insightillinois.com. College of Commerce and Business Administration

Free tornado safety show

WILL AM-FM-TV chief meteorologist Ed Kieser will give a free tornado safety seminar at 7 p.m. April 16 at Beckman Institute. He will explain tornado formation, different tornado types, tornado strength and what to do when a tornado strikes. For more information, call 333-0850, or see www.will.uiuc.edu. Presentation of the seminar is made possible by the cooperation of the UI Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. Dads Association

Nominations due April 22

Each year the Dads Association recognizes excellence in faculty, staff, students and student organizations by presenting awards to one outstanding member of each category. Nomination forms, which are due April 22, are available at www.odos.uiuc.edu/parent/mom_dad. Nominations require two letters of support. Return the forms with a cover letter to Nancy Rotzoll, executive director, Dads Association, 300 Student Services Building, MC-306, or respond through the Web page. If you have questions, call Rotzoll at 333-7063. The recipients will be notified of their selection by the beginning of June. Award recipients and their nominator will be guests at an Oct. 12 awards banquet. Illini Union Bookstore lectures

CAP applications due April 5

Nomination forms and statements for serving on the Council of Academic Professionals (formerly known as the Professional Advisory Committee) are due April 5. This year CAP is expanding its size from 10 to 20 members, who are elected from the academic professional staff for staggered three-year terms. Districts 3, 4 and 7 are holding elections due to expiring terms. A second new representative will be elected from each of the 10 districts because of the expansion. See the CAP Web site, www.cap.uiuc.edu, for special considerations governing eligibility for the new representatives and elections in districts with two open positions. CAP is an advisory committee to the chancellor that is a communication channel between academic professionals and administrative officers. More information is available at 333-4523, [email protected], or www.cap.uiuc.edu.

Symposium to celebrate economist

A symposium that acknowledges the wisdom and contributions to society of the late Julian Simon, an internationally renowned economist and longtime UI faculty member, will be April 24. The Julian Simon Memorial Dedication Symposium will feature several respected speakers from across the nation, a luncheon and keynote address, and dedication ceremony and reception. The dedication also will acknowledge creation of the Julian Simon Memorial Faculty Scholar Endowment, which will support a junior faculty member in the College of Commerce and Business Administration. The symposium, moderated by Simon's widow, Rita James Simon, a former UI faculty member and current SEE BRIEFS, PAGE 12

Michael Moore to visit campus

Michael Moore, political satirist, acclaimed director and best-selling author, will speak at 7 p.m. April 17 at Foellinger Auditorium. Following his lecture and a brief

April 4, 2002

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PAGE 9

calendar of events

lectures

Entries for the calendar should be sent 15 days before the desired publication date to Inside Illinois Calendar, News Bureau, 807 S. Wright St., Suite 520 East, Champaign, MC-314, or to [email protected] More information is available from Marty Yeakel at 333-1085. The online UIUC Events Calendar is at www.uiuc.edu/uicalendar/cal.html.

April 4 to 21

University. 4 p.m. 2240 Digital Computer Lab. Computer Science. "Popular Attitudes in the Middle East Towards the United States: Is Iran Different?" Hadi Saledi Esfahani, UI. 4 p.m. 356 Armory Building. Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security. "The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 8 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Admission charge. Dessert and Conversation: 7 p.m. Krannert Room, Krannert Center. IUB Spring Musical: "Crazy for You." 8 p.m. Assembly Hall. Admission charge. Illini Union Board.

10 Wednesday

"Is There a New Opportunity for Peace in the Middle East?" HRH Prince El Hassan of Jordan. 4 p.m. Tryon Festival Theater, Krannert Center. MillerComm, International Programs and Studies and Office of the Associate Provost for International Affairs.

4 Thursday

"Schillers aesthetische Utopie." Klaus L. Berghahn, University of Wisconsin. 7:30 p.m. Lucy Ellis Lounge, 1080 Foreign Languages Building. Germanic Languages and Literatures.

Jaroslav Pelikan, Yale University. 4 p.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. MillerComm and Russian and East European Center.

colloquia

4 Thursday

"Reflections From Behind the Backstrap Loom: Learning to Weave in Todos Santos, Guatemala." Emma Rueter, UI. Noon. 101 International Studies Building. Latin American and Caribbean Studies. "New Academic Professionals Interaction With the UIUC Senate." Vera Mainz, Glen Whitmer and Bob Damrau, speakers. Noon. 217 Illini Union. Council for Academic Professionals. "Audio Design for Interactive Systems." Camille Goudeseune, UI. Noon. 3269 Beckman Institute. Imaging Technology Group/Beckman Institute. "The Precautionary Principle 1896-2000: Late Lessons From Early Warnings." Pous Harremoes, Technical University of Denmark. Noon. B102 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. Civil and Environmental Engineering. "Managing High Variation Workloads in Pervasive Computing Systems." Marco Caccamo, Scuola Superiore Santa Anna, Pisa, Italy. 4 p.m. 2240 Digital Computer Lab. Computer Science. "Tradition and Innovation in Old Comedy." Anton Bierl, University of Leipzig. 5 p.m. 4136 Foreign Languages Building. Oldfather Lecture Series/Classics.

5 Friday

"How Not to Solve the Nursing Shortage: Why the Most Popular Proposals to Solve the Shortage Won't Work." Suzanne Gordon, journalist and author. 4 p.m. Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory auditorium. MillerComm

16 Tuesday

The Alexander String Quartet: "The Music of Beethoven." Lunch 11:55 a.m.; speaker 12:10 p.m. Latzer Hall, University YMCA. Know Your University.

"The Debate in the Japanese Government and Media Over Japan's New Role in International Security." Emanuel Pastreich, UI. 4 p.m. 356 Armory Building. Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security. "Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Contribution to Intestinal Epithelial Disorders." Bart Deplancke, UI. 4 p.m. 150 Animal Sciences Lab. Nutritional Sciences.

18 Thursday

"Colonial Bilingual Texts From Peru: A Sociolinguistic Analysis." Anna Maria Escobar, UI. Noon. 101 International Studies Building. Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

13 Saturday

IUB Spring Musical: "Crazy for You." 2 and 8 p.m. Assembly Hall. Admission charge. Illini Union Board. "The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 8 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Admission charge.

11 Thursday

"Exploiting Lightweight Structure in Text: MultipleSelection Editing and Outlier Finding." Robert C. Miller, Carnegie Mellon University. 4 p.m. 2240 Digital Computer Lab. Computer Science. "Crystallographic Structures of the Intermediate States in the Proton Transport Cycle of Bacteriorhodopsin." Janos K. Lanyi, University of California, Irvine. 4 p.m. Medical Sciences auditorium. Ada Doisy Lecture/Biochemistry.

8 Monday

"Coming Out As a Black Activist." Keith Boykin, author and political activist. 7 p.m. Library and Information Science Building auditorium. For more information, go to www.awarenessdays.org or call 244-8863. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Awareness Days. "Cold Warriors: EisenhowerKhrushchev-Kennedy." Sergei Khrushchev, Brown University. 7:30 p.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. MillerComm and Russian and East European Center.

17 Wednesday

"A Critical but Caring Lens: The Politics of Identity, Social Justice and the Environment in Contemporary India." Anand Patwardhan, independent documentary film maker, Mumbai, India. 7:30 p.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. Several of Anad Patwardhans films will be shown during his visit to campus. For times, locations and titles, call 244-7331, or visit www.uiuc.edu/ providers/psames/ events.html. MillerComm and Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies.

19 Friday

"Literature as Protest Under Nero." Vasily Rudich, Yale University. 2 p.m. 405 Illini Union. Oldfather Lecture Series/Classics.

theater

4 Thursday

"Song of Solomon." 8 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. Created under the direction of Struan Leslie with Lisa Gaye Dixon, featured performer. Actors, dancers and musicians from the College of Fine and Applied Arts make the Bible's written word breathe, walk, run, play and make love in this interdisciplinary theater work. Recommended for mature audiences. Admission charge.

18 Thursday

"The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 8 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Admission charge.

12 Friday

"Understanding How Students Learn From Their Classroom Experiences." Graham Nuthall, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. Noon. 210A Education Building. Bureau of Educational Research. "Power in Biology." John E. Walker, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. Noon. Medical Sciences auditorium. Ada Doisy Lecture/Biochemistry.

19 Friday

"The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 8 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Admission charge.

9 Tuesday

"Sustainable Campus Environment Committee." John Braden, UI. Lunch 11:55 a.m.; speaker 12:10 p.m. Latzer Hall, University YMCA. Know Your University. "TriZetto: Transforming Fundamentals Into Innovation." Jeffrey Margolis, The Trizetto Group. 5 p.m. 141 Wohlers Hall. V. Dale Cozad Lecture/ Commerce and Business Administration.

18 Thursday

"The Only Good Neighbor is a Dead Neighbor: A Lacanian Approach to Ideology in Cinema." Slavoj Zizek, University of Ljublijana, Slovenia and European Graduate School, Switzerland. 4 p.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. MillerComm and Comparative and World Literature.

5 Friday

"Song of Solomon." 8 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. Created under the direction of Struan Leslie with Lisa Gaye Dixon, featured performer. For mature audiences. Admission charge.

20 Saturday

"The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 8 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Admission charge.

10 Wednesday

"Not Just Race, Not Just Gender: Workplace Harassment in the Lives of African­American Women." NiCole Buchanan, UI. Noon. Women's Studies building. Women's Studies.

15 Monday

"Thread-Level Speculation: Towards Ubiquitous Parallelism." J. Gregory Steffan, Carnegie Mellon University. 10:30 a.m. 2240 Digital Computer Lab. Computer Science. "A Reading of Short Fiction." Audrey Petty, UI. Noon. Afro-American Studies and Research, 1201 W. Nevada St., Urbana. AfroAmerican Studies and Research. "Historical Fictions in Chen Hongshou's `Elegant Gathering.' " Anne BurkusChasson, UI. Noon. 101 International Studies Building. East Asian and Pacific Studies. "Mobile IPv6 and Fast Handover." Charles E. Perkins, Nokia Research Center, Mountain View, Calif. 4 p.m. 1320 Digital Computer Lab. Computer Science.

19 Friday

"The Russian Christ: The Silence of Jesus from Hesychasm to the Legend of the Grand Inquisitor."

6 Saturday

"Song of Solomon." 8 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. Created under the direction of Struan Leslie with Lisa Gaye Dixon, featured performer. For mature audiences. Admission charge.

21 Sunday

"The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 3 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Admission charge. Dessert and Conversation: 2 p.m. Krannert Room, Krannert Center.

Pianist returns for premiere

Sinfonia da Camera's last concert of the 2001-02 season is a diverse program featuring the world premiere of Jonathan Faiman's "Conversations with Piano and Orchestra," with the composer himself at the piano. The concert, at 8 p.m. April 30 in the Foellinger Great Hall of Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, also features Sinfonia's horn players, Christopher Smith and Michael Hatfield. And the Beethoven Symphonic Cycle continues with the famous Sixth Symphony, the "Pastoral." Jonathan Faiman returns to his hometown of Champaign-Urbana to aiman perform the world premiere of his nF Jonatha "Conversations with Piano and Orchestra," inspired by a Georgian Shabbat service in Vienna. Faiman also will give a master class for students at University High School, his Alma Mater. Faiman is on the faculty at the Bloomingdale School of Music, he also writes music for the Locrian Chamber Players and the Actors Company Theatre.

7 Sunday

"Song of Solomon." 3 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. Created under the direction of Struan Leslie with Lisa Gaye Dixon, featured performer. For mature audiences. Admission charge.

music

4 Thursday

Junior Recital. Raquel Adorno, lyric mezzo-soprano. 11 a.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Thursdays at Twelve Twenty. 12:20 p.m. Beckman Institute atrium. String Quartet. Beckman Institute and School of Music. Guest Artist Master Class. Omar Faruk Tekbilek, with Balkanalia. 7 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Workshop in Turkish instrumental and vocal styles. UI Symphony Orchestra. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall,

11 Thursday

"The Threepenny Opera." James Zager, director. 8 p.m. Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center. Music by Kurt Weill; book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. The wickedly funny story of betrayal upon betrayal, featuring some of the 20thcentury's most familiar songs, including "Mack the Knife." Admission charge.

17 Wednesday

"Lost in the Shuffle? Women and Land Reform in Southern Africa." Ragan Petrie, University of Wisconsin. Noon. 101 International Studies Building. African Studies. "Text Retrieval as Risk Minimization." Chengxiang Zhai, Carnegie Mellon

12 Friday

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InsideIllinois

April 4, 2002

more calendar of events

CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

Krannert Center. Steven Eggleston, guest conductor. David Grandis, graduate student conductor. Works by Mozart, Mendelssohn, Wagner and Strauss are on the program. Admission charge. School of Music. Senior Recital. Eurydice Han, piano. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. charge. Prelude: 2 p.m. Krannert Room, Krannert Center. Senior Recital. Celeste Johnson, oboe. 7 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Master of Music Recital. Mark Gary, tenor. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

8 Monday

Doctor of Musical Arts Project Recital. Lisa Kristina, soprano. 8 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall.

5 Friday

Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. Steven Larsen, music director and conductor. With Cory Cerovsek, violin. The program includes "Scottish Fantasy" by Bruch and Concerto for Orchestra by Bartók. Admission charge. Concert of Turkish Music. Omar Faruk Tekbilek and Ensemble. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. An evening of traditional Sufi music and folk music of the Middle East.

9 Tuesday

Voice Division Recital. 11 a.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

10 Wednesday

Orchestra of St. Luke's: Tchaikovsky's World. Sir Roger Norrington, conductor. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. The manners, morals and music of the world of Tchaikovsky. These two nights of Tchaikovsky's works include the Souvenir de Florence and Symphony No. 5 on Wednesday and the "Pathetique" Symphony on Thursday. Ticket purchase gives admission to both nights. Admission charge. Graduate Recital. Malgorzata Staszewska, violin. 8 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall.

6 Saturday

Doctor of Musical Arts Project Recital. Yoonmi Ham, piano. 2:30 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Junior Recital. Sergio Rodriguez, trombone. 5 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Junior Recital. Anne Lyle, bassoon. 5:30 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Student Brass Quintet. 8 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Faith Holley and Gosia Woldarska, trumpet; Jessie Brooks, horn; Art Haecker, trombone; and Clint McCanless, tuba. Anonymous 4 and Lionheart: "Gods and Mortals." 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. The female vocal group Anonymous 4 teams up with the male sextet Lionheart in a concert which examines the influence of ancient Roman literature on music of the Renaissance, from the classic to the comic, from the seductive to the carefree. Admission charge. Afterglow. Barrington Coleman Trio. 10 p.m. Lobby, Krannert Center. Barrington Coleman, piano; William Koehler, bass; and Robert McEntyre, drums.

11 Thursday

Thursdays at Twelve Twenty. 12:20 p.m. Beckman Institute atrium. UI Clarinet Choir. Lisa Reams, conductor. Beckman Institute and School of Music. Orchestra of St. Luke's: Tchaikovsky's World. Sir Roger Norrington, conductor. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. Ticket purchase gives admission to April 10 and 11 concerts. Admission charge. Guest Artist Recital. "Guys with Big Cars." 8 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Stephen David Beck, piano and electronics, and Griffin Campbell, saxophones, Louisiana State University. Senior Recital. Stevi Caufield, bassoon. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

ensemble music performed by harp students of Ann Yeung. Annual Mom's Day Concert: UI Women's Glee Club. Joe Grant, conductor. 2 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. With the UI Varsity Men's Glee Club and The Girls Next Door. An eclectic program featuring music from a variety of periods, styles and cultures. Admission charge. School of Music. Senior Recital. Andrea DiOrio, clarinet. 2 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Music Education Senior Recital. Lauren Hurd, violin. 2 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Master of Music Recital. Michelle Swinney, bassoon. 5 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Junior Recital. Jenn Von Behren, violin. 5 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Atius-Sachem Mom's Day Sing. 7 and 10 p.m. Foellinger Auditorium. Admission charge. Mom's Association. Annual Mom's Day Concert: UI Black Chorus. Ollie Watts Davis, conductor. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. An evening of music from the popular and sacred traditions in honor of Mom's Day on the UI campus. Admission charge. School of Music. Master of Music Recital. Matilda Butkas, piano. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. The final concert in a series of nine featuring the complete solo piano music of Frederic Chopin. Admission charge. School of Music. Composition Division Recital. 8 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Works of current UI composition students.

18 Thursday

Junior Recital. Bomi Lim, piano. 11 a.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Alexander String Quartet: The Complete String Quartets of Beethoven. 7 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. This concert features the premiere of "Rise Chanting" by Augusta Read Thomas, written as her personal response to Beethoven's quartets, as well as Beethoven's Op. 18, No. 5; and Op. 130/133. Admission charge. Doctor of Musical Arts Recital. Jinah Lee, piano. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

19 Friday

Doctor of Musical Arts Project Recital. Peony Luk, piano. 4 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Senior Recital. Taerim Lee, soprano. 6:30 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. UI Percussion Ensemble. William Moersch, director. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. Mallet ensemble works by Gillingham, Helble and Maslanka will be presented. The program also features a collaboration with the ROSQ (a saxophone quartet). Admission charge. School of Music. The Enescu Ensemble. Sherban Lupu, leader and violin soloist. 8 p.m. Tryon Festival Theater, Krannert Center. Music of Bach, Sibelius, Bartok, Mozart and Stravinsky make up this program by this ensemble comprised of faculty and students. Admission charge. School of Music. UI Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble. Mark Moore, conductor. 8 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Senior Recital. Heidi Richter, soprano. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

Senior Recital. Stephanie Pendergrass, oboe. 5 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. UI Varsity Men's Glee Club. Barrington Coleman, conductor. 8 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. With The Other Guys. Featuring a variety of music for men's chorus as well as traditional favorites and school songs long associated with the ensemble. Admission charge. School of Music. UI Steel Band. Ricardo Flores, leader. 8 p.m. Tyron Festival Theater, Krannert Center. This ensemble presents traditional Soca and Calypso steel band styles along with a Panorama transcription as played by the 120-piece steel bands of Trinidad and Tobago during the National Panorama Competition. Admission charge. School of Music. Concerto Urbano. Charlotte Mattax, director. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Chamber Music Recital. 8 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Students of Timothy McGovern. Master of Music Recital. Karra Duchi, cello. 8 p.m. Music Building auditorium.

"Six Characters in Search of an Author." Kevin Class, conductor, and Lincoln Clark, director. 8 p.m. Tryon Festival Theater, Krannert Center. Music by Hugo Weisgall; libretto by Denis Johnston. From the play by Luigi Pirandello. On a bare stage of an opera house, six characters appear in search of an author who can complete and give life to their drama ­ a probing psychological exercise and virtuoso theatrical experience. Sung in English with supertitles. Admission charge. School of Music Opera Program.

6 Saturday

"Six Characters in Search of an Author." Kevin Class, conductor, and Lincoln Clark, director. 8 p.m. Tryon Festival Theater, Krannert Center. Music by Hugo Weisgall; libretto by Denis Johnston. From the play by Luigi Pirandello. Sung in English with supertitles. Admission charge. Libretto: 7 p.m. Krannert Room, Krannert Center. Admission charge. School of Music Opera Program.

13 Saturday

"Six Characters in Search of an Author." Kevin Class, conductor, and Lincoln Clark, director. 8 p.m. Tryon Festival Theater, Krannert Center. Music by Hugo Weisgall; libretto by Denis Johnston. From the play by Luigi Pirandello. Sung in English with supertitles. Admission charge. School of Music Opera Program.

21 Sunday

Senior Recital. Lindsay Wipert, soprano. 11 a.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Music Education Senior Recital. Catherine Portner, flute. 11:30 a.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Master of Music Recital. Jessie Brooks, horn. 1:30 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Studio Recital. 2 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Voice students of Desiree Hassler. Illini Symphony. Jack Ranney, conductor. 3 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. With Aldo Mancinelli, McMurray University, piano. Mahler's "Titan" Symphony is paired with Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 in this program. Admission charge. School of Music. Saxophone Quartet Recital. 3:30 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Students of Debra Richtmeyer. Doctor of Musical Arts Recital. Jae-Eun Park, piano. 4 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Senior Recital. Meredith Santarelli, viola. 4 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. UI Concert Bands IIA and IIB. Robert Busan, Mark Walker, Matthew Luttrell and George Brozak, conductors. 7 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. An evening of music from the concert band repertoire. Admission charge. School of Music. Master of Music Recital. Tim Welch, baritone. 7 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Doctor of Musical Arts Recital. Jie Tao, violin. 7 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall.

14 Sunday

Master of Music Recital. Jerrod Cook, percussion. 1 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Faculty Recital. Elliot Chasanov, trombone. 3 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. Enjoy a mix of original compositions for trombone by international composers. Admission charge. School of Music. Junior Recital. Jessie Arian, clarinet. 4 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Balkanalia. Donna Buchanan, director. 7 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. With the Hellenic Student Association Dancers. Traditional music from Athens to Izmir to Budapest. Undergraduate Recital. Katherine Cameron and Liana Gadeliya, violin. 7 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall.

14 Sunday

"Six Characters in Search of an Author." Kevin Class, conductor, and Lincoln Clark, director. 3 p.m. Tryon Festival Theater, Krannert Center. Music by Hugo Weisgall; libretto by Denis Johnston. From the play by Luigi Pirandello. Sung in English with supertitles. Admission charge. Libretto: 2 p.m. Krannert Room, Krannert Center. Admission charge. School of Music Opera Program.

dance

18 Thursday

Studiodance II. 8 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. An annual program showcasing the choreography of both graduate and undergraduate dance students. Admission charge.

12 Friday

Master of Music Recital. Amy Cathleen Speek, soprano. 4:30 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Music of Asia. 7:30 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Atius-Sachem Mom's Day Sing. 8 p.m. Foellinger Auditorium. Admission charge. Mom's Association. Master of Music Recital. Melanie Carter, soprano. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall.

7 Sunday

Music Education Senior Recital. Annabel Baptist, piano, and Mariebel de la Cruz, soprano. Noon. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Senior Recital. Matt Gaziano, bass trombone. 1 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Trio Fontenay. 3 p.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. Wolf Harden, piano; Michael Mücke, violin; and Jens Peter Maintz, cello. The trio will perform Trio No. 1, Op. 35, by Turina; Trio No. 2 (in one movement) by Nikolai Roslawez; and Mendelssohn's Trio No. 1 in D minor, Op. 49. Admission

20 Saturday

Alexander String Quartet: The Complete String Quartets of Beethoven. 10 a.m. Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center. The program includes the second performance of "Rise Chanting" by Augusta Read Thomas. Admission charge. Doctor of Musical Arts Recital. Jim Romain, saxophone. 11 a.m. Music Building auditorium. Senior Recital. Monica Williams, oboe. 11:30 a.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Senior Recital. Megan Gray, horn. 2 p.m. Music Building auditorium.

15 Monday

Master of Music Choral Conducting Recital. Travis Sletta, conductor. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Graduate Class Recital. 8 p.m. Memorial Room, Smith Hall. Flute students of Alexander Murray. UI Graduate String Quartet. 8 p.m. Music Building auditorium. Ruth Lenz and Andrew McCann, violin; István Szabó, viola; and Diana Flesner, cello.

19 Friday

Studiodance II. 7 and 9 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. An annual program showcasing the choreography of both graduate and undergraduate dance students. Admission charge.

13 Saturday

Music Education Senior Recital. Matthew Janus, percussion. 11 a.m. Recital Hall, Smith Hall. Studio Recital. 11 a.m. Music Building auditorium. Solo, chamber and harp

20 Saturday

Studiodance II. 7 and 9 p.m. Studio Theater, Krannert Center. An annual program showcasing the choreography of both graduate and

17 Wednesday

Ian Hobson, piano. 8 p.m.

opera

5 Friday

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April 4, 2002

InsideIllinois

PAGE 11

CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

undergraduate dance students. Admission charge. Paul Pena, a blind San Francisco bluesman. For more information send e-mail to [email protected] or call 333-6022. Russian and East European Center.

14 Sunday

Women's Tennis. UI vs. University of Wisconsin. 11 a.m. Atkins Tennis Center. Baseball. UI vs. University of Michigan. 1:05 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

films

4 Thursday

"Gladys: A Cuban Mother Before Night Falls." 7 p.m. 274 Medical Sciences Building. Part of the 2002 Reel Queer Film Fest. For more information, visit www.awarenessdays.org or call 244-8863. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns.

17 Wednesday

"An American in Paris." Vincente Minnelli, director. 4 p.m. 62 Krannert Art Museum. Part of the film series, "Re-Make/Re-Model" presented by IPRH. For more information, call 244-3344 or www.iprh.uiuc.edu. Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities.

16 Tuesday

Softball. UI vs. Ball State University. 4 p.m. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge.

20 Saturday

Men's Tennis. UI vs. Pennsylvania State University. Noon. Atkins Tennis Center.

5 Friday

"Swerve and Different for Girls." 7 p.m. 274 Medical Sciences Building. Part of the 2002 Reel Queer Film Fest. For more information, visit www.awarenessdays.org or call 244-8863. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns. "Aguirre: Wrath of God. (Germany)." 7:47 p.m. Latzer Hall, University YMCA. University YMCA.

Sacred art

photo by Bill Wiegand

sports

4 Thursday

Men's Tennis. UI vs. Northwestern University. 6 p.m. Atkins Tennis Center.

21 Sunday

Men's Tennis. UI vs. Ohio State University. Noon. Atkins Tennis Center.

Monk artists in residence Tenzin Shakya (left) and Geshe Lobsang Kunga painstakingly create a mandala dedicated to the Medicine Buddha. Each morning at 10 a.m., the monks, who are from the from the Drepung Goman Monastery in India, begin their work with 15 minutes of chanted prayer. They invite the public to join them in their meditation and observe them at work in the Krannert Art Museum, where the mandala will be on display after it is finished. The mandala is seen as a microcosm embodying the various divine powers at work in the universe, and it serves as a collection point for the gods and universal forces. In Tibetan Buddhism, a mandala is used as an aid to meditation. The monks will work on the mandala until April 7.

"The Means of Reproduction." 8:30 a.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. For more information and a conference schedule, call 244-3344 or go to www.iprh.uiuc.edu. Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. food as well as inflatable slides for kids. For more information and tickets, call 333-5000. Illini Union Faculty-Staff Social Committee. Annual International Dinner. 6 p.m. University YMCA. Countries will be represented by their various culinary specialties. After dinner, performances representative of several world cultures will be presented. For more information and to make reservations, call 367-3079. Cosmopolitan Club. Slide Presentation. Nina Bovasso, artist. 5 p.m. 62 Krannert Art Museum. For more information, send e-mail to [email protected] or call 333-0855. Art and Design and Fine Arts. Coffee Hour: Romanian. 7:30 p.m. Cosmopolitan Club, 307 E. John St., Champaign. Hosted by the Romanian Student Club. For more information, call 3673079 or visit the Web site at www.prairienet.org/cosmo/. Cosmopolitan Club.

5 Friday

Softball. UI vs. University of Iowa. 6 p.m. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge. Baseball. UI vs. Purdue University. 6:35 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

et cetera

4 Thursday

Richard G. and Carole J. Cline Symposium. 3 p.m. Beckman Institute auditorium. Keynote address: "War and Civic Democracy in America: From the Civil War to the Struggle Against Global Terror." Theda Skcopol, Harvard University. 7:30 p.m. Discussions will address a variety of topics, including the impacts of the attacks on American foreign policy and the media and the war. Other participants include: Peter Nardulli, moderator; Scott Althaus, Ira Carmen, Paul Diehl and Brian Gaines, UI. For more information, call 333-2177 or e-mail [email protected] Political Science and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Fourth Annual Conference: "The Means of Reproduction." 3 p.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. Guest speakers include: Roger Chartier, University of Pennsylvania; Martin S. Pernick, University of Michigan; Dorothy Roberts, Northwestern University; and Robert Rosen, University of California at Los Angeles. For more information and a conference schedule, call 244-3344 or go to www.iprh.uiuc.edu. Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. Coffee Hour: Italian. 7:30 p.m. Cosmopolitan Club. Hosted by the Italian Connection. For more information, call 367-3079 or visit the Web site at www.prairienet.org/ cosmo/. Cosmopolitan Club.

6 Saturday

"Our House: Lesbians and Gays in the Hood," "Love Ltd." and "Ellen: the Coming Out Episode." 3 p.m. 274 Medical Sciences Building. Part of the 2002 Reel Queer Film Fest. For more information, call 244-8863 or go to www.awarenessdays.org. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns. "Stray Dogs." 7 p.m. 274 Medical Sciences Building. Part of the 2002 Reel Queer Film Fest. For more information, call 244-8863 or go to www.awarenessdays.org. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns.

6 Saturday

Women's Tennis. UI vs. University of Iowa. 11 a.m. Atkins Tennis Center. Softball. UI vs. University of Iowa. Noon. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge. Baseball. UI vs. Purdue University. 4:05 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

6 Saturday

Veterinary Medicine Open House. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. College of Veterinary Medicine, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana. Learn more about the only vet med school in Illinois through the many exhibits and demonstrations provided by the student-run open house. For more information, e-mail [email protected], call 244-1562 or visit http:// www.cvm.uiuc.edu/ openhouse/. Veterinary Medicine. Fourth Annual Conference: "The Means of Reproduction." 9 a.m. Third floor, Levis Faculty Center. For more information and a complete conference schedule, call 244-3344 or visit the Web site at www.iprh.uiuc.edu. Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. "Kenya: Land of Contrast." 1 p.m. Anita Purves Nature Center, 1501 N. Broadway Ave., Urbana. A slide and sound presentation. For more information, call 333-2360. World Heritage Museum Guild/Spurlock Museum. International Fest. 1-5 p.m. Lobby, Krannert Center. An annual event for families that celebrates artistic culture. Enjoy demonstrations and displays from local cultural groups who share their artistic heritage. Krannert Center Student Association.

7 Sunday

Softball. UI vs. Northwestern University. Noon. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge. Baseball. UI vs. Purdue University. 1:05 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

12 Friday

"TeachIT 2002: Teaching With Instructional Technologies." 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Grainger Engineering Library, 1301 W. Springfield Ave., Urbana. Keynote address: "How Virtual Interactions Deepen Learning for Real Students." Chris Dede, Harvard Graduate School of Education. 10 a.m. Beckman Institute. For more information or a complete schedule, e-mail [email protected], call 333-1078 or visit www.cet.uiuc.edu/ teachIT2002/. Center for Educational Technologies.

8 Monday

International Documentary Film Series: "Under One Sky: Arab Women in North America Talk About the Hijab." Noon. 101 International Studies Building. Presents the viewpoints of women who wear the hijab (head scarf) and those who do not, and discusses the background for the Western perception of the veil. For more information, call 3331244 or 333-1994. Asian Educational Media Service, African Studies, Russian and East European Center, Woman and Gender in Global Perspectives.

8 Monday

"Overcoming Challenges in the 21st Century Classroom: The Role of the Computer in Executing Effective Learning Strategies." Lanny Arvan, Jim Levin and Mats Selen, UI. 6:30 p.m. 23 Psychology Building. For more information, call 333-1078. Center for Educational Technologies.

9 Tuesday

Baseball. UI vs. Western Illinois University. 6:35 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

10 Wednesday

Softball. UI vs. Indiana State University. 6 p.m. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge.

9 Tuesday

Spring Luau at Levis. 5-7 p.m. Levis Faculty Center. $4 per person, cash bar. For more information, send email to [email protected] or call 244-4457. Levis Faculty Center. "I'm Here: What Do You Want to Know? 7 p.m. Tyron Festival Theater, Krannert Center. Sir Roger Norrington, conductor, Orchestra of St. Luke's discusses his life and work.

12 Friday

Softball. UI vs. Indiana University. 6 p.m. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge. Baseball. UI vs. University of Michigan. 6:35 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

13 Saturday

Flower and Garden Show. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Stock Pavilion. Mom's Day Craft Fair. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Illini Rooms, Illini Union. For more information, call 333-7063 or e-mail [email protected] Saturday Safari: "Amazing Australian Animals." 1011:30 a.m. 231 Natural History Building. For kindergarten and first grade students. What kinds of animals live in the world "down under"? Pre-registration and a $5 fee is required. Registration forms are available in the third-floor gallery of the museum of Natural History or call 244-

11 Thursday

International Documentary Film Series: "Debt Police." Noon. 101 International Studies Building. Uganda and the debt relief initiative coordinated by the World Bank. For more information, call 333-1244 or 333-1994. Asian Educational Media Service, African Studies, Russian and East European Center, Woman and Gender in Global Perspectives.

5 Friday

International Week 2002: A World of Opportunities. Continues through April 14. Dedicated to showcasing the various cultures represented at the university and promoting international education to the campus and community. For more information, call 333-1303. A complete schedule is available at www.uiuc.edu/ providers/oisa. International Student Affairs. Fourth Annual Conference:

13 Saturday

Women's Tennis. UI vs. University of Minnesota. 11 a.m. Atkins Tennis Center. Softball. UI vs. Indiana University. Noon. Eichelberger Field. Admission charge. Baseball. UI vs. University of Michigan. 4:05 p.m. Illinois Field. Admission charge.

10 Wednesday

Roundtable discussion. 7 p.m. Krannert Art Museum auditorium. "Confronting Mortality: Remembering the Dead." Kerry Morgan, UI, moderator. Krannert Art Museum.

16 Tuesday

"Ghengis Blues." 7 p.m. 101 International Studies Building. Documentary about

7 Sunday

A Day in the Park. 2-4 p.m. Illini Union Ballroom. Featuring fun, games and

11 Thursday

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 12

PAGE 12 BRIEFS, FROM PAGE 8

professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University, will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the Monsanto Multi-Media Executive Studio in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) Library, Information and Alumni Center. The luncheon and keynote address at noon and dedication ceremony and reception at 3 p.m. will be in Room 370 Wohlers Hall. For a full list of speakers, their topics and times, go to www.cba.uiuc.edu. A professor of economics and senior fellow at the Cato Institute at the time of his death in 1998, Simon helped push a generation to rethink their views on population, resources and the environment by confronting doomsayers with facts that contradicted their positions. The symposium and reception are free and open to the public. The luncheon is $20 per person and must be paid by April 17 at 15 Wohlers Hall. Space is limited for the luncheon, and reservations are required. For information, call 333-6434, fax 2448808 or e-mail [email protected] Spurlock Museum

InsideIllinois

CAREER CENTER, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2

ate school information from the center's "Guide to Graduate School" presentations or the college-specific Graduate School Speaker Series. The center has started a Graduate School Weekly electronic newsletter that gives notice to interested students regarding locations and times for those presentations and other events. While all UI students can utilize previously mentioned programs and services in their graduate school search, the center also offers programs for students interested in health professions. The Career Center mails Health Careers Weekly, an electronic newsletter, to at least 2,200 students each week. The newsletter provides students with current admission information, a list of recruiters visiting campus and opportunities in the community for volunteer experiences. Applying to a health profession, especially medicine and dentistry, requires special attention because of the application process, Paulsen said. With only 125 medical schools and 52 dental schools in the United States, thousands of students nationwide are applying for limited enrollment and the application process is less flexible than many graduate school applications. Timeliness, accuracy and proof of competitiveness are essential for a successful candidate. In October, the center sponsors a Health and Graduate School Fair, which features representatives/admission officers from about 150 schools over a two-day period. Last semester's fair had 72 health professions schools in attendance on the second day. Students can explore and discuss program requirements for schools that interest them. Health and Graduate School Information Nights involve admission officers, recruitment directors, or alumni from a particular school. Sometimes they are also willing to meet individually with students during the day. "From a competitive position, recruiters can better put a face with a name and a name with an application," Paulsen said. Even with all the programs available to UI students, there all still some who make career decisions based on misinformation. "All [students] have to do is ask and we will help," Paulsen said. The career counselors want to make freshmen more aware of what it takes to gain admittance to a graduate program. They also encourage students to re-evaluate their competitiveness as they consider entering the job market or applying to a graduate or professional school. "Pressure to make career decisions does not give a resourceful outcome, but awareness and correct information will help position yourself for three wonderful choices upon graduation," Paulsen said. x would be another way to reduce the costs and improve the quality of audits. Many public corporations, however, retain the same auditor for decades and never open the process to outside bidders. Kaplan also expressed worry in his article that the true extent of auditing failures would not be revealed until a company or whole industry sector underwent a severe downturn. "Reported audit failures usually involve bankrupt companies, [which raises the question of] how many audit failures and imprudent accounting practices may be camouflaged by a company's continuing solvency, if not prosperity?" The number of audits that fail to detect financial problems, he therefore predicted, is "probably larger" than the occasional audit scandal that had grabbed newspaper headlines in the 1980s. The bottom line according to Kaplan: "If accountants are not catching fraud, why do we have them?" x

April 4, 2002

deaths

Eva Faye Benton, died March 19 at Provena Covenant Medical Center, Urbana. Benton started working for the UI in 1935 and retired in 1975 as the English Language and Literature Librarian and associate professor of library administration. Memorials: UI Friends of the Library or Champaign County Humane Society. Elder Lloyd W. Clapp, 87, died March 22 at his St. Joseph home. He worked for the agronomy department from 1945 until 1976, when he retired as a farm foreman. Memorials: New Liberty Primitive Baptist Church, Champaign, or Carle Hospice, Urbana. Eldon Lee Johnson, 93, died March 24 at Meadowbrook Health Care Center, Urbana. He served as a vice president of the UI from 1966 to 1977. He was vice president for governmental relations and public service during the David Dodds Henry administration and was vice president for academic affairs during the John Corbally administration. Memorials: Carle Hospice or the Cunningham Children's Home. Mary Katherine Peer, 88, died March 25 at the Champaign County Nursing Home, Urbana. She worked for the English department from 1935 until she retired in 1976 and worked closely with graduate students and doctoral candidates. She also served on a number of boards on campus. In recognition of her years of service, the lounge in the English Building was named after her in 1981. Memorials: First Presbyterian Church of Champaign, the UI Foundation for the Library Friends or the Community Foundation of Champaign County. x

ACCOUNTING, FROM PAGE 1

the big firms to "educate" the public about the limitations of audits. "The public won't accept educating itself as the answer. Besides, if the financial public really understood the limitations of the `generally acceptable' audit, they might conclude that such audits are not worth requiring or obtaining." Expectations should be met the other way around, Kaplan wrote ­ "by accountants providing the audit that the public wants and apparently thinks it is getting already." The UI scholar said that a thorough audit of a company's finances should not be prohibitively expensive, especially if accountants reexamined some of their arcane procedures. "Perhaps, for example, more time should be spent on asset verification procedures and less on simply replicating last year's paperwork without much regard to the continuing utility of the exercise." Instituting real competition for corporate accounts among the major auditing firms

Kenya show is April 6

"Kenya: Land of Contrast," a slide and sound presentation featuring the landscape and wildlife of Kenya, will be at 1 p.m. April 6 at the Anita Purves Nature Center, 1505 N. Broadway, Urbana. The show is free and open to the public. A reception and sale of African merchandise will follow. The event will be run by Mike and Lynn Noel, who have been involved in travelogue photography and the collection of African art and craft pieces for 36 years. The presentation is part of the Lecture and Performance Series in honor of the World Heritage Museum Guild and in conjunction with the Spurlock Museum. x

more calendar of events

CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 3355 for more information. 17 Wednesday

Natural History Division/ Spurlock Museum. IUB Mom's Day Fashion Show. Noon, 2 and 4 p.m. Illini Union Ballroom. Admission charge. Illini Union Board. Book signing. 2-4 p.m. Author's corner, second floor, Illini Union Bookstore. Don Hamerman will sign copies of his book "Insight: UI Photographs." For more information, e-mail [email protected] or go to www.insightillinois.com. Illini Union Bookstore. Retirement Planning Seminar: Central Management Services - 457 Deferred Compensation Plan. 10:30 a.m.-noon or 1:30-3 p.m. 407 Illini Union. This seminar outlines the provisions of the 457 Compensation plan and how it may benefit short- and/or long-range retirement goals. Register online at https:// nessie.uihr.uillinois.edu/cf/ benefits/seminars/ or call 3333111. Human Resources and Benefits. Nutrition Symposium. 2 p.m. Oral presentations; 4 p.m. Keynote Lecture. 150 Animal Sciences Lab. Richard Weindruch, University of Wisconsin, keynote speaker. Nutritional Sciences. Lecture and Question and Answer Session. Michael Moore, political satirist and author of "Stupid White Men and Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation." 7 p.m. Foellinger Auditorium. A book signing will follow. Tickets required for admission and will become available at Illini Union Ticket Central after April 9. Illini Union Board.

20 Saturday

Japan House Spring Open House. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Japan House. "A Primer for an American Tea Experience," will be presented by A. Doyle Moore, UI at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tea ceremonies will be conducted throughout the day by the Japan House Uransenke Tea Study Group and members of the Urasenke Chicago Chapter. For more information, e-mail [email protected] or call 244-9934. Japan House.

18 Thursday

Coffee Hour: Israeli. 7:30 p.m. Cosmopolitan Club. Hosted by students from Hillel. For more information, call 367-3079 or go to www.prairienet.org/cosmo/. Cosmopolitan Club.

exhibits

"Anntologia de literature y poesia latina" Latin American and Caribbean Library. "Library Time Warp"

14 Sunday

Flower and Garden Show. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Stock Pavilion.

Main hall cases, Library. "Leopold Sedar Senghor (1906-2001)" Modern Languages and Linguistics Library. "UI and Its Winter" University Archives. Through April 30. s "Petals and Paintings" On view April 12-14. Master of Fine Arts Exhibition Through April 7. "Meditation and Transformation: Devotional Arts of Tibet" Through May 5. "Featured Works VIII: Confronting Mortality" Through May 12. Krannert Art Museum and

Kinkead Pavilion. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday; 2-5 p.m. Sunday. Admission to the museum is free; a donation of $3 is suggested. s @art gallery. Online exhibit of the UI School of Art and Design. www.art.uiuc.edu/ @art. s World Heritage Museum. Closed. Will reopen as the new Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at a new location in 2002. www.spurlock.uiuc.edu. x

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