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Fact File

2000

17-1, Ginza 6-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8023, Japan

12000-0007 Printed in Japan

I. CORPORATE DATA

I CONTENTS I

I. Corporate Data ......................................................................................................................................................................1 Corporate Data................................................................................................................................................................1 Board Members ..............................................................................................................................................................1 Corporate Officers .........................................................................................................................................................2 Major Events in Nissan's History ....................................................................................................................................4 The Alliance with Renault................................................................................................................................................6 Nissan Revival Plan ........................................................................................................................................................7 Nissan's Global Structure ...............................................................................................................................................8 Facilities in Japan .........................................................................................................................................................10 Global Operations .........................................................................................................................................................12 Liaison Offices Worldwide ............................................................................................................................................12 Vehicle Production Facilities Worldwide .......................................................................................................................12 II. Business Overview ..............................................................................................................................................................14 Business Results ..........................................................................................................................................................14 Sales Results by Division (millions of yen)...................................................................................................................14 Production, Export, and Domestic Sales Results..........................................................................................................15 Cumulative Production, Export, and Domestic Sales Totals .........................................................................................15 Recent Production and Registration Milestones ...........................................................................................................15 Production in Japan (Top Five Models) ........................................................................................................................16 Sales in Japan (Top Five Models) .................................................................................................................................16 Exports from Japan (Top Five Models).........................................................................................................................16 Sales by Country...........................................................................................................................................................17 Exports from Japan by Region .....................................................................................................................................17 Exports from Japan (Top Five Countries) .....................................................................................................................18 Overseas Production by Country ..................................................................................................................................18 Model Names for Overseas Markets .............................................................................................................................19 Model Range ................................................................................................................................................................20 Domestic Model Changes .............................................................................................................................................22 The Birth of Datsun ......................................................................................................................................................23 Sales and Service Networks..........................................................................................................................................26 Nissan Business College...............................................................................................................................................26 III. Environmental and Vehicle Safety and ITS Protection .......................................................................................................27 Environmental Protection .............................................................................................................................................27 Safety Improvement .....................................................................................................................................................29 Advanced Safety Vehicle-2 (ASV-2)..............................................................................................................................30 Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS)..............................................................................................................................31 IV. Community and Cultural Activities......................................................................................................................................32 Supporting Culture and the Arts ...................................................................................................................................32 Scholarship Program....................................................................................................................................................32 International and Cultural Exchange .............................................................................................................................32 Support for Community Welfare and Environment-Related Activities...........................................................................33 Community Activities and Employee Participation........................................................................................................33 Nissan Science Foundation...........................................................................................................................................34 V. Club Activities and Professional Soccer Term....................................................................................................................34 Baseball Term...............................................................................................................................................................34 Table Tennis Club .........................................................................................................................................................34 Track and Field Club .....................................................................................................................................................34 Yokohama F.Marinos Professional Soccer Term ..........................................................................................................34 VI. Principal Subsidiaries and Affiliates ..................................................................................................................................35 Institute of Automotive Technology ..............................................................................................................................35 Principal Subsidiaries and Affiliates in Japan................................................................................................................36 Principal Subsidiaries and Affiliates Worldwide............................................................................................................40 Paid-in Capital Stock Information

I CORPORATE DATA I

Company Name Date of Establishment Headquarters Registered Head Office Objects Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. December 26, 1933 17-1, Ginza 6-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8023, Japan Tel. (03) 3543-5523 2, Takara-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 220-8623, Japan

As of March 31, 2000

11. The development, manufacture, purchase, sale, lease and repair of the following items, parts therefor and their related materials and goods; (1) automobiles, industrial vehicles and other transport machines and equipment; (2) internal-combustion engines and other power machines and equipment; (3) ships and engines therefor; (4) aeronautical machines and equipment, rockets, projectile mechanisms, airplanes and weapons (5) textile machines; (6) machine tools, press machines, casting and forging machines, assembly machines and equipment, dies, jigs, tools and measuring instruments; and (7) fuel of every kind, lubricating oil and other oil products; 12. Engineering, consulting and technical guidance relating to any of the preceding businesses and the development, sale, license and intermediation of inventions, ideas, designs, know-how and technical information and the like relating to each of the preceding items; 13. Information communications, information processing and information services, and the development, purchase, sale and lease of software, information communication machines and equipment and office equipment; 14. The purchase, sale, lease, brokerage and management of real estate and the operation of parking lots and the security guard business; 15. The designing, implementation, contracting and supervision for civil engineering and building construction, and the supervision of construction; 16. Electric work, electric communication work and installation work for machines and tools; 17. The financial business and the purchase and sale of securities; 18. The inland transportation, marine transportation, air transportation, warehousing and tourism business; 19. The acquisition, operation and management of facilities for education, medical care, sports, amusement parks, exhibition halls, marinas, food and drink stands and restaurants and lodging and the like, and incidental facilities thereto; 10. Management and administration of sport clubs, and producing sport entertainment; 11. Personnel dispatching business; 12. Plate-making, printing, bookbinding, publication of books and prints, and advertising; 13. Non-life insurance agency business and life insurance agency business; and 14. Any and all businesses incidental or relative to any of the preceding paragraphs. ¥496,605 million Common stock (issued and outstanding): Authorized number of shares: Number of shareholders: 32,707 (male: 30,747 female: 1,960 ) 3,977,293,751 6,000,000,000 102,755

Number of Employees

Corporate Mark

The Origins of the Nissan Name Nissan Motor Co.,Ltd.

The circle in the background is red. This red, the blue of the middle bar, and the white of the overlaying letters are Nissan's official corporate colors. The red circle symbolizes the rising sun and sincerity, and the blue represents the color of the sky. The concept behind the mark is the proverb "Sincerity brings success."

The Company was jointly established on December 26, 1933, as Jidosha Seizo Co., Ltd. (president: Yoshisuke Aikawa), by Nihon Sangyo Co. and Tobata Imono Co., to manufacture and sell Datsun cars and parts. On June 1, 1934, Nihon Sangyo (Nissan) became the Company's sole owner and changed the Company name to Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.

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I BOARD MEMBERS I

Representative Board Members

Yoshikazu Hanawa Carlos Ghosn

As of July 1, 2000

As of July 1, 2000

Board Members

Hiroshi Moriyama Hisayoshi Kojima Itaru Koeda Nobuo Okubo Norio Matsumura Patrick Pélata Thierry Moulonguet

Tadao Takahashi

Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering Division Oppama Plant, Murayama Plant Tochigi Plant (except Powertrain Operations Division), Kyushu Plant GM, Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering Division

Takashi Kitajima

Purchasing Administration Dept. Materials and Machinery Purchasing Dept. Purchasing Engineering Support Dept. Parts Purchasing Dept. No.1 Parts Purchasing Dept. No.2 Support / Services Purchasing Dept. No.1 Support / Services Purchasing Dept. No.2 GM, Purchasing Administration Dept.

Toshiyuki Shiga

Overseas Sales Division No.1 (Asia, Oceania, Central and South America) GM, Overseas Sales Division No.1 Chairman, Nissan Motor Company(Australia) Pty.Ltd. Chairman, Nissan Casting Australia Pty.Ltd.

Bernard Ray

Purchasing Strategy Dept. GM, Purchasing Startegy Dept.

I CORPORATE OFFICERS I

Chairman Chief Executive Officer

Ryoso Kodama

As of July 1, 2000

Industrial Machinery Division Marine Administration Office GM, Industrial Machinery Division

Shuji Yamagata

Vehicle Development Dept.No.1 Vehicle Development Dept.No.3 Vehicle Component Development Dept.,

Nobuo Okubo

Technology and Engineering Development Group Vehicle 3-3-3 Promotion office

Vice Chairman Kanemitsu Anraku

External and Government Affairs Dept.

Jean-Jacques Le Goff

Global Marketing Division e-Commerce Development Dept. GM, Global Marketing Division

Yoshikazu Hanawa

President Chief Operating Officer

Eiichi Abe

Senior Vice Presidents

Vehicle Advanced Engineering Dept. Nissan Research Center GM, Nissan Research Center

Electronics Development Dept.No1 Electronics Development Dept.No.2 Vehicle Component Test Dept.

Resource Management Division GM, Resource Management Division

Iwao Nakamura

Customer Service Division Intellectual Property Dept. Engineering Information Systems Dept. Environmental and Safety Engineering Dept. Vehicle Evaluation/Test Dept. Vehicle Development Dept.No.2

Carlos Ghosn

Human Resources Dept. Administration Dept for Affiliated Companies. TQM Promotion Dept. Corporate Communications Dept. Legal Dept.

Norio Matsumura

Overseas Operations Group North America and European Operations President, Nissan North America, Inc

Eiji Imai Kuniaki Sasaki

Administration Dept. for Affiliated Companies Program Director

Yukio Kitahora Akihiro Kojima

Sales Support Division in Domestic Marketing & Sales Group. Renault Sales Dept. GM, Sales Support Division Parts Division (Worldwide) Business Development Dept (in Domestic Market) Nissan Business College Nissan Institute of Mechanic and Business

Auditors

Tadao Takei Shozo Yoshimatsu Haruhiko Takenaka Hideo Nakamura

Patrick Pélata

Executive Vice Presidents

Planning Group; Corporate Planning Dept. Program Management office Product Strategy and Planning Division Design Division

Hajime Kawasaki

Tochigi Plant (Powertrain Operations Group) Powertrain Operations Division Yokohama Plant, Iwaki Plant GM, Powertrain Operations Division

Hiroshi Moriyama

Domestic Marketing and Sales Group; Parts Division Administration Department in Domestic Marketing & Sales Group.

Ian Gibson

Deputy to EVP, Overseas Sales and Marketing

Keisuke Takebe

Overseas Sales Division No.2(Middle East and Africa) Overseas Operations Support Dept. GM, Overseas Sales Division No.2

Thierry Moulonguet Hisayoshi Kojima

Manufacturing and Engineering Group Powertrain Operations Group Industrial Machinery Division

Shigeru Takagi

Materials Engineering Dept. Vehicle Production Engineering Division GM, Vehicle Production Engineering Division

Chief Financial Officer

Finance Dept. Treasury Dept. Cost and Profit Management Dept. Group IT Division

Shiro Tomii Masahiko Aoki

Human Resources Development Dept. General Support Dept. GM, Human Resources Development Dept. Marketing Division (Domestic Market) GM, Marketing Division

Itaru Koeda

Purchasing Group

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I MAJOR EVENTS IN NISSAN'S HISTORY I

Date 1933 December Event Jidosha Seizo Co., Ltd., predecessor of Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., is established in Yokohama with paid-in capital of ¥10,000,000. Yoshisuke Aikawa is named the new company's president. Construction of the Yokohama Plant is completed. Production of tools commences. The Company name is changed to Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. The first Datsuns are exported to Asia and Central and South America, with shipments totalling 44 units. The first car manufactured by a fully integrated assembly system rolls off the line at the Yokohama Plant. The corporate mark is chosen. The first knockdown (KD) units are shipped to Dowa Jidosha Kogyo in Manchuria. Construction of the Yoshiwara Plant is completed. (Operations begin in October 1943.) World War II progresses: production of cars and trucks is completely stopped. Company name is changed to Nissan Heavy Industries, Ltd. The first postwar-manufactured car rolls off the line. Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. is reestablished as the Company name. Nissan acquires an equity interest in Minsei Diesel Motor Co., Ltd. (now called Nissan Diesel Motor Co., Ltd.) Nissan enters into a technological cooperation agreement with Austin Motor Co., Ltd. of the United Kingdom. Forklift production starts. Export of passenger cars to the United States begins. Datsuns are entered in the 6th Australia Mobilgas Trial, with one taking first place for the first time. Production commences at Yulon Motor Co., Ltd. in Taiwan, the Company's first overseas KD factory. The technological cooperation agreement with Austin Motor expires. Nissan wins the 10th Annual Deming Prize for excellence in industrial engineering. Nissan Motor Corporation in U.S.A. is established. Nissan Mexicana, S.A. de C.V. is established. (Production begins in July 1966.) Construction of the Oppama Plant is completed. (Partial operations begin in October 1961.) Construction of the Zama Plant is completed. (Partial operations begin in December 1964.) Nissan Motor Co. (Australia) Pty. Ltd. is established. Nissan merges with Prince Motors, Ltd. of Japan. Construction of the Honmoku Wharf is completed. 1981 June July August November 1982 March April December 1983 January July 1984 April May November 1985 July August 1986 December 1977 June July 1979 April 1980 January January July Date 1968 January 1970 February March 1971 March 1972 September 1973 October 1974 April 1975 June 1976 March Event Headquarters operations are moved to the Company's new building in the Ginza area of Tokyo. Lambda 4S-5 successfully launches Japan's first satellite, OHSUMI. (Nissan developed and manufactured the rocket engine and launch vehicle.) Nissan moves into the marine engine field. Construction of the Tochigi Plant is completed. (Partial operations begin in October 1968.) Cumulative domestic production surpasses 10 million units. Construction of the Sagamihara Parts Center is completed. (Partial operations began in April 1972.) Nissan Science Foundation is established. Cumulative domestic sales surpass 10 million units. Nissan Motor Manufacturing Co. (Australia) Ltd. is established and full-scale operation begins. Construction of the Kyushu Plant is completed. (Partial operations begin in April 1975.) Cumulative production surpasses 20 million units. Nissan Design International, Inc. (NDI) is established in the United States. Nissan acquires an equity interest in Motor Ibérica, S.A. in Spain. Cumulative exports surpass 10 million units. Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A. (NMMC) is established. (The first Datsun truck rolled off the line in June 1983; the first Sentra (Sunny), in March 1985.) Construction of the Kambara Manufacturing Plant, the satellite facility of the Yoshiwara Plant, is completed, and operations begin. Nissan begins worldwide marketing of vehicles under the Nissan name as part of a new corporate identity program. Cumulative production surpasses 30 million units. The Nissan Technical Center is completed. Construction of the Kurihama Manufacturing Plant, the satellite facility of the Yokohama Plant, is completed. (Production begins in May 1982.) Nissan wins the Safari Rally for the fourth consecutive year. The new corporate mark is announced. Nissan Motor Ibérica, S.A. begins production of the Patrol (Safari). Nissan Research & Development, Inc. is established in the United States. Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. is established. (Production begins in July 1986.) Cumulative domestic sales surpass 20 million units. Construction of the Oppama Wharf is completed. Nissan acquires an equity interest in Yulon Motor Co., Ltd. in Taiwan. Cumulative production surpasses 40 million units. June New corporate philosophy and corporate principles are announced. June 1990 January January August November 1991 March June August 1992 January April June August September October November November December 1993 February March September October 1994 January February April Date 1987 January April August Event Date Event Company's regional business management company for the Middle East. Cumulative domestic production surpasses 60 million units. Nissan concludes a technical transfer and license agreement with Nanjing Auto Works in China. Vehicle production at the Zama Plant ceases. Nissan, Indomobil and Marubeni form a joint venture, P.T. Ismac Nissan Manufacturing in Indonesia. Nissan formulates "Global Restructuring Policy" regarding promotion of globalization for production locations and expansion of imported parts, etc. Cumulative overseas production surpasses 10 million units. Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A. commences production at a new engine and transmission plant in Decherd. Nissan develops a "hybrid electric vehicle (HEV)"­electric vehicle with the versatile convenience of a gasoline-engine vehicle. Nissan begins sales of vehicles with continuously variable transmission, Hyper CVT. Nissan introduces vehicles with direct injection gasoline engines. Nissan formulates an independent action plan for motor vehicle recycling. The Aerospace Division's Tomioka Plant is completed and becomes operational in May. Nissan formulates a Global Business Reform Plan. A Nissan R390GT1 is placed third in the Le Mans 24-hour race. Nissan introduces vehicles with direct injection diesel engines. Nissan Environmental Forum is held at Makuhari Messe. Nissan Creates Internet Customer Inquiry and Reservation System, "Clicar." Nissan and Renault signs an agreement for a global alliance, including equity participation. Nissan's 7 major domestic plants and Product Planning and Research Development Group completed to obtain ISO 14001 environmental management system certification. Nissan transfers its Texsys' Water Jet Texfile Machineny business to Toyoda Automatic Loom Works. Nissan begins driving tests of a methanol fuel cell vehicle. Nissan sells Fuji Plant and A/T and CVT development organization, establishes a wholly owned subsidiary, TransTechnology Ltd. Cumulative exports surpass 30 million Units. TransTechnology Ltd. and JATCO Corp. merge and they start to operate as JATCO TransTechnology. Nissan begins sales of vehicles with new generation automatic transmission "Extroid CVT". The company announces the Nissan Revival Plan. Japan's largest auto mall, "Carest Zama" begins operations. Nissan begins sales of the ultra-small EV Hypermini. Nissan begins sales of the super ultra low emission vehicle (SULEV) Sentra CA in California. Nissan releases the Tino Hybrid. Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A is merged into Nissan North America, Inc. Nissan develops the Nissan ASV-2 Advanced Safety Vehicle. Nissan opens an exclusive berth for ocean-going vessels beside Kyusyu Plant. Nissan begins sales of an ultra low emission vehicle, AD Van CNGV (Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle). Nissan starts to sell Renault vehicles through its domestic dealers.

1934 May June

The Pulsar, EXA, Langley, and Liberta Villa win the '86-'87 Japanese Car of the Year award. Cumulative exports surpass 20 million units. The H-I rocket, featuring the fixed apogee motor designed and produced by Nissan in Japan, successfully launches the engineering test satellite KIKU-5. Nissan European Technology Centre Ltd. is established in the United Kingdom. The Silvia wins the '88-'89 Japanese Car of the Year award. Nissan Europe N.V., the Company's regional headquarters for European operations, and Nissan Distribution Service (Europe) B.V., are established in the Netherlands. (Operations begin in April 1990.) Nissan North America, Inc., the Company's regional headquarters for North American operations, is established in the United States. (Operations begin in April 1990.) Cumulative production surpasses 50 million units. Nissan announces plans to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons from Company operations and products. Nissan acquires an equity interest in Siam Motors Co., Ltd., in Thailand. A new distribution company, Nissan Motor (GB) Ltd., is established in the United Kingdom. (Operations begin in January 1992.) Nissan announces the reorganization of its parts supplier associations, and the Nissho Kai is newly established. Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. begins exporting its Primera 5-door Hatchback model to Japan. The Hokkaido Proving Grounds is established in Hokkaido as a cold-weather testing facility. New production facility at the Kyushu Plant is completed, and production begins. Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A. begins production of the Altima (Bluebird). Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. begins production of the Micra (March). Nissan Casting Australia Pty. Ltd. is established. Cumulative domestic sales surpass 30 million units. Nissan Design Europe GmbH is established in Germany. The Micra (March) earns the Car of the Year 1993 award in Europe. The March earns the '92-'93 Japanese Car of the Year award and the RJC New Car of the Year 1992-1993 award in Japan. Nissan Motor Ibérica, S.A. begins production of a new 4WD model, the Terrano II for the European market. Nissan and the Zhengzhou Light Truck Factory form a joint venture, Zhengzhou Nissan Automobile Co., Ltd., for the production of commercial vehicles in China. Nissan begins production and sales of the AD Resort wagons and pickups in Thailand and Taiwan, specifically for Asian markets. Nissan Logistics Corporation is established in U.S.A. Production begins at the Iwaki Plant. The first H-II rocket, featuring solid-fuel rocket booster (SRB) and pyrotechnics designed and produced by Nissan in Japan, is successfully launched. Nissan concludes a technical assistance and license agreement with South Korea's Samsung Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. on manufacturing passenger cars. (Samsung Motors Inc. was established in March 1995.) Nissan Motor (China) Ltd. is established in Hong Kong to manage the distribution of vehicles and service parts to China. Nissan Middle East FZE is established in Dubai, UAE as the

December December 1995 March May June

1988 June 1989 January April

1935 April May 1940 March 1943 August December 1944 September 1945 November 1949 August 1950 May 1952 December 1957 August 1958 June September 1959 March 1960 March June September 1961 September 1962 March 1965 May 1966 May August 1967 July

1996 October 1997 May May September December 1998 February April May June June September December 1999 March March April May July July October October October December 2000 February February March April April April April May

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I The Alliance with RenaultI

Nissan and Renault agreed to form a global and comprehensive alliance to strengthen Nissan's financial position and achieve profitable growth for both partners on March 27,1999. This alliance promotes all synergies between the two companies, while respecting the brand identities of both partners. This newly-formed Nissan and Renault group is an automobile group with an annual output of 4.8 million vehicles.

I Nissan Revival PlanI

Nissan announced the Nissan Revival Plan as a global and comprehensive restructuring plan on October 18, 1999. This plan aims to change Nissan into a competitive, global company and achieve lasting and profitable growth through business developments and enhanced market presence that are driven by the development of attractive products, and through cost reductions.

·Three Commitments

· Return to profitability for FY 2000 · Achieve consolidated operating profit of 4.5 percent of sales by FY2002. · Reduce net debt from 1.4 trillion yen to less than 700 billion yen by FY2002.

·Organization

A Global Alliance Committee (GAC) has been created as the organization for decision-making to promote joint strategy and synergies between two companies. And Nissan and Renault made eleven Cross Company Teams (CCTs) that consist of members from both companies as the function to propose to GAC the plans on all possible synergies to be implemented by each of the partners. *Areas covered by the CCTs: "Product planning and related strategy", "Vehicle Engineering", "Powertrains", "Purchasing, Logistics and Service", "Manufacture", "Marketing and Sales strategy in six regions".

·Creating the Plan

· In order to develop this plan, Nissan created nine cross-functional teams (CFTs). CFTs have been organized across various functional divisions according to nine priority areas. Each of them made innovative proposals for improving company performance.

·Concrete Examples of Cooperative Projects That Have Already Been Decided under the Alliance

Mexico Renault now returns to Mexico at low costs with strong support from Nissan on sales and manufacture. Nissan aims a nearly complete utilization of its plants and the expanded range of products it can offer. · Renault will begin sales of Scenic from 2001. · Plans foresee some 1.2 million vehicles-400,000 for Renault and 800,000 for Nissan-being produced by the Alliance from 2000 to 2010.

*Areas covered by the CFTs: "Business Development", "Purchasing", "Manufacturing", "Research and Development", "Marketing and Sales", "General & Administrative Costs", "Finance Cost", "Product Phasing Out", and "Organization and Decision Making Process". "Cost of Investment" was added after the announcement of the Nissan Revival Plan.

·Main Contents of the Plan

Business Development Shifting resources from cost reduction into product developments, Nissan plans to market new products and develop its automobile business. · Introduce 22 new products globally from FY2000 through FY2002. · Increase consolidated capital expenditures by 25 percent (equivalent to approx. 5 percent of consolidated net sales) Purchasing Reducing procurement costs by promoting concentrated and global purchasing and halving the number of suppliers. · Purchasing costs, which account for fully 60 percent of Nissan's total costs, will be reduced by 20 percent over three years, from FY2000 through FY2002.

Japan Renault strengthens sales in Japan at low costs with strong support from Nissan. · In 2000, some 50 Nissan outlets will market Renault vehicles. · The network will grow to more than 150 outlets in the coming years. · The goal is to increase Renault sales in Japan to 15,000 vehicles in 2004, growing to 30,000 units annually over the long term.

Mercosur Nissan expands its presence in Mercosur market with strong support from Renault on sales and manufacturing. · Nissan will start to produce the new Frontier Pickup model in Renault's Brazilian manufacturing facilities from 2002. · Nissan will produce 5 products locally by 2005 and sell more than 150,000 units by 2010. · Nissan and Renault will bolster their long-term presence aiming for 15 percent of the market by 2010.

Manufacturing Reducing excess domestic production capacity to achieve optimum production efficiency and enhanced cost competitiveness on a global level. · Terminate manufacturing of vehicles and powertrains in five plants. *Five Plants: Three Assembly Plants: Murayama, Nissan Shatai Kyoto, and Aichi Kikai Minato Two Powertrain Operations: Kurihama Plant and Kyusyu Engine Shop · Improve productivity and the operating rate of the remaining plants.

Research and Development Concentrating its resources and using them effectively by selecting the areas of research and development that are the core competence of the company and sharing with Renault in research and development.

Financial Cost Concentrating on the core automotive business and reducing debt by selling non-core assets. · Sales of shareholdings · Sales of non-core assets · Decrease inventory-to-sales level by 30 percent.

Sales, General and Administrative Costs Reducing inefficiencies to increase the efficiency of global operations, conducting organizational changes, and reducing the headcount. · Reduce cost of sales, general and administrative costs by 20 percent. · Overhaul organization of domestic sales and research & development operations · Streamline operations in North America. · Reexamine and reorganize the sales and marketing function in Europe. · Reduce by 21,000 global workforce.

Organization and decision-making process. Making its organization global and promoting efficiency of decision-making to execute the plan. · Establish Management Committee in Europe and the US as strategic decision-making organizations. · Strengthen the capacity to develop global strategies and empower regional operating units to implement the Nissan Revival Plan.

Nissan/Renault signing ceremony

Engineering staff gathering around the Renault Clio (Nissan Mexicana)

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I NISSAN'S GLOBAL STRUCTURE I

·Nissan's Vehicle Production and Sales Network

Europe

Sales Countries 42 National Sales Companies 36 Dealers 4,362 · Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. · Nissan Motor Ibérica, S.A. (Spain) · Nissan Vehiculos Industriales, S.A. (Spain)

Production

U.K.

Middle East

Sales Countries 25 National Sales Companies 19 Dealers 413

Spain

U.S.A.

North America

Sales Countries 2 National Sales Companies 4 Dealers 1,397

Production

Iran Egypt

· S.A.I.P.A. Co. (Iran) · Pars Khodro Co. (Iran) · Nissan Egypt S.A.E. (Egypt)

Japan China

Japan (As of March 31, 2000)

Pakistan Thailand Taiwan Vietnam

Production

Sales

Dealers Outlets

190 3,509

· Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation (U.S.A) (NMMC was merged into the NNA organization on April 2000)

Mexico

Philippines

Production

Malaysia Kenya

· Oppama Plant · Murayama Plant · Tochigi Plant · Kyushu Plant

Latin America & Caribbean

Sales Countries 38 National Sales Companies 42 Dealers 594

Asia

Sales Countries 22 National Sales Companies 17 Dealers 453

Indonesia

Production

· Nissan Mexicana,

S.A. de C.V.

Africa

Sales Countries 49 National Sales Companies 41 Dealers 261

Zimbabwe

Production

· Kenya Vehicle Manufacturers Ltd. · Willowvale Mazda Motor

Industries (Pvt.) Ltd. (Zimbabwe) · Nissan South Africa (Pty.) Ltd.

Production

South Africa

· Yulon Motor Co., Ltd. (Taiwan) · Siam Nissan Automobile Co., Ltd. (Thailand) · Siam Motors & Nissan Co., Ltd. (Thailand) · Zhengzhou Nissan Automobile Co., Ltd. (China) · Universal Motors Corp. (Philippines) · Nissan Motor Philippines, Inc. · Tan Chong Motor

As of March 31, 2000

·Nissan's Worldwide R&D Network

Oceania

Sales Countries 13 National Sales Companies 13 Dealers 253

(Japan)

G Product

Development

G Basic

& Applied Research

Vehicle production base

Assemblies Sdn. Bhd. (Malaysia) · P.T. Ismac Nissan Manufacturing (Indonesia) · Nissan TCM Vietnam Co., Ltd. (Vietnam) · Ghandhara Nissan Ltd. (Pakistan)

Nissan Technical Center

Nissan Research Center

· Planning and marketing · Styling · Design · Prototypes · Testing

Proving Grounds

(Tochigi, Oppama, Hokkaido) · Vehicle testing (performance, durability, safety)

Engine Testing

(Yokohama) · Testing

Overseas Sales Network Countries National Sales Companies Dealers 191 172 7,733 Nissan Design Europe GmbH

· Engines and powertrains · Vehicles · Transportation · Electronics · New materials · Environment and energy

(North America)

(Europe)

Nissan Technical Centre Europe (Spain), S.A. Nissan Technical Centre Europe, Ltd. Nissan Technical Centre Europe (Brussels), S.A.

Domestic Sales Network Dealers Outlets 190 3,509

Nissan Design International, Inc.

Nissan Technical Center North America, Inc.

· Styling

· Vehicle development

· Vehicle development

· Technical research · Vehicle evaluation · Homologation

· Styling

· Vehicle development · Technical research · Vehicle evaluation · Homologation · Basic research & development

Arizona Test Center, Inc.

· Vehicle testing (vehicle

evaluation, durability, thermal resistance)

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I FACILITIES IN JAPAN I

Office/Facility

Headquarters Customer Service Division Nissan Technical Center Hokkaido Proving Grounds

As of July, 2000

Address

17-1, Ginza 6-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8023 Tel. (03) 3543-5523 17-1, Shin-Koyasu 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa Tel. (045) 435-1111 560-2, Okatsukoku, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0192 Tel. (046) 270-1220 48-1, Aza-Rinnai, Rikubetsu-cho, Ashoro-gun, Hokkaido 089-4356 Tel. (01562) 7-2121 386, Shimokawa-aza-Otsurugi, Izumi-cho, Iwaki-shi, Fukushima 971-8183 Tel. (0246) 75-1123 2500, Kamigamou, Kaminokawa-machi, Kawachi-gun, Tochigi 329-0692 Tel. (0285) 56-1204 1-1, Enoki, Musashi-Murayama-shi, Tokyo 208-8523 Tel. (042) 563-5000 2, Takara-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 220-8623 Tel. (045) 461-7304 8, Nishiki-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 231-0812 Tel. (045) 621-2901 1, Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa 237-8523 Tel. (0468) 67-5000 (Oppama Plant) Tel. (0468) 67-5142 (Nissan Research Center) 2-2, Sahara 2-chome, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa 239-0835 Tel. (0468) 33-2605 10-1, Hironodai 2-chome, Zama-shi, Kanagawa 228-8502 Tel. (046) 252-3211 4-1, Asamizodai 1-chome, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 228-8523 Tel. (0427) 45-5523 1-3, Shinhama-cho, Kanda-machi, Miyako-gun, Fukuoka 800-0395 Tel. (093) 435-1111

910, Ichisawa-cho, Asahi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 241-0014 Tel. (045) 371-5523 (Nissan Education Center) Tel. (045) 371-5521 (Nissan Business College) Tel. (045) 371-2990 (Nissan Institute of Mechanic and Business)

Date Operations Commenced

January 1968 July 1995 November 1981 January 1992

Land Area

(thousand sq. meters)

Number of Employees

(As of March 31)

Major Operations/Products

Management and strategic operation of Nissan's business activities Contact of Customer, domestic and overseas service business, quality assurance of vehicles manufactured by Nissan and its Group Technology and product development and the procurement of components Vehicle testing and evaluation

0,010 0,005 1,159 7,076

2,000 0,220 5,500 --

Locations of Domestic Facilities

Iwaki Plant

January 1994

0,205

0,490

Casting, machining, assembling of engines

Hokkaido Proving Grounds

Tochigi Plant Murayama Plant

October 1968 July 1962

2,971 1,284

5,700 2,800

President, Cima, Cedric, Gloria, Presage, Bassara, and R'nessa; axles; cast components; vehicle testing and evaluation Laurel, Skyline, Stagea, Presea, March, Cube, and Tino; design, development, and manufacturing of forklifts; vehicle testing, Assembling of engines, machining, axles and related parts; research and development of engines; casting, forging, and sintering; engine testing and evaluation, design and production of metal mold Vehicles and parts shipment for overseas markets; packaging and shipping of KD units; acceptance of import components Maxima, Cefiro, Bluebird, and Primera; vehicle testing and evaluation

Iwaki Plant Kyushu Plant

Yokohama Plant

April 1935

0,572

3,380

Honmoku Wharf Oppama Plant Nissan Research Center Oppama Wharf Kurihama Manufacturing Plant Zama Operations Center Sagamihara Parts Center Kyushu Plant Kanda Wharf Nissan Education Center Nissan Business College Nissan Institute of Mechanic and Business

July 1967 October 1961 April 1961 May 1983 May 1982 December 1964 April 1972 April 1975

0,331

0,190

1,720

4,200

Long-term, basic research and development Vehicles shipment for domestic and overseas markets

Tochigi Plant

0,141 0,795 0,428

0,340 1,100 0,590

Assembling of engines machining, welding and machining of axle components; design and development of marine products Design and development, and manufacturing of tools, jigs, and facilities robots Supply and shipment of service parts for domestic and overseas markets Silvia, Sunny, Pulsar, Terrano, and Terrano Regulus; assembling of engines, axles, and related parts; packaging of KD units Vehicles shipment for domestic and overseas markets

Zama Operations Center Customer Service Headquarters Sagamihara Parts Center Nissan Technical Center

Murayama Plant

Headquarters Yokohama Plant Honmoku Wharf

2,483 May 1991 May 1962 0,063 April 1989

5,000

Kurihama Manufacturing Plant Oppama Plant Nissan Service Development Center Nissan Education Center Nissan Business College Nissan Institute of Mechanic and Business

Planning and implementation of training and education for dealers 0,330 Training for service engineers and sales staff (car life advisor) Planning and implementation of service training for overseas Nissan Group employees, editing service information, and training for bodywork and painting for domestic and overseas Nissan Group employees

Nissan Service Development Center

Note: Land area totals include areas for facilities for employee welfare.

3-7, Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 236-0004 Tel. (045) 785-0023

October 1985

0,017

0,070

10

11

I GLOBAL OPERATIONSI

Nissan's Overseas Headquarters As of March 31, 2000

Date of Number of Establishment Employees

I VEHICLE PRODUCTION FACILITIES WORLDWIDE I

Region

North America

As of March 31, 2000 Location

Smyrna, Tennessee Sunderland, Tyne and Wear Barcelona Avila Miaoli

Country

U.S.A.

Company

Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A. (MMMC was merged into the NNA organization on April 2000)

Commencement Number of of Production Employees

Jun. 1983 5,771

Models Produced/Assembled (Local Model Names)

Datsun (Frontier); Xterra*; Altima*

Region

North America Europe Latin America and Caribbean Middle East

Country

United States (Gardena, Calif.) Netherlands (Amsterdam) Mexico (Mexico D.F.) United Arab Emirates (Dubai)

Company

Nissan North America, Inc. Nissan Europe N.V. Nissan Mexicana, S.A. de C.V. Nissan Middle East FZE

Europe

Jan. 1990 *1 Apr. 1989

2,212

U.K.

Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. Nissan Motor Ibérica, S.A. Nissan Vehiculos Industriales, S.A. Yulon Motor Co., Ltd.

Jul. 1986 Jan. 1983 Jan. 1995 Mar. 1959

4,200 3,900 0,800 2,600

Primera; Pulsar(Almera); March (Micra) Safari (Patrol); Terrano II ; Serena; Vanette Cargo* Trade; Cabster E*; Atleon*; small and medium trucks* Cefiro; Sunny (Sentra); March; Atlas (Jing Yong); AD Resort (N-RV)

0,591

Spain

Jan. 1995 *2 Jun. 1994

0,027 *3 0,065

Taiwan

China

Zhengzhou Nissan Automobile Co., Ltd.

Zhengzhou

Oct. 1995

2,400

Datsun (Pi Ka)

*1 Began managing function overseeing all entities. *2 Transfer date of regional marketing and sales function *3 Number of employees of the Export Department, Nissan Mexicana, S.A. de C.V.

Siam Nissan Automobile Co., Ltd. Thailand Siam Motors & Nissan Co., Ltd.

Samuthprakarn

Sep. 1977

1,198

Datsun (Big M)

Samuthprakarn

Aug. 1962

321

Cefiro; Sunny; AD Resort

Universal Motors Corporation

I LIAISON OFFICES WORLDWIDE I

As of March 31, 2000 Region Country

Thailand People's Republic of China Indonesia

Manila

Jan. 1972

156

Datsun (Pathfinder); Safari (Patrol); Terrano; Caravan (Urvan)

Asia

Philippines Nissan Motor Philippines, Inc. Sta. Rosa Jun. 1983 531 Cefiro; Sunny (Sentra); AD Resort & AD Max; Largo (Vanette)

Office

ASEAN Office

Date of Establishment 1957

Malaysia

Tan Chong Motor Assemblies Sdn. Bhd.

Kuala Lumpur Bukit Indah, West Java Danang

Aug. 1976

790

Sunny (Sentra); AD Resort; Cefiro; Vanette; Atlas (Cabstar); Terrano; Serena

Indonesia Asia Beijing Office March 1985 Vietnam Jakarta Office October 1991 Pakistan Latin America and Caribbean

P.T. Ismac Nissan Manufacturing

Oct. 1996

--

Cedric; Cefiro; Sunny ; Terrano

Nissan TCM Vietnam Co., Ltd.

--

--

Planning

Ghandhara Nissan Ltd.

Karachi

Jan. 1997

165

Sunny

Mexico

Nissan Mexicana, S.A. de C.V.

Mexico D.F.

Jul. 1966

9,000

Sunny (Tsuru, Sentra); Lucino; Datsun (Nissan Pickup); AD Wagon (Tsubame)

S.A.I.P.A. Co. Middle East Iran Pars Khodro Co.

Tehran

Feb. 1983

3,000

Junior*

Tehran

Feb. 1987

2,325

Safari (Patrol)

Egypt

Nissan Egypt S.A.E.

Six October

Dec. 1977

500

Datsun

Kenya Africa

Kenya Vehicle Manufacturers Ltd.

Thika

Jan. 1978

400

Caravan (Urvan)

Zimbabwe

Willowvale Mazda Motor Industries (Pvt.) Ltd.

Harare

Jun. 1999

740

Datsun (Hardbody)

South Africa

Nissan South Africa (Pty.) Ltd.

Direct equity participation Indirect equity participation

Pretoria

1963

3,395

Pulsar (Sentra); Sunny Truck (1400 Pickup); Datsun (Hardbody)

Notes: 1. All the model names listed above are the standard model names used in Japan. Model names in parentheses are those used in local markets. 2. Nissan is carrying out joint business with Ford Motor Co. related to the Quest multipurpose minivan. Development was undertaken by Nissan and production is being carried out by Ford at its Ohio Plant. Production commenced in April 1992. 3. *For local market only

12

13

II. BUSINESS OVERVIEW

I BUSINESS RESULTSI

Item

Net Sales(millions of yen) Domestic Overseas

Consolidated

Fiscal years beginning April 1 1997 ('97.4~'98.3)

6,564,637 3,070,185 3,494,452 84,346 4,695 14,007 280.7 --) 3,546,126 1,921,124 1,625,002 85,626 57,707 16,548 203,755 106.4 208.0

I PRODUCTION, EXPORT, AND DOMESTIC SALES RESULTS I

1997

Item Units Global Production Passenger Cars Commercial Vehicles 2,264,388 490,210 2,754,598 1,463,705 207,805 1,671,510 800,683 282,405 1,083,088 39.3 617,339 94,053 711,392 42.6 690,142 277,027 967,169 20.4 4,748,638 6,281,700 83.4 91.3 85.5 665,511 195,900 861,411 20.4 4,214,907 5,875,595 119.1 118.0 118.9 586,445 124,400 710,845 46.5 96.4 70.7 89.1 % Change from Previous Year 104.3 85.8 100.4 100.3 101.9 100.5 112.4 76.8 100.3 Units 2,047,083 418,780 2,465,863 1,330,481 197,980 1,528,461 716,602 220,800 937,402 38.0 95.2 130.8 99.9 % Change from Previous Year 90.4 85.4 89.5 90.9 95.3 91.4 89.5 78.2 86.5

Fiscal years beginning April 1 1998

Units 1,863,497 541,153 2,404,650 1,163,181 173,737 1,336,918 700,316 367,416 1,067,732 44.4 520,174 91,816 611,990 45.8 538,957 221,182 760,139 19.1 3,981,601 5,890,269 81.0 112.9 88.2 88.7 73.8 86.1

1998 ('98.4~'99.3)

6,580,001 2,863,603 3,716,398 109,722 24,463 27,714 245.8 --) 3,319,659 1,722,093 1,597,565 15,165 14,646 34,809 203,755 99.7 213.0

1999 ('99.4~'00.3)

5,977,075 2,626,866 3,350,209 82,565 1,642 684,363 244.2 238.6 Exports 2,997,020 1,546,744 1,450,275 15,674 35,850 790,064 496,605 80.9 -- Domestic Sales Overseas Production Domestic Production

1999

% Change from Previous Year 91.0 129.2 97.5 87.4 87.8 87.5 97.7 166.4 113.9

Total Passenger Cars Commercial Vehicles Total Passenger Cars Commercial Vehicles Total Ratio to total production Passenger Cars Commercial Vehicles Total Ratio to total production

Operating Income(Loss)(millions of yen) Recurring Income (Loss)(millions of yen) Net Income (Loss)(millions of yen) Investments in Property, Plant, and Equipment (billions of yen) R&D Investments (billions of yen) Net Sales(millions of yen) Domestic Overseas

Passenger Cars Commercial Vehicles Total

Non-Consolidated

Operating Income(Loss)(milions of yen) Recurring Income (Loss)(millions of yen) Net Income (Loss)(millions of yen) Paied-in Capital (millions of yen) Investments in Property, Plant, and Equipment (billions of yen) R&D Investments (billions of yen)

Market Share(Excluding Mini Vehicles) Total Demand(Excluding Mini Vehicles) Total Demand(Including Mini Vehicles)

Note: Domestic sales include imported models from overseas production bases. Retail sales basis

I CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION, EXPORT, AND DOMESTIC SALES TOTALS I

As of March 31, 2000 Item Fiscal years beginning April 1

Domestic Production Overseas Production Global Total Production Sales 2,069,515 239,638 2,309,154 246,628 355,573 45,911 39,751 2,997,020 Exports Domestic Sales

I SALES RESULTS BY DIVISION (millions of yen) I

1997 Item

Units Passenger Cars Vehicles Commercial Vehicles Total Parts for Production at Overseas Plants Parts / Others Aerospace Forklifts / Marine Total 1,447,644 237,859 1,685,503 -- -- -- -- -- Sales 2,526,886 277,899 2,804,785 276,264 368,902 44,035 52,138 3,546,126 Units 1,355,082 229,468 1,584,550 -- -- -- -- -- Sales 2,350,681 265,855 2,616,537 221,383 386,523 51,157 44,057 3,319,659

Total (units)

68,379,986 13,664,098 82,044,084 30,484,993 37,560,688

1998

Units 1,159,290 197,285 1,356,575 -- -- -- -- --

1999

Note: Domestic sales include imported models from overseas production bases. Retail sales basis

I RECENT PRODUCTION AND REGISTRATION MILESTONES I

I September 1992

Cumulative production at the Oppama Plant surpasses 10,000,000 units.

Since September 1992

I October 1997

Cumulative VQ engine production at Iwaki Plant surpasses 1,000,000 units.

I October 1992

Cumulative domestic registrations surpass 30,000,000 units.

I December 1997

Cumulative domestic production of Pulsar (passenger car) surpasses 4,000,000 units.

I November 1992

Cumulative domestic registrations of the Pulsar surpass 1,000,000 units.

I December 1997

Cumulative domestic sales of Sunny (passenger car) surpasses 5,000,000 units.

I November 1992

Cumulative production at Nissan Mexicana, S.A. de C.V. surpasses 1,500,000 units.

I July 1998

Cumulative domestic production of Terrano surpasses 1,000,000 units.

I May 1994

Cumulative domestic production of the Bluebird surpasses 8,000,000 units.

I August 1998

Cumulative production of Kyushu plant's 2nd factory surpasses 1,000,000 units.

I December 1994

Cumulative domestic production surpasses 60,000,000 units.

I January 1995

Cumulative production at Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. surpasses 1,000,000 units.

I July 1999

Cumulative exports surpass 30 million units.

I October 1996

Cumulative overseas production surpasses 10,000,000 units.

I September 1999

Cumulative production of Micra at Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) LTD. surpasses 1,000,000 units.

I April 1997

Cumulative global production of March (Micra) surpasses 3,000,000 units.

I September 1999

Cumulative sales of Primera in European market surpasses 1,000,000 units.

I September 1997

Cumulative engine production at Yokohama Plant surpasses 30,000,000 units.

I June 2000

Cumulative production at the Kyushu Plant surpasses 8,000,000 units.

14

15

I PRODUCTION IN JAPAN (TOP FIVE MODELS) I

Ranking 1 2 3 4 5 1997

Pulsar 196,413 March 139,570 Maxima 132,733 Cefiro 129,160 Terrano 117,480

Fiscal years beginning April 1 (Units) 1998

Pulsar 189,552 Cube 120,298 Maxima 109,608 Sunny 104,916 Terrano 90,292

I SALES BY COUNTRY I

1997*

Country Units Japan 1,042,675 728,377 469,231 101,393 93,813 60,427 93,816 % Change from Previous Year -6.6 -2.9 7.4 3.0 4.5 22.1 59.0 Units 903,572 621,528 502,790 106,478 96,021 70,282 139,518

1999

Maxima 158,601 Pulsar 103,553 Terrano 103,363 Sunny 88,118 Cefiro 79,800

1998*

% Change from Previous Year -13.3 -14.7 7.2 5.0 2.4 16.3 48.7 Units 773,602 677,212 485,269 100,453 78,254 74,303 134,937

1999*

% Change from Previous Year -14.4 9.0 -3.5 -5.7 -18.5 5.7 -3.3

U.S. Western Europe U.K. Germany Spain

Note: All the model names listed above are the standard model names used in Japan. Export model names are listed on page 19.

Mexico

I SALES IN JAPAN (TOP FIVE MODELS) I

Ranking 1 2 3 4 5 1997

March 126,963 Sunny 75,213 Pulsar 51,069 Cefiro 45,801 Laurel 38,831

* Calendar year, Retail sales basis Note: Sales in Japan include imported models from overseas production bases. Western Europe means European main 17 countries.

Fiscal years beginning April 1 (Units) 1998

Cube 113,095 March 79,440 Sunny 66,065 Presage 38,210 Skyline 34,363

1999

Cube 79,380 Serena 63,142 March 58,910 Sunny 55,865 Elgrand 49,558

I EXPORTS FROM JAPAN BY REGION I

1997

Region Units North America Europe Asia Latin America and Caribbean Middle East Oceania Africa 294,429 151,517 82,465 29,779 90,198 44,483 17,601 920 711,392 % of Total 41.4 21.3 11.6 4.2 12.7 6.2 2.5 0.1 100.0 Units 247,053 197,705 38,025 28,724 121,043 57,406 19,520 1,369 710,845 % of Total 34.8 27.8 5.3 4.0 17.0 8.1 2.7 0.3 100.0

Fiscal years beginning April 1 1998

Units 293,884 117,450 60,946 26,924 55,123 48,966 7,769 928 611,990

1999

% of Total 48.0 19.2 10.0 4.4 9.0 8.0 1.3 0.1 100.0

Note: Retail sales basis All the model names listed above are the standard model names used in Japan. Export model names are listed on page 19. Figures include imported models from overseas production bases. Figure of Serena is the total of passenger and commercial vehicles. Figure of Elgrand is the total of Caravan Elgrand and Homy Elgrand.

I EXPORTS FROM JAPAN (TOP FIVE MODELS) I

Ranking 1 2 3 4 5 1997

Maxima 136,434 Pulsar 135,711 Terrano 108,658 Cefiro 83,632 Datsun 59,270

Fiscal years beginning April 1 (Units) 1998

Pulsar 157,372 Maxima 107,169 Terrano 87,124 Datsun 85,990 Safari 70,070

International Agencies, etc. Total

1999

Maxima 150,599 Terrano 96,440 Pulsar 87,423 Datsun 65,960 Cefiro 64,960

Note: All the model names listed above are the standard model names used in Japan. Export model names are listed on page 19.

16

17

I EXPORTS FROM JAPAN (TOP FIVE COUNTRIES) I

1997 Ranking Units 1 2 3 4 5

U.S. 273,509 Australia 36,427 Saudi Arabia 35,600 Germany 31,737 China 26,067

Fiscal years beginning April 1 1998 1999 % of Total

32.3

I MODEL NAMES FOR OVERSEAS MARKETS I

Model Type JG50

As of March 31, 2000

Asia Latin America & Caribbean

-- Infiniti Q45

Japan

President Cima

North America

-- (Infiniti) Q45

Europe

-- --

Middle East

-- Infiniti Q45

Oceania

-- --

Africa

-- --

President (HongKong) Infiniti Q45 (Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, China, Philippines) Gong Jue** (China) Cedric (Singapore, Indonesia) Gloria (Hong Kong) Cefiro (Hong Kong, Thailand, Philippines) Feng Du** (China) -- Skyline (Hong Kong Singapore) Lan niao** (China) Bluebird (Brunei) -- Primera

% of Total

38.4

Units

U.S. 229,503 Australia 48,742 Saudi Arabia 46,256 Germany 37,328 U.K. 26,687

Units

U.S. 271,063 Australia 40,366 Saudi Arabia 25,559 Canada 22,821 Spain 18,967

% of Total

44.3

FY33

Y31 Y33 Y34 A32 A33 A33 R34

Cedric/Gloria

--

--

--

Cedric Gloria

--

Cedric

5.1

6.9

6.6

Cefiro

(Infiniti) I30

Maxima QX, QX(UK only) --

Infiniti I30 (Mexico) Maxima Maxima (Mexico) -- -- Altima (Mexico) Primera

Maxima

Maxima

Maxima

5.0

6.5

4.2

-- Skyline Bluebird -- Primera Primera wagon Silvia --

Maxima -- -- Altima (Infiniti) G20 Primera

-- -- -- -- Primera

-- Skyline (New Zealand) -- -- Primera (New Zealand) Primera

-- -- -- --

Skyline GT-R (UK) -- --

4.5

5.3

3.7

U13 U14 L30

3.7

3.8

3.1

P11 WP11 S14 S15

--

-- --

Primera wagon

200SX --

-- --

Sentra (Philippines) Sunny (Indonesia)

Sunny (Thailand) Sentra (Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan) Yiang Guang** (China) Sunny VIP (Singapore)

--

--

--

Primera wagon

(New Zealand) 200SX --

--

-- --

Exports vs. Overseas Production

1,090,376 1,079,864 1,083,088

Fiscal years beginning April 1 (Units)

B13

Sentra (Mexican made) Tsuru (Mexico) Sentra

--

1,054,697

937,402

1,067,732

B14 B15

Sunny

Sentra (sedan)

--

Sunny (sedan)

--

Sunny (sedan)

B14 N14

-- -- Pulsar --

-- -- --

-- -- Almera NX Almera (Italy only) Almera

-- --

Lucino (Mexico) -- Almera

-- -- -- Pulsar

-- --

-- Sentra (South Africa) --

711,392

710,845

611,215

593,597

598,244

611,990

N15 N16

--

Sunny (Hong Kong, Singapore) Yiang Guang**(China) March (Taiwan, Singapore) -- -- N-RV(Taiwan) Wingroad(Singapore) AD Resort (Malaysia, Philippines) Prairie Joy (Singapore,Malaysia) -- Cube (Hong Kong) Patrol Tu Le** (China) Terrano (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines) Infiniti QX4 (Taiwan) Terrano II (Thailand) -- Quest (Taiwan) -- Pi Ka** (China) Terrano II Quest

--

--

Pulsar (Australia)

--

Exports Overseas Production 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 FY

K11 E30 Y10 Y11

March -- Wingroad

Altra EV

--

Micra

March (Caribbean) -- AD Wagon Tsubame (Mexico) Wingroad (Caribbean)

-- -- --

-- -- Pulsar Wagon (New Zealand)

-- -- AD Wagon

--

Sunny Wagon Sunny Traveller (Germany only)

M11 V10 Z10

-- Tino Cube Safari

-- -- -- -- Patrol Patrol GR

-- -- --

-- -- Cube (Caribbean) Patrol Patrol Pickup Pathfinder -- Terrano II

-- -- -- Patrol Patrol Pickup Pathfinder -- Terrano II --

-- Tino (New Zealand) -- Patrol Patrol Pickup Pathfinder -- Terrano II -- -- --

-- -- -- Patrol Patrol Pickup -- --

I OVERSEAS PRODUCTION BY COUNTRY I

1997

Country

Fiscal years beginning April 1 1998 Units

279,392 275,993 96,000 169,339 116,678 937,402 % Change from Previous Year -29.6 -0.5 -3.9 -8.3 -6.0 -23.5

1999 Units

348,214 286,865 105,245 216,140 111,268 1,067,732 % Change from Previous Year 24.6 3.9 9.6

260 Y60 Y61 R50 WD21 JR50 R20 V40 B120 D21

Terrano Terrano Regulus -- -- -- --

Pathfinder (Infiniti) QX4 -- Quest -- --

Units

U.S. U.K. Spain Mexico Others Total 396,887 277,509 99,885 184,699 124,108 1,083,088

% Change from Previous Year -3.2 11.9 -7.3 26.0 -25.9 0.3

Pathfinder (Germany, Switzerland) -- Terrano II

-- 1400 Bakkie (South Africa), 1200 Pickup Nissan Pickup Hard Body (South Africa) Nissan Pickup Hard Body (South Africa)

-- --

-- Nissan Pickup

-- Nissan Pickup

D22

Datsun

Frontier

27.6 -4.6 13.9

Pickup King cab (Sweden, Denmark, Italy, Holland, Belgium, Iceland) --

Frontier (Philippines) Pi Ka** (China) Big M (Thailand) -- --

Nissan Pickup

Nissan Pickup

Navara

WD22 TK0 140 F23

-- -- -- Atlas

Xterra

Xterra -- -- Cabstar Junior

-- --

-- -- --

-- -- -- Cabstar

--

-- --

Atleon -- Cabstar

-- Cabstar Jing Yong** (Taiwan) Ka Xing** (China) --

--

--

TLO E24 E50 C22 C23 C24 W40 W41

-- Caravan Elgrand -- Serena Civilian

-- -- -- -- -- --

Cabstar E -- -- -- Serena/Vanette Cargo --

-- Urvan -- -- Serena NIssan W41 Civilian Urvan

--

-- Urvan (New Zealand) Urvan

--

Urvan Jia Ben** (China) Elgrand (Hong Kong) Vanette (Malaysia) Serena Civilian Bi Lian** (China)

-- -- --

-- -- -- Civilian (Australia) Civilian

-- -- --

Notes: Besides the aforementioned, there are some more area-specific model names used in other countries. ** These are transliterations of local product names written in Chinese characters.

18

19

I MODEL RANGE I

Powertrain Configuration Transmission

As of June 30, 2000 Engine Gasoline Diesel

4.5 Extroid CVT Hyper CVT

4.1 3.3 VG30DETT

3.0 VQ30DD#

2.6 RB26DETT VQ25DD#

2.5

2.4

2.0

1.8 QG18DD#

1.6

1.5

1.3

1.0 5.2 4.6

4.3

4.2

3.2 3.1 3.0 2.8 2.7 2.5 ZD30DDTi#

2.2

2.0

VQ30DET

RB25DET

SR20DET

VH45DE

VH41DE

VG30DE

VQ30DE

VQ25DE

RB25DE

VQ20DE

RB20DE

SR20DE

KA24DE

SR20VE

KA20DE

YD25DDTi# YD22DD#

CGA3DE

QG18DE

QG15DE

QG13DE

SR18DE

GA16DE

GA15DE

CG10DE

SR16VE

4HK1-T

RD28E

4HF1N

VG33E

VG30E

VG20E

RB20E

TB45E

4WD

MT

FR

AT

Model President Cima Cedric / Gloria Laurel Cefiro Skyline Crew Bluebird Primera Presea Sunny Pulsar

G G G G G G

FF

G G G G G G G

G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G

March Fairlady Z Silvia Stagea Avenir Wingroad Rasheen Elgrand Serena Presage Bassara Prairie Liberty R'nessa Tino Cube Safari Terrano Terrano Regulus Expert AD Van Caravan Vanette *1 Datsun Atlas (1-1.5 ton) Atlas (2-4 ton) *2 Civilian

G G G

G G

G G G G G G G

G

G

G G G G G G

G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G

Commercial Vehicles

G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G

G

G

G G G

G G

G G G

G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G

G G G G G

G G

G G G

G G G G G G G G G G

G G G G G

G G G G G G G G

G G

Passenger Cars

G G G G G

G G

G G G G G G G G G G G G G

G G G G G G

G

G

G G G G G G

G

G

G

G

G G G G G G G G G

G G G G G G G

G

G G G

G G G G G G G G

G G

G G G

G G G G

G G

G

Note: All the model names listed above are the standard model names used in Japan. Export model names are listed on page 19. Excluding models for taxi and driving school use. *1 Supplied from Mazda Motor Corp under an OEM(Original Equipment Manufacturing) agreement. *2 Supplied from Isuzu Motor Ltd. under an OEM agreement. # Direct-injection engine

20

CD20E

TD42T

4HG1

QD32

4HF1

TD42

TD27

4JG2

R2

F8

21

I DOMESTIC MODEL CHANGES I

1931-1959

As of June 30, 1999

Date of Sale 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 Model

Datsun (passenger car) (Bluebird) (Truck) (Cablight) Nissan (Junior) (Caball) (Patrol) (Passenger car) (Truck) (Bus) Prince (passenger car) (Gloria) (Truck) (Miller) (Cabovertruck)

1960-2000

March (Model 10) Datsun

August Datson

1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

Novembe (Model DA) March (Model DB) September (Model DS) December: discontinued January (Model DC3)Sports

January: discontinued

January (Model 110)

October (Model 210)

(Model S211) Datsun Sports August (Model 310) Datsun Bluebird

July (Model 10T) Datsun

December: discontinued

November Model 1121)

July Reintroduced (Model 15T)

January (Model 120)

November (Model 220)

August (Model A20)

Augast (Model B40) December(Model C40) September (Model 4W60) June (Model 70) June (Model 80) June (Model 90) February (Model 180) February (Model 190) May (Model E4S/EMS) Tama electric car February (Model 290) December: discontinued

February (Model 380) February (Model 390)

January, '62 (Model 40)

October, '70 (Model 140)

'82: discontinued

February (Model 480) May (Model 490)

March (Model 580) December (Model 590) April (Model ALSI) Skyline

May (Model 680) May (Model 690)

February '69 (Model 780)

September, '72: discontinued

'76: discontinued

March (Model AISH) passenger car

February (Model BLSI) Prince Gloria March (Model AFTF) truck September (Model ARTH) May (Model AKTG) Cabover truck October August '62 (Model T430) (Model AQTI) '67 (Model T446) Nissan Prince Miller

'70: discontinued

As of June 30, 2000

Date of Sale 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 Model

President Infiniti Q45 Cima Cedric Cima Gloria Cima Cedric Gloria Leopard J. Ferie Leopard Maxima Laurel Cefiro Skyline Crew Bluebird Primera Presea Sunny Pulsar March Hypermini Datsun Sports Fairlady Z Silvia 180SX Stagea

Note: All the model names listed above are the standard model names used in Japan. Export model names are listed on page 19. 1 Lucino (Model B14): Introduced as a 2-door Sunny coupe in May 1994, discontinued in April 1999. 2 S-RV (Model N15): Introduced as the Pulsar Serie S-RV in May 1996.

January (Model SPL212) Datsun Fairlady April (Model CSP311) Silvia

June: discontinued (Model S211)

1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

October (Model JG50) November (Model G50) Infiniti Q45 August (Model FY32) Cima January (Model FY31) January (Model FY31) September discontinued June (Model FY33)

February (Model 50) Cedric Special

October (Model 150) President

August (Model

250)

April (Model 30) Cedric (Model BLSI) Prince Gloria September (Model S40)

October (Model 130) April (Model A30) Nissan Gloria

February (Model 230) February (Model 230)

June (Model 330) June (Model 330)

June (Model 430) June (Model 430)

June (Model Y30) June (Model Y30)

June (Model Y31) June (Model Y31)

June (Model Y32) Hardtop June (Model Y32) Hardtop June (Model JY32) Leopard J. Ferie

June (Model Y33) June (Model Y33)

June (Model Y34) June (Model Y34)

September (Model F30) Leopard

February (Model F31) May (Model U11) October (Model J30) January (Model C33) September (Model A31) January (Model C34)

March (Model JY33)

June (Discontinued)

April (Model C30) Laurel

April (Model C130)

January (Model C230)

November (Model C31)

October (Model C32)

June (Model C35) December (Mobel A33) May(Model R34)

August (Model A32) August (Model R33) July (Model K30)

(Model ALSI) Prince Skyline

November (Model S50)

August (Model C10) Nissan Skyline

September (Model C110)

August (Model C210)

August (Model R30)

August (Model R31)

May (Model R32)

(Model 310) Datsun Bluebird

September (Model 410)

August (Model 510)

August (Model 610) November: discontinued

July (Model 810)

November (Model 910)

October (Model U11)Nissan Bluebird Maxima October (Model U11) Nissan Bluebird

September (Model U12)

September (Model U13) February (Model P10) Primera June (Model R10) Presea

January (Model U14) September (Model P11) January (Model R11)

1

January (Model B14)

April discontinued October (Model B15)

April (Model B10) Datsun Sunny

January (Model B110) October (Model E10) Cherry

May (Model B210) September (Model F10) herry FII

October (Model B310) May (Model N10) Pulsar

October (Model B11) Nissan Sunny April (Model N12) October (Model K10) March

September (Model B12) May (Model N13)

January (Model B13) 2 August (Model N14)

2

January (Model N15)

January (Model K11) March

February (Model EAO)

October (Model SP310) Datsun Fairlady

October (Model S30) Nissan Fairlady Z October (Model S10)

August (Model S130) March (Model S110)

September (Model Z31) August (Model S12)

July (Model Z32) May (Model S13) April (Model RS13) 180SX October (Model S14)

December discontinued

January (Model S15)

October (Model WC34) Stagea

I THE BIRTH OF DATSUN I

The first DATSON was manufactured in August 1931 by Nissan's predecessor, DAT Automobile Manufacturing. The name DAT was formed by combining the first letters of the family names of Kenjiro Den (D), Rokuro Aoyama (A), and Meitaro Takeuchi (T), the founders of Kaishinsha, the forerunner of DAT Automobile Manufacturing. DATSON thus means the son of DAT. In 1932, SON was changed to SUN. In the following years, DATSUN played a leading role in supporting Nissan's growth and development.

22

23

1960-2000

As of June 30, 2000

Date of Sale 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 Model

R'nessa Avenir Tino Wingroad Rasheen Cube Elgrand Caravan Homy Presage Bassara Prairie Liberty Safari Patrol Terrano Mistral Expert AD Van Largo Vanette Largo Serena Vanette Sunny Truck Datsun Vanette Sunny Cab/Vanette Cherry Cab/Vanette

Clipper Caball Atlas Cabstar Homer

(Model AQTI) Cabover Truck April (Model C140) Caball

(Model A20) Datsun Cablight Patrol (Model 4W60)

1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

October(Model N30)

May (Model W10) Avenir

3

August(Model W11)

December(Model V10)

October (Model WY10) Sunny California

5

May (Model Y10) Wingroad

May(Model Y11)

December (Model B14)

February(Model Z10) May (Model E50)

February (Model E20) Caravan October (Model B640) Prince Homy January (Model E20) Nissan Homy

August (Model E23) August (Model E23)

September (Model E24) September (Model E24)

June(Model U30)

November (Model JU30)

6

August (Model M10) Prairie June (Model 160) Safari October (Model 60)

September (Model M11) November (Model Y60)

7

November(Model M12) October(Model Y61)

August (Model WD21) Terrano

Mistral is imported from Nissan Motor Ibérica, S.A.

8 September(Model R50)

June (Model R20)

February Discontinued

June(Model W11)

October (Model VB11)

9 AD Van

October (Model VY10) May (Model W30) Largo

June(Model Y11)

June discontinued November (Model GC22) Vanette Largo June (Model C23) Serena November (Model C22) February (Model B20) Datsun Sunny Truck February (Model B120)

September (Model GC22) March (Model C120) Datsun Vanette September (Model C120) Largo September (Model GC22) May (Model GC22) June(Model C24)

Vanette Coach undergoes a model change and is renamed as Serena.

April(Model S20)

June(Model S21)

November (Model B122) Nissan Sunny Truck

*November: Vehicles use the same name

August (Model C20) Datsun Sunny Cab

January (Model C20) Nissan Sunny Cab

November (Model C120) Sunny Vanette November (Model C120) Cherry Vanette

September (Model C120) Largo September (Model GC22)

10

May (Model GC22)

September (Model C20) Nissan Cherry Cab January (Model T631) Clipper August (Model C240) March (Model A220) October (Model A320) Datsun Cabstar August (Model T20) Nissan Homer May (Model 520) February (Model 620) September (Model GC240) Civilian March (Model GC140) Echo (Model BQVH-2) Prince Light Coach (Model B632-4) August (Model GC240) May (Model GC340) January (Model T40) May (Model C340) January (Model F20) Caball/Clipper

September (Model C120) Largo

10

May (Model GC22)

December (Model H40) Nissan Atlas February (Model F22) Nissan Atlas

Cabstar/Homer renamed as Atlas.

October (Model H41)

11

June(Model H42)

March (Model A120)

Nissan Cabstar/Homer

January (Model F23)

September (Model T64) Prince Homer

(Model 220) Datsun Truck

Datsun Civilian Echo Light Coach

August (Model 320)

October (Model 720) August (Model W40)

August (Model D21) Nissan Datsun

January (Model D22)

February(Model W41)

Echo undergoes a model change and is renamed as Civilian with its model (Model GHWT 40) Nissan Light Coach

type M/C being unchanged.

I OEM I

Company Name Mazda Provide AD Van(August 1993) Wingroad(June 1996) Fuji Heavy Industries Isuzu AD Van(April 1994) Civilian(August 1993) Atlas 1 ton(June 1995) Caravan(August 1995) Elgrand(July 1997) Elf 2-4 tons(June 1995) (marketed under the name of Atlas 2-4 tons) Supplied Bongo Vans and Trucks(April 1994) (marketed under the name of Vanette Vans and Trucks)

3 Avenir Salut: Renamed wagon model after minor change in August 1995. 4 Avenir Cargo: Renamed as Expert after full model change in June 1999. 5 Sunny California: Changed to Model WY10 in October 1990. After a minor change, Sunny California and AD Wagon were integrated into one model, Wingroad (model Y10) in May 1996. 6 Homy (model E24): Integrated into Caravan in June 1999. 7 Prairie Liberty: Renamed after minor change in November 1998. 8 Terrano Regulus (model JR50) was introduced in August 1996. 9 AD Van: Sunny AD Van, Pulsar AD Van and Datsun AD Van were integrated into one model in May 1988.

10 Vanette: Sunny Vanette and Cherry Vanette were introduced in November 1978. 11 Atlas (model H41): The standard and wide cabin series were introduced in October 1991 and January 1992, respectively.

24

25

III. ENVIRONMENTAL AND VEHICLE SAFETY AND ITS PROTECTION

I SALES AND SERVICE NETWORKS I

·Sales Network and Service Facilities in Japan

As of March 31, 2000

I ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONI

Outlets Dealers

(incl. those for pre-owned vehicles)

Sales Channel

Models

(as of June 30, 2000)

Service Number of Facilities Employees

927 20,399

Blue Stage

Nissan Motor

President, Cima, Cedric, Cedric Sedan, Fairlady Z, Laurel, Cefiro, Cefiro Wagon, Crew, Stagea, Presage, Bluebird, R'nessa, Presea, Prairie Liberty, Avenir, Expert, Pulsar, Pulsar Serie S-RV, Rasheen, Wingroad, March, Cube, Atlas, Safari, Terrano, Terrano Regulus, Datsun, Elgrand, Caravan, Vanette, AD Van, Civilian, Hypermini

Nissan Motor Satio

57

1,122

Nissan has implemented an updated Environmental Action Program (Version 3) based on the Company's Environmental Philosophy of fostering "symbiosis of people, automobiles and nature." As outlined below, Nissan is vigorously pursuing wide-ranging activities to protect the global environment. Inter-departmental task forces, such as the Recycling Promotion Committee, have been formed to address especially critical and urgent environmental concerns in specific areas. These Environmental protection activities are coordinated by the Environmental Management Committee,globally which is responsible for promoting carefully focused efforts under ISO 14001 comprehensive environmental management system. And NISSAN publishes an Environment Report annually and shows information about environmental protection activity positively. Looking can have "NISSAN ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 1999" with Internet. (http://global.nissan.co.jp./japan/SYMBIOSIS/)

·Nissan's Environmental Philosophy and Environmental Guidelines

30 510 427 8,955

<Nissan's Environmental Philosophy> Symbiosis of people, vehicles and nature

55

907

780

14,879

Red Stage

Satio Prince Cherry

Cima, Gloria, Skyline, Cedric Sedan, Stagea, Bassara, Primera, Primera Wagon, Fairlady Z, R'nessa, Silvia, Presea, Tino, Sunny, Pulsar, Pulsar Serie S-RV, Rasheen, Wingroad, March, Cube, Atlas, Safari, Elgrand, Caravan, Expert, Vanette, Serena, AD Van

Prince Cherry

47

962

745

16,183

If is our view that the basis of environmental protection lies in the human capacity to show kindness and concern. Along with striving to understand the environment better, all of us at Nissan bring a shared concern for people, society, nature and the Earth to bear on our activities. This commitment and concern are embodied in every Nissan product and throughout all of the company's operations as the driving forces of Nissan's ongoing contributions to the advancement and enrichment of society. <Environmental Guidelines> Nissan is taking the initiative to promote wide-ranging activities aimed at improving the environment both globally and locally in line with the guidelines noted here. These efforts are being pursued in all areas of the company's operations, including product development, manufacturing, sales and service, in order to make Nissan's Environmental Philosophy a reality. 1. To achieve a cleaner automotive society 2. To conserve natural resources and energy 3. To expand and continuously improve Nissan's environmental management system 4. To issue reports on environmental activities

1

8

7

91

Total

Hypermini is only sold at selected dealerships.

190

3,509

2,886

60,507

I NISSAN BUSINESS COLLEGE I

Nissan has opened the Nissan Business College, which provides comprehensive training and education for employees of sales companies in the Nissan Group. Using the most advanced instruction methods, the school aims to provide effective education courses to improve marketing and service technology skills. Nissan Business College's main campus is in Yokohama. It also has five branches across Japan.

·Facilities

Name Location

NBC Yokohama NBC Hokkaido NBC Miyagi NBC Nagoya NBC Kobe NBC Fukuoka (Wakahisa) (Niihama)

Ichisawa-cho, Asahi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa Shinmei-cho, Tomakomai-shi, Hokkaido Machimae, Tagajo-shi, Miyagi Koei, Minato-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi Gakuen-Nishimachi, Nishi-ku, Kobe-shi, Hyogo Wakahisa-cho, Kanda-machi, Miyako-gun, Fukuoka Shinhama-cho, Kanda-machi, Miyako-gun, Fukuoka

· Nissan expands LEV models---Silvia. (January 1999) · Nissan receives ISO14001 Environmental Management System Certification. Fuji pant (January 1999),Kyushu plant,Iwaki Plant,and Product Planning & Research Development Group (March 1999).Nissan completes ISO14001 certification acquisition of all seven major domestic plants and Product Planning & Research Developmennt Group. · Nissan receives the "Sho-Ene Taisho" (The Energy Conservation Prize)from the Energy Conservation Center,Japan. (January 1999) · NEO Di direct-injection gasoline engine plus Hyper CVT:Commendation from the Director-General of the Agency of Natural Resoueces and Energy. · NEO Di direct-injection diesel engine:Commendation from the Chairmen of the Energy Conservation Center. · Nissan expands the models equipped with NEO Di diesel engine---Terrano and Terrano Regulus. (February 1999) · Nissan expands supply system of used parts called "Nissan Green Parts." (February 1999) · Nissan launches sale of "Fukkatsu-kun"---engine coolant recycling equipment. (February 1999) · Nissan launches test-drive program for the Tino Hybrid on public roads. (March 1999) · Nissan publishes "Automotive Transportation in Perspective "providing the information on current transportation and traffic situations in Japan. (April 1999) · Nissan begins driving tests of a methanol fuel cell vehicle. (May 1999) · Nissan introduces Cedric and Gloria with direct-injection gasoline engines which comply with Japan's 2000 LEV standards. (June 1999) · Nissan expands the models equipped with NEO Di diesel engine - Terrano and Terrano Regulus (February), Elgrand (August), Safari and Sunny (September), Bassara(October 1999) · Nissan develops Multi-Use Forklift for car dismantlers. (September 1999) · Nissan to Exhibit the *CYPACT Concept Car at the 58th Frankfurt Motor Show (September 1999) *The 3-liter car is a general designation in Europe for vehicles that emit no more carbon dioxide (CO2) than 90 g/km, which is equivalent to consuming 3.4 liters of diesel fuel per 100 kilometers or approximately equal to driving 30 kilometers on a liter of fuel. · Nissan to Participate in Joint Field Trial Projects with the Ultra-Small EV Hypermini. (September 1999) · Nissan honored with the 1999 Climate Protection Award given by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (September 1999) · The "NISSAN ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 1999" is issued. (September 1999) · Nissan expands the models equipped with HYPER CVT - March/March Box and Cube. (November 1999) · A World First: "EXTROID CVT" New Generation Transmission Brought to the Market - Installed in the Cedric and the Gloria. (October 1999) · Nissan expands the models equipped with a natural gas vehicle of the Caravan. (November 1999) · 2000 MODEL YEAR NISSAN SENTRA CERTIFIED AS CLEANEST GASOLINE-FUELED CAR IN THE WORLD Sentra "CA" Meets CARB, Stringent Tailpipe, OBD Emissions Levels. (November 1999) and Zero Evaporative

· Nissan expands the supply system of the "Green Parts". (December 1999) · Nissan expands the models equipped with HYPER CVT - R'nessa. (January 2000) · 2000 Nissan Sentra CA "Clean Air" Model Claims Title, As the Cleanest Gasoline-Fueled Car in the World. (January 2000) · Nissan expands the models equipped with a natural gas vehicle of the AD Van. (January 2000) · Nissan introduces AD Van and Expert which company with Japan's 2000-2001 LEV standards. (January 2000) · Nissan Hypermini Wins "New Energy Grand Prize". (January 2000) · Nissan introduces the Ultra-Small EV Hypermini. (February 2000) · Nissan joins The California Fuel Cell Partnership in the U.S. (March 2000) · Nissan introduces "Green Shop Certification System", which promotes environmental conservation activities at Nissan dealers. (March 2000) · Nissan Releases Tino HYBRID. (March 2000) · Nissan receives Director-General's Award of MITI's Environmental Protection and Industrial Location Bureau under the Recycling. (March 2000) · Nissan AD Van CNGV Becomes the First to be Certified under MOT's Low-Emission Vehicle Certification System for Reducing Exhaust Emissions by 75% from Japan's 2000 Exhaust

26

27

·This program is aimed primarily at Nissan's activities in Japan

Item Overview of Environmental Action Plan (Ver. 3)

I SAFETY IMPROVEMENT I

To improve traffic safety, it is essential to consider three factors--people, automobiles, and the traffic environment. Nissan has been working vigorously to advance these three factors by seeking to increase public awareness regarding safety, researching new traffic environments, and developing safer vehicles.

Environmental Management System Control of Global Warming

· Establishment of Euro and North American Environmental Management Committees

· Attainment of autonomous standards tougher than fuel economy improvement targets set for gasoline engine vehicles (FY 2001) · Attainment of autonomous standards tougher than fuel economy improvement targets set for gasoline engine trucks (FY 2004) · Introduction of direct-injection gasoline and diesel engines · Prevention of emissions of the HFC134a refrigerant (refrigerant savings, recovery) · Development of new motive power sources (hybrid engines, etc.) · Recovery and destruction of CFC12 refrigerant · Early attainment of autonomous standards more stringent than exhaust emission reduction targets set for domestic gasoline engine vehicles (post-1978 exhaust emission regulations: 2000-) · Expanded introduction of low-emission vehicles (LEVs, etc.) · Early attainment of autonomous standards more stringent than long-range requirements set for diesel engine vehicles · Early attainment of autonomous standards more stringent than exhaust gas reduction targets set for special-purpose diesel vehicles (forklifts, etc., 2004-) · Reduction of HC emissions from marine engines by applying automotive technology · Development of hybrid automotive systems · Research and development relating to fuel cell vehicles · Early attainment of autonomous standards tougher than targets set down in the report of the Environment Agency's Central Environmental Council (1998-2000) · Reduction of engine noise levels during idling · Management of chemical substances in general · Establishment of substance data base and substance information distribution system · Elimination of almost all lead (2002) · Implementation of prior environmental impact assessments at new plant sites · Introduction of an ISO environmental management system · Prevention of air pollution Reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) relative to electrodeposition in painted area by more than 30% from the FY 1995 level by FY 2001 · Prevention of water pollution · Overcoming noise, vibration, odors · Stabilization of CO2 emission levels at 1990 level in 2000 · Reduction of basic unit energy consumption relative to the value of production by 10% from the FY 1991 level by FY 2001 · Reduction of waste volume (disposed of in landfills) relative to the value of production by 70% from the FY 1990's level by FY 2000 · Nissan has already attained its goal of discontinuing all use of ozone-depleting substances · Identification of the composition of chemical substances and construction of a related database · Implementation of regular training in the deployment of emergency measures in accordance with the Emergency Manual · Improvement of load factors for parts deliveries to 90% · Attainment of 100% use of plastic pallets for parts deliveries · Improvement of the share of returnable plastic containers used for service parts to 85% · Establishment of separate item for "environmental protection through automobile recycling" · Early attainment of vehicle recycling targets under MITI's "Initiatives to Recycle" (2000-) · To attain a recyclable rate of 90% or higher for new vehicles (2000-) · Recovery, etc., of products during or after use · Promoting appropriate disposal and recycling of end-of-life vehicles · Nissan Environmental network meetings · Organization of the global conferences of Nissan's Environmental Management Committees from Japan, Europe and North America · Proposal of urban transport system based on ultra-mini electric vehicles · Promotion of Green office Program · Publication of environmental reports (annual environmental reports published by Nissan)

People

Enhancement of driver and pedestrian safety awareness

Traffic Environment

Improvement of traffic system such as roads, traffic signals, and traffic laws

Product-Related Environmental Protection

Ozone Layer Protection Reduction of Exhaust Emissions

Basic Concept

Safety for a better and more enjoyable life

Automobiles

Improvement of automobile safety

Development of Alternative Energy Vehicles Reduction of Vehicle Noise

Technical Approach for Safety

Environmental Protection in Nissan's Operations

Improved Management of Chemical Substances Environmental Protection at New Plant Sites

·Automobiles

Nissan is committed to making safer vehicles based on the following safety philosophy. Safety philosophy: As an automobile manufacturer that provides its products throughout the world, Nissan shall research, design, manufacture and sell vehicles which achieve high levels of safety performance and customer satisfaction. We are committed to developing and applying advanced safety technology when practical and to providing appropriate information to customers for the safe use of our products. Nissan has formulated a new "Triple Safety" concept comprising three citadels of safety based on extensive analysis of the relationship between people and vehicles. This new concept represents a further advancement over the conventional ideas of active safety and passive safety. With this concept, Nissan is vigorously improving and expanding safety features by offering the antilock braking system (ABS) and the dual airbag SRS (supplemental restraint system as standard equipment, and by adopting Xenon headlamps, side airbag SRS, and the world-class, high-strength Zone Body construction. As a result of these activities, either the driver's seat or the front passenger seat (or both) of 15 Nissan models were awarded the "AAA", the highest safety rating in the Japan New Car Assessment Program (J-NCAP) conducted by the Ministry of Transport from FY1997 through FY1999. Thus, Nissan has been awarded the most AAAs of all Japanese automakers. Triple Citadels of "Triple Safety"

Citadel 1

Environmental Protection in Vehicle Manufacturing

Advance Prevention of Environmental Issues

Control of Global Warming

Promotion of Waste Reduction and Recycling Ozone Layer Protection Improved Management of Chemical Substances Emergency Measures Environmental Protection in Logistics Operations

Information safety

Citadel 2

Control safety

Citadel 3

Impact safety

Safety technologies for forewarning the driver <Vehicle supports driver>

Driver Visibility Recognition Warning Vehicle Driving environment information

Safety technologies for assisting the driver in avoiding accidents <Cooperative interaction between driver and vehicle>

Safety technologies which act to reduce injury <Vehicle protects people>

Environmental Protection in Vehicle Recycling

Vehicle

Driver (Driving skill) Vehicle (Dynamic performance)

People

Environmental Protection through Cooperation with Subsidiaries and Affiliates Environmental Protection in Relations with Society

Long-life water repellent glass Titanium clear outside mirror Xenon headlamps High-mounted stop lamp Panoramic door mirror, etc

Antilock Braking System (ABS) Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC) Braking Assist Electronic Brake force Distribution (EBD) Adaptive Cruise Control System (ACC), etc.

Dual airbag SRS Side airbag SRS Seatbelts Rear seatbelts with a child seat locking mechanism in the outboard positons Zone Body, etc.

28

29

·People (safety education programs carried out in Japan)

Category Summary 1) Promoting the Nissan "Hello Safety" Campaign together with Nissan dealerships since 1972 to protect children from traffic accidents and to raise drivers' traffic safety awareness Promoting traffic safety awareness · Publication and distribution of the "Traffic Safety Picture Book" of children's illustrations on the theme of traffic rules, and safety book promoting traffic safety and the use of seat belts · A video entitled "Let's use a child seat," designed to encourage people to use a child seat for their infants, is shown at our domestic dealers. The video is also available for rental. · Traffic safety campaigns through newspaper and radio ads, and posters and banners at Nissan's operating offices and dealerships 2) Cooperation with traffic safety events Promoting understanding of vehicles and traffic safety Others 1) Promoting greater understanding of vehicles from the viewpoint of traffic safety by providing descriptions of safety technologies in product catalogs, and by producing and distributing videos concerning safety and related materials 2) Distribution of pamphlets­"Correct Way of Using Safety Equipment" in order to promote the effective use of safety equipment Providing first-aid kits as optional equipment for vehicles Promotion of benefits of "First Aid" among the general public

I INTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS (ITS) I

Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) will bring radical improvements in the safety, efficiency and comfort of road travel by using advanced infocommunications technology and vehicle control technology to network people, vehicles, and roads. Nissan sees ITS as a way to achieve a balanced integration of people, society and the transportation environment. It aims to contribute to the development of environment-friendly motorized communities, and to the realization of a motorized lifestyle that is both safer and more enjoyable.

Nissan is putting forward proposals regarding ITS in the following four fields.

"A safe motoring life" Research and Development and commercialization to support systems for safe driving systems that place emphasis on human-machine interface", including the Advanced Safety Vehicle (ASV), the Advanced CruiseAssist Highway System (AHS), and the Universal Traffic Management Systems (UTMS). Research and development that endeavors to meld cars and infrastructure, for example BIRDVIEW navigation system, vehicle information and communication systems (VICS), and electronic toll collections, and the subsequent bringing of these into practical use, and commercialization. Creating motoring lifestyle enhancements for the multimedia society of the 21st century, including the COMPASSLINK information service and the Mayday emergency reporting system. Research into ultra-compact electric vehicles and traffic-flow simulation with the use of ITS technology, and the presentation of proposals regarding new relationships between the car and the city through the dissemination of information and formulation of proposals.

R

"A smooth and environmentally friendly caroriented society"

"A comfortable and enjoyable motoring life"

·Traffic Environment

Category Summary Nissan has been very active in researching current traffic problems (traffic congestion, accidents, shortage of parking facilities, environmental damage from vehicles) and presenting proposals on improved traffic systems Improving traffic environment · Formulating projections for improved future traffic systems · Researching and making proposals on improving road networks and parking facilities · Participating in public and private sector efforts to develop navigation systems (systems enabling communication between vehicles and monitors that will facilitate a smoother flow of traffic)

"New urban traffic concept"

·R&D Networking

Nissan makes effective use of various domestic and international networks in its research and development relating to ITS. Joining Downtown Rental Car System project of the Association of Electronic Technology for Automobile Traffic and Driving (JSK), Nissan has started a field trial demonstration of the Ultra-small Hypermini EV at the Yokohama Minato Mirai 21 area in January 2000 by using ITS transport control technologies. Downtown Rental Car System project of the Association of Electronic Technology for Automobile Traffic and Driving (JSK) This project is being undertaken for the purpose of developing new transportation systems that emphasize environmental friendliness and user convenience. The idea behind this public field trial is to develop application systems for EVs through the use of Intelligent Transport System (ITS) technologies, conduct tests to evaluate the systems and in this way promote the popularization of EVs. In this field trial, ITS functions are being used to detect vehicle positions and monitor their operating status. Nissan furnishes twenty units of the Hypermini to provide vehicles for business use by people who are working in the Yokohama Minato Mirai 21 district and for personal use by tourists who are going for sightseeing in the neighborhood. Information is communicated between the operations control center, users and vehicles which are fitted with a car navigation system incorporating communications capabilities to achieve efficient operation that is highly convenient to users. Nissan is participating in various governmental projects such as VICS, ETC, UTMS, ASV, and AHS in which Nissan will participate in a joint field demonstration of the Ministry of Transport's Advanced Safety Vehicle (ASV) project and the Ministry of Construction's Advanced Cruise-Assist Highway Systems (AHS) project as well as in the Smart Cruise 21 Demonstration 2000 with Nissan ASV-2 experimental vehicle. The former field trial will be conducted from October through November 2000 and the latter demonstration will be carried out in December. Nissan is also contributing to the establishment of international conferences and standards and the development of systems architecture through its cooperation with government agencies, related organizations and the Vehicle, Road and Traffic Intelligence Society (VERTIS). Nissan has a number of overseas R&D operations, including Nissan Technical Centre Europe Limited (NTCE) in Europe and Nissan Technical Center North America,Inc. (NTCNA) in North America. Research relating to human-machine interface technology is carried out in the United States at the Cambridge Basic Research (CBR). COMPASSLINK CORP. was established in December 1997. In September 1998 it launched the COMPASSLINK service, a nationwide 24-hour information service based on car navigation and the use of digital cellular telephone technology to communicate with operators. Nissan has also developed adaptive cruise control (ACC) system. The new system, which has been adopted in the Cima since July 1999, automatically controls the speed of the host vehicle to maintain a set distance to a preceding vehicle. Nissan has further expanded its involvement in ITS R&D and the development of practical applications and products. In December 1998 it reached basic agreement with Hitachi Ltd. and Unisia JECS Corp. on the expansion of a joint development arrangement in the area of ITS vehicle control technology. In March 1999 Nissan, Calsonic Corp. and Kansei Corp. (merged into Calsonic-Kansei Corp. in April 2000) signed a basic agreement concerning efforts to improve development efficiency and product potential in the area of ITS information technology.

I ADVANCED SAFETY VEHICLE-2 (ASV-2) I

The ASV project is being promoted by the Ministry of Transport. Nissan took part in Phase 1 (FY1991-1995) of this program and is continuing to play an active role in the second phase (FY1996-2000) now under way. Created in line with Phase 2, the Nissan ASV-2 is being used to research and develop technologies for supporting drivers through cooperative interaction with the road infrastructure as well as the human-machine interfaces underlying such driver-assistance systems. Additionally, this experimental vehicle is also contributing to further improvements in the systems Nissan developed during Phase 1 of the project and to the development of many new technologies. Examples of the latter include an all-speed-range Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) system with automatic brake actuation for reducing collision speeds and headlamps with adaptive illumination pattern control.

30

31

IV. COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

Besides working to address environmental and safety issues through vehicle design and engineering, Nissan also has an extensive program of corporate citizenship activities aimed at encouraging artistic and cultural endeavors, international exchanges and community projects. In January 1991, the Corporate Citizenship Office was newly formed as a specialized department responsible for the vigorous promotion of these activities. This close communication with society also helps to create a more attractive corporate culture. Nissan is involved in wide-ranging philanthropic activities in the hope of contributing to the enrichment of society as a good corporate citizen.

I SUPPORT FOR COMMUNITY WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT-RELATED ACTIVITIES I

Nissan supports many community welfare and environment-related activities and provides disaster relief grants.

· Contributes to the National Council of Mothers for Traffic Safety (since 1980) · Donates vehicles to the NHK Public Welfare Organization (since 1981) · Donates welfare vehicles to Nippon Television's 24-hour charity television broadcast program (since 1978); Nissan has donated 165 vehicles to date. Nissan employees have voluntarily held charity bazaars. (since 1985) · Offers two rooms of a dormitory to the steering committee of "Family House" which supports patients suffering from terminal diseases and their families (1994-1999) · Donation to "Kanagawa, Dream Kokutai'' (1998) · Donation to "Children's Hour" campaign. (1999) · Contributed funds to the Keidanren's Environmental Protection Fund (1992, 1995) · Contributes funds to the Clean Japan Center, which treats industrial waste (since 1976) · Donation of two cars with super low exhaust emissions to nature protection activity Group called Creative Conservation Club (C.C.C.) · Donation to "National Natural Observation Countryside" (since 1999) · Donation to "The National Contest of A School Yard Natural Area" (since 1999) · Contributed funds to relief efforts during the Great Hanshin Earthquake, and introduced special leave system to support company teams and volunteers helping the victims of the quake (1995) · Donation of funds and provision of work clothes following a crude oil spill from a Russian tanker (1997) · Lends vehicles for commuting volunteer staff, and sends employees as restoration volunteer to the disaster area of torrential rain in North Kanto and Tohoku (1998) · Donation of funds and relief goods for the Great Taiwan Earthgueke (1999)

I SUPPORTING CULTURE AND THE ARTS I

Nissan sponsors culture-related activities aimed at stimulating the imaginations of children, who represent the foundation of tomorrow's society. It also supports various artistic activities in newer areas of the arts.

Nissan has sponsored the Nissan Children's Storybook and Picture Book Grand Prix, which is held each year for amateur authors and illustrators. The winners of the Nissan Children's Storybook and Picture Book Grand Prix are selected from over 4,000 works submitted annually since 1984. The winning works have been published and distributed free of charge to about 3,400 libraries across Japan through Nissan dealers (since 1985). Nissan cosponsors a series of lectures by Toshio Ozawa, Professor of Shirayuri College, at Nissan dealerships throughout Japan.Mr. Ozawa is a leading authority on Japanese folklore. (since 1992) Every year, Nissan sponsors the Joyful Storybook and Picture Book Exhibition held at the Children's Castle at Aoyama, Tokyo. The event exhibits award-winning works of the Nissan Children's Storybook and Picture Book Grand Prix and other various storybooks and picture books for children. It also provides children with direct experiences of making stories and drawings. (since 1992) As a main sponsor, Nissan has supported the Hans Christian Andersen Award, the most prestigious accolade given to authors and illustrators of children's books by IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) every two years. (since 1992) · A concert for children in Matsumoto by the Saito Kinen Orchestra (since1992) · Hasse Mitsuko "The Verbal Acrobat" performances (since 1995) · Kusatsu International Summer Music Academy & Festival (since 1990) · Rei Naito exhibitions (in 1992, 1995 and 1997) · Yukio Waguri & Kohzensha Butoh Performance with Wadaiko, Shamisen, Modern Art & Lighting (since 1996) · Alice Festival (Asian Little Theater Exchange Network) (since 1996) · Art Communication support "Document 2000 Project" (since 1996) · Activities of "Studio Shokudo"--joint studio for young artists (since 1997-99) · Modern performing arts--AGUA GALA (since 1997)

Community Welfare

Book Grand Prix

Environmental Protection

Nissan Storytelling Circle

Disaster Relief

Joyful Storybook and Picture Book Exhibition

Hans Christian Andersen Award Other Events for Children

I COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES AND EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION I

Nissan makes numerous contribution activities to the local communities where it has business offices.

Plant tours of production lines along with a variety of other events are held at factories to foster closer ties with local communities. These activities include open days, featuring various stands and giving the general public a firsthand look at Nissan's facilities. (at all plants since 1986) The Nissan Technical Center holds a biennial Kaihatsu Festival that includes opening its vehicle design, engineering and testing facilities to the public, a concept car contest, various stands and a host of other events. Some 40,000 visitors attend this festival. (since 1986) Over 200,000 elementary school pupils tour Nissan plants every year as part of their social studies class. Nissan began holding the Nissan Table Tennis School in Yokohama in 1985 for elementary, junior high and high school students and housewives. Alumni of the Nissan Table Tennis Club serve as the coaches.

Supporting the Activities Related to Japanese Arts and Culture

Community Activities

Educational Support Sports Promotion

I SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMI

The Nissan-NPO Learning Scholarship Program was launched in November 1998 as a new initiative for partnerships with nonprofit organizations(NPOs).

· Nissan recruits and selects students who want to experience the activities of an NPO and provides those selected with scholarships as compensation for their work at such organizations. The objective of this program is to help students to acquire intellectual experience at NPOs, where specialized and self-reliant action is required, as part of their preparation for leading meaningful lives in sosiety. Nissan has positioned this Learning Scholarsip Program as an investment in youth,education and the future.

sponsored the Cup Kanagawa Triathlon Athletics Championship. (since Holding Events at Factories and Showrooms · The Oppama Plant has the Nissan Cup NissanTennis Championship have been held at each Nissan plant1988) · Sports events such as Table annually.

Nissan supports employees who want to participate in community activities (volunteer activities etc.)

Employees who seek information about community participation (volunteer activities, etc.) are placed in a register, together with details of the areas of activity in which they and their families are interested. Information is supplied from time to time on the basis of the data registered. (since 1993) "H` IMAGINE," a community participation journal, is published every other week. (since 1992)

Nissan-NPO Learning Scholarship Program

"TRY-ANGLE" community participation scheme

I INTERNATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE I

Nissan supports a host of activities intended to accurately communicate aspects of contemporary Japan to overseas audiences and to facilitate a deeper mutual understanding of Japanese and overseas cultures.

· Contributed funds to establish the Nissan Institute for Japanese Studies at Oxford University in the United Kingdom (1979); · Nissan committed additional funds to construct a new building for the Institute and to cover the operating costs of courses · there.(1990-1994) · Contributes funds to Harvard University for establishing Asia Center (since 1997) · Donates vehicle for activities of OISCA, International in Malaysia (1997) · Donates vehicle to UNICEF · Donates to ESUJ. University Debating Competition(1998-) · Supported Project for the Chapel of St. Vigor de Mieux in which Japanese artists and local · residents in France cooperated to repair an old church in the region (since 1993)

Nissan financial support system for volunteer activities

Grants are provided to fund volunteer activities in which employees are directly involved, and to purchase goods that employees wish to donate to facilities or organizations. Under a new "matching gift" system, the Company makes matches donations made by employees to those organizations. (since 1996) The Company hosts "Philanthropy Seminars" to provide basic knowledge required for volunteer activities, such as sign language, information about wheelchairs and environmental issues. (since 1994)

Others

Establishment of a special paid holiday system to support employees' volunteer activities for Japan Overseas Cooporation Volunteers. (since 1975)

Contributing to Overseas Research Organizations and Non-Profit organizations (NPO), etc.

The overseas companies in the Nissan Group are also engaged in activities that contribute to the local communities where they do business.

Nissan Foundation (United States)

In 1992, Nissan Motor Corporation in the U.S.A. began providing $1 million annually over a five-year period to the Nissan Foundation. Income generated from the management of the Foundation donates to a minority support organization -- L.A. Urban League etc. Nissan and the Los Angeles Urban League are working together to promote minority education, training, and employment. (since 1992) Nissan Motor Corporation in the U.S.A., Nissan Canada Inc. and other local Nissan offices in the U.S. and Canada match the amount of funds contributed by employees. The matched funds are then donated to support the activities of the United Way, the largest jointfund-soliciting organization in the United States. (since 1982) Employees of Nissan Canada Inc. deliver meals to the sick and elderly who live alone in the surrounding neighborhoods. Nissan Canada provides the delivery vehicles and pays the fuel costs. (since 1990) Nissan Norge AS, in cooperation with the local P4 Radio Channel, donated NOK 350,000 to a cancer research group on "Nissan Day", September 23, 1998. Nissan Norge AS, is donating to humanitarian groups every year on this day since 1995. Three companies belonging to the U.K. Nissan Group support the activities of National Children's Home, an organization which helps children and the families of children who suffer from poverty or incurable disease. Support is provided through contributions, donation of vehicles, and employee fund-raising. (Since 1994, Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd., Nissan Motor (GB) Ltd., Nissan Technical Centre Europe Ltd.)

Fostering a Better Understanding of Japanese Arts and Culture

Support to United Way of America (United States and Canada)

Meals on Wheels (Canada) Contribution on the "Nissan Day" (Norway) Support to National Children's Home (United Kingdom)

32

33

VI. PRINCIPAL SUBSIDIARIES AND AFFILIATES

I NISSAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION I

In April 1974, Nissan celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Company's founding by establishing the Nissan Science Foundation, presently headed by Yoshifumi Tsuji, to contribute to the advancement of Japanese sciences. The foundation concentrates on fostering scientific research in the natural sciences, and environmental and life sciences, holding symposia, and contributing to research conferences in related fields. In 1993, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of establishment, Nissan established the Nissan Science Prize, which is given to young researchers--whose research has been recognized both overseas and in Japan--to acknowledge their outstanding accomplishments and to encourage their further research activities. As of March 31, 1999, the foundation's endowment amounted to about ¥7.2 billion.

I INSTITUTE OF AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY I

As the number of cars increases and automobile technology advances, Nissan has opened five vocational schools in Japan for car service with the aim of nurturing superior automobile mechanics to meet society's demands for improved car service and car safety systems.

School Name

Nissan Institute of Automotive Technology

Address / Telephone

2120, Oaza Kamigo, Kaminokawa-machi, Kawachi-gun, Tochigi Tel : 0285-56-3585 910, Ichisawa-cho, Asahi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa Tel : 045-371-2990 7-12, Koei 1-chome, Minato-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi Tel : 052-653-4123

Date of Opening

Class Size

300 persons/grade (auto mechanic course) 30 persons/grade (auto mechanic research course)

·Foundation Development

Item 19751992 ¥3,234 (483) 192 (250) ¥3,426 1993 ¥205 (62) 5 (8) ¥210 1994 ¥210 (56) 10 (7) ¥220 1995 ¥207 (57) 9 (8) ¥217 1996 ¥200 (57) 8 (7) ¥208 1997 ¥200 (54) 9 (7) ¥209 1998 ¥200 (55) 5 (6) ¥205

Fiscal years beginning April 1 1999 ¥194 (53) 5 (6) ¥199 Total ¥4,651 (877) 243 (299) ¥4,894

April 1983

Research Grants Support for Symposia Total

Nissan Institute of Mechanic and Business

April 1989

240 persons/grade (auto mechanic course) 50 persons/grade (auto business course)

Nissan Aichi Automobile Technical School

April 1993

200 persons/grade (auto mechanic course) 20 persons/grade (auto mechanic research course) 350 persons/grade (auto mechanic course) 50 persons/grade (auto body repair course) 40 persons/grade (auto body repair major course) 20 persons/grade (auto mechanic research course) 20 persons/grade (auto painting research course)

Note: Figures in millions of yen; numbers in parentheses represent the number of grants or symposia. Figures include rewards for winners of the Nissan Science Prize since fiscal year 1993. (3 prizes in fiscal year 1993, and 2 prizes in fiscal years 1994, 1995, 1996 ,1997, 1998 and 1999)

Nissan Motor Kyoto Technical Institute

27-6, Hayashi, Kumiyama-cho, Kuse-gun, Kyoto Tel : 0774-46-1123

April 1988

V. Club Activities and Professional Soccer Team

With the enhancement of workers' morale and the creation of a united feeling as the Company's goal, Nissan actively supports three organized sports clubs --the Baseball, Table Tennis, and Track and Field clubs.

Fiscal years beginning April 1

Nissan Ehime Automobile Technical School

I BASEBALL TEAM I

(Started in 1959)

8-27, Miyanishi 2-chome, Matsuyama-shi, Ehime Tel : 089-925-0103

April 1977

100 persons/grade

1998 1999

The 69th Intercity Baseball Tournament (Champion) The 52nd Babe Ruth Cup Baseball Tournament (Champion) The 70th Intercity Baseball Tournament (Quarter finalist) The 53rd Babe Ruth Cup Baseball Tournament (Semi Finalist) The 55th Tokyo 'suponichi' Cup Baseball Tournament (Semi Finalist)

Fiscal years beginning April 1 ~

I TABLE TENNIS CLUB I

(Men's club started in 1960)

1997 1999 1998 1999

Sweep of official Big Four' tournaments, achieving a Grand Slam for three years in a row First and Second Half Japan League All-Japan Table Tennis Championship Tournament <Institutional Division> All-Japan Institutional Table Tennis Championship Tournament Tokyo Table Tennis Chmpionship Tournament (<Single Division>Champion:Takashi & Chin) Tokyo Table Tennis Chmpionship Tournament (<Doubles Division>Champion:Takashi & Chin) All-Japan Table Tennis Championship Tournament <Single Division> (single & doubles Champion:Shibutani) Mr.Shibutani is selected to participate in the Sydney Olympics in September

{

Fiscal years beginning April 1

I TRACK AND FIELD CLUB I

(Started in 1947)

1998

52nd Kanagawa Road Relay (Champion) 43rd New Year Road Relay

I YOKOHAMA F ·MARINOS PROFESSIONAL SOCCER TEAMI

Established in 1972, the Nissan Football Club compiled an impressive record as an industrial league team, winning the Imperial Cup All-Japan Soccer Championship Tournament a record six times. The Club has been playing in the J-League under the name Yokohama Marinos since this professional soccer league was started in Japan in 1993. The Yokohama Marinos have continued their winning tradition by capturing the J-League Championship in 1995. The Nissan Football Club Corp. was established in 1992 to operate and manage the Yokohama Marinos. On February 1, 1999, the Nissan Football Club merged with ANA Sports Co., Ltd. The company name became "Yokohama Marinos Ltd.," and the team name, "Yokohama F ·Marinos." The club will strive to cultivate close ties with the local community. The Yokohama F.Marinos has won the 2000 JLeague 1st Stage Championship for the first time after its unification.

Corporate Data Company Name Team Name Origin of the Team Name President Paid-in Capital Date of Establishment Address Yokohama Marinos Ltd. Yokohama F ·Marinos Marinos is Spanish for mariner. The name is intended to convey one of the aspirations of this team from the international port city of Yokohama: to become a top international soccer team. Shuzo Nogami ¥28.6 million (70%, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. 30%, All Nippon Airways) April 1, 1992 Head Office: 18-1, Shin-Koyasu 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 045-434-2331 Home Ground: 1527 Shinano-machi, Totsuka-ku, Kanagawa 045-823-2200 35

34

I PRINCIPAL SUBSIDIARIES AND AFFILIATES IN JAPAN I

Company Vehicle assembly Aichi Machine Industry Co., Ltd. Nissan Diesel Motor Co., Ltd. Nissan Shatai Co., Ltd. Alpha Corporation Calsonic Kansai Corporation EXEDY Corporation Fuji Univance Corporation Hashimoto Forming Industry Co., Ltd. Ikeda Bussan Co., Ltd. JATCO TransTechnology Ltd. Jidosha Denki Kogyo Co., Ltd. Kasai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Kinugawa Rubber Industrial Co., Ltd. Kiriu Machine Mfg. Co., Ltd. Parts Nihon Plast Co., Ltd. Niles Parts Co., Ltd. Nissan Kohki Co., Ltd. Ohi Seisakusho Co., Ltd. Rhythm Corporation Saga Tekkosho Co., Ltd. Tennex Corporation Tochigi Fuji Industrial Co., Ltd. Unisia JECS Corporation Unipres Corporation Yorozu Corporation Xanavi Informatics Corporation Finance Nissan Financial Services Co., Ltd. Nissan Finance Co., Ltd. Principal Products or Areas of Operations Vehicles (Serena), engines, transmissions Vehicles (Atlas, heavy- and medium-duty trucks), diesel engines Vehicles (Fairlady Z, Avenir, Elgrand, Prairie Liberty, Wingroad, AD Van, Safari, Datsun) Door handles, keys, coin-operated lockers Car air conditioners, radiator, mufflers, Interior and exterior components, meters, harnesses, airbags Clutches, torque converters, transmissions parts Transmissions, transfers for 4WD vehicles Moldings, door sashes, finisher, wheel covers Production and sales of seats, automotive interior parts Development, production and sales of transmissions Electrical products (wipers, relays, power windows switches, speed controllers) Automotive interior parts (door trim, insulators, sun visors) Automotive rubber, synthetic plastic parts Casting automotive parts, numerical control systems, machine tools Steering wheels, console boxes, airbags Switches, relays, electronic equipment Engines, axles, marine and industrial equipment engines Door locks, door hinges, wind regulators Steering linkages, ball joints, load sensing valves Bolts Air cleaners, oil filters, converters Viscous control units, differential locks, hub locks Pistons, clutches, power steering systems, antilock braking systems (ABS), electronic concentrated engine control system Stamping parts (gasoline tanks, radiator core supports, pillars, rails, etc.), precision-pressed parts Stamping parts (suspension members, oil pans, multi-link suspensions) Development, production, and sales of car navigations and audio Auto credit, Car leasing, Car rental, Card business Financial services for the group companies Equity Interest*1 41.60% 23.37% 45.15% 30.44% 34.35% * 23.41% 31.47% 28.44% 38.98% 99.71% 22.73% 21.27% 21.08% 36.88% 26.57% 40.00% 91.82% 29.59% 51.00% 33.40% 56.69% 20.45% 26.09% 30.80% 31.18% 49.00% 100.0% * 100.0%

3 2

As of July 1, 2000 Date of Establishment May 1949 May 1950 April 1949 April 1938 April 2000 July 1950 March 1937 December 1939 May 1948 October 1999 September 1947 October 1946 October 1939 December 1906 October 1948 March 1954 September 1964 August 1943 December 1961 November 1938 July 1945 June 1952 May 1956 April 1998 April 1948 January 1991 July 2000 August 1987 Representative Masato Nakagawa Hirofumi Nakazawa Kazutaka Kobatake Kinichi Takahashi Koichi Takagi Takeshi Nakano Iwao Suzuki Kunio Toda Susumu Miyata Kenichi Sasaki Yoshimichi Urabe Zenzo Fujita Toshihiko Sekine Toshio Nakagawa Makoto Hirose Taketoshi Suzuki Kiyoshi Miyamoto Masaru Naramura Keiichi Maejima Tatsuzo Katsuya Nobuo Araki Yoshikazu Kurihara Koichiro Toda Morihiko Terada Akihiko Shido Atsushi Fujii Minoru Nakamura Thierry Moulonguet Address 2-12, Kawanami-cho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 456-8601 1-1, Oaza, Ageo-shi, Saitama 362-8523 10-1, Amanuma, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 254-8610 6-8, Fukuura 1-chome, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 236-0004 24-15, Minamidai 5-chome, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-8602 1-1 Kidamotomiya 1-chome, Neyagawa-shi, Osaka 572-8570 2418, Washizu, Kosai-shi, Shizuoka 431-0431 320, Kamiyabe-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 245-8511 771, Kozono-cho, Ayase-shi, Kanagawa 252-1121 700-1, Aza Kamoda, Imaizumi, Fuji-shi, Shizuoka 417-8585 1760, Higashi-Matano-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 245-8510 3316, Miyayama, Samukawa-machi, Koza-gun, Kanagawa 253-0106 330, Naganuma-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-0005 2, Omata-Minami-cho, Ashikaga-shi, Tochigi 326-0142 218, Aoshima-cho, Fuji-shi, Shizuoka 417-0047 Steering wheels, console boxes 6-1, Okada 6-chome, Samukawa-machi, Koza-gun, Kanagawa 253-0105 14-7, Maruyama 1-chome, Isogo-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 235-8588 283-3, Gokyu-cho, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 430-0831 129-3, Takaya, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 251-0017 591, Shimo Akasaka, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-1155 2388, Omiya-cho, Tochigi-shi, Tochigi 328-8502 1370, Onna, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-8510 19-1, Gomijima, Fuji-shi, Shizuoka 416-8510 7-60, Tarumachi 3-chome, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 222-8560 2-4991, Hironodai 2-chome, Zama-shi, Kanagawa 228-0012 2-10, Shiroganedai 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0071 Nissan Builnet 1, 16-9, Ginza 6-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061 Tel. No. 052-681-1111 048-781-2301 0463-21-8001 045-787-8400 03-5385-0111 0720-22-1151 053-576-1311 045-811-1211 0467-70-0512 0545-51-0047 045-853-7501 0467-75-1111 043-259-3111 0284-62-2321 0545-52-0481 03-3763-0333 0467-75-1711 045-757-7000 053-462-2111 0466-27-1721 0492-66-7612 0282-27-1111 046-225-8025 0545-62-5020 045-543-6800 046-259-1300 03-5424-4111 03-3541-4821

Note:

Companies listed on a stock exchange or an over-the-counter market 1 Nissan and its consolidated subsidiaries' combined shareholdings as of March 31, 2000 2 As of April 1, 2000 3 As of July 1, 2000

36

37

As of July 1, 2000 Company Kyushu Kyuko Ferry K.K. Nissan Motor Car Carrier Co., Ltd. Logistics Nissan Prince Kaiun Co., Ltd. Nissan Transport Co., Ltd. Overseas Air Cargo Co., Ltd. Vantec Corporation Autech Japan, Inc. Carion Co., Ltd. Creative Box Inc. e-Graphics Co., Ltd. Estech Corporation IID Inc. NIC Co., Ltd. Nissan Altia Co., Ltd. Nissan Arc Ltd. Services Nissan Builnet Corporation Nissan Digital Process Ltd. Principal Products or Areas of Operations Freight carrier operation between Oppama, Omaezaki and Kanda Operation of export car carriers (shipping) Operation of car carriers (shipping) Automobile shipping in Japan, maintenance, and storage Air freight services Transportation of automotive parts, packing, customs clearance, storage and delivery of commodities, and moving operations Development, production, and sales of limited-edition vehicles (including specially equipped vehicles) Fee-based job search services (T.B.D.) Design research and product planning for automobiles and other production Printing, photoengraving, bookbinding, planning and production of information media and sales Consulting services through analysis and simulation Planning, execution, evaluation, and verification of market research related to design Development of software, System operation and maintenance.Service and operation of Nissan information commutication network. Development and sale of car accessories, automotive service equipment, and factory machinery Operations and consulting related to the analysis and assay of raw materials Comprehensive buildings management, rental building management CAD/CAM/CAE, design and development of software systems Equity Interest*1 42.00% 60.00% 27.08% 100.0% 60.00% 72.17% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 33.42% 70.00% 100.0%

3 68.64% *

Date of Establishment August 1974 June 1965 January 1963 October 1961 April 1982 January 1954 September 1986 June 1999 November 1987 January 1980 February 1989 October 1990 April 2000 January 1936 December 1990 November 1960 February 1987 July 1999 December 1956 September 1984 June 1964 July 1987 February 1983 November 1985 April 1978 April 1992

Representative Osamu Takemura Akio Sumitomo Yutaka Nagate Yoshi Iwashita Shinsuke Okuno Shinsuke Okuno Tsuyoshi Aibe Makoto Okuri Takeo Shibue Ichiro Inoue Koreyuki Yamamoto Makoto Moriya Isao Oya Sakae Komuro Kunio Funabiki Kenshow Kusumi Hirofumi Nakazawa Shin Miyahara Kunihiro Matsuda Jiro Adachi Kenshow Kusumi Sotaro Mori Shoichiro Fujita Iwao Nakamura Tetsuo Tabata Shuzo Nogami

Address Kabukiza Bldg., 12-15, Ginza 4-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061 7F Tougeki Building, 1-1, Tsukiji 4-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 11F, Recruit Kobe Building, 95, Edo-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe-shi, Hyogo 650-0033 9-11, Tsurumi-Chuo 4-chome, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 230-0051 12-2, Nihonbashi-Hakozaki-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 103-0015 3-353, Koyasudori, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 221-0021 824-2, Hagizono, Chigasaki-shi, Kanagawa 253-8571 16-9, Ginza 6-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061 31-15, Jingumae 6-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 25-28, Mure 6-chome, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-0002 89-1, Yamashita-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 231-0023 4F, Zentaku-Roppongi Bldg, 1-27, Roppongi 1-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032 6F, Nissan Yokohama Building, 6-32, Takashima 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 220-0011 Gate City Osaki, East Tower 11-2, Osaki 1-chome, Shinagawa-ku Tokyo 141-8573 1 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa 237-0061 16-9, Ginza 6-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061 9-6, Naka-machi 2-chome, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0018 910, Ichisawa-cho, Asahi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 241-0014 2384, Kamiyabe-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 245-8558 10-6, Minami-Oi 2-chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-8563 17-2, Ginza 7-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061 31-5, Shin-Koyasu 1-chome, kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 221-0013 10-1, Higashi-Shinagawa 4-chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-0002 791-1, Hibarigaoka 5-chome, Zama-shi, Kanagawa 228-0003 Mita 43 Mori Bldg., 13-16, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 18-1, Shin-Koyasu 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 221-8523

Tel. No. 03-3545-2011 03-3543-5165 078-391-6492 045-502-1123 03-5644-0410 045-441-8171 0467-87-8001 03-5565-2224 03-3486-0791 0422-49-5523 03-3505-2721 045-661-1661 045-451-5770 03-5436-2355 0468-67-5280 03-3541-4616 046-225-3923 045-373-5688 045-814-7301 03-3763-2331 03-3543-5051 045-402-2355 03-3450-5523 046-256-7111 03-5442-2311 045-434-2331

91.95% 74.63% 100.0% 90.00% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 67.00% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 69.93%

Nissan Human Resources Development Center Inc. Education planning and implementation Nissan Koe Co, Ltd. Nissan Motorsports International Co., Ltd. Nissan Real Estate Development Corporation Nissan Security Service Co, Ltd. Nissan Sports Plaza Co., Ltd. Nissan Techno Co., Ltd. Nissan Trading Co., Ltd. Yokohama Marinos Ltd. Shop services, design and production of manufacturing facilities, environmental landscaping, information, printing, insurance agency, and travel agency Promotion of motorsports (race, auto camp, events, vehicle remodeling), parts Real estate business Security services (including machine maintenance), sales of fire protection equipment, and general administrative services for facilities Management of health and sports facilities, restaurants, and parking lots Design, drawing and translation of technical materials and design drawings Import and export of materials and parts Management of soccer club and other sports-related activities

38

39

I PRINCIPAL SUBSIDIARIES AND AFFILIATES WORLDWIDE I

Region Country United States (California) (Tennesse) North America (California) (Michigan) (California) Company Operations Headquarters for management of North America operations, such as production, sales, and overall strategic management. Production of vehicles and auto parts (NMMC was merged into the NNA organization on April 2000) Vehicle styling Vehicle development, technical research, vehicle evaluation, homologation, and basic research Financing and leasing services for Nissan products Imports/sales of vehicles, and auto parts Financing and leasing services for Nissan products Production of vehicles and auto parts Vehicle development Sales of vehicles, industrial machinery, and auto parts Headquarters for management of European operations, such as production, sales, and overall strategic management Imports/sales of vehicles and auto parts Imports/sales of vehicles, industrial machinery, and auto parts Imports/sales of vehicles and auto parts Imports/sales of vehicles and auto parts Development/Production of vehicles and engines Imports/sales of vehicles and auto parts Imports/sales of vehicles and auto parts Production/sales of vehicles and auto parts Distribution/after service of vehicles and auto parts for China Production/sales of commercial vehicles Production/sales of vehicles and auto parts Headquarters for management of Middle East operations, such as sales and marketing Production and Sales of Nissan and Nissan Diesel vehicles in South Africa, and managing such operations as exports to other areas Production/sales of cast aluminum parts Imports/sales of vehicles and auto parts Equity Interest Date of Establishment

As of March 31, 2000 Representative (As of July 1, 2000)

Nissan North America, Inc.

100%

January 1960

Norio Matsumura

President

Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A. Nissan Design International, Inc. Nissan Technical Center North America, Inc. Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation Nissan Canada Inc.

0% (Nissan North America, Inc., 100%) 0% (Nissan North America, Inc., 100%) 0% (Nissan North America, Inc., 100%) 0% (Nissan North America, Inc., 100%) 38.3% (Nissan North America, Inc., 61.7%) 0% (Nissan Canada Inc., 100%) 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 100% 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 100% 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 94.8%) 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 6.8% (Nissan Europe N.V., 92.9%, other 0.3%) 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 0% (Nissan Europe N.V., 100%) 25% 100% 25% 99.88% 100%

July 1988 April 1979 July 1983 November 1981 January 1965 June 1990 April 1984 May 1988 March 1991 April 1989 March 1982 February 1969 June 1973 January 1985 March 1920 January 1995 January 1988 September 1953 June 1994 November 1973 September 1961 June 1994 David Archibald Hitoshi Kawaguchi R. Toni Pulm Thomas H. Bucher R. Boronat Daniel J. Young Giuliano Musumeci Greco Vivian W. Yen Akio Kondo Phornthep Phornprapha Hiroshi Yoshioka Kyosuke Miyoshi President President President Managing Director Managing Director President President Chairperson President President President Managing Director Tom Semple Shigeo Ishida Katsumi Ishii Kiyoharu Owada Kiyoharu Owada John Cushnaghan Masaki Sugisawa Brian Carolin , President (effective Oct.1, 00) President President President President Managing Director President Managing Director

Canada Nissan Canada Finance, Inc. Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. U.K. Nissan Technical Centre Europe Ltd. Nissan Motor (GB) Ltd. Nissan Europe N.V. Netherlands Nissan Motor Nederland B.V. Europe France Germany Switzerland Nissan France S.A. Nissan Motor Deutschland GmbH Nissan Motor (Schweiz) AG Nissan Motor Ibérica, S.A. Spain Nissan Motor España, S.A. Italy Taiwan Asia China Thailand Middle Latin East America Mexico United Arab Emirates South Africa Nissan Italia S.p.A. Yulon Motor Co., Ltd. Nissan Motor (China) Ltd. Siam Nissan Automobile Co., Ltd. Nissan Mexicana, S.A. de C.V. Nissan Middle East FZE

Africa

Automakers Ltd. Nissan Casting Australia Pty. Ltd.

98.8% 100% 100%

September 1974 October 1992 May 1966

Toshio Aoki Leon P. Daphne Leon P. Daphne

CEO President President

Oceania

Australia Nissan Motor Co. (Australia) Pty. Ltd.

40

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