Read Genre Units of Study text version

Genre Units of Study

Erica Maynard Julie Stratman

The Reciprocity of Reading and Writing

· How authors write texts that readers can comprehend and how readers use their knowledge of text conventions and style assists the reader's comprehension. This illustrates the relationship between reading and writing. · If readers understand how texts are organized and how writers write, and if they have an understanding of the author's topic, they can use information to predict and infer author's intentions. · TFDC p. 90-91

The Reciprocity of Reading and Writing

· If readers lack experience with authors and texts, their reading comprehension is likely to be impaired. · It is so important for students to have some knowledge of the organization of the texts they read, we as teachers must introduce our students to genre studies. · TFDC p. 90-91

What is a genre?

· It is organized to a specified set of criteria for a particular written form.

Glossary of genres

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Autobiography Biography Fable Fairy tale Fantasy Folktale Historical Fiction Memoir Mystery Nonfiction Poetry Realistic Fiction Science Fiction Tall Tale P. 132- TFDC Book lists- p. 133-156 TFDC

How long does it take?

· The genre unit of study can take several weeks and usually only one specific study is done per quarter. · It can be integrated in many literacy activities but specifically in phase II and writer's workshop.

How do you fit Phase II in?

· It needs to be in your schedule at least 3 times a week for 30 minutes in 1st-3rd and 20 minutes for Kdg.

Determining appropriate genre studies for your grade

· · · · · District Writing Genres per quarter (pilot) 1st- Narrative 2nd- Functional 3rd- Expository(Informational) 4th- Poetry

Determining appropriate genre studies for your grade

· Next steps.... · As a school, it would be beneficial to strategically plan explicitly taught genres for each grade for each quarter. · You should begin by thinking about the writing genres and what genre would be appropriate for your students in writing.

Monroe Strategic Plan

See handout

Genres Nursery Rhymes Animal Fantasy(narrative) Narrative story(ISAT) Personal Narrative essay)(ISAT) Fables(ISAT) Folktales(ISAT) Simple Biographies Historical Fiction Fairy Tale(ISAT) Poetry(ISAT)

Kindergarten 3 1

First 3 2-reading only-(2nd) 1 2-(1st) 2-How to- (3rd)

Second 3 1 2-(1st) 2-All About-(3rd)

Third

2(1st - 2nd) Factual Information(non-fiction- 2-Descriptive ­(3rd)

1 1 1 1 2-(4th) 1 2-(4th) 2-Reading only-(2nd) 2-(4th)

2-(1st) 3-(1st) 2-Descriptive Expository essay(3rd) 2-reading only-(2nd) 2-reading only-(2nd) 1 1 3 2-(4th)

1-Introduce (read alouds) 2-Explicitly Teach ( unit of study) 3-Reinforce ( review text structure) K-3 Writing Genre Studies

Genres Narrative -1st Functional-2nd Expository(Informational)-3rd Poetry-4th

Kindergarten 2-personal 2-labels 2-descriptive 2-free verse

First 2-personal 2-letters 2-how to 2-acrostic/free verse

Second 2-personal 2-writing about reading 2-all about 2-cinquains/free verse

Third 2-story 2-writing about reading 2-descriptive essay 2-couplets/free verse

Planning the genre study

· Begin choosing your mentor texts and books for your library basket. · You will also need to consider the text map and writing guide when making your choices.

What is a mentor text?

· Mentor texts are books that are well loved by the teacher and known inside and out, backward and forward. · They are revisited many times to help students examine the works of the author. · It has great curricular potential, i.e. language examples, comprehension strategies, author's craft. · It allows you to look at texts through the eyes of the writer and then to write like a reader.

How do I choose a mentor text?

· Titles recommended by

­ ­ ­ ­ Colleagues Professional literature Librarians Discussion board- www.arliteracymodel.org

Selecting mentor texts

· Select books with rich vocabulary to read with the eyes of a reader and a writer. · Summarize the story and list reading, writing, and language mini-lessons using the text you have selected. · Think of the students in your classroom, needs, loves, and language development levels.

Sample Mentor Text

Personal Narrative: · A Chair For My Mother · Owl Moon · When the Relatives Came · When I Was Young in the Mountains · Thundercake

Narrative Story: Mentor Text

· The Recess Queen · The Butterfly · Amazing Grace

Realistic Fiction: Mentor Text

· The Night Tree · Amazing Grace · My Rotten Red Headed Older Brother

Functional: Letters

· · · · Dear Annie Dear Mr. Blueberry Dear Mrs. LaRue I Wanna Iguana

Expository: How to

· How to Lose All Your Friends · How to Make a Card · How to Make a Super Sandwich

Expository: Recipe

· · · · · Super Snack Recipes Pancakes for Breakfast The Popcorn Book Pancakes, Pancakes Saturdays and Teacakes

Expository: Descriptive Essay

· Everybody Needs a Rock · Stars Beneath Your Bed

What is a text map and writing guide?

· A text map covers the essential features of the book type. Students use the map to analyze the book and it's features. · The writing guide is the tool to help the student construct the writing piece in that specific genre.

Narrative Text Map

A Chair For My Mother

First Grade Personal Narrative Story Organizer

Recipe Text Map

Sample format for a genre study which begins in Phase II- Developing knowledge of text structures

· · · Teacher assesses the students' background knowledge of the specific genre to be studied and charts the students' responses. Teacher records the definition of the genre on a chart. Teacher book talks 8-10 books in the specific genre.

· Teacher( and students) choose 1-2 mentor texts to use as exemplars or mentors during this study. The remainder of the books are placed in the classroom library that can be used for read alouds, independent reading, or small group instruction. · Teacher reads aloud a mentor text and the teacher and students engage in purposeful talk about the text. Teacher supports the students as they analyze the text structure for the specific genre.

· Teacher charts students' responses on a large text map. (Teacher will want to complete prior to lesson) · Teacher and students discuss author's purpose for writing this genre. · Teacher records what students are noticing about the genre on a chart. · Students place a copy of chart in the genre section of their notebook. · Teacher continues this cycle with other mentor text.

Reading: Developing and applying comprehension strategies

· Teacher and students read or reread a mentor text and the teacher models and engages the students in applying comprehension strategies as they comprehend the text. · Teacher and students add to and/or revise their comprehension strategies chart. · Teacher leaves the chart on the wall. Teacher and students revisit the chart and/or revises the chart during future lessons and studies.

Ten strategies for deep comprehension

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Predicting Inferring Visualizing Connecting Analyzing Summarizing Synthesizing Skimming Critiquing Reflecting All require the reader to activate prior knowledge and use multiple sources of information to think beyond the text.

Responding to Reading in Journals

Responding to Reading

Responding to Reading

Student Reading Journals

Reading Comprehension Mini-lessons: Knowledge of vocabulary, language use and conventions

· Language units of study may overlap with genre studies.

Language Units

Reading Conferences

· During independent reading, the teacher conferences with the students pertaining to any learning(mini-lessons) during the genre unit.

Shared Writing: Using Composing Strategies and Knowledge of Conventions in Writer's Workshop · Teacher and students make a list of ideas for writing in this particular genre. · Teacher engages students in a shared writing(writing aloud) experience around an idea; the group plans for writing using the text guide(large). · Teacher and students draft and revise their class writing. · Teacher and students apply their knowledge of text structure, composing strategies, and of language use and conventions to write a story for the audience. · Teacher and students use a writing checklist to reflect on their writing. * Shared Writing may happen at the same time as Independent Writing

Independent Writing: Using Composing Strategies and Knowledge of Conventions

· Students choose an idea from the class list, students rehearse the idea with a peer; students use a text guide to plan their writing. · Students use learning from their co-constructed charts, notebooks, and notes to assist with writing their writing piece. · Students reflect on their writing using a writing checklist.

Writing Conferences

· Teacher conferences with the students pertaining to the new learning(mini-lessons) during the genre unit.

Genre Unit Planning Guide

· See handout

Book Talks 8-10

Mentor Text 1-2

Develop knowledge of text structure

Developing & Applying Comp. Strategies

Shared Writing

Guided Reading Texts

Independent writing

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

1. 2. 3

Mentor text:

Mentor Text

Text Map Text map can be done with partners after 1st time. Create chart: What we are noticing about the text structure

Teacher models and engages the students in applying comp. strategies. Add to Comprehension Strategies Chart

Teacher and students chart "global" ideas for writing

Students create a list of writing ideas in Writer's Notebook.

Students choose an idea from their notebook, rehearse idea with a peer, and use an organizer to plan their writing. Students use composing strategies and knowledge of conventions to write piece *Teacher can do writing units of study during WW minilessons.

Place a copy in Genre Learning Section of Reading Notebook.

Repeat with all mentor texts

Discuss author's purpose for writing genre

Teacher engages students in a shared writing experience around a common experience. The group rehearses their writing plans using a text guide(graphic organizer) and begins drafting and revising their genre piece.

Revise original definition of genre

Place a copy of the definition in Reading Notebooks.

Teacher and students use coconstructed anchor charts and notebooks to assist with class genre writing.

Let's walk through a First Grade Personal Narrative Genre Unit

· Handout

Book Talks 8-10

Mentor Text 1-2

Develop knowledge of text structure

Mentor text:

Developing & Applying Comp. Strategies

Mentor Text

Shared Writing

Guided Reading Texts

Independent writing

1. Salt Hands 2. Do Like Kyla 3. Joshua Night Whispers 4. Night Shift Daddy 5.I Fly 6.Birthday Presents 7.Little House Books 8. Art Lesson 9. My Great Aunt Arizona 10. Owl Moon

1. Christmas in the Big Woods 2. A Chair For My Mother 3. Birthday Presents

Text Map Text map can be done with partners after 1st time. Create chart: What we are noticing about the text structure

Teacher models and engages the students in applying comp. strategies. Add to Comprehension Strategies Chart *Predicting *Connecting

Teacher and students chart "global" ideas for writing *Special Person *Miss Nelson is Missing *Halloween Party Students create a list of writing ideas in Writer's Notebook.

Students choose an idea from their notebook, rehearse idea with a peer, and use an organizer to plan their writing. Students use composing strategies and knowledge of conventions to write piece *Teacher can do writing units of study during WW minilessons.

Place a copy in Genre Learning Section of Reading Notebook. Repeat with all mentor texts Discuss author's purpose for writing genre

·Prediction ·Text Map ·Connection

Revise original definition of genre

Teacher engages students in a shared writing experience around a common experience. The group rehearses their writing plans using a text guide(graphic organizer) and begins drafting and revising their genre piece. Teacher and students use coconstructed anchor charts and notebooks to assist with class genre writing.

Place a copy of the definition in Reading Notebooks.

Book Talks

· · · · · · · · · · 1. Salt Hands 2. Do Like Kyla 3. Joshua Night Whispers 4. Night Shift Daddy 5. I Fly 6. Birthday Presents 7. Little House Books 8. Art Lesson 9. My Great Aunt Arizona 10. Owl Moon

Mentor Texts

· 1. Christmas in the Big Woods · 2. A Chair For My Mother

· 3. Birthday Present

Text Maps

Text Maps

What are we noticing about Personal Narratives?

Definition of a Personal Narrative

Shared Writing

Independent Writing

Independent Writing

Independent Writing

Independent Writing

Independent Writing

Let's walk through a realistic fiction story

Book Talks

· Alexander And the Terrible No Good Bad Day · Mrs. Mack · Smokey Nights · Amazing Grace · The Night Tree · My Rotten Red Headed Older Brother

Mentor Texts

· Amazing Grace · The Night Tree · My Rotten Red Headed Older Brother

Text Maps

Text Map

Text Map

What are we noticing about realistic fiction stories?

Shared Writing

Independent Writing

Let's walk through a first grade letter writing genre unit

· Handout

Book Talks

· · · · · · · Dear Annie Dear Mr. Blueberry Jolly Postman Dear Mrs. LaRue Dear Polar Bear I Wanna Iguana Dear deer

What are we noticing?

Text Maps

Shared Writing

Independent Writing

Let's walk through a recipe genre unit

· Handout

Book Talks

· · · · · Super Snack Recipes Pancakes For Breakfast Let's Bake The Popcorn Book Pancakes Pancakes

Mentor Texts

· · · · · Super Snack Recipes Pancakes For Breakfast Let's Bake The Popcorn Book Pancakes Pancakes

Text Map

What are we noticing about recipes?

Definition of a recipe

Shared Writing

Independent Writing

Questions

Julie Stratman- [email protected]

Erica Maynard- [email protected]

Information

Genre Units of Study

89 pages

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