Read sk_cv.pdf text version

Sachin R. Katti

888 Stanford Ave, Emeryville, CA, 94608 (617) 784-3524 http://nms.csail.mit.edu/~sachin [email protected] Citizenship: India Networked systems, wireless communications, security & privacy, applied coding theory Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Ph.D. in Computer Science, September 2008 Thesis topic: Network Coded Wireless Architecture Advisor: Dina Katabi Winner of the George Sprowls Award for Best Doctoral Thesis in Computer Science Nominated for the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award by MIT M.S. in Computer Science, September 2005 Thesis topic: Collaborative Intrusion Detection Advisor: Dina Katabi Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India B.Tech. in Electrical Engineering, May 2003 Thesis topic: OFDM modulation for DSL modems Advisor: Vikram Gadre

Research Interests Education

9/05-9/08

9/03-9/05

7/99-5/03

Professional Experience

8/08 - present Postdoctoral Scholar, ICSI/U.C.Berkeley Advisor: Scott Shenker Research Assistant, MIT CSAIL Advisor: Dina Katabi Summer Intern, AT&T Research Advisor: Balachander Krishnamurthy Summer Intern, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge Advisor: Ian Pratt

9/03 - 7/08 6/04 ­ 8/04 5/02 ­ 7/02

Teaching Experience

9/08 Tutorial on Wireless Network Coding at ACM MOBICOM 2008 Co-taught with Dina Katabi Designed and delivered research lectures on how networking researchers can use network coding to build high performance networked wireless systems. Teaching Assistant 6.829 ­ Graduate Computer Networks, EECS, MIT Developed problem sets, exams and gave recitations. Advised student groups on research projects, one of which led to a Mobicom 2007 paper. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. George Sprowls Award for Best Doctoral Thesis in Computer Science, MIT ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award Nomination, MIT MIT Deshpande Center Ignition Grant Fellowships at U.C.Berkeley, C.M.U and Rice University (declined) Merit Scholar, IIT Bombay (1999-2003) National Talent Search Scholar, India

9/06 ­ 12/06

Awards

Mentoring

Masters Undergraduate Jeffrey Cohen, Shyamnath Gollakota Katarzyna Puchala

Page 1 of 5

Publications

Conference Publications 1. Sachin Katti, Dina Katabi, Hari Balakrishnan and Muriel Medard Symbol-level Network Coding for Wireless Mesh Networks ACM SIGCOMM 2008. 2. Sachin Katti, Shyamnath Gollakota and Dina Katabi Embracing Wireless Interference: Analog Network Coding ACM SIGCOMM 2007. 3. Szymon Chachulski, Michael Jennings, Sachin Katti and Dina Katabi Trading Structure for Randomness in Wireless Opportunistic Routing ACM SIGCOMM 2007 4. Sachin Katti, Jeffrey Cohen and Dina Katabi Information Slicing: Anonymity Using Unreliable Overlays USENIX NSDI 2007 5. Sidharth Jaggi, Michael Langberg, Sachin Katti, Tracey Ho, Dina Katabi, Muriel Medard Resilient Network Coding in the Presence of Byzantine Adversaries IEEE INFOCOM 2007 6. Sachin Katti, Hariharan Rahul, Wenjun Hu, Dina Katabi, Muriel Medard and Jon Crowcroft XORs in the Air: Practical Wireless Network Coding ACM SIGCOMM 2006 7. Sachin Katti, Balachander Krishnamurthy and Dina Katabi Collaborating Against Common Enemies ACM IMC 2005 8. Sachin Katti, Charles Blake, Dina Katabi, Jacob Strauss and Eddie Kohler MultiQ: Automated Detection of Multiple Bottlenecks Along a Path ACM IMC 2004 9. Rajiv Chakravorty, Sachin Katti, Jon Crowcroft and Ian Pratt Flow Aggregation for Enhanced TCP over Wide Area Wireless IEEE INFOCOM 2003 Workshop Publications 10. Sachin Katti, Andrey Ermolinskiy, Martin Casado, Scott Shenker and Hari Balakrishnan S3: Securing Sensitive Stuff USENIX OSDI 2008, Work in Progress Report 11. Sachin Katti and Dina Katabi MIXIT: The Network Meets the Wireless Channel ACM HotNets 2007 12. Sachin Katti, Dina Katabi and Katarzyna Puchala Slicing the Onion: Anonymous Routing without PKI ACM HotNets 2005 13. Charles Blake, Dina Katabi and Sachin Katti Cross Traffic: Noise or Data ISMA BeST 2003 Journal Publications 14. Sachin Katti, Hariharan Rahul, Wenjun Hu, Dina Katabi, Muriel Medard and Jon Crowcroft XORs in the Air: Practical Wireless Network Coding IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2008 15. Sidharth Jaggi, Michael Langberg, Sachin Katti, Tracey Ho, Dina Katabi, Muriel Medard and Michelle Effros Resilient Network Coding in the Presence of Byzantine Adversaries IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 2008 16. Rajiv Chakravorty, Sachin Katti, Jon Crowcroft and Ian Pratt Using TCP Flow Aggregation to Enhance Data Experience of Cellular Wireless Users IEEE Journal on Selected Areas of Communications, 2005 Invited Papers 17. Sachin Katti, Saurabh Shintre, Sidharth Jaggi, Dina Katabi and Muriel Medard Real Network Codes: Breaking the All or Nothing Barrier Allerton, 2007 18. Sachin Katti, Dina Katabi, Wenjun Hu, Hariharan Rahul and Muriel Medard Practical Network Coding for Wireless Environments Allerton, 2005 Page 2 of 5

Book Chapters 19. Dina Katabi and Sachin Katti XORs in the Air: Practical Wireless Network Coding Chapter 12, Multi-hop Ad hoc Networks from Theory to Reality, Nova Publishers

Patents

1.

Sachin Katti, Hariharan Rahul, Wenjun Hu, Dina Katabi, Muriel Medard and Jon Crowcroft Method and Apparatus for Practical Wireless Network Coding M063570084US00, Patent Pending.

Selected Talks

1.

Symbol-level Network Coding for Wireless Mesh Networks ACM SIGCOMM, August 2008, Seattle, WA 2. Network Coded Wireless Architecture U.C. Berkeley EECS MURI Seminar, November 2008, Berkeley, CA 3. Embracing Wireless Interference: Analog Network Coding MSR Redmond, March 2008, Redmond, WA 4. MIXIT: The Network Meets the Wireless Channel ACM HotNets, November 2007, Atlanta, GA 5. Information Slicing: Anonymity Using Unreliable Overlays Usenix NSDI, April 2007, Cambridge, MA 6. Embracing Wireless Interference: Analog Network Coding ACM SIGCOMM, September 2007, Kyoto, Japan 7. XORs in the Air: Practical Wireless Network Coding ACM SIGCOMM, August 2006, Pisa, Italy 8. The Importance of Being Opportunistic: Practical Wireless Network Coding ICSI Berkeley, October 2005, Berkeley, CA 9. Information Slicing: Anonymity without PKI ACM Hotnets, November 2005, College Park, MD 10. Collaborating Against Common Enemies ACM IMC, October 2005, Berkeley, CA 11. Multiq: Detecting Bottleneck Capacities Along a Path ACM IMC, October 2004, Taormina, Italy

Professional Activities

External Reviews SIGCOMM'08, MOBICOM'08, NSDI'08, INFOCOM'08, SIGCOMM'07, NSDI'07, INFOCOM'07, SIGCOMM'06, NSDI'06, INFOCOM'05 IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, IEEE Transactions on Communications

Journal Reviews

Service

5/06-5/08 5/05-5/06 2/06-4/06 7/01-5/02 Treasurer, MIT Tang Hall IT Chair, MIT Tang Hall MIT Graduate Housing Committee Literary Secretary, Hostel 5, IIT Bombay

Research Description Wireless Networks

2005-present Network Coded Wireless Architecture. Conceived and led the project on re-designing wireless mesh networks with network coding as the fundamental building block. The project's goal is to build high throughput wireless mesh networks. The key insight is that network coding enables new architectures where layers can cleanly collaborate to exploit the basic characteristics of the wireless medium to improve performance and reliability. We built three systems which embody the above philosophy.

Page 3 of 5

2005-2006

Designed, implemented and evaluated COPE, a packet-level network coding technique that takes advantage of the broadcast nature of the wireless medium to improve performance. It builds on a novel observation that wireless broadcast creates pools of shared redundancy in a router's neighbourhood, which the router can exploit using network coding to compress more information into each transmission and improve throughput. COPE was the first wireless system to integrate and implement network coding into the networking stack. COPE also introduces a new technique to perform inter-flow network coding for multiple unicast sessions. Designed, implemented and evaluated ANC, an analog network coding technique that exploits strategic wireless interference, instead of avoiding it at all costs. ANC shows that when packets collide, the network layer often has the data bits corresponding to one of the signals in the interfered packet. Thus if the physical and network layers collaborate, we can use the network layer information to cancel out interference and recover the other packet, thus improving throughput. The ANC system made two important conceptual contributions: first, it introduced a shift in how the networking community treated interference (the new philosophy was adopted in subsequent work which dealt with collisions in 802.11 networks), and second, it extended network coding to the signal level, opening up new avenues for theoretical investigation. Designed, implemented and evaluated MIXIT, a symbol-level network coding technique exploits wireless spatial diversity to improve end-to-end throughput without sacrificing reliability. The key observation is that in a dense wireless mesh network, even when no packet is received correctly, every bit is likely received correctly by some node. MIXIT builds on this insight to construct a symbol-level network where routers co-operatively funnel likely correct bits to deliver completely correct packets to the destination. MIXIT is a sophisticated system, incorporating ideas from cooperative wireless diversity, back-pressure routing and algebraic rank-metric codes to deliver on the vision of a symbol-level network.

2006-2007

2007-2008

Security & Privacy

2008-present S3: Securing Sensitive Stuff Conceived and am leading the project on building a system to protect sensitive data flow in an enterprise. Current deployed operating systems and applications are extremely complex, running into millions of lines of code, making it very difficult to get them `'right''. Instead of trying to ensure that programmers write correct code, we focus on the sensitive data which needs to be secured. Leveraging recent hardware trends towards hardware-assisted virtualization and multicore computing, we are building a secure hypervisor which tracks how sensitive information flows at the instruction level. A network of such hypervisors in an enterprise work together to provide guarantees on sensitive information flow throughput the enterprise network. Since the hypervisor operates below the operating system, we do not need to trust OS code or change it. Information Slicing: Anonymity in Overlays Designed, implemented and evaluated Information Slicing, an overlay based anonymous routing technique that does not require a PKI. Content distribution systems such as Bit-torrent are extremely popular, but do a poor job of protecting the identities of their users. Several anonymous routing schemes have been proposed to protect user identities in such systems, but they all assume the existence of a centralized PKI, which is hard to realize in practice, given the large number of users and their transient nature. Information Slicing alleviates this bottleneck because it does not require a PKI. The key idea is that the Internet offers a diversity of paths to reach any destination. Information Slicing exploits this diversity to build a novel anonymous routing technique which uses random network coding to divide information along multiple node-disjoint paths. The code is setup such that each node only knows its previous hops and next hops and nothing else. This protects source and destination identities, and further even the destination does not know who the sender is. Information Slicing thus provides a low cost route to bootstrap anonymity in overlay networks.

2005-2007

Network Measurement & Inference

2003-2005 Multiq: Designed and implemented Multiq, a tool to measure bottleneck capacities along a path without requiring active probes. Multiq exploited the fact that bottleneck links induce multi-modal distributions of inter-arrival times of packet pairs. The location of the modes tells us what the capacities of the bottleneck links are. Multiq has been widely used in a number of network measurement studies since.

Page 4 of 5

2004-2005

CIDS: Performed analysis of intrusion detection system (IDS) logs in a tier 1 ISP to answer the question: How useful would a collaborative IDS system be? We found that there are significant benefits to co-operative IDS systems, since they reduce false positives, improve detection time by an order of magnitude and enable forensic analysis of questions such as attacker locations and attack methodology.

Congestion Control

2002-2003 Improving TCP Performance in GPRS Cellular Networks Designed and implemented a TCP proxy on GPRS cellular base-stations to improve TCP performance over the wireless hop. TCP performance suffers due to non-congestion related packet loss on wireless links. Our proxy used link-layer packet caching, and feedback from multiple TCP sessions which were treated as a single logical TCP session, to mask packet loss from the wired sender and provide a better view of the available capacity on the wireless link. Prof. Dina Katabi Massachusetts Institute of Technology, EECS Department, 32 Vassar St, #G934. Cambridge, MA, 02139 +1 (617) 324-6027 [email protected] Prof. Hari Balakrishnan Massachusetts Institute of Technology, EECS Department, 32 Vassar St, #G938. Cambridge, MA, 02139 +1 (617) 253-8713 [email protected] Prof. Ralf Koetter Inst. for Communications Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Building N4, Room N2403, Theresienstrasse 90 D-80333 München +49 (0) 89 289 23491 [email protected] Prof. Scott Shenker University of California, Berkeley, EECS Department, Radlab, 465 Soda Hall, Berkeley, CA +1 (510) 643-3043 [email protected] Prof. Muriel Medard Massachusetts Institute of Technology, EECS Department, 32 Vassar St, #D626 Cambridge, MA, 02139 +1 (617) 253-3167 [email protected]

References

Page 5 of 5

Information

5 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

1137122


Notice: fwrite(): send of 198 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531