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Green Beans

Nutrition Education Gardening Physical Activity

NORTHCOAST NUTRITION AND FITNESS COLLABORATIVE

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Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Did You Know?

Green beans are actually immature legumes--they are harvested before the seeds have been allowed to dry and mature. Legumes are the seed of a plant that has pods. All legumes absorb nitrogen from the air so they are rich sources of protein, more than any other plant food! Beans are classified into 2 basic categories: 1. Edible pod beans: green beans, also known as snap and string beans; edamame (immature soy beans); snow pea; sugar snap pea 2. Shelled beans: Lima, fava or broadbean, pinto, kidney, garbanzo, navy, black - Shelled beans that are bought dried must be soaked and then cooked before eaten. Beans are one of the oldest things around and one of the first wild plants to be domesticated, long before any wild animals were made to live with people. Beans are high in soluble fiber which helps to control blood cholesterol.

Beans are good for diabetics because their balance of complex carbohydrates and proteins provides a steady source of glucose. Green beans originated in the tropical southern part of Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and part of Costa Rica. Green Beans are the most popular edible pod bean; lima beans are the most common shell bean in the US. Green Bean pods are not only green. They can be green, golden, purple, red, or streaked, but the beans inside the pod are always green. Green fruits and vegetables help maintain vision and strong bones and teeth. They may also lower the risk of some cancers.

Type of Bean Green Beans or Snap beans

Appearance Green, golden, purple, red, or streaked edible pod that originally had a fibrous string along the seam of the bean pod. Pale green beans in big floppy pods. They have a buttery texture and nutty taste. Medium ovals are mottled beige and brown with an earthy flavor. Large, red, and kidney shaped. They have a bland taste and soft texture but tough skins. Chick Large, round, and tan colored. They have a nutty flavor and crunchy texture.

How they are eaten They are eaten raw, blanched, in stir frys, and in salads. Served simply boiled, mashed and spread on crostini, or added to stews & soups. They are used most often in Mexican dishes, such as refried beans, stews, and dips Used in chili, bean stews, on salads, and Mexican dishes Used in soups, stews, pureed in dips, and on salads They are found in numerous food products like tofu, flour, grits, and milk. Also eaten plain as edamame.

Fava Bean or Broadbean

Pinto Bean

Kidney Bean

Garbanzo Beans / -peas

Soybean

Round and come in many colors. They have a firm texture and bland flavor.

Information can be found at: Personal Nutrition by Maire A. Boyle; pg 151 http://growingtaste.com/vegetables/bean.shtml http://www.greenbeansmore.com/green-bean-recipes.html http://www.soupsong.com/fbeans.html http://www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov/month/index.html http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=9163283

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutritional Comparison Between Common Types of Beans

Type of Bean 4-8 yr old 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup boiled, mature seeds 298 28.62 150.63 84.18 10.3 54.21 boiled, mature seeds 269 14.53 76.47 42.74 12.5 65.79 boiled, mature seeds 225 15.35 80.79 45.15 13.1 68.95 boiled, mature seeds 245 15.41 81.11 45.32 15.4 81.05 49.68 42.26 40.32 33.23 boiled, mature seeds 187 12.92 68.00 38.00 9.2 48.42 29.68 raw 34 2 10.53 5.88 3.7 19.47 11.94 9-13 yr old 4-8 yr old 9-13 girl 9-13 boy 14.23 35.38 59.23 50.38 48.08 39.62

Amount

How Prepared

Calories Protein (g) (kcal) Fiber (g)

% DV Protein

% DV Protein

% DV Fiber

% DV Fiber

% DV Fiber

Green, snap bean

Fava Beans

Pinto Bean

Kidney Bean

Garbanzo Bean

Nutrition Education

Soybean

Type of Bean 4-8 yr old 9-13 yr old raw boiled, mature seeds boiled, mature seeds boiled, mature seeds boiled, mature seeds boiled, mature seeds 2.9 11.60 6.44 2.1 8.40 4.67 2 0 2.1 8.40 4.67 0 1.4 5.60 3.11 0 0.00 0.00 0.73 0.00 0.5 2.00 1.11 2 0.73 17.9 71.60 39.78 38 13.82 8.54 0.45 0.00 0.00 0.45 0.00

Amount

How Prepared

Vitamin C (mg)

% DV Vit C

% DV Vit C

Vitamin A (mcg)

% DV Vit A

% DV Vit A

% DV Vit A

Iron (mg)

% DV Iron

% DV Iron 4-8 yr old 9-13 yr old

4-8 yr old 9-13 girl 9-13 boy 9.05 0.48 0.00 0.00 0.48 0.00 1.4 2.55 3.57 5.2 4.74 8.84

Green,snap bean 1 cup

14.00 25.50 35.70 52.00 47.40 88.40

17.50 31.88 44.63 65.00 59.25 110.50

Gardening

Fava Beans

1 cup

Pinto Bean

1 cup

Kidney Bean

1 cup

Garbanzo Bean 1 cup

Physical Activity

Soybean

1 cup

Green, Snap Bean Kidney Bean

Fava Bean

Pinto Bean

Garbanzo Bean

Green Soy Bean Edamame

Soy Bean

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrient information from http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/ %Daily values from Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine http://www.iom.edu/Object.File/Master/21/372/0.pdf

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Green Beans

Staff:

Teacher and garden coordinator plus extra adults to make appropriate ratio

Classroom Setting:

Classroom and garden

Learning Objective:

Nutrition Education and Health: To provide healthy eating and active living through: Identifying and defining key nutrients and their functions Discussing the nutritional value of green beans Selecting nutritious foods through a decision-making process Supporting others in making positive food and physical activity choices Creating and cooking a healthy recipe using green beans Gardening: To provide basic gardening skills through: Learning basic planting and harvesting techniques

Curricular Links:

Health Education Content Standards Possible Related Core Subjects

Essential Health Concepts Analyzing Health Influences Accessing Valid Health Information Interpersonal Communication Decision Making Goal Setting Practicing Health-Enhancing Behaviors Health Promotion

X

Life Science Earth Science Physical Science Math Reading Writing

X X X x X

X

Comprehension Physical Activity

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Activity 1: Planting and Harvesting

Supplies and Equipment for Cultivation

Seeds Garden Tools

Time: 1 hour total

10 minutes demo 10 minutes prep

Target Ages: Grades K-8

Adapt as necessary for grades K-3 (see Appendix #1)

Group Size: Whole class

divided into small groups

Background Information:

Beans can be either bush or pole (climbing). Both are warm season crops. They grow best in full sun and well-drained, fertile soil.

Nutrients:

Green beans have less starch, protein, folic acid, potassium (to keep our heart beating regularly) and thiamin (to help our body use energy) as dry beans. Green beans contain fiber that aids the body with digestion and elimination, Vitamin C (to help boost our immune systems to keep us from getting sick), Vitamin A (to help us see better in the dark) and small amounts of other nutrients. Green beans are a vegetable.

Get Physical: "Plant and Harvest"

Play the "Plant and Harvest" game using the fruit and vegetable cards (See Appendix) 1. Scatter cards around the garden or classroom 2. Place half of the cards faceup and half face-down 3. Select half the students as planters and the other half as harvesters. The goal of the planters is to quickly turn all the cards face-down "to plant" the fruit or vegetable and the goal of the harvesters is to turn all the cards face-up "to harvest" the produce 4. Play the game for 30 seconds 5. Have the students switch and play again explaining the cycle of planting and harvesting in your garden

Seasonal Information

Planting

Cool Climate Warm Climate Late Spring Spring

Harvesting

Late Summer Summer

Cooking

Late Summer Summer

For the Students:

Children's Power Play! connection Schools Idea & Resource Kit 4th Grade--page 47 "Fruit & Vegetables Power Play Journal" Website: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cpns/Pages/PowerPlayResources.asp

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Activity 1: Planting & Harvesting

Time: 1 hour total

Planting:

1. Plant: Green beans should be planted after all danger of frost has passed and the soil has warmed to at least 50 degrees. Plant seeds at least 1 -1 ½ inches deep and 6-12 inches apart. Allow 2-3 feet between rows. For a continuous harvest, plant every 2-3 weeks. For pole types, provide stakes for climbing that are at least 6-7 feet tall with a rough surface. Adaptations: Fava beans require a long, cool growing season and do not tolerate hot summer weather. It might be a good substitute for gardens in cooler parts of Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino Counties where green beans don't grow as well. 2. Discuss: Using the background information, have students complete the monocot and dicot worksheets found at the back of this lesson and highlight how nutrients found in the beans are beneficial to the body. 3. Maintain: The terminal vines should be clipped off to encourage branching. Bean plants need approximately 1 inch of water per week. The Super Marconi pole bean has a huge but tender pod and contains a lima-type bean at maturity. It makes excellent soup and is available at www.containerseeds.com. It's fun to grow several varieties and dry them on the vine. Students love the different seed colors and sizes.

10 minutes demo 10 minutes prep

Target Ages: Grades K-8

Adapt as necessary for grades K-3 (see Appendix #1)

Group Size: Whole class

divided into small groups

Get Physical:

Facts to Grow On Did you know that calories are how we measure energy? The more calories a food has, the more energy it contains, but if we eat more calories than our bodies can burn off, the extra energy is stored as fat. A cheeseburger has 300 calories. To burn off all that energy you would have to go for a 2 ½ hour walk! One cup of green beans only has 34 calories, which is enough energy to walk briskly for 15 minutes.

For more information www.usda.gov go to:

Harvesting:

Planting

Cool Climate Warm Climate Late Spring Spring

Harvesting

Cooking

Late Summer Late Summer Summer Summer

Examine these seeds in the garden. Complete the attached worksheet to this lesson.

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Activity 2: Preparing & Cooking

Supplies for Recipes:

green beans from your garden ingredients not in your garden (see recipes on next page) large skillet mixing bowl spatula or cooking spoon measuring cups measuring spoons stove and burner knives serrated sandwich spreaders for K-5 serving platter cutting mats or boards utensils and plates for serving

Time:

1 hour total 15minutes demo 10 minutes prep

Target Ages: Grades K-8

Adapt as necessary for grades K-3 (see Appendix #1)

Group Size: Whole class divided into small groups

Get Physical:

"Movement of the Day"

Play this fun game to reinforce vocabulary words and increase listening skills! Get Ready: Pick a vocabulary word related to nutrition that you know you will say during the cooking demonstration and pick a movement like "march in place," or "squats." Get Set: Inform the class of the word of the day and the corresponding movement. Tell the class that whenever they hear the word of day they need to do the movement. Go: Have fun trying to use the word of the day as often as possible during the lesson to keep your class on their toes!

Background Information:

Note: Ideally the beans should be picked from the garden and students can shell the beans or slice them, if green. If this is not possible, frozen or canned may be used.

Nutrients:

See Page 6 for comparison of nutrients in various beans.

Seasonal Information:

Planting

Cool Climate Warm Climate Late Spring Spring

Harvesting

Cooking

Late Summer Late Summer Summer Summer

Student Activity:

Children's Power Play! Campaign connection Schools Idea & Resource Kit 5th Grade--page 57 "You Be The Food Critic" Website: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cpns/Pages/PowerPlayResources.asp

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Activity 2: Continued--Cooking

1. Make the connection between the garden and the recipe. 2. Decide how best to divide the children into work groups (see "Cooking Activity Methods" in appendix) 3. Review "Playing it Safe While Cooking" (see appendix) 4. Have students read out loud the following recipe and review the ingredient list. 5. Highlight fruits, vegetables and nutrients in the recipes. For more information go to www.harvestofthemonth.com

Time: 2 hours total

10 minutes demo 15 minutes prep

Target Ages: Grades K-8

Adapt as necessary for grades K-3 (see Appendix #1)

Group Size: Whole class

divided into small groups

Get Physical :

Facts to Grow On Did you know that green beans are a good source of fiber and Vitamins A and C? A diet rich in vitamins boosts the body's immune system to help fight off common colds. Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables each day, including green beans, can help you stay healthy and have more days to play outside! Green Beans & Dip

Makes 32 servings ½ cup green beans and ¼ cup salsa dip per serving Prep time: 10 minutes

Creole Green Beans

Makes 8 servings ¾ cups per serving Prep time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients: 1 pound fresh green beans, ends snapped off 2 small cloves garlic 1 teaspoon vegetable oil 1 cup chopped red bell pepper 1 cup chopped tomatoes ½ cup chopped celery ½ teaspoon hickory salt ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1. Wash green beans, snap off the ends and cut in half. 2. In a large skillet, sauté garlic in oil over low heat for 1 minute. 3. Add green beans and bell pepper. 4. Increase heat to medium and cook for 5 more minutes. 5. Stir in the rest of the ingredients and cook for another 5 minutes. Serve warm.

Adapted from: Discover the Secret to Healthy Living, Public Health Institute, 2004

Nutrition information per serving: Calories 40, Carbohydrate 6 g, Dietary Fiber 3 g, Protein 1 g, Total Fat 2 g, Saturated Fat 0 g, Trans Fat 0 g, Cholesterol 0 mg, Sodium 10 mg

Ingredients: 16 cups green beans, washed, ends cut or snapped off 4 cups light or fat free sour cream 4 cups fresh salsa 1. Arrange bite-size green beans on platter. 2. In a small bowl, mix sour cream and salsa. Serve immediately.

Adapted from: Healthy Latino Recipes, Made With Love, Latino 5 a Day Campaign, 2004

Nutrition information per serving: Calories 100, Carbohydrate 22 g, Dietary Fiber 6 g, Protein 3 g, Total Fat 0 g, Saturated Fat 0 g, Trans Fat 0

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Background Information:

Common Name The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, is an herbaceous annual plant grown worldwide for its edible bean. Botanical Name The common bean, (Fabaceae family), is classified as a dicotyledon, (dicot). Dicotyledons, or "dicots", is a name for a group of flowering plants whose seed typically has two halves and two embryonic leaves or cotyledons. For example, corn is a monocot. History There are thousands of types of beans grown in the United States and around the world. It is among the most ancient plants in cultivation, being domesticated independently in ancient Mesoamerica and the Andes and is one of the easiest plants to grow. The leaf is occasionally used as a leaf vegetable and the straw is used for animal feed. Fully mature beans harvested from the pod before they have begun to dry are called shelling beans and are eaten lightly steamed or simmered in water. Dry beans are left on the vine to dry before harvest. They are commonly soaked before cooking to soften them and shorten cooking time. Both dry beans and shell beans can be eaten whole, mashed, or added to soups and stews. The immature bean, or green bean, is also very popular and eaten raw or steamed. It is picked well before the beans mature in the pod. The broad bean or fava bean (Vicia faba), is a species of bean native to North Africa and southwestern Asia. The term fava bean (from the Italian fava, meaning "broad bean") is the most common name in the United States. It is believed that along with lentils, peas and chickpeas, they became part of the eastern Mediterranean diet around 6000 BC or earlier. In addition to culinary uses, they are often grown as a cover crop to prevent erosion because they can over-winter. As a legume, they also fix nitrogen in the soil. Fava beans are the most common fast food in the Egyptian diet. The cooked beans are mashed together with olive oil, garlic, lemon, salt and cumin and eaten with bread.

Extensions--Go Farther:

Explore the botanical aspect of beans by completing the worksheets

Resources:

Harvest of the Month: http://www.harvestofthemonth.org/ Department of Agriculture: https://www.agclassroom.org/ USDA: http://www.fns.usda.gov/FDD/schfacts/FV/A070_BeansFrzGreen_30lb.pdf My Pyramid: http://www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables.html

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Comparing Monocots and Dicots

Both monocot and dicot seeds develop in similar ways and have the same parts. There are a few minor differences: monocots start out with one seed leaf, while dicots have two. The technical word for seed leaf is cotyledon: you can find it on the coloring sheet; it is the first leaf to emerge from a developing seed. Color all the cotyledons (A) on the seeds dark green. As a seed, both monocots and dicots are covered by a seed coat. Color the seed coat (B) yellow. The seed consists of the outside seed coat and a large area called the endosperm which functions as a source of reserve materials and food for the developing embryo. As germination occurs, the endosperm will be broken down and used by the plant. Color the endosperm blue (C). Germination occurs when the seed begins to sprout, usually in the spring and under appropriate conditions the radicle, the part of the seed that will become the root, begins to elongate and grow downward. Color the root brown (D). Meanwhile, the coleoptile begins to grow upward. The coleoptile is a sheath that encloses the shoot of the embryo. The primary function of the coleoptile is to provide protection to the developing shoot as it is passing through the soil. Color the coleoptile orange (E). Extending out from the coleoptile is the shoot. Color the shoot purple (F). Eventually adult leaves grow on the plant. Color these leaves light green. (G) Comparing Adult Monocots and Dicots DICOT MONOCOT Angiosperms are divided into two classes, the monocots and the dicots. The majority of flowering plants are dicots. Dicots include maples, oaks, and magnolias. Monocots are grasses, wheat, corn, and rice. Most of our food supply comes from monocots. The diagram compares the differences between the two. First of all look at the roots. The root of a Arrangement of the monocot is called a fibrous root and the root of a Vascular bundles in a typical dicot and monocot stem dicot is a taproot. Notice how taproots have one main part ­ called the primary root. In a taproot the primary root grows very large and small roots spread out from it. Fibrous roots, on the other hand, do not have very large primary roots, and many small roots develop and remain near the surface. Color the taproot dark brown and the fibrous root light brown. Monocots and dicots also differ in their leaf structure. Adult monocots usually have parallel venation, whereas dicots have net-like venation. For monocots and dicots, color the leaves green and outline the veins in a darker green. The flowers of monocots and dicots differ in the number of petals they have. Monocots tend to have flower parts that occur in 3's ( 3, 6, 9, 12...). Dicot flowers usually have 4 to 5 petals. Color the monocot flower purple, and the dicot flower pink (make sure all petals are colored). Stems hold the flowers up and attach the leaves, color the stems blue. Monocots and dicots also differ in the way their vascular systems are arranged. In monocots, the vascular bundles are scattered throughout the stem. In dicots, the vascular bundles are arranged in a ring. Color the vascular bundles in both types of plants purple (V), color the stems green.

Adapted from: www.biologycorner.com

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Questions:

1. Give two examples of plants that are monocots.

2. Give two examples of plants that are dicots.

3. What is a cotyledon?

4. What is the radicle?

5. What is the coleoptile?

6. What is the function of the endosperm?

7. Fill out the table below.

Number of Seed Leaves Type of Leaf Venation Number of Flower Parts Type of Roots Example

Monocot

Dicot

An unknown plant is brought to you and your job is to determine whether it is a monocot or a dicot. You observe that the plant has 6 petals and its leaves have parallel veins. Is it a monocot or a dicot?

Adapted from: www.biologycorner.com

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Adapted from; www.biologycorner.com/docs/monocot%20dicot%20coloring.doc

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Nutrition Education

Gardening

Physical Activity

Adapted from: M.J. Farabee, all rights reserved. Use for educational purposes is encouraged http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookPLANTANATII.html Diagram illustrating the tissue layers and their organization within monocot and dicot roots. Image from Purves et al., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates

For food stamp information, call 877-847-3663. Funded by the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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