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MERCYHURST COLLEGE

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST

ADMISSIONS

[email protected]

16 West Division Street · North East, PA 16428 (814) 725-6144 · (814) 725-6100 · (800) 825-1926

Mercyhurst believes that all persons are entitled to equal opportunity in all aspects of involvement with the College. It is, therefore, incumbent upon the members of the community to see that no individual or groups are discriminated against because of race, color, creed, sex, age, national origin, ancestry, marital status, disabilities, and also education. Inquiries concerning the Title VI, IX and Section 504 compliance should be directed to the Affirmative Action Officer, Mercyhurst College, Erie, PA 16546.

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Table of contents

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

MERCYHURST NORTH EASt

table of contents

PAGE Academic Calendar ............................................................................................................. 5 Program Offerings ............................................................................................................... 6 Mercyhurst North East ......................................................................................................... 7 Student Support .................................................................................................................. 8 Admission ............................................................................................................................9 Academic Affairs .................................................................................................................. 9 Academic Standards and Grades .....................................................................................10 Academic Assistance and Support ....................................................................................15 Tuition and Fees ................................................................................................................ 16 Financial Aid ...................................................................................................................... 19 Programs of Study, Mercyhurst North East Associate Degrees ......................................................................................................... 30 Certificate Programs .......................................................................................................45 Course Descriptions ....................................................................................................... 49 Programs of Study, West Campus Associate Degrees ......................................................................................................... 69 Course Descriptions ....................................................................................................... 71 Programs of Study, Catherine McAuley Adult Education Center - Associate Degrees ..................................................................73 Catherine McAuley Course Descriptions .........................................................................75 Index ..................................................................................................................................81

Academic calendar

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MERCYHURST COLLEGE

MERCYHURST NORTH EASt 2009 ­ 2010 MNE ACADEMIC CALENDAR

September 2, 2009 ­ May 19, 2010

FALL TERM: Sept. 2, 2009 ­ Nov. 18, 2009 August

31 .... ........ 1 ...... ........ 2 ...... ........ 5 ...... 7 ...... 9 ...... 17 .... 26 ... Mon .... ........... Tues ... ........... Wed .... ........... Sat ...... Mon .... Wed .... Thurs .. Sat ...... Freshmen resident students arrive (9:00 ­ 5:00) Faculty Convocation Freshman Convocation Returning resident students arrive (9:00 ­ 5:00) Day and Evening Classes Begin Summer Incompletes to Instructor Weekend Classes Begin Labor Day ­ No Classes Last Day to Drop/Add Classes Summer Incompletes to Registrar Parents Day 22 .... 29 .... Fri ....... Fri ....... Mid Term Last Day to Withdraw from Classes Online Registration Begins Last Day to Declare Pass-Fail Weekend Classes End Regular Classes End FINAL EXAMS FINAL EXAMS FINAL EXAMS Grades Due: 9:00 a.m.

February

1 ...... 5 ...... 14 .... 16 .... 17 .... 18 .... 19 .... 22 .... Mon .... Fri ....... Sun ..... Tues .. Wed .... Thurs .. Fri ....... Mon ....

September

SPRING TERM Mar. 3, 2010 ­ May 19, 2010 March

3 ...... 6 ...... 10 .... 19 .... Wed .... Sat ...... Wed .... Fri ....... Thurs .. Tues ... ........... Sat ...... Mon .... Fri ....... Thurs .. Fri ....... Thurs .. Fri ....... Sun ..... Mon .... Tues ... Wed .... Thurs .. Sat ...... Sun ..... Tues ... Day and Evening Classes Begin Weekend Classes Begin Last Day to Drop/Add Classes Winter Term Incompletes to Instructor Easter Break Begins after classes Day and Evening Classes Resume Winter Term Incompletes to Registrar Weekend Classes Resume Mid-term Last Day to Withdraw from Classes Online Fall Registration Begins Last Day to Declare Pass-Fail Last Day of Classes Reading Day No Classes Weekend Classes End FINAL EXAMS FINAL EXAMS FINAL EXAMS Senior Grades Due to Registrar by Noon MNE and Adult College GRADUATION Baccalaureate Mass and Graduation Erie Campus All Other Grades Due: 9:00 a.m.

October

9 ...... 15-18 23 .... 26 .... 30 .... 12 .... 13 .... 15 .... 16 .... 17 .... 18 .... 23 .... Fri ....... Mid-term Thurs-Sun Fall Term Break Fri ....... Last Day to Withdraw from classes Mon .... Online Registration Begins Fri ....... Last Day to Declare Pass-Fail Thurs .. Fri ....... Sun ..... Mon .... Tues ... Wed .... Mon .... Regular Classes End Reading Day ­ No Classes Weekend Classes End FINAL EXAMS FINAL EXAMS FINAL EXAMS Grades Due: 9:00 a.m.

April

1 ...... 6 ...... ........ 10 .... 12 .... 23 .... 29 .... 30 ....

November

May

13 .... 14 .... 16 .... 17 .... 18 .... 19 .... 20 .... 22 .... 23 .... 25 ....

WINTER TERM: Nov. 30, 2009 ­ Feb. 19, 2010 November

30 .... 5 ...... 7 ...... 18 .... 22 .... Mon .... Sat ...... Mon .... Fri ....... Tues ... Sat/Sun Mon .... Wed .... Mon .... ........... Day & Evening Classes Begin Weekend Classes Begin Last Day to Drop/Add Classes Fall Term Incompletes to Instructor Christmas Vacation Begins No Classes Held Weekend Classes Resume Winter Term Day and Evening Classes Resume Fall Term Incompletes to Registrar Martin Luther King Day Observed ­ No daytime classes Evening classes held (any MW classes After 3:30 pm)

December

January

2-3 ... 4 ......

13 .... 18 .... ........

Day/Evening Classes: June 21 ­ August 5, 2010 No Classes: July 5, 2010 Summer Exams: August 6 - 7, 2010 Science of Nursing: June 8 ­ August 18, 2010 Practical Nursing: June 5, - August 28, 2010 Respiratory Therapy: June 21 ­ August 5, 2010 Medical Lab Tech: June 21 ­ August 5, 2010 Occupational Therapy: June 8 ­ August 18, 2010

Summer Term:

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Program Offerings

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

MERCYHURST NORTH EASt

Early Childhood Education Liberal Arts Liberal Arts ­ Communications Concentration Liberal Arts ­ Education Concentration Liberal Arts ­ Radio Programming Concentration Liberal Arts ­ Science Concentration

ASSOCIATE Of ARTS

Business Administration Business Administration ­ Accounting Concentration Business Administration ­ Sport Management/Personal Trainer Concentration Computer Systems Support Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Crime Analysis Concentration Hospitality Management Hospitality Management - Culinary Arts Concentration Medical Lab Technician Occupational Therapy Assistant Office Management -Medical Office Concentration Physical Therapist Assistant Respiratory Therapist Nursing (RN)

ASSOCIATE Of SCIENCE

CERTIfICATE PROGRAMS

Culinary Arts Information Technology Specialist Medical Assistant Medical Transcriptionist Municipal Police Medical Insurance Coding Specialist Practical Nurse (PN)

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 1914-2680 Phone: (267)284-5000 The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission

ACCREDITATION:

ASSOCIATIONS/APPROVALS:

PDE (PA Dept of Ed) Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing Three Rivers Academic Consortium

CATHERINE MCAULEY ADULT EDUCATION CENTER Associate Degrees

Business Administration ­ Accounting Concentration Business Administration Religious Education and Lay Ministry

CERTIfICATE PROGRAMS

Religious Education and Lay Ministry

Associate Degrees Business Administration Hospitality Management ­ Facilities and Property Management Concentration Liberal Arts

MERCYHURST WEST

Purpose and mission

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MERCYHURST COLLEGE:

PURPOSE AND MISSION

Mercyhurst College seeks to be a leading higher educational institution that integrates excellence in the liberal arts, professional and career-path programs, and service to regional and world communities. Consistent with its Catholic identity and Mercy heritage, Mercyhurst College educates women and men in a culture where faith and reason flourish together, where the beauty and power of the liberal arts combine with an appreciation for the dignity of work and a commitment to serving others. Confident in the strength of its student-faculty bonds, the College community is inspired by the image of students whose choices, in life and work, will enable them to realize the human and spiritual values embedded in everyday realities and to exercise leadership in service toward a just world.

THE CAMPUS AND ITS RESOURCES

Located in North East, Pennsylvania near Lake Erie, Mercyhurst North East campus is situated on 84 acres just a few blocks from the town center with its traditional architecture and small town atmosphere. The Redemptorist Fathers had previously operated the property for 110 years as St. Mary's College. The North East campus has thirteen buildings providing an imposing vista. The facilities and resources continue to be expanded and enhanced. They include recently modernized academic/residential buildings, the Michele and Tom Ridge Regional Health and Safety Building, a majestic Gothic-style chapel, an observatory, a gymnasium with a weight and exercise facility, residential town-houses, a swimming pool in a nearby center, and several playing fields for soccer, lacrosse, baseball and softball. The campus has a full Internet infrastructure that connects it with the Erie campus and to the World Wide Web. Each resident room has at least one Internet connection through the college's system. There are computer laboratories and a Library with computers that provide basic resources in word processing, spread sheets and data bases with web browsers permitting full contact to the Erie campus library - Hammermill and its resources including online scholarly materials and access to the web-based catalogue for the college's library collection - available within a day to the students at Mercyhurst North East. A special dining hall and three instructional kitchens support the culinary arts instruction. Health Science laboratories for physical therapy and nursing are well equipped to support programming. Basic science laboratories for instruction and research in anatomy, physiology and microbiology as well as a new bookstore have been added to Miller Hall. The Admission Office is located on the North East campus. The telephone number is: (814) 725-6144. The Office of Adult & Graduate Programs is located in the Catherine McAuley Education Center at 511 E. 34th Street in Erie, three blocks north of the Erie campus. The Office provides admissions, registration, academic counseling, and related services to non-traditional learners on the Erie campus. It offers the associate degree in business administration under the auspices of Mercyhurst North East, as well as other undergraduate degree and postbaccalaureate certificate programs. A number of classes are also offered in the former Corrian Hotel in Corry, Pennsylvania. This provides convenient access for residents of neighboring counties to avail themselves of Mercyhurst education. The building, which is owned by the Corry Higher Education Council, was recently renamed the Bruce and Arlene Smith Education Center. In 2006, Mercyhurst College established Mercyhurst West. In the tradition of Mercyhurst North East, Mercyhurst West reaches out to both non-traditional and traditional students, seeking to offer programs that meet immediate professional skill needs in the context of an academicallychallenging liberal arts environment. Mercyhurst West joins with Mercyhurst North East in a commitment to preparing students for purposeful and effective work in the work and to establishing Mercyhurst College as a regional force in two-year, certificate, and continuing education. Building, thus, upon the success of Mercyhurst North East in offering educational opportunities and career development in the two-

MERCYHURST:

HISTORY AND PURPOSE

The original mission of Mother Catherine McAuley, founder of the Sisters of Mercy, was to assist those who are interested in improving their lives. Mercyhurst North East seeks to extend the Mercyhurst College motto of "Carpe Diem" ("Seize the Opportunity") by offering post-secondary education focused on associate degree and certificate education along with the initial two years of education that permit matriculation in the four-year college. This is the tradition of the Sisters of Mercy and encourages a greater spectrum of individuals to avail themselves of a post-secondary education in a private college environment. In 1991, Mercyhurst College established Mercyhurst North East as a lineal descendant of the Mercyhurst College Career Institute and its outreach efforts through classes offered in Corry, Pennsylvania. The intent was to create an "opportunity and career college" dedicated to providing post-secondary education for capable learners who seek to learn job-entry skills - in essence to fulfill a community college role in the Mercyhurst tradition. This concept effectively broadened the vision and scope of Mercyhurst College to include both non-traditional students and those with academically varied interests and talents. Mercyhurst North East continues the challenge of offering focused programs to qualified students in an accredited, developmentally sound, and academically rigorous learning environment. Students may enroll in one-year job preparation programs at the certificate level, and two-year associate degree programs in a variety of fields not limited to but including the health care professions, business and technology as well as the culinary arts and education. The standards for academic programming are developed as a part of the college as a whole and are reviewed and maintained through established collegial processes. Most of the courses are applicable to further study in baccalaureate programs at Mercyhurst College or other institutions. The purpose of Mercyhurst North East is clear: to enrich and prepare students to successfully manage future academic, career and life challenges. This is the structure that fulfills the vision and Christian commitment of Mercyhurst College to the intrinsic value of each individual.

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Purpose and mission / Student Support

year setting, Mercyhurst West expands the historic Mission of the college in new directions, moving it boldly forward to explore new program possibilities consistent with innovative and responsive service to our regional communities and sensitive and compassionate stewardship of our environment. Mercyhurst West is positioned to emerge as a center for innovative programs in land, water, and building management and their related technologies and to move the college to prominence regionally and nationally for programs in sustainable agriculture and renewable energy. In mission and purpose, Mercyhurst West seeks to serve the needs of the community, grow the college in keeping with its Mission, and establish a presence that will both thrive and endure.

Professional Counseling Services

The College provides an opportunity for students to consult an objective counselor for guidance with academic, personal, social, or relationship concerns. All services are held in complete confidence. Students at the North East campus should contact the Director of Student Life (814) 7256312 or the Counseling Office (814) 725-6125. Confidential professional psychological counseling is available in the Counseling Center. Contact Mr. James Beaulieu, MA, CAC, LPC (814) 725-6136.

Residence Living

For many, living on campus is a part of the collegiate experience. Resident halls have rooms equipped with beds, dressers, desks and chairs. Students must provide their own bedding, towels, etc. A Resident Assistant is assigned to each residence floor to assist students in planning social, cultural and educational activities in the residence halls, while ensuring an atmosphere conducive to the academic mission of the college. Freshmen students living in residence halls are required to board at the college. The college food meal plan consists of 20 meals per week. Priority for furnished townhouses is given to returning and transfer students or with permission, to incoming freshmen. Each three-bedroom unit houses six students, and includes one full bath upstairs and a half-bath down with full kitchen and living room areas. Students residing in a townhouse are required to purchase a partial-board plan consisting of 70 meals of their choice each term.

STUDENT SUPPORT

As students within the Mercyhurst College community, Mercyhurst North East students are entitled to full utilization of the same services and privileges available to students enrolled on the Erie Campus. Some of these special services include the following: Students at Mercyhurst North East have the opportunity to participate in a variety of intercollegiate sports including men's baseball and wrestling, lacrosse, women's softball and volleyball, as well as men's and women's teams in basketball, soccer, cross country, swimming and diving, and golf. Athletic teams are fielded at the North East campus and are subject to the athletic regulations of the National Junior College Athletic Association.

Athletics/Intramurals

Career/Placement Services

The Office of Career Services at Mercyhurst North East provides career-related assistance to students. Students can develop their professional résumé with a Career Services counselor. Internships, co-ops, and externships are also coordinated by the Office of Career Services. In addition, part-time and full-time jobs are posted, internet access for job searching is provided, and contacts are developed throughout the community to make graduates more marketable, competitive, and employable. It is the student's responsibility to schedule an appointment with the career counselor to discuss résumé construction, cover letter writing, interviewing techniques, and job placement strategies.

Mercyhurst North East Student Government

(M.N.E.S.G.)[email protected] Mercyhurst North East Student Government is the voice of all students on campus and is operated by members and elected officers. It is a multi-functional organization which serves the college community and the community at large and acts as a liaison between students and administration. M.N.E.S.G. supports all other student organizations, sponsors activities which will enrich the college community, both culturally and socially. Activities include weekly tournaments, movies, dances, trips and excursions as well.

Student Publication

The Chancellor is the student newspaper and the voice of the Mercyhurst North East community. It provides an opportunity for students to develop their writing and photography skills and acts as a forum for campus opinions. The Chancellor is published several times each term.

Health Services

The purpose of the Mercyhurst North East Health Services policy is to ensure that students have access to care in the event of an illness or injury. Students will be responsible for all fees incurred and are strongly encouraged to have health insurance. Students may enroll in a student health insurance plan through the Erie Campus Student Services Office (814) 824-2122. Knowledge of limitations, provisions, or requirements of personal health insurance is the responsibility of the student. Students with chronic health care needs should follow up with their own health care providers.

Discipline

Disciplinary appeals are made to the Judicial Board of Mercyhurst North East which recommends sanctions to the Administrative Dean. The Board has the ability to increase, decrease, or support any sanctions imposed. Consequences include, but are not limited to, monetary fines, community service, removal from housing, suspension, and expulsion. Cooperation with staff in confronting inappropriate behavior, along with accepting responsibility for one's own actions, is strongly encouraged.

Mercyhurst North East Health Services

Students who experience an illness or injury may access the Hamot Healthcare Center at Mercyhurst North East located on Campus ­ Vineyard Primary Care (814) 877-7711.

Admission / Academic Affairs

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ADMISSION

Criteria for Admission

In selecting a student for admission, Mercyhurst North East looks at several criteria in order to assess both the applicant's academic background and his or her readiness for success at the college level, including reviewing the student's previous academic records. The College Entrance policy is free of discrimination on the grounds of race, creed, color, sex, or national origin. The primary admission requirement for Mercyhurst North East is graduation from high school, or a General Educational Development (GED) Equivalency Diploma. Other criteria may include SAT or ACT scores, completion of the Mercyhurst North East basic skills placement examination, and a personal interview. Associate degree program requirements vary. Most programs require a minimum grade point average of 1.75 in high school or equivalent G.E.D. scores, and the successful completion of the Mercyhurst North East basic skills placement examination. On occasion, the basic skills placement examination requirement is waived.

Notification of Decision

Notification of the decision made on the application will be given as soon as possible after all credentials reach the Admission Office. It is the responsibility of all applicants to see that all supporting documents are sent in a timely manner.

ACADEMIC AffAIRS

Successful completion of academic goals requires dedication to study, to planning, and to adhering to the academic standards and regulations of the college. The college provides substantial support to all students to assist them with successful course completion and with the planning of the completion of their academic program. The official registration period for each new term usually begins in the last month of the previous term. Announcements are made in a variety of ways and printed schedules for the coming term are made available. This schedule provides instructions for completing the process of registration including meeting financial obligations to the college along with the manner in which Financial Aid is obtained. Planning a course of study is a collaborative enterprise for which the student is principally responsible, but one in which the advisor has a role of explaining the elements of the curriculum the student is pursuing, as well as assisting in course selection. Students who register after the official registration period are subject to a late penalty fee. No student will be registered without the adviser's signature, nor will any registrations be accepted after the official ending of the registration period without approval of the Academic Dean.

Registration Process

Transfer Information

Students who have previously attended a college or university must accept these transfer regulations to be accepted for certificate or degree programs. · Only courses with grades of C or greater are transferable · Letter grades and cumulative grade point average do not transfer · Associate degree students may transfer up to 30 credits from another college, but must complete at least onehalf of the major requirements at Mercyhurst North East · Credit will generally be granted for those courses that are reasonably equivalent in content and subject matter to existing Mercyhurst North East courses · A certificate program student may transfer up to six credits from another college · Transcripts must be sent directly from schools previously attended to the Admission Office

Full-Time Student Status

Mercyhurst North East considers a full-time student as one who attempts at least 24 credit hours per academic year and carries a minimum of eight credit hours in any regular term. Students who receive financial aid or governmentsponsored loans should check with the Financial Aid Office before registering for less than eight credits in any term, and also discuss this with their advisor. Completing less than the planned credit hours a year jeopardizes the student's opportunity to complete his or her program in a normal time frame.

How to Apply

1. A potential student must file a completed Mercyhurst North East application form with the Admission Office. A non-refundable $25 fee must accompany the completed application. You may apply via the Internet at http://northeast.mercyhurst.edu, or by sending an application to: Admission Office Mercyhurst North East 16 West Division Street North East, PA 16428 A potential student must arrange with the high school and/or other appropriate educational institutions to have an official transcript sent to the Admission Office. The transcript should include class rank, grade average and test scores (if available). The standardized basic skills placement examinations are administered on a monthly basis and may be scheduled by calling (814) 725-6144.

Part-Time Student Status

A part-time student is one who is officially registered at Mercyhurst North East but carries less than 24 credit hours during the normal academic year, or who carries less than eight credit hours in any regular term. A part-time matriculated student is charged a per-credit rate,plus any mandatory fees.

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Core Curriculum / Academic Standards and grades

CORE CURRICULUM

The following courses, offered at Mercyhurst North East, meet SOME of the Core Curriculum requirements for a fouryear Bachelor's degree at Mercyhurst College.

Academic Standards and Grades

Grading System

The grading system of the College is: A 4.0 exceptional attainment B+ 3.5 superior work B 3.0 good work C+ 2.5 above adequate work C 2.0 adequate work D+ 1.5 less than adequate work D 1.0 poor work F 0.0 failure to meet course standards

THE COMMON CORE (CC): (5 courses)

College Writing I College Writing II Math (choose at least 1) 1. Business Math (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirements) 2. Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirements) 3. Math Problem Solving 4. Statistics 4. Computer (choose at least 1) 1. Computer Skills and Applications (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirements) 2. Computer Applications (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirements) 3. Advanced Computer Applications (may not satify bachelor's degree requirements) 5. Religious Traditions (choose at least 1) 1. Religious Person/Tradition 2. Understanding Scripture 3. Christology 4. New Testament 1. 2. 3.

Grade Point Average

Grade points are earned according to the grading scale below for each credit attempted. Under the grading system, a student's Grade Point Average (GPA) is computed by dividing the number of Grade points earned by the number of credits attempted. The resulting number is the student's Grade Point Average. Example: Grade points x credits attempted = total Grade points A 4.0 x 3 = 12.0 C 2.0 x 3 = 6.0 C+ 2.5 x 3 = 7.5 F 0 x 2 = 0 Totals ..........................................11 = 25.5 Grade Point Average Formula: 25.5 ÷ 11 = 2.32 GPA (total Grade points) (credits attempted)

THE DISTRIBUTION CORE (DC): (5 courses)

Behavioral Sciences (choose at least 1) 1. American Government 2. Contemporary Social Problems 3. Human Growth and Development 4. Introduction to Psychology 5. Macroeconomics 6. Introduction to Sociology 7. Natural Science/Art Appreciation (choose at least 1) 1. Dance Appreciation 2. Music Appreciation 3. Theatre Appreciation 4. Human Biology 5. Astronomy 6. Understanding Science 8. American/European/World History (choose at least 1) 1. U.S. History I: to 1865 2. U.S. History II: 1865 ­ 1945 3. U.S. History III: Since 1945 4. European History to the renaissance 5. European History since the Renaissance 6. World History III 9. Literature/Philosophy/World Perspective/ Communication (choose at least 1) 1. Public Speaking (may not transfer to Bachelor program) 2. Newswriting (may not satisfy Bachelor program requirements) 3. Western Classics 4. Introduction to Creative Writing 5. Philosophical Inquiry 6. Asian Cultures 7. Comparative Politics ­ Asia 8. World Geography 10. Open Elective Core (from any major) 6.

Academic Requirements

Mercyhurst North East students will be placed on probation or suspended from the college if they fail to attain the 2.0 minimum Q.P.A Overall, students are expected to earn at least a 2.0 GPA in any term. A consequence of poor performance includes the necessity to retake a course thus extending the time necessary to complete one's program of study. Almost all associate degree programs require a cumulative GPA in the major's courses higher than 2.0 (refer to specific programs for academic requirements). The academic policy relating to scholastic deficiency is: Certificate Program Standards: Students must complete the certificate program in which they are enrolled with a minimum 2.0 GPA Associate Degree Standards: Students must maintain a cumulative 2.0 GPA in any term and also achieve the programestablished academic standards to graduate (see specific program information within this catalog). Transfer standards for baccalaureate programs at Mercyhurst College: After the completion of 24 credits and the obtaining of a cumulative 2.5 GPA, a student may transfer to the Erie campus in pursuit of a baccalaureate degree. The successful completion of an associate degree permits transfer to the Erie campus. Because standards for matriculation are different in each program, a student may or may not be eligible to pursue a specific program on the Erie campus. Academic Support Services at the Erie campus provides a transfer counselor. Announcements concerning the procedures for transfer are publicized on the North East Campus at midyear.

Academic Standards and grades

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Probation and Suspension

Academic Probation: Students not achieving a cumulative 2.0 GPA will be placed on academic probation. This status places a student on notice that satisfactory academic achievement has not occurred, and that he or she is in jeopardy of being suspended from the college. Students on academic probation will be closely monitored by their faculty advisors and are required to avail themselves of academic support services. Failure to do so may be a factor during a suspension review. Academic Suspension: If a student's performance remains below established levels or if a student fails all courses in a specific term, careful review of academic potential will occur. If this assessment determines that the student is not ready to continue his or her studies with a prospect for success, the student will be suspended. Academic suspension can be for one or more terms as determined by past performance of the student. 1. At the end of the first term at the college, a student may be suspended if there is substantial evidence that academic success cannot be achieved at this time in the student's career. 2. If a student does not earn a cumulative 1.70 GPA by the end of the second or any subsequent terms, the individual may be suspended from the college for at least one full term. Academic suspension occurs when a student has clearly shown that his/her work (and/or attitude) remains unsatisfactory and that the minimum cumulative GPA for the level of attempted credits has not been achieved. 3. Students are expected to obtain a cumulative 2.00 GPA by the end of the third term if the student is to continue study at the college. 4. A student who fails a majority of their courses in any given term may be suspended for at least one term. 5. A student may appeal a suspension by writing to the Academic Dean. 6. Students who have been academically suspended from Mercyhurst North East for one term must apply for readmission. A formal letter requesting readmission must be sent to the Academic Dean's Office addressed to the Academic Suspension Appeals Committee at least one month prior to the beginning of the new term. The Academic Suspension Appeals Committee may consult with the suspended student's Academic Advisor and Academic Counselor. A meeting to discuss the matter may be convened involving the student and the Academic Appeals Committee. The Academic Dean will notify the student of the decision and the conditions required for readmission, if applicable. Readmitted students who subsequently fail to achieve a satisfactory academic average after a reasonable period of time may be suspended for no less than a year. 7. Mercyhurst North East students will be expected to exhibit a positive attitude, meet regular attendance standards, and show academic progress. Students whose attitude or attendance indicates a severe lack of interest will be counseled and informed that they may be asked to leave the college unless their behavior improves.

Every instructor defines, within the first week of the course, all factors on which the course grade is based. If classroom attendance is to be considered in calculating the course grade, a statement indicating attendance requirements will be included on the course syllabus distributed at the beginning of the term.

Course Withdrawal

Students who withdraw from a course after the first week, but before the end of the sixth week of each term will receive a "W" (no grade, no penalty) for the course. There will be no withdrawal after the end of the sixth week. Students seeking a waiver of the rule because of a confining illness or a serious emergency must file a letter with the Office of the Academic Dean explaining the special circumstances. Before students withdraw from or drop a course in any term, they must check with the Financial Aid Office to determine if financial aid will be adversely affected by the change.

THE STUDENT HANDBOOK

In addition to this catalog, the College publishes the Student Handbook. The Handbook is written to provide students with an understanding of the culture and community of Mercyhurst North East (MNE) as well as to provide behavioral standards and consequences for misbehavior. Included in the Handbook is information on various college departments and offices, the Student Conduct Code, residential policies, etc. Students are responsible for the information contained in the Handbook and for seeking clarification of that information as needed. The Student Handbook is available to all students on the College's website and in booklet form. Commuters and students living off-campus may obtain a copy of the Handbook from the Residence Life Office or online.

Schedule Changes

Students who wish to change their schedule may do so during the first week of a new term. Schedule changes may be made after the second week of class in a new term only upon approval of the Academic Dean. Schedule changes must carry the approval of the student's adviser.

Late Change of Program Fee

A fee of $75 will be charged to students who register late or who change their schedule after the date for the drop/add period.

Course Overload

Students who maintain an academic average of "B" or higher for three academic terms are permitted to take an additional course in the succeeding term. Other students may take such an overload only with the permission of their advisor and the Academic Dean.

Change of Grade

Grades are not changed except when instructor mathematical error is apparent. Grade change requests based on simple reevaluation of the instructor's original judgment are disallowed. Requests must be initiated within 45 days after the close of the term in which the grade was earned, with the exception of the spring term. Requests for the spring term must be initiated within 45 days after the fall term has begun. No grade changes may be made without the approval of the Academic Dean.

Class Attendance Policy

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Academic Standards and grades

Grade Appeals

In all cases it shall be assumed that the grade assigned is correct; the student appealing the grade must justify the need for a change of the grade assigned. A grade may only be appealed if the final grade issued for a class does not reflect what the student has earned according to the grading criteria outlined by the course instructor. Grade appeals may not be based upon a request to have submitted work re-evaluated by the instructor. An appeal must be initiated within 45 days after the close of the term in which the grade was earned (or 45 days into the fall term for grades issued during the previous spring term). If a student believes that a final grade issued is not reflective of the grading criteria outlined by the course instructor he/she should first meet with the instructor to discuss the final grade. If this meeting does not resolve the issue satisfactorily the student should submit a formal grade appeal to the Academic Dean at the Mercyhurst North East Office of Academic Affairs. The appeal should be word processed and should clearly state the basis for the appeal and all pertinent facts related to it. A copy of the course syllabus and copies of all pertinent assignments and exams should be attached to the appeal. Once the appeal has been received the instructor involved will be informed of the grade appeal and must submit a written statement in response. After considering both statements, the Academic Dean will make the final decision. As part of the decision making process, the Academic Dean may also refer the grade appeal to the Academic Policies Committee. The Office of Academic Affairs will notify both the student and instructor of the final decision.

removed no later than 30 days after the end of the term in which they were given, or the "I" grade is changed to an "F" grade. Students, who are working on special projects that carry into other terms, or on theses, should not register for credit until the term when completion appears likely. While on the transcript, "I" grades will carry no penalty.

Repeated Courses

Students who earned a "D+", "D", or "F" in a course may repeat that course and will be re-graded as PASS ("PA"), LOW PASS ("LP") or FAIL ("F"). Students earning at least a "C" will be re-graded as a PASS ("PA") for the course; students earning a "D+" or "D" will be re-graded as a LOW PASS ("LP"); students earning a FAIL will be re-graded as "F". When the re-grade is a "PA", an "LP", or an "F", the original grade is converted to an "R" (REPEAT). A LOW PASS or a PASS is not calculated in the GPA; however, if a student fails the course, the "F" grade is included in the cumulative grade point average. Students who receive a LOW PASS or a PASS for the course repeated in their major field must consult their department director concerning the effect of the repeated course on their departmental requirements.

Academic Honesty

Students are expected to contribute actively to the development of an atmosphere of academic integrity. Mercyhurst North East assumes, therefore, that students will not resort to plagiarism or any other form of academic dishonesty. Students found guilty of willful academic dishonesty may be subject to a broad range of sanctions. At the discretion of their instructor, they may be required to redo the plagiarized assignment, or they may receive an automatic F for the exam/assignment and/or the course. Students found to be in collaboration with other students involved in willful academic dishonesty are also subject to disciplinary action. With reference to class assignments: Academic integrity is an extremely important virtue in students and it is to be maintained in class assignments. Students should follow the directions given by faculty members about assignments. Assignments should be read in full, in the language assigned. Students are expected to do their own work; students are not permitted to submit work partially or totally done by another student or documents downloaded from the Internet. Use of computer-assigned translation on assignments to be submitted in a language other than English is likewise prohibited. Group work is permitted only when a collaborative effort is assigned; only those who actually worked on the assignment should have their names on the submission. With reference to citations in formal writing: Students are expected to uphold generally recognized standards of citation in order to avoid plagiarism. Though individual instructors may alter the expectations somewhat, general principles include: the necessity to provide citations for any direct quotation, the need to provide citations for any paraphrased material, the need to credit theories or concepts to their authors through citation, and the need to provide full and accurate citations. With reference to library conduct: Reading and audiovisual materials provided for the enrichment of the college community should be treated with respect by all students. Willful destruction of library materials, including but not limited to books, periodicals, manuscripts, CDs, videos and records constitutes academic misconduct.

Pass-Fail Option

A student is permitted to choose one course on a Pass/Fail basis. The purpose of this option is to encourage students to explore new areas of study in which they are interested but have little or no background. The Pass/Fail option is not offered as a means to remove deficient grades incurred, nor is the desire to reduce effort in a course appropriate justification for utilizing this option. The Pass/Fail option may be chosen for a Core course or any other course not needed to fulfill the major or minor requirements. The Pass/Fail option requires the written approval of the advisor and the Academic Dean. A student must attain a minimum of a "C" grade to receive a Pass ("PA") for the course. Students receiving a "D+" or "D" grade will receive a Low Pass ("LP") for the course. The "PA" or "LP" grades are not calculated in the grade point average; however, if the student fails the course, the "F" grade is included in the cumulative grade point average.

Incomplete Grades

The Incomplete grade ("I") is a temporary grade indicating that work in the course was acceptable, though a significant or critical part of it was not completed due to illness or other serious circumstances beyond the student's control. It is the student's responsibility to verify these conditions. The "I" grade may not be used to extend time for course work or for the convenience of student or faculty member. When the instructor agrees to assign an "I" grade, a report form must be filed with the Academic Dean's Office prior to the submission of grades, indicating what remains to be completed for a final grade and the exact date when it is to be completed. When approved, incomplete grades must be

Academic Standards and grades

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With reference to taking exams: It is expected that Mercyhurst North East College students will exhibit academic honesty when they take exams. Failure to do so is a form of deception that is unacceptable at Mercyhurst North East. Any action that misrepresents the extent to which a student has mastered material assessed on an exam constitutes academic dishonesty or cheating. Cheating includes, but is not limited to the following types of activities: copying from another student's test or assignment or allowing another student to copy from your test or assignment; collaborating during a test with any person without explicit faculty permission; stealing, buying or otherwise improperly obtaining all or part of a test before the exam; taking a test for someone else or allowing someone else to take a test for you; altering responses after an assignment or test was graded, then reporting that there has been a scoring mistake; and marking two answers on a test, so that the choice is unclear in hopes that the instructor will assume a correct response was intended. When an instructor believes that a student has committed an act of academic dishonesty, the instructor will inform the student and complete an Academic Dishonesty Report. That report is filed and kept in the Office of Academic Affairs. On a first offense, the student will be subject to the consequence determined by the individual faculty member. At the discretion of their instructor, they may be required to redo the plagiarized assignment, or they may receive an automatic F for the exam/ assignment and/or course. On a second offense, the student will be subject to the consequence determined by the individual faculty member, as well as any combination of consequences as determined by the Office of Academic Affairs. Students have a right to appeal if they believe an academic dishonesty allegation is unfounded. The student should submit a formal written appeal to the Academic Dean at the MNE Office of Academic Affairs. The appeal should be word processed and should clearly state the basis for the appeal and all pertinent facts related to it. Appeals will be heard by the Academic Dean . The Academic Dean may also refer the appeal to the Academic Policies Committee. The final determination in any academic dishonesty case lies with the MNE Office Academic Affairs. Questions regarding academic dishonesty or the appeal process should be directed to the MNE Office of Academic Affairs.

to study independently must first secure the approval of the department director, advisor, and faculty sponsor. A formal plan of study must then be filed with the Office of the Academic Dean for final approval. Independent Study courses are taken only on a Pass-Fail basis unless the course is a major or minor requirement. Special applications for enrolling in Independent Study courses are available in the Dean's Office. Students cannot register for Independent Study until their applications have been approved.

Tutorial Study

Tutorial study is available only to students who have completed a minimum of 35 credits and cannot enroll in the regularly scheduled course. Tutorial courses are different from Independent Study courses in that they are a part of the regular program and require no more special knowledge than that expected of students enrolled in a regular term course. Students who enroll into a tutorial course must meet the same requirements as those enrolled in the regular course, except that they must meet with the instructor two hours weekly during the term. Because there are fewer contact hours with the instructor, students whose Grade Point Average is below 2.5 are not permitted to enroll in tutorial courses. Permission to enroll in tutorial courses is reserved for students who are completing a program or who are meeting other requirements. It is expected that tutorial courses will not be taken simply as a matter of student convenience or preference. Under most circumstances a student may only enroll in two such courses during his/her course work at Mercyhurst North East. Exceptions are allowed at the discretion of the Academic Dean. Students who wish to enroll in a tutorial must seek the written permission of the department director, the major advisor, and the tutor. Tutorial courses are graded on a PassFail basis unless the course is a major or minor requirement. Special applications for tutorial study are available in the Academic Dean's Office. The Academic Dean must approve the application. The approved application must be on file in the Registrar's Office before a student will be permitted to register for tutorial study.

Copyright Violations

Due to the increase number of copying machines available on campus, it becomes easier every year to copy information from books, periodicals, etc. Every year, more and more students violate the copyright laws. Mercyhurst North East is aware of the problem and of the difficulty in knowing what is acceptable. A copy of the "guidelines" developed at New York University is now available at each of the copy locations throughout the college (with the encouragement and permission of New York University). Mercyhurst North East subscribes to these guidelines. Additional copies are available in the Academic Dean's Office.

Security Violations and Misuse of Computer Resources

Mercyhurst North East reserves the right to take serious action against any student who willfully releases restricted computer information or misuses the College computer resources. Such action may include (but is not limited to) the cancellation of computer privileges, immediate dismissal from work positions if applicable, academic suspension or expulsion as determined by the Academic Dean, and/or criminal prosecution.

Independent Study

Independent Study courses are reserved for students who have achieved a minimum of 45 credits, have had substantial experience, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the chosen area of study, and wish to pursue a specialized topic not offered in the regular program. Students enrolled in Independent Study courses must meet with the sponsoring faculty member at least one hour weekly during the term. Students who wish

Proficiency Examination Credit

This exam allows a student to take a comprehensive exam to earn credit for a course in which the student has a background in the subject. This exam cannot be used to "repeat" the course. All credit received through Proficiency Examinations will appear on the student's transcript as PASS. Failure will not be recorded on the transcript.

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Academic Standards and grades / Academic recognition and honors

Cooperative Education/Internship/Externship Program

Some students attending Mercyhurst North East have an opportunity to participate in Cooperative Education/Internship/ Externship experiences. Co-op is the combination of classroom and on-the-job work. It is organized in an educationally sound manner and coordinated so that experiences in business, industry, government, and various public agencies become an integral part of a student's college education. The benefits to students participating in a co-op are financial and experiential. Both help students mature socially and emotionally, aid students educationally, and assist students preparing for occupational advancement. Mercyhurst North East permits a maximum of three credits to be earned in a cooperative education or internship experience and applied toward a student's degree/certificate. Every opportunity is explored to place students in employment situations that reflect their academic course of study. All cooperative/internship/externship placements must be approved by the Co-op/Intern Program Coordinator. Since employers have the final decision about whom they will hire, and at what level, there can be no guarantees of placement in the cooperative/internship/externship program. To be eligible for placement, completed application forms, along with a copy of the student's academic transcript, signed approval from one's academic advisor/division director, and resume must be presented to the Career Services Office before the application deadline. Individual appointments with co-op coordinators to discuss specific placement opportunities cannot be made before this paper work is completed and filed.

Life Experience Credit

1. Life experience credit, e.g., prior employment, volunteer work, and credits earned from accredited institutions such as Edison (NJ) and Keystone (PA) will be accepted toward experience learning credit if the experience has produced learning outcomes similar to those approved for regular academic credit at Mercyhurst. Credit may be granted only with the approval of the student's academic advisor, the department director and the Academic Dean, and in some cases, may require a paper or project approved by the concerned department. No more than six credit hours can be allowed through life experience credit. Life experience credit is to be used to meet core requirements only upon the approval of the department director and the Academic Dean. Life experience credit does not apply for skill level courses, such as keyboarding

2. 3. 4.

Transcripts

An "official" transcript is one bearing the College seal and the signature of the Registrar and is issued only upon the written authorization of the student. Official transcripts are normally mailed directly to other institutions and agencies. Whenever an official transcript is released directly to the students, it will also bear the stamped message "Issued Directly to Student." A fee of $4 is charged for the issuance of each official transcript. An "unofficial" transcript does not bear the seal of the College nor the authorized signature. These are issued free of charge to the student upon request.

How Co-op Works

The student and the co-op coordinator establish measurable learning objectives that the co-op student must meet or exceed during his/her on-the-job experience in order to receive academic credit. Once the student is placed in a cooperative assignment, the coordinator makes periodic visits to the company where the student is employed to discuss his/her progress. He/she will also confer with the student at the conclusion of each cooperative work assignment. The coordinator uses on-site visitations and an "Employer Evaluation Form" to judge whether the student is successfully combining the theory of the classroom with the practical experience, and to see if the student is advancing in the position as effectively as possible.

Confidentiality of Student Records

Student records may be released only to the student or to proper academic and administrative personnel within the College (Public Law 930380). The Educational Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment) requires that all students and/or former students must provide written authorization for the release of their records to others, if they desire them to be released. Telephone requests to furnish such records, therefore, may not be honored if there is no record of an authorization to release.

Internships/Externships

An internship or externship is an on-the-job experience in business, industry, government, public agencies, etc. It is similar to a co-op in that it is coordinated through the Career Services Office, but the internship is a non-paid experience whereas the externship is a paid experience for only the culinary arts students. Both are supervised by the Co-op/ Internship/Externship Office. Internships and externships are set up and supervised in much the same way as co-ops so that they become sound educational experiences that can be evaluated fairly. Life experience may be used as a substitute for one's coop/internship requirement; however, a student must complete a paper and/or project assigned by the student's department director. The number of credits (maximum of six) and final grade will be approved by the Office of the Academic Dean and will be determined by the departmental faculty member assigned.

The College acknowledges the student whose exceptional academic performance is deemed worthy of recognition.

ACADEMIC RECOGNITION AND HONORS

DEAN'S LIST

The Dean's list is for the student enrolled at Mercyhurst North East in a two-year associate degree program and is computed at the end of each term. A minimum of 8 credits for the term is required to qualify, allowing for no "P" (Passing) grades to be considered in the required minimum credits. The credits are to be completed at Mercyhurst College (Erie) or Mercyhurst North East, and appear on the Mercyhurst North East student's transcript. The student must achieve a 3.5 Grade Point Average (GPA) for the specific term to qualify. The cumulative GPA is not a determinant. The qualifying student is awarded a certificate to commemorate this outstanding academic achievement.

Academic recognition and honors / Academic and student support services / Ridge Library

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GRADUATION HONORS

Graduation honors are given to students whose exceptional academic, service and leadership performances are deemed worthy of recognition.

Blue and Green Honor Cords

The cords are presented to students who have a cumulative Grade Point Average of 3.7 of higher. These students are presented these cords before graduation and are announced at the ceremony as "graduating with distinction".

Individual Program Awards

These awards are presented to a student in each of the two-year associate degree programs at Mercyhurst North East. Selections are based on overall achievement, judged on scholarship, and for the potential they demonstrate as future leaders of their professions.

success. Should a problem arise, the support team may contact the student's instructor and, together with the student, determine a solution, while closely monitoring that student's progress. In cases where instructors have identified problems through the academic warning system, at mid-term, or at any other time within a term, students will be referred to the Student Support Team. The team will take pro-active steps to meet and counsel students. Additionally, Student Support Services facilitates the availability of student tutors. For more information contact Karen Donnelly at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

Carl D. Perkins & Applied Technology Education Act (Perkins)

All students enrolled in vocational programs will be monitored by a counselor and offered Perkins' services, which include academic counseling, career counseling, tracking, resume writing, tutoring, internship supervision and placement.

The Robert S. Miller Award

This award is the highest award presented by Mercyhurst North East to an adult student. It is given in recognition of the dedication, perseverance, and sacrifice necessary to achieve outstanding academic performance while managing responsibilities to family, work and the community. The recipient exemplifies to traditionalaged students that learning is a lifelong process. This award is named for Robert S. Miller, friend and supporter of Mercyhurst North East.

The Higher Education Equal Opportunity Program Act (ACT 101)

The Higher Education Equal Opportunity Program Act (EOP) is an academic support program funded through the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Higher Education and is available only to Pennsylvania residents. Services such as academic tracking and advising, tutorial services in all academic subjects, and personal and financial counseling are available to eligible students throughout their college career. To determine one's eligibility for this program, contact the academic counselor for EOP.

The Redemptorist Fathers Award

This honor is given to the graduate who has given unselfishly of his/her time, energy, talent, and loyalty to Mercyhurst North East. The recipient of this award, involved in numerous activities of the college, has shown that he/she possesses a high degree of leadership skills.

Services for Students with Learning Differences

Mercyhurst North East is committed to equal educational opportunities and full participation for students with disabilities. After acceptance into Mercyhurst North East, students with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations must present appropriate documentation through the Learning Differences Program. This documentation must be in writing and from a licensed psychologist or one with medically or professionally equivalent credentials. Mercyhurst North East does not provide nor pay for diagnostic testing. All qualified students with disabilities are eligible to receive, free of charge, academic adjustments and auxiliary aids as required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. These services are referred to as Level One services only. Level II services are available to students who wish or need a more structured program than Level I. Students who are involved in Level II pay an additional fee for services that go beyond those required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Accommodations are provided by scheduling upcoming exams through the Student Support Counselors.

The Sister Catherine McAuley Award

This award is the highest academic honor given by the college. It is presented in recognition of an associate degree candidate who has attained the highest Grade Point Average in the graduating class. All courses must be taken at Mercyhurst College or Mercyhurst North East.

The Medal of Honor

This prestigious honor is the highest award presented by Mercyhurst North East to the graduating student who has had the most positive impact on the life of our college community. The recipient of this award has exhibited outstanding scholarship achievement, personal integrity, and leadership skills.

Students who are new to a college environment sometimes feel "lost" and may even experience academic difficulty while adapting to their situation. These problems may be expressed in missed or incomplete assignments, high absenteeism, and/or lack of ambition, in addition to the more obvious signs, such as low grades. To improve student performance, Mercyhurst North East has developed a strong support system consisting of a team of academic advisors and student support counselors. The focus of this support identifies early warning signals that can prevent a student from doing his or her best work. Frequently, personal situations can interfere with classroom

ACADEMIC AND STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

The Ridge Library collection contains more than 10,000 books, 180 videos, and 80 magazines/journals. Additionally, the extensive book collection at the Hammermill Library is available to students at the North East campus using the library's Online Public Access Catalog referred to as HamLET. HamLET is a shared resource between the Erie and North East Campuses providing state-of-the-art access to library resources 24 hours a day at both campuses and off site

Ridge Library

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Student financial Services

locations. A search can be conducted of the collections by author, title, and subject headings. Students may request books from the Erie Campus and have them available at the North East circulation desk within 48 hours. If resources are not available at either campus, the libraries from other local library catalogs can be searched on HamLET such as the Erie County Library System, Allegheny College, the Behrend Campus of Penn State University as well as Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Gannon University and 55 Pennsylvania colleges and university libraries using EZ Borrow. The library also maintains as efficient Interlibrary Loan Department, at the Erie Campus, which will assist students in obtaining research materials (both books and journal articles) not readily available to them from well over 2000+ libraries worldwide. The libraries subscribe to 31 different indexes and databases providing a multitude of journal articles both in full-text and citation form. The subscribed databases have over 4,600 full-text journals and 600 full-text newspapers available for printing, saving or emailing. All 56 computer terminals in the library have access to the Internet. Besides the 56 computer terminals, the library also provides the latest wireless technology. The Ridge library is staffed at all times during the 64 hours per week the library is open during regular academic terms. The staff is trained to help students, faculty, and staff with their research needs.

Students taking science lab will earn credits toward their degree; therefore, students will be charged tuition credit when enrolled in a science lab. Institutional financial aid is based on the premise that all full-time students take a minimum of 8 credits per term. Taking additional credits will result in a higher bill but will not result in additional financial aid. MERCYHURST COLLEGE 2009 -2010 FEES NORTHEAST CAMPUS

TUITION COST PER 3-CREDIT COURSE

Mercyhurst ­ North East .................................... 1215.00 Mercyhurst ­ Corry ............................................ 1215.00 Municipal Police Training ­ 16 Credits .............. 6480.00 Municipal Police Training ­ Certificate* ............. 3620.00 LPN Program ** ................................................. 3850.00 High School ........................................................ 300.00 Villa/Prep/Northeast & Corry .............................. 399.00 Proficiency Exam (includes testing fee).............. 420.00 Audit................................................................... 420.00 Experience Learning........................................... 420.00 Mercyhurst Prep ................................................. 210.00 CLEP ................................................................... 228.00 *Flat Rate ­ includes tuition/all fees **Per term ­ tuition only

STUDENT fINANCIAL SERVICES (SfS)

TUITION AND FEES

Depending on the student's academic major and course scheduling, a full time-student typically takes 30 credits (ten courses) each year. Usually students take one term of 12 credits (four courses) and two terms of 9 credits (three courses). (Note: freshmen typically take 31 credits their first year because they are required to take the 1-credit FYI course. Cost for this course is an additional $367). Below is a chart of typical costs for a full-time student. FALL WINTER SPRING TOTAL (12 credits) (9 credits) (9 credits) Tuition ............... 4632.00 3474.00 3474.00 11580.00 Registration Fee ... 40.00 40.00 40.00 120.00 Computer/ Network ...............113.00 113.00 113.00 339.00 Student Government .......... 45.00 45.00 45.00 135.00 Building Assessment ........ 191.00 191.00 191.00 573.00 Commuter Total ................. 5021.00 3863.00 3863.00 12747.00 Dorm Room ...... 1263.00 1263.00 1263.00 4089.00 Board ................ 1263.00 1263.00 1263.00 4089.00 Resident Total . 7547.00 6389.00 6389.00 20925.00 Bill Due Date 8/10/2009 11/24/2009 2/25/2010

REQUIRED FEE SCHEDULE PER TERM (ALL STUDENTS)

Registration ........................................................... 40.00 Computer/Network............................................... 113.00 Building Assessment ........................................... 191.00 (pro-rated at $19.00 per credit for part time students) .... Student Government ............................................. 45.00 Part-time ( per credit ).............................................. 5.00 LPN Fee .............................................................. 265.00 Culinary**............................................................. 425.00 Physical Therapy** .............................................. 425.00 Nursing ................................................................ 500.00 Sport Management** ........................................... 425.00 Computer Systems Support**.............................. 240.00 **Fees are associated with specific courses

OCCASIONAL FEES

Application Fee ...................................................... 25.00 Freshman Year Initiative ­ Freshman Only ......... 405.00 Orientation Fee .................................................... 150.00 I.D. / Smart Card.................................................... 30.00 Graduation ........................................................... 150.00 (required fee even if student does not participate in ceremony)....................................................................... Lab ( Sciences )................................................... 125.00 Lab ( HRIM, Art, etc) ............................................ 225.00 Official Transcript of Credits .................................... 4.00 Intelligence Studies ( per term )........................... 125.00 Learning Differences Program: Annual Fee (Level Two Services only- billed per term $666 Fall, Winter, Spring .......................................... 1998.00 Student Teaching Fee.......................................... 300.00 Summer Program Fee (optional) ......................... 200.00

MERCYHURST ­ CORRY PROGRAM FEES

Tuition ............... 4860.00 Registration Fee ... 40.00 Total ................. 4900.00 3645.00 3645.00 40.00 40.00 3685.00 3685.00 12150.00 120.00 12270.00

Tuition will be billed for credit hours taken at the rate of $405 a credit or $1215.00 for a 3 credit course. Therefore, a student's tuition cost will vary depending on the total number of credits taken each term.

Student financial Services

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FINANCIAL PENALTIES:

Late Payment ........................................................ 50.00 Room Change ....................................................... 50.00 Returned Check..................................................... 25.00

ROOM AND BOARD CHARGE (PER OCCUPANT PER TERM)

Room Deposit (one time charge)......................... 250.00 Room and Board ............................................... 2526.00 Single Room extra charge ................................... 300.00 Townhouses....................................................... 2257.00 (requires minimum meal plan of $470 ­ includes cable)

Municipal Police Training

College Credit Program Fees* Tuition (16 credits) ............................................. 6480.00 Registration Fee .................................................... 40.00 Commuter Total ................................................. 6520.00 Room & Board ................................................... 5052.00 Resident Total .................................................. 11572.00 College Non-Credit (Certificate Program Fee) Tuition (21 weeks) ............................................. 3620.00 Commuter Total ................................................. 3620.00 Room & Board ................................................... 5052.00 Resident Total .................................................... 8672.00 *Fees depend on room/board plan

PAYMENT POLICY FOR TUITION, FEES, ROOM AND BOARD

The Office of SFS sends fall term bills to first-time students shortly after they have registered for the term (this usually occurs immediately following the "Summer Orientations" program during the summer). Fall term bills are sent to registered upperclassmen during the month of July. For winter and spring terms, bills are sent to registered students approximately six weeks before the term begins. In addition to charges for tuition, fees, room and board and other expenses, the bill reflects any scholarships, grants, and loans as pending financial aid. Financial aid listed is pending until the student's eligibility is confirmed, verification is completed, and the student's enrollment is verified on the 8th day of the term. In addition, students must have completed Entrance Loan Counseling and have signed a Master Promissory Note for Stafford Loan and/or Perkins Loan. Also, Federal PLUS and other alternative loans are not credited to the student's account until a promissory note is signed and the loan proceeds arrive at Mercyhurst. Registration for a given term is not complete until all charges are paid or until acceptable payment arrangements have been made with the Office of SFS. If students do not pay in full or make acceptable payment arrangements by the billing due date, a late payment fee of $50 will be assessed. If the student is depending on financial aid to cover all or part of the charges, a FAFSA must be filed, required documentation for verification and eligibility must be submitted, and, if applicable, entrance loan counseling and sign a promissory note for any student loans must be handled by the required deadlines to prevent assessment of a $50 late fee.

Mercyhurst only accepts personal checks, money orders, or cash as payment. Payment can be made in person, or by mail. Payment may also be made electronically by wiring funds directly to Mercyhurst. For more information on this, contact the Office of SFS. In lieu of paying a student bill in full, it can be paid in monthly installments (partial payments made in intervals) through Tuition Management Systems (TMS). The TMS Payment Plan divides a student's financial obligation into nine (9) interest-free payments per academic year, making the payment responsibility for attendance at Mercyhurst more manageable. The installment plan is available to all qualified undergraduate and graduate students for the fall, winter and spring terms. There is a $60 non-refundable fee for participating in the TMS Payment Plan, regardless of the debt balance. TMS sends a monthly billing statement to the student's permanent address, with payment due by the 1st of the month from August 1st to April 1st. Students receiving financial aid may also participate in the TMS Payment Plan. To determine the minimum monthly payment, deduct the amount of financial aid (not including work-study) from the annual charges, and then divide the balance into 9 payments. When budgeting for TMS, families must understand that tuition credit consumption varies from one student to another. It is important that the TMS budget is reviewed each term to ensure that the scheduled monthly payment plan reflects the student's actual charges at Mercyhurst. The student's first bill is accompanied by a TMS brochure that contains the answers to most questions. For more information about the plan or how to calculate monthly payments, contact TMS directly at 1-888-713-7234, or visit www.afford.com. Students incur a legal obligation to pay for tuition and fees when registering for classes. If payment is not made or satisfactory payment arrangements are not made, students are put on Business Office Hold. Business Office Hold prevents students from registering for classes for the forthcoming term. In addition, issuance of an official Academic Transcript is not permitted. The College also has the right to deregister a student for the term for non-payment. Also, failure to make satisfactory payment arrangements to pay the student bill in a timely fashion may subject a student's account being placed with a collection agency. When accounts are forwarded to a collection agency, students may not attend Mercyhurst until the prior balance due to the College, as well as, collection costs associated with the account are paid in full. If check payment is made and funds do not clear, in addition to the $50 late fee, the student will be charged the cost of the bank fee associated with insufficient funds. In this instance, the student will be contacted and given one week to make payment to Mercyhurst in the form of a certified check or money order. Legal action may be taken against a person that repeatedly submits check payments that do not clear.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY

Students who wish to withdraw from the college must complete a Cease Enrollment Form (available in the Office of Academic Affairs and also obtain the necessary signed approvals. Students who officially withdraw before the end of the academic term will receive course grades based on the course withdrawal policy described below.

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Student financial services

Students who wish to withdraw from a course must complete a Class Schedule Form (available in the Office of the Registrar) and obtain his/her advisor's signature and take the form to the Office of the Registrar for processing. Withdrawal from courses after the 7th week of classes for the fall, winter, and spring terms is not permitted. Course withdrawals between the end of the 1st week and end of the 7th week of classes for the fall, winter and spring terms will result in a W grade for the course. However, to seek waiver of this rule due to medical, military, or emergency circumstances, students must appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs. Whether a student chooses to withdraw from one course or withdraw from the college completely, it is important that the student contact the Office of Student Financial Services for advice regarding financial aid and billing. If the student is not properly enrolled at the time the funds are awarded and disbursed, this could jeopardize receipt of particular types of aid. Also, if a student drops from full-time to part-time enrollment status, student financial aid adjustments may be required. Withdrawing from courses may also prevent a student from making satisfactory academic progress, which may affect the student's eligibility for future financial aid assistance. Students who have officially withdrawn from the college and do not return within one academic year must apply for readmission. When a student officially withdraws from all courses (ceases enrollment) he/she may receive a refund of some part of tuition, room and board depending on the date of withdrawal. The student may also be entitled to partial refund of tuition if he/she withdraws from a course depending on when the withdrawal occurs. Refer to the chart below. Fees are not refundable when withdrawal occurs after the first day of classes.

withdrawal, Mercyhurst College refunds tuition 100% and room and board charges are pro-rated accordingly. Fees are not refundable.

TREATMENT OF FINANCIAL AID FOR TOTAL WITHDRAWAL (CEASE ENROLLMENT)

If the student withdraws from all courses (ceases to be enrolled), SFS must review the student's financial aid to determine whether financial aid funds must be adjusted in accordance with college, state, and federal policies governing total withdrawals. The Office of SFS calculates refund for tuition, room and board according to college policy. However, the policies on treatment of financial aid for total withdrawals (cease enrollments) are specific to each designated financial aid program and are applicable only if the student was awarded that particular type of fund. If the student is awarded various types of financial aid, more than one policy may apply in determining the student's revised financial aid eligibility.

INSTITUTIONAL AND STATE GRANT/ SCHOLARSHIP FINANCIAL AID REFUND POLICY DUE TO TOTAL WITHDRAWAL (CEASE ENROLLMENT)

Adjustments to institutional and/or state grant/scholarships follow the college's policy on refunds for tuition, room, and board (refer to the Tuition, Room and Board Refund Policy Due to Total Withdrawal section above). For example, if the student's tuition is refunded 70%, the student's institutional and/or state grants/scholarships will be refunded 70%, meaning that the student may retain 30% of each of the institutional and/or state grant/scholarship awards. However for the state grant/scholarship, where, in accordance with the above policy, the amount of State Grant funds to be retained by the college is small, and the amount to refund to TUITION, ROOM AND BOARD REFUND POLICY the state is large, the Office of SFS may advise the student to DUE TO WITHDRAWAL forfeit the State Grant altogether when it appears that it will benefit the student. Period of Withdrawal During a Term Percentage of Tuition, Room & If the student forfeits the State Grant, Board Refund it will enable Mercyhurst to refund the On or before the 1st day of classes 100% (including fees) entire term's State Grant disbursement Up to and including calendar day 8 90% to PHEAA, thereby saving a term of Calendar days 9 ­ 15 80% State Grant eligibility for the student and possibly avoiding a state aid academic Calendar days 16 ­ 22 70% program problem in the future. For Calendar day 23 and later 0% example, if the student withdraws from The tuition refund policy for pre-summer, summer sessions, the college during the first week of classes, the student will have semester and clock-hour programs follow a different 90% of his/her tuition refunded, and following PHEAA regulations, schedule than above because the length of the sessions/ 90% of the State Grant will have to be refunded back to the state. programs differ than the fall, winter and spring terms. The If the PHEAA Grant is $1,000, $900 would be returned to the calculations are similar, but are done in proportion to the state and the student would be able to retain $100 to pay for any length of the sessions/programs. Refund schedules for educational charges for the week in attendance. In this instance, these special sessions/programs are available in the Office it is strongly recommended that the entire $1,000 be sent back of Student Financial Services. The pre-summer and summer to the state so that the student can receive a PHEAA Grant for a tuition refund policy is also published in the Pre-Summer and future term and not have this term of attendance count against Summer Registration Course Schedule. the student when calculating satisfactory academic progress for Students seeking waiver of the above Tuition, Room and PHEAA State Student Aid Programs. Board Refund Policy due to medical, military or serious FEDERAL (TITLE IV) FINANCIAL AID REFUND emergency, may file a letter with the Office of Academic Affairs POLICY DUE TO TOTAL WITHDRAWAL (CEASE explaining and documenting the special circumstances. ENROLLMENT) When students are granted approval by the Office of Academic Affairs for a medical, military or serious emergency The federal policy for return of Title IV funds maintains

Student financial services

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that the student can retain only that portion of federal aid that the student has earned based on time in attendance before withdrawal. The percentage of time that the student attended an academic term determines the amount of federal aid that must be returned to the federal government. This federally mandated policy is independent of the Mercyhurst Institutional Refund Policy for Tuition, Room and Board. The schedules vary by start and end dates of each term and each academic program. Refer to the 2009 -09 Student Financial Services Reference Guide for the Title IV Refund Title IV Refund Calculation Schedules or the Office of Student Financial Services.

FINANCIAL AID POLICIES

Students have the following rights and responsibilities: · Have access to complete information regarding fees, payment, and refund policies. · Confidentiality of all personal and family financial information. · Reconsideration of student aid eligibility if student and parent's situation warrants it through an appeal to SFS. · To advise SFS of any additional financial aid received that is not indicated on the Mercyhurst Financial Aid Award Letter Notification · To follow application filing deadlines and to submit all required documentation for verification of financial and other information pertaining to the financial aid application process within 21 days of the request. · To give SFS permission to relay pertinent financial, academic, and other information to donors of aid upon request. · To maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for Financial Aid (refer to SAP Policy in the following section). · To comply with the rules governing the types of financial assistance the student receives.

To apply for financial aid at Mercyhurst, include Mercyhurst's institutional code, 003297, in the college choice section (Step Six) of the FAFSA. Students may file the FAFSA after the deadline of March 15 and submit any required documentation after June 15; however, there are specific deadlines associated with each student aid program. If students apply late, they risk not receiving student aid from some programs. In addition to the processed FAFSA, sfs must receive all requested documentation 30 days before the end of the term or award period. This deadline allows processing and authorization of disbursements within timeframes defined by regulations pertaining to federal and state aid programs. Failure to apply or to submit required documentation by the indicated deadlines may result in a loss of financial aid eligibility for all student aid programs. Students should be familiar with the SFS processing schedule and adhere to the deadlines specified below.

SFS Processing Scheduled and Deadlines

December · Freshmen scholarship award offers begin. January · Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available for filing by going to www.FAFSA.ed.gov. · Tax Statements for federal and state income tax filing are sent to students that were enrolled prior calendar year. · Tuition bills are sent to students registered for spring term. February · Financial Aid Packaging begins for freshman, transfer students, and first-time graduate students that have filed a FAFSA. · SAP appeals for the spring term must be submitted to the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee by February 19. · Student Aid Reports (SAR) start arriving in the mail; Mercyhurst College must be listed as a college choice (school code 003297) on the SAR. · Loan exit counseling is completed by student-loan borrowers expecting to graduate after winter term. March · FAFSA preferred filing deadline for forthcoming academic year is March 15; Mercyhurst College must be listed as college choice (school code 003297) in the college choice section (STEP Six) of the FAFSA. April · Loan exit counseling is completed by student-loan borrowers expecting to graduate after spring term. · Summer Financial Aid applications are available in the SFS office and online at http://lakernet.mercyhurst.edu/ departments/stud_fin_svc/forms.asp. May · Admission tuition deposits due May 1. · FAFSA filing deadline for PHEAA Grant applicants is May 1. · Returning student records reviewed for Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) after spring term grades are posted. June · New students (and parents) attend Summer Orientations. · Returning students Financial Aid Packaging begins for

Financial Aid Application Procedures and Deadlines

To apply for federal, state, and institutional (Mercyhurst) financial aid, the student must complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each academic year. Students can submit the FAFSA electronically (online) using fafSa on the Web (http://www.fafsa.ed.gov), or can complete a paper FAFSA and mail it to the Federal Processor using the envelope provided in the FAFSA packet. Students may obtain a paper FAFSA either from their high school or at the SfS Office. To file electronically, the student (and parent if dependent) will need a u.S. Department of Education (USDE) PIN. Students (and parents) may apply for one at http://www.pin.ed.gov. The PIN serves as the student's identifier to let access to personal information in various US Department of Education (USDE) systems. Students that have questions about the fafSa on the Web can speak with a customer service representative by calling 1-800-801-0576. Assistance for students with hearing disabilities is available by dialing the Web TDD number, 1-800-511-5806. Although students can file the FAFSA anytime after January 1 prior to the forthcoming academic year in which they plan to attend, the deadline to file the fafsa is March 15 of that year to ensure full consideration for federal, state, and institutional scholarships, grants, loans, and work-study.

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Student financial services

those registered for the following fall term. · 2008 Federal Income Tax Returns and any other requested information must be submitted to the Office of SFS by June 15 to complete the federal financial aid verification process. · Upperclassmen SAP appeals for combined summer, fall, winter, and spring terms must be submitted to the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee by June 12. · Summer Financial Aid applications deadline is June 16. July · New students (and parents) attend Summer Orientations. · Tuition bills are sent to registered students for fall term. · Loan exit counseling is completed by student-loan borrowers expecting to graduate after summer term. August/September · New students (and parents) attend Summer Orientations. · New student loan borrowers complete loan entrance counseling. · Student loan borrowers sign promissory notes. · Student employees complete Work-study contracts and I-9 forms. · Upperclassmen SAP appeals for fall, winter and spring terms are submitted to the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee by August 21. October · Student loan borrowers graduating at the end of the fall term complete loan exit counseling. · Tuition bills are sent to students registered for the winter term. November · Upperclassmen SAP appeals for winter and spring terms must be submitted to the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee by November 20.

Expected Family Contribution (EFC)

Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is an estimate of the family's financial strength and the ability to contribute, and it is measured by applying the official needs-analysis formula to the data submitted on the student's FAFSA. It is the amount that the student and his/ her family are expected to contribute toward the expense of an education.

Financial Need

Financial need refers to the Cost of Attendance (coa) minus the Expected Family Contribution (efc). Demonstrated Financial Need (coa - efc = need) determines a student's eligibility for need-based financial assistance.

Special Circumstances

Although the formula to determine financial aid eligibility is standard for all applicants, there is some flexibility in recalculating eligibility in light of special circumstances. For example, if the student or the student's family has experienced an income reduction due to unemployment, disability, divorce, or death, the student can have his/her financial aid eligibility recalculated using updated information. Other special circumstances include loss of non-taxable income (e.g., child support, social security benefits, and so on). In all cases, special circumstances must be fully documented with tax returns, death certificates, court documentation, or letters from appropriate agencies, individuals, or employers. If there are other circumstances that affect the amount that the student and family are expected to contribute toward the student's education, please contact SfS immediately; however, keep in mind that the reasons must be sound and that the student will have to provide adequate proof to support any monetary adjustments.

Verification & Eligibility Confirmation

Verification is the process in which Student Financial Services (SfS)--as dictated by federal regulations--compares the information reported on the fafSa with student's (and student's parents) prior-year tax returns and other financial documentation. If the student's application is selected for verification, the student will be contacted by letter or e-mail requesting the required information. SfS must receive all requested documentation before federal, state and institutional aid can be disbursed. If there are differences between the data supplied on the FAFSA and the verification documentation, corrections may be needed, and student's FAFSA will be reprocessed. This may result in a revision of the Financial Aid Package. If the student is a Pennsylvania resident receiving state aid, PHeaa may select the student file for state validation. If the student receives an "Applicant Information Request" from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Student Assistance Authority (PHeaa), the student must forward all requested information and financial documents directly to PHeaa in Harrisburg. In some cases, PHeaa may request the same information that was requested by SfS. The student must forward this same information and documentation to PHeaa to avoid a delay in disbursement of funds or loss of your state aid altogether. It is extremely important that students (and parents) respond to requests for information promptly because finalized financial aid packages are processed in the

Financial Aid Packaging

Helping students afford a Mercyhurst education is important to the College. Although the primary responsibility for college education rests with a student's family, there are several sources that can help reduce the expense of an education at Mercyhurst. The federal government, state government, and Mercyhurst all provide various forms of assistance vehicles to help the student and the family finance the student's education at Mercyhurst. Detail on specific student aid programs available to students is in Financial Aid Awarding Policies section below. The student's Cost of Attendance, Expected Family Contribution and Financial Need, which are described below, are the components used to determine the student's financial aid eligibility and to create the student's Financial Aid Package.

Cost of Attendance (COA)

Mercyhurst determines the Cost of Attendance (COA), or budget, which is an estimate of the educational expenses the student will incur during the academic year. These costs include tuition, fees, room & board, transportation allowance, books & supplies allowance, and miscellaneous educational expenses. Please refer to the 2009 - 2010 Student Financial Services Policy and Procedures Guide for examples of COA budgets.

Student financial services / financial and awarding policies

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order of file completion date. To ensure that the student's financial aid funds disburse as scheduled at the start of the fall term, the student must be registered for classes, make Satisfactory Academic Progress, and submit all required documentation by June 15 prior to the academic year. Failure to reply to requests for information after three requests will result in cancellation of any financial aid offers. Students may still submit documents after the June 15 deadline, but the absolute deadline for submittal of all documents is 30 days prior to the end of the term or award period the student is enrolled for the academic year. The designated deadlines allow SfS to process and authorize disbursements within the timeframes permitted under federal regulations and college policies.

· Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SaP) once enrolled (Refer to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid in the section below. In addition to most of the federal aid criteria above, eligibility for Pennsylvania state assistance programs requires that the (and parents if the student is a dependent) be a legal Pennsylvania resident.

Enrollment at Other Institutions/Study-Abroad

When a student is a pursuing a degree at Mercyhurst and plan to take courses elsewhere, the student may apply to Mercyhurst for financial aid consideration through a "Consortium Agreement" between Mercyhurst and the other school to assist with covering the costs to take courses elsewhere. Contact the Office of SFS for more information on Consortium Agreements. Students cannot receive financial aid at multiple institutions for the same courses; a student must declare which institution is to be considered the "home school" for financial aid eligibility purposes. If the student has been approved to study abroad or to attend another institution during a term to take part or all of his/her educational requirements, the student may receive some forms of financial aid for that term if approved in advance and if a consortium or contractual agreement is executed between Mercyhurst and the other institution. (For more information regarding this topic, contact the Office of SfS).

Enrollment Status

As indicated in Financial Aid Awarding Policy section below, each financial aid program has specific requirements regarding enrollment status. In general, SfS uses the following undergraduate enrollment criteria to determine eligibility for the financial aid programs it administers:

Credits 8+ 6­7 4­5 1­3

Enrollment Status Classification Full time Three-quarter time Half time Less than half time

A student's Financial Aid Package is based on fulltime enrollment, and SfS uses your enrollment status on the 8th day of each term to determine your financial aid eligibility. If the student does not have full-time status, he/ she may lose eligibility for some financial aid programs and others may be reduced, accordingly. Graduate students enrolled in 6 or more credits a term are considered full-time students, and graduate students enrolled between 3 and 5 credits a term are considered half-time students for financial aid eligibility purposes. If a student's Financial Aid Package is finalized after the 8th day of the term, the enrollment status for financial aid eligibility varies by program. The student must consult with sfs if he/she plans to withdraw from any courses. During the summer session, the student's enrollment status on the 2nd day of the summer term determines enrollment status for financial aid eligibility.

fINANCIAL AID AWARDING POLICIES

The Financial Aid Package

Financial aid at Mercyhurst is awarded according to financial need, merit, talent, athletic ability or combination of these factors. If the student is eligible for financial assistance based on financial need, the student may receive a combination of gift aid (grants or scholarships that need not be repaid) and self-help aid (loans, which must be repaid), or parttime employment on campus. Any combination of awards is referred to as the student's "Financial Aid Package." Once a Financial Aid Package has been awarded, the student can review it at any time through his/her Web Advisor account. Eligibility for federal and state grants, as well as some Mercyhurst scholarships, is based on the information on the FAFSA and the general eligibility requirements of each program. Gift aid is always awarded before self-help aid. If the student has remaining eligibility after gift aid has been awarded, the student's Financial Aid Package may also include work-study and student loans. If any portion of the financial aid package consists of Federal SEOG, Federal ACG, Federal SMART Grant, Federal Work-study, Federal Perkins Loan, or Subsidized Stafford Loan, total aid (excluding Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Federal PLUS Loan, and Alternative Loans), may never exceed a student's demonstrated financial need. If a student receives a financial aid award after the original financial aid package is developed and that new award causes over "over award", some form of financial aid assistance will have to be reduced so that the total aid does not exceed the student's demonstrated financial need. In all instances, a student's total financial aid may never exceed the student Cost of Attendance (COA). Mercyhurst College usually reduces selfhelp aid (loans and work-study) first, and only if necessary

Other Eligibility Criteria

Eligibility for federal student aid is determined on the basis of financial need and on several other factors. To receive financial aid from federal programs students' must meet the following criteria: · Demonstrate financial need (not required for some loan programs) · Have a high-school diploma or a ged certificate, or pass a u. S. Department of Education-approved test · Be admitted to a certificate or degree program and be working toward a certificate or degree · Be a u.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen · Have a valid Social Security number · Register with Selective Service (if required) · Not be in default on a student loan or owe a repayment of federal student aid

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financial and awarding policies

will reduce gift aid (grants and scholarships). If gift aid must be reduced, Mercyhurst grants or scholarships are adjusted before federal, state or external sources. Also, Mercyhurst grants or scholarships are reduced when the total awards from Mercyhurst exceed the student's direct costs. Students may never receive a refund of Mercyhurst Grants or Scholarships in the form of a payment.

Mercyhurst Scholarships & Grants

Most scholarship and grant programs require that students be enrolled full time and maintain a minimum Grade Point Average (GPA). Most scholarships are renewable, but some are not. In order for students to continue receiving renewable scholarships, they must continue to meet the scholarship criteria as described in detail below or as described in a separate communication sent directly to the student with the award. Students must also meet the minimum standards specified in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid. Other scholarships may be based on athletic ability or talent. Mercyhurst also makes available scholarships and grants based on financial need. Students are required to file a FAFSA annually to continue to receive Mercyhurst needbased scholarships and grants. Note: The following information on the student aid programs is current as of the publication date of this academic catalog. Mercyhurst reserves the right to change or cancel awards because of regulatory changes, revised allocations, or additional information concerning a student's financial aid eligibility. Mercyhurst does not guarantee substitution of funds for any portion of the financial aid package which may be canceled or reduced by government agencies or other sources, nor for any portion of the financial aid package declined by the student. Awarding is contingent upon program requirements, student eligibility and availability of funds. · Endowed, Restricted and Foundation Scholarships (award amounts vary) - There are several dozens of grants and scholarships available that have been endowed by an individual or established in memory of a person. There are also numerous restricted and foundation scholarships that have been made available by a company, individual, or an organization on an annual basis. Eligibility varies according to the donor's wishes and at the time they awarded. Students are informed of the criteria required and requirements for renewal at the time of awarding. Below is a current listing of Mercyhurst College Endowed , Restricted and Foundation Scholarships: North East Campus: Act 120 Scholarship Fund Margaret Eckerd Brown Hamot Medical Center Nursing Scholarship Carnahan-Jackson Foundation Endowed Scholarship Carol R. Cochran `40 Opportunity Scholarship Lawrence T. Haas Endowed Scholarship Fund Edward & Agnes Kern Endowed Scholarship Frances C. Malaney `38 Endowed Scholarship Robert S. & Janet L. Miller Family Scholarship Mercyhurst North East Scholarship Endowment Professor & Amalia Morelli Endowed Scholarship Mercyhurst North East Student Government Scholarship

Saint Vincent Health System Nursing Scholarship Sisters of Mercy Endowed Scholarship · North East Grant ­ (awards vary) 2-year scholarship awarded to freshmen and transfer students attending the North East Campus demonstrating financial need. · Mercyhurst GED to College Incentive Grant ­ ($1,500) awarded to North East, Corry or Mercyhurst West students that have earned their GED and considered "college ready." Student must be recommended by the Admissions Office to receive this grant. Federal Need-Based Grants · Federal Pell Grant - Awarded to undergraduate students based on financial need if enrolled for at least 3 credits and have not yet received a first bachelor's degree. Students may be enrolled part-time or fulltime to receive Pell Grant. In addition to many other requirements, the student must also be a u. S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen and have a high-school diploma or ged, or demonstrate the ability to benefit from the program offered. Dollar amounts awarded depend on the student's reported Cost of Attendance (coa), Estimated Family Contribution (efc), and whether the student plans to attend full time or part time. The students EFC is derived from the information provided on the FAFSA. · Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (seog)­ Undergraduate student are eligible to receive Seog if Pell-eligible, pursuing his/her first undergraduate degree, and demonstrate "exceptional financial need," typically equated with a $0 Estimated Family Contribution (efc) as indicated on the student's Student Aid Report (Sar). Students may be enrolled parttime or full-time to receive SEOG. Because funding is limited, priority is given to applicants meeting the March 15 fafSa filing deadline. · Academic Competitiveness Grant (Up to $750 for the first undergraduate year and up to $1,300 for the second year) - To receive the acg, the student must be a u. S. citizen, be a federal Pell Grant recipient, be enrolled full time in a degree program, be enrolled in the first or second academic year of program of study, have completed a rigorous secondary-school program of study (after January 1, 2006, if a first-year student, and after January 1, 2005, if a second-year student). If a firstyear student, the student must not have been previously enrolled in an undergraduate program, and, if a secondyear student, the student must have a cumulative gPa of 3.0 for the first academic year. State Grants & Scholarships and Other Programs · Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Authority Grant (PHEAA) Grant ­ Students can receive a PHeaa grant if you are an undergraduate enrolled at least half time pursuing an associate or bachelor degree, demonstrate financial need, do not have a first bachelor's degree, and are a legal residents of Pennsylvania. The student must also be a high school graduate or a recipient of a GED. The Pennsylvania Higher Education Student Assistance Authority (PHeaa) determines eligibility and notifies students of any awards through a Student Eligibility Notice (Sen); however, before PHeaa Grant can disburse, the Office of SfS must confirm the student's eligibility by certifying that all eligibility requirements of the program are met. To be considered annually for PHeaa, the state

financial and awarding policies

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·

·

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must receive the student's processed fafSa by May 1 prior to the academic year applying. Montgomery G.I. Bill ­ this is a government program; contact the local U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs representative for more detailed information and assistance applying. New Economy Technology Scholarship (NETS) - The SciTech Scholarship and the Technology Scholarship are both awarded through the New Economy Technology Scholarship (NETS) Program. These scholarships make financial aid available if to undergraduates studying in approved science or technology fields. The goal of this program is to help address the critical need to educate and retain a workforce of highly trained technology experts that will help Pennsylvania attract and support new employers. Recipients of these scholarships must agree to work full-time in Pennsylvania following graduation, one year for each year that a scholarship award is received. These scholarships are not based on financial need. First priority for awarding funds under this program will be given to renewal applicants. Thereafter, funds under this program will be awarded on a first-come, firstserved basis. PHEAA recommends that students submit their application as soon as possible. To apply for either the SciTech Scholarship or the Technology Scholarship go to: http://www.pheaa.org/specialprogrAMS/nets/ New_Economy_Technology_Scholarship.shtml or call 1-800-692-7392. Partnership for Access to Higher Education (PATH) ­ Through the PATH program PHEAA offers qualifying students additional financial aid via educational grants. To be considered for this program, a participating PATH organization needs to nominate the student/submit the student's name to PHEAA. The student must be a State Grant recipient and have a Federal Student Loan and should demonstrate financial need for a PATH grant. For more information contact PHEAA at 1-800-692-7392. Pennsylvania Chafee Education and Training Grant Program (ETG) - PHEAA administers the Pennsylvania Chafee Education and Training Grant Program on behalf of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare. This program is authorized under the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999 as amended by the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Amendments of 2001. The Chafee Education and Training Grant Program offers grant assistance to Pennsylvania undergraduate students aging out of foster care who are attending a postsecondary institution approved for the Federal Title IV student financial assistance programs. To apply for this program, go to: http://www.pheaa.org/specialprogrAMS/ etg_application.pdf or call 1-800-831-0797. Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship - is a federally funded program administered by PHEAA offering a merit scholarship for outstanding high school seniors who have been accepted at an institution of higher education. The Byrd Scholarship Program rewards academic excellence in high school and encourages students to continue their education. The federal government allocates the funds that determine the amount of the scholarship award. To be considered for a Byrd Scholarship you must be a high school graduate during the same academic year

in which the scholarship is awarded, PA resident, a U.S. citizen or national, or be able to provide evidence of permanent residency. Candidates must meet the following educational standards: 1. Rank in the top 5 percent of graduating class, or hold a ranking of 1, 2 or 3 in classes of 60 students or less 2. Grade point average of 3.50 or above on a 4.00 (unweighted) scale 3. SAT = 1150 combined critical reading and math only; or ACT = composite score of 25 or above; or GED = score of 3550 or above. TOEFL = not accepted. The scholarship is renewable for three additional years and is based on full-time enrollment, maintenance of satisfactory academic progress as defined by the institution and federal funding. NOTE: Scholarship may not be used to attend a foreign school. Awards for this program are contingent upon federal funding. To apply for this scholarship go to: http://www.pheaa. org/specialprogrAMS/byrd_app.pdf or contact PHEAA at 1-800-692-7392. · Pennsylvania Higher Education Foundation (PHEF) Nursing Education Grant ­ these grants help alleviate the state of PA's nursing shortage and prevent further decline in the workforce. Health care organizations, health systems, and other health care related organizations across PA support the creation and proliferation of the Nursing Education Grants program and have worked with the Foundations to ensure their effectiveness. Contact the Office of SFS for more information and procedures for applying. · Nursing Education Grant Program Supplemental Grant ­ this is a supplemental grant to the PHEF Grant above. This grant specifically assists student enrolled in the Certified Practical Nursing program and provides assistance for the cost of mandatory textbooks needed for this program of student. Contact the Office of SFS for more information and procedures for applying. · Nursing Scholarship for Low Income Individuals ­ this scholarship program is to encourage more low income students to enroll into nursing education programs. A student with income that does not exceed 150% of the poverty level established by the Federal Office of Management and Budget may qualify. Contact the Office of SFS for more information and procedures for applying.

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Loan Programs

Loan Programs

Student Loans

Most students must rely on educational loans to cover at least some portion of their educational costs. Educational loans are available to undergraduate and graduate students as well as parents of undergraduate students. Student loan borrowing is an investment in the student's future. When deciding to borrow, it is very important that students obtain the best possible loans available in terms of interest rates and repayment options. Federal student loans are the most favorable type of educational loans for students. Students are advised to get all the federal loans they qualify for before considering private educational loans. Students are automatically considered for federal student loan eligibility when the student files the FAFSA.

the US Department of Education, students do not have to find a lender to borrow through this program. Students should disregard any offers they may receive about the Federal Stafford Loan program through private lenders. Since Mercyhurst College is a Federal Direct Lending institution, students may not use a private lender to apply for a Federal Stafford Loan.

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan

A Federal Direct Subsidized Loan is available to help meet financial need after other resources are subtracted or to the annual maximum loan limit, whichever is lower. The interest rate in effect for 2009 - 2010 for undergraduate students is fixed at 6.0% and for graduate students is fixed at 6.8%. Interest begins to accrue for the student 6 months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half time.

Federal Perkins Loan

The Federal Perkins loan is available to undergraduate and graduate students who demonstrate exceptional financial need and who have already exhausted their Federal Direct loan eligibility for the year. Since there is a limited pool of Federal Perkins loan funds each year, these loans are awarded first to students who meet the March 15 priority FAFSA filing deadline, prior to the academic year the student plans to attend. Federal Perkins loans are usually awarded between the range of $1,000 and $2,000 annually. Students awarded a Federal Perkins loan will be required to sign electronically a Federal Perkins Master Promissory Note (MPN) and complete on-line Entrance Counseling. As a recipient of a Federal Perkins loan offer, the student will be sent a letter directing him or her to a website to complete the Perkins promissory note and loan disclosure. Perkins loan cannot be disbursed to the student's account until the Federal Perkins MPN is signed. Once a Federal Perkins Loan MPN is completed and the loan is disbursed to the student by Mercyhurst College, the student does not have to sign Federal Perkins Loan MPN again (it is valid for 10 years). There are no insurance premiums or origination fees charged for this loan. Interest does not accrue while the student is enrolled at least half-time. Students have a nine-month grace period, which begins when the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half time. At the end of the grace period, students begin repayment to Mercyhurst College. The fixed interest rate of 5% begins when the student goes into repayment and the monthly payments are calculated for full repayment within 10 years (120 months) or $40 monthly, whichever is greater.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan

A Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan is not based on the student's financial need. If the student's Estimated Cost of Attendance is greater than the total financial aid and the student has not reached his or her annual maximum loan limit through the federal Direct Subsidized Loan, the student may qualify for Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan. The interest rate for federal Direct Unsubsidized loans is fixed at 6.8%. Students are charged interest on this loan from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. Students have the option to pay on the interest while in school, or to allow the interest to accumulate, which adds to the principal amount of the loan and increases the amount to be repaid.

Federal Direct Loan Interest and Fees

The interest rate in effect for 2009 - 2010 for Federal Direct Subsidized loans for undergraduate students is fixed at 6.0% and for graduate students is fixed at 6.8%. The interest rate for Federal Direct Unsubsidized loans is fixed at 6.8%. Subsidized loans do not accrue interest until loan repayment begins, whereas unsubsidized loans accrue interest from when the loan is disbursed. In addition to interest, all Federal Direct Loans have a 2.0% origination fee. However, students receive an upfront 1.5% rebate at the time of origination based on paying the first 12 monthly payments on time, so the assessed fee is only ½ percent. This fee reduces the amount that disburses to students accounts. For example, if a student borrows $3,500 for the academic year, $17.50 will be deducted from the loan amount and paid directly to the U.S. Department of Education.

Federal Direct Loan

Federal Direct Loans are low-interest loans from the U.S. Department of Education that are administered by Mercyhurst College. It is the U.S. Department of Education's major form of self-help aid and is available through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. There are two types of Federal Direct Loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. Federal Direct Loans replace the Federal Stafford Loans, which were formerly known as Federal Guaranteed Student Loans. Because the funding for these loans comes straight from

How to Apply for a Federal Direct Loan (Subsidized or Unsubsidized)

To apply for a Federal Direct Loan, students must complete the FAFSA. To be eligible, the student must be enrolled at least half-time and meet other general federal student aid eligibility requirements. If the student qualifies for a Federal Direct Loan, it will be included in the student's Financial Aid Award Letter.

E-sign the Federal Direct Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN)

Students borrowing a Federal Direct Loan must complete a Federal Direct Loan Electronic Master Promissory Note

Loan Programs

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(MPN) before loan money can be disbursed. Once a Federal Direct Loan MPN is completed and the loan is disbursed to the student by Mercyhurst College, the student does not have to sign Federal Loan MPN again (it is valid for 10 years). To complete the MPN, go to www.dlenote.ed.gov. Students will need their U.S. Department of Education PIN to sign the MPN electronically. After the student signs the MPN, electronic notification will be sent to Mercyhurst College. Mercyhurst College may not disburse the Federal Direct Loan unless the student has completed the MPN and has completed Entrance Counseling.

Federal Direct Loan Annual Limits Dependent Freshman ................................................................... $5,500 Sophomore ................................................................. $6,500 Junior, Senior & Post-Baccalaureate .......................... $7,500 Independent & Dependent with PLUS Denial Freshman ................................................................. $10,500 Sophomore ............................................................... $12,500 Junior, Senior & Post-Baccalaureate (excluding Teacher Certification) .............................. $12,500 Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification ................ $12,500 Graduate................................................................... $20,500 Federal Direct Loan Life Time Limits Undergraduate Dependent ....................................... $31,500 Undergraduate Independent..................................... $57,500 Graduate................................................................. $138,500

Federal Direct Loan Entrance Counseling

The federal government requires a student to participate in loan counseling prior to receiving a Federal Direct Loan. Entrance Counseling will explain various aspects of student loans, such as repayment and interest, and your rights and responsibility. It concludes with a 15-question quiz. Entrance Counseling can be completed at www.dlssonline. com. The student will need the U.S. Department of Education PIN to successfully complete Entrance Counseling. After Entrance Counseling is completed, the results will be sent electronically to Mercyhurst College, although the student may wish to print a copy of the rights and responsibilities page for personal records.

Federal Direct Loan Exit Counseling

The federal government requires that students participate in Exit Counseling prior to leaving or graduating from college. To complete Exit Counseling, go to www.dl.ed.gov. Students will need your U.S. Department of Education PIN to successfully complete Exit Counseling. During Exit Counseling students learn about additional deferment and forbearance and how to get the necessary forms. Even though students have a six month grace period, the Exit Counseling process will help students set up a repayment plan, a direct withdrawal and a payment date. The Direct Loan Servicing Center, who handles all Federal Direct Loan repayments, hosts Exit Counseling.

Receiving Federal Direct Loan Funds

When Mercyhurst College is notified by the Federal Direct Loan Processor that they have a valid MPN on file for you and you have completed Entrance Counseling, your Federal Direct Loan will automatically be credited to your student account as long as all other federal student aid eligibility requirements are met.

Federal Direct Loan Repayment

Repayment of the Federal Direct Loan begins 6 months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half time.

Request Reduction or Cancellation of Federal Direct Loans

Students have the right to reduce or cancel their Federal Direct Loan offer. Students may do so by making a notation on their Financial Aid Award Letter and returning it to the Office of Student Financial Services. Or, the student may complete a Financial Aid Adjustment Form and submit it to the Office of Student Financial Services.

Additional Federal Direct Loan Information

Contact Federal Direct Loan Servicing Center at www. dl.ed.gov or call them at (800) 848-0979, TTY (800) 8480983.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan

Federal Direct PLUS Loans are available to parents of undergraduate students and to graduate students, if they are credit-worthy applicants. A parent of an undergraduate student or a graduate student may borrow up to the total Estimated Cost of Attendance less financial aid resources received by the student. Because the funding for Federal Direct PLUS loans comes straight from the US Department of Education, students and parents do not have to find a lender to borrow through this program. Students and parent should disregard any offers they may receive about the Federal PLUS Loan program offered through private lenders. Since Mercyhurst College is a Federal Direct Lending institution, parents may not use a private lender to apply for a Federal PLUS Loan.

Federal Direct Loan Limits

The federal government sets limits on the amount of money a student can borrow. Mercyhurst College awards students that have filed the FAFSA the maximum amount eligible under such limits. The annual limit applies to the most a student can borrow in one academic year, while the aggregate limit applies to the maximum a student can borrow in a lifetime. Independent students and dependent students whose parents are unable to borrow a PLUS loan are eligible for additional Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan. Below is a chart of annual and aggregate loan limits for Federal Direct Loans:

PLUS Interest and Fees

The interest rate is a fixed 7.9% and is charged on the loan from the time the loan funds are disbursed until it is paid in full.

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Loan Programs

In addition to interest, the Federal PLUS Loan has 4.0% origination fee. However, Federal Direct PLUS Loan borrowers will receive an upfront 1.5% rebate at the time of origination based on paying the first 12 monthly payments on time. Thus, the assessed fee to the borrower is only 2.5%. This fee reduces the amount that disburses to the student's account. For example, if $5000 is borrowed under the Federal Direct PLUS Loan program, $62.50 will be deducted from the student's loan amount and paid directly to the U.S. Department of Education.

are met. In addition, Mercyhurst College must be notified that the graduate PLUS borrower has completed Entrance Counseling before the loan is credited.

Parent PLUS Loan Refunds

If the Federal Direct PLUS (for parent) disbursement generates a credit balance on the student account after college charges are paid, the refunded amount will go to the parent unless the parent borrower authorizes that the refund be sent to the student.

How to Apply for a Federal Direct PLUS Loan

To apply for a Federal Direct Loan, the student must complete the FAFSA. In addition, parent borrowers must complete a Federal Direct PLUS Loan Application Form and graduate borrowers must complete a Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Application Form and submit it to the Office of Student Financial Services. In addition to the PLUS borrower being credit-worthy, to be eligible, the student must be enrolled at least half-time and meet other general federal student aid eligibility requirements.

Parent PLUS Loan Denial

If a Federal Direct parent PLUS Loan Application is denied, it may be possible for a student to borrow an additional amount of unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan. The dependent student annual and aggregate maximum allowable loan limit will be replaced by the independent student maximum allowable loan limits.

Request Reduction or Cancellation of PLUS Loans

The parent or graduate student borrower has the right to reduce or cancel the Federal Direct PLUS Loan offer. This may be done by completing a Loan Change Request Form and submitting it to the Office of Student Financial Services.

E-sign the Federal Direct PLUS Loan Master Promissory Note (PLUS MPN)

Parents and graduate students borrowing a Federal Direct PLUS Loan must complete a Federal Direct PLUS Loan Electronic master Promissory Note (PLUS MPN) before loan money can be disbursed. Once a Federal Direct Loan MPN is completed and the loan is disbursed to the student's account by Mercyhurst College, the parent does not have to sign Federal Loan MPN again (it is valid for 10 years). To complete the PLUS MPN, the parent must go to www. dlenote.ed.gov. The parent will need a U.S. Department of Education PIN to sign your MPN electronically. After the PLUS MPN is signed, electronic notification will be sent to Mercyhurst College. Mercyhurst College may not disburse the Federal Direct PLUS Loans unless the borrower has completed PLUS MPN and the loan is approved by the US Department of Education. In addition, graduate PLUS borrowers must complete Entrance Counseling prior to receiving a Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan.

Exit Counseling for Graduate PLUS Borrowers

The federal government requires that graduate PLUS borrowers participate in Exit Counseling prior to leaving or graduating from college. To complete Exit Counseling, go to www.dl.ed.gov. You will need your U.S. Department of Education PIN to successfully complete Exit Counseling. During Exit Counseling you will learn about additional deferment and forbearance and how to get the necessary forms. Even though the student has a six month grace period, the Exit Counseling process will help the student set up a repayment plan, a direct withdrawal and a payment date. The Direct Loan Servicing Center, who handles all Federal Direct Loan repayments, hosts Exit Counseling.

PLUS Loan Repayment

Repayment of the PLUS loan begins 60 days after the loan is disbursed. Graduate PLUS borrowers can defer repayment of the PLUS loan until 6 months after graduation or after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time.

Graduate PLUS Entrance Counseling

The federal government requires graduate students to complete in loan counseling prior to receiving a Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan. Entrance Counseling will explain various aspects of student loans, such as repayment and interest, and your rights and responsibility. Entrance Counseling can be completed at www.dlssonline. com. Students will need their U.S. Department of Education PIN to successfully complete Entrance Counseling. After Entrance Counseling is completed, the results will be sent electronically to Mercyhurst College, although the student may wish to print a copy of the rights and responsibility page for personal records.

Additional Federal Direct PLUS Loan Information

Contact Federal Direct Loan Servicing Center at www. dl.ed.gov or call them at (800) 848-0979, TTY (800) 8480983.

Private Alternative Loans

There are a large number of private commercial educational loan options to assist students and families in meeting college costs. Students should only consider obtaining a private alternative loan if they need funds above and beyond the maximum amount of Federal Direct Loans, which means that students should file the FAFSA. Students and parents are also encouraged to compare private alternative loan costs with those of the Federal Direct PLUS Loan, as PLUS Loan is usually less expensive and usually has better repayment options. Most private alternative lenders rely heavily on the

Receiving PLUS Loan Funds

When Mercyhurst College is notified by the Federal Direct Loan Processor that they have a valid PLUS MPN on file and the PLUS loan is approved, the Federal Direct PLUS Loan will automatically be credited to the student's account as long as all other federal student aid eligibility requirements

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creditworthiness of the student and cosigner to determine whether or not a loan application will be approved and the interest rate. Mercyhurst College recommends that borrowers compare and research various private alternative lenders available in the marketplace, but to avoid direct-to-consumer loans. Direct-to-consumer loans often have much higher interest rates than private alternative educational loans. Usually direct-to-consumer loans do not require school certification. A good place to begin your research for Private Alternative Educational Loans is at www.finaid.org/loans/ privatestudentloans.phtml.

Institutional and Federal Student Aid Quantitative Measure Credit Hour Programs:

Students must complete a minimum number of credits toward graduation requirements each academic year in which they are enrolled at Mercyhurst. The quantitative measurement for academic progress compares the credits attempted to credits passed. To calculate credits completed, all courses taken by the student will be counted. Below is the minimum academic progress chart that full-time undergraduate students must adhere to: End of Fulltime Year Credits Completed 1 24 2 48 3 72 4 96 5 120

Student Employment Programs

SfS offers programs that allow students to earn money to help finance college expenses and acquire practical work experience through part-time employment. The student must be accepted into a degree-granting program and be attending classes to apply for such jobs. Student-employment programs provide on-campus jobs in many academic disciplines and administrative offices for eligible students. Students may be eligible to participate in the following programs: The Federal Work-Study (fws) program may be available if the student is an undergraduate or a graduate, a u. S. citizen or permanent resident, and have an fwS allocation as part of the student's Financial Aid Package. The student may be enrolled part-time or full-time to receive FWS. Student can earn up to the amount specified in the Financial Aid Award Letter notification when hired for employment. fwS employment also includes community-service tutoring and literacy-project positions. fwS earnings are excluded from income on the student's subsequent year's financial aid application (fafSa). Institutional Work-Study (iws) provides on-campus employment opportunities for MercyHurST students that demonstrate financial need. You must be enrolled full-time to qualify for Institutional Work-study.

Students that do not attend all terms within the academic year, will follow the same chart above, but the expectation is that the student will complete a proportion of the credits. For example, if the student is attending a 3-term academic program, but has only attended one term, the expectation is that the student must complete a minimum of 8 credits at the end of the academic year. For terms of less than full-time enrollment, the progression is based on the proportions below applied to the full-time chart: Full-time (8 or more credits) Three quarter-time (6 - 7 credits) Half-time (4 -5 credits) Less than half-time (2 - 3 credits) 1.0 Term .75 term .50 term .25 term

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR FINANCIAL AID

All students must be making satisfactory academic progress at Mercyhurst College to establish and retain eligibility for student financial aid. Mercyhurst monitors satisfactory academic progress (SAP) after the spring term to provide students with early notification of their academic progress status for financial aid eligibility. However, final review is performed again after the summer term for the preceding 12-month period (fall, winter, spring and summer terms). The student's entire academic history must be considered when determining the academic progress status. This includes coursework transferred in from another college. Mercyhurst must apply two different Satisfactory Academic Policy standards depending on the type and sources of funding. The two SAP Policies are as follows: 1. Institutional and Federal Student Aid 2. Pennsylvania State Grants and Scholarships The following standards explain the components to the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

Clock Hour Programs:

Quantitative measure for clock hour programs is evaluated based on calendar time. The review must occur at the midpoint of the program length. Practical Nursing - 1,670 clock hours, 48 weeks, and 4 terms (spring, summer, fall and winter) At the conclusion of summer term, Practical Nursing students are expected to have successfully completed at least 600 clock hours. Municipal Police Cadet ­ 796 clock hours, 18 weeks, 1 term After the ninth week of the program, Municipal Police Cadets are expected to have successfully completed 318 clock hours.

Graduate Students:

The quantitative requirement for graduate students is that they must successfully complete 75% of their coursework attempted. Students taking non-credit remedial must follow the progression of the quantitative chart indicated above. Even though students do not earn credit toward graduation for remedial courses, students receive grades for these courses.

Maximum Time Frame for Completion

The maximum time frame a student may attend and continue

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aid eligibility cannot exceed 150 percent of the published length of the student's academic program measured in academic years, this is for both undergraduate and graduate students. For example, the published length of a four-year program is 12 full-time equivalent terms. Therefore, the full-time student has a maximum of 18 terms to complete the program. Note, however, there is a 4-year limit (12 fulltime equivalent terms) to receive institutional scholarships and grants. When the student's enrollment exceeds the 150 percent point, the student is no longer eligible for federal financial aid. Credits transferred to Mercyhurst affect the measurement of quantitative progress and the maximum time frame for completion. For example, an entering student with 48 transfer credits is placed on the chart as if he/she attempted six full-time terms. Readmitted students must meet the same requirements as students who have remained enrolled based on the total number of terms attended at Mercyhurst. All credits the student attempts count toward the 150 percent time frame requirement, even if the student changes major. If a student is pursuing two programs simultaneously, the program requiring the most credits to complete will be used to measure the maximum time frame for completion. If the student has earned a degree at Mercyhurst and pursues a subsequent degree, only the courses taken toward the subsequent degree will be calculated to measure maximum time frame.

The Mercyhurst Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form is available at http://lakernet.mercyhurst.edu/ departments/stud_fin_svc/forms.asp. SAP Appeal requests must provide an explanation of the circumstances that contributed to the student's failure to meet the minimum academic progress standards and a realistic academic plan for improvement. Students must also meet with their academic support counselor to obtain approval of their academic plans prior to submitting an appeal. If the Financial Aid Appeals Committee approves the appeal, the student's financial aid eligibility is reinstated for the applicable payment periods. Students receive their appeal results in writing. The decision of the Financial Aid Appeals Committee is final. Students have an opportunity to take summer courses to help make up credits not earned during the academic year or to raise their GPAs. Even though summer credits attempted and earned are included in the calculation of satisfactory academic progress (qualitative, quantitative and maximum time frame measures), courses taken in the summer are combined with the fall, winter and spring terms to calculate successful completion. For example, after one academic year (fall, winter and spring terms) and the summer session, fulltime students are expected to have successfully completed a minimum of 24 credits.

Deadlines to Appeal

June 12 ­ for summer, fall, winter and spring terms August 21 ­ for fall, winter and spring terms November 20 ­ for winter and spring terms February 19 - spring term

Qualitative Measure

After attending two academic years, undergraduate students must have a 2.0 cumulative GPA regardless of how many credits the student has accrued. After attending one academic year, graduate students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA regardless of how many credits the student has accrued. Specific Mercyhurst scholarships and grants may have different grade point requirements for continued eligibility. This is a separate and distinct factor in renewing or continuing eligibility for certain institutional scholarships and grants. The grade point requirement for specific programs supersedes the grade point average requirement referenced above. Information on the terms and conditions of specific institutional awards is made at the time of the grant/scholarship offer. Effect of Withdrawals, Incomplete Courses, and Repeated Courses If a student withdraws from a course or courses (W grade) after the first week of classes during a given term, the credits are included in the count of courses attempted. An incomplete course counts as credits attempted, but is not included in the GPA and credits completed until the incomplete grade changes to a passing or failing grade. A repeated course is only counted toward progression if it replaces a previous course for which the student received no credit.

Pennsylvania (PHEAA) State Grants and Scholarships

Before crediting a state grant or scholarship to a student's account, Mercyhurst must certify that for the last academic year during which the student received a state grant, the student completed the minimum required credits hours for the terms to which grant aid was applied. For example, if the student received an equivalent of an academic year State grant award during the prior academic year, the student is expected to have completed successfully 24 credits over the course of the prior academic year and summer. If the student has received at least one term of state grant aid during a prior academic year, Mercyhurst must verify that, during or subsequent to those terms, the student completed the minimum number of semester credits/clock hours needed to make academic progress given the number of terms of state grant aid received and the student state grant award status (full-time or part-time) during each of those terms. The following table is used in determining the minimum number of credits/clock hours that must be successfully completed for each enrollment status during a term of state grant aid. It is necessary to add the award counters (according to the student's specific enrollment and award status) for each term of the academic year in order to determine the minimum total number of credits/clock hours that must have been completed by the student for the academic year period in question.

Procedures for Appealing

Students not meeting the minimum standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress described above are ineligible for federal and institutional financial aid (this includes grants, scholarships, work and loans). However, students may request reinstatement of their financial aid eligibility by submitting a written appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee.

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For each: Full-time semester award

Full-time trimester/quarter award Part-time semester award Part-time quarter award

Award Counter .50

.33/.34 .25 .16/.17

Student Must Complete Minimum of: 12 semester credits/450 clock hours

12 qtr. or 8 semester credits/300 clock hours 6 semester credits/225 clock hours 6 qtr. or 4 semester credits/150 clock hours student with the opportunity to improve competence in the basic skills needed to succeed in the college, and enable, in most cases, direct articulation to related baccalaureate degrees offered by the college in Erie. The selection of certificates and degrees available at Mercyhurst North East is largely determined by the job market in the local, regional and national marketplace, which gives direction as to the viability of the programs and determines what content is taught. Also, Mercyhurst North East is supported in part by the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act. Please note: Denotes a major course requirement for the program. These required courses have certain minimum grade competencies that must be achieved. Be sure to check with your faculty advisor for further specifics.

State aid grant/scholarship recipients who fail to meet the requirements above remain ineligible until the requisite credits have been completed.

Transfer Students

All of the student's coursework, whether it was taken at Mercyhurst or elsewhere, is applicable when performing the academic progress test for state aid. Transfer students that were prior year recipients of a state grant must have their official academic transcript from their prior institution submitted to the Mercyhurst Admissions Office so that academic progress may be reviewed by the Office of Student Financial Services. Credits successfully completed at the previous institution need not be transferable to Mercyhurst to be counted for academic progress.

Effects of Repeated Coursework and Incomplete Course

Repeated coursework may only be counted once toward the state aid grant/scholarship academic progress requirement. Credits earned through examination may only be counted toward the academic progress test if the examination is taken during one of the terms being reviewed for progress. In the case of students who were permitted a prior term of state grant on the basis of the remedial exception, only those remedial credits which were counted toward the full-time/halftime minimum may be considered part of the credits needed to meet the academic progress test for that period of time.

FRESHMAN EXPERIENCE

An important educational experience at Mercyhurst North East is Freshman Experience, a one-credit, letter-graded course that provides an introduction to the nature of college education, and a general orientation to the functions, support services, and resources of the college as a whole. Freshmen are given instruction in those basic areas which are so critical to classroom success, such as study skills, time and stress management and test-taking. In addition, students are encouraged to explore the Mercyhurst community through out-of-class experiences. The course provides a support group for students in the critical first year by examining problems common to the first year experience in an atmosphere somewhat less formal than that of traditional courses. All entering freshmen are required to enroll in this course with the exception of part-time students, allied health majors, transfer students and all "Certificate" programs.

Procedures for Appealing

In cases where the student has failed to complete the required number of credits to satisfy the academic progress test as a result of a medical condition, family illness, or other extenuating circumstances, such can be report to PHEAA on an individual basis for their review and approval. The academic progress exception form is available at www. pheaa.org/stategrants/forms.shtml. This medical exception form must be submitted with appropriate documentation to the office of SFS for approval before it is forwarded to PHEAA.

SERVICE LEARNING

Service-learning is a method and philosophy of experiential learning through which participants in community service meet community needs while developing their abilities for critical thinking, their commitments and values, and the skills they need for effective citizenship. Students in designated core classes complete a minimum of 8 hours of service at an approved non-profit agency. The course instructor incorporates the service experience into the class through reflection and discussion. The Director of Service Learning coordinates this program.

Deadlines to Appeal

The State Grant Progress Exception Form must be submitted within 30 days after the start of the term and will never be accepted after April 1 by PHEAA.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Program offerings at Mercyhurst College North East are established to permit students to explore a range of educational options. Courses of study are designed to provide an educational experience which leads to a college certificate or an associate degree. In the main, the programs of study at North East focus on preparing a student for a specific vocation. Additionally, these programs provide the

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Programs of Study

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

Denotes a major course requirement for the program. These required courses have certain minimum grade competencies that must be achieved. Be sure to check with your faculty advisor for further specifics.

· BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION: MANAGEMENT Associate Degree Program

The Business Administration Program will provide students with general training in the basic principles and techniques that are needed to secure an entry-level position in the business sector. Students enrolled in this program are introduced to the fundamentals of economics, accounting, management, and marketing. In addition, some upper-level coursework in human resources and computer applications is provided. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in required business courses to meet graduation requirements. Any required business course(s) with less than a 2.0 GPA must be repeated. The Business Division recognizes the importance of basic communication and mathematics. Hence, a significant amount of coursework in the program focuses on the development of these skills. Upon completion of this program, graduates will be prepared for entry-level positions in administration, marketing, manufacturing, and sales. With experience, one may qualify for promotion to a higher-level supervisory position in management. If upon completing this program, a student decides to transfer to one of the four-year degree programs in business, many courses with a grade of C or better will be applied toward the degree requirements. Students' academic progress and eligibility to continue in the second year of the program will be determined by the faculty in the Spring Term during the annual freshman review. A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. For more information contact Scott McAuley at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu

Term #4 BadM 275 Principles of Operations Management COMM 180 Business/Professional Communication ECON 106 Microeconomics MKTG 162 Principles of Integrated Marketing Term #5 MGMT 206 Human Resource Management MIS 110 Advanced Computer Applications *** *** Natural Science or Art Appreciation Term #6 MGMT 226 Human Behavior in Organizations MIS 140 Computer Operations or MIS 203 Computer Communications/Issues RLST *** Religious Studies Elective Students are encouraged to take MIS 140 or MIS 203 Note: All students are required to take the one-credit Freshman Experience.

· BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Associate Degree in Business Administration, Accounting concentration, offers a sequence of courses that prepares students for a career in the challenging field of accounting. Possible career paths will include such areas as: accounting data entry, payroll processing, accounts receivable/payable clerk, purchasing agent, and office management. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of economics, marketing, and management. Basic core competencies in technology, communication, and critical thinking are also developed. A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA along with a minimum grade of a 2.0 in all required courses and an overall 2.0 GPA in all required courses. Most courses will transfer into one of the four-year baccalaureate business programs if students wish to continue their education. Term 1 ENGL HIST MATH MGMT ORI Term 2 ACCT ECON ENGL Term 3 ACCT ACCT MIS Term 4 ACCT COMM ECON MKTG Term 5 ACCT MIS 101 *** 109 120 100 101 105 102 102 140 101 201 180 106 162 202 110 College Writing I American/European/World History Statistics Principles of Management Freshman Experience Principles of Accounting I Macroeconomics College Writing II Principles of Accounting II Computer Applications in Accounting Computer Applications (does not satisfy

bachelor's degree requirements)

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL HIST MATH MGMT ORI Term #2 ACCT ECON ENGL Term #3 ACCT ACCT MIS 101 *** 1** 120 100 101 105 102 102 140 101 College Writing I American/European/World History Mathematics Principles of Management Freshman Experience Principles of Accounting I Macroeconomics College Writing II Principles of Accounting II Computer Applications in Accounting Computer Applications (does not satisfy

bachelor's degree requirement) (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement)

Intermediate Accounting I Business/Professional Communication Microeconomics Principles of Integrated Marketing Intermediate Accounting II Advanced Computer Applications

Programs of Study

31

**** *** Business Elective Students are encouraged to take ACCT 330 Tax Accounting in Erie Term 6 ACCT 203 Intermediate Accounting III **** *** Natural Science/Art Appreciation RLST *** Religious Studies

**** Term #4 ECON MGMT MIS SMKT SMGT Term #5 COMM MGMT SMKT SMGT Term #6 HIST MGMT RLST SMGT

*** 106 120 101 205 111 180 206 203 112 *** 226 *** 113

Natural Science/Art Appreciation Microeconomics Principles of Management Computer Applications Facility Management Sport Management Lab I Pool Management (required) Business/Professional Communication Human Resource Management Legal Aspects of Sports Sport Management Lab II - Aquatic Mgmt (choose either SMGT 112 or SMGT 113) American/European/World History Human Behavior in Organization Religious Studies Elective Sport Management Lab III Life Saving Techniques (choose either SMGT 112 or SMGT 113)

· BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SPORT MANAGEMENT/PERSONAL TRAINER CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Associate of Science Degree in Business Administration Sport Management Concentration offers a sequence of courses that prepares students for entry-level positions in the sports industry. Possible career paths will include such areas as: Personal Trainer, Intercollegiate Athletics, Professional Sport Teams, Facility Management, Community-Based Sport Programs, Sport Marketing and Promotion, Pool Management, and Corporate Fitness Programs. Students are exposed to the fundamentals of Accounting, Economics, Management, Marketing, Anatomy and Physiology, Kinesiology, Exercise, Sports Facility Management and topics in Professional, Collegiate, and Recreational Athletics. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA and a minimum GPA of 2.0 in each required course to meet graduation requirements. The Business Department recognizes the importance of basic communication, mathematics, and computer technology. Hence, a significant amount of coursework in the program focuses on the development of these skills. Many of the program's courses may be transferable to four year degree business programs dependent upon grades and other transfer/admission criteria. Students' academic progress and eligibility to continue in the second year of the program will be determined by the faculty in the Spring Term during the annual Freshman Review. A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. Note: Students must pay both the lab fee and credit charge for BIO 241 For more information contact Scott McAuley at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu. Term #1 ENGL MATH MKGT SMKT ORI Term #2 ACCT ENGL SMKT Term #3 ACCT ECON SMGT 101 *** 162 102 100 101 102 201 140 105 211 College Writing I Mathematics Principles of Integrated Marketing Introduction to the Sports Industry Freshman Experience Principles of Accounting College Writing II Sport Marketing and Promotion Computer Applications in Accounting Macroeconomics Personal Fitness Training Certification or

· COMPUTER SYSTEMS SUPPORT Associate Degree Program

This degree is designed to give an overview of computer information with a strong background in hardware and software technology. An associate degree in computer systems support will fill a need in many types of businesses by providing expertise available to troubleshoot various types of problems that may occur. The duties of computer systems support personnel include the ability to troubleshoot, upgrade and install software and hardware, the familiarity of general applications of computer technology, and the ability to diagnose basic computer problems. Students will also be able to develop web pages for marketing and e-commerce. The settings where these services of computer systems support can be performed include virtually any type of business or institution that incorporates computers in the workplace. The variety and opportunity for employment should continue to grow as the inclusion of computer technology in all aspects of life becomes even more widespread. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA, along with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in required computer courses to meet graduation requirements. Any required computer course(s) with less than a 2.0 GPA must be repeated. Students' academic progress and eligibility to continue in the second year of the program will be determined by the faculty in the Spring Term during the annual freshman review. For more information contact Scott McAuley at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu. A minimum of 60 credits is required for completion of this associate degree.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 MIS 106 ENGL 101 MIS 101 Web Management I College Writing I Computer Applications

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Programs of Study

MATH MATH Ori Term #2 ENGL MIS MIS Term #3 MIS MIS RLST Term #4 ECON HIST MIS MIS Term #5 MIS MIS ***

108 109 100 102 125 110 140 107 *** 105 *** 202 260 204 108 ***

Math Problem Solving or Statistics Freshman Experience College Writing II Visual Basic Programming Advanced Computer Applications Microcomputer Operations I Web Management II Religious Studies Macroeconomics American/European/World Computer Operations II Networks Desktop Publishing Web Management III Literature/Philosophy/World Perspective/ Communication Web Management IV Computer Communications/Issues Internship or Elective

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 CRJS 101 ENGL 101 MIS 101 MIS MATH MATH MATH MATH Term #2 CRJS ENGL ART DANC MUS Spch 110 100 102 108 109 207 102 100 100 100 101 American Criminal Justice College Writing I Computer Applications (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Advanced Computer Applications Business Math or Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) or Mathematical Problem Solving or Statistics Police Functions College Writing II Art Appreciation or Dance Appreciation or Music Appreciation or Public Speaking (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Introduction to Corrections American Government Religious Person and Traditions or Understanding Scripture or Christology Criminal Investigations Criminology U.S. History I: to 1865 or U.S. History II: 1865 to 1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 Introduction to Sociology or Western Classics Juvenile Delinquency Introduction to Legal Concepts Professional Responsibility or Open Elective/Liberal Studies Common Core Liberal Studies Distribution Core Police Community Relations or Criminal Justice Internship Liberal Studies Distribution Core

Term #6 MIS 207 MIS 203 MIS 275

· CRIMINAL JUSTICE Associate Degree Program

The Criminal Justice Program is designed to prepare students for careers in criminal justice. Examples include law enforcement, corrections, probation, parole, and private security. The curriculum stresses the integration of job skills with an understanding of the human relations context within which police work occurs. Coursework in the operations of the criminal justice system is blended with upper-level courses in criminology, criminal investigation, police functions, and several human relations courses. Because the department recognizes the importance of basic communication, mathematics, and behavior skills, a strong developmental skills component is included in this program. Upon completing this program, students will be prepared for entry-level positions in many areas of the criminal justice system. With experience, one may qualify for promotion to higher-level supervisory positions. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA, along with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all Criminal Justice courses. If a student decides to transfer to a four-year degree program in criminal justice after completing this degree program, many of the completed courses with a grade of C or better will be applied toward the degree requirements. This degree can be coupled with the Municipal Police Officer's Training, and after successful completion, students will meet the training requirements for Pennsylvania Municipal Police Officers. For more information contact Steve Szwejbka at [email protected] A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program.

Term #3 CRJS 104 Poli 100 Rlst 100 Rlst 110 Rlst 230 Term #4 CRJS 208 CRJS 230 HIST 101 HIST 102 HIST 103 Soc 100 ENGL 103 Term #5 CRJS 205 CRJS 214 CRJS 227 Choose one Choose one Term #6 CRJS 212 CRJS 275 Choose two

CRIME/INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS CONCENTRATION

Term #1 CRJS 101 ENGL 101 MIS 101 MATH MATH MATH MATH ORI 100 102 108 109 100 American Criminal Justice College Writing Computer Applications (Does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Business Math or (Does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Elementary Algebra or (Does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Mathematical Problem Solving or Statistics Freshman Experience

Programs of Study

33

Term #2 ART DANC MUS SPCH

100 100 100 101

ENGL 102 RIAP 177 Term #3 POLI 100 RLST 100 RLST 110 RLST 230 Term #4 CRJS 206 SOC 100 HIST 102 HIST 103 Term #5 CRJS 214 CRJS 227 Choose one RIAP 274 Term #6 CRJS 275 CRJS 212 Choose two

Art Appreciation or Dance Appreciation or Music Appreciation or Public Speaking (Does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) College Writing II Intro to Research and Analysis American Government Religious Person and Traditions or Understanding Scripture or Christology Computer Skills for Crime Analyst Introduction to Sociology U.S. History II: 1865-1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 Legal Concepts Professional Responsibility or Elective/Liberal Studies/Common Core History of Intelligence Criminal Justice Internship or Police Community Relations Liberal Studies/Distribution Core

Special Act 120 Terms #5 and #6 CRJS 100 Introduction to Special Needs Population CRJS 102 Functions of Criminal Justice System CRJS 103 Professional Police Relations CRJS 209 Legal Procedures CRJS 201 Preliminary Criminal Investigations CRJS 211 Constitutional Issues in Policing Note: All students may be required to take the one-credit Freshman Experience course.

· EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Associate Degree Program

The Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education is a two-year stand-alone program that is specifically designed to educate students to work in a childcare, private nursery school, Head Start settings, or Family Day care. Although students in the program will receive a broad overview of the field of early childhood care and education, there is a major focus on the following: theories of child development and learning, ; developmentally appropriate practices; the beneficial effects of play on children's development, birth to age 8; practice of intentional teaching ; cultural sensitivity in order to meet the needs of diverse populations; activities which appropriately address all developmental domains; emphasis on social emotional development of children and early literacy and numeracy; PA Standards of early learning; and NAEYC Associate degree standards for outcome-based learning. Student teaching is a 10-week experience spent in a childcare setting five days a week, working with a cooperating teacher and the college supervisor. A seminar, held bi-monthly covers issues and topics pertaining to early childhood education and the student teaching experience. With the exception of EDEC 101, all of the early childhood courses require practicum experiences in a variety of child care settings that may include Head Start, public school, private child care centers, Pre-K counts programs, Family child care settings, and early intervention programs. The experience may include interaction with infants, toddlers, preschoolers and primary-aged children. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA, along with an overall grade of 2.7 in all EDEC and ESPE courses to meet graduation requirements. After the completion of 32 credit hours, full- and part-time students must participate in a Department Review. The initial review entails the preparation of a Portfolio, as well as a personal interview conducted by the Department Head and the student's Advisor. The Review is a requirement for continuation in the program and has been instituted to ensure that each student is meeting the academic, professional, and personal goals needed for successful completion of the degree. Students who desire to continue and obtain a four-year degree from Mercyhurst College must have an overall 2.5 G.P.A in order to transfer to the Erie campus. However, acceptance into the Education Program depends on a student meeting Sophomore Review requirements, which include receiving a passing score on three PRAXIS exams, as well as having an overall GPA of 3.0. For specific information regarding the four year program, log on to the Erie education website: http://education.mercyhurst.edu.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (WITH MUNICIPAL POLICE TRAINING PROGRAM)

Term #1 ENGL MIS CRJS HIST HIST HIST Term #2 CRJS MATH 101 101 101 101 102 103 205 100 College Writing I Computer Applications American Criminal Justice U.S. History I: to 1865 or U.S. History II: 1865-1945 or U.S. History III: since 1945 Juvenile Delinquency and Adolescent Development Business Mathematics or (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement)or Mathematical Problem Solving or Statistics College Writing II Contemporary Social Problems Introduction to Corrections Religious Person and Traditions American Government Criminal Investigation Introduction to Psychology Art Appreciation or Dance Appreciation or Music Appreciation or Public Speaking (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirement) Criminology

MATH 102 MATH MATH ENGL Term #3 Soc CRJS RLST POLI Term #4 CRJS PSYC ART DANC MUS SPCH CRJS 108 109 102 101 104 100 100 208 101 100 100 100 101 230

34

Programs of Study

Any student who has accrued 48 credit hours and intends on transferring to the Erie campus and making application for teacher certification is required to participate in an Admission Review. The student must meet the minimum requirements which include: GPA of 3.0, completion of all 3 core battery PRAXIS exams (Reading, Mathematics, and Writing), completion of 6 college credits in Mathematics (108 or higher), and completion of 6 college credits in English. Students must also have their transcripts reviewed by a member of the Education Department in order to determine the total number of credits that will be accepted at Erie Campus. Since the Associate Degree Program is a standalone program, not all credits will transfer to the Teacher Certification Program. It is the student's responsibility to have his/her transcript evaluated since revision of courses often occurs in response to PDE requirements for certification. In preparation for the Admission Review process, each student will prepare a professional portfolio showing evidence of meeting specific competencies. Students who fail to meet this requirement may not register for additional education courses. A representative from the Erie Education faculty and a representative from the Human Growth and Development Department from Mercyhurst North East will jointly facilitate the Review. ADDITIONAL FEES: Early childhood students are required to obtain the following: · a PA Criminal Records Check ($10.00) · a PA Child Abuse Clearance ($10.00), · a TB test, and, · as of April 1, 2007, an FBI fingerprint check done in Pennsylvania (cost ranges from $30.00 to $90.00). All information regarding how the student does this, except for the TB test, can be found by logging on to http:// education.mercyhurst.edu clicking on "students" then clicking "Clearances." Students will also receive information from their Advisors prior to fall term enrollment. The cost of this is dependent on where the student has the TB testing and fingerprinting done. Students are also required to maintain Student membership in the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) for the duration of their studies and to attend one professional development activity each year of enrollment. These responsibilities involve additional expenses and are determined by the cost of membership (it does change annually) and the choice of professional activity (conference, workshop, etc.). However, the student can expect that the cost will range from $70.00 to $90.00 each year. A minimum of 60 credits is required for completion of this associate degree program. Contact Dr. Jennifer Berke at [email protected] If you have questions regarding the Associate Degree Program for Early Childhood Education.

Term #2 EDEC EDEC ENGL Term #3 EDEC EDEC ESPE Term #4 EDEC EDEC HIST HIST HIST MATH MATH

207 103 102

Observation and Assessment Language and Literacy I College Writing II

202 Creative Activities 210 Educare for Infants and Toddlers 101 Psychology of Diverse Learners 220 230 101 102 103 100 102 Early Childhood Curriculum I Child Development/Behavior Guidance U.S. History I: to 1865 or U.S. History II: 1865 to 1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 Business Math (will not count toward 4-year degree) or Elementary Algebra (will not count toward 4-year degree) Family/School Partnerships Methodology in Early Childhood Classrooms Exceptional Children in Early Childhood Settings Pre-service Teaching in Child Care (6 credits) Religious Person and Traditions or Understanding Scripture

Term #5 EDEC 110 EDEC 260 EDEC 240

Term #6 EDEC 275 RLST RLST 100 110

· HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Associate Degree Program Program Concentrations: Culinary Arts Hospitality Management

The hospitality management program is designed to prepare students to enter or advance in the field of hospitality management. In this program, students are expected to complete a core of hospitality management courses and select a concentration in either restaurant management, hotel management, or culinary. In addition, students are given hands-on classroom experience and numerous other opportunities to practice their hospitality skills in appropriate environments. This program is carefully designed to provide students with the essential skills needed in this highly specialized and diversified field. The hospitality program was granted accreditation status by the Accreditation Commission for Programs in Hospitality Administration (ACPHA) in August 1992.

The Department's Mission Statement:

The Department of Hospitality Management provides industry-specific courses enriched by a broad selection of required liberal and elective courses offered by the College, to prepare our graduates to enter the workforce with an educational foundation to compete professionally. The hospitality management program operates state-ofthe-art foodservice facilities. Its classrooms and kitchens are used by students for both academic and operational

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 MIS EDEC EDEC ENGL ORI 101 101 105 101 100 Computer Applications Early Foundations Health and Wellness College Writing I Freshman Experience

Programs of Study

35

purposes. Students enrolled in this program will have the opportunity to participate in a co-op or externship program. If a student decides to transfer to one of the four-year degree programs in hospitality management after completing this program, many of the completed courses with a grade of C or better will be applied toward the degree requirements.

CULINARY ARTS CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Culinary and Wine Institute of Mercyhurst North East was established to fulfill the growing need for skilled and creative cooks and chefs. The intention of the Associate of Arts Degree in Hospitality Management with a Culinary Concentration is to prepare individuals to enter or advance in the field of food service management. This will be accomplished with course work designed to direct the student to be proficient in food preparation and to acquire the management skills necessary to lead a food service establishment successfully. The curriculum has a foundation of essential culinary arts courses that introduce the student to a broad spectrum of food preparation experiences including the processes of baking and pastry, hot and cold food preparation, wine education and the production of food to be consumed in a restaurant setting. This foundation is broadened by the addition of hospitality management and liberal arts courses which will enable the student to acquire the thinking skills necessary to run a modern professional kitchen/food service operation. The Culinary and Wine Institute operates state-of-the-art food service facilities. Its classrooms and kitchens are used by students for both academic and operational purposes. Students enrolled in the program will have the opportunity to participate in an on-the-job externship program in one of the outstanding food service operations in the region. The community of North East, Pennsylvania, is widely known as an agricultural and food manufacturing area. As a premier fruit-growing region, it has spawned numerous fine wineries and significant food manufacturing companies. The Culinary and Wine Institute makes use of this locale to enhance the educational opportunities for the students. After completing this program and maintaining a 2.0 GPA, a student may decide to transfer to one of the four-year degree programs in Hospitality Management. In any event, many of the completed courses with a grade of C or better will be applied toward the degree requirements. Students must earn a cumulative 2.0 GPA in all culinary and hospitality courses to meet graduation requirements. For more information contact Beth Ann Sheldon at [email protected]

Good Standing Policy

The Hospitality Management Department reserves the right to make a determination of each of its students enrolled from any program or concentration who fails to meet academic, professional and personal benchmarks. Academic benchmarks are concerned with grades; professional concerns itself with conduct in service hours and work experience; and personal concerns itself with ethical conduct on and off campus in any setting that might bear negatively on the student and/or the program. While occurrence is rare, the department reserves the right to admonish and expel any student who has been found in serious violation of any of these tenets, which we hold in the highest regard.

Academic Requirements

A hospitality management major must carry a minimum of 2.0 GPA or better in major courses to meet department and graduation requirements. A student major who fails to earn a grade of C or better in a hospitality management course must repeat the course, or he/she may be allowed to make special arrangements with the director of the program upon faculty advisement. If a student fails to receive the grade of at least C in a hospitality management major course, the student is permitted to repeat the course once. Should the student not receive a C after repeating the course, he/she will not be permitted to re-take the course, resulting in termination from the major.

Freshman Review Board

The Hospitality Department requires students to meet the review board criteria during their third term in the program. The details of the Freshman Review Board procedure are outlined in the Hospitality Management/Culinary office and are available to all program participants at any time. It is the responsibility of the student both to procure and meet the eligibility requirements as set forth in this procedure and to prepare adequately for this review. The department director makes a final recommendation, based on a careful review by department faculty and staff, of a Pass with Distinction, Pass, Pass Pending, Probation, or Fail. A designation below Pass Pending requires a meeting with an advisor to discuss problem areas or specific concerns. A final letter is sent to each student confirming his/her status upon completion of the Review Board Process. As part of the Review Board Process, each program participant is encouraged to work in Hospitality Management/ Culinary-related operations both on campus and elsewhere in addition to service/community hour requirements as detailed in the service hour policy guide available in the Culinary Department office. Students must see an advisor for details or stop by the Hospitality Management/Culinary office for a copy of the guidelines. For more information contact Beth Ann Sheldon at [email protected]

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I CULN 110 Food Service Sanitation CULN 134/135 Culinary Skills Module/Lab or CULN 174/175 Cooking Principles Module/lab HRIM 100 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry ORI 100 Freshman Experience Term # 2 ENGL 102 College Writing II CULN 174/175 Cooking Principles Module/Lab or CULN 184/185 Intro to Baking Module/Lab HRIM 212 Purchasing for Hospitality Industry CULN 197 Intro to Wines and Spirits

36

Programs of Study

Term # 3 FNUT 131 Intro to Nutrition CULN 134/135 Culinary Skills/Lab or CULN 184/185 Intro to Baking/Lab or Term # 4 (Summer) *This term is recommended but students may elect to take these courses during other terms as part of their freshman year. MIS 101 Computer Applications Rlst 100 Religious Person and Traditions or Rlst 110 Understanding Scripture Term # 5 ACCT 101 Prin. of Accounting I CULN 274/275 Garde Manger Module/Lab HIST 101 U.S. History I: to 1865 or HIST 102 U.S. History II: 1865-1945 or HIST 103 U.S. History III: Since 1945 SPCH 101 Public Speaking Term # 6 CULN 254/255 Regional & International Cuisine Module/ Lab or CULN 284/285 Advanced Baking and Pastries/Lab CULN 297 Advanced Wine & Food Appreciation HRIM 223 Management of Human Resources MATH 100 Business Math (does not satisfy bachelor degree math requirements) or MATH 109 Statistics Term # 7 CULN 294/295 Advanced Culinary Applications/ Management Module ECON 105 Macroeconomics HRIM 101 Applied. Service Methods HRIM 270 Seminar in Hospitality Legal Issues and Cost Controls Term # 8 (Summer) CULN 272 Culinary Externship (400 Hours) A minimum of 68 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. Department and community service hours are required of all students and must be fulfilled prior to graduation. 120 service hours are required throughout the two academic years.

MATH 100 MATH Term #4 HRIM FPM HRIM ACCT HIST HIST HIST Term #5 CULN ECON HRIM HRIM Term #6 HRIM 109 175 209 101 101 101 102 103 197 105 101 201 270

Business Math (does not satisfy bachelor degree math requirements) or Statistics Hospitality Engineering Housekeeping Operations Applied Service Methodology Principles of Accounting I U.S. History I: to 1865, or U.S. History II: 1865-1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 Introduction to Wine and Spirits Macroeconomics Applied Service Methodology Hotel Rooms Division

Seminar in Hospitality Legal Issues and Cost Controls RLST 100 Religious Person and Traditions or RLST 110 Understanding Scripture HRIM 295 Co-op A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. Department and community service hours are required of all students and must be fulfilled prior to graduation. 120 service hours are required throughout the two academic years.

· LIBERAL ARTS Associate Degree Program

The Liberal Arts Associate Degree requirements originate primarily within the liberal arts disciplines. They are intended to provide students with fundamental intellectual skills and knowledge of cultural and social areas, the sciences, and the arts. This associate degree at North East is intended to lead to a four-year degree and is designed to help students think critically and be creative in acquiring knowledge, insights, skills and vision in order to lead a fulfilling and productive life. Students must have completed 61 credits and earn an overall 2.0 GPA to meet graduation requirements. To transfer to a four-year program at Mercyhurst College requires the completion of 24 credits with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or the completion of the associate degree. However, acceptance into the program of concentration depends upon the student meeting the requirements of that department on the Erie Campus. Further, those students anticipating transfer to a fouryear program at Mercyhurst College are encouraged to reference the Common Core and Distribution Core Course Requirements as they appear in the Mercyhurst College catalog. For more information contact Alison Ollinger-Riefstahl at [email protected]

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Hospitality Management

Term #1 HRIM 100 Intro to Hospitality Industry ENGL 101 College Writing I MKTG 162 Principles of Integrated Marketing MIS 101 Computer Applications or MIS 110 Advanced Computer Applications ORI 100 Freshman Experience Term #2 ENGL 102 College Writing II HRIM 212 Purchasing for Hospitality Industry HRIM 223 Management of Human Resources Term #3 FNUT 131 Introduction to Nutrition HRIM 100 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry HRIM 202/203 Food Service Management I/Lab

Programs of Study

37

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS General LA Requirements (4)

ORI 100 Freshman Experience (1) SPCH 101 Public Speaking (3) Common Core: (15) ENGL 101 College Writing I (3) ENGL 102 College Writing II (3) MATH *** MATH (3) MATH 108 Math Problem Solving MATH 109 Statistics MIS 101 Computer Applications (3) RLST *** Religious Studies(3) RLST 100 Religious Person/Tradition RLST 110 Understanding Scripture Distribution Core: (15) HIST *** History (3) HIST 101 US History I: to 1865 HIST 102 US History II: 1865-1945 HIST 103 US History III: Since 1945 PHIL 100 Philosophical Inquiry (3) **** *** Behavioral Sciences (3) ECON 105 Macroeconomics HDFR 110 Human Growth & Development POLI 100 American Government SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology SOC 101 Contemporary Social Problems **** *** Art Appreciation (3) ART 110 Art Appreciation DANC 100 Dance Appreciation THEA 101 Theater Appreciation **** *** Non-Western Culture Course (3) ASIA 125 Asian Cultures ANTH 109 World Geography Liberal Arts Concentration Courses Required: (27) HIST *** European History (3) HIST 105 European History to the Renaissance HIST 106 European History Since the Renaissance **** *** Behavioral Sciences (3) ECON 105 Macroeconomics HDFR 110 Human Growth & Development POLI 100 American Government PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology SOC 101 Contemporary Social Problems ENGL *** Literature (3) ENGL 103 Western Classics ENGL 107 World Classics **** *** Natural Sciences (3) BIO 120/121 Human Biology & Lab EASP 118/119 Astrology & Lab SCI 150 Understanding Science **** 1** 100 Level Elective (6) **** 2** 200 Level Elective (9)

and web. The curriculum includes courses that address writing and speaking, computers and web management, and marketing, in addition to traditional liberal arts offerings. This background will prepare students for careers in newspaper, audio or video production (radio and TV), Internet, public relations, or advertising. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA, along with a minimum GPA of 2.0 in each major course to meet graduation requirements. Students may transfer to a four-year program after completion of this program or after 24 credits with a cumulative GPA of 2.5. For more information contact Melanie Karsak at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

General LA Requirements (4)

ORI 100 Freshman Experience (1) SPCH 101 Public Speaking (3) Common Core: (15) ENGL 101 College Writing I (3) ENGL 102 College Writing II (3) MATH *** MATH (3) MATH 108 Math Problem Solving MATH 109 Statistics MIS 101 Computer Applications (3) RLST *** Religious Studies(3) RLST 100 Religious Person/Tradition RLST 110 Understanding Scripture Distribution Core: (18) HIST *** History (3) HIST 101 US History I: to 1865 HIST 102 US History II: 1865-1945 HIST 103 US History III: Since 1945 PHIL 100 Philosophical Inquiry (3) **** *** Behavioral Sciences (3) ECON 105 Macroeconomics HDFR 110 Human Growth & Development POLI 100 American Government SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology SOC 101 Contemporary Social Problems **** *** Art Appreciation (3) ART 110 Art Appreciation DANC 100 Dance Appreciation THEA 101 Theater Appreciation **** *** Non-Western Culture Course (3) ASIA 125 Asian Cultures ANTH 109 World Geography **** *** Open Elective (3) Communication Concentration Courses Required (27) COMM 182 Audio Production (3) COMM 183 Electronic Media Production (3) COMM 184 Newswriting (3) Prequisite: Completed or Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101 COMM 280 Practicum (1) (4th Term) COMM 280 Practicum (1) (5th Term) COMM 280 Practicum (1) (6th Term) MIS 110 Advanced Computer Applications (3) MIS 106 Web Design (3) MIS 204 Computerized Desktop Publishing (3) MIS 207 Web Design IV (3) MKTG 162 Principals of Marketing (3) *Practica are worth one credit. Practica require students to participate in media activities on the college campus, such as newspaper, literary journal, MNE Happenings, and the

· LIBERAL ARTS COMMUNICATION CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Communication Concentration is designed to provide students with skills in media production: print, video, audio,

38

Programs of Study

radio station. Practica are pass/fail and students can enroll in one per term. A total of three, one-hour practica credits must be taken throughout the duration of the program.

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

TERM 1 ENGL 101 College Writing I MATH *** Mathematics MATH 108 Problem Solving MATH 109 Statistics EDEC 101 Early Foundations SPCH 101 Public Speaking ORI 100 Freshman Experience TERM 2 ENGL 102 College Writing MIS 101 Computer Applications EDEC 207 Observation & Assessment I TERM 3 ESPE 101 Psychology of Diverse Learners HIST 1** World History HIST 105 European History to the Renaissance HIST 106 European History Since the Renaissance HIST 109 World History RLST 1** Religious Studies RLST 100 Religious Person/Tradition RLST 110 Understanding Scripture TERM 4 **** 2** 200 Level Elective POLI 100 American Government EDEC 105 Health and Wellness HIST 1** History (3) HIST 101 US History I: to 1865 HIST 102 US History II: 1865-1945 HIST 103 US History III: Since 1945 TERM 5 ASIA 125 Asian Cultures EDEC 103 Language and Literacy **** *** 100 Level Classics or History ENGL 103 Western Classics ENGL 107 World Classics HIST 101 US History I: to 1865 HIST 102 US History II: 1865-1945 HIST 103 US History III: Since 1945 HIST 105 European History to the Renaissance HIST 106 European History Since the Renaissance HIST 109 World History TERM 6 EDEC 202 Creative Activities **** 1** Natural Sciences BIO 120/121 Human Biology & Lab EASP 118/119 Astrology & Lab SCI 150 Understanding Science

radio. The curriculum includes courses that address radio production, promotion, sales, journalism, computers/ technology production, as well as a variety of practicum and internships. This coursework background will prepare students for positions in various phases of commercial radio broadcasting. Students must earn an overall 2.0 QPA to meet graduation requirements. A minimum of 66 credits is required for the completion of this Liberal Arts Concentration associate degree program. An integral element of this concentration will evolve around the day-to-day operation of WYNE AM 1530, a commercial AM radio station owned and operated by Mercyhurst College. All radio program related courses will be taught at the WYNE studio facility. For more information contact Alison OllingerRiefstahl [email protected]

General LA Requirements (4)

ORI 100 Freshman Experience (1) SPCH 101 Public Speaking (3) Common Core: (15) ENGL 101 College Writing I (3) ENGL 102 College Writing II (3) MATH *** MATH (3) MATH 108 Math Problem Solving MATH 109 Statistics MIS 101 Computer Applications (3) RLST *** Religious Studies(3) RLST 100 Religious Person/Tradition RLST 110 Understanding Scripture Distribution Core: (18) HIST *** History (3) HIST 101 US History I: to 1865 HIST 102 US History II: 1865-1945 HIST 103 US History III: Since 1945 PHIL 100 Philosophical Inquiry (3) **** *** Behavioral Sciences (3) ECON 105 Macroeconomics HDFR 110 Human Growth & Development POLI 100 American Government SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology SOC 101 Contemporary Social Problems **** *** Art Appreciation (3) ART 110 Art Appreciation DANC 100 Dance Appreciation THEA 101 Theater Appreciation **** *** Non-Western Culture Course (3) ASIA 125 Asian Cultures ANTH 109 World Geography **** *** Open Elective (3) Communication Concentration Courses Required: (24) COMM 182 Radio Production (3) COMM 184 Newswriting (3) COMM 186 Radio Promotions and Marketing (3) COMM 204 Principles of Broadcast Sales (3) COMM 273 Internship or Three additional Practicum Hours in 3 separate 280 sections (1 per term) (3) COMM 283 Computer Application in Radio Operations or COMM 286 Sports Broadcasting (3) COMM 290 Advanced Audio Production (3)

LIBERAL ARTS RADIO PROGRAMMING CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Radio Programming Concentration is designed to provide students with skills in the industry of commercial

Programs of Study

39

COMM 280 COMM 280 COMM 280

Practicum I (1) Practicum II (1) Practicum III (1)

LIBERAL ARTS SCIENCE CONCENTRATION Associate Degree

TERM 1 ENGL 101 College Writing I MATH *** Mathematics MATH 108 Problem Solving MATH 109 Stastics HDFR 110 Human Growth and Development SecM 111 Medical Terminology ORI 100 Freshman Experience TERM 2 ENGL 102 College Writing II MIS 101 Computer Applications CHEM 101 Chemical Principals CHEM 102 Chemical Principals Lab TERM 3 RLST 1** Religious Studies BIO 120 Human Biology BIO 121 Human Biology Lab PSYC 1** Psychology TERM 4 BIO 240 Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIO 241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab HIST 1** History HIST 101 US History I: to 1865 HIST 102 US History II: 1865-1945 HIST 103 US History III: Since 1945 **** *** Art Appreciation (3) ART 110 Art Appreciation DANC 100 Dance Appreciation THEA 101 Theater Appreciation TERM 5 ASIA 125 Asian Cultures BIO 250 Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIO 251 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab ENGL *** Literature (3) ENGL 103 Western Classics ENGL 107 World Classics or HIST *** European History (3) HIST 105 European History to the Renaissance HIST 106 European History Since the Renaissance TERM 6 PHIL 100 Philosophical Inquiry **** 2** 200-Level Elective **** *** Natural Sciences and Lab(3) BIO 120/121 Human Biology & Lab EASP 118/119 Astrology & Lab

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN Associate Degree Program

The science of laboratory medicine is an essential link in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of medical diseases and disorders. The medical laboratory professional is an integral part in the health care team, working closely with the

medical staff of doctors and nurses to seek quality laboratory results within a relatively short period of time. The duties of a Medical Laboratory Technician include performing specimen collection, analysis, test resulting and consultation with the medical staff as necessary. These technicians are also responsible for routine maintenance, calibration, quality control, troubleshooting and upkeep of laboratory equipment and documentation. The MLT works under the direction and supervision of Medical Technologists as well as a Medical Director and/or Pathologist. The MTL may work in any or all of the sections of the laboratory including Hematology, Coagulation, General Chemistry, Special Chemistry/ Automated Chemistry, Immunology, Serology, Urinalysis, Blood Banking, and Microbiology. It is important that these professionals develop the skills necessary to adequately perform the duties required of their profession. The MLT Program curriculum is designed in accordance with the recommendations of the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS 8410 W. Bryn Mawr Avenue, Suite 670, Chicago, Il. 60631-3415 email: [email protected] or on the web www.naacls.org) and the American Society of Clinical Pathology. The students, upon completion of the Associate Degree requirements from Mercyhurst North East will meet the eligibility requirements to sit for the Board of Registry examination for the American Society of Clinical Pathology. (Upon program approval from NAACLS) The integrated two-year curriculum consists of a balance of liberal studies, science and technical laboratory courses. The AS of MLT must be completed within 5 years of enrollment in MLT 111. The students will complete a clinical lab externship where they will obtain hands-on learning in a clinical laboratory environment. The clinical lab externship will provide the students with the opportunity to transition from the classroom setting into the clinical environment while under the close supervision and guidance of experienced laboratory professionals. The clinical laboratory externship component of the curriculum requires a total of 400 clinical hours. The clinical externship will take place over a 10 week term and the students will be expected to stay on site for a typical 40 hour work week. Clinical sites utilized for clinical education are available throughout the United States with the majority of the sites in the tri-state region. An adequate number of clinical facilities within Erie County have committed their support to the program. In order to participate in the clinical lab externship, the students must submit documentation of a recent physical examination (within one year), appropriate immunizations, recent TB test, and current CPR certification. A minimum of 75 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. An overall of 2.0 GPA is required by the end of the 4th term and for graduation. No grade below a C is accepted in any MLT course. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are expected to sit for the American Society of Clinical Pathology ­ Board of Registry examination in order to be a certified MLT (ASCP). Several states have independent licensure of Medical Laboratory Technicians and may be a requirement to work in a clinical laboratory in that particular state. NAACLS accreditation in process. Upon completion of MLT program, students will be eligible to sit for ASCP and NCA certification exams. Further information is available at www.ascp.org.

40

Programs of Study

For more information contact Laura Merritt at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL BIO BIO MATH MATH Term #2 ENGL BIO BIO CHEM CHEM Term #3 BIO BIO CHEM CHEM Psyc Term #4 Rlst HDFR MLT Term #5 MLT MLT MLT Term #6 MLT MLT MLT MLT Term #7 MLT MLT 101 240 241 102 109 102 250 251 101 102 180 181 123 124 101 100 110 111 112 151 161 152 162 220 225 250 251 College Writing I Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab Elementary Algebra or Statistics College Writing II Human Anatomy and Physiology II Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab Chemical Priniciples Chemical Priniciples Lab Microorganisms Microorganisms Lab Bio-organic Chemistry Bio-organic Chemistry Lab Introduction to Psychology Religious Person and Traditions Human Growth and Development Clinical Laboratory I Clinical Laboratory II Clinical Microbiology I Clinical Chemistry I Clinical Microbiology II Clinical Chemistry II Clinical Hematology Serology/Blood Banking Clinical Laboratory Seminar Clinical Lab Externship

· NURSING Associate in Science in Nursing Degree Program

Registered nursing is a scientific discipline that is practice oriented and provides health services to individuals and families. It involves striving to identify and meet biological, psychosocial, and spiritual human needs. Nurses use knowledge, insight, skill, and vision to render holistic and comprehensive care to their clients. Underlying these skills are scientific, humanistic, and nursing theories that assure a comprehensive approach toward client care. The responsibilities of a nurse include assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation. The nurse must communicate effectively with clients and members of the interdisciplinary team. Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to write the National Council Licensure Examination-RN (NCLEX-RN) for licensure as a professional registered nurse. Graduates will be prepared to work in various health care settings such as acute care hospitals, long term care centers, ambulatory clinics, and home health care. The State Board of Nursing will not issue a license or

certificate to an applicant who has been convicted of a felonious act prohibited by the "The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act," or convicted of a felony relating to a controlled substance unless: 1) at least ten (10) years have lapsed from the date of conviction; 2) the applicant satisfactorily demonstrates to the Board that there has been significant progress in personal rehabilitation since the conviction; and 3) the applicant satisfies all qualifications in or authorized by the Professional Nursing Law. In addition, when a graduate applies for licensure, he/she will be asked to declare convictions of any felony or misdemeanor and/ or any current criminal charges pending and unresolved in any court. Conviction includes judgment, found guilty by a judge or jury, pleaded guilty or nolo contendere, received probation without verdict, disposition in lieu of trial, or ARD. Applicants must obtain a Criminal Record Report and Child Abuse Clearance Report before final acceptance into the Nursing Program. Applicants with concerns in these areas should call the Pennsylvania Board of Nursing or the nursing program director. The program is approved by the Pennsylvania Board of Nursing and consists of a minimum of 72 credits. Requirements for admission include a high school diploma with a preferred GPA of 2.5 or better, with evidence of 4 units of English, 3 units of Social Studies, 2 units of Math, (one of which is Algebra) and 2 units of Science with a Lab (Biology and Chemistry). Applicants with a GED who have taken courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Algebra and who have earned a C+ or better in these courses are encouraged to apply. Preference is given to applicants with an SAT score of at least 900. SAT's are required for those applicants who graduated from high school within the last 3 years. An assessment test to evaluate basic academic skills will be administered by the college. The results of this test are used to assist with admission decisions. Letters of recommendation may be required. The applicant will be required to take any pre-requisites that are needed based on the results of these tests. Acceptance into the nursing program is conditional until receipt and review of a required physical exam including immunization records, specific blood titers, TB testing, and criminal and child abuse history report. Physical and emotional health is necessary to fulfill the objectives of the program. Computer competency must be demonstrated prior to the end of the first year. Competency may be achieved through course work. CPR certification is required before the beginning of the first nursing course. The nursing curriculum is designed for full-time or parttime enrollment. Courses are taken in sequence as displayed in the course requirements listed below. Clinical rotations in the five nursing courses include both day and evening hours. Transfer of credit for previous course work in other majors or at other colleges may be accepted upon review by the Admissions Director in consultation with the Nursing Program Director. A minimum of a C+ in the theory component and a mark of "P" in the clinical lab component must be earned in all nursing courses. If a student is readmitted to a nursing course, both the clinical and theory portions must be repeated. Readmission policy is included in the Nursing program's student handbook which is distributed to the students at orientation. No more than two Ds may be earned in liberal arts or science courses. Students are

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responsible for their own transportation to clinical sites to which they are assigned. Participation in standardized testing and simulated nursing laboratory experiences are required of each nursing student periodically throughout the program. Test dates and simulation experiences will be announced at the beginning of each term within which they occur and may not always coincide with scheduled classes. Non-participation in standardized testing or simulated nursing laboratory experiences will result in an incomplete for the specific nursing course. Advanced placement may be offered to applicants who have completed nursing courses in other accredited nursing programs. The decision to grant advanced placement for a required nursing course is made by the nursing program director following review of transcripts and previous course outlines and syllabi. Applicants requesting transfer into the ASN program from another nursing program must provide a reference from the previous nursing director or designee. The nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission which may be contacted for information at: 61 Broadway, 33rd Floor, New York, NY 10006, or (212) 363-5555, ext. 153. For more information contact MaryAnn Lubiejewski at [email protected]

NURS 221 Term #7 NURS 225

Health Restoration of Clients with Acute/ Complex Health Deviations Across the Life Span Clinical Lab

Health Restoration of Clients/Families Across the Life Span with Multiple Unfulfilled Needs Related to Acute/ Complex Health Deviations with MultiSystem Implications NURS 226 Health Restoration of Clients/Families Across the Life Span with Multiple Unfulfilled Needs Related to Acute/ Complex Health Deviations with MultiSystem Implications Clinical Lab For more information contact Mary Ann Lubiejewski at [email protected]

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING REQUIREMENTS Part-Time Curriculum Plan

Term #1 Soc 101 BIO 240 BIO 241 Term #2 ENGL 101 BIO 250/251 Term #3 ENGL 102 BIO 180 BIO 181 MIS 103 Term #4 MATH 109 Rlst 100 Term #5 HDFR 110 BIO 203 Term #6 NURS 101 NURS 102 Term #7 NURS 202 NURS 203 Term #8 NURS 215 NURS 216 Term #9 NURS 220 NURS 221 Term #10 Contemporary Social Problems Human Anatomy & Physiology I Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab College Writing I Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab College Writing II Microbiology Microbiology Lab Computer Skills and Applications Statistics Religious Person and Traditions Human Growth and Development Pathophysiology Introduction to Nursing Practice Introduction to Nursing Clinical Lab Health Maintenance of Clients With Chronic Health Deviations Health Maintenance of Clients With Chronic Health Deviations Clinical Lab Health Restoration of Client with Acute Health Deviations Health Restoration of Clients with Acute Health Deviations Clinical Lab Health Restoration of Clients with Acute/Complex Health Deviations Across the Life Span Health Restoration of Clients with Acute/Complex Health Deviations Across the Life Span Clinical Lab

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING REQUIREMENTS Full Time Curriculum Plan

Term #1 ENGL 101 MATH 109 BIO 240 BIO 241 Soc 101 Term #2 ENGL 102 HDFR 110 BIO 250/251 MIS 103 Term #3 BIO BIO NURS NURS Term #4 BIO NURS 180 181 101 102 203 202 College Writing I Statistics Human Anatomy & Physiology I Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab Contemporary Social Problems College Writing II Human Growth and Development Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab Computer Skills and Applications (if needed) Microbiology Microbiology Lab Introduction to Nursing Practice Introduction to Nursing Clinical Lab Pathophysiology Health Maintenance of Clients with Chronic Health Deviations Health Maintenance of Clients with Chronic Health Deviations Clinical Lab Religious Person and Traditions Health Restoration of Clients with Acute Health Deviations Health Restoration of Clients with Acute Health Deviations Clinical Lab Health Restoration of Clients with Acute/Complex Health Deviations Across the Life Span

NURS 203 Term #5 Rlst 100 NURS 215 NURS 216 Term #6 NURS 220

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Programs of Study

Health Restoration of Clients/Families Across the Life Span with Multiple Unfulfilled Needs Related to Acute/ Complex Health Deviations with MultiSystem Implications NURS 226 Health Restoration of Clients/Families Across the Life Span with Multiple Unfulfilled Needs Related to Acute/ Complex Health Deviations with MultiSystem Implications Clinical Lab Part time Curriculum Plan-The part time program is offered in the evenings and on Saturday. For more information contact Janet Minzenberger at [email protected] edu

NURS 225

General Education Pre-requisite Courses

Prior to enrolling in the Sophomore Level nursing courses, students validating competency and students articulating will be required to complete all acceptance, pre-enrollment criteria and the following pre-requisite courses: BIO 240/241 Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab BIO 250/251 Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab HDFR 110 Human Growth and Development Eng 101 College Writing I Eng 102 College Writing II Soc 101 Contemporary Social Problems MATH 109 Statistics BIO 180/181 Microbiology and Lab Rlst 100 Religious Person and Traditions BIO 203 Pathophysiology NURS 209 PN to RN Role Transition NURS 210 PN to RN Role Transition Clinical Lab MIS 103 Computer Skills and Applications (if needed) For more information contact Marion Monahan at [email protected]

LPN to ASN Articulation

Graduates of State approved and NLNAC accredited practical nursing programs will be granted a maximum of 15 credits in nursing based on the following criteria. Applicants to the Associate in Science in Nursing (ASN) Degree program at Mercyhurst North East must meet the requirements of the College as well as the ASN program for admission. Competency testing may be required to assist in placement. In addition, the following criteria must be met prior to granting advanced placement: Practical Nursing License in good standing in all states the student is licensed in, and at least 6 months of employment as a LPN following graduation from a practical nursing program. Graduation within 5 years, with an earned 2.0 GPA, preferably from an NLNAC approved program, and a written recommendation from the Program Chairperson or current employer: or Graduation within 10 years, preferably from an NLNAC accredited program, and work experience in nursing equivalent to 1,000 hours in the last 3 years or Continuous employment as an LPN for those who have graduated longer than 10 years ago. Graduates of Practical Nursing programs, which have entered into an articulation agreement with the ASN Program at Mercyhurst North East, will be granted a maximum of 15 credits in nursing. Graduates of Practical Nursing programs that do not have a formal articulation agreement with the ASN program or who have graduated from non accredited programs or who have graduated over 10 years from the date of application to the ASN program have the opportunity to be awarded credits for previous learning. Following completion of acceptance criteria and competency validation, a maximum of 15 credits may be awarded. The NLN Nursing Acceleration Challenge Exams (ACE) are national validation tests designed to evaluate previous learning in order to assist with placement of LPNs who are seeking educational mobility. LPNs may take the Foundations of Nursing exam and if successful, receive Advanced Placement for Nursing 101/102 and 202/203. Waiver of the above requirements is at the discretion of the Nursing Program Director in consultation with nursing faculty. The LPN to ASN program may be completed via the full-time or part-time sequence. A specific calendar for the part-time sequence is available from Admissions.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT Associate Degree Program

Occupational therapy is skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. Occupational therapy assists people in developing the "skills for the job of living" necessary for independent and satisfying lives. (AOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association) Occupational therapy practitioners are skilled professionals whose education includes the study of human growth and development with specific emphasis on the social, emotional, and physiological effects of illness and injury. (AOTA) The occupational therapy assistant (OTA) is an integral part of the health care team. Occupational therapy assistants provide occupational therapy services under the direction and supervision of the occupational therapist. OTA's implement selected components of patient/client interventions and obtain data related to that intervention; make modifications in selected interventions either to progress the patient/ client as directed by the occupational therapist or to ensure patient/client safety and comfort; educate and interact with occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students, aides, technicians, volunteers, patients/clients families, caregivers; and respond to patient/client and environmental emergency situations. The OTA curriculum consists of liberal studies, science and OTA preparation courses. Within this curriculum, fieldwork placement in a clinical setting, supervised by a licensed OT or OTA, is completed. This is integrated into the course schedule for Level I Fieldwork, with a placement within the four Principles and Skills courses. Level II Fieldwork is a full time clinical placement during the last term of the curriculum. This consists of two separate clinical experiences, lasting eight weeks each. A minimum of 72 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. No grade below a C is accepted in any OTA course. Successful completion of fieldwork placements within clinical settings as scheduled

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in the curriculum is mandatory. Upon completion of this program, graduates will be qualified to take the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy Examination, required to practice as an Occupational Therapy Assistant in most states. The occupational therapy assistant program has applied for accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. ACOTE's telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA. Once accreditation of the program has been obtained, its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure. For additional information please contact Mary Gavacs @ [email protected]

OTA 205 Term #7 OTA 221 OTA 222

Occupational Therapy Professional Issues OT Fieldwork II (8 weeks) OT Fieldwork II (8 weeks)

· OFFICE MANAGEMENT/MEDICAL OFFICE CONCENTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Office Management/Medical Office program is designed to prepare students for a more advanced and diverse position in a health care facility. In addition to the entry-level medical office courses, students will take courses in medical transcription as well as coding systems. Course work will include a high degree of competency in computer applications in a business/medical office. As part of this program, students will have the opportunity to participate in an internship program, where they may work in a physician's office or hospital department to reinforce the training received in the classroom. Students must earn an overall GPA of 2.0, along with a minimum GPA of 2.0 in each major course to meet graduation requirements (major courses denoted with ). A minimum of 63 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. For more information, please contact Leslie Reed at [email protected]

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL BIO BIO MATH MATH Term #2 ENGL BIO BIO PSYC Term #3 HDFR OTA MIS PSYC Term #4 OTA 101 240 241 102 109 102 250 251 101 110 101 101 211 201 College Writing I Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab Elementary Algebra or Statistics College Writing II Human Anatomy and Physiology II Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab Introduction to Psychology Human Growth and Development Introduction to Occupational Therapy Computer Applications Abnormal Psychology OT Principles and Skills 2: Psychosocial Disabilities Fieldwork I/ Psychosocial Disabilities Contemporary Social Problems OT Principles and Skills 3: Physical Disabilities Fieldwork I/ Physical Disabilities Religious Person and Traditions OT Principles and Skills 4: Pediatrics OT Fieldwork I/ Pediatrics OT Principles and Skills 5: Aging Populations OT Fieldwork I/ Aging Populations

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I MIS 101 Computer Applications SecM 111 Medical Terminology Ori 100 Freshman Experience SecM 107 Keyboarding I Term #2 ENGL 102 College Writing II MIS 110 Advanced Computer Applications SecM 108 Keyboarding II SecM 203 Machine/Medical Transcription Term #3 Spch 101 Public Speaking or Choose Distribution Core Course HIST 101 U.S. History I: To 1865 or HIST 102 U.S. History II: 1865-1945 or HIST 103 U.S. History III: Since 1945 Rlst 100 Religious Person and Traditions Term #4 MGMT 120 MATH 100 MATH MATH ECON HDFR Psyc Soc SecM 102 109 105 110 101 101 106 Principles of Management Business Math (does not satisfy bachelor degree requirement) or Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor degree requirement)or Statistics Macroeconomics or Human Growth and Development or Intro to Psychology or Contemporary Social Problems Introduction to Coding

OTA 211 SOC 101 Term #5 OTA 202 OTA RLST Term #6 OTA OTA OTA OTA 212 100 203 213 204 214

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Programs of Study

Term #5 Choose one Distribution Core Course SecM 112 Administrative Medical Office I SecM 204 Intermediate ICD-9 and CPT Coding Term #6 SecM 113 Administrative Medical Office II SecM 205 Advanced ICD-9 Coding SecM 206 CPT Coding SecM 275 Medical Office Internship

· PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT Associate Degree Program

The American Physical Therapy Association defines Physical Therapy as the assessment, evaluation, treatment, and prevention of physical disability and pain resulting from injury, disease, disability, or other health-related conditions. The physical therapist assistant (PTA) is an integral part of the health care team. The duties of a physical therapist assistant include assisting in the implementation of treatment programs in accordance with the plan of care established by the physical therapist. The PTA works under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist in the provision of physical therapy services. Services may include use of physical agents such as therapeutic heat and cold, electrical stimulation and therapeutic ultrasound; application and instruction of therapeutic exercise techniques; functional mobility training; and data collection skills to monitor strength, range of motion, sensation, and reflexes. The practice of physical therapy offers opportunities to provide valuable health care service to patients or clients of all ages. The PTA Program curriculum is designed in accordance with recommendations of the American Physical Therapy Association's Model Curriculum for PTA Education (Version 2007), and meets established requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). The program has been accredited by CAPTE since 1996. The integrated two-year curriculum consists of a balance of liberal studies, science and technical courses. Within the curriculum, three full-time clinical education courses are completed. The clinical education courses provide an opportunity for students to transition from the classroom/ lab setting into the clinical environment. Students continue the learning process in various clinical settings under the direct supervision of a qualified physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. The clinical education component of the curriculum requires a total of 640 clinical hours. Clinical sites utilized for clinical education are available throughout the United States and in Canada with the majority of sites in the tri-state region. A significant number of clinical facilities within Erie County have committed their support to the program. Clinical sites available represent a wide variety of settings including hospitals, outpatient clinics, rehab centers, nursing homes, sports medicine clinics and pediatric settings. In order to participate in the clinical education courses, students must submit documentation of a recent physical exam (within one year), appropriate immunizations, recent TB test(some facilities require a two-step TB test), current CPR certification, completion of a criminal background check, and possible alcohol and drug screening if required by the clinical site. Students should be aware that a felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to attain a license

or certificate to practice, may restrict options for clinical placements and may impact employability. For more information contact Janice Haas at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu. A minimum of 69 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. An overall 2.0 GPA is required by the end of the fourth term and for graduation. No grade below a C+ is accepted in any PTA course. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are required to take the National Physical Therapy Examination in order to practice as a PTA in most states. The National Exam is administered by the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy (FSBPT.org).

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL MATH BIO BIO PTA PTA Term #2 ENGL BIO BIO HDFR PTA PTA Term #3 MIS PTA PTA PTA PTA Term #4 Rlst Psyc Term #5 PTA PTA PTA PTA PTA Term #6 PTA PTA Term #7 PTA PTA PTA 101 102 240 241 103 100 102 250 251 110 200 204 103 101 104 205 207 100 101 206 216 208 218 211 209 210 212 213 214 College Writing I Elementary Algebra (or higher) Anatomy & Physiology I Anatomy & Physiology I Lab Health Care Communication Physical Principles in PT College Writing II Anatomy & Physiology II Anatomy & Physiology II Lab Human Growth & Development Kinesiology Kinesiology Lab Computer Skills and Applications (if needed) Introduction to Physical Therapy Introduction to Physical Therapy Lab Pathophysiology Orthopedics for PTA Religious Person & Traditions Introduction to Psychology Therapeutic Modalities for PTA Therapeutic Modalities for PTA Lab Therapeutic Exercise Therapeutic Exercise Lab Clinical Education I Rehabilitation Neurorehab Clinical Education II Clinical Education III Professional Issues Seminar

RESPIRATORY THERAPIST Associate Degree Program

Respiratory Care is the health care discipline that specializes in the promotion of optimum cardiopulmonary function and health. Respiratory Therapists apply scientific principles to prevent, identify, and treat acute or chronic dysfunction of the cardiopulmonary system. Knowledge of the

Programs of Study

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scientific principles underlying cardiopulmonary physiology and pathophysiology, as well as biomedical engineering and technology, enable respiratory therapists to effectively offer preventative care to, as well as assess, educate, and treat patients with cardiopulmonary deficiencies. As a health care profession, Respiratory Care is practiced under medical direction across the health care continuum. Critical thinking, patient/environment assessment skills, and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines enable respiratory therapists to develop and implement effective care plans, patient-driven protocols, disease-based clinical pathways, and disease management programs. A variety of venues serve as the practice site for this health care profession including, but not limited to: acute care hospitals, sleep disorder centers and diagnostic laboratories, rehabilitation, research and skilled nursing facilities, patients' homes, patient transport systems, physician offices, convalescent and retirement centers, educational institutions, field representatives and wellness centers. The RT Program curriculum is designed in accordance with the recommendations of the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, the National Board for Respiratory Care and the American Association for Respiratory Care. Upon completion of this program, graduates will be qualified to sit for the Certification and Registry exams. The integrated two-year curriculum consists of a balance of liberal studies, science and technical courses. Within the curriculum, two full time clinical education courses are completed. The clinical education courses provide an opportunity for students to transition from the classroom/lab setting into the clinical environment. Students continue the learning process in various clinical settings under the direct supervision of a qualified respiratory therapist. The clinical education component of the curriculum requires a total of 640 clinical hours. Clinical sites utilized for clinical education are located in the tri-state area, with the majority of the sites in Erie County. Clinical sites available represent a wide variety of settings including hospitals, rehabilitation clinics, extended care facilities and home care agencies. In order to participate in the clinical education courses, students must submit a recent physical exam (within one year), appropriate immunizations, recent TB test and current CPR certification. A minimum of 74 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. No grade below a C is accepted in any RES course or science course that is required in the RT program. In order to be eligible for graduation the student must successfully pass the practice Certification and Registry exams. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are required to take the National Board for Respiratory Care Certification Exam in order to practice as a Respiratory Therapist in most states. For more information, contact Stephanie Adams at [email protected]

BIO Phy Term #2 Res BIO BIO CHEM CHEM Term #3 BIO BIO ENGL Res Res Term #4 HDFR Res Res Res Term #5 Res Res Res Rlst Term #6 Psyc Res Res Term #7 Res

214 123 101 250 251 101 102 180 181 102 110 111 110 120 121 122 201 202 203 100 101 210 211 220

Anatomy & Physiology I Lab Physics for Respiratory Therapy Introduction to Respiratory Therapy Anatomy & Physiology II Anatomy & Physiology II Lab Chemical Principles Chemical Principles Lab Microorganisms Microorganisms Lab College Writing II Respiratory Therapy I Respiratory Care Equipment I Human Growth & Development Respiratory Therapy II Respiratory Care Equipment II Respiratory Pharmacology Pediatric and Neonatal Respiratory Care Pulmonary Diagnostic Procedures Pulmonary and Related Pathology Religious Person and Traditions Introduction to Psychology Medical Aspects of Respiratory Therapy Respiratory Therapist Clinical I Respiratory Therapist Clinical II

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS · CULINARY ARTS Certificate Program

The Culinary Arts Certificate is designed to provide students with sufficient skills needed to secure an entry-level position in the restaurant/foods area. Students will gain basic skills in foods, sanitation, and nutrition as well as in purchasing and human resources. Courses in college writing, computers and math provide basic communication and math skills. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 overall, along with a minimum grade of a C in all Culinary and HRIM courses. The program is designed to allow the student to enter a new profession or acquire college credits with a minimal time investment as well as providing the opportunity to continue their education if they desire. After completing the Certificate Program, the student may transfer into the Associate Degree Program and courses with a C or better will be applied toward the degree requirements. For more information contact Beth Ann Sheldon at [email protected]

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL 101 MATH 102 BIO 240 College Writing I Elementary Algebra Anatomy & Physiology I

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I CULN 110 Food Service Sanitation CULN 184/185 Intro to Baking Module/Lab FNUT 131 Intro to Nutrition

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Programs of Study

Term #2 CULN 134/135 Culinary Skills Module/Lab CULN 197 Intro to Wine HRIM 212 Hospitality Purchasing Term #3 CULN 174/175 Cooking Principles Module/Lab HRIM 223 Management of Human Resources MIS 101 Computer Applications MATH 100 Business Math or (does not satisfy bachelor degree requirement) MATH 102 Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor degree requirement) A minimum of 32 credits is required for the completion of this certificate program.

MIS MIS

140 110

Microcomputer Operations Advanced Computer Applications

· MEDICAL ASSISTANT Certificate Program

Medical assistants are allied health practitioners who are educated to perform both administrative and/or clinical skills in an ambulatory or immediate care setting under the supervision of a licensed physician. The program is designed to prepare students who may wish to pursue a career in Medical Assisting, but may not wish to pursue a two-year degree. It is also designed for those who may want to pursue an additional certificate in the allied health care field. The certificate program will prepare students to perform basic administrative skills including medical office procedures of scheduling appointments, telephone communications, medical records, medical terminology, billing, and insurance coding. Clinical skills will include preparing patients for exams, taking vital signs, assisting in various procedures, and performing basic laboratory tests. Students will be encouraged to apply the principles of professional and ethical conduct, and to become involved with professional organizations. Employment opportunities exist in a variety of health care settings including private physician practices, immediate care offices, group practices, and family medicine centers. The skilled medical assistant is highly valued as a multiskilled practitioner able to perform a variety of duties in these settings. Students must successfully complete all administrative and clinical competencies before being placed in the internship. All criteria must be met before graduating, including a minimum 2.0 GPA overall, a minimum grade of 2.0 in all major courses, (denoted with a ) and successful completion of all performance objectives. A minimum of 37 credits is required for completion of this certificate program. For more information contact Leslie Reed at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu. Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I SecM 111 Medical Terminology BIO 160/161 Intro Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab SecM 106 Introduction to Coding Term #2 SecM 112 Administrative Medical Office I Psyc 101 Intro to Psychology BIO 162/163 Intro Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab MIS 103 Computer Skills and Applications Term #3 BIO 190 Disease Process MED 101/102 Medical Office Clinical Procedures/Lab MED 103 Medical Office Diagnostic Procedures SecM 113 Administrative Medical Office II Term #4 (Summer) MED 275 Medical Assistant Internship

· INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST Certificate Program

The Information Technology Specialist Program is designed to provide students with sufficient exposure to those computer-based problem-solving techniques needed to secure an entry-level position in the growing field of computer operations. The program provides an introduction to programming, as well as coursework in microcomputer applications and computer hardware. Students are introduced to Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Because Mercyhurst North East recognizes the importance of basic communication and mathematical skills, a strong skills development component is included in this certificate program. Upon completing this program, students will be prepared for entry-level positions as programmer trainees or microcomputer specialists. With experience, one may qualify for promotion to a higher-level supervisory position. Students must earn an overall GPA of 2.0, along with a minimum GPA of 2.0 in each major course to meet graduation requirements. After completing this program a student may transfer to one of the two-year or four-year degree programs, and many of the courses with a grade of C or better will be applied toward the degree requirements. A minimum of 30 credits is required for the completion of this certificate program. For more information contact Scott McAuley at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL 101 MATH 100 MATH 102 MIS MIS Term #2 MIS MIS *** ECON Term #3 MIS 101 106 204 125 *** 105 107 College Writing I Business Mathematics or Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor degree math requirement) Computer Applications Web Management I Computerized Desktop Publishing Visual Basic Programming or Computer Elective Macroeconomics Web Management II

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· MEDICAL INSURANCE CODING SPECIALIST Certificate Program

Health information coders are health care practitioners who work in the health care field without any direct patient care responsibilities. Coders access health information, identify diagnoses and procedures, and assign appropriate numerical codes to health terminology. The accuracy of this coding is essential because without it, correct reimbursement of all tests, procedures, etc., ordered by the physician will not occur. It also affects research, quality assurance, and risk management. Employment opportunities exist in a variety of health care settings including hospitals, physician offices, clinics, insurance companies, rehabilitation centers, legal offices, and research centers. The skilled coder is highly valued, as the demand for quality coding and reimbursement is increasing in several areas due to the coder's extensive interaction with physicians, financial staffs, insurance representatives, and government personnel. This certificate program prepares the student for entry-level employment as a coder by providing the basic knowledge, understanding, and skills required to accurately assign codes with clarity and timeliness, applying the principles of professional and ethical conduct. Students must successfully complete all administrative and clinical competencies before being placed in the internship. All criteria must be met before graduating, including a minimum 2.0 GPA overall, a minimum grade of 2.0 in all major courses (denoted with a ), and successful completion of all performance objectives. A minimum of 33 credits is required for completion of this certificate program. For more information contact Leslie Reed at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

medical knowledge and understanding, sound judgment, deductive reasoning and the ability to detect medical inconsistencies in dictation. Because medical reports take many forms, the medical transcriptionist must be well versed in the language of medicine and surgery. Students must successfully complete all administrative and clinical competencies before being placed in the internship. All criteria must be met before graduating, including a minimum 2.0 GPA overall, a minimum grade of 2.0 in all major courses (denoted with a ), and successful completion of all performance objectives. A minimum of 35 credits is required for completion of this certificate program. For more information contact Leslie Reed at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 BIO 160/161 SecM 111 SecM 108 SecM 106 Term #2 BIO 162/163 MIS 103 SecM 109 SecM 203 SecM 112 Term #3 SecM 113 ENGL 101 BIO 190 Term #4 SecM 275 Intro Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab Medical Terminology Keyboarding II Introduction to Coding Intro Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab Computer Skills and Applications Keyboarding III Machine/Medical Transcription Administrative Medical Office I Administrative Medical Office II College Writing I Disease Process Medical Transcription Internship

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Term #1 ENGL 101 SecM 106 SecM 111 BIO 160/161 Term #2 BIO 162/163 MIS 103 SecM 204 SecM 112 Term #3 SecM 205 SecM 206 BIO 190 SecM 275 College Writing I Introduction to Coding Medical Terminology Intro Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab Intro Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab Computer Skills and Applications Intermediate ICD-9 and CPT Coding Administrative Medical Office I Advanced ICD-9 Coding CPT Coding Disease Process Coding Internship

· MUNICIPAL POLICE CADET Certificate Program

The program of instruction associated with the Pennsylvania Act 120 Municipal Police Officers Basic Training Curriculum is designed to address the multi-faceted role of the police officer in a complex, democratic society. This 21-week program of instruction and study emphasizes task proficiency, professional development, and role and value understandings requisite for a high-quality police service. As an entry-level program of instruction, this curriculum has a specific focus - the municipal police patrol officer. The program aims to build a firm training and educational foundation upon which a professional police career can be built. Upon completing this program, students will be prepared for entry-level positions as police officers in any municipality, park rangers, deputy sheriffs, security guards, and many other related positions in the criminal justice system. With experience, one may qualify for promotion to higher-level supervisory positions. After completing this certificate program, a student may transfer to a two-year degree program in law enforcement, referencing associate degree requirements for course equivalency. Cadets are encouraged to consider enrolling in the associate degree program. Students have the option of attending the academy on either a "not-for-credit" or "for-credit" option basis. The "not-

· MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONISTS Certificate Program

Medical transcriptionists are medical language specialists who interpret and transcribe dictation by physicians and other health care professionals regarding patient assessment, workup, clinical course, diagnosis and prognosis in order to document patient care and facilitate delivery of health care services. Qualified medical transcriptionists have extensive

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Programs of Study

for-credit" basis results in charges according to the fee schedule and registration for "zero" credits. The "for-credit" basis option results in charges as indicated on the fee schedule and registration for 16 credits. Whether students attend "for-credit" or "not-for-credit," all testing procedures remain the same. Students attending on a "not-for-credit" basis may choose to purchase credits earned at a later date by paying the difference between the "not-for-credit" rate and the "for-credit" rate in effect at the time of purchase for passed course(s). For more information contact Art Amann at [email protected] mercyhurst.edu.

Nursing Student Handbook which is distributed to the students on admission. Standardized testing is scheduled across the curriculum. A percentile score of 60 or scoring above the level one proficiency level demonstrates mastery.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND TRANSFER

Transfer students from other practical nursing programs will be accepted into terms II, III, or IV and must complete at least two terms of the program. Transfer students must meet all of the regular admission requirements plus have successfully completed the first term of an approved program of practical nursing with a GPA of 2.00 or higher and a letter grade of C or higher in each course. In order to transfer into the Mercyhurst North East Practical Nursing Program an official transcript and a letter of recommendation from the program Director must be submitted. The applicant shall be accepted as a transfer student only if the practical nursing faculty believes such a decision is educationally sound for the applicant. Students currently enrolled at Mercyhurst North East may apply for admission. Students transferring internally must meet the admission requirements of the program, and must have a GPA of 2.00 and a grade of C or higher in all previous courses.

16-CREDIT PROGRAM

Term #1 CRJS CRJS CRJS CRJS CRJS CRJS 100 102 103 211 201 209 Intro Special Needs Populations Functions of the Criminal Justice System Professional Police Relations Constitutional Issues in Policing Preliminary Criminal Investigations Legal Procedures

· PRACTICAL NURSE Certificate Program

Practical nursing involves the performance of selected nursing acts in the care of the ill, injured, and infirmed clients across the life span. The performance of selected nursing acts are performed under the supervision of a professional nurse, licensed physician, or licensed dentist, which do not require the specialized skill, judgment, or knowledge required in professional nursing. The practical nurse is prepared to function as a member of the health-care team by exercising sound nursing judgment based on preparation, knowledge, skills, understandings, and past experiences in nursing situations. The practical nurse participates in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of nursing care in settings where nursing takes place. The practical nurse administers medications, carries out therapeutic treatments, administers immunizations, performs skin testing, performs venipuncture, and administers approved intravenous fluids, and take verbal orders from the physician. The practical nurse also participates in the development, revision, and implementation of policies and procedures designed to insure comfort and safety of patients in collaboration of other health care personnel. A practical nurse shall adhere to the Standards of Nursing Conduct. The practical nurse will not under-take a specific practice unless the practical nurse has the necessary knowledge, preparation, experience, and competence to properly execute the practice. While providing nursing care, the practical nurse will respect the individual's right to freedom from psychological and physical abuse, will safeguard the patient from incompetent, abusive, or illegal practices. The Practical Nurse will safeguard the patient's dignity, right to privacy, and the confidentiality of patient information.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

Requirements for admission include a G.E.D. or high school graduate. High school graduates must have a minimum of 16 units, including 4 units of English, 3 units of Social Studies, 2 units of Mathematics, and 2 units of Science. The college will administer a basic skills test to evaluate reading comprehension, writing, and math skills. A personal interview will be scheduled once an applicant has submitted all necessary credentials and has been determined a candidate. Acceptance into the nursing program is conditional until receipt and review of required physical examination records, criminal record check and child abuse clearance. Upon completion of the practical nursing program graduates are eligible to write the National Council Licensure Examination - PN (NCLEX-PN) for Licensure as a Licensed Practical Nurse. Graduates are prepared to work in various health care settings such as acute care hospitals, long-term care centers, physician offices, and home health. The Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing will not issue a license or certificate to an applicant who has been convicted of a felonious act as identified in the Act of April 14, 1972 (P.L. 233, No. 64.) known as the "Controlled Substance, Drug, Device, and CosmeticAct." This program is a noncredit program. For more information contact Marion Monahan at [email protected]

GRADING AND ATTENDANCE

In order to be promoted at the end of each term a student must have a grade of 80% or higher in both theory and clinical. Additional program policies are addressed in the Practical

PRACTICAL NURSING NON-CREDIT CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

TERM 1 TERM 2 TERM 3 TERM 4 Png Png Png Png 101 102 103 104 Practical Nursing 101 Practical Nursing 102 Practical Nursing 103 Practical Nursing 104

Programs of Study / Course Descriptions

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· PRACTICAL NURSING 101 TERM 1

This module is an introduction to anatomy, physiology, and normal nutrition. Basic concepts of chemistry and physics are reviewed. Knowledge of the normal structural and functional units of the body serves as the basis for the application of principles in providing safe, effective nursing care. This initial module is designed to prepare the student to provide care across the life span and along the health-illness continuum through understanding of the etiology of illness, the body's response to illness, and common methods of disease prevention. This module focuses on the development of an understanding of the nursing process as it relates to acquiring skills to meet simple nursing needs of adult clients. Students learn to apply knowledge of asepsis and universal precautions, body mechanics, basic nutrition and diet therapy, fluid and electrolyte balance, documentation, basic assessment skills, and CPR. Basic psychological and social concepts as well as fundamental concepts of ethics and legal responsibilities involved in nursing are introduced. Interpersonal relationships and communication skills are stressed along with aspects of personal and vocational growth. The current health care delivery system as it relates to values, influences, changes, and challenges in the areas of personal and community health is discussed, along with the role of the practical nurse in the delivery of care. Clinical experience will be in the acute care and long term care settings.

discussed in the course, as well as related information on disease prevention, health screenings, health promotion, and patient education is included. Clinical experience will be in acute care settings, long-term care settings, and facilities providing mental health services.

· PRACTICAL NURSING 104 TERM 4

This module focuses on the application of the nursing process in the care of the mother, and the care of the newborn following delivery. The concepts and principles of normal growth and development for the neonate and newborn periods are explored, and include the physical, emotional, psychosexual, mental, and social development of the infant. Content related to nutritional needs and drug therapy is integrated. Concepts of pediatric nursing are presented. Principles of normal physical growth and development, as well as emotional, psychological, and social development from infant through adolescence are emphasized. Conditions of illness are presented within the developmental framework. Content related to diet therapy, drug therapy, and disease management for common diseases of childhood is integrated. Information about health care agencies that provide services for common pediatric conditions, as well as related information on disease prevention, health screenings, health promotion, and patient education, is included. This module is designed to facilitate the transition from student to graduate. Employment opportunities, applications, resignation protocol, licensure, resumes, and interviews are presented. Leadership and management skills for the practical nurse will be discussed. Acute care and long-term care settings will be used for clinical experience to facilitate the development of organizational skills needed to care for multiple patients in both acute and long-term care settings, and the care of the maternity and pediatric client.

· PRACTICAL NURSING 102 TERM 2

This module introduces students to those skills needed to provide nursing care to adult clients with moderately complex nursing needs related to elimination, selected emergencies, perioperative care, death and dying, and medical-surgical conditions of illness. Students are introduced to pharmacology, drug calculations, and medication administration. Psychosocial and developmental needs of adult clients are discussed. Students apply the nursing process in caring for patients with diseases of the respiratory, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Content related to diet modifications, drug therapy, and disease management for these specific diseases is integrated. Information about health care agencies that focus on various conditions discussed in this module, as well as related information on disease prevention, health screenings, health promotion, and patient education is included. Principles of oncology, geriatrics, and rehabilitation are presented. Clinical experience will be in acute care settings, long-term care settings, rehabilitation facilities, and various community-based programs.

MERCYHURST COLLEGE MERCYHURST NORTH EAST

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACCT 101. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING Fundamental process of recording, classifying and summarizing business transactions for services and merchandising enterprises. Coverage includes receivables and payables, inventory, plant assets, and preparation of financial statements. 3 credits. ACCT 102. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II A continuation of Principles of Accounting I in which plant assets, intangibles, current and long-term liabilities, partnerships and corporations are examined. Pre-requisite: ACCT 101. 3 credits. ACCT 140. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING This applications course is designed to familiarize the student with the operation of an accounting system utilizing the microcomputer. Through the use of the computer, the student learns to use an accounting program that journals, posts, and prepares financial statements. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and interpretation of the financial statement. Pre-requisite: ACCT 101 and MIS 101. 3 credits.

· PRACTICAL NURSING 103 TERM 3

This module is a continuation of nursing care for adults with diseases of the cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and integumentary systems. Mental health conditions are discussed. Content related to diet modifications, drug therapy, and disease management for these specific diseases is integrated. Information about health care agencies that focus on various conditions

50

Course Descriptions

ACCT 201. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I A detailed examination of the development of specific accounting theories relating to the principles of valuation of the major balance sheet accounts. Pre-requisite: ACCT 102. 3 credits. ACCT 202. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I which deals with accounting theories relating to the valuation of the major balance sheet accounts. Pre-requisite: ACCT 201. 3 credits. ACCT 203. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III A continuation of the Intermediate Accounting cycle which deals with several advanced topics including the accounting for leases, pensions, and income taxes. Pre-requisite:: ACCT 201. 3 credits. ANTH 109. WORLD GEOGRAPHY Geography is a branch of knowledge that examines spatial patterns in the physical and human environments through an exploration of the various regions of the world at different scales from the regional to the global: the World in Spatial terms (physical processes and ecosystems of the world); Places (the regionality of the earth's surface); and Human Systems (the relationship of human populations to the landscape and each other). Students will have the opportunity to explore a number of current issues involving their place in the world through interactive group projects. 3 credits. ART 110. ART APPRECIATION A survey of the visual arts including painting, sculpture, and architecture. Includes the study of artists, design, significant art works, and art criticism. 3 credits. ASIA 125. ASIAN CULTURES Studies the cultures of India, China, Korea and Japan through an examination of common roots and development in geography, history, arts, and religion. 3 credits BadM275. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT This course is an introduction to the field of operations management. The student will be exposed to fundamental principles including demand forecasting, system design, supply chain management, project management and quality. This course will demonstrate the importance of these topics in both manufacturing and service concerns alike. Pre-requisite: MATH 109 or permission of the instructor. 3 credits. BIO 120. HUMAN BIOLOGY A basic biological study of man, examining human evolution, organ systems, genetics, behavior, and ecology. Co-requisite: BIO 121. 3 credits. BIO 121. HUMAN BIOLOGY LAB An opportunity for students to utilize the scientific method in performing simple experiments related to human function. Familiarizes students with the compound microscope and simple dissecting techniques. Co-requisite: BIO 120. 1 credit. BIO 160. INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I This course introduces students to the structure and functioning of the human body. The study of basic biochemistry, cells and tissues serves as a foundation for the investigation of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. This course is designed for students studying medical transcription. Co-requisite: BIO 161. 3 credits.

BIO 161.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LABORATORY This course serves to help the students better visualize the information studied in BIO 160. Co-requisite to BIO 160. 1 credit. BIO 162. INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II This course is a continuation of BIO 160 and focuses on the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Co-requisite: BIO 163. 3 credits. BIO 163. INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LABORATORY This course demonstrates the principles discussed in BIO 162 through dissection and laboratory experimentation. Co-requisite: BIO 162. 1 credit. BIO 180. MICROORGANISMS An introductory study of microorganisms directly impacting human health and society, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protists. Topics include taxonomy and identification of medically important taxa, human defense mechanisms, symbioses, course of infections, epidemiology and food sciences. 3 credits. BIO 181. MICROORGANISMS LAB Introduction to the methods of identification and culturing of medically important microorganisms and viruses. Emphasis on general and specialized culturing methods, staining techniques, and growth experiments. 1 credit. BIO 190. DISEASE PROCESS An introductory study of common human diseases and conditions including prevention, etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic and treatment modalities, and prognoses. This course is oriented to medical transcription and coding specialist students. Pre-requisites: BIO 160, 162. 3 credits. BIO 203. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY This course examines the nature of disease and its relationship to human resources to illness across the life span. Underlying pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and medical treatment of selected common diseases are presented for each body system. 3 credits. BIO 240. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I A study of the structural and functional relationships of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Corequisite: BIO 241 Pre-requisite: BIO 120 or 140 3 credits. BIO 241. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LAB A detailed study of human anatomy coupled with an extensive mammalian dissection. Co-requisite: BIO 240. 1 credit. BIO 250. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II A continuation of Biology 240, including the circulatory, respiratory, renal, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive systems of the human body. Pre-requisite: BIO 240. Co-requisite: BIO 251. 3 credits. BIO 251. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LAB Physiological experimentation designed to illustrate topics covered in BIO 250. A specialized research project is included. Co-requisite BIO 250. 1 credit.

Course Descriptions

51

CHEM 123. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY This course will focus on the evolving science of life chemistry. The broad subject of biochemistry will be explored from the molecular level covering DNA/RNA and other protein structure, synthesis and function as well as Genome sequencing, enzymes, hemoglobin, carbohydrates, and other regulatory systems of the human body. 3 credits CHEM 134. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB This lab will explore the role of RNA/DNA, proteins, genomes, carbohydrates and other biochemical functions of the human body. Co-requisite: CHEM 123. 1 credit COMM 180. BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS This course provides a background in communication in business settings, focusing on writing basic business documents and preparing effective presentations. 3 credits. COMM 182. RADIO PRODUCTION This course introduces the student to state of the art radio equipment at our radio station WYNE and broadcasting technique as the student writes and produces a radio commercial, an air-check and participates in a live radio play. In addition the course acquaints the student with radio history, ratings broadcast regulations and basic theory. 3 credits. COMM 183. ELECTRONIC MEDIA PRODUCTION Basic instruction in producing bideo in and outside of the television studio with emphasis on videography, sound and lighting. Instruction combines theoretical concepts in the classroom with practical experience in the field. Students work in small groups and individually to produce various video projects. The production process from conception to completion is covered. Field production includes both indoor and outdoor venues. Classroom training includes viewing of various video examples. This course is intended as an introductory look at the video field. 3 credits. COMM 184. NEWSWRITING This course covers fundamental skills in reporting, writing, producing, and presenting news stories, focusing on the development of news judgment and writing skills. Techniques in reporting news, trends in print, web, broadcast, multiple platforms, news values, legal and ethical issues, deadlines, and methods of evaluating news are covered. Students also practice research strategies for gathering information ethically and legally from databases, institutions, Internet, polls and people. This course also examines the history of the practice of journalism including First Amendment issues, language of media, changing conditions of information gathering, and the role of a democratic press. Students exercise skills in evaluating synthesizing, editing, and presenting information by covering on-campus assignments and preparing copy for campus newspaper. 3 credits COMM 186. RADIO PROMOTIONS AND MARKETING In this course, the student becomes familiar with advertising and marketing for radio stations studying both acquisitive and retentive marketing theory. Each student will design and present a radio contest, assemble a marketing plan for our radio station and deal with strategies for attracting new listeners and retaining current ones. In depth discussion of ratings, goals and market research are key parts of this course. 3 credits

COMM 204.

PRINCIPLES OF BROADCASTING SALES Higher salaries are generally earned by radio sales people than in any other non-management career in radio. In this course, the student learns techniques of selling advertising, creating advertising packages and presenting marketing plans to station clients. How ratings affect sales, understanding pricing, collections, billing and traffic are introduced as well as familiarity with rate cards and clients. 3 credits. COMM 273. SALES INTERNSHIP This internship is designed to provide the student with handson-experience in sales, marketing and promotional activities at a commercial radio station (WYNE). This internship experience will enable the student to gain additional knowledge of the radio industry. COMM 280. PRACTICUM These offer students the opportunity to participate in media activities on the college campus, such as newspaper, literary journal, MNE Happenings, and the radio station. A total of three one-credit practica must be taken throughout the duration of the program. Radio Broadcasting students are involved in practicum experiences that include various hands-on assigned positions at WYNE Radio as an on-air announcer, producer, or with sales, marketing and promotion. Also includes a mentoring program to match the student with an on-air practitioner from the local radio market. 1 credit COMM 283. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN RADIO OPERATIONS This course studies the operation of digital audio systems at most radio stations and looks at the transition from mechanical production of radio programs to digital production emanating from hard drives. The student will experience onair operation utilizing the Google automation system SS-32 at WYNE and associated production techniques. 3 credits. COMM 286. SPORTS BROADCASTING A significant part of many local radio operations is their coverage of local and national sports. This course involves play-by-play broadcasting, writing, interviewing, producing on-air sportscasts and on-field coverage of sporting events involving MNE athletics and nearby school districts. 1 credit. COMM 290. ADVANCED RADIO PRODUCTION A more in depth look at radio programming techniques, counter programming and station research is the goal of this course. Students will study day to day programming activities, music selection and promotions involving WYNE and other stations both in and out of the local market. In addition, students will become familiar with voice technique, editing digitally and the duties of a program director including personal management. 3 credits. CRJS 100. INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION Criminal justice practitioners frequently encounter elements of our populations that have special problems, such as the mentally ill and the mentally challenged. This course examines these types of cases, and provides the student with valuable information concerning the etiology of these disorders, their symptoms, and strategies for effective communication. Also discussed are relevant legal cases in this field of study. 1 credit.

52

Course Descriptions

CRJS 101. AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE This course provides students with an understanding of the criminal justice system in America. An examination of the role of police, the court systems, and the processes of corrections will be presented which will enable students to critically analyze success as well as inherent weaknesses within the administration of justice in our society. Included will be a survey of problems, trends and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal agencies engaged in the criminal justice process. Students will become familiar with those qualifications and requirements that criminal justice agencies have established for entry-level positions. 3 credits. CRJS 102. FUNCTIONS OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM A close examination of the role of the police, courts and corrections personnel in the criminal justice system. Includes a study of crimes and criminals and the way in which society views them. 2 credits. CRJS 103. PROFESSIONAL POLICE RELATIONS A study of the complexities involved in traditional and contemporary relationships involving the police and the public they serve. Emphasis is placed on the police selfimage, public perceptions and considerations that could possibly bring the two closer together. 3 credits. CRJS 104. INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS An introduction to the corrections systems and their relationship to the American Criminal Justice System. Students learn the objectives, policies, and procedures of probation, parole, jails, and prisons, as well as the issues and problems within these functions. CRJS 105. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER CRIME This course presents information concerning an evergrowing problem in the U.S.: computer crime. Government studies indicate that billions of dollars are lost each year due to identity theft and other crimes committed by criminals through the use of automated devices. The course will explore law enforcement's readiness and response to this problem, and take a futuristic view concerning how this issue may be addressed throughout the 21st century. 3 credits CRJS 106. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE This course focuses on criminal activities that are generally hidden from the public and police view. Understanding such crimes against society, recognizing and identifying structural crime activities, developing information sources, and the ethical and legal constraints in dealing with such offenses are examined. The course teaches methods to analyze these crimes through basic techniques using graphical, rather than quantitative methods. Students study techniques necessary to prepare link diagrams, conduct telephone toll analysis, perform hierarchical analysis, prepare visual investigative finds, and conduct basic financial analysis in search of crimederived monies and other assets. 3 credits. CRJS 201. PRELIMINARY CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION Basic procedures in the investigation of criminal matters. Includes interview procedures, crime scene examinations, development of information, procedures for solving crimes, surveillance and preparing reports. Case problems will be presented for resolution. 3 credits.

CRJS 202.

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH An introduction to social science research, with emphasis on research appropriate to criminal justice. Students learn to form research questions, to select and carry out appropriate research strategies, and to present findings in a professional manner. Pre-requisite: CRJS 101. 3 credits. CRJS 205. INTRODUCTION TO JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY This is the basic course which provides an overview of the in Juvenile Justice System and the study of Juvenile Delinquency. It examines the nature and development of delinquency against the backdrop of normal adolescent development. Research and theory are used to help the student distinguish between typical forms of adolescent exploration and indications of potentially serious delinquency. A variety of sociological and psychological theories of delinquency are reviewed. 3 credits. CRJS 206. COMPUTER SKILLS FOR THE CRIME ANALYST Because the rapid acquisition of information by crime analysts has become an integral element of modern law enforcement, computer skills are crucial to all position in the crime analysis field. The course provides beginning instruction in the basic skills and computer software commonly encountered in law enforcement; including word processing, spreadsheets, photo databases, and graphic formats. It also covers geographic information systems and the latest uses of computer generated link and time line analysis for the crime and intelligence analyst. Valuable instruction and insight into the daily activities and responsibilities of a crime analyst are also covered. 3 credits. CRJS 207. POLICE FUNCTIONS This course provides an overview of those basic line functions found within state and local law enforcement agencies. Included are patrol procedures and community policing concepts currently being undertaken that enhance those relationships between the police and the community they serve. The role of other operating components found within law enforcement agencies will be explored along with the responsibilities of the services and auxiliary bureaus. Pre-requisite: CRJS 101. 3 credits. CRJS 208. CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION Basic procedures in the investigation of criminal matters. Includes interview procedures, crime scene examinations, development of information, procedures for solving crimes, criminalistics, and use of forensic sciences. Pre-requisite: CRJS 101, 207, or permission. 3 credits. CRJS 209. LEGAL PROCEDURES A study of the judicial process and the legal framework encountered by the law enforcement officer as he/she successfully takes the case from arrest to adjudication. Includes both criminal law factors and evidential procedures. 3 credits. CRJS 211. CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES IN POLICING Course explores purposes/processes of civil/criminal law as shaped and defined by the Constitution. Stress is on the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments. 3 credits.

Course Descriptions

53

CRJS 212. POLICE COMMUNITY RELATIONS A study of the complexities in traditional and contemporary relationships involving the police and the public they serve. Emphasis is placed on role and police discretion, police selfimage, public perceptions, and considerations that could possibly bring the two closer together. Community-oriented policing and crime prevention are also explored. 3 credits. CRJS 214. INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL CONCEPTS This course examines concepts in the areas of constitutional law, criminal procedure, and criminal law as those concepts relate to criminal justice. This course also examines developing legal issues in criminal law. 3 credits. CRJS 227. PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY The main objective of the course is to provide an understanding of ethical views that relate to criminal justice and the consequences of instituting those views of ethics. Another objective is to examine the idea that humans have a moral sense which connects them to a transcendent source of moral good. 3 credits. CRJS/SOC 230. CRIMINOLOGY An in-depth analysis of the criminal behavior systems, theoretical developments in explaining crime, and research methodology used in modern American criminology. 3 credits. CRJS 275. CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP This course provides actual involvement with the various aspects of law enforcement. Open only to seniors who are recommended by the department and who have at least a 2.5 GPA Students will also be expected to complete a research paper suggesting a solution to a police problem encountered during the internship or co-op experience. Pre-requisite: by permission only. 3 credits. CULN 110. FOOD SERVICE SANITATION This course will expose the student to the basic principles of sanitation and safety as they apply to the food service industry. Upon successful completion of the course, each student will receive a certificate from the National Restaurant Association signifying that he/she is a graduate. 2 credits. CULN 134. CULINARY SKILLS MODULE Application of concepts related to the operation and handling of foods for restaurant and commercial use. Food selection, preparation, sanitation, and usage are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on measurements, proper application, and techniques. Food cost and recipe conversions are addressed. Knife skills will be a focus and used in the preparation of stocks, sauces, soups, and vegetable cookery during the lab. Lecture and kitchen/laboratory activities are interrelated and form part of a whole in terms of instructional methodology. Participation in food-related event evenings and weekends may be required. Pre-requisite: CULN 110 Co-requisite: CULN 135 3 credits. CULN 135. CULINARY SKILLS LAB Lab time emphasizes techniques discussed in lectures. Co-Requisite: CULN 135 Lab fee/Regulation uniforms required. 1 credit. CULN 174. COOKING PRINCIPLES MODULE This course combines the theoretical and practical learning experiences to provide the student with skills used in the preparation of food. Cooking techniques will be discussed and applied. In particular the focus will be in the identification, preparation and evaluation of meats, poultry, seafood, starches, and vegetables. The following areas will be presented in this course and throughout the entire two-year

course of study: standards of professionalism, sanitation, nutrition, and work place organization and safety. Lecture and kitchen/laboratory activities are interrelated, and form part of a whole in terms of the instructional methodology. Participation in food-related event evenings and weekends may be required. Pre-requisite: CULN 134/135 and CULN 110. 3 credits. CULN 175. COOKING PRINCIPLES LAB A laboratory approach taken as a co-requisite to Basic Cooking Principles. Lab fee/regulation uniform required. 1 credit. CULN 184. INTRO TO BAKING MODULE This course introduces the student to the bakeshop. The curriculum includes emphasis on bakeshop tools and equipment, weights and measures, as well as types of flours, starch, and various fillings. Lecture and kitchen/laboratory activities are interrelated and form part of a whole in terms of the instructional methodology. Participation in food-related events evenings and weekends is required. Co-Requisite: CULN 185 Pre-requisite: CULN 110. 3 credits. CULN 185. INTRO TO BAKING LAB A laboratory approach taken as a co-requisite to Basic Baking. Co-Requisite: CULN 184 Lab Fee. Regulation uniform required. 1 credit. CULN 197. INTRODUCTION TO WINES AND SPIRITS This course will include lecture and practicum on methods of production of dietary beverages, developing skills in sensory analysis and identification of beverages, and in better understanding the relationship of these beverages in food presentation and preparation. 3 credits. CULN 254. REGIONAL/INTERNATIONAL CUISINE MODULE This course builds upon the food principles derived from Culinary Arts I and Culinary Arts II with application of theory and techniques. Students are introduced to the concepts of menu planning, costing, pricing, and production scheduling. Regional cuisines, including American Regional will be explored. Participation in food-related events evenings and weekends is required. Pre-requisite : CULN 110, CULN 134/135, CULN 174/175 ; Co-requisite : CULN 255 3 credits. CULN 255. REGIONAL/INTERNATIONAL CUISINE LAB A laboratory approach taken as a co-requisite to Regional/ International Cuisine. Co-Requisite: CULN 254 Lab fee/Regulation uniform required. 1 credit. CULN 272. CULINARY EXTERNSHIP This is an on-the-job training and learning experience in a culinary facility providing the student with the opportunity to gain additional knowledge of the industry. An externship must total 400 hours. Registration Fee; Required; Non-credit. CULN 274. GARDE MANGER MODULE The Garde Manger portion of the course will develop skills in producing a variety of cold food products and in pre-paring items appropriate for buffet presentation. The buffet segment enables the advanced student to plan, organize, and set up a complete buffet. It also concentrates on the practical

54

Course Descriptions

techniques and preparation of showpieces. Participation in food-related events evenings and weekends is required. Pre-requisites : CULN 134/135, 174/175. Co-requisite : CULN 110, 275. 3 credits. CULN 275. GARDE MANGER LAB A laboratory approach taken as a co-requisite to Garde Manger Module. Co-Requisite: CULN 274 Lab Fee/Regulation uniform required. 1 credit. CULN 284. ADVANCED BAKING AND PASTRIES Utilizing the student's knowledge and hands-on experience from the basic baking course, emphasis will be placed on the understanding of advanced baking principles, ingredient selection, baking formulas, and furthering the knowledge of pastry shop delicacies and specialty bakeshop items. As in all Culinary and Wine Institute classes, standards of professionalism, sanitation, nutrition, and organization will be emphasized. Pre-requisites: CULN 184/185 Must have completed 184/185 with a grade of 3.5 (B+) or better. This course is registered by instructor permission only. Co-requisite: CULN 285 3 credits CULN 285. ADVANCED BAKING AND PASTRIES LAB A laboratory approach taken as a co-requisite to Advanced Baking. Pre-requisites: CULN 184/185 Must have completed 184/185 with a grade of 2.5 (C+) or better. This course is registered by instructor permission only. Co-requisite: CULN 284 1 credit. CULN 294. ADVANCED CULINARY APPLICATIONS/ MGMT. MODULE Within this course students are introduced to the preparation of classical dishes. Students will plan and produce a menu including costing, pricing, and production scheduling. Participation in food-related events evenings and weekends is required. Pre-requisites: CULN 110, 134/135, 174/175, 184/185, 274/275 By permission only. Co-requisite: CULN 295, 3 credits. CULN 295. ADVANCED CULINARY APPLICATIONS/ MGMT. LAB A laboratory approach taken as a co-requisite to Advanced Culinary Applications/Mgmt. Co-requisite: CULN 294 Lab Fee/Regulation uniform required. 1 credit. CULN 297. ADVANCED WINE AND FOOD APPRECIATION This course continues the study of wines and beverages begun in Introduction to Wines and Beverages. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of beverages with food. The selection of wines to accompany specific foods and menus, cooking with wines and other alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages, and the service of beverages will be key elements to this course. Additional information will be provided to further the study of the production and popularity of wines. Pre-requisite: CULN 197. 3 credits. DANC 100. DANCE APPRECIATION An introduction to dance as an educational, technical, and creative discipline. Course work consists of lecture/ discussion, history, films, papers, group assignments and attendance at live concerts. Participation in movement

experiences including jazz, ballet, modern, and social dance techniques. Intended for non-dance majors. 3 credits. EASP 118. ASTRONOMY This course is an introduction to the study of astronomy. The topics covered are the solar system, planets, and asteroids, pulsars, quasars and Black-holes; and the origin of the Universe. Co-requisite: EASP 119 3 credits EASP 119. ASTRONOMY LAB Laboratory experience to accompany EASP 118. Observations through the observatory. Co-requisite: EASP 118 1 credit EDEC 101. EARLY FOUNDATIONS This course introduces the student to the field of early childhood care and education. An overview of the field will include: history, developmental and learning theory and research; the social, emotional, physical, cognitive, language and creative development of young children; how early childhood professionals and early childhood programs meet the needs of young children and their families, as well as recognize the critical relationships that must be developed; types and organization of Early childhood programs; characteristics of quality early care and education, including the critical importance of play and developmentally appropriate practices; current issues of the profession; cultural awareness, diversity and sensitivity; and the importance of ethical and professional conduct in the field. Activities (initial lesson planning), appropriate materials and strategies, and standards used in the early childhood profession are introduced. 3 credits. EDEC 103. LANGUAGE AND LITERACY I This course provides a solid foundation in the theoretical and pedagogical underpinnings of best practices that support language and literacy acquisition from birth through the early primary grades, with a special focus on how language contributes to literacy attainment. The use of children's literature (picture book genre) in the language arts curricula receives special attention. There is also a focus on the development of the skills of speaking, listening, writing, reading, and viewing, essential components of literacy. Students will utilize several checklists to evaluate children's speech and language learning and conduct appropriate literacy assessments on children and programs. The importance of family literacy partnerships and the significance of meeting the needs of second language learners and bilingual children will be addressed. Knowledge regarding content, instructional strategies, age-appropriate materials, and technology for intentional teaching will be discussed and practiced. Practicum required. Pre-requisites: EDEC 101 except with permission of instructor 3 credits. EDEC 105. HEALTH AND WELLNESS This course focuses on promotion and maintenance of physical activity, health, safety, and nutrition of young children. It provides an overview of the basic principles and best practices of physical education, health, safety, and nutrition utilized in early childhood and primary-aged settings caring for children from birth to age nine. The course work is informed by the following: National Health Education Standards; National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) standards; NAEYC health and safety accreditation standards; Pennsylvania Learning Standards; and DPW regulations. Topics covered include:

Course Descriptions

55

Physical Education-recognition of the importance of physical education and the goal of life-long physical fitness; knowledge about and ability to provide physical education and movement activities aimed at promoting increased motor development and competence; strategies used to encourage children and families to foster life-long habits of health and well-being; and impact of inactivity on all domains of development. Health and Safety- knowledge about common childhood illnesses and communicable diseases; preventive health and safety measures; record keeping, supervision and reporting (including mandated child abuse reporting); arrangement and maintenance of indoor and outdoor equipment; knowledge about basic first aid and emergency procedures; and identification of dangers specific to developmental stages and individual needs. Nutrition- identifying nutritional needs of young children; planning nutritional and culturally sensitive snacks and meals; and discussing nutrition related issues such as obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. 3 credits EDEC 110. FAMILY, SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS This course deals with the critical importance of communicating, collaborating, and working with families of young children in the care of adults in out-of-home settings. Respecting the diversity and cultural beliefs of families is a critical part of developmentally appropriate practices. Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory framework will help students develop a broader perspective on the multifaceted context of children's lives. Techniques for working cooperatively with families will be discussed and current issues in family relations and parenting will be addressed. The issues affecting young children include, but are not limited to, the topics of divorce, single-parent families, death of parent, adoption, poverty, drug and alcohol abuse, physical and sexual abuse, cigarette smoke exposure, and diverse family structures. Students will research and identify various resources (local, state and national) that available to support the various needs of families. The NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct will be examined as a tool for decision-making. . In addition, students will participate in preparing and presenting a family night informational program. This course is conducted in a seminar format. Practicum required. 3 credits. EDEC 202. CREATIVE ACTIVITIES This course is designed to help the student gain experience in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate creative activities which can be used with young children, ages 3 to 8, focusing especially on the areas of art, music, movement, food (nutrition) and dramatics. Thematic, integrated, and culturally-sensitive activities will be explored using a "hands-on" and "participatory" approach for the students in a creative arts lab setting. Appropriate responses to children's art work that use the terminology of art elements will be emphasized. Developing an appreciation of aesthetics in classroom environments, project work, and personal lives will be stressed, as well as holistic planning and teaching approaches that enhance young children's creative process abilities in thinking, playing, and meaning-making. Practicum Required. Pre-requisite: EDEC 101, Except with permission of Instructor 3 credits.

EDEC 207. OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT This course focuses on the importance of assessment that is done through the techniques of observation, recording and documentation. Authentic assessment, the documentation of children's learning in naturalistic settings and via nonnumerical instruments, will be stressed. Students will learn about different methods and tools for recording observations as they complete a practicum in a local early childhood program. Using observation as a method of understanding and assessing children's development and learning, as well as transforming the collected data into curricula and individual educational plans will be addressed. The importance of confidentiality and professional ethical behavior will also be topics of discussion. Practicum is required. 3 credits EDEC 210. EDUCARE FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS This course introduces students to the field of the educare of infants and toddlers with a special focus on the critical factor of building trusting relationships with infants, toddlers and their families. Students will strengthen observation skills, read and discuss past and current research and trends in infant/toddler care, and examine pre and post-natal factors which can affect a child's development. They will increase their knowledge about the developmental needs of infants and toddlers and explore program guidelines which are required in caring for infants and toddlers. Students will apply theory to practice as they plan and implement developmentally appropriate activities based on the needs of a specific child or group of children within their field setting and complete a case study. Special attention will be given to respectful and responsive relationships, the child and care giving routines as the source for curriculum; intentional and purposeful interactions (the why of doing activities), and the environment as a teaching tool. Practicum Required: A minimum of 20 hours will be spent in the field experience, preferably in an accredited NAEYC site, or one seeking accreditation, a STARS program, or a licensed family day care home. Pre-requisites: EDEC 101, 207 except with permission of Instructor 3 credits EDEC 220. EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM I In this course students will acquire an understanding of the critical role that play has on young children's development and learning. Pre-service teachers examine how children's play can be facilitated and evaluated in a play-based and integrated curriculum, research and design lessons and themes/projects that include play as an integral component, compare the qualitative and quantitative differences between play that occurs in different settings, research the importance of outdoor play, and design an ideal learning environment for young children. Curriculum models (past and present) will be researched, the role of intentional teaching , and children's approaches to learning will be examined. Multicultural teaching and learning will also be a topic of interest as students investigate the "isms" which impact decisionmaking. By participating in anti-bias activities, students will learn the importance of including all families, children, and cultures in early childhood programs. Finally, the impact of learning standards on curriculum will be discussed as students examine the NAEYC and NAECS/SDE joint position statement on the topic, as well as the PA standards for Preschool. Pre-requisites: EDEC 101, 103, 105, 202, 207 3 credits

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Course Descriptions

CHILD DEVELOPMENT/BEHAVIOR GUIDANCE This course covers theories of early childhood development in the areas of physical/motor, cognitive, and language, with special emphasis given to the social and emotional domains and competence. Each area of development will be assessed by students using documentation panels. The importance of realistic expectations for children's behavior will utilize a developmental context to examine practical principles and techniques for developmentally appropriate guidance. Strategies will be introduced which enable preservice teachers to help children to do the following: maintain positive social interactions through the development of social competence and pro-social skills; develop initial conflict resolution skills; and strengthen self-regulation, self-concept, and self-motivation skills. Pre-service teachers will learn to identify the normal behaviors children utilize as they engage in the socialization process and learn how their own behaviors in reacting to children's actions impacts development. An indepth case study on one child's behavior will require pre and post evaluation and a behavior guidance plan will be written and submitted as part of a teaching portfolio. Practicum Required Pre-requisites: EDEC 101, 103, 105, 202, 207 3 credits EDEC 240. EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTINGS This course focuses on working with young children with special needs from 0-6 years of age and provides an overview of history, laws, definitions, methodologies, trends, issues and research. Various categories of disabilities including physical and learning disabilities, cognitive delays, autism, behavioral disorders, attention deficit disorders, visual/ hearing impairments, and giftedness will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on learning methods for adapting home and classroom environments to meet the specific needs of identified children and developing teaching strategies that accommodate individual needs and enhance learning opportunities. Practicum Required. Pre-requisites: EDEC 101, 103, 105, 202, 207 3 credits EDEC 260. METHODOLOGY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD CLASSROOMS This course examines the methodology of teaching an integrated curriculum based on the emerging interests and needs of preschool children. Pre-service teachers will work with co-operating teachers and children to plan and implement a long-term theme or project. The content areas of math, science, social studies, language arts and creative processes will be integrated utilizing discovery methods, facilitated learning, and hands-on experiences in a preschool setting. Students will observe and document the children's learning, create a discovery center, and collect data for documentation panels. The use of technology as a viable learning tool for young children will also be explored. This class must be taken at the conclusion of the student's educational course work because the Student Portfolio is finalized with supporting data from this experience prior to Student Teaching. Practicum Required. Pre-requisites: EDEC 101, 103, 105, 202, 207, 220, 230 & ESPE 110 3 credits

EDEC 230.

PRE-SERVICE TEACHING IN CHILD CARE AND SEMINAR This course is designed as a full-time field experience providing the student with responsibility for the day-to-day care and education of young children and the ongoing assessment of children to document learning. This experience is viewed as an opportunity for intentional teaching as the student applies cumulative knowledge of theory, and strategies in order to gain professional expertise The student teaching experience for the associate degree program does not equate to the student teaching experience of the B.A. program. Pre-requisites-All other EDEC and ESPE course work 6 credits ECON 105. MACROECONOMICS A study of mixed capitalism in aggregate form designed to provide the student with knowledge of the American economic system. Topics include the causes of recession, unemployment, inflation, and the uses of fiscal and monetary policies. 3 credits. ECON 106. MICROECONOMICS A course emphasizing the economic activities of individual consumers and producers. Topic coverage includes demandsupply analysis, the costs of production, and price and output determination by the market structure. 3 credits. EDUC 102. CRITICAL AND EVALUATIVE READING This course builds the critical thinking skills for the reading of expository text and a variety of fictional genre. Course includes application analysis, synthesis and evaluation. 3 credits. EDUC 211. COMPUTERS FOR TEACHERS This course will help education students develop the technology competencies identified by the ISTE/NETS standards as important for teachers. Students will use basic software productivity tools such as word processing, databases, and spreadsheets to accomplish personal and professional tasks, identify how particular technologies could help them achieve instructional goals, design technologybased inquiry lessons, use web-editing software to create a teacher web page, evaluate educational software, identify technology related legal and ethical issues, and use technology tools for collecting and communicating student performance data. 3 credits ENGL 098. DEVELOPMENTAL WRITING Students whose writing abilities fall below acceptable standards for college-level writing coursework build skills in the development of ideas, fluidity of expression, and coherence of the whole work. Emphasis is placed on understanding audience, developing detail, and increasing skills in the conventions of sentence, paragraph, and basic essay construction. Credits do not count toward graduation. 3 credits. ENGL 101. COLLEGE WRITING I First in a sequence of practical experiences in academic writing. Emphasis on creating goals and planning for writing tasks, as well as producing essays of exposition, argument and problem solution. 3 credits. ENGL 102. COLLEGE WRITING II Further development of experiences in writing for academic disciplines. Includes reading and thinking critically, accessing and using information in the construction of essays and research papers. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101. 3 credits.

EDEC 275.

Course Descriptions

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ENGL 103. WESTERN CLASSICS A study of major writers of the Western World from Homer to modern times, with attention given to their individual achievements and contributions to Western literary and cultural development. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101, 102. 3 credits. ENGL 107. WORLD CLASSICS An opportunity to read deeply into literary traditions and to make connections and distinctions between different traditions in non-western literatures, Including selections from South America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, India, and Asia. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101, 102. 3 credits. ENGL 204. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE This is a survey course designed to familiarize students with the lives, works, and related scholarship concerning major African American authors such as August Wilson, Langston Hughes, Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Gwendolyn Brooks, Lorraine Hansberry, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and Maya Angelou. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101, 102, 103. 3 credits ENGL 296. INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING Examination of the fundamentals essential in the art of fiction and poetry writing through the reading and discussion of work by contemporary writers and through the development and critiquing of students' own writing in a workshop setting. 3 credits. FNUT 131. INTRODUCTION TO NUTRITION This course is designed for students who are not health science majors and focuses on consumer issues related to foods and nutrition. In discussing the role of nutrients in health promotion, menu planning and disease prevention, it includes critical information which will help consumers and food related professionals to sort out nutrition advice, concepts, principles, and strategies which will enable the consumer to personalize their food choices. Consumer and commercial food and nutrition trends, cultural eating styles and other food choice factors are stressed in the curriculum. An open nutrition elective for all students. A requirement for Family& Consumer Sciences majors except Dietetics. 3 credits. FPM 209. Housekeeping Operations and Management An intensive overview of the housekeeping function and the cost analysis of effective staffing and operations in the maintenance of a physical plant. The course offers a variety of methods and specific activities to orient participants to the essentials of cost effective quality management with regard to housekeeping operations and function. The care and use of commercial housekeeping will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT. 101 or permission. 3 credits. HDFR 110. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT A survey of the processes and outcomes of development from conception through death. Emphasis is on the interaction between individual potential and the social and natural environments. Course includes theoretical perspectives, relevant research, and issues such as child-rearing, family life, schooling, sexuality, sex-role stereotyping, and myths about maturity and aging. 3 credits.

HIST 101. U.S. HISTORY I: TO 1865 A survey of the major issues and problems of the American past from the origins of the American Revolution through the Civil War, including the awakening of nationalism, sectionalism, slavery, and American expansionism. 3 credits. HIST 102. U.S. HISTORY II: 1865-1945 A survey of some of the major problems of American life, including Reconstruction. America's emergence as a world power, Progressivism, and the New Deal. 3 credits. HIST 103. U.S. HISTORY III: SINCE 1945 A study of major developments in America from 1945 through the 1980's. Attention is given to the Cold War, the Eisenhower era, the turbulent 60's, and the Nixon era. 3 credits. HIST 105. EUROPEAN HISTORY TO THE RENAISSANCE This course surveys the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean and the feudal kingdoms that developed after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire. Particular attention is given to political, cultural, and religious institutions and the origins of the great powers of the 20th century Europe. 3 credits. HIST 106. EUROPEAN HISTORY SINCE THE RENAISSANCE This course traces the transformation of Western societies from traditional, rural, and agrarian societies into modern, urban, and industrial states. Emphasis is placed on the political, intellectual, economic, and social forces that have shaped the modern Western World. 3 credits. HIST 109. WORLD HISTORY III: TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD An examination of the major political, social, and economic movements of the twentieth century. Special attention will be paid to the organization of political states in the wake of World War I and the regional variations of political ideologies such as Communism, Fascism, and Democracy. The interaction of economies, technologies, and industries will be evaluated as well. 3 credits. HRIM 100. INTRODUCTION TO THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY This course will familiarize the student with past and current developments in the hospitality industry, introduce basic systems, and analyze operations. It will present the role of management in the marketing of services to the hotel and restaurant guest and patron. Guest speakers accent lectures and lift students' awareness about important issues in the hospitality field. Lab required. Minimum travel fees. 3 credits. HRIM 101. APPLIED SERVICE METHODOLOGY This course is designed to give a hands-on introduction to front-of-the-house restaurant operations. This lab covers topics such as host/hostess training, waiter/waitress training, American/French/Russian service, front-of-the-house, tableware/equipment, and buffets/banquets. Lab fee. Uniform required. 1 credit. HRIM 175. HOSPITALITY ENGINEERING This course is a practical study into the engineering systems, maintenance requirements, and sanitation requirements of the hospitality facility. It helps build a strong working relationship between the hospitality manager and repair personnel, maintenance personnel, architects, contractors, equipment dealers, and health authorities. 3 credits.

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Course Descriptions

HRIM 201. HOTEL ROOMS MANAGEMENT An emphasis on introducing students to the fundamentals and operation of the hotel room division from a managerial perspective. Primary concern is that the student understands how different departments within the hotel interact and why coordination, communication, record keeping and management are so important. Pre-requisite: MIS 101 and ACCT 101. Minimum travel fees. 3 credits. HRIM 202. FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT I Application of concepts related to the operation and handling of foods for restaurant use. Food selection, preparation, sanitation, and usage are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on measurements, proper application, and techniques. Food cost and recipe conversion are addressed. Co-requisite: HRIM 203. 3 credits. HRIM 203. FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT I LAB Lab time emphasizes techniques discussed in lectures. Lab fee. Regulation uniforms required. 1 credit. HRIM 212. PURCHASING FOR THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY This course takes a managerial approach to the purchasing function. It studies purchasing objectives, department organization, cost controls, and supervision. It also provides product information on food and non-food items used in the hospitality industry. 3 credits. HRIM 223. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT This course provides an introduction to organizational behavior, selection and placement of personnel, work analysis, and design. Management basics with regard to regularly applied and accepted practices are discussed. 3 credits. HRIM 270. SEMINAR IN HOSPITALITY LEGAL ISSUES AND COST CONTROLS Introduction to hospitality management and legal issues pertaining to the accounting, financial and operational data used in planning, problem solving, and decision making of the industry's uniform systems of accounting. The course introduces the issues and aspects of the laws affecting the industry, including government regulations and the insurance industry and thus reviewed in how they affect the hospitality industry. 3 credits. HRIM 295. HOTEL/RESTAURANT CO-OP This is an individual work-study experience in a hospitality facility. The student is provided with training and on-the-job learning. Coordinated and supervised by the Career Services Dept. 3 credits. MATH 099. BASIC MATHEMATICS This course emphasizes the acquisition and development of basic mathematical, geometric and algebraic skills. This course involves teaching the skills of problem solving related to percentages, proportions, rates, and averages; the skills for interpreting data involving graphs and tables, and skills for working with basic algebra. Credits do not count toward graduation. 3 credits. MATH 100. BUSINESS MATHEMATICS An introduction to the mathematics used in business applications. Topics include: review of the number systems, decimals, fractions, percents, interest, pricing, annuities, depreciation, inventory control, investments, insurance, and statistics. Does not satisfy bachelor degree math requirement. Credits are not transferable to the Erie Campus. 3 credits.

MATH 102. ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA The course deals with the fundamental operations of algebra and the applications of these operations. Number systems, fractions, linear equations, linear inequalities, graphs, exponents and polynomial expressions are studied. No student with two or more years of secondary mathematics should take this course. Does not meet the mathematics liberal studies requirement for the baccalaureate program. 3 credits. MATH 108. MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM-SOLVING An introduction to applications of mathematics. Topics selected from algebraic functions (linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic) and their graphs and applications, introductory trigonometry and applications, arithmetic and geometric growth, linear programming, applications to finance, counting principles, applications of data analysis, basic probability and statistics, calculus techniques, and graph theory. Satisfies the mathematics common core or distribution core requirement. Pre-requisite: One year of college preparatory mathematics that includes Algebra or MATH 102 Elementary Algebra. For non-science and non-mathematics majors. 3 credits. MATH 109. STATISTICS This course is an introduction to the uses of statistics and probability as decision and problem-solving tools. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; variability; probability; counting; binomial distribution; normal distribution; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; hypothesis testing, statistical inference, sampling techniques and experimental design. Satisfies the mathematics common core or distribution core requirements. Pre-requisite: One year of college preparatory mathematics that includes Algebra or MATH 102 Elementary Algebra. 3 credits. MED 101. MEDICAL OFFICE CLINICAL PROCEDURES This course consists of a study of theoretical and practical knowledge of the clinical procedures necessary to assist the physician in caring for patients in the medical office. 3 credits. MED 102. MEDICAL OFFICE CLINICAL PROCEDURES LAB This course serves to help students better visualize and utilize the information studied in MED 101. 1 credit. MED 103. MEDICAL OFFICE DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES This course will introduce students to the basic principles of medical lab procedures, and enable them to develop an understanding of the reasons for certain lab procedures and the skills needed to perform them. Emphasis will be placed on basic techniques of laboratory practice, quality control, basic instrumentation, and current advances in testing procedures. 3 credits. MGMT 120. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT An introduction designed to provide basic understanding of the principles, concepts, and functions of management planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, with emphasis on managing and of being managed. 3 credits. MGMT 206. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Examination of the basic personnel processes involved in the selection, development and maintenance of human resources. Emphasis on managerial and legal requirements. 3 credits.

Course Descriptions

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MGMT 226. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATION A study of the individual as a functioning member of groups and organizations. Topics include organizational culture, motivation, group dynamics, communication, leadership, and conflict. Pre-requisite: MGMT 120. 3 credits. MIS 101. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS This introductory computer course provides students with a working knowledge of computer terminology, and the computer itself. Topics also include Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office, Word, Excel, Access and Power-Point and their applications in business. Materials fee. Offered every term for those with no/little previous computer experience or only Word experience. 3 credits. MIS103. COMPUTER SKILLS AND APPLICATIONS This introductory computer course provides students with a working knowledge of computer terminology, and the computer itself. Topics include: Office Fundamentals, Word, and Excel. 1 credit MIS 106. WEB MANAGEMENT I This course introduces the student to the basics of web page creation using current markup standards. Students will design, maintain, and upgrade web pages, using both text editors and design programs. Pages will be displayed on our local server. Applies to associate degree only. 3 credits. MIS 107. WEB MANAGEMENT II This course is designed to provide a guide for the beginning programmer to develop web applications using the Java programming language. Students will focus on sound programming concepts and syntax. Applies to associate degree only. 3 credits. MIS 108. WEB MANAGEMENT III This course introduces students to web scripting languages such as VbScript, JavaScript, and Perl. The focus will be on how scripts are integrated into web pages in order to make them dynamic and interactive. Applies to associate degree only. 3 credits. MIS 110. ADVANCED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS This course focuses on the use of spreadsheets and databases to manage information. Topics studied include systems analysis, basic database design, and applications development using Microsoft Excel and Access. Prerequisite: MIS 101 or Word and Excel basics. Computer Exam Fee fee applies. 3 credits. MIS 125. VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING I An introduction to the Visual Basic programming language, with an emphasis on the development of good programming habits and skills. Topics will include the development of graphical user interfaces and the understanding of fundamental programming concepts such as variables, decisions, conditions, loops, sub procedures, arrays, data files. Pre-requisites: MATH 111 or permission 3 credits. MIS 140. COMPUTER OPERATIONS This course introduces the basics of computer architecture and how software enables it to function. Students will gain knowledge and skill in configuring computer hardware components, including drives, motherboards, memory, network/communications, interfaces, printers and other

peripherals. Students will install and evaluate software. Students will use software utilities to do diagnostics, perform backups, and utilities for security and virus detection. Pre-requisite: MIS 110 as a co-requisite or permission of department. 3 credits. MIS 202. COMPUTER OPERATIONS II This course builds upon the skills developed in MIS 105. Students will advance their knowledge of computer architecture, hardware components, network/communications interfaces, and diagnostics. Students will be actively involved in the application of concepts learned. 3 credits. MIS 203. COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS/ ISSUES This course enables students to explore current computer issues utilizing trade journal research and the Internet. Topics covered will include help desk management, application of technology to company strategy, and ethical issues. Computer System Support fee applies. 3 credits. MIS 204. COMPUTERIZED DESKTOP PUBLISHING Students will learn to scan and manipulate photographs using photo editing software. They will also learn to "color correct" photos; "mask image" using channels, apply filters, create duotone, tritone and quadtone images, create layers, and prepare photos for use in print and on the Web. Students will apply basic fundamentals of color theory, commercial publishing, and graphic layout and design to create professional quality documents such as business cards, letter head, newsletters, flyers, package design and booklets using page layout software. *This course does not count as a major course in the BA Computer Systems. MIS 206. WEB DATA MANAGEMENT The course will focus on how a web page communicates with a database. The student will learn to implement ready-to-use code modules enabling data-base connectivity. Applies to associate degree only. 3 credits. MIS 207. WEB MANAGEMENT IV This course focuses on the tools and technologies available for web development. Students will develop, design, and implement interactive websites. Applies to associate degree only. 3 credits. MIS 260. NETWORKS This is a study of the theory and utilization of computer networks. Topics include network hardware components, network standards form ISO-OSI and IEEE, networking protocols: channel access methods, Ethernet, and TCP/IP Internet tools, peer to peer networking, network management, network routing and virtual circuits. Network software utilized in the course will include Windows 2003 server, Windows XP and Linux. Pre-requisite: MIS 110 and MIS 105 or permission of the department. 3 credits. MIS 275. COMPUTER SYSTEMS SUPPORT INTERNSHIP The student will complete a 200-hour internship in a regular business setting, providing training and experience for the student. Opportunities will include (but not be limited to) businesses in computer sales, computer repair, or those which heavily use computers on a day-to-day basis. 3 credits.

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Course Descriptions

MKTG 162.

PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATED MARKETING A broad study of the field of marketing from a managerial perspective. Emphasis is on demand analysis, need satisfaction, strategic planning, product development, distribution channels, promotions, and price determination. 3 credits. MLT 111. CLINICAL LABORATORY I This course will be an introductory level course designed to teach the basic functions of the clinical laboratory. It will cover specimen collection, handling, and preparation. The course will go on to incorporate Urinalysis, basic Hematology and Coagulation principles as well as an overview of Immunology, Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Parasitology. These subjects will all be covered more in depth in their individual course titles. 3 credits MLT 112. CLINICAL LABORATORY II Clinical laboratory II introduces the student to the basic laboratory concepts as they apply to the clinical laboratory with an emphasis on clinical microbiology and clinical chemistry techniques. 3 credits MLT 151. CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY I This course designed to prepare the student to gain a general understanding of and apply laboratory principles as they apply to Clinical Microbiology. This course will prepare the student for identification of microorganisms, parasites, and fungi (pathogens and common non-pathogens associated with human disease). 3 credits MLT 152. CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY II This course designed to prepare the student to gain a more in-depth understanding of and apply laboratory principles as they apply to Clinical Microbiology. This is a course on the isolation and identification processes of microorganisms causing disease (pathogens). Topics include microbes and the environment, specimen collection, normal flora, characterization of specific pathogens, biochemical tests, and the rationale for determining the pathogenicity of organisms. 3 credits MLT 161. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY I This course designed to prepare the student to gain a general understanding of and apply chemical principles in the study of clinical chemistry. This is a course on quality control in the laboratory, normal and abnormal body chemistry, the pathophysiology of disease of major body systems, manual and simple automated clinical chemistry techniques. 3 credits MLT162. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY II This course designed to prepare the student to gain broader understanding of and apply chemical principles in the study of clinical chemistry. The classroom approach will be to cover in depth the subjects of Enzymes, Tumor Markers, Carbohydrates, Lipids, Electrolytes, Kidney Function, Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, Molecular Diagnostics, and Nucleic Acid Biochemistry. 3 credits MLT 220. CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY This course designed to prepare the student to gain a general understanding of and apply hematology principles and applications for use in laboratory medicine. A course on the formation and maturation of blood cells, basic laboratory hematologic techniques and disorders of erythrocytes, leukocytes, plasma, and hemostasis. 3 credits

MLT 225. EROLOGY/BLOOD BANKING This course designed to prepare the student to gain a general understanding of and apply serology and blood banking principles in the study of clinical serology and blood bank. This is a course on immune mechanisms, classification of immunologic phenomena in clinical medicine. Topics will include human blood grouping, compatibility testing, and blood component therapy. 3 credits MLT 250. CLINICAL LABORATORY SEMINAR Clinical Laboratory Seminar builds upon the knowledge base the student possesses from passing all the MLT classes up to this point. It provides an opportunity for self-exploration of special topics of interest to the student with which they will gain a broader understanding of laboratory medicine. 3 credits MLT 251. CLINICAL LABORATORY EXTERNSHIP This course is primarily a fieldwork externship in which the student will rotate through various clinical laboratory settings in which they will be able to gain valuable hand-on experience. This course is designed to be very individualized and the students will be accountable for their own objectives based learning. The Clinical laboratory externship will emphasize the basic laboratory principles upon which the students can build a broader understanding of laboratory medicine. 9 credits MUS 100. MUSIC APPRECIATION A survey of musical materials, forms, styles, and instruments. Includes discussion and listening of major works from various periods of musical composition. Designed for non-majors. 3 credits. MUS 140. LARGE ENSEMBLE Students learn and perform selected literature for programs on campus and in the community. Open to all Mercyhurst students by audition. 1 credit per term. NURS 101. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING PRACTICE Introduction to Nursing Practice is the initial nursing course designed to prepare the student to provide nursing care to clients across the life span and the Health-Illness continuum. The course introduces the student to the history of nursing, human need theory, the nursing process, normal nutrition, physical assessment, communication, and health promotion skills as they relate to the nurse's role as a health care provider. In addition, the learners are introduced to the values of truth, individual integrity, human dignity, mercy, and justice. 6 credits. NURS 102. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING CLINICAL LAB The clinical laboratory component of Nursing 101 is designed to assist the student in the development of basic level insight/ interpersonal knowledge/intellectual, technical and vision/ management skills which are used in the implementation of the nursing process to care for clients. Each subsequent clinical course builds on these four skill areas. Clinical experiences take place in simulated lab, long-term agencies, and day care settings. 0 credits NURS 202. HEALTH MAINTENANCE OF CLIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEALTH DEVIATIONS This course is designed to assist the student in the development of skills and knowledge necessary to maintain the maximum degree of function and need fulfillment for clients with chronic illness. Theory focuses on the chronically

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ill individuals who have partially unfulfilled needs of selfesteem, coping/adaptation, autonomy/choice, activity, sleep, freedom from pain, wholesome body image, nutrition, elimination and sensory integrity. 6 credits. NURS 203. HEALTH MAINTENANCE OF CLIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEALTH DEVIATIONS CLINICAL LAB The clinical experiences designed to compliment the theory presented in Nursing 202. These learning opportunities with chronically ill children and adults take place in the community and include clinics, rehabilitation centers, children's hospital, and acute care settings and simulated lab experiences. 0 credits NURS 209. PN TO RN ROLE TRANSITIONS This course is designed to assist the Licensed Practical Nurse to successfully transition to the role of Registered Nurse. The conceptual framework of the Associate Degree Nursing Program is discussed. The student compares and contrasts the differences in responsibilities of the Registered Nurse and PN. The nursing process is presented as framework for registered nurse practice. Physical exam skills are presented in detail. Critical thinking skills are developed through theory, discussion, simulations and clinical practice activities. The student learns appropriate leadership and management techniques inherent to the role of a registered nurse. Clinical activities take place in simulated lab and an acute care facility. 4 credits. NURS 210. PN TO RN ROLE TRANSITIONS CLINICAL LAB The clinical experiences designed to compliment the theory presented in Nursing 209. Clinical activities take place in a simulated lab and an acute care facility. 0 credits NURS 215. HEALTH RESTORATION OF CLIENTS WITH ACUTE HEALTH DEVIATIONS This course focuses on the restoration of need fulfillment in clients/families across the life span when needs for safety and love and belonging are unfulfilled because of acute/ simple health deviations. Learning experiences addressed in the course include caring for the childbearing family and for clients/families whose needs are unfulfilled because of surgery. The learner applies knowledge of developmental crisis theory and the need for love and belonging as they relate to the childbearing family. In addition, the learner applies knowledge of situational crisis theory and the need for safety for clients/families across the life span that must experience surgery. Learning experiences are structured to allow the student to acquire basic technical health restoration skills and further develop insight/interpersonal skills to explore implicitly expressed needs with clients/families. Critical thinking and organizational skills are facilitated as the student manages clinical care of more than one client. Intellectual skills needed to individualize a plan of care for a client are introduced. 9 credits. NURS 216. HEALTH RESTORATION OF CLIENTS WITH ACUTE HEALTH DEVIATIONS CLINICAL LAB The clinical experiences are designed to compliment the theory presented in Nursing 215. Clinical experiences take place in the gyn/obstetrical, pediatric orthopedic center, and medical/surgical units in an acute care settings as well as in simulated clinical experiences. 0 credits.

NURS 220.

HEALTH RESTORATION OF CLIENTS WITH ACUTE/COMPLEX HEALTH DEVIATIONS ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN This course focuses on the care of client/families across the life span who are experiencing the following unmet needs for: rationality, conceptualization, interchange of gases, fluid and electrolyte balance, and spiritual integrity. High-level critical thinking skills are the knowledge/intellectual skills needed to develop comprehensive plans of care. The student learns complex health restoration skills that are directed toward meeting unfulfilled needs in the management of more than one client with complex health deviations. Insight/ interpersonal skills facilitate the client/family's ability to cope with complex health deviations 9 credits. NURS 221. HEALTH RESTORATION OF CLIENTS WITH ACUTE/COMPLEX HEALTH DEVIATIONS ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN CLINICAL LAB The clinical experiences are designed to compliment the theory presented in Nursing 220. Clinical experiences take place in psychiatric inpatient and outpatient settings, acute medical floors, pediatric units and in the client's home. Simulated lab experiences are also a component of this course. 0 credits NURS 225. HEALTH RESTORATION OF CLIENTS/ FAMILIES ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN WITH MULTIPLE UNFULFILLED NEEDS RELATED TO ACUTE/COMPLEX HEALTH DEVIATIONS WITH MULTISYSTEM IMPLICATIONS This course is designed to assist the learner in the development of nursing strategies required to care for clients/families with multiple unfulfilled needs with multisystem implications. Emphasis is placed on the health needs of clients/families across the life span with altered neurological status, cardiac deviations, and/or trauma that require complex health restoration nursing interventions based on a high level of problem-solving skills. The learner is given the opportunity to perfect organizational skills in the clinical management of multiple clients/families. Appropriate pharmacological and dietary interventions are integrated into the content areas. 9 credits. NURS 226. HEALTH RESTORATION OF CLIENTS/ FAMILIES ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN WITH MULTIPLE UNFULFILLED NEEDS RELATED TO ACUTE/COMPLEX HEALTH DEVIATIONS WITH MULTISYSTEM IMPLICATIONS CLINICAL LAB The clinical experiences are designed to compliment the theory presented in Nursing 225. Clinical experiences take place in simulated lab, intensive care settings and acute care facilities. 0 credits ORI 100. Freshman Experience This course introduces the first year student to the nature of college education and general orientation to the functions, support services, and resources of the college as a whole. General study skills topics will be presented to aid in student success. This course provides a support group for students by examining problems common to the first year experience. 1 credit.

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Course Descriptions

OTA 101.

INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY This course introduces the student to the profession of occupational therapy (OT) and the role of the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) as a health care provider and member of a treatment team. The history, philosophy and major theories of occupational therapy are presented. Areas of practice, ethics and current trends of the health care delivery as they relate to OT are presented. Medical terminology is covered in this course. 5 Credits. Pre-requisites: BIO 240/241, BIO 250/251, and admittance into the OTA Program OTA 201. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 2: PSYCHOSOCIAL/MENTAL HEALTH This course will provide the student with an overview of the role of occupational therapy within the mental health/ psychosocial area. The student will be presented with diagnosis, symptom, medication, and OT remediation of dysfunction in this area. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 Credits. Pre-requisite: OTA 101, BIO 240/241, 250/251 and PSYC 101, 211 Co-requisite: OTA 211 OTA 202. OTA PRINICIPLES AND SKILLS 3: PHYSICAL DISABILITIES This course will provide the student with an overview of the role and responsibilities of the occupational therapy assistant within the physical disabilities area. The student will gain understanding of various types of physical disabilities, the theoretical basis for how to intervene with these populations, the evaluations and therapeutic interventions provided within the framework of occupational therapy, and will become adept at using professional terminology used within this practice realm. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 Credits Pre-requisite: BIO 240, 241, BIO 250, 251, OTA 101, 201 and PSYC 101, 211 Co-requisite: OTA 212 OTA 203. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 4: PEDIATRICS This course will provide the occupational therapy assistant student with an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the occupational therapy assistant with the 0-21 year old population, with the focus on infants, pre-school and school aged individuals. Through lecture and lab experiences, the student will gain a basic understanding of diagnosis groups, evaluation, therapeutic interventions and techniques, and frames of reference that apply for work with this population. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 Credits Pre-requisite: BIO 240, 241, BIO 250, 251, OTA 101, 210, 211, 202, 212, PSYC 101, 211, HDFR 110 Co-requisite: OTA 213 OTA 204. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 5: AGING POPULATIONS This course will provide the OTA student with an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the OTA when working with the aging population. Through lecture, lab, and observational experiences, the OTA student will gain an understanding of diagnosis groups, evaluations, therapeutic activities, frames of reference and the differences between working with this ever growing part of the US population. 2 Credits

Pre-requisite: BIO 240,241, BIO 250,251, OTA 202, PSYC 101, 211. SOC 101, HDFR 110 Co-requisite: OTA 214 OTA 205. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY This course will provide the OTA student with a general overview of professional issues, health-related research endeavors, licensure and certification, legislative initiatives and legal issues, practice domain concerns, and the roles and responsibilities that reflect the current arena of healthcare for the entry-level OTA. This is the capstone course of the program. 2 Credits. Pre-requisite: All other OTA courses. OTA 211. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 2: PSYCHOSOCIAL/MENTAL HEALTH The student will, through lab experiences, gain basic skills in a logical and sequential manner in which to conduct group activities with a variety of client mental health diagnosis groups across the lifespan. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 Credits. Pre-requisite: OTA 101, BIO 240/241, 250/251 and PSYC 101, 211 Co-requisite: OTA 201 OTA 212. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 3: PHYSICAL DISABILITIES LAB In lab experiences, the student will gain familiarity with splinting, use of basic therapeutic physical agent modalities, and the use of functional muscle testing, range of motion and strength measurements, and additional testing used for clients with physical disabilities. This course will encompass techniques that are applicable when working with physically disabled clients across the lifespan and with a variety of physical disabilities. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 credits Pre-requisite: BIO 240, 241, BIO 250, 251, OTA 101, 201 and PSYC 101, 211 Co-requisite: OTA 202 OTA 213. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 4: PEDIATRICS LAB In lab experiences, the student will gain simulated and handon opportunities to learn, practice and refine intervention and interaction techniques. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 Credits. Pre-requisite: BIO 240, 241, BIO 250, 251, OTA 101, 210, 211, 202, 212, PSYC 101, 211, HDFR 110 Co-requisite: OTA 203 OTA 214. OTA PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS 5: AGING POPULATIONS LAB In lab and observational experiences, the student will secure knowledge of how to use the self in a therapeutic manner when working with the elderly client population. Level I clinical placement is included in this course. 2 Credits. Pre-requisite: BIO 240,241, BIO 250,251, OTA 202, PSYC 101, 211. SOC 101, HDFR 110 Co-requisite: OTA 204 OTA 221. LEVEL II FIELDWORK This fieldwork placement is conducted in a setting where OT services are provided and supervised by a licensed OT or OTA. The experience is structured to provide the student with the opportunity to practice skills in the delivery of occupational therapy services. This prepares the student for entry level skill performance. The placement is 8 weeks long, in a full time work environment. 5 credits

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OTA 222. LEVEL III FIELDWORK This fieldwork placement is conducted in a setting where OT services are provided and supervised by a licensed OT or OTA. The experience is structured to provide the student with the opportunity to practice skills in the delivery of occupational therapy services. This prepares the student for entry level skill performance. The placement is 8 weeks long, in a full time work environment. The Level II Fieldwork placements are conducted in two different practice areas. 5 Credits PHIL 100. PHILOSOPHICAL INQUIRY An introduction to philosophy through study of the principles of sound argument, the nature of philosophical perplexity, and selected topics in the theory of knowledge, ethics, metaphysics and the philosophy of religion. Lecture and discussion. 3 credits. PHIL 102. PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN NATURE An examination of issues involving the nature of persons and human existence. Topics include freedom of action, the relationship of human nature to social reality, the extent to which humans are selfish, the nature of genuine self-interest, the basic problem of human existence, the meaning of life and the good life. Lecture and discussion. 3 credits. PHYS 123. UNDERSTANDING PHYSICS This course will examine those laws and principles dealing with motion, forces, fluids and electricity/magnetism. Major topics of study include: measurement units, conversions and experimental errors, forces, Newton's laws of motion, the characteristics of liquids and gases, the flow of fluids under various conditions, the effects of heat and temperature on gases and liquids and the basics of electricity and magnetism. Co-requisite: MATH 102 3 credits. PNG 101. PRACTICAL NURSING I Body Structure and Function I: This course is an introduction to anatomy, physiology, and normal nutrition utilizing the body systems approach with the interrelationship between the body systems emphasized. Basic concepts of chemistry and physics are reviewed. Knowledge of the normal structural and functional units of the body serves as the basis for the application of principles in providing safe, effective nursing care. Nursing Principles I: This course is the initial course designed to prepare the student to provide care across the life span and along the health-illness continuum through understanding of the etiology of illness, the body's response to illness, and common methods of disease prevention. The focus of the course is on understanding the nursing process as it relates to acquiring skills to meet simple nursing needs of adult clients. Students learn to apply knowledge of asepsis and universal precautions, body mechanics, basic nutrition and diet therapy, fluid and electrolyte balance, documentation, basic assessment skills, and CPR. Basic psychological and social concepts as well as fundamental concepts of ethics and legal responsibilities involved in nursing are introduced. Interpersonal relationships and communication skills are stressed along with aspects of personal and vocational growth. The current health care delivery system as it relates to values, influences, changes, and challenges in the areas of personal and community health is discussed, along with the role of the practical nurse in the delivery of care. Clinical experience will be in the acute or long-term care setting. 0 credits.

PNG 102. PRACTICAL NURSING II This course introduces students to those skills needed to provide nursing care to adult clients with moderately complex nursing needs related to elimination, selected emergencies, perioperative care, and death and dying. Students are introduced to pharmacology, drug calculations, and medication administration. Clinical experience will be in acute care settings, long-term care settings, rehabilitation, and various community-based programs. Adult Conditions Of Illness I: This course introduces students to the care required by adult clients with more complex medical-surgical conditions. Psychosocial and developmental needs of adult clients are discussed. Students apply the nursing process in caring for patients with diseases of the respiratory, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Content related to diet modifications, drug therapy, and disease management for these specific diseases is integrated. Information about health care agencies that focus on various conditions discussed in this course, as well as related information on disease prevention, health screenings, health promotion, and patient education is included. Principles of Oncology, Geriatrics, and rehabilitation are presented. Clinical experience will be in acute care settings, long-term care settings, rehabilitation, and various community-based programs. 0 credits. PNG 103. PRACTICAL NURSING III Adult Conditions Of Illness II: This course is a continuation of nursing care for adults with diseases of the cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and integumentary systems. Mental health conditions are discussed. Content related to diet modifications, drug therapy, and disease management for these specific diseases is integrated. Information about health care agencies that focus on various conditions discussed in the course, as well as related information on disease prevention, health screenings, health promotion, and patient education is included. Clinical experience will be in acute care settings, long term care settings, and facilities providing mental health services. The course includes theory and clinical experience in the application of nursing care to adult clients, including the geriatric client, progressing from the simple to the more complex medical and surgical diseases and disorders of the various body systems. Integrated into this course are dietary modifications and the medications used in treating the various conditions. The course also emphasizes the psychosocial and developmental needs of clients as they relate to nursing care. Community health agencies are presented as they relate to various disorders. Basic principles of planning of client care are introduced with a discussion of the leadership and incidental teaching role of the practical nurse. 0 credits PNG 104. PRACTICAL NURSING IV MATERNAL CHILD HEALTH NURSING: Maternity nursing focuses on the care of the mother during the prenatal, labor and delivery, postpartum periods, and the care of the newborn following delivery. The concepts and principles of normal growth and development for the neonate and newborn periods are explored, and include the physical, emotional, psychosexual, mental, and social development of the infant. Clinical experience focuses on care of the mother

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Course Descriptions

during the prenatal, labor and delivery, postpartum period, and care of the newborn following delivery. Pediatric nursing presents an overview of sociology and the effects of family life and the environment on the child. The concepts and principles of normal growth and development for the infant to adolescent are explored and include the physical, emotional, psychosexual, mental, and social development. Conditions of illness are presented within the developmental framework focusing on the etiology, predisposing factors, pathophysiology, disease prevention, early detection, clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, changed in body image, prognosis, complications, applicable nursing diagnoses, treatment, and patient education. Clinical experience utilizes a wide variety of settings both acute care and community based programs. ADVANCED MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING: This course is designed to facilitate the transition from student to graduate. Employment opportunities, applications, resignation protocol, licensure, resumes, and interviews are presented. Leadership and management skills for the practical nurse will be discussed. Acute care and long term care settings will be used for clinical experience to facilitate the development of organizational skills needed to care for multiple patients in both acute and long term care settings. 0 credits. POLI 100. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Introductory course in Political Science stressing how policy-making is done at the national level. Beginning with the Constitution, an introduction is given to the three main branches of the U.S. Government. Attention is also given to elections, political parties, interest groups, and the federal system. 3 credits. POLI 241. COMPARATIVE POLITICS: ASIA A comparative study of a variety of political systems emphasizing Asia. Survey of topics/problems related to economic development, democratization, government structure, and foreign relations with the United States. Specific countries examined include China, Japan, India, Indonesia, and South Korea. 3 credits PSYC 101. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY A general introduction to the science of behavior and mental processes. Topics considered include learning, memory, perception, motivation, personality, psychopathology and social interaction. 3 credits. PSYC 231. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY An introduction to social psychology, how the thoughts, feelings and behavior of an individual are influenced by others. The course investigates social psychological theories, research and applications. Topics include attraction, social influence, person perception, groups, attitudes, altruism, and aggression. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 3 credits. PTA 100. PHYSICAL PRINCIPLES IN PT This course presents physical principles associated with physical therapy. Course content will serve as a foundation for principles revisited in Kinesiology, Orthopedics and Modalities. Special attention is given to topics with direct application for physical therapist assistants. These topics include: motion, force, levers, friction, sound waves, light and electricity. 1 credit.

PTA 101. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY This course presents a general orientation to the profession of physical therapy (PT) and the role of the physical therapist assistant (PTA) as part of the treatment team. The course includes the historical background, professional ethics and development of the profession of PT. Documentation and medical terminology introduced earlier will be revisited. The student will gain an appreciation of the psychosocial issues and cultural diversity in health care, as well as the physical and mechanical principles relative to body function. Topics of instruction includes application techniques for the following interventions and data collection skills: vital signs, basic first aid, positioning, massage, muscle testing, range of motion assessment, reflex testing, sensation testing, flexibility testing, body mechanics, and transfer and gait training with assistive devices. Emphasis will be on interventions of particular significance to the PTA. Pre-requisite: BIO 250/251. Co-requisite: PTA 104 4 lecture credits. PTA 103. HEALTH CARE COMMUNICATIONS This course presents communication strategies and skills essential in today's health care environment. Emphasis is placed on medical terminology, professionalism, communication and documentation in the medical record. 1 credit. PTA 104. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY LAB This lab is designed to provide physical demonstration, instruction and practice of interventions presented in the lecture. Students will learn application techniques for the following topics: vital signs, basic first aid, positioning, massage, muscle testing, range of motion assessment, reflex testing, sensation testing, flexibility testing, body mechanics, and transfer and gait training with assistive devices. Emphasis will be on interventions of particular significance to the PTA. Students must complete competency skills testing for each of the topics studied. Co-requisite: PTA 101. 1 lab credit. PTA 200. KINESIOLOGY This course focuses on the study of human motion, including principles of body mechanics and anatomy in relation to human movement. Strong emphasis is placed on movement analysis and knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy and physiology. A laboratory component is included, in which students will participate in hands on activities including palpation, postural assessment, gait analysis and movement analysis under normal conditions. Pre-requisite: BIO 240/241. 3 lecture credits, PTA 204. KINESIOLOGY LAB Kinesiology lab is designed to assist students in understanding information presented in PTA 200. Emphasis is placed on identification and palpation of body structures using skeletal models and human subjects. The student will also gain experience with postural assessment and gait analysis under normal conditions. Co-requisite: PTA 200. 1 lab credit. PTA 205. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY This course examines the medical, surgical, neurological and multi-system conditions commonly encountered in physical therapy. The disease process, abnormal physiology, diagnostic procedures and medical interventions associated with these clinical conditions will be presented. Emphasis will be on conditions of particular significance to the PTA. Prerequisite: BIO 250/251, PTA 103. 3 credits.

Course Descriptions

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PTA 206. THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES FOR THE PTA In this course students will learn the foundation and rationale for various physical agents utilized in physical therapy treatments. Emphasis during lecture will prepare the student with the knowledge of indications, contraindications, special precautions and implementation of modalities such as: superficial heat and cold, hydrotherapy, traction, short wave diathermy, ultrasound, infrared, ultraviolet, external compression and electrical stimulation currents. Prerequisite: PTA 207. Co-requisite: PTA 216 4 credits. PTA 207. ORTHOPEDICS FOR THE PTA This course provides a sound knowledge base of common orthopedic disorders and disease processes seen in physical therapy practice. The scientific rationale for physical therapy procedures and modalities used in the management of orthopedic injuries will be emphasized. Pre-requisite: PTA 200, PTA 204 4 credits. PTA 208. THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE This course examines the anatomy and physiology of exercise and the principles and application of exercise to pathologic conditions. Exercise techniques used to enhance strength, power, flexibility, endurance, postural control, balance, circulation and coordination are discussed. Development of exercise programs to correct specific postural abnormalities, muscle weakness and joint limitations are emphasized. Corequisite: PTA 218. Pre-requisite: PTA 200. 3 credits. PTA 209. REHABILITATION This course will present numerous specialty areas including vascular disorders, amputations, prosthetics, orthotics, burns, and cardiopulmonary diagnoses. Students will learn specific intervention strategies and data collection skills associated with rehabilitation. Pre-requisite: PTA 206/216, PTA 208/218. 4 credits. PTA 210. NEUROREHAB This course will cover specialty areas specific to neurological dysfunction. Areas of discussion include pediatrics, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, neuromuscular disorders, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Treatment techniques specific to the care of individuals with neurologic conditions will be presented. Pre-requisite: PTA 206/216, PTA 208/218. 4 credits. PTA 211. PTA CLINICAL EDUCATION I The first clinical rotation is a closely supervised clinical experience. A minimum of 160 hours will be completed at a facility emphasizing general medical and orthopedic diagnoses. The experience is structured to provide the student with the opportunity to develop their skills in direct patient care under the supervision of a qualified physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. The student will begin to integrate their knowledge and skill from the classroom/lab to the health care setting. Pre-requisite: PTA 206/216, PTA 208/218. 4 credits. PTA 212. PTA CLINICAL EDUCATION II In the second clinical affiliation, the student will continue to gain exposure to physical therapy practice under the direct supervision of a qualified physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. A minimum of 280 hours will be completed in any type of physical therapy setting. This experience is structured to provide the student with the opportunity to refine their skills in direct patient care and to demonstrate competency in the management of patients with more complex problems. Pre-requisite:PTA 209, PTA 210. 4 credits.

PTA 213. PTA CLINICAL EDUCATION III This course is the third and final clinical affiliation. A minimum of 280 hours will be completed in any type of physical therapy setting. The student will continue to gain exposure to physical therapy practice under the direct supervision of a qualified physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. This experience is structured to provide the student with the opportunity to further refine their skills in direct patient care, develop advanced skills, and to move toward entry-level performance. The student will be challenged in problem solving and critical thinking. Pre-requisite: PTA 212. 4 credits. PTA 214. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES SEMINAR This seminar provides a forum for the discussion of professional issues in physical therapy and health care. Emphasis is placed on continued preparation for the National Physical Therapy Examination and future employment. Comprehensive examinations are provided to assess competency and readiness for the National Exam. Required. non-credit. PTA 216. THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES FOR THE PTA This lab will provide demonstration, instruction and practice of hands-on application of the modalities discussed in the lecture. Knowledge of indications, contraindications and precautions will be reinforced. Students will gain a better understanding and appreciation for application techniques, parameter adjustments and patient monitoring. Students must complete competency skills testing for each of the physical agents studied. Co-requisite: PTA 206 1 credit. PTA 218. THEAREPUTIC EXERCISE This lab is designed to provide physical demonstration, instruction and practice of exercise techniques presented in the lecture. Hands-on application of therapeutic exercise interventions sued to enhance strength, power, flexibility, endurance, postural control, balance, circulation and coordination are practiced. Students must complete competency skills testing for each of the topics studied. Corequisite: PTA 208 1 credit RES 101. INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY THERAPY This course is designed to familiarize the student with the history of respiratory therapy as a profession, medical and legal ethics, medical terminology, medical records, communication and safety in health care environments. 2 credits. RES 110. RESPIRATORY THERAPY I This course is designed to cover various therapeutic procedures used in respiratory therapy. The indications, side effects, hazards and basis of application will be stressed. This includes but is not limited to: aerosol and humidity therapy, oxygen therapy, chest percussion, hyperinflation therapy, suctioning, and arterial blood gas sampling. Pre-requisites: BIO 240, BIO 241, BIO 250, BIO 251, MATH 102, PHYS 123, CHEM 101, CHEM 102. Co-requisites: BIO 180, BIO 181, RES 111. 3 credits. RES 111. RESPIRATORY CARE EQUIPMENT I A course relating the equipment used in respiratory therapy to treat the pathological conditions of patients. This course will allow students to practice and apply topics discussed in RES 110. Pre-requisites: BIO 240, BIO 241, BIO 250, BIO 251, MATH 102, PHYS 123, CHEM 101, CHEM 102. Co-requisites: BIO 180, BIO 181, RES 110. 1 credit.

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Course Descriptions

RES 120. RESPIRATORY THERAPY II A continuation of RES 110-Respiratory Therapy 1. This course consists of the theory of how to treat patients in the critical care setting. Emphasis will be placed on mechanical ventilation, artificial airway care, emergency/trauma situations and analyzing arterial blood gas results. Pre-requisites: RES 101, RES 110, RES 111, PHYS 123. Co-requisites: RES 121, RES 122. 3 credits. RES 121. RESPIRATORY CARE EQUIPMENT II This course is a continuation of RES 110. The course will allow students to apply knowledge gained in RES 120. Emphasis will be placed on mechanical ventilation, their operation and application to patient care. Pre-requisites: RES 101, RES 110, RES 111, PHYS 123. Co-requisites: RES 120, RES 122. 1 credit. RES 122. RESPIRATORY PHARMACOLOGY The study of respiratory pharmacology with an emphasis placed on the properties of medications and their effects on the patient. Safe and effective use of medications by the respiratory therapist will be stressed. Pre-requisites: RES 101, RES 110, RES 111, PHYS 123. Co-requisites: RES 120, RES 121. 2 credits. RES 201. PEDIATRIC AND NEONATAL RESPIRATORY CARE This course is a study of the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric and neonatal patients. Emphasis will be placed on diseases unique to pediatric and neonatal patients as well as mechanical ventilation for these patients. Pre-requisites: RES 120, RES 121, RES 122. Co-requisites: RES 202, RES 203. 2 credits. RES 202. PULMONARY DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES This course is a study of noninvasive and invasive testing and monitoring techniques used in treating and diagnosing cardiopulmonary patients. Emphasis will be placed on pulmonary function tests, chest x rays and EKGs. Pre-requisites: RES 120, RES 121, RES 122. Corequisties: RES 201, RES 203. 3 credits. RES 203. PULMONARY AND RELATED PATHOLOGY This course is the study of the nature and the cause of pathological conditions in patients. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing clinical signs and symptoms of the disease, including any changes in normal laboratory values. Pre-requisites: RES 120, RES 121, RES 122. Co-requisites: RES 201, RES 202. 3 credits. RES 210. MEDICAL ASPECTS OF RESPIRATORY THERAPY A course providing a physician's insights into medical and surgical topics related to respiratory therapy with an emphasis on MD/therapist communication. Also included in the course will the study of current issues in respiratory therapy including pulmonary rehabilitation and sleep medicine. Case study analysis will be done to further enhance the understanding diagnosis and treatment of patients. Pre-requisites: RES 201, RES 202, RES 203. Co-requisites: RES 211. 2 credits. RES 211. RESPIRATORY THERAPIST CLINICAL I A clinical externship in which students work under supervision in affiliated institutions for three days a week. The students apply therapeutic and diagnostic procedures. Included are general floor therapies, home care and pulmonary

rehabilitation. Pre-requisites: RES 201, RES 202, RES 203. Co-requisites: RES 210. 6 credits. RES 220. RESPIRATORY THERAPIST CLINICAL II A continuation of practical clinical application of therapies and equipment in respiratory therapy. Emphasis will be placed on critical care patients including advanced therapeutic and diagnostic procedures used by respiratory therapists. Also included in the course will be practice credentialing exams, these exams must be passed for successful completion of the Respiratory Therapy Program. Clinical externship will be five days a week. Pre-requisites: RES 210, RES 211. 9 credits. RIAP 177. INTRO TO INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS An introduction to the structure, function and process of the Intelligence Community. Exposes first year students to basic skills in writing, research, analysis, presentation, and technology. 3 credits. RIAP 272. TERRORISM Fosters an understanding of the roots, development and impact of contemporary worldwide terrorism, especially in the U.S., while using a simulated operational environment. 3 credits. RIAP 274. HISTORY OF U.S. INTELLIGENCE Examines the scope, elements and history of intelligence activities, especially the American experience. Particular attention is paid to the role of intelligence in a democratic society. 3 credits. RLST 100. RELIGIOUS PERSON AND TRADITIONS In the interest of religious literacy, students examine various ways of being religious in the Jewish, Christian, and Buddhist traditions. The course examines the lifestyles and beliefs central to these traditions. Concepts of faith development, religion, and theology are considered. 3 credits. RLST 110. UNDERSTANDING SCRIPTURE A critical examination is made of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Gospels, Epistles, Revelation. Special attention is paid to the latest biblical and archaeological finds which illuminate the biblical text. 3 credits. RLST 210. NEW TESTAMENT This course studies the biblical traditions and texts of the Christian Scriptures as products of particular historical and cultural faith communities, and as literary and theological documents. 3 credits RLST/RLED 230. CHRISTOLOGY An examination of the development of images, concepts, and doctrines about Jesus of Nazareth. It moves chronologically from New Testament materials to contemporary theological discussions about the person and message of Jesus and their significance for the post-modern world. 3 credits. RLST 240. MEDICAL ETHICS Medical Ethics is a discipline that examines the issues of health care, distribution of medical resources, death, suffering, and overall well being. In order to examine the issues relevant to medical ethics, we will focus on the contributions made by contemporary social thinkers, classical ethical theorists, and contemporary theologians and ethicists. This course will require you to examine your own participation in social structures which hinder or enhance the well being of other people. It will also examine the role of medical care professionals in the medical system and their ethical and professional obligations to their patients, employers, and the larger society. 3 credits.

Course Descriptions

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SCI 150. UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE An exploration of the various theories of science, with the goal of enhancing scientific literacy. Students develop the skills necessary to explore science and technology subjects in-depth, through independent investigations that utilize library and computer-based resources. 3 credits. SecM 106. INTRODUCTION TO CODING This course is designed to introduce the student to ICD-9CM and CPT coding. Topics covered include basic ICD-9CM coding conventions and guidelines, selection of principal and secondary diagnoses and procedure coding. The course will discuss the various work environments in which coding is used. Medical records will be used as students are introduced to the reading and interpretation of the medical record as a source document for applying codes. 3 credits. SecM 107. KEYBOARDING I This is a competency-based course designed to meet the entry-level vocational needs of the student. Students will develop touch control of the keyboard and proper typing techniques , build basic speed and accuracy and provide a practice in applying those basic skills to the formatting of letters, reports, tables, memos, and other kinds of personal and business communications. A keyboarding speed of 35 wpm for five minutes with zero errors must be achieved. 1 credit. SecM 108. KEYBOARDING II Students should have a working knowledge of Word applications and Windows. Keyboarding II is a ten-week, one-credit, competency-based course designed to meet the entry-level vocational needs of the student. Students will build basic speed and accuracy and provide a practice in applying those basic skills to the formatting of letters, reports, tables, memos and other kinds of personal and business communications. A keyboarding speed of 45 wpm for five minutes with zero errors must be achieved. Pre-requisite: SecM 107. 1 credit. SecM 109. KEYBOARDING III Students should have a working knowledge of Word applications and Windows. Keyboarding III is a ten-week, one-credit competency-based course designed to meet the entry-level vocation needs of the student. Students will build basic speed and accuracy and provide a practice in applying those basic skills to the formatting of letters, reports, tables, memos and other kinds of personal and business communications. A keyboarding speed of 55 wpm for five minutes with zero errors must be achieved. Pre-requisite: SecM 107, 108. 1 credit. SecM 111. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY This course is intended to assist those studying in the fields of medicine and health care by learning a word-building system for defining, using, spelling, and pronouncing medical words. Students are provided with an overview of basic human anatomy and physiology. 3 credits. SecM 112. ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL OFFICE I This course is designed to provide students with entrylevel competencies for the medical administrative assistant. Terminal performance objectives will be presented and students will then apply classroom learning to real life work situations. Topics include: administrative procedures, professionalism, communication skills, medical records administration, and practice finances. This course also includes the fundamentals of private and public insurance

programs, managed care, workers' compensation claims, Medicaid and Medicare claims Pre-requisites: SecM 111. 3 credits. SecM 113. ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL OFFICE II This is a continuation of Administrative Medical Office I. Terminal performance objectives will be presented and students will then apply classroom learning to real life work situations. Topics include operational functions, patient education/instruction, and an entire section on medical law and ethics. Students will have the opportunity to learn skills through challenging situations, hands-on document production activities. Pre-requisites: SecM 112. 3 credits. SecM 203. MACHINE/MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION This course develops skills in proper mechanics in transcription of medical/business dictation from cassettes. Activities develop skills of listening, punctuation, grammar, spelling, and proofreading. Pre-requisite: SecM 111, MIS 103 or MIS 101. 3 credits. SecM 204. INTERMEDIATE ICD-9-CM AND CPT CODING This course is a continuation of SecM 106 focusing on ICD-9-CM and CPT coding of digestive, genitourinary, respiratory, musculoskeletal, integumentary, endocrine and mental disorders along with neoplasms and blood disorders. Reimbursement systems will also be introduced. Pre-requisites: SecM 106, SecM 111. 3 credits. SecM 205. ADVANCED ICD-9-CM AND CPT CODING This course is a continuation of SecM 204 focusing on ICD-9-CM and CPT coding of infectious, nervous and circulatory conditions, pregnancy, childbirth and newborn records, injuries, burns and medical complications. Special emphasis is placed on application of DRG's and optimizing reimbursement. Pre-requisite: SecM 111, SecM 106, SecM 204. 3 credits. SecM 206. CPT CODING This course covers Current Procedural Terminology coding, focusing on both hospital-based and physician-based reporting practices to include Evaluation and Management, all surgical sections of CPT, radiology, pathology, laboratory, anesthesia and medicine chapters. Both physician office and hospital-based reimbursement methodologies will be introduced including Ambulatory Payment Classifications. Pre-requisite: SecM 204, SecM 111 3 credits. SecM 275. CODING INTERNSHIP The student will complete a clinical experience (200 hours) during the last term. A clinical setting will be coordinated by the faculty where students can apply their coding skills. The student will be evaluated jointly by the coordinator and employer/supervisor on coding, accuracy, productivity, and professional and ethical conduct. 3 credits. SecM 275. MEDICAL OFFICE INTERNSHIP The student will complete a practical internship (200 hours) during the last term. A medical office work setting is required. In addition, weekly logs must be submitted to the internship coordinator and a ten-page final paper is required upon internship completion. Students will be evaluated jointly by the instructor and employer/supervisor on successful completion of the internship and professional and ethical conduct. 3 credits.

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Course Descriptions / Mercyhurst West

SecM 275.

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION INTERNSHIP The student will complete a practical internship (200 hours) during the last term. A medical transcription work setting is required, with student duties limited to medical transcription emphasizing the basic four reports (histories and physicals, operative reports, consultations, and discharge summaries) and including various other medical reports. In addition, weekly logs must be submitted to the internship coordinator and a ten-page final paper is required upon internship completion. Students will be evaluated jointly by the instructor and employer/supervisor on successful completion of the internship and professional and ethical conduct. 3 credits. SecM 275. MEDICAL ASSISTANT INTERNSHIP The student will complete a clinical internship (200 hours) during the last term. A medical assistant work setting is required. In addition, weekly logs must be submitted to the internship coordinator and a ten-page final paper is required upon internship completion. Students will be evaluated jointly by the instructor and employer/supervisor on successful completion of the internship and professional and ethical conduct. 3 credits. SMGT 111. SPORT MANAGEMENT LAB I ­ POOL MANAGEMENT This lab covers pool operation and management. The training will be a combination of classroom and "hands-on" experiences at the college's Aquatic Center. Water analysis, chemical treatment and an equipment overview will be discussed. SMGT 112. SPORT MANAGEMENT LAB II ­ AQUATIC MANAGEMENT Successful completion of this lab will certify students as lifeguards with advanced CPR and First Aid. SMGT 113. SPORT MANAGEMENT LAB III ­ LIFE SAVING TECHNIQUES Successful completion of this lab will prepare students to handle emergency situations. Topics covered will include First Aid, CPR, and Automated External Defibrillators. SMKT 102. INTRODUCTION TO THE SPORT INDUSTRY This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the areas of potential career opportunities within the sport industry. Students will be given both and overview of major sport industry segments and an introduction to issues and examples currently affecting the sport industry. 3 credits. SMKT 201. SPORT MARKETING AND PROMOTION This course applies basic marketing principles to the sport industry. An examination of the bilateral marketing environment currently existing in business will be provided. Included in this course will be tactics, strategies, and examples of sport industry organizations use of marketing in addition to a discussion of how leagues, teams, and athletes are used as marketing tools by other industries. Pre-requisite: SMKT 102 and MKTG 162 3 credits. SMKT 203. LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORT This course in an introduction to the legal principles involved in sport settings. Students will be provided an overview of tort law, including intentional torts, negligence, and product liability. Constitutional law issues will be discussed, particularly as they concern athletic eligibility, athletes' rights,

gender discrimination and drug testing issues. Additionally, the topic of contracts in sport will be discussed. Pre-requisite: SMKT 102 3 credits. SMKT 205. FACILITY MANAGEMENT This course is designed to study the planning, development and administration of sports facilities such as physical, education, athletics, recreation, and fitness/wellness centers. The course also will address the basics of sport equipment management. Course content will be covered through the discussion of three major areas: the facility planning and design process, management and risk management of facilities, and equipment management. 3 credits. SOC 100. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY An introduction to the scientific study of human societies and human group behavior through the presentation of major concepts in the field and exposure to selective classic and contemporary studies undertaken by sociologists. 3 credits. SOC 101. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS This course is designed to provide a context for students to critically explore selected social problems from a sociological perspective. The contributions of opposing ideologies and ideas, and a critique of research related to the phenomena, will be utilized to facilitate understanding. Alternative modes of intervention will be discussed. 3 credits. SOC 214. GRIEF AND LOSS This course explores the complex process of grieving as a result of loss. While a large focus will be on death and dying, other losses such as divorce, job loss, and loss of physical health will be discussed. Cultural variations and common rituals will be addressed. 3 credits. SOC 275. SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP The internship affords the student an opportunity to utilize sociology concepts in a variety of work environments. 3 credits. SPCH 101. PUBLIC SPEAKING An introductory study of principles of good speaking, developing ease, grace of manner, and voice control in the delivery of formal speeches. Students are required to make a number of oral presentations. Offered every year. Credits are not transferable to the Erie Campus. 3 credits. THEA 101. THEATRE APPRECIATION A basic introduction to theatre, its development, nature and practice. This course will expose the student to theatre as an artistic, social, and commercial institution. 3 credits.

Mercyhurst West

CORE CURRICULUM

The following courses, offered at Mercyhurst West, meet SOME of the Core Curriculum requirements for a four-year Bachelor's degree at Mercyhurst College: THE COMMON CORE (CC): 10-course Requirement 1. American History (one course) 1. US History I: to 1865 2. US History II: 1865-1945 3. US History III: since 1945 2. Arts Appreciation (one course) 2. Art Appreciation

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College Writing (two courses) 2. College Writing I 3. College Writing II 4. European or World History (one course) 2. European History since the Renaissance 5. Mathematics (one course) 5. Mathematical Problem Solving 6. Statistics 6. Natural Sciences & Lab (one course) 5. Human Biology & Lab 7. Philosophy (one course) 5. Philosophical Inquiry 8. Religious Traditions (one course) 5. Religious Person & Traditions 6. Understanding Scripture 9. Literature (one course) 5. Western Classics 6. World Classics THE DISTRIBUTION CORE (DC): 8-Course Requirement 10. Behavior/Social Sciences (two courses) Choose courses from 2 different departments. 1. American Government 2. Contemporary Social Problems 3. Human Growth & Development 4. Introduction to Psychology 5. Macroeconomics 11. Mathematics/Natural Sciences (one course) Must be different than courses taken in Common Core 6 & 7. 1. Human Biology & Lab 2. Astronomy & Lab 3. Mathematical Problem Solving 4. Statistics 5. Understanding Science 12. Religious Studies (one course) 12. Christology 13. World Perspectives (two courses) 12. Asian Cultures 13. Comparative Politics: Asia 14. See Erie Campus Catalog (four courses) NOTE: Additional courses are offered at the Erie campus of Mercyhurst College that meet both CC and DC requirements.

3.

OCCASIONAL FEES Application Fee Orientation Fee - Freshmen only I.D. Card Graduation Lab (Sciences) Lab (HRIM, Art, Sport Management, etc.) Official Transcript of Credits FINANCIAL PENALTIES Late Payment Returned Check

$ 25 $ 100 $ 30 $ 150 $ 300 $ 200 $ 4 $ $ 50 20

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Program offerings at Mercyhurst West are established to permit students to explore a range of educational options. Courses of study are designed to provide an educational experience which leads to a college certificate or an associate degree. In the main, the programs of study at West focus on preparing a student for a specific vocation. Additionally, programs provide the student with the opportunity to improve competence in the basic skills needed to succeed in college, and enable, in most cases, direct articulation to related baccalaureate degrees offered at the Erie campus of Mercyhurst College. The selection of certificates and degrees available at Mercyhurst West is largely determined by the job market in the local, regional and national marketplace, which gives direction as to the viability of the programs and determines what content is taught.

MERCYHURST WEST ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The Business Administration Program provides students with general training in the basic principles and techniques that are needed to secure an entry-level position in the business sector. Students enrolled in this program are introduced to the fundamentals of economics, accounting, management, and marketing. In addition, some upper-level coursework in human resources and computer applications is offered. Students must earn an overall 2.0 G.P.A. and a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 in required business courses to meet graduation requirements. Any required business course(s) with less than a 2.0 G.P.A. must be repeated. Mercyhurst College and the Walker School of Business and Communication recognize the importance of basic communication and mathematics. Hence, a significant amount of coursework in the program focuses on the development of these skills. Upon completion of this program, graduates are prepared for entry-level positions in administration, marketing, manufacturing, and sales. With experience, a degree recipient may qualify for promotion to a higher-level supervisory position in management. If, upon completion of the associate degree program, a student decides to transfer to one of the four-year degree programs in business, many courses with a grade of C or better may be applied toward the degree requirements.

MERCYHURST WEST 2009 - 2010 FEES

TUITION COST PER 3-CREDIT COURSE Mercyhurst - West High School Audit $ 1,215 $ 300 $ 420

REQUIRED FEES PER TERM (ALL STUDENTS) Registration $ 40 Computer/Network $ 113

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Mercyhurst West

An individual student's academic progress and eligibility to continue in the second year of the program is determined by the administration and faculty in the Spring Term during the annual freshman review. A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

( denotes major requirement) Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I HIST 101 U.S. History I: To 1865 or HIST 102 U.S. History II: To 1864-1945 or HIST 103 U.S. History III: Since 1945 MATH 100 Business Mathematics(credits do not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A. program) or MATH 108 Mathematical Problem Solving MATH 109 Statistics MGMT 120 Principles of Management Term #2 ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I ECON 105 Macroeconomics ENGL 102 College Writing II Term #3 ACCT 102 Principles of Accounting II ACCT 140 Computer Applications in Accounting MGMT 206 Human Resource Management MIS 101 Computer Applications (does not satisfy bachelor's degree requirements) Term #4 ECON 106 Microeconomics MKTG 162 Principles of Integrated Marketing Comm 180 Business/Professional Communications or Spch 101 Public Speaking **** *** Elective Term #5 BadM 275 Principles of Operations Management MGMT 206 Human Resource Management MIS 110 Advanced Computer Applications (does not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A. program) Term #6 MGMT 226 Human Behavior in Organizations RLST 100 Religious Person/Tradition or RLST 110 Understanding Scripture **** *** Choose one distribution/liberal/common core course

design, construction, plant operations, landscape, and maintenance management essentials. In addition, students are given hands-on classroom experience and numerous other opportunities to practice their facilities and property skills in appropriate environments. This program is carefully designed to provide students with the essential skills needed in this highly specialized and diversified field. The Mercyhurst College Hospitality Management program was granted accreditation status by the Accreditation Commission for Programs in Hospitality Administration (ACPHA) in August 1992. The Department of Hospitality Management provides industry-specific courses enriched by a broad selection of required liberal and elective courses offered by the College, to prepare our graduates to enter the workforce with an educational foundation to compete professionally. Students enrolled in this program have the opportunity to participate in a co-op or externship program. If a student decides to transfer to one of the four-year degree programs in hospitality management after completing this program, many of the completed courses with a grade of C or better may be applied toward the degree requirements. The Hospitality Management Department reserves the right to pursue disciplinary actions up to and including expulsion from in the HRIM program for any student who fails to meet academic, professional and personal benchmarks. (Academic refers to overall GPA and grades in major courses; professional refers to conduct in service hours and work experience; and personal refers to ethical conduct on and off campus in any setting that reflects negatively on the student and/or the program.) A Hospitality Management major must carry a minimum of 2.0 G.P.A. or better in major courses to meet department and graduation requirements. A student major who fails to earn a grade of C or better in a Hospitality Management course must repeat the course, or he/she may be allowed to make special arrangements with the director of the program and upon faculty advisement. If a student fails to receive the grade of at least C in a Hospitality management major course, the student is permitted to repeat the course once. Should the student not receive a C after repeating the course, he/she will not be permitted to re-take the course, resulting in termination from the major. A minimum of 63 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program. Up to 120 department and community service hours will be required of all students and must be fulfilled prior to graduation

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

(denotes major requirement) Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I FPM 100 Introduction to Facility Management MIS 101 Computer Applications(credits do not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A.or B.S. program) MATH 100 Business Mathematics(credits do not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A.or B.S. program) or MATH 108 Mathematical Problem Solving or MATH 109 Statistics Term #2

MERCYHURST WEST ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT: FACILITIES AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

The facilities management concentration in the hospitality management program is designed to prepare students to enter or advance in the field of facilities and properties management. The associate's degree offers of balance of facilities engineering and management coursework. The curriculum adheres to the requirements of the International Facilities Management Association and includes planning,

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ENGL FPM FPM Term #3 RLST RLST HIST HIST HIST FPM Term #4 SPCH FPM ACCT Term #5 ECON FPM **** Term #6 MGMT SCI FPM Term #7 FPM

102 101 102 100 110 101 102 103 104 101 200 101 105 204 *** 120 150 210 275

College Writing II FM Operations and Maintenance FM Code and Regulation Compliance Religious Person/Tradition or Understanding Scripture U.S. History I: To 1865 or U.S. History II: To 1864-1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 FM Technology Public Speaking (credits do not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A.or B.S.program) FM Construction and Renovation Principles of Accounting I Macroeconomics FM Quality and Innovation Elective Principles of Management Understanding Science FM Business Workshop FM Internship

SPCH MIS ART MUS THEA Term #2 ENGL MATH MATH PSYC SOC ECON HDFR POLI Term #3 ENGL ENGL HIST HIST HIST RLST RLST Term #4 HIST HIST

101 101 110 100 101 102 109 108 101 101 105 110 100 103 107 101 102 103 100 110 105 106

Public Speaking(credits do not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A. program) Computer Applications(credits do not transfer into the Erie Campus B.A. program) Art Appreciation or Music Appreciation or Theater Appreciation College Writing II Statistic or Math Problem Solving Intro to Psychology or Contemporary Social Problems or Macroeconomics or Human Growth & Development or American Government Western Classics or World Classics U.S. History I: To 1865 or U.S. History II: To 1864-1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 Religious Person/Tradition or Understanding Scripture European History to the Renaissance or European History Since the Renaissance or World History III American Government or Macroeconomics or Contemporary Social Problems or Intro to Psychology or Human Growth & Development Two hundred level Elective Philosophical Inquiry or Philosophy of Human Nature One hundred level Elective Two hundred level Elective Understanding Science or Human Biology/Lab One hundred level Elective Two hundred level Elective

MERCYHURST WEST ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM LIBERAL ARTS

The Liberal Arts Associate Degree requirements originate primarily within the liberal arts disciplines. They are intended to provide students with fundamental intellectual skills and knowledge of cultural and social areas, the sciences, and the arts. The liberal arts associate degree is intended to lead to a four-year degree and is designed to help students think critically and be creative in acquiring knowledge, insights, skills and vision in order to lead a fulfilling and productive life. Students must earn an overall 2.0 G.P.A. to meet graduation requirements. To transfer to a four-year program at Mercyhurst College requires the completion of 24 credits with a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.5 or the completion of the associate degree. Further, those students anticipating transfer to a fouryear program at Mercyhurst College are encouraged to reference the Common Core and Distribution Core Course Requirements as they appear in the Mercyhurst College catalog. All students must take three (3) 200-level elective courses. These course offerings will vary from term to term and will seek to provide courses in a variety of disciplines. Note, however, that in meeting the program/course interests of individual students, cross-registration at the Erie or North East campuses for specialized 200-elective courses may be required.

HIST 109 POLI 100 ECON 105 SOC 101 PSYC 101 HDFR 110 *** 2** Term #5 PHIL 100 PHIL 102 *** 1** *** 2** Term #6 SCI 150 BIO 120/121 *** 1** *** 2**

MERCYHURST WEST COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACCT 101. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING An introduction to the fundamental process of recording, classifying and summarizing business transactions for services and merchandising enterprises. Coverage includes receivables and payables, inventory, and preparation of financial statements. 3 credits. ACCT 102. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II A continuation of Principles of Accounting I in which plant assets, intangibles, current and long-term liabilities, partnerships and corporations are examined. Pre-requisite: ACCT 101. 3 credits.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

(bold items in option categories denotes scheduled course) Term #1 ENGL 101 College Writing I

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Mercyhurst West

ACCT 140.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING This applications course is designed to familiarize the student with the operation of an accounting system utilizing the microcomputer. Through the use of the computer, the student learns to use an accounting program that journals, posts, and prepares financial statements. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and interpretation of the financial statement. Pre-requisite: ACCT 102. 3 credits. ART 110. ART APPRECIATION A survey of the visual arts including painting, sculpture, and architecture. Includes the study of artists, design, significant art works, and art criticism. (For Non-Art Majors Only) 3 credits. ASIA 125. ASIAN CULTURES Studies the cultures of India, China, Korea and Japan through an examination of common roots and development in geography, history, arts, and religion. 3 credits BADM 275. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT This course is an introduction to the field of operations management. The student will be exposed to fundamental principles including demand forecasting, system design, supply chain management, project management and quality. This course will demonstrate the importance of these topics in both manufacturing and service concerns alike. Pre-requisite: MATH 109 or permission of the instructor. 3 credits. COMM 180. BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS This course provides a background in communication in business settings, focusing on writing basic business documents and preparing effective presentations. 3 credits. ECON 105. MACROECONOMICS A study of mixed capitalism in aggregate form designed to provide the student with knowledge of the American economic system. Topics include the causes of recession, unemployment, inflation, and the uses of fiscal and monetary policies. 3 credits. ECON 106. MICROECONOMICS A course emphasizing the economic activities of individual consumers and producers. Topic coverage includes demandsupply analysis, the costs of production, and price and output determination by the market structure. 3 credits. ENGL 101. COLLEGE WRITING I First in a sequence of practical experiences in academic writing. Emphasis on creative goals and planning for writing tasks, as well as producing essays of exposition, argument and problem solution. 3 credits. ENGL 102. COLLEGE WRITING II Further development of experiences in writing for academic disciplines. Includes reading and thinking critically, accessing and using information in the construction of essays and research papers. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101 3 credits ENGL 103. WESTERN CLASSICS A study of major writers of the Western World from Homer to modern times, with attention given to their individual achievements and contribution to Western literary and cultural development. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101, 102 3 credits

FPM 100.

INTRODUCTION TO FACILITY MANAGEMENT Course familiarizes the student with the business of Facility Management as it pertains to the facilities management professional. It introduces the concepts of operations and maintenance technology, management of people, and the administration of real estate and construction projects. The course also stresses leadership and organization skills as key to successful facility management. 3 credits FPM 101. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT-- OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE Course offers a practical study of the facility manager's role in administering and maintaining a building or site. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology in constructing effective preventative maintenance systems, contracting and maintaining relationships with vendors, and administering internal staff. 3 credits FPM 102. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT--CODE AND REGULATION COMPLIANCE Course familiarizes the student with the codes, regulations, and systems that are critical in complying with the many external agencies that govern building occupancy and safety, including regulatory agencies such as O.S.H.A., and with participation in continuous improvement methodologies such as behavior-based safety. 3 credits MATH 100. BUSINESS MATHEMATICS An introduction to the mathematics used in business applications. Topics include: review of the number systems, decimals, fractions, percents, interest, pricing, annuities, depreciation, inventory control, investments, insurance, and statistics. For one year certificate and associate degree programs only. Does not meet the mathematics core requirement. Pre-requisite: Completion of Basic Mathematics or its equivalent. 3 credits MATH 108. MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM-SOLVING An introduction to applications of mathematics. Topics selected from algebraic functions (linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic) and their graphs and applications, introductory trigonometry and applications, arithmetic and geometric growth, linear programming, applications to finance, counting principles, applications of data analysis, basic probability and statistics, calculus techniques, and graph theory. Satisfies the mathematics common core or distribution core requirement. Pre-requisite: One year of college preparatory mathematics that includes Algebra or MATH 102 Elementary Algebra. For non-science and non-mathematics majors. 3 credits MATH 109. STATISTICS This course is an introduction to the uses of statistics and probability as decision and problem-solving tools. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; variability; probability; counting; binomial distribution; normal distribution; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; hypothesis testing, statistical inference, sampling techniques and experimental design. Satisfies the mathematics common core or distribution core requirements. Pre-requisite: One year of college preparatory mathematics that includes Algebra or MATH 102 Elementary Algebra. 3 credits MGMT 120. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT An introduction designed to provide basic understanding of the principles, concepts, and functions of management

Mercyhurst West / Catherine McAuley Education Center

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planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, with emphasis on managing and of being managed. 3 credits MGMT 206. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Examination of the basic personnel processes involved in the selection, development and maintenance of human resources. Emphasis on managerial and legal requirements. 3 credits. MGMT 226. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATION A study of the individual as a functioning member of groups and organizations. Topics include organizational culture, motivation, group dynamics, communication, leadership, and conflict. Pre-requisite: MGMT 120. 3 credits. MIS 101. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS This introductory computer course provides students with a working knowledge of computer terminology, and the computer itself. Topics also include Microsoft Office, Word, Excel, Access and Power-Point and their applications in business. Materials fee 3 credits. MIS 110. ADVANCED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS This course focuses on the use of spreadsheets and databases to manage information. Topics studied include systems analysis, basic database design, and applications development using Microsoft Excel and Access. Prerequisite: MIS 101 or Word and Excel basics. 3 credits MKTG 162. PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATED MARKETING A broad study of the field of marketing from a managerial perspective. Emphasis is on demand analysis, need satisfaction, strategic planning, product development, distribution channels, promotions, and price determination. 3 credits. MUS 100. MUSIC APPRECIATION A survey of musical materials, forms, styles, and instruments. Includes discussion and listening of major works from various periods of musical composition. Designed for non-majors. 3 credits. PHIL 100. PHILOSOPHICAL INQUIRY An introduction to philosophy through study of the principles of sound argument, the nature of philosophical perplexity, and selected topics in the theory of knowledge, ethics, metaphysics and the philosophy of religion. Lecture and discussion. 3 credits POLI 100. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Introductory course in Political Science stressing how policy-making is done at the national level. Beginning with the Constitution, an introduction is given to the three main branches of the U.S. Government. Attention is also given to elections, political parties, interest groups, and the federal system. 3 credits PSYC 101. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY A general introduction to the science of behavior and mental processes. Topics considered include learning, memory, perception, motivation, personality, psychopathology and social interaction. 3 credits RLST 100. RELIGIOUS PERSON AND TRADITIONS In the interest of religious literacy, students examine various ways of being religious in the Jewish, Christian, and Buddhist traditions. The course examines the beliefs, symbols and behaviors central to these traditions. Concepts of faith development, religion, and theology are considered. 3 credits

SCI 150. UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE An exploration of the various theories of science, with the goal of enhancing scientific literacy. Students develop the skills necessary to explore science and technology subjects in-depth, through independent investigations that utilize library and computer-based resources. 3 credits SPCH 101. PUBLIC SPEAKING An introductory study of principles of good speaking, developing ease, grace of manner, and voice control in the delivery of formal speeches. Students are required to make a number of oral presentations. 3 credits

MERCYHURST WEST ADMINISTRATION

GARY BROWN, Ph.D. Vice President for Strategic Finance Executive Vice president ­ Mercyhurst North East and Mercyhurst West MELISSA (MISSY) LANG Enrollment Coordinator B.A., M.S Mercyhurst College

CATHERINE McAULEY ADULT EDUCATION CENTER

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

Note: Tuition and fees are different from those at Mercyhurst North East. Please contact the Office of Adult and Graduate Programs Admission Office for specific information (814) 824-2270.

· BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Associate Degree Program

The Associate of Science Degree in Business Administration offers a sequence of courses that prepare students for entrylevel positions in organizations with career paths that may eventually lead to supervisory and managerial positions. The course of study for this degree program includes a balance between courses related to career areas and the liberal arts and sciences. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of economics, accounting, management and marketing, as well as upper-level course work in human resources and computer applications. An optional internship provides hands-on experience. A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree. Students must earn an overall 2.0 GPA along with a 2.75 GPA in the required business courses to meet graduation requirements. Students who earn less than a "C" in a required business course must repeat that course. Most courses will transfer into one of the fouryear baccalaureate business programs if students wish to continue their education. Upon completion of this program, graduates will be prepared for entry-level positions in administration, marketing, manufacturing, and sales.

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Catherine McAuley Education Center

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS:

Students must demonstrate computer competence through proficiency testing or by taking MIS 101, Computer Applications for three additional credits, and a total of 63 credits. After meeting course pre-requisites, students may choose either a Management Track or an Accounting Track to focus their preferred concentration. Common Core: (24 Credits) ENGL 101 College Writing I ENGL 102 College Writing II PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology or HDFR 110 Human Growth and Development or POLI 100 American Government or SOC 101 Contemporary Social Problems HIST 101 U.S. History I to 1865 or HIST 102 U.S. History II 1865 ­ 1945 or HIST 103 U.S. History III Since 1945 MATH 102 Elementary Algebra or MATH 108 Math Problem Solving or MATH 109 Statistics RLST 100 Religious Person/Tradition or RLST 110 Understanding Scripture Liberal Studies Elective Liberal Studies Elective Business Core: (18 Credits) ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 102 Principles of Accounting II ECON 105 Macroeconomics ECON 106 Microeconomics MGMT 120 Principles of Management MKTG 162 Principles of Integrated Marketing Choose either the Management or Accounting Track. Management Track: (18 credits) ACCT 210 Managerial Accounting or ACCT 140 Computer Applications in Accounting COMM 180 Business/Professional Communication MGMT 206 Human Resource Management MGMT 226 Human Behavior in Organizations 200 Level Business Elective 200 Level Business Elective or Internship Accounting Track: (18 credits) ACCT 140 Computer Applications in Accounting or MIS 110 Advanced Computer Applications ACCT 201 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 202 Intermediate Accounting II ACCT 203 Intermediate Accounting III **** *** Accounting Elective or ACCT 140 Computer Applications in Accounting Business Elective or Internship

ministers in the areas of Religious Education, Youth Ministry or Christian Initiation. Courses may be taken for certificate credit or regular college credit leading to an associate degree or bachelor degree. These courses are recognized by the College and by the Diocese as meeting diocesan requirements for Religious Education Leaders.

Advanced certification is offered in 3 areas:

· · · Religious Education Leadership Christian Initiation Coordination Youth Ministry

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES

Admissions to the Advanced Certificate Program requires meeting with an advisor from the Mercy Institute for Religious Education and Lay Ministry or with the Director of the Office of Religious Education of the Diocese to discuss the potential for ministry. Approval of an advisor is required.

THE MERCYHURST INSTITUTE

Sisters of Mercy Institute for Religious Education and Lay Ministry

Mission Statement

The Mercy Institute of Mercyhurst College was founded by the Sisters of Mercy of Erie to work in co-operation with the College, to foster and support the Catholic tradition at Mercyhurst, to deepen awareness of the Catholic identity and Mercy heritage of the College, and to provide education for the ministries of the Erie Catholic Diocese.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of 21 credits is required for the completion of this certificate program - seven of the following courses: Biblical-Historical RLST/RLED 240 Christian Spiritual Traditions RLED 253 Sacraments and Liturgy RLST/RLED 111 The Gospels RLST/RLED 110 Understanding Scripture Systematic-Ethical RLST/RLED 260 Catholic Vision RLST/RLED 230 Christology RLST/RLED 200 Contemporary Moral Issues RLSD 170 Foundations for Ministry RLST/RLED 405 Social Ethics Ministry-Education RLED 156 Educational and Religious Principles for Lifelong Learning RLED 210 Parish Leadership Skills RLED 215 Ministry to the Adolescent RLED 270 RCIA: Bringing It to Life in Your Parish RLST/RLED 100 Religious Person and Traditions

· RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND LAY MINISTRY

The Advanced Certificate Program is offered at Mercyhurst College and off-campus sites as part of a cooperative agreement between the College's Religious Education Program and the Diocese of Erie. The Advanced Certificate Program offers collegelevel courses for those interested in being certified as lay

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of 60 credits is required for the completion of this associate degree program - eight of the courses listed above and the following Liberal Studies Courses: ENGL 101 College Writing I ENGL 102 College Writing II

Catherine McAuley Education Center / Course Descriptions

75

MATH MATH ART DANC MUS THEA HDFR SOC SPCH HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST MIS PHIL ****

100 102 110 100 100 101 175 101 101 101 102 103 105 106 101 100 ****

Business Mathematics or Elementary Algebra (does not satisfy bachelor degree math requirement) Art Appreciation or Dance Appreciation Music Appreciation or Theater Appreciation Human Sexuality and Gender Development Contemporary Social Problems Public Speaking U.S. History I: To 1865 or U.S. History II: 1865 to 1945 or U.S. History III: Since 1945 European History to the Renaissance or European History Since the Renaissance Computer Applications Philosophical Inquiry Core Elective

RLED 270.

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

CATHERINE McAULEY ADULT EDUCATION CENTER COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

RLED 156. EDUCATION AND RELIGIOUS PRINCIPLES FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING This course examines the theoretical religious and educational principles that underlie the practice of church educational ministry. In examining these principles this course will make recommendations as to their application for pedagogy (elementary education), youth ministry (including peer ministry), and androgogy (adult learning). 3 credits. RLED 170. FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY This course is an introduction to the theological ideas that serve as a foundation for ministry in the Catholic community. It examines the roots of ministry in the New Testament and subsequent historical changes. It attends to the notions of church as articulated in the 2nd Vatican Council and the implications of this for ministry. 3 credits. RLED 210. PARISH LEADERSHIP SKILLS This course integrates theological, psychological and organizational theory, combining leadership principles with a practical handbook that can help parish ministers explore, understand and revitalize themselves and their parish. 3 credits. RLED 215. MINISTRY TO THE ADOLESCENT This course integrates the knowledge and skills needed to begin and maintain a ministry program for the adolescent in a parish/school setting. Adolescent development, integration of religious education/youth ministry, and parent involvement are among topics addressed. 3 credits. RLED 253. SACRAMENTS AND LITURGY This course will examine the foundational principle of sacramentality, its implication for life, and the development of the Church's Great Sacraments. It will further examine the role of symbol and ritual in how sacraments become lived reality in the Church's life: its liturgy. 3 credits.

RCIA: BRINGING IT TO LIFE IN YOUR PARISH The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults redefines what it means to be a Christian and what it means to be Church. It addresses practical aspects of making the RCIA a reality in the parish. Emphasis is on sorting out the ideal from the possible and growing together into Church. Topics include: Nurturing the Faith Community, Calling Forth Ministries, Establishing a Catechumenate Team and the Spiritual Growth of the Catechumens and Sponsors. 3 credits. RLST/RLED 111. THE GOSPELS An examination of the emergence of the Gospel traditions as documents of early Christian communities of faith. A consideration of the historical and theological contexts of the Gospel texts. 3 credits. RLST/RLED 200. CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES Course explores moral issues both personal and social, in light of Christian Scriptures, tradition and human experience. A Roman Catholic perspective on these issues is emphasized. 3 credits. RLST/RLED 260. CATHOLIC VISION An examination of the elements of the Catholic vision of human life; an exploration of the meaning of Catholic symbols, doctrines, rituals and community structures. A reflection on the theological questions confronting contemporary Catholicism. 3 credits.

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MERCYHURST COLLEGE OffICERS & ADMINISTRATION / MERCYHURST NORTH EAST ADMINISTRATION

MERCYHURST COLLEGE OffICERS & ADMINISTRATION COLLEGE OffICERS

THOMAS J. GAMBLE, Ph.D. President JAMES M.ADOVASIO, Ph.D. Provost THOMAS A. BILLINGSLEY, M.A. Executive Vice President for Administration GARY BROWN, Ph.D. Vice President for Strategic Finance Executive Vice president Mercyhurst North East and Mercyhurst West MICHAEL LYDEN, Ed.D Vice President for Enrollment Management PHILLIP J. BELFIORE, Ph.D. Vice President for Academic Affairs JANE KELSEY, B.S., C.P.A. Vice President for Finance and Treasurer DAVID J. LIVINGSTON, Ph.D. Vice President for Advancement SR. LISA MARY McCARTNEY, R.S.M, Ph.D. Vice President for Mission Integration GERARD TOBIN, Ph.D. Vice President for Student Life ACADEMIC AFFAIRS PHILLIP J. BELFIORE Ph.D. Vice President for Academic Affairs BRIAN D. RIPLEY, Ph.D. Senior Academic Advisor MEREDITH SCHULTZ, J.D. Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs MICHELE WHEATON, M.S. Assistant Vice President for Academic Services

ADMINISTRATION

Admission MICHAEL LYDEN Ed.D. Vice President of Enrollment Management Business Services JANE KELSEY, B.S., C.P.A. Vice President of Finance and Treasurer JAMES LIEB, B.A. Associate Director of Finance DAVID O. HEWETT, B.A., CPA Controller

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST ADMINISTRATION

GARY BROWN Vice President for Strategic Finance Executive Vice President B.A., College of Saint Rose M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale [email protected] CATHERINE ANDERSON Dean of Student Life B.A., Gannon University M.A., Edinboro University [email protected] JAMES LANAHAN Dean of Administration B.A., M.A., St. Bonaventure [email protected] THOMAS STASZEWSKI Academic Dean B.S., Penn State University M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh [email protected] TRAVIS LINDAHL Director of Admission B.A., M.S., Mercyhurst College [email protected] ART AMANN Director of Public Safety Institute B.S., Slippery Rock University M.A., Gannon University Ed.D, Nova Southeastern University [email protected] KATHRYN BURNS Program Development Specialist B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] BONITA HALL Registrar B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] GINA ILLINGWORTH Director of MNE Dance Institute B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] LAWRENCE G. KOZLOWSKI Director of Student Life B.S., Edinboro University of Pennsylvania [email protected] JANET LEXOW Assistant Librarian B.A., Theil College M.A., Slippery Rock Unversity M.S.L.S., Clarion University [email protected] BARRY NUHFER Director of Computing Services B.S., Edinboro University [email protected] LINDA RHODES Director, Hirtzel Institute on Health Education and Aging B.A., Mercyhurst College

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST ADMINISTRATION / Mercyhurst North East faculty

77

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST ADMINISTRATION

M.Ed., Edinboro University Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University [email protected] PATRICIA SULLIVAN Music Director Coordinator of Auxiliary Services B.A., Mercyhurst College M.Ed., Gannon University [email protected] SHIRLEY WILLIAMS Internal Transfer Student Coordinator B.S., M.S., Mercyhurst College [email protected] RAY YOST Associate Athletic Director B.S., Colorado College [email protected]

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST faculty

STEPHANIE ADAMS Director Respiratory Therapy Instructor Respiratory Therapy A.S., Gannon University B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] JENNIFER BERKE Director of Early Childhood Education Program Assistant Professor of Education B.S., Syracuse University M.Ed., Boston State College Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo [email protected] EDWARD T. BRENNAN Instructor of Criminal Justice/ Sociology B.A., M.Ed., Gannon University [email protected] KAREN BUGAJ Instructor of Nursing B.A., Mercyhurst College B.S., M.S., Edinboro University [email protected] AMY CHARDEEN Instructor of Nursing B.S.N., Duquesne University M.S.N., Edinboro University [email protected] MARGARET CATHARINE DAVIS Instructor of Practical Nursing R.N., Huron Road Hospital School of Nursing B.S.N., Slippery Rock University M.S.N., Edinboro University [email protected] KAREN DAY Instructor Respiratory Therapy Program B.S., RRT Gannon University [email protected] DENNIS DUNNE Instructor of Culinary Arts B.A., Gannon University [email protected] FRANK EMANUELE Instructor of Computers/Science B.S., Gannon University M.S., Edinboro University [email protected] SHARON FAULKNER Instructor of Nursing B.S.N., Villa Maria College M.S.N., Edinboro University [email protected] MARY GAVACS Director Occupational Therapy Assistant Program Instructor of Occupational Therapy B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University [email protected] JANICE HAAS Director Physical Therapist Assistant Program Assistant Professor in Physical Therapy A.S., Lehigh County Community College B.A.,M.S., Mercyhurst College [email protected] ROBERT HARRIS Assistant Professor of Religious Studies B.A., Susquehanna University M.Div., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity School [email protected] LINDA JOHNSON Instructor of Practical Nursing R.N., St. Vincent School of Nursing B.S.N. Villa Maria College M.S.N., C.R.N.P., Gannon University [email protected] STEPHEN KANICKI Instructor of Computer Science and Business B.S., State University College at Buffalo A.A.S., Jamestown Community College M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology [email protected] MELANIE KARSAK Instructor of English B.A., Pennsylvania State University M.A., Gannon University [email protected] MARY ANN LUBIEJEWSKI Assistant Professor of Nursing R.N., M.S.N., Edinboro University [email protected] JUDITH LYNCH Assistant Professor of History/Sociology B.A., George Washington University M.A., Gannon University Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh [email protected] DAVID MARSH Instructor of Mathematics B.S., State University of New York at Fredonia [email protected] CLAUDIA MATZ Director of Liberal Arts Program Instructor of English B.A., Edinboro University M.A., Gannon University [email protected]

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Mercyhurst North East faculty

MERCYHURST NORTH EAST faculty

SCOTT McAULEY Director of Business & Computer Science Program Assistant Professor of Business B.S., M.B.A., Clarion University [email protected] LISA MILLER Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education Physical Therapist Assistant Program Assistant Professor in Physical Therapy B.A., M.P.T., D.P.T., Gannon University [email protected] LAURA MERRITT Director Medical Lab Technician Instructor Medical Lab Technician B.S., Gannon University M.S., Mercyhurst College [email protected] JANET MINZENBERGER Director of Part-time ASN Program and RN to BSN Completion Program Instructor of Nursing B.S.N., Edinboro University M.S.N., Indiana State University [email protected] MARION MONAHAN Director of Practical Nurse Program Instructor of Practical Nursing R.N., Sewickley Valley Hospital School of Nursing M.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania [email protected] DAVID MONICO Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania D.C., Palmer College of Chiropractic [email protected] LUCILLE MORRISON Assistant Professor of Nursing A.B., Allegheny Wesleyan College B.S., Kent State University B.S.N., M.Ed., M.S.N., C.R.N.P., Edinboro University [email protected] ALISON OLLINGER-RIEFSTAHL Instructor of History and Political Science B.A., Pennsylvania State University M.A., Clemson University [email protected] DIANE ONORATO Instructor of English B.A., University of West Georgia M.A., University of South Florida [email protected] JUDITH POLASKI-BROWN Instructor of Practical Nursing R.N., St Vincent School of Nursing B.S.N., Villa Maria College [email protected] PATRICIA PULITO Clinical Lab Specialist for RN and LPN Programs A.S., B.S.N., SUNY M.S.N., Edinboro University [email protected] LESLIE REED Director of Medical Certificate Program Instructor of Business B.S., Gannon University M.A., Edinboro University [email protected] RANDALL RINKE Instructor of Business B.A., Mercyhurst College M.B.A., Gannon University [email protected] BETH ANN SHELDON Director of HRIM Instructor of HRIM A.S., B.S., Mercyhurst College M.Ed., Penn State University [email protected] BRIAN STAHLSMITH Chef Instructor A.S., Pennsylvania Institute of Culinary Arts [email protected] STEPHEN SZWEJBKA Director of Associate Program in Criminal Justice Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice B.S., Buffalo State College M.S., Mercyhurst College [email protected] DEBORAH TERHUNE Instructor of Nursing B.S.N., Cedarville College M.S.N., Edinboro University [email protected] MARTHA TINGLEY Instructor of Practical Nursing L.P.N., RI School of Practical Nursing B.S.N., Edinboro University M.S.N., University of Phoenix [email protected] PETER YAKSICK Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice/Sociology D.Ed., Morgan State University M.A., B.A., Edinboro University [email protected] MONICA ZEWE Instructor of English B.A., Seton Hill College M.A., Duquesne University [email protected]

Student support services / admission / coaches

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Student support services

DAVID DESANTE Perkins Counselor and Career Internship Coordinator B.A., Gannon University M.A., Niagara University [email protected] KAREN DONNELLY Perkins Coordinator Designated School Official (DSO) B.S., University of Rhode Island M.A., Fordham University M.A., Slippery Rock University [email protected] LORI HAMBLIN Coordinator of Learning Differences B.A., Mercyhurst College M.Ed., Slippery Rock University [email protected] JAMES HOUSTON Perkins Counselor B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] CLAUDIA MOKWA Perkins Counselor B.S. Gannon University M.A. Edinboro University [email protected] NICOLE SWAN Perkins Counselor B.A., Mercyhurst College M.S., Gannon University [email protected] KRISTIN TOBIN Perkins Counselor B.S., M.S, Shippensburg University [email protected]

Admissions

CHRISTIN COONEY Admissions Counselor B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] STEVE GREG Admissions Counselor B.A., Allegheny College [email protected] KATHY HILL Admissions Counselor B.A., Westminster College [email protected] COLLLEEN LANIGAN Admissions Counselor B.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] CHERYL SANDBERG Associate Director of Admissions B.A., SUNY Fredonia M.S., Gannon University [email protected]

Coaches

RYAN BAILEY Women's Basketball/Volleyball B.A., Ohio University [email protected] DAN BERTOLINI Baseball Coach [email protected] BRYAN BLASZCZYK Men's Soccer /Sports Information [email protected] AARON COOPER Wrestling Coach Director of Transportation B.S., University of Akron [email protected] BRIAN DEWEY Softball Coach/Compliance Director A.A., Mercyhurst College [email protected] FRANCIS FACCHINE Athletic Facility Manager B.S., Gannon University [email protected] DAVID GAHAN Men's Basketball Coach/ Intramural Director B.A, Penn State Behrend [email protected] JACOB HORDYCH Women's Soccer Coach/Fitness Center/SAAC B.S., Lock Haven University B.S., Penn State University [email protected] JAMES MALONE Men's Lacrosse Coach B.A., College of the Holy Cross [email protected]

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Index

81

Mercyhurst North East Index

A Academic and Student Support Services .... 15 Academic Honesty....................................... 12 Academic Requirements ............................. 10 Academic Standards and Grades................ 10 Admission Criteria ......................................... 9 Application Process ....................................... 9 Associate Degree Programs - Catherine McAuley Adult Education Center Business Administration .......................... 73 Religious Education and Lay Ministry ..... 74 Associate Degree Programs - North East Business Administration .......................... 30 Business Administration - Sport Management/Personal Trainer .............. 31 Computer System Support ...................... 31 Criminal Justice ....................................... 32 Culinary Arts ............................................ 35 Early Childhood Education ...................... 33 Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management ......................................... 36 Liberal Arts .............................................. 36 Liberal Arts - Communication Concentration ........................................ 37 Nursing .................................................... 40 Office Management/Medical Office ......... 43 Physical Therapist Assistant.................... 44 Athletics/Intramurals ...................................... 8 B Business Administration, Associate Degree, North East ............................................... 30 Business Administration Sport Management/ Personal Trainer Concentration, Associate Degree, North East Business Administration Sport Management Concentration, Associate Degree, North East.................................. 31 C Calendar, Academic 2009-2010 .................... 5 Campus Locations ......................................... 7 Career/Placement Services ........................... 8 Certificate Programs, North East Culinary Arts ............................................ 45 Information Technology Specialist ........... 46 Medical Assistant..................................... 46 Medical Insurance Coding Specialist ...... 47 Medical Transcriptionist ........................... 47 Municipal Police Cadet ............................ 47 Practical Nurse (PN)................................ 48 Change of Grade .......................................... 11 Class Attendance Policy ............................... 11 Common Core ............................................. 10 Computer Systems Support, Associate Degree .................................... 31 Confidentiality of Student Records .............. 14 Cooperative Education/Internship/Externship Program................................................... 14 Copyright Violations..................................... 13 Counseling Services ...................................... 8 Course Descriptions .................................... 49 Course Overload .......................................... 11 Course Withdrawal ....................................... 11 Criminal Justice, Associate Degree ............. 32 Criminal Justice/Crime/Intelligence Analysis Concentration Associate Degree ............. 32 Culinary Arts, Associate Degree .................. 35 Culinary Arts, Certificate Degree ................. 45 D Dean's List ................................................... 14 Discipline ....................................................... 8 E Early Childhood Education, Associate Degree..................................................... 33 F Fees............................................................. 16 Financial Aid Application Process ................ 19 Financial Aid Policies ................................... 19 Financial Aid Programs................................ 24 Freshman Experience ................................. 29 Freshman Fees and Deposits ..................... 16 Full-Time Student Status ............................... 9 G Grade Appeals ............................................. Grade Change Policy ................................... Grading System ........................................... Graduation Honors/Awards ......................... 12 11 10 15 Mercyhurst Institute ..................................... 74 Mercyhurst North East Administration ......... 76 Mercyhurst North East Coaches.................. 79 Mercyhurst North East Faculty .................... 78 Mercyhurst North East History and Purpose . 7 Mercyhurst North East Student Government 8 Mercyhurst North East Student Support Services Staff .......................................... 79 Municipal Police Cadet, Certificate .............. 47 N Notification of Decision .................................. 9 Nursing, Associate Degree .......................... 40 O Office Management/Medical Office, Associate Degree .................................... 43 P Part-Time Student Status .............................. 9 Pass-Fail Option .......................................... 12 Perkins Program .......................................... 15 Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree .................................... 44 Practical Nurse (PN), Certificate.................. 48 Probation and Suspension ........................... 11 Proficiency Examination Credit.................... 13 Programs of Study ....................................... 29 R Recalculation Policy .................................... 18 Registration Process ..................................... 9 Religious Education and Lay Ministry, Associate Degree .................................... 74 Religious Education and Lay Ministry, Certificate ................................................ 74 Repeated Courses....................................... 12 Residence Living ........................................... 8 Respiratory Therapist, Associate Degree .... 44 Room and Board Charges ........................... 17 S Schedule Changes ....................................... 11 Security Violations/Misuse of Computer Resources ............................................... 13 Service Learning.......................................... 29 Student Status ............................................... 9 Student Support............................................. 8 Suspension Policy ......................................... 8 T Transcripts ................................................... 14 Transfer Information ...................................... 9 Tuition and Fees .......................................... 16 U Unpaid Bills.................................................. 17 W West Campus .............................................. 68 Withdrawl from Course ................................. 11 Withdrawl (Voluntary/Involuntary) ................ 17

H Health Services ............................................. 8 Higher Education Equal Opportunity Program (Act 101) .................................................. 15 Hospitality Management MNE ..................... 34 Hospitality Management West ..................... 70 I Incomplete Grades ...................................... 12 Independent Study ...................................... 13 Information Technology Specialist, Certificate 46 Internships ................................................... 14 Intramurals..................................................... 8 L Late Change of Program Fee ....................... Late Payment Fees ..................................... Learning Differences, Services.................... Liberal Arts, Associate Degree MNE ........... Liberal Arts, Associate Degree West ........... Liberal Arts, Communication Concentration Liberal Arts, Radio Programming Concentration .......................................... Library.......................................................... Life Experience Credit ................................. 11 17 15 36 71 37 38 15 14

M Medical Assistant, Certificate....................... 46 Medical Insurance Coding Specialist, Certificate ................................................ 47 Medical Laboratory Technician, Associate Degree..................................................... 39 Medical Transcriptionist, Certificate ............. 47 Mercyhurst College Administration .............. 76 Mercyhurst College Officers ........................ 76 Mercyhurst College Purpose and Mission ..... 7

82

Board of trustees / officers / board members / association of mercy colleges

Mercyhurst North East BOARD Of TRUSTEES OffICERS

MARLENE D. MOSCO `68

Chair of the Board Erie, PA

RICHARD A. LANZILLO `83

Vice Chair Erie, PA

ROBERT S. MILLER

Secretary North East, PA

SISTER JOANNE K. COURNEEN, RSM `64

Assistant Secretary Buffalo, NY

Second Assistant Secretary Erie, PA

MARY ELLEN DAHLKEMPER `73

BOARD MEMBERS

PHILIP J. BELFIORE

Erie, PA Erie, PA

DENNIS R. MARIN

Erie, PA

SISTER MARY ANN SCHIMSCHEINER, RSM

Buffalo, NY Erie, PA Erie, PA Erie, PA

TERRENCE W. CAVANAUGH VERNON D. DOBBS,

Fairview, PA

ROBERT MAZZA

North East, PA Erie, PA Erie, PA Erie, PA

WILLIAM C. SENNETT, ESQ. SISTER MAURA SMITH, RSM, `50 MSGR. L. THOMAS SNYDERWINE, JANE THEUERKAUF

Erie, Pa. Erie, PA

OWEN J. MCCORMICK DESMOND J. McDONALD MARCO A. MONSALVE HELEN F. MULLEN, `47

Moon Township, PA

ROSEMARY DURKIN `77

Princeton, NJ Erie, PA Erie, PA

MARY FELICE DUSKA, RSM `64 THOMAS J. GAMBLE, (ex officio) ELIZABETH M. GREENLEAF `52

Meadville, PA Erie, PA Erie, PA Erie, PA

FRANK B. VICTOR `87 ON LEAVE F. BRADY LOUIS

Erie, PA

SISTER MARIA O'CONNOR, RSM, `50

Erie, PA Erie, PA

DAVID HYLAND MYRON JONES CHARLES G. KNIGHT WILLIAM G. LEWIS

North East, PA Erie, PA

BRUCE H. RAIMY GARY W. RENAUD

Fairview, PA

TRUSTEE EMERITI (Non-Voting) CHARLES H. BRACKEN

Erie, PA

KATHLEEN C. ROHM

Mayville, NY

A. JAMES FREEMAN

Long Boat, FL Erie, PA

MICHAEL A. MALPIEDI `81

New Albany, OH/Naples, FL

ELLEN H. RYAN `64

BARRETT C. WALKER JAMES A. ZURN

Dallas, TX

DINORAH SANCHEZ `10

Baytown, TX

Association of Mercy Colleges

CARLOW UNIVERSITY

Pittsburg, PA 15213 DALLAS, PA 18612 OMAHA, NE 68124

MARIAN COURT COLLEGE

SWAMPSCOTT, MA 01907 Des Moines, IA 50309 Toledo, OH 43624 ERIE, PA 16546

SAINT JOSEPH COLLEGE

WEST HARTFORD, CT 06117 STANDISH, ME 04062 CHICAGO, IL 60655

COLLEGE MISERICORDIA COLLEGE OF SAINT MARY GEORGIAN COURT COLLEGE

LAKEWOOD, NJ 08701

MERCY COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES MERCY COLLEGE OF NORTHWEST OHIO MERCYHURST COLLEGE MOUNT ALOYSIUS COLLEGE

CRESSON, PA 16630

SAINT JOSEPH'S COLLEGE SAINT XAVIER COLLEGE SALVE REGINA COLLEGE

NEWPORT, RI 02840 BUFFALO, NY 14220 Detroit, MI 48219

GWYNEDD-MERCY COLLEGE

GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA 19437

TROCAIRE COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY

MARIA COLLEGE

ALBANY, NY 12208

MOUNT MERCY COLLEGE

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA 52402

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