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on your 2008 Annual Conference 3- or 5-day registration fee when you register by Oct. 13, 2008

Step Up Speak Out

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Conference Program

G AY L O R D N AT I O N A L R E S O RT A N D C O N F E R E N C E C E N T E R WA S H I N G T O N , D C · D E C E M B E R 6 - 1 0 , 2 0 0 8

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he Board of Trustees of the National Staff Development Council is delighted to extend an invitation to you to join us in Washington, DC for our 2008 Annual Conference. This year's premier learning event will be held at the new Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center on the Potomac River. We believe that Washington, DC is an appropriate venue for this year's conference. The theme, "Step Up and Speak Out" is more than a catchy phrase because it serves as a challenge to all attendees

to stand up and be counted among those who are committed to taking actions that will move us closer to achieving NSDC's purpose: Every educator engages in effective professional learning every day so every student achieves. Karen Dyer The NSDC Annual Conference has proven time and time again to be a hub President Center for Creative for accessing ideas, gaining new information, identifying resources, making lasting Leadership Greensboro, NC connections, and having fun in the process--all of which move us toward our purpose. You will be joined by other educators--teachers, principals, district administrators, aspiring leaders, school board members, university professors, regional and state education agency personnel--from around the globe as we focus on what matters most: improved teaching and learning for students and adults. Whether you are a first-time attendee or an NSDC veteran, the 2008 conference promises to be a dynamic learning experience that you won't want to miss! This conference program serves as a professional development tool in itself as it highlights research, trends, and best practices along with the researchers, practitioners, and presenters who will lead these learning experiences. We encourage you and your colleagues to use this guide to facilitate your gaining new knowledge, honing existing skills, and engaging in meaningful conversations with colleagues, friends, thought leaders, and others about the importance of professional learning and the impact it can have in our schools. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we look forward to seeing you "step up and speak out" in Washington, DC this December.

Karen Dyer NSDC President 2008 NSDC BOARD OF TRUSTEES

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Charles Mason President-Elect Mountain Brook Public Schools Birmingham, AL

Sue McAdamis Past President Rockwood School District Eureka, MO

Sydnee Dickson Utah Department of Education Salt Lake City, UT

Sue Showers Coaching for Leadership & Learning Cincinnati, OH

James Roussin Generative Human Systems Coon Rapids, MN

Cheryl Love Retired (DeKalb County Schools) Decatur, GA

Ed Wittchen Ed Wittchen Consulting, Ltd. Bonnyville, AB Canada

Ingrid Carney Boston Public Schools Boston, MA

Step Up Speak Out

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Join Us in DC!

Ted Haynie Conference Chair DC Metro Host Committee

Dear Colleagues, Step Up and Speak Out for high levels of learning for all of our students and for the educators who work with them. December 6-10, 2008, marks NSDC's 40th Annual Conference, and this year it will take place in the DC Metro area. The Host Committee has been working for many months to make every aspect of this conference special for each attendee.

TA B L E O F CONTENTS NSDC President Letter . .2 NSDC Board of Trustees .2 Host Committee Chair Letter . . . . . . . . . . .3 Host Committee . . . . . . . .4 Conference Content Planning Committee . . . .4 Conference Strands . . . . .5 Conference Overview . . .6

From the setting The brand new Gaylord National Resort and Conference Center on the Potomac River at National Harbor, MD, offers a spectacular setting for a spectacular learning experience. Stay on the property and enjoy the more than one million square feet of retail, dining, and entertainment options. To the conference program You will have the opportunity to attend preconference sessions conducted by leading thinkers and practitioners in our field, more than 300 high-quality concurrent sessions, and inspiring keynote addresses by Freeman Hrabowski, Stephen Covey, Alfred Tatum, Linda Darling-Hammond, and Neila Connors. To the evening events Travel a few miles to the National Mall, the Washington Monument, the U.S. Capitol, the White House, and other world-famous sites. Experience a very diverse selection of restaurants or take a water taxi from the hotel across the Potomac to Old Town Alexandria. And, don't miss a special performance by the Capitol Steps. To the interaction and networking Experience a sense of community as you interact with educators from every corner of the U.S. and many other countries. Shared meals and lively discussion are part of the culture of the conference and one of the highlights of the entire experience. To your work place It is crucial that our experiences in Washington, DC, result in improved learning for our children. In our work together, let's think next actions, let's commit to best practices, let's advocate for every child, let's step up and speak out for a brighter tomorrow for educators and students.

Keynote Speakers . . . . . .8 Scholars . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Sponsors and Exhibitors . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Conference Features . . .14 Preconference Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Concurrent Sessions . . .34 About NSDC . . . . . . . . .99 Hotel Information . . . . .101 Registration Information . . . . . . . . . .101 Conference Registration Form . . . .102 Session Registration . .103 NSDC Membership Options . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Topic Index . . . . . . . . .106 Audience Index . . . . . .107 Presenter Index . . . . . .108 Affiliate Contacts . . . . .110

Ted Haynie, Conference Chair DC Metro Host Committee

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D C M E T R O A R E A H O S T C O M M I T T E E ( D C , M D , VA )

CONFERENCE CONTENT PLANNING COMMITTEE Cathy BerlingerGustafson Facilitator Crystal Lake, IL Nikki Barnes Washington, DC Ingrid Carney Boston, MA Mike Ford Clifton Springs, NY Chris Guinther Jefferson City, MO Karen Kearney San Francisco, CA Andrew Kim Manor, TX Janice Ollarvia Country Club Hills, IL Joanne Robinson Toronto, ON, Canada Shelley Zion Denver, CO

Sharon Hemphill Montgomery County Public Schools (MD) Franklin Horstman Anne Arundel County Public Schools (MD) Antoinette Kellaher Prince George's County Public Schools (MD)

Ted Haynie, Chair Calvert County Public Schools (MD) Karen Barnes Baltimore County Public Schools (MD) Denny Berry Fairfax County Public Schools (VA)

Kitty Blumsack Maryland Association of Boards of Education Jeff Maher St. Mary's County Public School (MD) Nancy Carey Maryland State Department of Education

Lenore Cohen Johns Hopkins University (MD) Beverly Echols DC Area Member-at-Large Dorothy Egbufor Washington Teachers' Union (DC)

Judy Newhouse Prince William County Public Schools (VA) Katharine Roed Fairfax County Public Schools (VA) Diane Rymer Baltimore County Public Schools (MD)

Barbara Steverson Virginia Staff Development Council, Inc. Linda Thompson Henrico County Public Schools (VA) Patricia Wiedel Stafford County Public Schools (VA)

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CONFERENCE STRANDS

This year's conference strands are aligned with NSDC's Standards and Strategic Priorities.

STRAND 1: DEVELOPING POLICY AND ADVOCACY FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING What organizational structures are necessary to support the implementation of powerful professional learning? What are successful advocacy strategies for influencing professional learning? What are the critical elements for effective professional learning policies at the federal, state and local level?

STRAND 3: DOCUMENTING THE IMPACT OF PROFESSIONAL LEARNING ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT What organizational structures lead to results-driven professional learning? What evaluative processes demonstrate the link between professional learning and student learning? What evaluative processes provide evidence of professional and student learning? How is research used to drive results? What is the research supporting student learning?

STRAND 6: ENHANCING TEACHING QUALITY What organizational structures and cultures enhance teaching quality? What processes improve teaching quality and classroom learning? What knowledge and skills are necessary to improve teaching quality?

STRAND 7: LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY AS A RESOURCE FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING What organizational structures support the implementation of technology as a professional learning delivery system? In what ways is technology used to support professional learning? What are the research-based content and skills necessary to use technology for effective professional learning?

STRAND 2: DEVELOPING SCHOOL AND DISTRICT LEADERS TO SUSTAIN SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GROWTH What organizational structures and cultures develop and support leadership? In what ways do leaders learn effective skills and strategies to support effective professional learning and school improvement? What research-based knowledge and skills do leaders use to engage the community in sustained, focused school improvement?

STRAND 4: APPLYING KNOWLEDGE OF RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE TO NARROW THE LEARNING GAP What organizational structures and cultures support the narrowing of the learning gap? What are the ways to implement practices that are sensitive to race, class, and culture? What are the research-based knowledge, skills and dispositions critical to narrowing the learning gap?

STRAND 5: TEACHING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF POWERFUL PROFESSIONAL LEARNING What organizational structures ensure a culture for results-driven professional learning? What are effective strategies to implement the NSDC standards? What are the standards-based content and practices that lead to results-driven professional learning?

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Conference Overview

Friday

12.05.08

Monday

7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Registration 7:00 a.m. - 7:30 a.m. Breakfast

12.08.08

Tuesday

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:00 a.m. - 7:30 a.m. Breakfast

12.09.08

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Academy Class of 2009 and Class of 2010 Sessions 5:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. First-Time Conference Goers Orientation 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Registration 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Meet and Greet

7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m. General Session 1 Keynote Address: Freeman Hrabowski III 8:30 a.m. - 5:45 p.m. Exhibits and NSDC Foundation Silent Auction

7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m. General Session 3 Keynote Address: Alfred Tatum 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Exhibits and NSDC Foundation Silent Auction 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (G & I) 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (H & J) 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Roundtable 3 12:15 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. General Session 4 Keynote Address: Stephen Covey 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (K) 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (L) (G & H continued) 5:45 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. NSDC Business Meeting

Saturday

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Registration

12.06.08

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (A & C) 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (B & D) 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Roundtable 1 12:15 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Lunch

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Preconference and Academy Sessions

Sunday

7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Registration

12.07.08

1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. General Session 2 Keynote Address: Linda Darling-Hammond 2:30 p.m .- 5:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (E) 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Session E03 Affiliate Leaders Meeting 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions (F) (A & B continued) 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Roundtable 2 4:45 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Reception 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. State and Provincial Affiliate Receptions

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Preconference Sessions 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Exhibits Preview 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Exhibits Grand Opening and NSDC Foundation Silent Auction 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Academy Reception and Academy Graduation 6:00 p.m. - 6:45 p.m. First-Time Conference Goers Orientation 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. Member Reception 7:45 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Capital Steps Performance 8:45 p.m. Dance Sponsored by Host Committee

Wednesday

7:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Registration

12.10.08

7:45 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Concurrent Sessions (M) 9:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Brunch 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. General Session 5 Keynote Address: Neila Connors 12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Post Conference Sessions (P) 3:00 p.m. Conference Adjourns

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NSDC STANDARDS

S T R AT E G I C PRIORITIES

Priority 1: Affecting the policy context Priority 2: Examining the evidence Priority 3: Narrowing the achievement gap Priority 4: Developing school leaders Priority 5: Engaging thought leaders

C O N T E X T S TA N D A R D S I LEARNING COMMUNITIES: Staff development that improves the learning of all students organizes adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school and district.

P R O C E S S S TA N D A R D S IV DATA-DRIVEN: Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses disaggregated student data to determine adult learning priorities, monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement. V EVALUATION: Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses multiple sources of information to guide improvement and demonstrate its impact. VI RESEARCH-BASED: Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares educators to apply research to decision making. VII DESIGN: Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses learning strategies appropriate to the intended goal. VIII LEARNING: Staff development that improves the learning of all students applies knowledge about human learning and change. IX COLLABORATION: Staff development that improves the learning of all students provides educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate.

C O N T E N T S TA N D A R D S X EQUITY: Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares educators to understand and appreciate all students, create safe, orderly and supportive learning environments, and hold high expectations for their academic achievement. XI QUALITY TEACHING: Staff development that improves the learning of all students deepens educators' content knowledge, provides them with research-based instructional strategies to assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards, and prepares them to use various types of classroom assessments appropriately. XII FAMILY INVOLVEMENT: Staff development that improves the learning of all students provides educators with knowledge and skills to involve families and other stakeholders appropriately.

II LEADERSHIP: Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires skillful school and district leaders who guide continuous instructional improvement. III RESOURCES: Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires resources to support adult learning and collaboration.

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Keynote Speakers

Freeman A. Hrabowski III

Monday a.m. Keynote

Linda DarlingHammond

Monday p.m. Keynote

Alfred Tatum

Tuesday a.m. Keynote

ACADEMIC LEADERSHIP: CREATING A CLIMATE OF SUCCESS FOR ALL STUDENTS

Freeman Hrabowski III has served as president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County since 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with emphasis on minority participation and performance. Hrabowski serves as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and universities and school systems nationally. He also sits on several corporate and civic boards. Hrabowski has co-authored two books, Beating the Odds and Overcoming the Odds, focusing on parenting and high-achieving AfricanAmerican males and females in science. A child-leader in the Civil Rights Movement, he was prominently featured in Spike Lee's 1997 documentary, Four Little Girls, on the racially motivated bombing in 1963 of Birmingham's Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. His recent awards include election to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, the prestigious McGraw Prize in Education, and the U.S. Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, focusing on higher education administration and statistics. He holds a number of honorary degrees from Haverford College, Princeton University, Duke University, the University of AlabamaBirmingham, Gallaudet University, Goucher College, the Medical University of South Carolina, and Binghamton University.

TEACHING AS THE LEARNING PROFESSION: TODAY'S CHALLENGE, TOMORROW'S AGENDA

Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University, where she launched the Stanford Educational Leadership Institute and the School Redesign Network. She is currently serving as education policy adviser to U.S. Sen. Barack Obama. DarlingHammond was also William F. Russell Professor in the Foundations of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. As the founding executive director of the National Commission for Teaching and America's Future, Darling-Hammond catalyzed major policy changes across the U.S. to improve the quality of teacher education and teaching. She began her career as a public school teacher and co-founded a preschool, daycare center, and a charter public high school. She has also served as senior social scientist and director of the RAND Corporation's Education and Human Resources Program and as director of the National Urban Coalition's Excellence in Education Program. Her research, teaching, and policy work focus on issues of teaching quality, school reform, and educational equity. Among her more than 200 publications is The Right to Learn, which was the

FROM RESISTANCE TO RESILIENCE: USING A MORE 'ANATOMICALLY' COMPLETE MODEL OF LITERACY INSTRUCTION

Alfred Tatum is a renowned literacy expert working in the Department of Literacy at Northern Illinois University. He also serves on the National Advisory Reading Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He provides professional development support to schools across the nation interested in addressing the literacy needs of students characterized as vulnerable, particularly African-American adolescent males. Before joining the faculty of Northern Illinois University, Tatum was a senior program associate in the Center for Literacy of the North Central Region Education Lab. He also served as assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Maryland, director in the Reading Clinic at Buffalo State College in

ALFRED TATUM New York, and as a research intern for the Rainbow PUSH coalition in Chicago. Tatum's career began as an eighth-grade teacher on the south side of Chicago. A published author, Tatum's work has appeared in the three major journals of the International Reading Association. Among his works are Breaking Down Barriers that Disenfranchise AfricanAmerican Adolescents in Low-Level Reading Tracks and A Road Map for Reading Specialists Entering Schools Without Exemplary Reading Programs. His latest book, Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males: Closing the Achievement Gap, was published in 2005. Tatum received his B.S. from Northern Illinois University, and his M.Ed. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Chicago.

LINDA DARLINGHAMMOND recipient of the American Educational Research Association's Outstanding Book Award for 1998, and Teaching as the Learning Profession, co-edited with Gary Sykes, which was the recipient of the National Staff Development Council's Outstanding Book Award for 2000. Darling-Hammond received her B.A. from Yale University, and her Ed.D. in Urban Education from Temple University.

FREEMAN A. HRABOWSKI III

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Keynote Speakers

Stephen Covey

Tuesday p.m. Keynote

Neila Connors

Wednesday a.m. Keynote

Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson

INSIGHTS INTO LEADERSHIP

Stephen Covey is a leadership authority, family expert, teacher, organizational consultant, and author. He dedicates his life to teaching principle-centered living and leadership to individuals, families, and organizations. He is cofounder and vice chairman of FranklinCovey, the leading global professional services firm, with offices in 123 countries. His organizational legacy to the world is the Covey Leadership Center. A merger, in 1997, of Covey Leadership Center with Franklin Quest created FranklinCovey. FranklinCovey shares

IF YOU DON'T FEED THE TEACHERS THEY EAT THE STUDENTS

Neila Connors is the founder and president of N.A.C. CONNECTIONS INC., a corporation dedicated to the implementation of positive attitudes and actions in GWENDOLYN WEBBJOHNSON Backup Keynote

NEILA CONNORS people. Working with students in grades K-12, Connors has been an elementary and middle school teacher, high school advanced placement coordinator, International Baccalaureate coordinator, and administrator. At the Florida Department of Education she was responsible for coordinating the development of state curriculum frameworks for high school teachers and administrators. She was also a tenured professor in the Department of Secondary Education at Valdosta State University in Georgia. Connors' research has been in the areas of teacher advisory programs, successful counselors, attitudes of students from rural areas, positive teachers and their characteristics, and homework. Among her most notable publications are S.O.S. (Success-Oriented Strategies) or Teachers of At-Risk Early Adolescents: P.S. - All Early Adolescents Are At Risk! and Homework: A New Direction. Her most recent publication is If You Don't Feed the Teachers, They Eat the Students. She has written numerous articles and has presented to public and private school educators and corporations in all 50 states, Canada, and Europe. Connors received her B.A. from St. Leo College in Florida and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Florida State University.

SERVANT LEADERSHIP: EMPOWERING 21ST CENTURY LEARNERS THROUGH CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE PEDAGOGY

Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson is an assistant professor of educational administration and human resource development at Texas A&M University. She teaches classes in instructional leadership, epistemologies, special populations, analysis of teaching behavior, curriculum development, and multicultural education. She spent seven years at the University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Special Education. Webb-Johnson has served as an educator for 32 years and has been teaching teachers for the past 17 years. Webb-Johnson's research interests include culturally responsive leadership, pedagogy, and teacher development; the disproportionate representation of African-American learners in special education; the empowerment of families in the school context; and culturally responsive and effective classroom management designed to improve educational outcomes. She conducts workshops for school boards, administrators and other school-based staff, diagnosticians, and community organizations.

STEPHEN COVEY Covey's vision, discipline, and passion to inspire, lift, and provide tools for change and growth of individuals and organizations throughout the world. A recipient of awards ranging from International Man of Peace to the National Fatherhood Award, Stephen Covey is continuously engaged in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding through reading and interaction with the diverse, inspirational people he encounters. He is the author of several acclaimed books, including the international bestseller The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and the recently released The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness. Covey has an MBA from Harvard in Business Administration and doctorate from Brigham Young University (Ed.D) in Organizational Behavior.

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Scholars

Monday a.m. Lecture Monday Late a.m. Lecture Monday p.m. Lecture

John Deasy

ENACTING A COMPREHENSIVE REFORM MODEL FOR URBAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS: THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND STORY

John Deasy is the superintendent of Prince George's County Public Schools, the second largest school system in Maryland and the nation's 18th largest district. He leads an organization that offers an innovative, technologyinfused curriculum to 134,000 children from 148 countries, speaking 140 different languages. Prior to this position Deasy was superintendent of the Santa MonicaMalibu Unified School District in California, where he led districtwide reforms using a highly focused set of strategies to improve teaching and learning. These reforms produced dramatic improvements in student learning and were effective in closing the achievement gap. Deasy also served as superintendent, assistant superintendent, director of personnel, and as a high school principal in the Coventry Public Schools in Rhode Island. In New York, he was as an assistant high school principal, taught biology, chemistry, calculus, and English, and coached sports. Deasy is an author, a Broad Fellow, an Annenberg Fellow, State Superintendent of the Year, and a consultant to school districts undertaking high school reform. Deasy earned a B.A. in biology and chemistry and an M.A. in education administration from Providence College. He received his Ph.D. in education from the University of Louisville.

Dennis Sparks

LEADERSHIP FOR "RECULTURING" SCHOOLS

Dennis Sparks serves as a "thinking partner" to leadership teams of education organizations that are committed to the continuous improvement of teaching and learning for all students. He is emeritus executive director of the National Staff Development Council, having served as NSDC's executive director from 1984-2007. He is author of Leading for Results: Transforming Teaching, Learning, and Relationships in Schools, 2nd Edition (Corwin, 2007); Designing Powerful Professional Development for Teachers and Principals (NSDC, 2002); co-author with Stephanie Hirsh of Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn (NSDC, 2000); co-author with Joan Richardson of What is Staff Development Anyway? (NSDC, 1998); and co-author with Stephanie Hirsh of A New Vision for Staff Development (ASCD/NSDC, 1997). Sparks' articles have appeared in a variety of publications, including Educational Leadership, Phi Delta Kappan, The American School Board Journal, The Principal, and The School Administrator. He currently writes a bimonthly online column, "Leading Through Learning," for Phi Delta Kappa. All of Sparks' interviews and articles are accessible on the NSDC web site at www.nsdc.org/library/authors/sparks.cfm.

Margarita Calderón

EXPEDITING READING COMPREHENSION FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

Margarita Calderón is a professor at the Center for Research and Reform in Education at Johns Hopkins University. Calderón taught ESL and bilingual classes in elementary, middle, and high school, and graduate courses in educational leadership/administration and bilingual teacher education. She has authored more than 100 publications, including teachers' manuals, journal articles, and books. She is a principal research scientist at Johns Hopkins University's Center for Research on Education of Students Placed at Risk, and is co-principal investigator for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development on a study of the transition from Spanish reading into English reading. She directs the El Paso Adult Bilingual Curriculum Institute and has recently been appointed

MARGARITA CALDERÓN to the National Literacy Panel on Language Minority Children and Youth. Calderón has a doctorate from Claremont Graduate School with an emphasis on multicultural education and organizational development.

DENNIS SPARKS Sparks has also been a teacher, counselor, co-director of an alternative high school, and director of the Northwest Staff Development Center, a state and federally funded teacher center in Livonia, MI. He completed his Ph.D. in counseling at the University of Michigan in 1976, and has taught at several universities. He speaks frequently throughout North America on topics related to professional learning and leadership.

JOHN DEASY

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Scholars

Tuesday a.m. Lecture Tuesday p.m. Lecture

Kati Haycock

IMPROVING ACHIEVEMENT AND CLOSING GAPS BETWEEN GROUPS: LESSONS FROM SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS ON THE PERFORMANCE FRONTIER

Kati Haycock currently serves as president of Education Trust. Established in 1990, the Trust advocates for what's right for young people, especially those who are poor or are members of minority groups. The Trust also provides hands-on assistance to urban school districts and universities working together to improve student achievement, kindergarten through college.

Vera Blake

SUCCESS IS THE ONLY OPTION: USING THE RESEARCH TO SUPPORT CHANGE

Vera Blake is a retired principal of Falls Church High School in Falls Church, Fairfax County, VA. She also served as principal for 12 years at Homes Middle

VERA BLAKE School in Fairfax County. Blake was a contributing author of Transforming Ourselves, Transforming Schools: Middle School Change, (NMSA, 2001), coauthored "Middle School Partnerships: The More, the Better" (Principal Magazine, Fall 1999), and "Addressing Diversity Through Partnerships" (Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, Summer 1998). She was the 2000 Virginia Middle School Principal of the Year, the 1999 Fairfax County Principal of the Year, and a 2000 Washington Post Distinguished Educational Leader. Blake now works as a school improvement coach and consultant for several school districts in Illinois, Michigan, Nebraska, Virginia, Hawaii, Texas, Washington, DC, and St. Croix and St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Blake serves as a professional development consultant for ASCD. She also serves as a cadre member for ASCD for What Works in Schools and Differentiated Instruction and as a member of National Middle School Association's Site-Based Services Cadre. She received her B.S. from St. Paul's College, her M.Ed from the University of Virginia, and her Ed.D from Vanderbilt University.

KATI HAYCOCK Before coming to Education Trust, Haycock served as executive vice president of the Children's Defense Fund, the nation's largest child advocacy organization. A native Californian, Haycock founded and served as president of the Achievement Council, a statewide organization that provides assistance to teachers and principals who are seeking to improve student achievement in predominantly minority schools. Before that, she served as director of the Outreach and Student Affirmative Action programs for the nine-campus University of California system. Haycock received her B.A. in political science from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her M.A. in education policy from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Sponsors & Exhibitors

SPONSORS

(as of June 1, 2008)

EXHIBITORS

(as of June 1, 2008)

P L AT I N U M

MetLife Foundation Teachscape Solution Tree

BRONZE

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Bill of Rights Institute CHARACTER COUNTS! eCOVE Software Education Week/Teacher Sourcebook Educator's Virtual Mentor eSchool Solutions ETS Eye On Education FranklinCovey Company

SAIL for Education Sanron - Teach Me Writing Scarf King School Improvement Network SchoolDataDirect.org Shell Educational Publishing Shurley Instructional Materials, Inc. Silver Strong & Associates/Thoughtful Education Press Solution Tree Staff Development for Educators/Crystal Springs Books Talent-Max, Inc. Teachers College Press Teachscape TeachFirst, Inc. Tool Thyme for Trainers TrueNorthLogic Wavelength WestEd Whaley Gradebook WIDE World at Harvard Graduate School of Education

New Teacher Center at UCSC

S TA R

Just ASK Publications & Professional Development

The Great Books Foundation Great Source IDE Corp. Jossey Bass, A Wiley Imprint Just ASK Publications & Professional Development Learning First, Inc. Learning Sciences International Math Solutions Professional Development Mindsteps Inc. My Learning Plan New Teacher Center @ UCSC PBS Teacherline The Pin Man-OK/PositivePins.com Recorded Books Regent University Regional Training Center Renaissance Learning Responsive Classroom Rigby Professional Development

Plan now! Attend NSDC's 40th Annual Conference to meet and learn from outstanding practitioners, researchers, authors, and consultants.

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"

I will not miss NSDC's conference.

-- Past Conference Participant

What Makes NSDC's Annual Conference THE Learning Conference?

NSDC conference participants become a community of learners as they experience cutting-edge keynotes and general sessions, participate in interactive learning sessions, and form lasting professional relationships.

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It's the best investment you can make to promote professional learning that advances educator and student performance. Several educators report this conference to be "the one" they attend every year. They say it's their annual travel request because of its high standard of relevant and informative breakout sessions.

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The Program

· Develop new knowledge and hone existing skills. · Engage in meaningful conversations with thought leaders and colleagues. · Acquire tools you can apply to your work with teachers and students · Push your thinking to a higher level through distinguished scholar lectures. · Address your priority issues through beginner, advanced, and leadership tracks. · Attend pre- and post-conferences to delve more deeply into priority areas. · Learn about colleague's accomplishments, challenges, and lessons learned.

The On-Site Experience

· Family-style sit down meals encourage conversation and promote relationship building. · Reserved space in ticketed sessions means your presenter is expecting you and has materials ready. · Daily receptions ensure time for expanding one's network. · Reflect on new learning and its application in small discussion groups. · More than 100 exhibitors offer valuable products and resources specific to professional learning. ACCESS NEW IDEAS GAIN NEW KNOWLEDGE LEARN FROM THOUGHT LEADERS IDENTIFY RESOURCES MAKE CONNECTIONS

All the sessions I attended were "right on target" with what I needed this year.

-- Past Conference Participant

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"

I came away reenergized and enthusiastic about my job.

-- Past Conference Participant

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Conference Features

NSDC Foundation Silent Auction Support Impacting the Future Now Foundation. Bid on items at the silent auction during exhibit hall hours. Special pointers are indicated throughout the 2008 Conference Program. Please read all the recommendations before you finalize your conference plans. General Sessions and Keynote Presenters General sessions begin after breakfast on Monday and Tuesday, lunch on Monday and Tuesday, and brunch on Wednesday. General sessions feature NSDC leaders, special guests, and student performances. Keynote speakers address the audience at the conclusion of each general session. NSDC allows approximately 45 minutes for meal service. Meals will not be served once the general session has begun. NSDC has a long-held tradition in which participants eat meals together in the spirit of camaraderie and networking. We encourage you to come to each general session and sit with different people each time. Scholars Scholar Lectures feature selected leaders in the field of professional development, school improvement, and other areas of interest. One hour lectures are scheduled throughout the conference so that attendees have the option of attending all of them. Lecture Series Check one box on the Session Registration page and you will be scheduled for all Keynote Q and A sessions, Scholar Lectures, and the Back-up Keynote. This option is recommended for attendees who prefer lecture-style learning. Exhibit Hall Sessions Each year some conference attendees regret they did not schedule time to spend in the NSDC exhibit hall. At the 2008 Annual Conference attendees will have the option to register for concurrent sessions scheduled in the exhibit hall that feature selected exhibitors and their clients as well as offer time to visit with other exhibitors. These sessions can be found at D21, F24, J20.

One-on-One Coaching Sessions Members of Coaching for Results Inc. are providing the gift of one-on-one coaching to conference attendees. Give yourself time to explore your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities... a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a tough situation. Sign up for a coaching session by selecting one of the following sessions: D22, F25, J21, L32, M61. NSDC Roundtable Track NSDC Roundtables offer attendees the opportunity to survey a number of programs in a short period time. Attendees registering for the Roundtable track will be provided tickets for sessions RT1, RT2, and RT3. This will entitle attendees to select six small group sessions to attend. In addition attendees may select a longer session for Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday morning. Roundtable track attendees may also pick up tickets to attend question and answer sessions with the conference keynoters. Beginner and Advanced Sessions To better serve your individual learning needs, some presenters identified their sessions at the beginner or advanced levels. All other sessions are planned for participants with intermediate knowledge of the topic. Post-Conference Sessions NSDC is offering specially selected three-hour sessions after the final general session on Wednesday. This is available to attendees who register for the Wednesday one-day regular conference and also to those three-day or five-day registrants who choose the Wednesday post-conference for an additional $25.

Meals and Receptions Individuals who register for a preconference program are invited to the Friday reception and will receive coffee and lunch. Individuals who register for the three-day regular conference program may attend the Sunday reception, Exhibit Hall and Affiliate receptions on Monday evening, breakfast and lunch on Monday and Tuesday, and brunch on Wednesday. Conference meals are selected to support a variety of dietary needs and preferences. First-Timer Orientation First-time conference goers will want to attend a special session at 6 p.m. Sunday with Executive Director Stephanie Hirsh, President Karen Dyer, and Host Committee Chair Ted Haynie. They will share exciting information on NSDC goals, member benefits, and tips on how to get the most from the conference. They will then escort first-timers to the NSDC member reception.

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PC101 ADVOCACY FOR HIGH-QUALITY PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Staff development leaders often consider advocacy to be the work of lobbyists and policy makers. That view overlooks the influential role that educators can play as advocates for powerful professional development every day. Become a frontline advocate for high-quality professional development. Consider why it is critical to own the role of advocacy. Focus on the development of knowledge and skills for advancing this important work. Participants will: · Identify why advocacy for high-quality professional development is important. · Learn tools and strategies to assist with advocacy work. · Determine an advocacy agenda and strategy. · Practice giving laser talks to increase skill when talking with decision makers.

Kitty Blumsack, Maryland Association of Boards of Education, Montgomery Village, MD, [email protected] Kitty Blumsack is the director of board development for the Maryland Association of Boards of Education (MABE). She works with school board and school system staff in strategic planning, team building, communication skills, community engagement, and leadership topics. Prior to joining MABE, she worked for Montgomery County Public Schools as a teacher and administrator. She is past president of the Maryland Council of Staff Developers and a Fulbright Scholar. She is a former NSDC trustee and past president. Sharon Cox, Germantown, MD, [email protected] Sharon Cox is an elected member of the Montgomery County Maryland Board of Education and has served as its president and vice president. She also chaired the board's policy committee and represented the board on the district's Continuous Improvement Steering Committee. A graduate of Harvard's Public Education Leadership Project and member of the MCPS leadership team, Cox helped craft staff development's critical role in eliminating achievement gaps among diverse groups of students by addressing individual and institutional barriers to equity. Cox works with school districts to improve student outcomes through an alignment of good governance, planning, and data monitoring.

PC102 LEADING IN YOUR ROLE: WORKING TOGETHER TO IMPACT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Participants may hold various leadership roles and bring varied backgrounds in professional development and coaching, but what everyone will have in common is the desire and the requirement to increase student achievement. Facilitating agreement through conversations about approaches and outcomes will be addressed. Participants will: · Gain structure and process for linking staff development to changes in teacher practice and to student achievement. · Develop models for increasing teacher-to-teacher communication focused on teacher learning. · Learn strategies for involving reluctant and resistant staff in professional development and change. · Connect the work of staff developers, coaches, and school principals, focused on observable teacher and student changes.

Stephen Barkley, Performance Learning Systems Inc., New Hope, PA, [email protected] Stephen Barkley is executive vice president of Performance Learning Systems, Inc., and an internationally recognized teacher-educator with expertise in designing training programs to meet the criteria set by state departments of education and school districts. He has extensive experience in helping district personnel design staff development models. Barkley presents keynote addresses, short- and long-term workshops for teachers and administrators in classroom management, instruction, and supervision skills. He is author of three books including Tapping Student Effort: Increasing Student Achievement, WOW! Adding Pizzazz to Teaching and Learning, and Quality Teaching in a Culture of Coaching.

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PC103 CULTURAL PROFICIENCY: A FRAMEWORK FOR CRITICAL CONVERSATIONS ABOUT RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE LEADING TO SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT Cultural proficiency is a mind-set employing an inside-out approach to change that will lead us to esteem the cultures of others as well as our own. Plan for engaging in reflective practices and application of the tools of cultural proficiency­the continuum, principles, essential elements, and barriers­by shifting conversations from blame to collective responsibility for leading profound transformational change in schools. Participants will: · Learn the cultural proficiency continuum and guiding principles and apply them to educational achievement. · Apply a process for surfacing assumptions that underlie interpretations about students that lead to actions. · Practice tools for facilitating dialogue about race, class, and culture through the lens of cultural proficiency.

Franklin CampbellJones, CampbellJones & Associates, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] Franklin CampbellJones is the vice president of CampbellJones & Associates and co-author of The Culturally Proficient School: An Implementation Guide for School. As a facilitator of organization learning and cultural diversity, he has addressed audiences in Thailand, the People's Republic of China, Guam, Costa Rica, and Canada. Additionally, he works directly with schools and districts throughout the United States to help them meet the challenges of academic and social needs of all students. CampbellJones has served as a high school social science and reading teacher, school administrator, district office director, state director for California School Leadership Academy, and university professor. Brenda CampbellJones, CampbellJones & Associates, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] Brenda CampbellJones is president of CampbellJones & Associates. Formerly she was an area superintendent of a large urban school district, executive director of one of Azusa Pacific University's regional campuses, and executive director of the California Leadership Academy. She provides staff development and technical assistance to school districts throughout the United States. CampbellJones has served students as a teacher, an elementary principal, and an award-winning middle school principal.

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PC104 INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING: WHAT WE ARE LEARNING ABOUT EFFECTIVE COACHING PRACTICES Researchers at the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning (CRL) have been studying instructional coaching for more than a decade. In the past two years, they have conducted three major qualitative and quantitative studies to identify the attributes of effective coaches, describe the impact coaches can have on teacher practices, and develop a tool (Real Learning Index) that coaches can use to increase student achievement. Engage in several learning structures designed to prompt dialogue and deeper understanding. Participants will: · Review the key components of CRL's approach as well as the nuts and bolts of instructional coaching. · Learn how coaches enroll teachers, model lessons, observe lessons, discuss data, and reflect on their practices. · Explore the partnership philosophy that is the theory behind this approach and the research that has been conducted on this model of coaching.

Jim Knight, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, [email protected] Jim Knight is a research associate at the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning. Knight's articles on instructional coaching have been published in JSD, Principal Leadership, and The School Administrator. He has written two books on instructional coaching. Knight is frequently asked to guide professional learning for instructional coaches and has presented and consulted in more than 35 states.

Be intense! Select one or two preconference sessions and experience deeper learning.

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PC105 CREATING THE CONTEXT FOR COLLABORATION: A TOOLKIT TO SUPPORT SCHOOL-LEVEL COLLABORATIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING New Jersey has created a statewide framework for collaborative, school- and district-level professional learning. To implement the framework, the state Department of Education partnered with NSDC Deputy Executive Director Joellen Killion to create a toolkit to support schools and districts. Collaborative Professional Learning In School and Beyond provides a rich resource of tools, templates, and research that gives planning teams and learning teams workable models to focus professional learning on increasing student success. Examine the toolkit and consider strategies and tools to create that initial understanding of collaborative professional learning, strengthen school and district culture, help school teams focus on a common goal, understand the roles of the stakeholders in the school, troubleshoot issues that are perceived as barriers to professional learning, and develop a strong evaluation system that ensures revisions are based on needs. Participants will: · Identify the components of collaborative learning that focus on student outcomes. · Identify the major decision areas that impact effective professional learning. · Assess a school's or district's needs and readiness for implementing collaborative, team-based professional learning. · Understand how the toolkit supports team development and its focus on student learning. · Develop an initial plan for powerful professional learning through collaboration.

Victoria Duff, New Jersey Department of Education, Trenton, NJ, [email protected] Victoria Duff is the teacher quality coordinator in the Office of Professional Standards for the New Jersey Department of Education. She is responsible for supporting the implementation of local district mentoring programs, overseeing the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards state subsidy program, and coaching school districts in developing strategic improvement plans. She facilitated the publication of the Mentoring for Quality Induction Toolkit for statewide distribution and was involved in the editing of the Collaborative Professional Learning In School and Beyond Toolkit. Both were written in partnership with NSDC, the New Jersey Mentoring Task Force and the Professional Teaching Standards Board. She is a former chair of the New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards Board. Michael Cohan, New Jersey Education Association, Union, NJ, [email protected] Michael Cohan is the director of professional development and instructional issues for the New Jersey Education Association. His professional experience includes Social Studies teacher and coordinator of staff development and mentoring for the Union Public Schools. He was a founding member and chair of the New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards Board and co-chair of the New Jersey Quality Teaching and Learning Task Force, where he advised the commissioner and State Board of Education on the issues of teacher leadership, support for effective teacher practice, and professional development. Linda Mayer, Northern Valley School District, Demarest, NJ, [email protected] Linda Mayer is the supervisor of the Northern Valley Schools Consortium Staff Development Program and a professional development provider. As founder and chairperson of the regional professional development board she has received recognition for her work in advancing teacher leadership. Mayer is a graduate of the NSDC Academy XIII and the NSDC Wachovia Coaches Academy. As current president of the New Jersey Staff Development Council she has increased statewide membership and introduced programs that support educators in sustaining high levels of collaboration. Peggy Stewart, Vernon Township High School, Vernon, NJ, [email protected] Peggy Stewart has taught world history and U.S. history at Vernon Township High School for the past 15 years. She was the New Jersey State Teacher of the Year in 2005. She has served on the New Jersey Quality Teaching and Learning Task Force and the New Jersey International Education Task Force. Stewart also serves on the New Jersey Center for Teaching and Learning Advisory Board, the NJEA Instruction Committee, and is the current chair of the New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards Board. Stewart has been continuously engaged in professional development programs, particularly in the area of international education.

PC106 THE STANDARDS-IN-PRACTICE GAP ANALYSIS PROCESS: CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP BY ELIMINATING THE INSTRUCTIONAL GAP Over the past 10 years and in spite of hard work, progress toward closing the gap has been disappointingly slow. This lack of progress is due, in part, to the failure to address one of the primary causes of achievement differences: the disparity between what many students are taught and what they need to learn to be successful. Learn about the Standards-in-Practice gap analysis process and how it works to reveal and close the instructional gap by ensuring that teachers' assignments are aligned with standards and assessments. Work through the six steps of the Standards-in-Practice gap analysis strategy. Participants will: · Become acquainted with the Standards-in-Practice gap analysis process. · Learn how the six steps provide a framework for professional dialogue that leads to uncovering the information gap and developing targeted instructional intervention.

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· Analyze samples of classroom assignments against standards and assessments, identify the information gap, and discuss strategies to close the instructional gap.

Stephanie Robinson, The Education Trust, Washington, DC, [email protected] Stephanie Robinson is senior adviser at The Education Trust where she provides technical assistance to school districts implementing standards-based reform. Previously, she was a teacher, administrator, and deputy superintendent. While at the Urban League she designed and implemented the National Education Initiative.

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Shana Kennedy, The Education Trust, Washington, DC, [email protected] Shana Kennedy is a senior associate at The Education Trust where she works with teachers on the implementation of Standards-in-Practice. Her publications include Primary Progress, Secondary Challenge: A State-By-State Look At Student Achievement Patterns and An Analysis of Florida's Voluntary Pre-K Program. Prior to joining The Education Trust, Kennedy was an early childhood educator and a professional development coordinator.

PC107 A FRESH LOOK AT POWERFUL PROFESSIONAL LEARNING: THE 2008 EDITION Learn about the new tools, strategies, and designs that are included in the second edition of Powerful Designs for Professional Learning. Interpret twelve qualities of powerful professional learning as they relate to learning communities and use new context, content, and process tools to select appropriate designs for learning communities. Participants will: · Consider the twelve qualities of powerful professional learning in terms of their learning communities. · Use tools for context, content, and process to assess the appropriateness of the designs for their learning communities. · Experience several designs and be able to facilitate those designs within their learning communities. Participants will be required to purchase a copy of Powerful Designs for Professional Learning (2nd edition, NSDC, 2008), for $48.00. Books will be distributed during the session.

Lois Easton, Boulder, CO, [email protected] Lois Easton works as a consultant, coach, and author. She recently retired as director of professional development at Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center, Estes Park, CO. Prior to that, Easton was director of ReLearning Systems at the Education Commission of the States. She is the author of Powerful Designs for Professional Learning (NSDC, 2008) and Engaging the Disengaged: How Schools Can Help Struggling Students Succeed.

PC108 LEADING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES (PLC): VOICES FROM RESEARCH AND PRACTICE What are your PLC participants learning? How are they sharing their learning throughout their school or across their districts? The purpose of a PLC is the continuous learning of the professionals in the school. How these professionals decide what they need to learn, how they learn it, and how they apply their learning to classroom practice is the focal point of this session. Participants will: · Explore the relationship between principals' and teachers' continuous learning and student success. · Review the research and define a PLC and its components. · Examine what leaders do to initiate, develop, and sustain a PLC. · Learn how to assess the PLC at the school, classroom, and student levels.

Shirley Hord, Boerne, TX, [email protected] Shirley Hord is a consultant and NSDC Scholar Laureate. She has authored articles and books on school-based professional development, school change and improvement, and professional learning communities. Her most recent publications are Learning Together, Leading Together: Changing Schools Through Professional Learning Communities and The Role of Leaders in Creating and Sustaining Professional Learning Communities. Her research, development, and training efforts have taken her across the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa. William Sommers, Austin, TX, [email protected] William Sommers over the last 30 years has been a principal, university professor, and independent consultant. He is also a senior fellow for the Urban Leadership Academy at the University of Minnesota. He is a former NSDC trustee and past president. He has co-authored six books and has written many articles regarding coaching, assessment, and reflective thinking.

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December 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC201 CULTURALLY RELEVANT TEACHING: ELIMINATING RACIAL ACHIEVEMENT DISPARITIES AND IMPROVING LEARNING FOR ALL STUDENTS Enter into deep inquiry around why popular "best" pedagogical practices fail to meet the needs of underserved student groups. Examine culturally relevant instructional strategies designed to meet the needs of marginalized student populations and eliminate racial, economic, and linguistic achievement disparities. Learn to engage others in courageous conversations and use courageous instructional practices that support the elimination of predictable race, culture, and class achievement disparities. Participants will: · Develop requisite skill, knowledge, and capacity for examining four complex themes: racial identity development, critical race theory, instructional racism, and culturally relevant teaching. · Review the agreements, conditions, and compass of courageous conversations. · Investigate a framework for systemic equity transformation used by districts in addressing the impact of race on student achievement. · Understand and be able to converse about the vital role that institutional racism plays in the educational failure of students.

Jamie Almanzan, Pacific Educational Group, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Jamie Almanzan is associate director of teacher development for the Pacific Education Group (PEG). Almanzan has designed and facilitated numerous equity-focused professional development seminars and training for teachers and administrators around the nation. At PEG, he leads the Collaborative Action Research for Equity program for teachers working to close the achievement gap.

PC202 BUILDING SCHOOL CULTURES THROUGH EXPANDED LEADERSHIP Lasting change involves building strong school cultures that engage educational professionals with their colleagues and communities. Learn how to intensify leadership through the development of professional community, organizational learning, and trust within a school by involving teachers, parents, and community in the important work of school improvement. Learn how to diagnose a school's culture and make changes that produce results. Participants will: · Consider the importance of professional community, organizational learning, and trust (PCOLT) as a tool for school improvement and change and be prepared to teach the ideas to others. · Identify the most significant educational cultures and subcultures within schools. · Diagnose the culture of a school using PCOLT themes. · Identify cultural team players and learn how to engage them in intensified leadership roles. · Gain strategies for working with district and building leaders as well as community leaders on shared school improvement goals.

Karen Seashore Louis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Karen Seashore is a professor in the Department of Educational Policy and Administration at the University of Minnesota's College of Education and Human Development and a recipient of NSDC's Contribution to Staff Development award. Her research interests include organizational theory, schools as workplaces, and leadership with a focus on school improvement and school reform. She has devoted over 30 years of research and consulting efforts to improvement in K-12 leadership and policy, primarily in urban secondary schools, and has published 13 books and over 100 articles. Sharon Kruse, University of Akron, Akron, OH, [email protected] Sharon Kruse is a professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership at the University of Akron. Over the past decade she has studied school leadership and successful school improvement practices. She co-authored with Karen Seashore Louis Professionalism and Community: Perspective on Reforming Urban Schools and co-authored with Bob Johnson, Jr. Decision Making for Educational Leaders: Under-Examined Dimensions and Issues.

PC203 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT: THE KEY TO PERFORMANCE-BASED LEARNING Formative assessments correlated to state standards help students examine their own work, adjust their efforts, and perform some do-overs to improve the quality of their performances. Learn how to help educators write engaging and relevant performance tasks, develop criteria checklists to guide students, and create analytical rubrics to showcase quality work. Standards-based checklists and rubrics can be used as a

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response to intervention to help struggling students succeed and as a strategy to help all students work independently to meet and exceed standards and attain a deeper understanding of important concepts. Participants will: · Create valid standards-based formative assessments. · Develop performance tasks to target multiple standards and motivate students to learn. · Create checklists and rubrics to use to provide specific feedback to students. · Prepare an action plan to implement this process and deliver it to other educators.

Kay Burke, Kay Burke & Associates, Inc., Greensboro, GA, [email protected] Kay Burke is a teacher and author who presents interactive workshops focused on standards-based learning, performance assessment, classroom management, portfolio development, and mentoring. She is the co-author of The Portfolio Connection: Student Work Linked to Standards, 3rd edition and Foundations of Meaningful Educational Assessment (2008), She is the author of How to Assess Student Learning, 4th edition, and From Standards to Rubrics in Six Steps: Tools for Assessing Student Learning, K-8.

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PC204 QUALITY TEACHING AND STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH EQUITABLE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Discover what students need to know, what teachers need to know and do, and what administrative leaders need to know and do to create equitable learning environments for all. Consider how organizational leaders embrace a candid look at structures and practices that impede or promote equitable learning. Examine how principals focus at the classroom level to assess the quality of teaching and at the student level to assess the quality of the experiences, relationships, and perceptions that impede or promote equitable learning for all. Participants will: · Discuss the research that addresses the practices and importance of equitable learning environments. · Utilize protocols at an organizational, instructional, and student level to identify strengths and weaknesses of learning environments. · Experience strategies and gain insights on structuring learning for impact. · Develop action steps for creating learning environments with enhanced learning for all students, teachers, and school leaders.

Deborah Childs-Bowen, Samford University, Decatur, GA, [email protected] Deborah Childs-Bowen is the director of the Institute for Teaching and Student Achievement in the School of Education at Samford University in Birmingham, AL. Childs-Bowen has been involved in long-term school improvement projects nationwide and has been a leader in pushing professional learning experiences and research that advance teaching quality, particularly in urban settings. Childs-Bowen is a former NSDC academy mentor, conference presenter, former NSDC trustee and past president.

PC205 MAKING MEETINGS WORK Are you attending more meetings and getting less done? Do you want to get something done rather than hosting or participating in more unproductive meetings? If you answer yes to either of these questions, attend this session and become familiar with the book Making Meetings Work. Gain practical, user-friendly tools to support a collaborative process and improve the quality of meetings, decisions, problem solving, and conflict resolution. Be prepared to participate actively, practice using new strategies, and have fun learning together. Participants will: · Explore the five areas essential for ensuring successful meetings: planning a meeting, getting the group started, running the meeting, making decisions, and taking action. · Understand the processes used to facilitate group work and make efficient use of time. · Clarify the causes for resistance and discuss strategies for overcoming resistance. · Increase your repertoire of facilitation tools. Participants are required to purchase a copy of Making Meetings Work (Corwin, 2007) for $22.00. Books will be distributed at the session.

Ann Delehant, Delehant and Associates, Pittsford, NY, [email protected] Ann Delehant has been a training and development professional for more than 20 years. Delehant has experience as a facilitator, staff developer, teacher, guidance counselor, government relations specialist, curriculum developer, and university instructor. She was director of staff development for the City School District in Rochester, NY, for more than six years. Delehant has worked as a consultant for national firms, professional associations, universities, and in several school districts at both the school and district level.

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PC206 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING TEAMS: TEAMING TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION Looking for a type of team meeting that makes a genuine difference for teachers and students? Professional learning teams engage faculties in sustained, onsite professional learning that builds more relevance into classroom instruction, develops teacher capacity and collegiality, and increases student learning. Acquire tools and procedures for establishing and maintaining professional learning teams in your school. Examine and use a number of field-tested ideas for successful teacher collaboration. Participants will: · Learn how to support the role of professional learning teams in improving teaching quality. · Engage teachers in more successful team meetings and experiences. · Experience learning team tools for organizing and launching teams, setting team goals, engaging teams in successful meetings, maintaining team momentum, and monitoring team progress. · Examine communication channels and other strategies for advancing successful collaborative work schoolwide. Participants are required to purchase A Facilitators Guide to Professional Learning Teams (NSDC, 2008) for $36.00. The books will be distributed during the session.

Anne Jolly, PLTWorks, Warrior, AL, [email protected] Anne Jolly is founder and director of PLTWorks. She conceptualizes, researches, designs, and facilitates processes to build effective communities of educators who learn and grow together for the benefit of their students. Jolly designs instructional tools and materials, and uses both web-based tools and onsite support to help educators sustain productive teams.

PC207 "SIT & GET" WON'T GROW DENDRITES: 20 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING STRATEGIES THAT ENGAGE THE ADULT BRAIN Have you ever attended a boring class and found yourself looking at your watch every five minutes? Chances are, you recollect very little of what you learned and any new learning did not result in meaningful behavior change. Like students, adults learn when actively engaged. Experience 20 brain-compatible strategies for effectively presenting to adult audiences. Learn to use music, storytelling, and movement to enhance your presentation of information. Ensure that teachers and administrators apply your message through strategies such as action research, study groups, and peer coaching. This workshop is both personally and professionally life changing and lots of fun. Participants will: · Explore six precepts of adult-learning theory. · Experience five strategies for making learning memorable. · Generate 10 characteristics of a brain-compatible speech, workshop, or course. · Develop a professional learning lesson plan that will result in behavior change.

Marcia Tate, Conyers, GA, [email protected] Marcia Tate is an educational consultant and a member of the Speaker's Bureau for the Teacher's Workshop. During her 30-year career with the DeKalb (GA) County School System, she served as classroom teacher, reading specialist, language arts coordinator, and staff development director. She is the author of Worksheets Don't Grow Dendrites: 20 Instructional Strategies That Engage the Brain and "Sit and Get" Won't Grow Dendrites: 20 Professional Learning Strategies That Engage the Adult Brain.

PC208 UNLEASHING THE POWER OF COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY: CONNECTING DATA TO RESULTS In one year, schools serving poor students in a rural county in Tennessee doubled the percentage of students reaching proficiency in mathematics. Urban middle and high schools in Ohio demonstrated significant improvement in the percentage of students proficient in mathematics on the state assessment in the same timeframe. Learn about a structured process of collaborative inquiry that is contributing to these and other examples of gains in student achievement. The approach features the development of data coaches, school and district leaders who lead data teams through a process of building a foundation, identifying a student learning problem, verifying causes of student learning problems, generating and monitoring solutions, and achieving results. Participants will: · Experience the process firsthand through a data simulation. · Gain insights into how to marshal the power of data and collaborative inquiry as catalysts for equitable school improvement.

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· Articulate a theory of action for connecting data use to improved results for students. · Gain skills in facilitating data-driven dialogue. · Increase awareness of the assumptions and cultural lenses that we bring to data interpretation. All participants are required to purchase a copy of A Data Coach's Guide to Improving Learning for All Students: Unleashing the Power of Collaborative Inquiry, Nancy Love, Katherine E. Stiles, Susan Mundry, and Kathryn DiRanna, (Corwin, 2008) $30.57. Books will be distributed at the session.

Nancy Love, Research for Better Teaching, Acton, MA, [email protected] Nancy Love is director of program development at Research for Better Teaching. She is the former director of the Using Data Project, a collaboration between TERC and WestEd, where she led the development of a comprehensive professional development program to improve teaching and learning through effective and collaborative use of school data. Love has authored and co-authored several books and articles on data use and professional development. In 2006, she was awarded the NSDC Susan Loucks-Horsley Award in recognition of her contribution to the field of staff development.

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PC209 WRITING FOR PROFESSIONAL GROWTH Writing about your work is a professional learning strategy that will help you reflect on your actions and explore what you have learned. Walk through a process that will help you write an article for a professional publication. Unlike journal writing, writing for professional publications allows educators to share what they have learned with others. Do not expect to learn how to write a dissertation or an article for a peer-reviewed journal. Attending with a colleague who will share the writing experience with you is encouraged. Participants will: · Write an introduction and abstract for an article. · Prepare an organizational plan for an article. · Learn how to complete and self-edit an article. · Learn how to submit their article for publication. · Learn how to work with an editor after an article is accepted for publication.

Joan Richardson, National Staff Development Council, Grosse Pointe Park, MI, [email protected] Joan Richardson is director of communications for NSDC and executive editor of JSD. She oversees NSDC's book publishing and website. Richardson created the NSDC newsletters Tools for Schools, The Learning Principal, The Learning System, and Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3). Before joining NSDC, she was an award-winning education writer for the Detroit Free Press. She was the recipient of the Michigan Journalism Fellowship and served six years on her local school board.

PC210 POWERFUL TEACHING STRATEGIES FOR 21ST CENTURY LEARNERS We all know the future will be greatly impacted by the development of new digital tools. But have we considered how the digital world is impacting the students who enter our classrooms? Examine the profound implications of how digital kids process, interact, and communicate in current learning environments. Hear about the shift in the basic paradigm of teaching that is required to prepare students for the communication and information age. Consider how educators can teach effectively in an age when new technologies enter the new digital landscape at an astonishing rate. Learn the principles and processes that transcend these new technologies. Participants will: · Gain an understanding of various research-based strategies that can be used to optimize learning by the digital generation in the new digital landscape. · Examine instructional strategies against current findings from the social, psychological, and neurosciences on how effective teaching and learning occurs. · Learn how to meet curricular goals and prepare students with the skills, knowledge and understandings beyond content recall necessary to meet the realities of the 21st century.

Ian Jukes, InfoSavvy Group Consultants Inc., Kelonawa, BC, Canada, [email protected] Ian Jukes is the director of the InfoSavvy Group, an international consulting group that provides leadership and program development. He has been a teacher, an administrator, writer, consultant, university instructor, and keynote speaker. Jukes has written several books and educational series and has more than 100 articles published in various journals. Jukes is the publisher of an online electronic newsletter, the Committed Sardine Blog, which is electronically distributed in over 60 countries. He is the creator and co-developer of TechWorks, the internationally successful K-8 technology framework, and was the catalyst of the NetSavvy and InfoSavvy information literacy series.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC301 QUALITY SECONDARY SCHOOLS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND ALL OTHER STUDENTS Examine the prerequisites that middle and high school administrators and teachers need to achieve academic success with English language learners. Review the design and pedagogical approach that promotes academic rigor and high expectations, aligned with a focus on academic uses of language. Experience lecture and group engagement focusing on language arts, mathematics, reading, video case studies, and reflection. Participants will: · Consider the importance of "high challenge and high support" pedagogy in supporting adolescent English language learners. · Develop experiential and reflective understanding of practices that accelerate the development of literacy with second language learners. · Review and discuss cases of schools where progress is beginning to take place. Participants will be asked to read two articles prior to attending the program: "Structural obstacles that inhibit student success, access and engagement: Effective program design and instructional approaches for immigrant students at the secondary level," Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics and Delta Systems, and "Scaffolding instruction for English language learners: A conceptual framework," The International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 9(2), 159-180. Access to these articles will be sent prior to the conference.

Aída Walqui, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Aida Walqui, director of teacher professional development at WestEd, is responsible for coordinating teacher professional development and leading the organizational effort to support teachers throughout their careers. Previously, Walqui taught at the University of California, Santa Cruz and at Stanford University, where she coordinated the cross-cultural linguistic and academic development emphasis in the STEP program. She has also taught at universities in Peru, Mexico, and England. Leslie Hamburger, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Leslie Hamburger, associate director of the Quality Teaching for English Learners project at WestEd, designs and conducts professional development in English and Spanish to enhance the expertise of secondary teachers with adolescent English learners. She has held school and district leadership positions, including assistant principal, resource teacher, and curriculum specialist, as well as developer of bilingual, sheltered, transitional, mainstream, and GATE curricula.

PC302 LEADING FOR RESULTS: TRANSFORMING TEACHING, LEARNING, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN SCHOOLS The most important changes in organizations begin with significant changes in leaders' beliefs, the depth of their understanding of critical issues, their speech, and their actions. These changes radiate outward to deeply and permanently alter the culture, processes, and outcomes of an organization. Explore ways district leaders, principals, and teacher leaders can change themselves to address three major barriers to improvement: lack of clarity, resignation, and dependency. Learn to promote transformations in professional learning, teaching, student learning, and relationships within schools. Participants will: · Develop clarity regarding their assumptions, intentions, requests, and "next actions" related to key areas of work. · Apply several "results skills" that increase interpersonal influence. · Identify ways in which other skills addressed in Leading for Results: Transforming Teaching, Learning, and Relationships in Schools, 2nd Edition, can be used in their settings. All participants are required to purchase a copy of Leading for Results: Transforming Teaching, Learning, and Relationships in Schools, 2nd Edition (Corwin, 2006) for $25. Books will be distributed at the session.

Dennis Sparks, Ann Arbor, MI, [email protected] Dennis Sparks served as executive director of the National Staff Development Council for 23 years. Sparks has also been a teacher, counselor, co-director of an alternative high school, and director of a federally funded teacher center. His articles and columns have appeared in a wide variety of publications, including JSD, The School Administrator, Education Week, Educational Leadership, and Phi Delta Kappan. His newest book is Leading for Results: Transforming Teaching, Learning and Relationships in Schools, 2nd Edition. Sparks became emeritus executive director of NSDC in 2007.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC303 FIERCE CONVERSATIONS®: ACHIEVING SUCCESS AT WORK AND IN LIFE, ONE CONVERSATION AT A TIME Learn the foundational skills that will change the way people connect with each other, shift perceptions of what it means to lead, and propel individuals and teams toward success. Learn and practice intuitive, effective frameworks for teaming, coaching, decision making, and confrontation. These models transform the relationships central to collective success within schools and they provide clear road maps for individual and collective development that leads to an open culture that identifies and addresses issues truthfully and effectively, generating the best decisions for the organization. Participants will: · Develop the skill and the will to tackle and resolve an organization's toughest challenges and develop an open, direct, respectful culture. · Examine four robust fierce conversation models that build emotional capital and increase productivity, innovation, and bottom-line results. · Learn that the conversation IS the relationship and the implications of this context at work and at home. · Develop and execute real conversations that propel administrators, teachers, staff, and students to create real results, ultimately enhancing student achievement.

Susan Scott, Fierce Inc., Bellevue, WA, [email protected] Susan Scott is founder and CEO of Fierce Inc., a company committed to large-scale and individual transformation through challenging conversations in the workplace. Previously a high school English teacher, Scott works with schools and youth agencies to provide educators and students with practical, actionable lifelong skills that transform the conversations central to their success. Scott is the author of Fierce Conversations: Achieving Success at Work and in Life, One Conversation at a Time.

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PC304 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: BUILDING 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS Microsoft's Partners in Learning initiative has called on premier learning scientist John Bransford and his associates at the University of Washington Life Science Center and Little Planet Learning to create a program that focuses the conversation in schools on instructional leadership practices. Engage in an interactive simulation that begins as high school principal Jim Forrester contemplates the advice of former high school students when they return to speak to the student body. Consider the similarity of challenges faced in other schools. Tap the expertise of the session leaders and other participants as the group works through issues addressed by the four modules: Dimensions of Change, New Visions, Some Educational Possibilities, and Leadership. All participants will leave with a CD to replicate the process with a school faculty or other appropriate learning team. Please bring a laptop and headphones. Participants will: · Describe the applications of how people learn using the simulation. · Describe the benefits of applying the model to high schools in the midst of reform. · Learn how to lead the simulation with a school's faculty. · Be able to prepare school leaders or other staff developers to use the modules with specific groups. · Capitalize on the expertise of colleagues to strengthen current change efforts.

Toby Herrera, Albuquerque Public schools, Albuquerque, NM, [email protected] Toby Herrera is director of the Albuquerque Public Schools' Student, School and Community Service Center. Previously, he was professional development coordinator with the New Mexico Coalition of School Administrators. During his 31 years as an educator, Herrera was a math teacher, tennis and cross country coach, activities director, high school assistant principal, and high school principal.

Kathy Klock Persing, Redmond, OR, [email protected] Kathy Klock Persing is a consultant involved with a variety of education change programs. She consults in Microsoft Partners in Learning and serves as commissioner for the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future. She spent six years with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle and was responsible for the foundation's original professional development programs. Previously, Persing was executive director of curriculum, instruction, and assessment for the Snohomish (WA) School District.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC305 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION STRATEGIES THAT HELP ENSURE IMPACT FROM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Gain strategies that can help shift practices to a results-focused paradigm and achieve measurable impact from professional development efforts. These strategies are drawn from case studies, published success stories, and real examples of professional development efforts at the instructional team level and school, district, and state agency levels. Begin developing a tool or plan to use in work "back home." Participants will: · Learn how to apply evaluation throughout program implementation using a range of data collection techniques. · Explore ways to work with other leaders across an organization and gain leverage by using common planning and evaluation. · Apply the professional development evaluation strategies to a specific program. · Initiate an action plan that applies the strategies and receive initial feedback.

Robby Champion, Staunton, VA, [email protected] Robby Champion has been an independent consultant since 1990, following her work in education as a classroom teacher, college instructor, state program leader for teacher induction, and branch chief of staff development. Her focus has been to develop leaders and to encourage them to be more strategic in their work. She has written two columns for the JSD --- Skillshop and Taking Measure (1999 through 2006). She has authored several books: Learning the Craft of Training (2000), Tools for Change Workshops (1993), and The Principal as Instructional Leader (with H. E. Behling, 1984). Currently, Champion writes for the Professional Development Idea Exchange, a web board on ASCD's web site.

PC306 CREATING AND SUSTAINING CULTURALLY PROFICIENT LEARNING COMMUNITIES Leaders need to be responsive to different ethnic, linguistic, and religious subcultures or they will place many students at risk of being excluded from the benefits of a high-quality education. By valuing diversity and preserving the cultural dignity of students, cultural proficiency enables educators to create an inclusive and instructionally powerful learning environment. Experience the four tools of cultural proficiency through the use of protocols, readings, and reflective activities. Engage in an in-depth study of the four tools of cultural proficiency. Develop a deeper understanding of the lens of cultural proficiency for effectively supporting equitable education in diverse settings. Participants will: · Gain knowledge of various tools of cultural proficiency including Descriptive Language: The Cultural Proficiency Continuum; Behavioral Competencies: The Essential Elements of Cultural Proficiency; and Underlying Values: The Guiding Principles of Cultural Proficiency. · Learn to use the cultural proficiency tools. · Apply the tools of cultural proficiency to school or district professional development.

Delores Lindsey, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA, [email protected] Delores Lindsey is an assistant professor at California State University San Marcos. She has served K-12 education as a middle grades and high school teacher, assistant principal, principal, and county office of education administrator. She co-authored Culturally Proficient Instruction: A Guide for People Who Teach and Culturally Proficient Coaching: Supporting Educators to Create Equitable Schools.

Randall Lindsey, San Marcos, CA, [email protected] Randall B. Lindsey is a professor emeritus at California State University, Los Angeles. He has served as a junior high school and high school teacher and as an administrator in charge of school desegregation efforts. At Cal State, Los Angeles, he served as director of a regional race desegregation assistance center. He co-authored Cultural Proficiency: A Manual for School Leaders, and five more books about cultural proficiency, most recently, Culturally Proficient Inquiry: A Lens for Identifying and Examining Educational Gaps.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC307 FROM POLICY TO PRACTICE AND BACK AGAIN: A CLINIC DESIGNED TO GET THE LEADERS YOU WANT AND NEED Ensure that organizations understand their leadership needs and can create development programs that are responsive to their challenges and supportive of school improvement. Learn how to create the conditions necessary for effective leadership; the programs required to build, share, and prepare leadership; the partnerships necessary to support a district's efforts; and the assessments that ensure that leaders are working at the highest levels consistent with state and national standards for educational leaders. Participants will: · Assess their organization's policy alignment with current and future leadership needs and will outline their organization's ability to develop successful succession plans. · Map a successful leadership continuum and explore activities to develop leaders. · Explore and develop strategies to ensure that an organization's conditions support leadership success. · Learn how to develop and assess leadership programs that produce leaders capable of making positive change and increasing student and staff performance.

Andrew Cole, Fairfax County Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Andrew Cole is director of LEAD Fairfax and the Office of Employee Performance and Development for Fairfax County Public Schools. He oversees the district's career development programs, new hire orientation, succession management planning, and labor relations policies and operations.

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Laura Dukess, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY, [email protected] Laura Dukess is the director of professional development, Office of School Leadership for the New York City Department of Education, where she manages a U.S. Department of Education leadership grant and is responsible for planning and implementing professional development for practicing and aspiring school leaders in two districts in the Bronx. She also supports the Office of School Leadership in developing citywide strategies for supporting school leaders. She began her career in education at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she was the director of policy programs at the Center for Educational Outreach and Innovation. Dukess was an attorney for several years in New York City.

PC308 DEVELOPING LEARNING COMMUNITIES THAT LEAD AND LAST Professional learning communities can become the means for improving teaching and learning as well as promoting and sustaining educational innovations. Examine a framework for implementing learning communities that offers four major themes: the engagement of all partners in the learning and working of the community; processes for making connections between vision, expertise, and actions, both individually and organizationally; a three-tier structure to develop and sustain leadership and expertise; and dispositions of practice that support and deepen the learning and the work of the community. Participants will: · Engage in selected processes for aligning individual and organizational interest, vision, and expertise in professional learning communities. · Understand the values and behaviors that support professional learning communities. · Explore the nature and work of communities that learn, lead, and last. · Explore tools and measures of individual and organizational readiness for supporting learning communities.

Giselle Martin-Kniep, Learner-Centered Initiatives Ltd., Floral Park, NY, [email protected] Giselle Martin-Kniep is a teacher educator, researcher, program evaluator, and author. She is the president of LearnerCentered Initiatives, an educational consulting organization specializing in comprehensive regional and school-based curriculum and assessment work. Her most recent book is Communities that Learn, Lead, and Last: Building and Sustaining Educational Expertise.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC309 BUILDING LEADERSHIP CAPACITY: DEVELOPMENTAL LESSONS FOR SCHOOLS AND SYSTEMS The 21st century is producing more complex challenges for educational leaders as the public sector demands greater transparency, increased accountability, and improved results. Simultaneously, schools and systems are facing a leadership crisis: fewer interested, committed, and qualified pool of candidates ready to lead reform and improvement efforts. How can schools and systems address these alarming conditions and build leadership capacity for their organizations? Participants will: · Survey the international landscape for best practices and next practices in leadership development. · Learn about the key components of effective best- and next-practice leadership development programs. · Engage in a simulated design process for outlining local models for developing leadership capacity. · Examine issues of marketing, positioning, and sustainability to produce strategic support for leadership development initiatives.

Al Bertani, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Al Bertani is a senior researcher in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he teaches, advises, and directs the Principals' Network. Previously, he was chief officer for professional development for the Chicago Public Schools, senior executive director for Chicago Leadership Academies for Supporting Success of the Chicago Principals and Administrators Association, and co-director of school and leadership development with the Center for School Improvement at the University of Chicago. Bertani is a former NSDC trustee. David Jackson, Innovation Unit, London, England, [email protected] David Jackson is a senior associate of the Innovation Unit, where he is lead consultant to the Innovation Unit's Next Practice in System Leadership (NCSL) program. He leads large-scale programs supporting the implementation of network-based practices and system leadership approaches. He began teaching in 1971 and taught at a large secondary community comprehensive school. In 2000 he was appointed NCSL's first director of research and school improvement and in 2002 became director of NCSL's Networked Learning Group.

PC310 A COURAGE TO TEACH INTRODUCTORY RETREAT: RECONNECTING WHO YOU ARE WITH WHAT YOU DO These are challenging times to teach, lead school improvement efforts, and bring passion and commitment to our chosen work day after day. Good teaching and effective leadership flow from the identity and integrity of the individual. Learn retreat experiences developed by Parker Palmer to help educators renew and sustain their own vocational commitment and personal integrity. Through large group, small group, and solitary settings, explore the intersections of personal selves and professional lives, make use of personal stories, reflect on education practice, and consider insights from poets, storytellers, and various wisdom traditions. Participants will: · Experience a Courage to Teach introductory retreat. · Reflect on the value of slowing down and listening deeply to oneself and others to answer significant questions about vocation and self-examination. · Discuss the benefits of an approach proven effective at creating a safe and trustworthy space for reflection and dialogue. · Make connections with other professionals in education. · Establish clarity about complex personal and professional issues.

Terry Chadsey, Center for Courage & Renewal, Bainbridge Island, WA, [email protected] Terry Chadsey is program director for the Center for Courage and Renewal. He has worked in public education as a teacher and administrator for more than 30 years, teaching grades K--8 in Chicago, Australia, and Washington. For the last 20 years, he has provided professional and organizational development support to districts and schools, principals and teachers. He is a lead trainer for Positive Discipline and is a Courage to Teach/Courage to Lead facilitator.

Debbie Dewitt, Caroline Forest Elementary, Myrtle Beach, SC, [email protected] Debbie Dewitt is a kindergarten and mentor teacher. A former early childhood professor at the University of South Carolina and Coastal Carolina University, she has served as the Horry County chair of the First Steps State Initiative. She has written and presented various articles on diversity in the public school classroom. Dewitt is a founding facilitator for the Center for Courage and Renewal and has led Courage to Teach retreats for educators in South Carolina.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC311 ACCELERATING NEW TEACHER DEVELOPMENT BY BUILDING INSTRUCTION-FOCUSED INDUCTION PROGRAMS The first two to three years of a teacher's career may be the most important, and districts across the country are recognizing the importance of taking full advantage of this unique learning opportunity. The New Teacher Center has been working for over two decades with new teachers, mentors, and program leaders from a wide range of school systems and settings that strive to use induction to go beyond the status quo. Examine the critical elements of induction programs that accelerate new teacher development, explore strategies that build a strong, districtwide context of support, and focus in on the role, knowledge, and skills necessary for the instructional mentors at the heart of such programs. Note: This session is intended for program leaders and experienced mentors. Participants will: · Understand and utilize a program framework that guides the design and implementation of comprehensive induction programs focused on the acceleration of new teacher development. · Develop an understanding of and practice attitudes and skills of instructional mentors. · Analyze the critical role of principals and other stakeholders with regard to mentors and successful induction programs. · Explore dilemmas of practice for instructional mentors and program leaders and assess and make applications to their local context.

Ellen Moir, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Ellen Moir is founder and executive director of the New Teacher Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. For more than 20 years, she has pioneered innovative approaches to new teacher development, research on new teacher practice, and the design and administration of teacher induction programs. Ellen is the author of several articles and book chapters and has produced video series related to new teacher development.

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Janet Gless, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Janet Gless is associate director of the New Teacher Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) working with policy makers, educational organizations, administrators, and teacher leaders to design and implement teacher induction programs. A classroom teacher for 17 years, she has co-authored book chapters, articles, and training videos on various topics related to new teacher induction. Janet joined Ellen Moir at UCSC where she helped found the New Teacher Center.

PC312 MANAGING DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AS A LEADER: EDUCATORS WORK SMARTER! STUDENTS WORK HARDER! Attention all leaders in state, district, or school level positions who are interested in learning to manage differentiated classrooms. Educators must face the complex task of differentiating instruction to meet the unique needs of today's learners. Experience a train-the-trainer model of assessing, planning, and managing differentiated instruction. Participants will: · Examine the how-to of informal and formal assessments. · Review guidelines and tips for using centers and stations, independent and small group assignments, academic contracts, and flexible grouping. · Learn how to use planning tools that simultaneously meet the needs of students who are on three different knowledge levels. · Explore 10 practical planning models for differentiating instruction.

Carolyn Chapman, Creative Learning Connection, Thompson, GA, [email protected] Carolyn Chapman is an international educational consultant, author, and teacher. She has taught classes from kindergarten to college. Her interactive, hands-on professional development opportunities focus on challenging the mind to ensure success for learners of all ages. Chapman authored, If the Shoe Fits ...: How to Develop Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom and has co-authored several other publications on differentiated instruction.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC313 SERVANT LEADERSHIP: BUILDING EQUITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE THROUGH CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE PEDAGOGICAL CONTEXTS Our nation's educators are perplexed by the reality of what it really takes to effectively educate children. Learn strategies necessary to design, implement, and support holistic processes to build culturally proficient school leadership. Examine tenets necessary for systemic and systematic change from a servant leader's perspective. Acting and developing leaders will be offered tools for empowerment and support. A specific focus on transforming the academic environment of youth of color and economically challenged youth will guide this session. Participants will: · Explore the need and efficacy of culturally responsive leadership for the purpose of supporting and serving educators who deliver data and outcome driven services to all learners. · Review data-driven examples of school districts from across the nation addressing the impact of service delivery inclusive and void of cultural contexts in school leadership. · Experience evidence-based, culturally responsive leadership strategies and practices that target the elimination of patterns of incomplete success among children of color and children from economically challenging environments. · Critique professional development paradigms that have been successful in countering the negative effects of culturally inappropriate leadership tenets.

Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, [email protected] Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson is an assistant professor in Educational Administration and Human Resource Development at Texas A&M University. She teaches classes in instructional leadership, epistemologies, educating special populations, the analysis of teaching behavior, curriculum development, and multicultural education. Webb-Johnson has served as an educator for 32 years and has been teaching teachers for the past 17 years.

PC314 SHAPING POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURES AND TRANSFORMING TOXIC CULTURES TO SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Examine ways to shape positive school culture and transform toxic cultures to support professional learning and student success. Learn ways to read, assess, and build strong, ethical cultures that reinforce successful schools. Gain practical strategies to reinforce cultural beliefs, enhance ethical student-focused values, apply storytelling and celebrations to building a sense of purpose, and address the challenges of negative behaviors and relationships. Participants will: · Identify the core features of positive cultures. · Develop strategies and discuss tools to overcome toxic cultures. · Learn how to conduct cultural histories. · Practice approaches to cultural storytelling. · Examine the relationship between school culture and student learning outcomes.

Kent Peterson, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, [email protected] Kent Peterson is a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis and founder of the Principals' Leadership Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is also the founding director of the Vanderbilt Principals' Institute and the co-director of the Wisconsin LEAD Academy. Peterson works with urban and suburban leadership academies for new, aspiring, and experienced school principals. His most recent book, co-authored with Terence Deal, is The Shaping School Culture Fieldbook. Pam Robbins, Mt. Crawford, VA, [email protected] Pam Robbins consults internationally in the areas of emotional intelligence, brain-compatible training, instructional strategies for block scheduling, peer collaboration, coaching, mentoring, leadership skills, site-based decision making, school improvement, team building, dimensions of learning, and presentation skills. She was formerly director of training for the California School Leadership Academy. She authored How to Develop and Implement a Peer Coaching Program.

PC315 CREATING A CULTURE OF CONSCIOUSNESS This retreat-like experience is designed for the skilled leader and facilitator who understands two significant aspects of educational professional development: The importance of creating a culture of consciousness in every school and district and professional development as an experience which engages creative and varied approaches to learning communities. Current thinking from business and learning organizations suggests that

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

today's consumers and participants expect their learning and business interactions to be multidimensional experiences. Engage in learning the content and creating a culture of consciousness, and leave with practical maps, mental models, and protocols for helping teachers, administrators, and students become more conscious in their learning and school community relationships. Be prepared to commit to learning and building relationships in a deeper sense than a traditional session would require. Participants will: · Engage in creative and authentic activities for learning including meditation, movement, music, and relationship building. · Develop new awareness, mindsets, and consciousness about ways of learning and encouraging change. · Recognize new opportunities for design and delivery of professional development. · Discover ways to go over, under, around or to transform the internal and external blocks to deep learning and change. · Understand and apply maps, mental models, and protocols to support second order change.

Rob Bocchino, Heart of Change; Change of Heart Associates, Carolina Beach, NC, [email protected] Rob Bocchino, co-founder of Heart of Change Associates, is an international consultant, teacher, and facilitator. He has expertise in brain compatible learning and communication skills as well as group dynamics, change, and leadership. He has worked for over 18 years to help educators create brain-based approaches to instruction and change processes. He authored Emotional Literacy.

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Kathleen Bocchino, Heart of Change; Change of Heart Associates, Carolina Beach, NC, [email protected] Kathleen Bocchino, is co-founder of Heart of Change Associates. She taught for 18 years before beginning her work as a staff development specialist. She has worked as a consultant, university professor, assistant superintendent, and most recently as the Director of New Teacher Induction for the New York City Department of Education where she created and led a new induction program for New York City's annual 8000 new teachers.

PC316 COACHING BOOT CAMP: LEADERSHIP COACHING FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE This "basic training" session will equip you with the knowledge and skills to become a powerful coach. An essential requirement for today's leader is deep understanding and confidence to use coaching skills in educational settings. Put on your boots and your camouflage if you are ready to exercise your mind, stretch your thinking, and maximize your strength as a leader who believes in possibility and is committed to promoting thinking in others. Gain skills and strategies for becoming a leader who defaults to coaching as a "go to" approach for leadership and leading. Participants will: · Distinguish and clarify roles required of school leaders. · Demonstrate four essential skills of masterful coaching. · Connect coaching behaviors to the standards of coaching. · Practice coaching skills used within the context of school conversations.

Karen Anderson, Mesquite, TX, [email protected] Karen Anderson is a founding member of Coaching for Results Inc. (CFR) and is responsible for the Teaching and Learning Division. Her responsibilities include the design, development, and delivery of internal and external professional learning experiences that provide ongoing growth for CFR coaches and those desiring to become coaches. She also serves as a CFR trainer, facilitator for coaching labs, and mentor for those developing their coaching skills. She currently serves as an adjunct faculty member at Texas A&M University-Commerce. She has been a public school educator for more than 30 years. From 1996-2004, she served as the executive director of the Texas Staff Development Council. Kathryn Kee, Shady Shores, TX, [email protected] Kathryn Kee is a founding member of Coaching For Results and serves on its board of directors. She is a leadership coach to numerous elementary, middle, and high school principals, assistant principals, and teachers in schools in Texas and across the U.S. Previously, Kee was assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction, director of staff development, director of gifted education, campus instructional dean, department head, reading specialist and teacher in rural, urban, military, and suburban schools. She served as the first president and executive director of the Texas Staff Development Council. She is a former NSDC trustee and past president. Diana Raney Williams, Millersport, OH, [email protected] Diana Raney Williams is a co-director of Coaching for Results and is an educational consultant for school districts and a state department of education. She has been an urban educator for over 30 years. She has served as a principal, a staff development supervisor, central office administrator for a parent/community involvement initiative, resource teacher, classroom teacher, and a university program coordinator. She is a former NSDC trustee and past president. She was co-founder and past president of the Staff Development Council of Ohio.

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December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC317 ACTION RESEARCH: A POWERFUL PROFESSIONAL DESIGN FOR CREATING EQUITABLE CLASSROOMS Districts across the nation are urgently working to end inequalities that exist for students from various ethnic, linguistic, and social class backgrounds. An important method for addressing these gaps is to support teachers in critically examining different learning needs in real-life classrooms. Engaging in action research around issues of equity and achievement puts teachers and administrators at the center of change that directly impacts student learning. Explore a range of practical strategies, teacher stories, and interactive experiences related to the action research process and explore implementation of equity-based action research programs. Interact with school leaders who have effectively used action research to develop more equitable educational practices. Participants will: · Learn how the process of action research is implemented in classrooms and schools through questioning, data gathering, analysis, and writing about instructional practice. · Practice facilitation processes to ensure high-quality action research work. · Apply the lens of equity and diversity to all steps of the action research process. · Discuss barriers to and strategies for implementing and sustaining action research in a school district. · Network and learn from practicing action researchers and other participants.

Cathy Caro-Bruce, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI, [email protected] Cathy Caro-Bruce is an educational consultant to school districts and is developing Wisconsin's Statewide System of Support, a program that will provide technical assistance to Title I schools. For 30 years, she was a staff and organization development specialist for the Madison Metropolitan School District, and for 15 years she coordinated classroom action research as part of the district's professional development program. Caro-Bruce is co-editor of Creating Equitable Classrooms Through Action Research and co-author of "A School District-Based Action Research Program in the United States," a chapter in the upcoming Handbook of Educational Action Research. Mary Klehr, Madison Metropolitan School District, Madison, WI, [email protected] Mary Klehr has been involved in action research for over 10 years. She coordinates the district's Classroom Action Research Program and chairs the Teacher as Researcher special interest group for the American Educational Research Association. She is co-editor of Creating Equitable Classrooms Through Action Research, and co-author of "A School District-Based Action Research Program in the United States," a chapter in the upcoming Handbook of Educational Action Research.

PC318 ADULT DEVELOPMENTAL LEADERSHIP: PROMISING NEW WAYS TO SUPPORT ADULT LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT How can you, as a principal, assistant principal, teacher leader, or professional developer, create opportunities for learning and professional development that support adults with different needs, preferences, and developmental orientations? The best professional development programs ignite and sustain adults' excitement in lifelong learning, growing, and changing their practices. Learn how 25 principals from diverse schools shape positive school climates and employ practices that support and sustain adult learning and development and use adult developmental theory and the pillar practices to inform their work in supporting adult development. Participants will: · Develop a deeper understanding of how assumptions guide leadership behaviors and how understanding them can help in supporting their own and other adults' growth. · Learn about adult-development theory and its practical application to supporting adult learning and growth. · Examine four robust pillar practices and how they support adults with a diversity of developmental orientations. · Enhance their capacity for shaping school cultures that sustain continuous adult learning and positively impact student achievement.

Ellie Drago-Severson, Columbia University's Teachers College, New York, NY, [email protected] Ellie Drago-Severson is a professor of education leadership at Columbia University's Teachers College. Her research and teaching passions include leadership for supporting adult development and qualitative research. She was lead researcher on the Adult Development Team of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy at Harvard University. Drago-Severson is author of three recent books: Leading Adult Learning, Becoming Adult Learners: Principles and Practices for Effective Development, and Helping Teachers Learn: Principal Leadership for Adult Growth and Development. Helping Teachers Learn was NSDC's 2004 Book of the Year.

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Preconference sessions

December 6 & 7, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

PC319 ADAPTIVE SCHOOLS AND SCHOOLING BY DESIGN: THE WHAT AND HOW OF TRANSFORMING SCHOOLS Academic leaders (school and district-level administrators, teacher leaders, and professional development teams) interested in systemic change and continuous improvement will examine the confluence of ideas necessary to leading and sustaining enhanced student learning. Learn how to build strong collaborative and caring work cultures, in which results-oriented faculties work together for continuous school improvement. Explore the latest practical findings in organizational development, team learning, and navigating the currents of change. Participants will: · Gain practical and proven processes and strategies for promoting school improvement. · Learn how to support systemic change. · Expand their repertoire of practical facilitation tools. · Develop an increased capacity to initiate, develop and sustain high functioning groups. Participants are required to purchase a copy of The Adaptive School: A Sourcebook for Developing Collaborative Groups, 2nd edition, by R. Garmston & B. Wellman and Schooling by Design by G. Wiggins & J. McTighe ($65.21 for both). Books will be distributed at the session.

Robert J.Garmston, El Dorado Hills, CA, [email protected] Robert Garmston is devoted to developing the capabilities and potential within each person and group. He is director of Facilitation Associates, an educational consulting firm specializing in leadership, learning, and organizational development for schools in North America, Africa, Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, South America, and the Middle East. He has written books and articles dealing with educational leadership, learning, coaching, and staff development. He also served as teacher, principal, superintendent, and curriculum director. Garmston is a recipient of NSDC's Contribution to Staff Development Award. Jay McTighe, Columbia, MD, [email protected] Jay McTighe serves as director of the Maryland Assessment Consortium, a state collaboration of school districts working to develop and share formative performance assessments. Prior to this position, McTighe was involved with school improvement projects at the Maryland State Department of Education and with statewide efforts to develop instructional strategies, curriculum models, and assessment procedures for improving the quality of student thinking. McTighe worked in Prince George's County, MD as a classroom teacher, resource specialist, and program coordinator. McTighe has published articles in leading educational journals and books and is co-author with Grant Wiggins of the Understanding by Design series.

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 5-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. continues at 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

A01 POWERFUL PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR NEW STAFF DEVELOPERS Polish your presentation skills and energize your audiences. Learn how to make your presentations more dynamic. Help people make meaning of and connections with content. Gain new tools and strategies to involve your participants in your presentations. Capture the brain's attention. Learn why is it important to establish and adhere to norms. Examine the value of movement. Experience what is involved in setting a powerful context and the process tools to support it. Note: This session is specially designed for and limited to beginning staff developers. Meet other participants with similar challenges and establish a new network of colleagues in a similar position.

Deborah Estes, Estes Group, Inc., Sherman, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

A02 WORKSHEETS DON'T GROW DENDRITES: 20 STRATEGIES THAT WORK It stands to reason that if students don't learn the way we teach them, then we must teach them the way they learn. Experience 20 instructional strategies that maximize memory and minimize forgetting. Increase learning for both students and adults when strategies like drawing, metaphor, music, and storytelling are used to teach curriculum objectives and meet national standards. Ensure that people retain key concepts, not just for tests but for life.

Marcia Tate, Developing Minds Inc., Conyers, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

A04 BUILDING COLLABORATIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES Engage colleagues in processes for building collaborative communities by exploring how personalities impact the team, the development of group norms, the creation of SMART goals, and the analysis of student work. Build collaborative communities of learners committed to improving their practice and enhancing student achievement.

Ronni Reed, Monmouth County Vocational School District, Freehold, NJ, [email protected] Denise Kebeck, Monmouth County Vocational School District, Freehold, NJ, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

A03 RIGOR, RELEVANCE, AND RESPECTFUL RELATIONSHIPS Explore new approaches and methods grounded in real world situations that reach all students. Examine a rigor and relevance framework and planning process. Engage in collaborative interaction in learning teams and participate in activities that are aligned with rigor, relevance, and respectful relationships. Learn how rigor and relevance can differentiate instruction and benefit all students.

Jeri Cook, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Denise Kattan, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Laura McDuffie, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

A05 IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT: CONNECT INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT Learn to use strategic reading strategies and critical thinking processes to differentiate instruction and close the achievement gap. Hear how to link instruction and relevant assessment techniques and implement an instructional assessment system to improve the academic performance of each student.

Evelyn English, Educational Consultants International, Simpsonville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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A06 PROFESSIONAL COACHING FOR LEADERS Build leadership capacity through coaching at the individual, team, and systems levels. Use five research-based leadership lenses to link leadership behavior with student achievement. Practice five key coaching skills: listening, intuition, curiosity, action learning, and self-management. Examine current examples of application within schools and systems.

T.C. Motzkus, West Bend School District #1, West Bend, WI, [email protected] Donna Recht, Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI, [email protected] Nancy Marsho, Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI, [email protected] Nancy Stanford-Blair, Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

A07 CLOSING ACHIEVEMENT GAPS WITH THE EQUITY FRAMEWORK Can schools truly close all achievement gaps, regardless of race, language, and economics? Learn about an equity framework, a powerful approach to school improvement based upon schools that have closed all gaps. Discover how courageous conversations about race can help your school have the tough conversations on how teachers can lift every student to grade level, year after year.

Curtis Linton, School Improvement Network, Salt Lake City, UT, [email protected] Bonnie Davis, A4Achievement Consulting, Laguna Beach, CA, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

Customize! If you'd like to identify sessions to address specific needs, email [email protected] with your request and a session recommendation will be sent to you.

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 4-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. continues at 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

B01 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR MENTORS Take an inside look at a mentor forum where mentors share challenging situations, seek feedback, formatively assess, and extend their skills. Experience how the structured format, collaborative processes, and mentor formative assessment tools facilitate and encourage reflective mentor practice.

Janet Gless, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Cynthia Brunswick, New Teacher Center, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Ronni Mann, New Teacher Center, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

B02 CULTURAL PROFICIENCY: PROFOUND CHANGE FOR EQUITABLE SCHOOLS Cultural proficiency engages schools in profound transformative change to achieve equity for all students. Learn to apply the tools of cultural proficiency to your work setting. Gain key insights from two school systems successfully implementing cultural proficiency as a sustained, systemwide initiative. Consider do's and don'ts for successful implementation.

Franklin CampbellJones, CampbellJones & Associates, Laurel, MD, [email protected] Brenda CampbellJones, CampbellJones & Associates, Laurel, MD, [email protected] Delores Lindsey, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA, [email protected] Andrea Zamora, Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD, [email protected] Carlisa Finney, Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD, [email protected] John Krownapple, Howard County Public School System, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

B03 TEACHER AS DECISION MAKER: PEOPLE, TIME, INFORMATION The first years of teaching are critical foundation-building years. Examine how first teaching experiences become the foundation for future professional expectations. Explore adult "ways of knowing" and the impact of various coaching contexts on teacher decision making. Acquire strategies for helping new teachers manage time, people, and information.

Elizabeth Guglielmo, New York City Department of Education, Bayside, NY, [email protected] Joseph Piccirillo, New York City Department of Education, Bayside, NY, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

B04 CLOSING THE GAP: HOW ALIGNMENT IS KEY Prince William County Schools are restructuring their professional development program to reflect the vision and mission of the school division. Investigate how clearly defined and sustained organizational alignment can be a major factor in closing the achievement gap. Develop an action-based approach to systemic alignment of a professional development plan.

Cherif Sadki, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA, [email protected] Victor Martin, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Know thyself! Sessions are labeled B for beginner or A for advanced. All others are for intermediate knowledge of the topic.

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B05 MEASURING THE IMPACT OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT How do you make the link from professional development to teacher practice and its impact on student learning? Learn how to design, implement, and monitor a comprehensive professional development program. Develop monitoring tools that measure the effectiveness of professional development.

Denise DeFiore, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Jennifer Bernard, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] LeighAnn Uzamere, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Deborah Whitley, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

B06 BUILDING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT CAPACITY IN LARGE SYSTEMS Building capacity in large school systems requires attention to processes, relationships, and results. Central office departments and schools must align their work toward improving student learning. Gain tools and resources to create a framework for sustaining effective school improvement. Examine the impact of capacity building through three dimensions of success: results, processes, and relationships.

Susan Andrews, Wake County Public School System, Raleigh, NC, [email protected] Donna Olsen, Wake County Public School System, Raleigh, NC, [email protected] Elizabeth Colbert, Wake County Public School System, Raleigh, NC, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

B08 THE ROLE OF COMMUNITY IN CONTENT LEARNING The Understanding Science project at WestEd uses a case-based approach to teacher learning that draws heavily on current ideas about learning in professional communities and the elements of effective professional development. Experience strategies that help teachers learn science together through a collaborative social process. Explore the broader role professional communities can play in supporting quality science education.

Mayumi Shinohara, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Kirsten Daehler, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Andrew Guevara, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Charlotte, NC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

B07 CREATING LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR SUSTAINED PROFESSIONAL GROWTH Creating professional learning communities in an online environment can allow schools and districts to provide sustained staff development that is accessible at anytime, anyplace. Learn the advantages of such environments, the research that supports their creation, and how different types of online learning, including online courses for graduate credit and online book groups for self-study, can help meet local needs.

Rita Bigham, ideastream, Cleveland, OH, [email protected] Melissa Hughes, Carson-Dellosa Publishing Co., Greensboro, NC, [email protected] Strand: Technology

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C01 MONDAY MORNING LECTURE OPTION

concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

C03 LEADERSHIP WITH AN ATTITUDE Leadership is like fire fighting. Learn how to build an organization that is not only fireproof, but can put out and start fires.

Betty Burks, San Antonio Independent School District, San Antonio, TX, [email protected] William Sommers, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Charlene Jordon, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

This will allow you to attend the following sessions: C02: Questions and Answers with Freeman Hrabowski 9:00 a.m. ­ 10:00 a.m. D01: Scholar Lecture: John Deasy 10:00 a.m. ­ 11:00 a.m. D02: Scholar Lecture: Dennis Sparks 11:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. Please see the individual session descriptions for details.

Strand: Leadership

C06 EQUALS WORKSHOPS: DEVELOPING EQUITABLE PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE Deep understanding of mathematics content is critical to student success. Understanding how to teach standardsbased content to students is also important. Learn how the EQUALS professional development model integrates mathematics content, pedagogy, and equity in ways that allow teachers to develop instructional practices that allow each student to achieve.

Karen Mayfield-Ingram, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, [email protected] José Franco, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

C04 LEARNING CONVERSATIONS: BUILDING RESILIENCY AND RAISING ACHIEVEMENT Conversations can make a difference in what we know and do. When informed by data they impact thinking, deepen understanding, and guide practice. Examine current research and experience strategies that ignite conversations that foster resiliency in staff and students.

Steve Biancaniello, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, [email protected] Stephanie Cucunato, New Brighton School District, New Brighton, PA, [email protected] Kelly Ford, New Brighton School District, New Brighton, PA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C02 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER FREEMAN HRABOWSKI Keynote speaker Freeman Hrabowski will address your FREEMAN A. questions in this HRABOWSKI III special session following his keynote address Monday morning. The session will conclude after one hour.

Freeman Hrabowski, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C07 PARTNERSHIP LEARNING: DIALOGUE DURING WORKSHOPS Partnership Learning is a scientifically proven approach to conducting workshops that puts dialogue at the heart of professional learning. Review the theory behind this approach, experience six powerful partnership learning structures, and examine the research that supports this approach.

Jim Knight, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C05 ESSENTIAL DISPOSITIONS FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Learn six critical dispositions of practice that promote professional learning and their relationship to school improvement. Explore tools, including rubrics, selfassessment checklists, and vignettes, to assess these dispositions. Examine strategies for developing these and other dispositions in individuals and schools.

Giselle Martin-Kniep, Communities for Learning, New York, NY, [email protected] Jason Levy, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY, [email protected]

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C08 ENHANCING TEACHER LEADERSHIP THROUGH COLLABORATIVE COACHING Teacher leaders are crucial to sustainable mentoring and coaching. Explore a teacher leadership model that builds the capacity of teacher leaders to serve as coaches and professional developers. Leave with research and tools to strengthen a current program.

Susan Villani, Learning Innovations at WestEd, Woburn, MA, [email protected] Kathy Dunne, Learning Innovations at WestEd, Woburn, MA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C10 PLANNING MATTERS: SCHOOLWIDE REFORM STRATEGIES AND RESOURCES The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement is federally funded to assist schools, districts, and states with school improvement. Review complimentary materials and services including school-level audit protocols and subject matter materials for use in targeted professional development available through the center.

Stephanie Wood-Garnett, Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, Washington, DC, [email protected] Carolyn Brown, Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, Washington, DC, [email protected] Abner Oakes, Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, Washington, DC, [email protected] Traci Maday, Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, Washington, DC, [email protected] Shanika Hope, Office of the State Superintendent of Education, District of Columbia, Washington, DC, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

Jean Jordan, Albert Lea Area Public Schools, Albert Lea, MN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C12 TEACHING AND LEADING AS SOCIAL JUSTICE ADVOCACY Be prepared to challenge the normative approach for viewing race and racism. Review a conceptual framework for moving from color blindness toward color consciousness. Begin a journey toward color consciousness and learn how it leads to eliminating the achievement gap.

Peter Wilson, Educational Equity Consultants, St. Louis, MO, [email protected] Tony Neal, SIUE/East St. Louis Charter School, East St. Louis, IL, [email protected] Cindy Neu, Webster Groves School District, Webster Groves, MO, [email protected] Jamie Devlin, Webster Groves School District, Webster Groves, MO, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

C09 ADDRESSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP THROUGH THE LENS OF RIGOR, CULTURAL PROFICIENCY, AND COURAGEOUS CONVERSATION Examine the important and demanding work that educators do when they move from equity awareness to leadership for equity. Schools and districts that have already anchored themselves in courageous conversations about race, culture, and institutional bias are invited to look at implementation and monitoring. Learn how to extend rigor and deepen cultural proficiency in instructional practices and professional behaviors. Engage in both personal and institutional transformation.

Pamala Noli, Noli-Porter Associates, Oakland, CA, [email protected] Edward Porter, Noli-Porter Associates, Oakland, CA, [email protected] Charles Gary, Milpitas Unified School District, Milpitas, CA, [email protected] Edward Winchester, San Mateo-Foster City School District, Foster City, CA, ewinchester @smfc.k12.ca.us Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

C13 INSTRUCTIONAL DATA ASSISTANTS: LEADERSHIP THROUGH DATA Instructional data assistants are becoming key players on school leadership teams. Learn how to provide ongoing professional development for data assistants. Support them with new tools for collecting and analyzing data. Leverage this new breed of paraeducator to impact student results.

Sally Murek, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Ellen Harris, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Wilma Richardson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C11 LEADERSHIP MAPS FOR EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES Learn to use eight innovation maps to assess and align structures, resources, and relationships to build, maintain, and sustain effective professional learning communities. Enhance your ability to use coaching to lead innovations that produce increased professional growth and student learning.

Kathleen Foord, Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN, [email protected] Jean Haar, Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN, [email protected] Cindy Amoroso, Mankato Area Public Schools, Mankato, MN, [email protected]

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

C14 GIVE YOUR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES SOME TLC Observe a PLC that works. Experience multiple models that promote adult learning. Examine the usefulness of clear position statements to develop shared understanding and increase adult learning.

Jill Donley, St. Vrain Valley School District, Longmont, CO, [email protected] Laurie Ballering, Project GRAD Houston, Houston, TX, [email protected] Rosemary Seitel, Englewood Public Schools, Englewood, NJ, [email protected] Charles Clemmons, Cullman County Public Schools, Cullman, AL, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C16 COACHING COACHES: DISTRICT STRUCTURES TO SUPPORT COACHES

C18 TEACHER WORK THAT MATTERS Review how teachers use a daily professional learning period to collaborate and promote effective instruction. Learn how to look at student work, assessments, and value-added data to improve student achievement at your school.

School-based coaches need coaching, too. Review the components of a collaborative districtwide model that supports school-based literacy coaches. Walk away with tools that will enhance collabo- Randall Squier, Oxford Academy & Central ration among school-based coaches and School District, Oxford, NY, [email protected] Janet Laytham, Oxford Academy & Central between the coach and teacher.

Dana Bickmore, Jordan School District, Sandy, UT, [email protected] Kathy Ridd, Jordan School District, Sandy, UT, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

School District, Oxford, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C15 ARE YOU DATA RICH AND ANALYSIS POOR? Using data effectively to guide instructional decisions is a critical skill for educators. Learn a data analysis structure that can be applied in the classroom with teams and with departments. Practice a process that moves from identified student needs to data to questions to findings to root causes to instructional interventions.

Robert Bastress, Bastress Consulting Group, Sykesville, MD, [email protected] Wanda Coates, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Mary Louise Cohen, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Roni Silverstein, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

C17 EFFECTIVE STEPS TO CONNECT TECHNOLOGY AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT Connecting technology, school goals, and personnel can maximize student achievement. Learn effective strategies and proven steps to address teaching, learning, and student achievement through technology. Analyze school improvement plans that establish staff development needs, explore time, define personnel utilization, and align technology tools.

Fred Scott, Chesterfield County Public Schools, Chesterfield, VA, [email protected] Pat Cuomo, Chesterfield County Public Schools, Chesterfield, VA, [email protected] Brenda Price, Chesterfield County Public Schools, Chesterfield, VA, b[email protected] Sharon Cox-Ponder, Chesterfield County Public Schools, Chesterfield, VA, [email protected] Laura Michaels, Chesterfield County Public Schools, Chesterfield, VA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

C19 SILOS TO SYSTEMS: ALIGNING DISTRICT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT From urban to suburban districts, instructional curriculum and professional development departments and programs are often isolated from each other. Learn how one district is changing its culture to align professional development to enhance the quality, delivery, and impact of participant learning. Develop similar tools and action steps to support your district's efforts.

Cathleen Kral, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA, [email protected] Annie Howell, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA, [email protected] Kenny Salim, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA, [email protected] George Cox, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA, [email protected] Khita Pottinger, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA, [email protected] boston.k12.ma.us Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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C20 TARGETED INTERVENTIONS MATTER Analyze data from student work. Identify specific instructional interventions based on the student work. Learn a metacognitive process to use with students to promote learning. Plan targeted interventions to improve student learning.

Jody Sherriff, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Greta Smith, Garvey School District, Garvey, CA, [email protected] April Diaz, Lake Elsinore Unified School District, Lake Elsinore, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

C22 CLASSIFIED STAFF DEVELOPMENT: A BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS Identify unique challenges of classified professional development. Learn how one of the fastest growing school districts addresses the training needs of classified positions. Develop a job-specific pathway for continuous improvement through professional development.

Peggy Mueller, Douglas County School District, Castle Rock, CO, [email protected] Kathy Leeser, Douglas County School District, Castle Rock, CO, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C24 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION: ENTRY POINTS FOR MENTORS Help mentors apply differentiated instruction in their content area with tools, strategies, and entry points for supporting new teacher development in differentiation. Mentors will discuss and apply methods for increasing new teachers' content-based differentiation skills for the purpose of raising student achievement. Learn tools that give teachers feedback about their progress within a standards-based context.

Laura Gschwend, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Anne Watkins, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

C21 PEER COACHING: A WORLDWIDE INITATIVE Review resources that have been used by teacher leaders throughout the world to promote job-embedded, standardsbased staff development that integrates technology. See how these resources encourage teachers to meet regularly with colleagues during the school day to plan instruction that aligns with the school's goals. Learn strategies you can apply to your programs.

Karen Meyer, Puget Sound Center for Teaching, Learning, & Technology, Bothell, WA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

C23 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS Learn how the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and 11 schools have partnered to develop an arts integration program featuring long-term, sustained, job-embedded professional learning. Examine the organizational structures and various formats, such as courses, coaching, and study groups, which have made the Changing Education Through the Arts program a powerful form of professional learning.

Amy Duma, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, DC, [email protected]nedy-center.org Mahri Aste, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, [email protected] Melanie Layne, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, [email protected] John Word, Arlington Public Schools, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C25 CONDUCTING IMPACT EVALUATIONS CONSISTENTLY Hear how a large urban school system regularly evaluates support staff training for results. Review the details of this success story and the impact created by high impact learning and success case evaluation methodology.

Jeffrey Hafen, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Timothy Mooney, Advantage Performance Group, Boston, MA, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

Get with the program! Register now and find out for yourself why this is "the" learning conference.

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

C26 BUILDING CAPACITY BY DEFINING A TEACHER LEADER Learn how the role of the instructional leader is crucial in building the capacity of a school. Examine the impact of assumptions on school leadership. Practice strategies that promote group decision making and interaction. Engage the unengaged and expand capacity for leadership among teachers on the staff.

Lisa Marie Kelly, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, [email protected] Marie Parker-McElroy, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, [email protected] Tina Lane, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C28 THE ROAD TO TEACHING FOR UNDERSTANDING Hear about a professional learning journey that uses curriculum mapping, backward design, and teaching for understanding. Experience practical simulations and protocols that build unit design literacy. Apply tools and processes that promote a cultural shift.

Patty Butz, The American School in Japan, Tokyo, Japan, [email protected] Angela Wooles, The American School in Japan, Tokyo, Japan, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C30 REACHING ALL LEARNERS: PRACTICAL CO-TEACHING STRATEGIES Teaching is a job where two heads are often better than one. Learn how co-teaching leads to powerful learning for all students. Explore practical coteaching approaches and resources.

Wendy Boehm, Fairfax County Public Schools, Alexandria, VA, [email protected] Penelope Wald, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

C29 DEVELOPING PRINCIPALS AS EFFECTIVE LEADERS High levels of learning for all students requires principals who are consensus builders, strong instructional leaders, and skillful in forming and sustaining professional learning communities. Learn about a professional development process to develop these competencies. Presenters will examine the rationale and design of the program, participant experiences, and the results of a five-year program evaluation.

Katherine Funk, Twin Tiers Coalition for Learning, Corning, NY, [email protected] Maggie Thurber, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Joe Rumsey, Prattsburgh School District, Prattsburgh, NY, [email protected] Kay Psencik, Cypress, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C31 SCHOOL SELF-ASSESSMENT: MAKING IT REALLY HAPPEN School leaders have always worked hard to ensure that regular self-review is linked effectively to the school improvement planning process. Gain insight into strategies and processes that school leaders can implement in order to ensure that school self-assessment/self-evaluation is a systematic process embedded in the culture of the school at all levels.

Sue Mark, Ontario Principals' Council, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C27 UNMASKING STUDENT POTENTIAL Learn to guide reflective conversations on instructional design to ensure traditionally underserved and underrepresented students have opportunities to develop and demonstrate strengths. Examine masks that hide academic potential in children that are related to the characteristics of giftedness. Consider instructional practices that reveal students' academic strengths hidden by diverse behavior, culture, gender, language, learning disability, poverty, and race.

Elizabeth Sandall, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Dryer Thackston, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

Collaborate! Choose some sessions to attend with your colleagues and then split up for others.

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C32 MORE SWIMMING, LESS SINKING: INDUCTION SYSTEMS A multi-district and education service district collaboration offers new teachers the supportive induction they deserve. Learn and understand the crucial elements of this comprehensive and sustainable induction program. Assess where your district or school stands in relation to the standards of hiring, orientation, mentoring, professional development, and assessment for learning. Implement ideas and plans based on induction program standards.

Mindy Meyer, Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession, Tacoma, WA, [email protected] Char Allen, Educational Service District 113, Olympia, WA, [email protected] Kim Fry, Rochester School District, Rochester, WA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

C34 TRUST IN THE POWER OF MENTORING Learn how to establish a mentoring model, increase teacher retention, and impact student achievement. Engage in coaching, planning, and reflecting simulations. Leave feeling empowered with the knowledge and strategies to support new teachers.

Liz Motter, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Angela Bibby, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Terra Graves, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Sheri-Lyn Cutler, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

C36 NAVIGATING THE PRINCIPAL/ MENTOR RELATIONSHIP A professional and collaborative relationship between a mentor and principal is vital to the success of a quality new teacher induction program. Gain insights on conditions that facilitate a professional partnership between a mentor and principal. Explore how a mentor and principal define and respect boundaries, engage in critical conversations, and collaborate in the support of beginning teachers. Consider standards that guide difficult conversations between a mentor and principal.

Fred Williams, Durham Public Schools, Durham, NC, [email protected] Andrew Sioberg, Durham Public Schools, Durham, NC, [email protected] Emmett Tilley, Durham Public Schools, Durham, NC, [email protected] Sandi Bates, Durham Public Schools, Durham, NC, [email protected] Beverly Jarrell, Durham Public Schools, Durham, NC, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C35 SUSTAINING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES: DATA, LEADERSHIP, AND RESOURCES Closing achievement gaps through the deliberate, focused work of professional learning communities is both the result of and catalyst for the ongoing learning of school-based teams. Part process, part data analysis, part district support and resources ­ together they result in teachers realizing what true efficacy is as students thrive in light of increasing opportunities to learn.

Diana Nunnaley, TERC, Cambridge, MA, [email protected] Carol Woodbury, Dennis-Yarmouth Public Schools, Cape Cod, MA, [email protected] Jennifer Unger, GroupWorks, Grafton, MA, [email protected] Gloria Lemerise, Dennis-Yarmouth Public Schools, Cape Cod, MA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

C33 LEADERS AS LEARNERS: REFLECTIVE COMMUNITY IMPACTING PRACTICE Learn about content-focused professional development for administrators designed to support changing practices in supervision and build a community of leaders-as-learners. Explore how content, process, and context considerations are used to guide planning. Hear examples of the impact on administrators' practice and reflect upon implications for your own instructional leadership.

Naomi Resnick, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Sharon Fogler, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Vera Torrence, New Leaders for New Schools, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

C37 OUR CHILDREN ARE NOT THE STUDENTS OUR SCHOOLS WERE DESIGNED FOR: UNDERSTANDING DIGITAL KIDS Examine the effect digital bombardment from constant exposure to digital media has on digital kids in the new digital landscape. Consider the profound implications this holds for the future of education. Review the latest neuroscientific and psychological research on the role of intense and frequent experiences on the brain, particularly the young and impressionable brain. Prepare to have assumptions about children and how they learn seriously challenged.

Ian Jukes, InfoSavvy Group Consultants Inc., Kelonawa, BC, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Technology 43

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D01 SCHOLAR LECTURE 10:00 a.m. ­ 11:00 a.m.

JOHN DEASY

concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

D03 COACHING WORKS Learn how to leverage the work of coaches. Review the NSDC Standards for Staff Development and determine how coaches move those standards forward in schools to ensure a higher quality of professional learning and improved student learning. Gain ideas, confidence, and motivation for energizing the work of school-based staff developers.

Lea Arnau, Grayson, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

D05 DEVELOPING MATHEMATICS TEACHER LEADERS A school district and consulting firm partnership is in its second year of building and sustaining a cadre of mathematics teacher leaders. Examine the framework for this leadership initiative, the staff development that supports it, and the impact of the work on classroom instruction. Review the impact of the work on teacher and student learning.

Lisa Koenig, Deer Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ, [email protected] Patty Clark, Math Solutions Professional Development, Sausalito, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

ENACTING A COMPREHENSIVE REFORM MODEL FOR URBAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Using the Theory of Action of Managed Performance Empowerment and a strong performance management reform agenda, Prince George's County Public Schools has turned around a system that was slated for state takeover. Learn about the success in turning around a chronically underperforming school system through the lens of equity, access, and targeted professional development.

John Deasy, Prince George's County Public Schools, Upper Marlboro, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

D04 OFF TO A GOOD START: MENTORING PRINCIPALS Examine evidence for the efficacy of principal mentoring. Develop deeper understanding of the complexities and costs of establishing high-quality principal mentoring programs. Gain information to assist with planning, implementing, and evaluating mentoring programs. Review research on the benefits of mentoring to aspiring and novice principals, mentors, and organizations.

Mary Mattis, The Wallace Foundation, New York, NY, [email protected] Kathleen O'Neill, Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA, [email protected] Lynn Scott, RAND Corporation, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

D06 LEADERSHIP ACTIONS THAT HELP PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES FLOURISH Learn what leaders can do to create the conditions that encourage the development of PLCs that truly impact instruction and student learning. Examine the culture and climate issues that inhibit the full implementation of PLCs. Create a plan for putting in place the supportive conditions necessary for PLCs to function productively.

Edward Tobia, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL), Austin, TX, [email protected] Sylvia Segura Pirtle, SEDL, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

D02 SCHOLAR LECTURE 11:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. LEADERSHIP FOR RE-CULTURING SCHOOLS

The most important and often overlooked factor in school change is the nature of the relationships among the adults in schools. But not all relationships are equally influential in producing results, so it is vitally important that school and system leaders view re-culturing relationships as a primary responsibility. Hear attributes of the new culture and the learning processes for leaders that will create and sustain it.

Dennis Sparks, Thinking Partners, Ann Arbor, MI, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

DENNIS SPARKS

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D07 CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP: BRAIN-FRIENDLY INSTRUCTION Align staff development with how the brain best learns and engage more learners fully. Review empirical data demonstrating how brain-friendly instructional strategies reduce the achievement gap. Experience a range of proven strategies including RallyQuiz, Kinesthetic Symbols, Timed Pair Share, and Sage-N-Scribe.

Spencer Kagan, Kagan Publishing, San Clemente, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

D09 MOBILIZING KNOWLEDGE FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION INSTRUCTION Hear about a large-scale change process designed to promote academic achievement for students with special needs. Explore the components of the project design, the lessons learned, the research base, and the impact of the project on staff and student learning. Review evidence-based strategies that effectively support students with special education needs within the regular classroom.

Michelle Forge, Ontario Council of Directors of Education, Oakville, ON, Canada, [email protected] John Fauteux, Ontario Council of Directors of Education, Oakville, ON, Canada, [email protected]ca Erica vanRoosmalen, Halton Catholic District School Board, Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

D11 LEADING UNDERACHIEVING CHILDREN OF POVERTY TO SUCCESS Recent research on high-poverty/highperforming schools clearly documents that with appropriate leadership and intervention, dramatic student achievement gains will occur. Review the compelling findings and recommendations from these K-12 high-achieving schools.

William Parrett, Boise State University Center for School Improvement & Policy Studies, Boise, ID, [email protected] Kathleen Budge, Boise State University, Boise, ID, [email protected] Teri Wagner, Lapwai School District, Lapwai, ID, [email protected] Stand: Leadership

D08 RESEARCH-BASED MEASUREMENT OF TEACHER DEVELOPMENT EFFECTS Learn about findings from the crossstate study of the quality of professional development programs. Examine designs for measuring effects of professional development on teacher knowledge, teaching practices, and student outcomes. Consider how evaluation designs can be effectively implemented and used in a variety of settings.

Rolf Blank, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC, [email protected] Nina de las Alas, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC, [email protected] Faith Connolly, Naviance, Washington, DC, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

D10 COACHES AND PRINCIPALS: TEAMING FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Many districts are investing in reading, math, science, and writing coaches to provide job-embedded professional development for teachers. Study the components of an effective coach and administrator relationship on staff learning. Examine key questions administrators and coaches can use to plan differentiated job-embedded professional development.

Stephen Barkley, Performance Learning Systems, New Hope, PA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

D12 NO TEACHER LEFT BEHIND: REVIEWING NEW DIRECTIONS FOR FEDERAL POLICY THAT IMPACT EDUCATORS Too often, there is a disconnect between educators and the federal policies that impact them. Review teacher effectiveness topics like performance pay, valueadded models, career ladders, data systems and new models of professional development being discussed by policy makers in Washington and across the nation. Be prepared to engage in conversation about the pros and cons of these policies from your personal perspective. Leave with up-to-date knowledge of the current status of federal policy, potential new directions, and ways to advocate for reform.

M. Miller, Alliance for Excellent Education, Washington, DC, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

D13 INTEGRATING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING, STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT, AND ACCREDITATION Learn how districts are using the WholeFaculty Study Groups design for teacher collaboration and learning in classroom instructional strategies that work to improve student achievement and attain re-accreditation.

Alice Senseney, Nebraska Department of Education, Lincoln, NE, [email protected] Robert Lungrin, Educational Service Unit 10, Arcadia, NE, [email protected] Becky Brandl, Educational Service Unit 8, Neligh, NE, [email protected] Andy Luebbe, Madison Public Schools, Madison, NE, [email protected] Carlene Murphy, National Center for Whole-Faculty Study Groups, Augusta, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

D15 FACILITATING ANGRY OR DIFFICULT GROUPS OF PEOPLE Learn how to use coaching and facilitation skills in working with angry or difficult groups. Practice reflecting skills, managing change, assessing people's level of concern, and working with implementation blockers. Leave with practical strategies that can be immediately implemented to help groups or individuals work through problems.

John Eller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Sheila Eller, Mounds View Public Schools, Shoreview, MN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

D17 BUILDING SCHOOL CULTURES THROUGH EXPANDED LEADERSHIP Creating lasting change involves building strong school cultures that engage educational professionals with their colleagues and communities. Learn how to intensify leadership through the development of professional community, organizational learning, and trust within a school by involving teachers, parents, and community in the important work of school improvement.

Sharon Kruse, University of Akron, Akron, OH, [email protected] Karen Seashore Louis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Stand: Leadership

D16 TRAINING COACHES/MENTORS AS DISCUSSION BOARD FACILITATORS Consider the training needs of coaches and mentors who use online technology to support professional development. Review research findings related to online discussion board use. Examine the professional development necessary to support instructional coaches and mentors using online discussion boards in their work.

Marcia Foster, PBS TeacherLine, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Elizabeth Wolzak, PBS TeacherLine, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Kathe Simons, Hezel Associates, Syracuse, NY, [email protected] Strand: Technology

D14 CREATING A DISTRICT LEARNING COMMUNITY Identify the steps for creating a districtwide learning community and examine the evidence of how teacher performance improved based on pre- and post-teacher assessment data. Learn how to sustain growth through the development of teacher mentoring teams. Engage in a discussion and share questions on how individual teacher professional development needs were met through job-embedded coaching.

Toni Hollingsworth, Lead to Learn, Chapin, SC, [email protected] Rina Vassallo, Springfield School District, Springfield, PA, [email protected] Jan Rozzelle, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

D18 BOOK TALK: EVERYDAY RACISM: GETTING REAL ABOUT RACE IN SCHOOL Those attending this structured conversation should read Everyday Racism: Getting Real About Race, edited by Mica Pollock. Come prepared to discuss the concrete and realistic strategies for dealing with race in schools. Be prepared to share ideas in small group and large group conversations.

Casel Walker, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

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D19 LEVERAGING LEARNING CONVERSATIONS THAT MATTER Learn to communicate with members of your learning community in ways that promote mutual professional growth. Share knowledge, engage in inquiry, support reflection, and transform practice. Leave ready to use these tools to deepen and expand professional learning and energize commitment to successful student achievement.

Laraine Roberts, Springboard Schools, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Carolyn Bainer, Springboard Schools, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Gail Wright, Avid Programs, San Diego, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

D21 A GRASSROOTS CAMPAIGN FOR EXCELLENCE Listen to selected exhibitors describe products specially designed for beginning administrators and teacher leaders. Hear from practitioners how they adapted these products to achieve amazing results. Time has been reserved at the end of the session to continue one-onone conversations with the exhibitors and practitioners. Use the remaining time to visit with other exhibitors.

Invited NSDC Exhibitors Facilitated by Vaughn Gross, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

D22 THE GIFT OF COACHING A powerful coach requires skill that is best developed by experiencing and observing coaching firsthand. Members of Coaching for Results Inc. are providing the gift of one-on-one coaching. Give yourself time to explore your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities ... a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a tough situation.

Karen Anderson, Coaching for Results, Inc., Mesquite, TX, [email protected] Pam Smith, Coaching for Results, Inc., Garland, TX, [email protected] Bob Carter, Coaching for Results, Inc., Rowlett, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

CUSTOM-DESIGNED SERVICES PLANNING

D20 PLANNING FOR SUCCESS: EVALUATE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Look at three specific tools that have changed the way we design and evaluate professional learning. They are KASAB, the logic model, and RPTIM. See successes modeled. Explore these tools and consider ways to improve the outcomes of professional learning.

John Eyolfson, Cherry Creek School District, Centennial, CO, [email protected] Jane Sluiter, Cherry Creek School District, Centennial, CO, [email protected] Karen Peterson, Cherry Creek School District, Centennial, CO, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

AUDITING EVALUATING WORKSHOPS & TRAINING CONSULTING

Check your alignment!

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se NSDC's Standards Assessment Inventory (SAI) to learn whether your staff development aligns with NSDC's definition of quality staff development. Each member of your staff will spend only 10 minutes responding to an online survey. NSDC generates reports for the district and for each school and recommends follow-up readings and actions tied to your results. To learn how NSDC can work with your district to address your needs, contact Sue Francis, NSDC's Custom-Designed Services, 972-943-0381 or [email protected]

NATIONAL STAFF DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL 800-727-7288 www.nsdc.org

NSDC's purpose: Every educator engages in effective professional learning every day so everystudent achieves.

Recent SAI clients

Alabama Best Practices Center Alaska Educational Innovation Network Ann Arbor Public Schools, Mich. Arizona Department of Education Duval County Public Schools, Fla. Foothills School Division, Alberta, CA Georgia Department of Education Gwinnett County Public Schools Humboldt County School District, Nev. Lloydminster Public School Division, Alberta, CA Memphis City Schools, Tenn. Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Fla. Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Our Lady of Good Counsel High School, Olney, Md. Palm Beach County Public Schools, Fla. Project GRAD, Houston, Texas Rockwall Ind. School District, Texas Shelby County Public Schools, Ala.

The Southwest Educational Development Laboratory has established the validity and reliability of this instrument.

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Roundtables 1

Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

NARROWING THE LEARNING GAP IN LITERACY AND MATHEMATICS Gain strategies in literacy and mathematics that will enable all students to express mathematical ideas with precision and clarity, communicate mathematical thinking coherently, and clearly analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking of others.

Evelyn Rothstein, Rothstein Learning Strategies, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

SHARING EFFECTIVE SCHOOL PRACTICES WITHIN YOUR DISTRICT Learn a protocol that includes self study and a site visit for documenting and sharing effective practices in your district.

Ledyard McFadden, SchoolWorks, Beverly, MA, [email protected] Tonya Cooper, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, [email protected] Anne Lane, SchoolWorks, Beverly, MA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

PARTNERING WITH PARENTS: THE IMPORTANCE OF EFFORT Learn how to collaborate with parents to communicate high expectations and to reinforce the connection between effort and achievement.

Amy Kines, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] John Jeffries, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

PRINCIPALS LEADING THEIR OWN LEARNING Hear how two principals and their administrative coaches implemented writing workshops and then established learning communities around them.

Linnea Weiland, William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ, [email protected] Gail Schwartz, Lakewood Public Schools, Lakewood, NJ, [email protected] Linette Shyers, Clifton Public Schools, Clifton, NJ, [email protected] Tressa Brown, Plainfield, NJ, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

THE STEP-UP STORY: INDUCTION WITH RESULTS Learn how to gain stakeholders' support and locate funding for exemplary induction that will decrease beginning teacher attrition.

Anita Kissinger, Springfield Public Schools, Springfield, MO, [email protected] Pam Hankins, Springfield Public Schools, Springfield, MO, [email protected] Virginia Crawford, Springfield Public Schools, Springfield, MO, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

TALES OF A FIRST-YEAR TEACHER Examine an action research project used to gather data on first-year teaching experiences and see how this data was used to build a framework for supporting new teachers.

Kelly Johnson-Turnbull, Northern Lights School Division #69, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING, PYRAMIDS OF INTERVENTION, AND RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION Build a community of learners with strategies that have a sharp focus on the individual needs of children. Learn how to get staff to buy in as you build a pyramid of interventions and then lead them to the implementation of a response to intervention model.

Shawn Minnich, Northeastern School District, Manchester, PA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

CREATING AND PLANNING FOR EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Gain strategies to successfully incorporate focused professional development into your school's busy schedule. Plan for professional development grounded in identified school improvement goals.

Kathleen Hwang, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA, [email protected] William Shipp, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

ACTION RESEARCH: THEORY INTO PRACTICE Learn how to engage staff in developing independent action research projects and how to apply the five steps in action research using Accelerated Reader as an example.

Mary Moyer, Delsea Regional School District, Franklinville, NJ, [email protected] Frank Borelli, Delsea Regional School District, Franklinville, NJ, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

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STEP-BY-STEP: SCHOOLWIDE WALK-THROUGHS Learn about a schoolwide walk-through process for facilitating teachers' active engagement in understanding personal roles in student motivation and what professional development is necessary to improve it.

Jennifer Cuddapah, Johns Hopkins University, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Dee Jolles, Johns Hopkins University, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Moriah Martin, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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ASSESSMENT-CENTERED TEACHING: A REFLECTIVE PRACTICE Learn how to use the AssessmentCentered Teaching Portfolio to help teachers reflect on their practice by developing quality assessment and instruction systems in their classrooms.

Kathy DiRanna, WestEd, Santa Ana, CA, [email protected] Jo Topps, WestEd, Santa Ana, CA, [email protected] Melissa Smith, Lake Elsinore Unified School District, Lake Elsinore, CA, [email protected] Lynn Barakos, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

STRATEGIES FOR DIFFERENTIATING IN CONTENT AREAS Examine eight ready-to-use strategies that may be used in classrooms 3-12 to enhance the teaching quality of any teacher or coach.

Beverly Strayer, Red Lion Area School District, Red Lion, PA, [email protected] Troy Strayer, Red Lion Area School District, Red Lion, PA, [email protected] LeeAnn Zeroth, Red Lion Area School District, Red Lion, PA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

WHAT GREAT MENTOR-COACHES DO DIFFERENTLY See how teachers who practice, share, and reflect upon their learning experiences daily can positively impact adult and student learning.

Ava Sweet, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Lori Grossman, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

BUILDING THE PERFECT TEAM Learn to recognize style differences and gain strategies to make the most of participants' strengths to build a cohesive, cooperative, and dynamic team.

Carolyn Hirst-Loucks, Auburn Enlarged City School District, Auburn, NY, [email protected] Kim Loucks, OCM BOCES, Syracuse, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

QUALITY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT + QUALITY SCHOOL = PRICELESS Join an award-winning district's professional development team to learn about strategies for continuous improvement, data and goal-driven planning, and their journey to performance excellence.

Tracy Bayles, Jenks Public Schools, Jenks, OK, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

INCREASING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT WITH THE PAYNE SCHOOL MODEL Learn how to raise student achievement and build the capacity of your staff with this collegial and collaborative model designed by Ruby Payne.

Jennifer Meka Ratka, aha! Process, Inc., Highlands, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

STAGE TEACHERS AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT PREPARING EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Examine critical features of effective programs for English language learners, sheltered English immersion, transitional bilingual, dual language, and heritage language that are appropriate for a school and community.

Rebecca Freeman Field, Caslon, Philadelphia, PA, [email protected] Hilda Rivera, Plainfield Community Consolidated School District 2022, Plainfield, IL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality 49

Discover how second-stage teachers benefit from a structured career planning process that differentiates staff development to meet the needs of various stages of their careers.

Mike Schwei, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX, [email protected] Michelle Pawski, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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Roundtables I

Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

IMPLEMENTING SUCCESSFUL ONTHE-JOB PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Identify the criteria for effective professional learning and learn how to create the conditions for it to thrive in your school.

Jennifer Groves, Telluride, CO, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

CO-TEACHING: THE PROFESSIONAL MARRIAGE Learn the essential components of inclusion needed for a successful coteaching experience that impacts student achievement for all.

Tanya Settles, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Royce Davis, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

EXPLORE NSDC Get to know NSDC. Hear how NSDC will achieve its purpose through the new strategic plan. Get answers to your questions regarding NSDC's programs, services, publications, and advocacy efforts. Learn ways you can increase your involvement with NSDC.

Tracy Crow, National Staff Development Council, Columbus, OH, [email protected] Sue Showers, NSDC Board of Trustees, Cincinnati, OH, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

RESEARCH-TO-PRACTICE: DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP Learn how high schools and middle schools, urban and rural, use distributed leadership to organize adults into learning communities focused on student achievement.

Sharon Brittingham, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, [email protected] Annemarie Linden, New Castle County VoTech, Newark, DE, [email protected] Amy Levitz, Christina School District, Newark, DE, [email protected] Donna Hall, Milford School District, Milford, DE, [email protected] Dave Sechler, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, [email protected] Shannon Wilson, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

9,000:1 - YOU'RE NOT ALONE Examine a comprehensive professional growth system for support professionals that promotes workforce excellence through the application of a core competency model.

Inger Swimpson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Kim Bishop, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

CREATIVE LEADERSHIP ACHIEVES STUDENT SUCCESS (CLASS) Hear how the CLASS Project, which was created locally by teachers, offers an expanded career architecture to enhance the professional practice of teachers and increase student success in three Oregon school districts.

Sue Hildick, Chalkboard Project, Portland, OR, [email protected] Kate Dickson, Leadership Matters, Inc., West Linn, OR, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

STANDARDS ASSESSMENT INVENTORY (SAI) ­ MUCH MORE THAN A SURVEY Analyze simulated SAI data that lead to identifying NSDC Standards to implement in your district and write the professional learning plan for your district and school.

Steve Preston, SI Consultants Inc., Decatur, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

Gather 'round! Choose roundtables and you will have the option to select six 45-minute sessions from over 50 topics and presenters.

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 5:30 p.m.

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E01 MONDAY AFTERNOON LECTURE OPTION This will allow you to attend the following sessions: E02: Questions and Answers with Linda Darling-Hammond 2:15 p.m. ­ 3:15 p.m. F01: Scholar Lecture by Margarita Calderón 3:15 p.m. ­ 4:15 p.m. Please see the individual session descriptions for details.

Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E03 NSDC'S AFFILIATE LEADERS MEETING Join other affiliate leaders and interact with NSDC's Board of Trustees and senior staff members. Gather new information, review NSDC's progress on its strategic plans, review progress on your affiliate's strategic plan, and network with your fellow affiliate leaders.

Dale Hair, Kennesaw, GA, [email protected] Rene Islas, B&D Consulting, Washington DC, [email protected] Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, CO, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

E05 SHIFT, EXPAND, FOCUS YOUR CIRCLE OF INFLUENCE Learn how the leaders of three districts collaborate to implement seamless instructional support services K-12. Understand the roles and responsibilities of Instructional Strategists. Leave with an understanding of specific practices, protocols, and activities you can use to build teacher leadership capacity through embedded professional development.

Jane Golding, Yarmouth School Department, Yarmouth, ME, [email protected] Katie Hawes, Gorham School Department, Gorham, ME, [email protected] Dominic DePatsy, Cape Elizabeth School Department, Cape Elizabeth, ME, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

E02 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER LINDA DARLING-HAMMOND Keynote speaker Linda DarlingHammond will LINDA DARLINGaddress your HAMMOND questions in this special session following her keynote address Monday afternoon. This session will conclude after one hour.

Linda Darling-Hammond, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E04 MINDFULLY RESOLVING CONFLICTS: FACILITATION FOR DIVERSITY ISSUES How do we begin a conversation with people culturally different from ourselves? Explore what it takes to develop authentic and meaningful relationships, even in conflict. Address issues such as racism and cultural differences. Experience group processes, conflict facilitation, and cross-cultural communication techniques transferable to classrooms, meetings, and counseling sessions.

Mun Wah Lee, StirFry Seminars & Consulting, Berkeley, CA, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

E06 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ON THE M.U.V.E. A blended learning environment provides a structure for building a diverse community of learners that accommodates individual learning styles. Learn how to use multiple distance learning technologies (Moodle, Elluminate, and Second Life) to create powerful professional development by participating in a hands-on experiential workshop and analyzing distance learning alternatives.

Andrea Tejedor, Orange-Ulster BOCES, Goshen, NY, [email protected] Jeanann Klopchin, Orange-Ulster BOCES, Goshen, NY, [email protected] Julia Downey, Orange-Ulster BOCES, Goshen, NY, [email protected] Kathleen Helhoski, Orange-Ulster BOCES, Goshen, NY, [email protected] Strand: Technology

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E07 PRINCIPAL: FIRST-LINE STAFF DEVELOPER

concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 5:30 p.m.

E09 USING STUDENT VOICE TO PLAN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT The use of student voice is often not included in the data analyzed to plan for relevant professional development. Review examples of data gathering protocols, including Data-in-a-Day, and learn how student voice can assist leadership teams to determine relevant professional development action plans.

Robin Shrode, American Alliance for Innovative Schools, Inc., Irving, TX, [email protected] David Holden, American Alliance for Innovative Schools, Inc., Chula Vista, CA, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

Consider the rationale for recognizing the principal as a primary staff developer in a school. Learn how classroom visits and meetings enable effective principals to recognize needs and provide growth experiences. Identify administrators' skill sets and learn contexts, timelines, and strategies leading to meaningful professional development.

Deborah Carey, Auburn Enlarged City School District, Auburn, NY, [email protected] Megan Popkess, Auburn Enlarged City School District, Auburn, NY, [email protected] Anthony Fisher, Auburn Enlarged City School District, Auburn, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

professional learning among teachers and administrators. Acquire strategies for using data on ELLs' growth and achievement to foster collaboration among mainstream, ESL, special education, and bilingual education teachers and administrators. Adapt this inclusive assessment and accountability system to a program, school, or district.

Diep Nguyen, Des Plaines School District 62, Des Plaines, IL, [email protected] Margo Gottlieb, The Center: Illinois Resource Center, Des Plaines, IL, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

E10 ONGOING DAILY INDUCTION LEADS TO SUCCESS Learn about an induction program that develops quality teaching through an initial intensive summer training, ongoing monthly formal/informal sessions, and daily professional development with assigned personal mentors. Hear how, through the collaborative effort of teachers and administrators, the district creatively uses time, funding, and resources to make this program successful.

Claudia Shulman, East Penn School District, Emmaus, PA, [email protected] Linda DeIvernois, East Penn School District, Emmaus, PA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

E12 INSTRUCTIONAL TALK-THROUGHS: EFFECTIVE TEACHER LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Enhance teacher practice, support teacher leadership, and ensure the ongoing practice of assessment for learning through the Instructional Talk Through project. Learn how it enhances teaching practice, expertise, and student learning through the establishment of positive relationships between administrators, teachers, students, and parents.

Mary Michailides, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] Dean Michailides, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] Dorothy Cronk, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] Linda Inglis, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] Nancy Petersen, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] David Morris, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton. AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E08 IMPLEMENTING EQUITABLE PRACTICES IN THE CLASSROOM Learn how to eliminate the achievement gap by providing the knowledge and tools for teachers to consciously and consistently demonstrate specific, observable, and measurable equitable instructional practices with all students. Equitable practices ensure that students from all racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, linguistic, and disability groups receive the same consistent messages of high expectations.

Themis Johnson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Katie Rossini, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

E11 DATA-DRIVEN PROFESSIONAL LEARNING: COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Common formative and summative data on English language learners (ELLs) provides a powerful foundation for

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E13 DEVELOPING ADAPTIVE LEADERS School leaders may not have answers for the tough, adaptive problems they face today, but they have to know the questions. Examine the role of questions and reflection in developing leadership skills. Simulate a professional development committee for school leaders. Gain strategies to mobilize school teams to close the gap between beliefs and reality.

Gail Covington McBride, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Ruth Koenigsberg, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Kevin Hobbs, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Jerome Lynch, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] LaVerne Kimball, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

resource that summarizes major findings from the last five surveys as well as NSDC newsletters published in 2008 that support key ideas.

A. Richardson Love, Jr., The MetLife Foundation, New York, NY, [email protected] Joan Richardson, National Staff Development Council, Grosse Pointe Park, MI, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

E17 MAKING A DIFFERENCE FOR ALL STUDENTS Review the components of a comprehensive system plan for improving student literacy rates. Review the framework for implementing the teaching and learning cycle and for monitoring the effective implementation of instructional strategies. Align district and school goals with human and financial resources and professional development to increase student achievement.

Eleanor Adam, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected] Ruth Peden, Halton District School Board, Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected] Veronica Purcell, Halton District School Board, Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected] Camilla Martin, Ministry of Education, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

E15 ADMINISTRATIVE COURAGE Courageous leadership is necessary to maintain a sense of hope, optimism, and composure. Consider the ethical and moral issues faced by administrators, as viewed through the lens of courage. Learn a framework that supports deeper understanding of courage and its transfer to administrative lives.

Karla Satchwell, Elk Island Public Schools, Sherwood Park, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

E14 CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF THE METLIFE SURVEY OF THE AMERICAN TEACHER MetLife has conducted The Survey of the American Teacher for 25 years to share the voice of those closest to the classroom with leaders and the general public. A special edition of the survey will commemorate this accomplishment as well as offer readers the opportunity to compare responses to key issues over time. Be among the first to review the findings of this landmark survey. Engage in conversation on how the survey can be used to leverage support for and understanding of key professional development issues. Receive a special

E16 GENERATIONAL SAVVY: SUPPORTING EDUCATORS OF ALL GENERATIONS Have you noticed that beginning teachers and administrators act differently from the novices you remember? Are you noticing communication challenges between older and younger colleagues? Learn structures that will help all generations do their jobs well, become effective leaders, and stay in our profession.

Jennifer Abrams, Palo Alto Unified School District, Palo Alto, CA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

E18 NETWORKS: CHANGE AGENTS FOR BUILDING LEADERSHIP CAPACITY AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Learn how the National School Leaders Network's unique model of collaborative coaching and mentoring facilitates "change leadership" in real life school context. Engage in activities designed to catapult school leaders and school improvement.

Elizabeth Neale, National School Leaders Network, Hinsdale, MA, [email protected] Rachelle Salerno, Albany City School District, Albany, NY, [email protected] Michael Rafferty, Old Saybrook Connecticut Central School District, Old Saybrook, CT, [email protected] Sandi Bisceglia, Monroe County Schools, Key West, FL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

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Monday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 5:30 p.m.

E19 LEARNING FROM STORIES OF SCHOOL-BASED COACHES Hear the stories and experiences of successful school-based coaches as they tell how coaches help educators gain goal clarity, align classroom goals to those of the school and district, and deepen educators' content knowledge and pedagogical skills to improve teaching and learning.

Riva Korashan, United Federation of Teachers (UFT) Teacher Center, New York, NY, [email protected] Gail Sternfeld, United Federation of Teachers (UFT) Teacher Center, New York, NY, [email protected] Diana Carbone, United Federation of Teachers (UFT) Teacher Center, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E21 COOL TOOLS: INCORPORATING WEB 2.0 TOOLS Breeze through tools from free web 2.0 applications to utilizing a cell phone and clickers for learning. Take polls, embed presentations, and pilot Google's latest technologies. Contemplate technology as an effective vehicle for professional learning and strategies to prepare our students for the 21st century. BYOL (bring your own laptop).

Jennifer Arns, Organization for Educational Technology and Curriculum (OETC), Wilsonville, OR, [email protected] Strand: Technology

E23 TOOLS FOR FOSTERING QUALITY COLLEGIAL INQUIRY Examine tools for improving the quality and depth of collegial inquiry. Consider the relationship between the inquiry question and the process for creating an aligned action plan. Identify strategies to support collaborative data analysis to improve student learning. Use data displays to deepen understanding of collegial inquiry.

Diane Cunningham, Learner-Centered Initiatives, Floral Park, NY, [email protected] Julie Kopp, Penfield Central Schools, Penfield, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E22 POWER OF WE: A DISTRICT'S JOURNEY Hear how a rural district improved student learning by engaging in honest conversations about collaboration and leadership at the central office level. Learn how the NSDC Academy experience, along with attention to planning for continuous improvement aimed at supporting learning communities, has transformed one district's "I" mentalities to the successful power of "we."

Vicky Spear, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL, [email protected] Denise Schuman, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL, [email protected] Hank Allen, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL, [email protected] Charles Clemmons, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

E20 DISTRICT TRANSFORMATION THROUGH JOB-EMBEDDED PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Learn how one district aligned district resources and initiatives to support successful school-based and districtwide professional learning communities. Explore the challenges of implementing high-quality, job-embedded professional learning that infuses every classroom with research-based instructional strategies and technology tools to enhance student learning, and creates a districtwide culture of collaboration.

Rachel Porter, Centers for Quality Teaching and Learning, Raleigh, NC, [email protected] Betsy Bryan, Franklin County Schools, Louisburg, NC, [email protected] Lesley Coe, Franklin County Schools, Louisburg, NC, [email protected] Theresa Bell, Centers for Quality Teaching and Learning, Raleigh, NC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality 54

E24 UNLOCKING CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT THROUGH KEYS TO QUALITY Get engaged in Georgia's model for continuous school improvement by examining three interrelated tools. Hear how the process addresses unpacking standards, analyzing data, developing action plans, and monitoring results.

Kathy Carrollton, Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, GA, [email protected] Li Massey, Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, GA, [email protected] Wanda Oldfield, Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, GA, [email protected] Karen Walker, Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, GA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

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E25 TRAINERS' TACKLE BOX: BRAIN-COMPATIBLE WORKSHOP STRATEGIES Fill your tackle box with powerful presentation strategies. Make sure you have a variety of differentiated techniques to "hook" participants' interest and attention. Orchestrate workshops using brain-compatible best practices. Acquire dozens of strategies for future presentations.

Martha Kaufeldt, Begin with the Brain, Scotts Valley, CA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E27 LINKING LEARNING TO RESULTS: LESSONS LEARNED Review how staff development, curriculum alignment, and on-going student assessment are linked to improved student learning and performance. Examine which organizational structures and resources lead to results-driven professional learning. Evaluate the elements of assessment design that provide evidence of student learning results.

Gail Worrell, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Jasey Kolarik, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Sandy Ogren, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Tiffany Staples, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Anne Buck, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Christine Arason, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Lorie Blickhan, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Daniel Woods, Zion-Benton Township High School District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

order to make the content accessible and promote the development of academic language.

Mariana Castro, World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium, Madison, WI, [email protected] Robert Kohl, WIDA Consortium, Madison, WI, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

E29 KNOWING ISN'T ENOUGH: AWARENESS TO ACTION Review why past or current professional development activities may not have resulted in changing or improving practice. Learn how to design professional development experiences that go beyond raising awareness to changing and improving practice by using a professional learning protocol.

Douglas Fisher, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, [email protected] Sandi Everlove, TeachFirst, Seattle, WA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E26 PROMOTING POWERFUL PROFESSIONAL GROWTH THROUGH NBPTS CERTIFICATION How do you promote substantive and sustained professional growth through candidate support? An overview of the NBPTS program in Montgomery County will illustrate how a program evolved from logistical and technical support to a professional learning experience by using the NBPTS Standards as a basis, and then branched into a graduate certificate program. Examine challenges, rewards, and ethical issues.

Jolynn Tarwater, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Stephen Helgeson, National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Renee Patrick, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Julie Grant, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

E30 FRONT-END COMMITMENT TO GETTING IT RIGHT Identify structures that support quality mentor selection, professional development, and accountability. Explore the components of a comprehensive, classroom-based model of induction. Discuss the complexity of new teacher professional development in an urban context.

Cheryl Krehbiel, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC, [email protected] Barbara Davis, New Teacher Center at University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

E28 OPENING CLASSROOM DOORS TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS For teachers of English language learners (ELLs), the question often is, "Should I focus on the language or the content?" Learn how to integrate both language and content standards in the planning, instruction, and assessment of ELLs in

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F01 SCHOLAR LECTURE 3:15 p.m. ­ 4:15 p.m.

MARGARITA CALDERÓN

concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

EXPEDITING READING COMPREHENSION FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

F03 MANAGING UNSOLVABLE PROBLEMS: SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT AS POLARITIES Leadership for continuous improvement of learning for all students requires educators to effectively manage competing interests and unsolvable problems. Learn to identify and manage those complex issues as polarities. Explore how to distinguish problems from polarities, why it matters to know the difference, and what practical skills allow us to manage polarities well.

Terry Chadsey, Center for Courage & Renewal, Bainbridge Island, WA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

F05 RESEARCH-BASED DESIGN OF ONLINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Develop a deeper understanding of the potential for online professional development in instructional coaching programs. Learn how to make data-based decisions about online professional development. Discuss and reflect on potential benefits and challenges of online technology in supporting the work that instructional coaches do as facilitators, team builders, and partners in learning.

Kathe Simons, Hezel Associates, Syracuse, NY, [email protected] Marcia Foster, PBS TeacherLine, Arlington, VA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

The diversity of adolescent long-term English language learners and students with interrupted formal education in grades 4-12 ranges from pre-literate to reading at a 4th grade level in English. Schools must be accountable for their progress and engage in data-driven reform. Hear about research, frameworks, technology, and professional development designs, and how these models are being implemented in New York City schools.

Margarita Calderón, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

F04 LEADERSHIP TEAMS THAT WORK Learn to apply collaborative processes and research to transform teacher committees into effective leadership teams that produce results focused on student learning. Hear how teacher teams, empowered with time and knowledge, collaborate to produce standard assessment practices that guide effective teaching. Participate in activities that challenge current practices, inspire collective vision, and demonstrate through example.

Cindy Newell, Durant Independent School District, Durant, OK, [email protected] Nancy Johnson, Durant Independent School District, Durant, OK, [email protected] Tanya Lindley, Durant Independent School District, Durant, OK, [email protected] Elaine Sawyers, Durant Independent School District, Durant, OK, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

F06 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING: A TEACHER-LED TEAMING APPROACH Help your teachers create a successful professional learning community where flexible team work and cooperation stimulates professional growth. Identify successful teaming techniques, discuss collaboration skills, and build instructional capacity to ensure the success of professional learning communities.

Carol Hicks, Bushland Independent School District, Bushland, TX, [email protected] Kristy Johnson, Bushland Independent School District, Bushland, TX, [email protected] Shawn Thrash, Bushland Independent School District, Bushland, TX, [email protected] Kyleen Reed, Bushland Independent School District, Bushland, TX, [email protected] Shandra Brown, Bushland Independent School District, Bushland, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

F02 THE LEADER IN ME When elementary students meet principle-centered habits, schools see increased parental involvement, a more positive school culture, highly engaged educators, and decreased discipline referrals. Examine what is involved in teaching students to know the 7 Habits and, more importantly, to live them. Be introduced to the irresistible cast of characters of The 7 Habits of Happy Kids and accessible stories that give teachers the tools to help inspire children to be the best they can be.

Sean Covey, FranklinCovey Company, Provo, UT, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

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F07 PRINCIPAL ACTION RESEARCH IN A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY Discuss how principal action research builds the capacity of school leaders and teachers to improve student achievement. Examine the benefits to a professional learning community that invests in this kind of research. Learn how to facilitate teacher action research, conduct an action research project, and contribute to a principal learning team on a collaborative action research project.

Linda Massey, Ontario Principals' Council, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

strategies to create learning communities to address teachers' and students' diverse needs.

Peggy Villars Abadie, New Orleans Public Schools, New Orleans, LA, [email protected] Adam Garry, Pearson, Cary, NC, [email protected] Strand: Technology

Daniel Scanlon, Hillcrest High School, Queens, NY, [email protected] David Morrison, Hillcrest High School, Queens, NY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

F12 RECRUITING AND RETAINING FACULTY IN IMPACTED SCHOOLS Review an alternative salary structure program that is successfully recruiting and retaining quality teachers in highpoverty schools. Hear district personnel and principals tell how a combination of compensation incentives, performance accountability, professional development, and structural support is impacting professional learning, teaching quality, student learning, and school culture.

Amy Holcombe, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC, [email protected] Peggy Thompson, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC, [email protected] Renee McKinnon, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC, [email protected] Lori Bolds, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

F10 COACHING TOOLS TO HELP TEACHERS REVISE INSTRUCTION Examine a professional development model that uses modified lesson study to support instructional coaches and deepen their coaching practice. Learn new tools to support district-level coaches and create a collaborative learning environment. Help teachers be more reflective on a daily basis.

Thuy Do, Developmental Studies Center, Oakland, CA, [email protected] Jan Mayes, Kent School District, Kent, WA, [email protected] Shannon Stanton, Kent School District, Kent, WA, [email protected] Susan Fish, Kent School District, Kent, WA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

F08 MATH COACHING MOVES: INFUSING CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Learn about different K-8 math coach roles: model, collaborator, teacher, and leader. Be engaged in moves and strategies that support the development of these roles. Reflect upon how coaching moves enhance teacher growth and support the inclusion of all students in the learning process.

Lanette Waddell, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, [email protected] Kelly Toscano, Cherry Hill Public Schools, Cherry Hill, NJ, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

F11 FROM SHEEP TO SHEPHERD Hear how a large urban high school is transforming into nine semi-autonomous small learning communities under a central supervisory and administrative umbrella. Learn strategies that lead to student-centered, data-driven instruction and the building of leadership capacity by redefining leadership roles. Gain knowledge to replicate this model of high school reform.

Stephen Duch, New York City Department of Education, Queens, NY, [email protected] Amar Nepal, Hillcrest High School, Queens, NY, [email protected]

F13 THE NEED FOR SUBSTITUTE TEACHER STAFF DEVELOPMENT The substitute teacher is the "real" teacher when the regular classroom teacher is absent. Hear why districts concerned with quality instruction address the staff development needs of substitute teachers. Learn how to teach classroom management skills to substitutes and give them the knowledge that supports effective teaching.

Geoffrey Smith, Utah State University, Logan, UT, [email protected] Blaine Sorenson, Utah State University, Logan, UT, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality 57

F09 A MODEL CLASSROOM: TRANSFORMING INSTRUCTION WITH TECHNOLOGY Learn how to create a model classroom using multiple technologies to engage, involve, and assess students. Transform the traditional teacher-led instructional model into an interactive, studentcentered learning environment. Gain

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concurrent sessions

Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

F14 TEACHER LEADERSHIP FOR IMPROVED STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Engage in activities that support the seven facets of teacher leadership and nine important roles that teacher leaders play in improving student achievement. Take away practical strategies and tools.

Chris Pigman, Mid-Ohio Educational Service Center, Mansfield, OH, [email protected] Donna Stanfield, Bucyrus City Schools, Bucyrus, OH, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

F16 COACHING: BLENDED MODEL FOR ONLINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Learn how educators can engage in online professional development blended with face-to-face educator dialogue and learning. Learn how to integrate peer coaching techniques into an online program. See how effective online professional development impacts education practice.

Linda James, National Education Association, Washington, DC, [email protected] Anita Behrman, Educational Impact, Warminister, PA, [email protected] Thomas Blanford, National Education Association, Washington, DC, [email protected] Strand: Technology

strategies to help teachers respond to data and incorporate differentiated instruction in the heterogeneous classroom.

Maureen Robins, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY, [email protected] Viviane Verstandig, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

F15 APPLYING GUSKEY'S FIVE EVALUATION LEVELS TO PRINCIPALS AND BEYOND Hear how New Leaders for New Schools, an organization focused on the selection, development, and support of principals, addresses the planning, implementation, and evaluation of professional learning. Examine how an organization can use Guskey's work to better understand the ways in which it is and is not supporting quality implementation of professional development.

Kate Gerson, New Leaders for New Schools, New York, NY, [email protected] Karen Barnes, New Leaders for New Schools, New York, NY, [email protected] Marc Etienne, New Leaders for New Schools, New York, NY, [email protected] Drema Brown, New Leaders for New Schools, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

F19 MARYLAND'S LONG-TERM STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT State and local leaders and professional development stakeholders in Maryland have been working together since January 2003 to improve professional development for all teachers. Learn about the key strategies and specific steps that led to a statewide consensus regarding a definition of high-quality professional development and how it is used to guide improvements in professional development policies and programs at the state and local level. Examine tools that have been developed to support the improvement efforts and to increase state and local capacity to plan, implement, and evaluate professional development. Receive a CD with a complete set of tools and major reports on teacher professional development in Maryland.

Bruce Haslam, Policy Studies Associates, Washington, DC, [email protected] Colleen Seremet, Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Darren Hornbeck, Frederick County Public Schools, Frederick, MD, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

F17 SCALING UP SUCCESS FROM SCHOOL TO DISTRICT Learn how to use data to support the need for school change. Review seven steps for scaling up success from one school to other schools. Transfer effective practices from this district's success to another.

Chris Confer, Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

F18 AFTER THE DATA SNAPSHOT: WHAT NOW? Learn how data-driven instruction can be supported through brain-compatible learning practices. Explore how teacher leaders and staff developers coach teachers toward monitoring, learning, and adjusting teaching. Gain specific

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F20 STAFF ROOM TO CLASSROOM: EVIDENCE OF TRANSFER Determining the level of transfer from the staff room to the classroom helps leaders determine the level of implementation of professional learning opportunities. Explore the signals and cues that help track teachers' depth of understanding and the level of authentic application in classrooms. Learn how to gather the evidence that shows that professional development is working.

Robin Fogarty, Robin Fogarty and Associates, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Robert Maxey, New Hanover County Schools, Wilmington, NC, [email protected] Stand: Documenting the Impact

F22 SHARED LEADERSHIP: STRENGTHENING TEACHER LEADERS AND ADMINISTRATORS Learn how to forge shared leadership partnerships by tapping into the combined strengths of two pivotal school roles. Explore shared leadership in an educational context. Discover the power of teacher leader/administrator teams.

Sharon Kortman, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, [email protected] Mary Anne Duggan, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, [email protected] Mark McCall, Dysart Unified School District, Surprise, AZ, [email protected] Jean Meier, Dysart Unified School District, Surprise, AZ, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

F24 GREAT TECHNOLOGY, GREAT OUTCOMES Demystify the selection and use of technology tools to manage professional development at the school and district level. Hear about technology that will simplify efforts to assess, maintain, and support professional development. Experts who use these tools will share their knowledge and practical experiences. This session will be hosted in the NSDC exhibit hall and offers attendees not only the opportunity for formal presentations, but additional time to peruse the other exhibits.

Invited NSDC Exhibitors Facilitated by Vaughn Gross, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Strand: Technology

F21 THE 21ST CENTURY STUDENT When we were students we read, wrote, and spoke. Today our kids blog, podcast, create, and share. How can we use the skills that our students bring to the classroom to increase student achievement? Examine the implications for professional development.

Carol Burlinski, High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] Susan Carley, High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] Mark Schaetzlein, High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] Strand: Technology

F23 COLLABORATIVE INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP: PRINCIPALS PARTNERING WITH TEACHERS Explore leadership strengths. Examine a framework for distributing leadership. Learn effective collaboration strategies that promote shared leadership roles and responsibilities.

Jane Kise, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Beth Russell, Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

F25 THE GIFT OF COACHING A powerful coach requires skill that is best developed by experiencing and observing coaching firsthand. Members of Coaching for Results Inc. are providing the gift of one-on-one coaching. Give yourself time to explore your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities ... a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a tough situation.

Kathy Kee, Coaching for Results, Inc., Shady Shores, TX, [email protected] Vicky Dearing, Coaching for Results, Inc., Lewisville, TX, [email protected] Jane Bidlack, Coaching for Results, Inc., Tyler, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Be intense! Select one or two preconference sessions and experience deeper learning.

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Monday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 8, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

STAND UP FOR THE ARTS Review a successful model of arts integration for an elementary school that provides powerful learning for all students.

Jayne Ellicott, Charleston County Schools, Charleston, SC, [email protected] Cathie Middleton, Charleston County Schools, Charleston, SC, [email protected] Cherrie Sneed, Charleston County Schools, Charleston, SC, [email protected] Fannie Moore, Charleston County Schools, Charleston, SC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

Carolyne Creel, Fort Worth Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

HEAR OUR CRY: BOYS IN CRISIS Examine practical strategies, based on the book Hear Our Cry: Boys in Crisis by Paul Slocumb, to reduce the gaps in school, both socially and academically, between boys and girls.

Jim Littlejohn, aha! Process, Inc, Highlands, TX, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

David Steinberg, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Jeffrey Martinez, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

EDUCATION SERVICE DISTRICT'S POWERFUL PLANNING WITH DISTRICTS Learn about the Northwest Regional Education Service District's partnership with the Leadership and Learning Center that resulted in a five-year plan to implement core learning targets, data teams, common formative assessments, and effective teaching strategies for a network of 20 school districts.

Marta Turner, Northwest Regional Education Service District, Hillsboro, OR, [email protected] Karen Durbin, Northwest Regional Education Service District, Hillsboro, OR, [email protected] Mike Durbin, Gaston School District, Gaston, OR, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS REGARDING THEIR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCES Examine the strengths, weaknesses, barriers, and elements of a learning community as viewed by elementary school teachers.

Theresa Nugent, Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Malden, MA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

PROFESSIONAL READING GROUPS OPEN CLASSROOM DOORS Discover how to engage teachers in professional book studies and learn strategies and tools to facilitate book study groups.

Judith Wilson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Cathy Sourk, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Jenn Pisarra, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Jessica Steben, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

COLLABORATING WITH PARAEDUCATORS TO MAXIMIZE STUDENT LEARNING Examine a 36-hour course specifically designed to help paraeducators maximize student learning.

Amy Kines, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Wade Coplen, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Lori Spinelli-Samara, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Quality Teaching

POSITIVE DEVIANTS AND SCHOOL CULTURE Explore the fundamentals of how a positive deviant, someone who has access to the same resources as others yet produces remarkable results, affects school culture.

Frances Miller, Elizabethtown Area School District, Elizabethtown, PA, [email protected] Tracy Fasick, Intermediate Unit 13, Lancaster, PA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

CHANGING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING SYSTEMS: IMPLEMENTING INSTRUCTIONAL COACHES Reinvent your organizational structure and align resources to implement a campus coaching program that provides continuous professional learning.

Linda Tamburello, Education Service Center Region XI, Fort Worth, TX, [email protected] Cathleen Richardson, Fort Worth Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX, [email protected] 60

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: A HOLISTIC LOOK AT NEEDS Review national research that points to the most common needs related to coaching, mentoring, and professional learning communities.

Kim Glassman, Hezel Associates, LLC, Syracuse, NY, [email protected]

SUCCESSFUL INTERVIEWING AND PRESENTATION STRATEGIES Enhance presentation skills. Learn to present messages and information clearly and effectively to support continuous school improvement.

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Erika Blackburn, Hezel Associates, LLC, Syracuse, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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PARTNERSHIP FOR CASE-BASED LEARNING Learn how a school district partnered with an online learning company to use a case-study approach to help educators find and nurture academic strengths in students who have historically been underserved in advanced academic programs.

Carol Horn, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, [email protected] Diane Reed, CaseNEX, Charlottesville, VA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

during the day to help increase academic performance and support overall student achievement.

Tara Donahue, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL, [email protected] Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL, [email protected] Jaime Stephanidis, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

TRANSFORMING URBAN CLASSROOMS THROUGH SERVICE LEARNING Discover how conducting a high-quality service learning project can transform urban communities and learning environments by reviewing the five steps of a high-quality service learning project and methods for establishing networks to support teachers' efforts.

Kim Kirn, Need in Deed, Philadelphia, PA, [email protected] Jenn Wong, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

INTREPD: 21ST CENTURY TEACHING AND LEARNING Learn how Spotsylvania County instructional technology resource teachers, in conjunction with classroom teachers, use Innovation, Teacher Research, and Embedded Professional Development to increase student achievement and motivation through a collaborative model of professional development.

Brenda Conway, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Mary Hefner, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Wendy Fletcher, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Don Clayton, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Jodi Caruso, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

SUPPORTING NEW TEACHERS THROUGH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Hear an overview of a professional development program for new teachers and uncover the reasons why effective training is crucial to new teacher success and retention.

Debbie Tomasetti, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Joy Pearson, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

NEW LEADERS: TREADING WATER WITH WATER WINGS Confront the gap between university leadership preparation programs and the challenges of preK--12 schools, based on current research, case studies, and personal narratives.

Lynn Bush, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Bryan Albro, Sunset Ridge School District #29, Northfield, IL, [email protected] Terry Stirling, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Howard Bultinck, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE TEACHERS' ACADEMY Learn how Missouri's Teachers' Academy has improved teaching by providing a collaborative forum for master teachers with support at the local, regional, and state level.

Beccy Baldwin, Northwest MO Regional Professional Development Center, Maryville, MO, [email protected] Janice Rehak, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City, MO, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

TAKING ACTION FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Learn how to make student engagement measurable, set goals, and move schools toward higher levels of student engagement.

Richard Jones, RDJ Associates, Loudonville, NY, [email protected] Kathleen Weigel, Palm Beach County Schools, West Palm Beach, FL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

NSDC NETWORK: TECHNOLOGY AND THE INTERNET Dialogue and share ideas for multimedia presentations, telecommunications, and other topics related to the implications for technology in staff development. Discuss how staff developers can assist educators in moving beyond classroom walls to establish a worldwide community of lifelong learners.

Bobb Darnell, Achievement Strategies, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL, [email protected] Strand: Technology 61

USING AFTER-SCHOOL TO EXPAND LEARNING Learn how to work effectively with afterschool staff to create a quality program that complements what students do

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concurrent sessions

Tuesday ­ 5-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. continues at 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

G01 POWERFUL PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR NEW STAFF DEVELOPERS Polish your presentation skills and energize your audiences. Learn how to make your presentations more dynamic. Help people make meaning of and connections with content. Gain new tools and strategies to involve your participants in your presentations. Capture the brain's attention. Learn why is it important to establish and adhere to norms. Examine the value of movement. Experience what is involved in setting a powerful context and the process tools to support it. Note: This session is specially designed and limited to beginning staff developers. Meet other participants with similar challenges and establish a new network of colleagues in a similar position.

Deborah Estes, Estes Group, Inc., Sherman, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

G03 TOOLS AND STRATEGIES FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTATION AND SUSTAINABILITY Support educators in the implementation of effective learning teams by helping them to ask the right questions, analyze answers, design and implement interventions, and then measure results. Walk away with practical tools, helpful handouts, and an opportunity to share successes and struggles in implementing PLCs. Leave inspired to continue this crucial work.

Robert Hess, Springfield Public Schools, Springfield, OR, [email protected] Pam Robbins, Mt. Crawford, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

G05 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES: STUDENTS FIRST Reflect on the significance of a school's mission, vision, values, and goals. Determine ways to create time for staff to collaborate effectively. Examine a cycle of continuous improvement involving learning teams engaged in action research study groups. Receive resources for supporting school-based planning to improve student learning.

Stephen McCombe, Thames Valley District School Board, London, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

G06 INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES THAT WORK FOR ALL DISCIPLINES Gain instructional strategies that assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards and prepare them for classroom assessments. Evaluate curriculum materials for content area, organize content for learning, and develop or evaluate scoring guides for student tasks. Distinguish between formative and summative assessment. Empower educators with research-based learning strategies to help students achieve. Learn to use assessment tools to assure that all students are successful.

Mary Wren, Great Falls School District, Great Falls, MT, [email protected] Keith Davey, Great Falls School District, Great Falls, MT, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

G04 FROM GOOD TO GREAT: A STANDARDS-BASED INITIATIVE Develop collaborative skills through meaningful staff development that will result in the benefits of increased creativity, energy, enthusiasm, and divergent thinking. Articulate an institutional goal or goals and inspire colleagues to achieve objectives in multiple ways. Learn how setting standards and giving freedom will result in higher-quality staff development.

Debra Webb, Deer Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ, [email protected] Cherryl Paul, Deer Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ, [email protected] Mike Andersen, Deer Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ, [email protected] Paula Tseunis, Deer Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

G02 NSDC FORUM FOR ACADEMY GRADUATES For further information, see the Academy newsletter or contact Joellen Killion at [email protected] This session is for former and current Academy members.

Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, CO, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

This symbol indicates an Advanced Level Session This symbol indicates a Beginner Level Session

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G07 CO-CREATING A DISTRIBUTIVE LEADERSHIP STAFF DEVELOPMENT MODEL Experience the co-creation of a district and campus model of staff development that distributes leadership across a school system. Learn the evolution of content and processes that nurture, develop, and utilize teacher leadership and teamwork at the school and system levels to advance student learning.

Mike Schwei, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX, [email protected] Kristi King, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

G09 LEADERSHIP FOR SUPPORTING ADULT DEVELOPMENT Experience mini-lecture, writing, case discussion, and dialogue. Learn adultdevelopmental theory, new models of learning-oriented leadership, practices that support adult development, and adult learning principles. Apply ideas to cases and develop action plans for implementing practices.

Eleanor Drago-Severson, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

G11 DATA-DRIVEN COACHING OF STRUGGLING TEACHERS Many ineffective teachers and new teachers do not respond to a coaching relationship immediately because they do not have the necessary background knowledge or experience. Examine a framework and data collection tool for helping a struggling or new teacher practice skills embedded in most plans of action.

Annette Brinkman, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT, annette.brinkman[email protected] Ellen Williams, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, [email protected] Stand: Teaching Quality

G10 DATA + COLLABORATION = RESULTS G08 CLOSING GAPS: LITERACY, LEADERSHIP, AND LEARNING Examine how collaborative learning focused on curriculum standards alignment, data analysis, best practices, and assessment design translates into improved student results in an urban, high-poverty high school. Review literacy projects underway in fine arts, English language arts, biology, and Spanish. Discuss instructional support in the context of comprehensive embedded professional learning.

Maggie Thurber, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Marnie Malone, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Heather Wolfe, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Nicole Van Horn, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Susan Tryon Rogers, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Lisa Murdie, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Kathy Pilling-Whitney, Elmira City School District, Elmira, NY, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

As Mike Schmoker writes, "The right kind of continuous, structured teacher collaboration improves the quality of teaching and pays big, often immediate, dividends in student learning and professional morale in virtually any setting." Experience protocols to structure collaboration, analyze data, and focus dialogue that result in shared understandings, instructional solutions, and measurable gains in student achievement.

Steven Carney, Center for Data Collaboration and Results, Lincoln, CA, [email protected] Janet Malone, Poway Unified School District, Poway, CA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

Search! Refer to the presenter, topic, and audience indices to choose sessions or use the online search functions.

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concurrent sessions

Tuesday ­ 4-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. continues at 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

H01 B TRANSFORMING HIGH-NEED DISTRICTS THROUGH COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS At the heart of an effective statewide system of support is a high-functioning partnership with school districts. Hear about three examples that support high-need districts and schools. Examine organizational structures that build district capacity. Engage with challenging questions and build new collaborative partnerships.

Cathy Caro-Bruce, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI, [email protected] Molly Garner, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI, [email protected] Danette Parsley, Great Lakes West Comprehensive Center, Denver, CO, [email protected] Brett Lane, Educational Alliance at Brown University, Providence, RI, [email protected] Janell Newman, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA, [email protected] Linda Morse, State of New Jersey Department of Education, Trenton, NJ, [email protected] Christopher Unger, Educational Alliance at Brown University, Providence, RI, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

H02 LEADING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT THROUGH PRINCIPAL LEARNING TEAMS Discover how three principal organizations, in partnership with Curriculum Services Canada and the Literacy Numeracy Secretariat, developed the Leading Student Achievement Initiative. Examine the work of principal learning teams and data that measure the impact of their leadership on meeting the challenge of raising Canadian elementary students to provincial standards in reading, writing, and math.

Robert Jackson, Thames Valley District School Board, London, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

H04 WORKING WITH STRUGGLING STUDENTS: EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Use case studies to understand what struggling students need to succeed as well as what their teachers need to help them succeed. Experience professional learning that can help teachers help struggling students. Review what struggling students need to succeed in terms of school culture, curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Lois Easton, Boulder, CO, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

H05 FACILITATING ACADEMIC IMPROVEMENT USING INQUIRY Learn to apply a systematic research process to uncover root causes and identify best practice strategies for improving student learning and achievement. Practice inquiry phases including hypothesizing, testing, researching solutions, and assessing effectiveness. Gain tools to apply research to decision making that focuses on improving the learning of all students.

Bonnie Hamill, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, [email protected] Jeffrey Wright, Santa Maria Independent School District, Santa Maria, TX, [email protected] Joan Vasbinder, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, [email protected] Charle Scott, Texas Staff Development Council, Odessa, TX, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

H03 BUILDING DATA TEAMS THAT IMPROVE STUDENT LEARNING High-functioning data teams rest on an infrastructure of district and school-level support. Learn about the organizational structures, leadership, professional development, and data tools that unleash the power of data teams to improve student learning. Apply valuable lessons from a high-poverty school district that has closed the special education gap and sustained dramatic gains in student achievement.

Nancy Love, Research for Better Teaching, Acton, MA, [email protected] David Timbs, Johnson County Schools, Mountain City, TN, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

Come and dine! Attend all five general sessions and enjoy family-style meals, cutting-edge keynotes, and NSDC celebrations.

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H06 WALKING AND TALKING: THE LEARNING CONTINUES Learn how principals as instructional leaders embed ongoing professional learning to build "the infrastructure that surrounds the classroom and will make such transformation inevitable" (Fullan). Learn how administrators use technology to gather and desegregate data at schools through a walk-through technique and reflective inquiry. Reflect on how technology and data collection support continuous improvement of professional development.

Dana Robb, Northern Lights School Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Janice Fulawka, Northern Lights School Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Blair Norton, Northern Lights School Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Technology

H07 RACE: NOT A FOUR LETTER WORD Open conversations about race and racism can be contentious. Yet research indicates that courageous conversations about race are necessary to eliminate racial disparities in education. Engage in conversations about the research and strategies used by one school system to initiate and sustain an explicit focus on race to eliminate the racial achievement gap.

Donna Graves, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Sheila Berlinger, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

school and district administrators. Gain the tools to develop the capacity of school and district leadership. Learn how to build an aligned and integrated approach that uses data-based decision making to close the achievement gap.

Brenda Clark, Iredell-Statesville School District, Statesville, NC, [email protected] Mathew Fail, Iredell-Statesville School District, Statesville, NC, [email protected] Colleen Allred, Iredell-Statesville School District, Statesville, NC, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

H09 21ST CENTURY LEARNING 101 What is 21st century learning? How can we determine if we are a 21st century school? Examine some of the models for 21st century learning and explore what it means to be a 21st century school. Participate in activities designed to address these questions.

Kathy Klock Persing, Redmond, OR, [email protected] Strand: Technology

H08 A SYSTEMS-BASED DISTRICT: MAKING IT A REALITY According to a nationwide study of superintendents, systems thinking and continuous improvement are the top professional development priorities for

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I01 TUESDAY MORNING LECTURE OPTION

concurrent sessions

Tuesday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

This will allow you to attend the following sessions: I02: Questions and Answers with Alfred Tatum 9:00 a.m. ­ 10:00 a.m. J01: Scholar Lecture by Kati Haycock 10:00 a.m. ­ 11:00 a.m. J02: Scholar Panel by DC Area Superintendents 11:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. Please see the individual session descriptions for details.

Strand: Leadership

I03 USING INNOVATION CONFIGURATIONS TO DOCUMENT IMPACT Innovation configurations (IC) help translate the NSDC standards into actions for a variety of role groups. Learn how IC maps can help schools and districts redefine staff development and how responsibilities must change to implement the standards with quality and consistency. Examine a vision of professional development standards in operation and apply precision and meaning to what the standards look like in practice.

Shirley Hord, Boerne, TX, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

I05 MENTORING COMMUNITIES: RETAINING NEW TEACHERS Discover why effective mentoring is crucial to new teacher success. Determine ways to establish a mentoring environment that enhances teacher leadership and strengthens the connection between teacher induction and mentoring efforts. Identify generational differences that will assist in developing effective mentoring skills and trust among new teachers and their mentors. Formulate a long-range mentoring plan and participate in activities that can be incorporated into any mentoring program.

Brenda Nielsen, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I02 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER ALFRED TATUM Keynote speaker Alfred Tatum will address your ALFRED questions in this TATUM special session following his keynote address on Tuesday morning. This session will conclude after one hour.

Alfred Tatum, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I04 ADVANCED ACCREDITATION: TREASURE-TROVE FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING The AdvancED accreditation process gives educators opportunities to experience high-quality, relevant, and jobembedded professional learning. Each of the cornerstones of accreditation-- research-based standards, continuous improvement, and quality assurance-- engage staff in collective inquiry, assessment, analysis, action, and evaluation. Explore ways to involve and develop staff using the accreditation process as the context for learning.

Nikki Armato, AdvancED, Decatur, GA, [email protected] David Hurst, AdvancED, Tempe, AZ, [email protected] Veronica Harts, AdvancED, Decatur, GA, [email protected] Mary Jo Rasmussen, AdvancED, Tempe, AZ, [email protected] Sharon Steindam, AdvancED, Decatur, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

I06 WHAT DO PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES DO? Discuss values and conditions necessary to build collaborative, high-trust cultures required for effective PLCs. Look at protocols to facilitate the examination of student work and enable better decisions about instruction. Develop common assessments and answer the question, "How will we know if students have mastered the concept?"

Jody Hoch, Rush-Henrietta Central School District, Henrietta, NY, j[email protected] Ann Delehant, Delehant and Associates, Pittsford, NY, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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I07 COACHING: CATALYST FOR CHANGE IN SOUTH CAROLINA Transform your thinking about professional learning and examine statewide coaching initiatives in mathematics, science, technology, and literacy that are contributing to increased datadriven dialogue, more collaborative cultures in schools, and significant gains in student achievement. Experience coaching skills and leave with tools to use in other settings.

Nan Dempsey, South Carolina Department of Education, Columbia, SC, [email protected] Pam Wills, South Carolina Department of Education, Columbia, SC, [email protected] Patricia Dangerfield, Orangeburg School District Four, Cope, SC, [email protected] ElizaBeth Weatherly, Coastal Pee Dee Mathematics & Science Regional Center, Florence, SC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I09 MEASURING WHAT WE DO School processes define what learning organizations, and those who work in them, do to help students learn. These processes include what educators teach, how they teach, and how they assess students, as well as how they learn. Learn how to measure your school processes and determine which processes are getting desirable results.

Victoria Bernhardt, California State University, Chico Research Foundation, Chico, CA, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

I11 ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS OF PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES Learn about the Learning Community Culture Indicator as an instrument to assess and diagnose 10 elements identified from scholarly and professional literature as indicative of a professional learning community in schools. Review this validated and online instrument that helps diagnose and improve a school's efforts in becoming a PLC and thus improve student learning.

Joseph Matthews, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, [email protected] Ellen Williams, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, [email protected] Courtney Stewart, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

I10 CONNECTING HIGH-STAKES DATA TO CLASSROOM PRACTICE Learn how to design and support a professional learning community that strategically uses data to improve student learning. Identify and use professional development tools to facilitate data-focused professional development. Engage in a model action research cycle that connects high-stakes standardized testing to classroom teaching and learning.

Jennifer Borgioli, Learner-Centered Initiatives, Ltd., Depew, NY, [email protected] Theresa Gray, Erie 2-ChautauquaCattaraugus Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Fredonia, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

I08 21ST CENTURY LEARNING FOR 21ST CENTURY LEADERS Preparing students for success in the 21st century requires school leaders to retool their skills to meet the changing needs of their students. Gain insights from the work of the Michigan MI-LIFE program that is retooling their school leaders for the 21st century. Learn strategies to integrate technology into a research-based leadership development program promoting 21st century learning and leading.

Marion Ginopolis, Michigan Leadership Improvement Framework Endorsement, Lansing, MI, [email protected] Jane Perzyk, Michigan Leadership Improvement Framework Endorsement, Lansing, MI, [email protected] Ron Faulds, Michigan Leadership Improvement Framework Endorsement, Lansing, MI, [email protected] Strand: Technology

I12 BUILDING CAPACITY: A COMPREHENSIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING MODEL Review a comprehensive, systematic, and multi-tiered approach to professional development. Explore the model, examine an application involving professional development in literacy, and apply it to another system's needs.

Liz Mackie, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Lora D'Adamo, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

This symbol indicates an Advanced Level Session This symbol indicates a Beginner Level Session

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I13 POWERFUL INDUCTION FOR SCHOOL LEADERS

concurrent sessions

Tuesday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

I15 CIA (CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, ASSESSMENT): LEADING THE WAY A major component of school and district improvement is the interconnectedness of CIA. Investigate successful districtlevel research-based models of CIA integration. Inspect the common practices used in high-achieving districts that have integrated CIA.

Joyce Lieberman, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL, [email protected] Cassandra Meyer, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL, [email protected] Dawn Dolby, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I17 DATA + MARZANO + TECHNOLOGY = STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Hear how teachers experience individualized data-driven professional development provided by instructional technology resource teachers. See how professional development uses data and Marzano's instructional strategies to improve student learning. Consider benefits of this embedded professional development that occurs daily in the schools where teachers and students learn.

Jodi Moore, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Carrie Rehberg, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Jessica Carter, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Sherry Smith, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Than Krueger, Spotsylvania County Schools, Spotsylvania, VA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

New school leaders need comprehensive, coaching-based support. Learn how systematic leadership induction can nurture instructional leadership. Preview key components of systematic induction programs for new school principals and other school leaders.

Gary Bloom, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Mike Bossi, Association of California School Administrators, Sacramento, CA, [email protected] Audrey Soglin, Consortium for Educational Change, Lombard, IL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I14 INCREASING MOTIVATION AND ENGAGEMENT IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Learn how to have greater impact and personal satisfaction from teaching adults. Hear about research-supported principles, keys, and techniques that unleash the power of intrinsic motivation and increase the depth of learning and application. Add practical tools for engaging more educators. Experience ways to gain broad implementation across staff that will result in major gains in achievement.

Spence Rogers, Peak Learning Systems, Evergreen, CO, [email protected] Chris Reitan, Galena City School District, Galena, AK, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I16 POETRY, LEADERSHIP, AND LEARNING COMMUNITIES Experience how short poems can build strong professional communities by opening the doors to personal and professional conversations. Learn how leaders can use poems to open critical conversations. Receive resources to continue poetic work at home.

Walter Olsen, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Jim Roussin, Generative Human Systems, Coon Rapids, MN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I18 INCREASING ACHIEVEMENT THROUGH RIGOR, RELEVANCE, AND RELATIONSHIPS Gain knowledge of proactive solutions and best practices for meeting the serious challenges faced by many youth today. Acquire effective educational tools to build strong caring schools, communities, and families that can meet the diverse needs of all learners.

Michelle Curry, Cobb County School District, Marietta, GA, [email protected] Lisa Hendrix, Cobb County School District, Marietta, GA, [email protected] Ashley Jimerson, Cobb County School District, Marietta, GA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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I19 CREATING A CULTURE FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Learn how to create a culture of highquality, job-embedded professional learning that is aligned to district, school, and individual goals and focuses on adult learning strategies. Examine the structures and resources necessary to implement sustained, high-quality professional learning for all school district employees.

Helene Spak, Northbrook School District 27, Northbrook, IL, [email protected] Theresa Fournier, Northbrook School District 27, Northbrook, IL, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

I21 FOCUSING ON RESULTS LEADS TO RESULTS If there was a silver bullet for school improvement, it would be establishing effective professional learning communities. And if there was one facet of PLCs critical to improvement, it would be data analysis driving instruction. Learn about one school's journey toward establishing powerful grade-level PLCs as the engine of improvement, with the examination of student performance as the primary fuel.

Molly Bensinger-Lacy, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Marie Parker, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Aileen Flaherty, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Kate O'Donnell, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Laura Robbins, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

I22 PROTOCOL FOR LESSON STUDY: TEACHING-LEARNING COLLABORATIVE Learn strategies and processes within an inquiry group lesson study protocol that focuses staff developers on enhancing teacher quality. Experience activities associated with the Teaching-Learning Collaborative. Examine key aspects including development of local facilitators, use of research-based teaching strategies appropriate to learning goals, and use of student work data for analysis of impact.

Karen Cerwin, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Diane Carnahan, WestEd, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Ericka Matthies, Lake Elsinore Unified School District, Lake Elsinore, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I20 SMART GOALS FOCUS ON MIDDLE SCHOOL MATH Review a regional professional development design for establishing a network of teacher leaders who facilitate learning communities in their schools. See how the SMART goals process provides a common language and methodology at the regional, district, school, and classroom levels. This multifaceted design incorporates technology, job-embedded coaching, and leadership support.

Terri Portice, Kent Intermediate School District, Grand Rapids, MI, [email protected] Susan Brummel, Kent Intermediate School District, Grand Rapids, MI, [email protected] Sue Koning, Sparta Area Schools, Sparta, MI, [email protected] Gail Ramesh, Rockford Public Schools, Rockford, MI, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I23 LEADERSHIP: DEVELOPING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE Research shows that individuals with high emotional intelligence will have more successful academic, social, and vocational outcomes. Learn how to create long-term, sustainable change in behaviors by improving emotional intelligence. Discover how to break down and communicate the concept of leadership into understandable actions.

Bridgit Barainca, Rapport Leadership International, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Relax! Don't be overwhelmed by the registration process. Call 800-727-7288 and NSDC staff will walk you through it.

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concurrent sessions

Tuesday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

I24 MENTORS AS TEACHER LEADERS Foster teacher leadership by empowering mentors' growth. Experience various strategies and tools to support mentor teacher leaders including incorporating data collection, collegial discussions, and reflecting on research.

Gail Epps, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Joan Mory, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Geraldine Duval, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I26 INSPIRING TEAM ACTION AND GETTING INSPIRING RESULTS Inspire teachers to commit to improving literacy and content learning. Learn to use teacher learning teams to transform credible data to actionable knowledge. Gain tools for determining if current practices match research-based strategies, while sustaining optimism, celebrating progress, and building professional relationships and leadership capacity.

Bobb Darnell, Achievement Strategies, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

I29 PRACTICES FOR CO-TEACHING Delve into co-teaching models, Universal Design for Learning strategies, and collaborative planning processes that support middle school students with disabilities. Experience knowledge, skills, and practices that promote quality teaching for students with disabilities and their general education peers.

Karen Guthro, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Paulina Masick, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Denise DeCoste, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I25 IMPACTING THE DISTRICT: SILOS, POWER, AND PITFALLS When you're not in the chain of command, how do you get power? When functions are isolated like silos, how do you break through? What's a surefire way to kill your own best idea? Learn to be more effective from inside or out.

Edie Holcomb, Kenosha Unified School District No. 1, Kenosha, WI, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I27 BEYOND EMPTY PRAISE: THE POWER OF FEEDBACK Consider key planning feedback elements that promote student achievement. Learn to distinguish between feedback and other types of responses to student work and the key planning elements that give feedback its power.

Ruth Sernak, Research for Better Teaching, Acton, MA, [email protected] Dianne Hamilton, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

I30 LEADING FOR RESULTS THROUGH COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP Bring out the best in current and future leaders. Leader knowledge of self is necessary in order to recognize and promote leadership skills in others. Learn and practice strategies that assist leaders in bringing out the best in others and increasing their self-knowledge.

Terri Martin, Solution Tree Publications, Bloomington, IN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

I28 TIMSS IN ACTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT This symbol indicates an Advanced Level Session This symbol indicates a Beginner Level Session What does science teaching look like in different countries? How can schools use international comparisons to improve teaching and learning? Explore the TIMSS findings, discuss implications for teacher training and lesson planning, and learn practical ways to enhance instruction in science.

Nicole Dingman, Pearson, Chandler, AZ, [email protected] 70 Strand: Teaching Quality

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Tuesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

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J01 SCHOLAR LECTURE 10:00 a.m. ­ 11:00 a.m. IMPROVING ACHIEVEMENT AND CLOSING GAPS BETWEEN GROUPS: LESSONS FROM SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS ON THE PERFORMANCE FRONTIER Kati Haycock will review national data on student KATI achievement HAYCOCK patterns, with a special focus on low-income students and students of color. She will talk about some of the problems that are made clear in the data, and share lessons from the schools and districts that are tackling those problems head on and getting results. (This lecture will end at 11:00 a.m. It will be followed by J02).

Kati Haycock, The Education Trust, Washington DC, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

J02 SCHOLAR PANEL 11:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m. DC AREA SUPERINTENDENTS Join a select group of DC area superintendents as they share their views on professional development and the contribution it makes to their plans for ensuring success for all students. Compare their views, their challenges, their successes, and their plans. Seek answers to questions regarding engendering support for professional development from the top school administrator.

Andrés Alonso, Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Joe Hairston, Baltimore County Public Schools, Towson, MD, [email protected] Steven Jones, Norfolk Public Schools, Norfolk, VA, [email protected] (Invited) Elizabeth Morgan, Washington County Public Schools, Hagerstown, MD, [email protected]@k12.md.us Steven Walts, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Linda Davin, National Education Association, Washington, DC, [email protected] Rob Weil, American Federation of Teachers, Washington, DC, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

J04 RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION: PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS Acquire the knowledge and skills needed to implement Response to Intervention (RTI) in schools and classrooms. Experience progress monitoring and learn the organizational structures needed for implementing RTI. Receive a list of research-based strategies and forms for duplication to use in implementing RTI.

Maryln Appelbaum, Appelbaum Training Institute, Sugar Land, TX, [email protected] Martin Appelbaum, Appelbaum Training Institute, Sugar Land, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

J03 POLICY PATHWAYS FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING NSDC, in cooperation with AFT, NEA, and CCSSO, examined local school district collective bargaining agreements and state policies to identify components that support effective professional learning. The national task force identified model agreement and policy language and identified recommendations for local districts, teacher associations, and states. Engage with members who participated in the study and discuss findings.

Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, CO, [email protected] Jody Westbrook-Youngblood, San Antonio Independent School District, San Antonio, TX, [email protected]

J05 A FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING POVERTY Understanding the diverse background of students and the hidden rules they bring to school will ensure that race, class, culture, and ability are seen as assets in the classroom. Learn to create a classroom/ school environment based on mutual respect. Envision the concept of a school where learning is equitable for all students.

Jim Littlejohn, aha! Process, Inc., Highlands, TX, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

Make it easy! Register for the Lecture Series and attend each Keynote Q&A and five lectures by local and national scholars.

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J06 USING TECHNOLOGY TOOLS TO MONITOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Technological innovations can help school administrators identify specific professional development needs, monitor teacher practice, and improve instructional support. Explore professional development tools that empower K-12 school administrators to apply real-time data to enhance literacy and math instruction.

Ava Byrne, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL, [email protected] Joseph Jackson, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL, [email protected] Toddra Bunyan, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL, [email protected] Strand: Technology

J08 GIFTED LEARNERS... GIFTED TEACHERS Newly adopted national standards for preparation of teachers of the gifted offer a framework for supporting all teachers who work with gifted students. Learn strategies for determining professional development needs based on the standards and practice. Develop an effective professional development plan that addresses district, school, and individual levels.

Wayne Lord, Augusta State University, Augusta, GA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

J10 A COLLABORATIVE STATEWIDE ADVOCACY STRATEGY FOR PROVIDING HIGH QUALITY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Hear how the Oregon Chalkboard Project has developed a collaborative statewide advocacy strategy that includes the legislature, governor, state department of education, education professional associations, school districts, and the business community to advocate and fund high-quality professional development. Review the why, what, who, and how for state-level advocacy of professional development that integrates the NSDC Standards as a policy framework for quality professional development.

Sue Hildick, Chalkboard Project, Portland, OR, [email protected] Kate Dickson, Leadership Matters, Inc., West Linn, OR, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

J09 ONE STEP AT A TIME Professional learning communities provide an excellent vehicle for lasting school improvement. Examine the incremental steps one school took to successfully transform its culture. Receive practical tools and strategies to improve students' achievement through collaboration.

Phil Streets, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK, [email protected] Teresa McCain, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK, [email protected] Katherine Plumlee, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK, [email protected] Paula Rowland, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

J07 UNDERSTANDING RESISTANT BEHAVIORS IN THE EDUCATION SETTING Recognizing overtly hostile, resistant behavior in staff development sessions is a tool trainers can use to control learning outcomes. Consider how participant perceptual filters such as race, culture, gender, age, and life experiences can affect staff development. Discuss the impact of these issues on quality training time and dollars.

Patricia Froggett, University of Virginia, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

J11 PEER COACHING: CULTIVATING COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP TEAMS When district leaders and administrators cultivate collaborative leadership through peer coaching, educators develop 21st century skills and teacher leaders are born. Explore how stakeholders collaborate at the district and school level using Microsoft's Peer Coaching Program to create a culture of 21st century teachers and students that are implementing cutting-edge technology in the classroom.

Kay Teehan, Polk County Pubic Schools, Bartow, FL, [email protected] Virginia Richard, Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL, [email protected] Mijana Lockard, Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL, [email protected] Evelyn Hollen, Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL, [email protected] Strand: Technology

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J12 STRATEGICALLY USING DATA TO IMPROVE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE From state test scores to classroom assessments, schools have a wealth of data about student learning. Learn how to take a strategic approach to data collection and analysis to make faster, more accurate decisions, and improve teacher effectiveness and student performance.

Robb Geier, Pearson, Glenview, IL, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

J14 BUILDING LEADERSHIP CAPACITY: THE SMART WAY Engage teachers in leading school-based reform using the SMART goals process. Learn how this systemic approach builds effective leadership teams at the grade and department levels by providing the process, tools, central office support, resources, and opportunities for professional development aimed at improved student learning.

Rick Albritton, Gilmer Independent School District, Gilmer, TX, [email protected] Sigrid Yates, Gilmer Independent School District, Gilmer, TX, [email protected] Kim Kemp, Gilmer Independent School District, Gilmer, TX, [email protected] Amber Watson, Gilmer Independent School District, Gilmer, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

J16 OVER THE RAINBOW: REACHING EVERY TEACHER, EVERYDAY Click your heels together and be whisked away to a place where daily job-embedded staff development is a reality. See how an arts magnet middle school uses unique organizational structures, data analysis, goal setting, and reflection to ensure that all teachers receive quality professional development daily. Learn tips and tricks for keeping teachers and leaders focused on student achievement.

Heather Yuhaniak, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Alison Serino, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

J13 OPEN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: NEW TOOLS, NEW POSSIBILITIES Social software provides an environment for collaboration and communication between students and teachers as well as colleague to colleague. Learn how these tools build communities of learners and encourage Internet usage, not for interaction with computers, but for interaction between people.

Robin Ellis, Quakertown Community School District, Quakertown, PA, [email protected] Darren Draper, Jordan School District, Sandy, UT, [email protected] Strand: Technology

J15 AFTER-SCHOOL LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR TEACHERS Examine a framework for developing after-school learning communities at the local school level that provides teachers with opportunities to deepen content knowledge and apply research-based instructional strategies. Understand the role of school-based coaches in developing and facilitating professional learning opportunities based on the needs of individual teachers and students.

Tiffany Coleman, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Lawrenceville, [email protected] Dot Schoeller, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Lawrenceville, GA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

J17 LEARN NEW TECH TOOLS Review how technology makes a difference in increased student learning and educator productivity. Experience current and new technologies, web 2.0 tools, gadgets, and other hardware and processes that bring classrooms to life and empower students and educators.

Sandra McLeroy, Region 6 Education Service Center, Huntsville, TX, [email protected] Rachelle Ferguson, Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District, Grapevine, TX, [email protected] Nancy Hollis, Region 6 Education Service Center, Huntsville, TX, [email protected] Strand: Technology

Gather 'round! Choose roundtables and you will have the option to select six 45-minute sessions from over 50 topics and presenters.

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December 9, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

J18 BOOK TALK: THE 8TH HABIT: FROM EFFECTIVENESS TO GREATNESS BY STEPHEN COVEY Read The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness by Stephen Covey. Come prepared to discuss how to tap into the higher reaches of human motivation and find a new mind-set.

Duncan Wilson, Scarsdale Central Schools, Scarsdale, NY, [email protected] Francis Trujillo, Colorado Academy, Denver, CO, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

J20 FRONT RUNNERS: RESOURCES FOR STUDENT SUCCESS Seize the opportunity to hear from a panel of administrators who are narrowing the achievement gap. Participate in a unique partnership between exhibitors and practitioners in the Exhibit Hall. Learn about valuable products that contributed to districts meeting and exceeding local, state, and national academic standards. Spend time viewing the exhibits in the Exhibit Hall as part of this special session.

Invited NSDC Exhibitors Facilitated by Vaughn Gross, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

J21 THE GIFT OF COACHING A powerful coach requires skill that is best developed by experiencing and observing coaching firsthand. Members of Coaching for Results Inc. are providing the gift of one-on-one coaching. Give yourself time to explore your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities ... a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a tough situation.

Marceta Reilly, Coaching for Results, Inc., Hoyt, KS, [email protected] Dayna Richardson, Coaching for Results, Inc., Hutchinson, KS, [email protected] Sandee Crowther, Coaching for Results, Inc., Lawrence, KS, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

J19 TEACHERS LEARNING TOGETHER: ACTION RESEARCH AT WORK Action research is a powerful model of professional development that builds collaboration within teacher teams. Learn how the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario supported teacher-led action research teams to increase their team efficacy and bridge the theory-to-practice gap. Examine the impact of the action research as well as case study work conducted across projects.

Ruth Dawson, Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected] Jane Bennett, Halton District School Board, Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected] Nancy Baldree, Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

Do you know how easy it is to register for the conference online? Our electronic registration tool let's you know immediately if the session you are selecting is available or full. So, before you complete a paper registration, go to www.nsdc.org, and register online.

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www.nsdc.org

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December 9, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

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LEADERSHIP SUCCESSION PLANNING: WE CANNOT WAIT Learn how the Leadership Succession Planning Guide for Maryland Schools and the Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework ensure a flow of competent, prepared candidates for school leadership positions.

Patricia Jones, Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Tom DeHart, Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

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DYNAMIC RESEARCH-BASED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR ALL EDUCATORS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Discover how the Center for Applied Linguistics hosts a course on behalf of the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment Consortium to meet the need for research-based professional development for primary and secondary teachers of English language learners.

Jessica Nelson, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, [email protected] Mariana Castro, World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment Consortium at Wisconsin Center for Ed. Research, Madison, WI, [email protected] Rona Fennessey, Providence School District, Providence, RI, [email protected] Emily Evans, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

GROWING DIFFERENTIATED JOB- EMBEDDED LEARNING COMMUNITIES Examine a differentiated, job-embedded learning community that focuses on classroom instruction and student achievement.

Christopher Tienken, Monroe Township School District, Monroe Township, NJ, [email protected] Stephanie Goldberg, Monroe Township School District, Monroe Township, NJ, [email protected] Lew Stonaker, Monroe Township School District, Monroe Township, NJ, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

BOOSTING THE BATTERIES OF YOUR NOVICE TEACHERS Explore the "who, what, why, and how" of professional development and how it incorporates and scaffolds courses aimed at meeting the needs of newly hired teachers.

Catherine Catalano, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Kellie Barrett, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Sandy Culp, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Corrine Weiser, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

CHARACTERISTICS OF INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP Examine the results of a research project that defines best administrative practice influencing classroom instruction.

James Trodden, Northern Lights School Division #69, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

SHAPING THE WORKDAY Discover how to create opportunities for collaboration and professional learning within the confines of the workday and examine a new teacher induction program that combines mentoring and a three-year professional development plan to acculturate new teachers to professional learning communities.

Kathryn Sever, Maine-Endwell Central School District, Endwell, NY, [email protected] Linda Bowgren, Maine-Endwell Central School District, Endwell, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

USING AVID TO IMPROVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Learn how inquiry-based professional development is a necessary foundation for inquiry-based instructional practices. Hear about research-driven strategies ready for implementation.

Granger Ward, AVID Center, San Diego, CA, [email protected] Ann Hart, AVID Center, San Diego, CA, [email protected] Strand: Quality Teaching

REFRESHING REFLECTION: ENERGIZING FOR ACTION AND RESULTS Learn how reflective practice can be used as a powerful tool to unveil priorities and determine actions that lead to desired results.

Stephanie Moss, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Janice Brown, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

PYRAMID OF INTERVENTIONS: LEARNING FOR ALL Explore how a learning community responds to students in need by building a pyramid of timely, systematic interventions.

Geri Parscale, USD 207, Fort Leavenworth Schools, Fort Leavenworth, KS, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

THE LITERACY COACH'S TOOLBOX Explore research-based strategies that will expand your repertoire for coaching colleagues with planning, motivating students, and teaching literacy skills across the content areas.

Maria Banks, Staff Development for Educators, Peterborough, NH, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality 75

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Roundtables 3

Tuesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 10:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 p.m.

SINGAPORE MATHEMATICS Explore the components of Singapore Math and how educators can put these math strategies and tools to work in classrooms.

Ann Stipek, Staff Development for Educators, Peterborough, NH, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

EDUCATORS UNITE: BEST PRACTICE FOR ALL Examine professional development and teaming that assumes all students deserve high-quality, standards-based education and requires opportunities for individuals to draw from the rich knowledge of general and special educators.

Deborah Taub, Inclusive Large Scale Standards and Assessment (ILSSA) Group, Lexington, KY, [email protected] Anne Denham, ILSSA, Lexington, KY, [email protected] Lou-Ann Land, ILSSA, Lexington, KY, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

NSDC NETWORK: PRINCIPALS AND ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS Principals are critical to school improvement. Come and share effective practices with colleagues facing similar challenges.

Gustava Cooper-Baker, George Washington Carver Elementary School, Kansas City, MO, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

THE HEALTHY LEARNER: FOCUS ON THE WHOLE CHILD Discover how wellness teams promote a healthy lifestyle for both staff and students to help maximize learning effectiveness.

Sandy Thompson, Manassas City Public Schools, Manassas, VA, [email protected] Jodie Wiggins, Manassas City Public Schools, Manassas, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

NSDC NETWORK: REGIONAL LABORATORIES, MATH AND SCIENCE CONSORTIA, AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AGENCIES Colleagues employed at Regional Education Laboratories, Comprehensive Centers, and the Regional Technology in Education Consortia are invited to discuss challenges and opportunities and to share resources.

D'Ette Cowan, SEDL, Austin, TX, [email protected] Edward Tobia, SEDL, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

SPECIAL EDUCATION MENTORING Review a successful mentoring program for beginning special education teachers.

Julie Parks, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Kym McDonough, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Allison Fannin, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Sharyn Appolloni, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING: WAYS TO REFLECT ON PRACTICE Examine adult learning theory and learn ways to foster reflective practices.

Katie Armstrong, Teachers College Innovations, New York, NY, [email protected] Jessica Cardichon, Teachers College Innovations, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

STANDARDS ASSESSMENT INVENTORY (SAI) ­ MUCH MORE THAN A SURVEY Analyze simulated SAI data that lead to identifying NSDC Standards to implement in your district and write the professional learning plan for your district and school.

Steve Preston, SI Consultants Inc., Decatur, GA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

INCREASE COMPREHENSION THROUGH PROGRESS MONITORING Discover how to help students maximize learning by using a reading comprehension assessment tool to monitor their progress.

Lori Kamola, Teacher Created Materials, Huntington Beach, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

CO-TEACHING STRATEGIES TO SUPPORT MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION Explore strategies that create effective co-teaching professional learning opportunities within schools and districts.

Vince Trocchi, Huron Perth Catholic District School Board, Dublin, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

EXPLORE NSDC Get to know NSDC. Hear how NSDC will achieve its purpose through the new strategic plan. Get answers to your questions regarding NSDC's programs, services, publications, and advocacy efforts. Learn ways you can increase your involvement with NSDC.

Sue Francis, National Staff Development Council, Plano, TX, [email protected] Sue McAdamis, NSDC Board of Trustees, Eureka, MO, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

CAPTURING TEACHERS' THINKING Explore ways to incorporate teachers' thinking processes into the design of professional learning in schools.

Angela Di Michele Lalor, Learner Centered Initiatives, Ltd., Floral Park, NY, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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December 9, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 5:30 p.m.

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K01 TUESDAY AFTERNOON LECTURE OPTION This will allow you to attend the following sessions: K02: Questions and Answers with Stephen Covey 2:45 p.m. ­ 3:45 p.m. L01: Scholar Lecture by Vera Blake 3:45 p.m. ­ 4:45 p.m. Please see the individual session descriptions for details.

Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

K03 FRAMEWORK FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION Review organizational structures that lead to positive change. Uncover the system structures that work against improvement and learn how to avoid them. Experience best practices that lead to higher levels of achievement for all students and for students with special needs in particular. Develop a plan of action to take back to a school or district.

Kelly Pauling, Colonial Intermediate Unit 20, Easton, PA, [email protected] Kathy Emeigh, Colonial Intermediate Unit 20, Easton, PA, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

K05 CLASSROOM TO CAPITOL: TAKING A "CORE" SAMPLE Targeting the instructional core is vital to high-quality teaching and learning at all levels. Gain clarity about strategies that build capacity for sustained instructional improvement. Examine theory and practice carried out across Kentucky, which worked with WIDE World at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, to bring greater academic achievement for all students.

Debbie Daniels, Kentucky Department of Education, Frankfort, KY, [email protected] Melanie Benitez, Jefferson County School, Louisville, KY, [email protected] Brenda Maynard, Pike County School District, Pikeville, KY, [email protected] Mary McFarland, WIDE World Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

K02 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER STEPHEN COVEY Keynote speaker Stephen Covey will address your STEPHEN questions in this COVEY special session following his keynote address on Tuesday afternoon. This session will conclude after one hour.

Stephen Covey, FranklinCovey Company, Provo, UT, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

K04 BUILDING TEACHER LEADERSHIP THROUGH POWERFUL EXPECTATIONS Learn how formative assessment is being used to narrow achievement gaps. Examine a process for creating a guaranteed and viable curriculum from state content expectations. See how a process of teacher leader empowerment was used to build capacity for change in a diverse group of high schools.

Daniel Jonker, Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, Holland, MI, [email protected] Cathy Feyt, Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, Holland, MI, [email protected] Laurie Schmitt, Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, Holland, MI [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

K06 GET SMART: TOOLS FOR 21ST CENTURY LEADERS Learn how to move beyond fascination to productive engagement using interactive whiteboard technologies. Learn how to work SMARTer to achieve desired results. Experience professional development activities that are motivational, useful, dynamic, and practical to help faculty increase student achievement.

Robert Vojtek, Avon Public Schools, Avon, CT, [email protected] RoseAnne O'Brien Vojtek, Bristol Public Schools, Bristol, CT, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

This symbol indicates an Advanced Level Session This symbol indicates a Beginner Level Session

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Tuesday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 5:30 p.m.

K07 HOW LEARNING-FRIENDLY ARE YOUR INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS? Examine an assessment tool that identifies where improvements are needed to increase learning. Determine if your instructional programs are learningfriendly on 15 research-based measures. Brainstorm ways to use these measures as the basis for school improvement plans. Hear how Learning First, a new staff development program, helps educators reach the 15 measures on a consistent basis.

Patsy Kollen, Benton, IL, [email protected] Sharon Phillips, Federal Hocking Local Schools, Federal Hocking, OH, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

K09 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING TEAMS: MOVING TOWARD MASTERY LEARNING Learn how professional learning teams develop curriculum aligned to standards. Examine a process for using performance rubrics to monitor daily student performance, explain standardized test data, and revise curriculum and instruction. Help teachers use data to drive student progress and teacher learning on a daily basis through PLTs.

MaryElin Barnish, Township High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] Howard McMackin, Township High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] John Harrington, Township High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] Charles Johns, Township High School District 214, Arlington Heights, IL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

K11 COURAGE TO TEACH LITERACY IN CONTENT AREAS Learn how a district implemented, monitored, and evaluated a scientifically based reading research intervention plan. All K-12 teachers consistently teach, model, and practice literacy strategies, before, during, and after reading, using seven processes of literacy. Review the seven processes of literacy and the five components of reading supported by literacy coaches throughout the district.

Margaret Williams, Citrus County Schools, Inveness, FL, [email protected] Kris Schirmer, Citrus County Schools, Inveness, FL, [email protected] Becky Smith, Citrus County Schools, Inveness, FL, [email protected] Debra Stanley, Citrus County Schools, Inveness, FL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

K08 RAISING ACHIEVEMENT AND CLOSING GAPS INSTITUTE Explore the key components of a district program that is enabling students to succeed. See how data-based decision making promotes necessary changes. Leave with tools and resources that provide a foundation for launching and sustaining a similar program.

Pamela Batey-Bright, Wake County Public Schools, Cary, NC, [email protected] Ashley Lindsay, Wake County Public Schools, Cary, NC, [email protected] James Thomas, Wake County Public Schools, Cary, NC, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

K12 LEADERSHIP IN THE MIDST OF CHANGE Developing leadership qualities in principals positively impacts student achievement. Learn cost-effective strategies for supporting campus instructional leaders. Customize your own structures, tiers, timelines, and resources from a model Principal Leadership Academy, monthly principal learning meetings, and other leadership development for principals. Hear testimonials from principals who have significantly changed their campus cultures to promote student success.

Ellen Bell, Birdville Independent School District, Haltom City, TX, [email protected] Debbie Tribble, Birdville Independent School District, Haltom City, TX, [email protected] Margaret Miller, Birdville Independent School District, Haltom City, TX, [email protected] Ernie Valamides, Birdville Independent School District, Haltom City, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

K10 A GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM FOR LEADERSHIP Gain research-based strategies for creating a supportive and productive working environment focused on student learning. Like a global positioning system, acquire rubrics and tools that identify leadership strengths and point to next steps for action.

Dawn Billings, School Synergy, Salem, OR, [email protected] Mardale Dunsworth, School Synergy, Salem, OR, [email protected] Stand: Leadership

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K13 COMMUNITY BY DESIGN WITH DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION Fostering professional learning communities requires schools and districts to examine how they provide structural and systematic support to improve teacher practice in an environment that promotes high levels of collaboration. Learn how to implement an effective professional development model using differentiated instruction and protocols for looking at student work that will impact teacher practice and student achievement.

Kevin Hutchinson, North Andover Public Schools, Andover, MA, [email protected] Judy Rogers, Andover, MA, [email protected] Liz Sharp, North Andover Public Schools, Andover, MA, [email protected] Carla Scuzzarella, North Andover Public Schools, Andover, MA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

K14 EXTERNAL COACHING: IS THAT WORKING FOR YOU? Internal coaching, self-assessment, and job-embedded professional development are critical components of any serious school reform initiative, but sometimes they aren't enough. External coaches build the capacity of the school or district by asking the tough questions and engaging in fierce conversations to get at the heart of teaching and learning. Learn tools, strategies, and protocols to enhance the coaching experience.

Claudia Wheatley, Solution Tree, Bloomington, IN, [email protected] Jan Radford, Michigan City Area Schools, Michigan City, IN, [email protected] Penny Gaither, Minds Matter LLC, Bloomington, IN, [email protected] Kevin Bailey, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, [email protected] Cate Hart, Indiana University Center for Lifelong Learning, Bloomington, IN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

K16 FOSTERING INSTRUCTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND TEACHER QUALITY Explore ways to enhance instructional intelligence for teachers. Experience best-practice instructional and assessment strategies that provide variety, meaning, and motivation for student success. Examine research-validated approaches that impact adult learning. Learn leadership strategies that build capacity in schools for ongoing teacher growth and development, supporting high-quality learning for all.

Gayle Gregory, Gayle Gregory Consulting Inc., Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected] Beth Duncombe, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

K17 HARNESSING DISTRICTWIDE CAPACITY TO IMPROVE STUDENTS' LEARNING Envision how to make major systemic shifts that result in unprecedented learning gains. Improve system performance with intentional design, integration, and implementation. Learn how to integrate system components to expand a school system's capacity and successfully meet the myriad of challenges associated with the change process.

Stephen Burkholder, Grand Island Public Schools, Grand Island, NE, [email protected] Nancy Schisler, Grand Island Public Schools, Grand Island, NE, [email protected] Jeff Gilbertson, Grand Island Public Schools, Grand Island, NE, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

K15 BUILDING CULTURAL COMPETENCE AT VARIOUS SYSTEM LEVELS Racism and xenophobia exist in society as well as our classrooms, schools, and offices. Intentional or not, they play a key role in the achievement gap. Gain strategies to raise consciousness, confront beliefs, and push for institutional equity and cultural competence.

Catherine Allie, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Lacey Robinson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Donna Graves, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Dianne Hamilton, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

Make it easy! Register for the Lecture Series and attend each Keynote Q&A and five lectures by local and national scholars.

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L01 SCHOLAR LECTURE 3:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

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Tuesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

L03 THE CLASSROOM WALK-THROUGH DANCE Know the dance when the music begins. Learn the steps to take to ensure that the classroom walk-through experience is a collaborative, successful one. Practice the skills to perform results-oriented classroom walk-throughs for both the teacher and the reviewer.

Tiffany Beasley, Bryant Public Schools, Bryant, AR, [email protected] Justin Minkel, Springdale School District, Springdale, AR, [email protected] Cheryl Williams, Teachscape, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

L05 MUCH TO DO ABOUT DATA Learn how to use data to drive instruction. Receive strategies to engage teachers in a data discussion that leads to a plan to access every student's needs. Consider practical applications of the process in other settings.

Lisa Fuller, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Linda Herriotts, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Stephen Swift, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

SUCCESS IS THE ONLY OPTION: USING RESEARCH TO SUPPORT CHANGE We are more successful when we build on our VERA strengths. Learn BLAKE to collaborate, use data and research to improve practices, and ensure that belief systems are consistent with principles of excellence and equity. Leave prepared to share a commitment to holding all students responsible for mastering rigorous standards that will prepare them for the change-driven, technology-dominated world of the 21st century.

Vera Blake, VJ Blake & Associates, Dumfries, VA, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

L04 WHAT GAP CLOSERS KNOW AND ARE ABLE TO DO Learn how school leaders can become gap closers and play a decisive role in changing the way we think about each other and our students. Have the courage not only to talk about race but to experiment with the touchy issues and hidden meanings in ways that make us lean into discomfort, uncover our own biases, and examine what separates the haves from the have-nots. Consider the achievement gap in the context of gaps in income, health, housing, and criminal justice. Leave with greater awareness of the unconscious impressions that perpetuate prejudice and with a plan to advocate for all children, regardless of race or status.

Cathy Owens, Pontiac, MI, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, Culture

L06 REDESIGNING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: CREATING A HYBRID MODEL Review the knowledge, skills, and practices that are the essential elements of effective professional learning. Hear about the Teacher Leadership Project professional development model being used in over 15 states. Examine its research-proven elements for professional development, including sustained opportunities to learn, opportunities for long-term feedback, follow-up activities, and team efforts with professional peers within and outside the school.

Becky Firth, Northwest Educational Service District 189, Anacortes, WA, [email protected] Kathy Dorr, Northwest Educational Service District 189, Anacortes, WA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

L02 NETWORKING: OPEN SPACE TECHNOLOGY Choose an extended networking and open space opportunity. Talk with others with challenges and questions similar to yours. Experience the open space meeting process. Come prepared with ideas and questions.

Rob Bocchino, Heart of Change; Change of Heart Associates, Carolina Beach, NC, [email protected] Kathleen Bocchino, Heart of Change; Change of Heart Associates, Carolina Beach, NC, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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L07 AMELIA COUNTY INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT PROCESS Hear about achieving benefits from local benchmark assessments from teachers and administrators working collaboratively to monitor student achievement. Observe how teachers, using the PDSA cycle, engage in discussions related to student achievement, areas of student weakness, and effective instructional strategies.

Patrizia Humphrey, Amelia County Public Schools, Amelia, VA, [email protected] LaTaisha Owens, Amelia County Public Schools, Amelia, VA, [email protected] Donna Matthews, Amelia County Public Schools, Amelia, VA, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

veterans and novices engage in conversations that deepen their own content knowledge and focus on student learning. Explore how BEST resources can enhance an induction and professional growth process.

Nancy Celentano, EASTCONN, Willimantic, CT, [email protected] Grace Levin, EASTCONN, Willimantic, CT, [email protected] Diane Dugas, East Windsor Public Schools, East Windsor, CT, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

Johnnie Brown-Falu Mendoza, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, [email protected] Martha Stone, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

L12 FROM TRANSMISSION TO CONSTRUCTIVISM: CONVINCING SECONDARY TEACHERS Experience staff development that convinces secondary teachers to use a constructivist framework for instruction. Examine classroom strategies that help students become skilled, strategic users of reading and writing. Hear how a career-technical school and a middle school have implemented these techniques with great success.

Mark Forget, University of Findlay, Findlay, OH, [email protected] Kim Forget, University of Findlay, Findlay, OH, [email protected] Todd Luke, Lenape Vocational Technical School, Ford City, PA, [email protected] Andrew Pinney, Solon City Schools, Solon, OH, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

L10 TRANSFORMING CULTURE THROUGH THE LENS OF TECHNOLOGY Learn how to promote sustained professional development for technology integration. Consider how technology can change a reticent culture. Gain strategies for supporting professional learning needs and differentiate for individual faculty.

Karen Karmazin, Grand Island Central School District, Grand Island, NY, [email protected] Molly Marren, Grand Island Central School District, Grand Island, NY, [email protected] Strand: Technology

L08 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES: TACKLING MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS Learn how to use disaggregated student data to determine teaching priorities, monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement in the area of mathematics. Acquire strategies to engage and encourage teachers in collaborative learning.

Kenya Wallach, Richmond Public Schools, Richmond, VA, [email protected] Maria Crenshaw, Richmond Public Schools, Richmond, VA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

L13 21ST CENTURY SKILLS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT The Partnership for 21st Century Skills is a national education-business coalition that is working with states to implement a comprehensive 21st century skills initiative to prepare students for success in the 21st century, globally interconnected workplace and society. Learn how to assist teachers in planning and delivering effective 21st century instruction.

Ken Kay, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Tucson, AZ, [email protected] Jorea Marple, West Virginia Department of Education, Charleston, WV, [email protected] Strand: Technology 81

L11 POWERFUL TEACHING FOR POWERFUL LEARNING Explore how to change teacher instructional behavior by addressing teacher instructional attitudes and beliefs. See how constructivist instruction empowers teachers to improve the learning of all students. Learn how to create lessons that are authentic, inclusive, learner centered, interactive and continuous. Apply research to instructional decision making as well as using appropriate learning strategies to motivate and increase student interest.

L09 ARE YOUR MENTORING CONVERSATIONS TRANSFORMING INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE? Transform professional conversations and improve educator practice. Learn how

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December 9, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

L14 DEVELOPING A PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO FOR SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS Through the Supporting Services Professional Growth System, employees with over 520 job classifications are encouraged to participate in professional development to enhance their job performance. Learn how to implement an employee portfolio process to document growth and performance.

Frank Lipscomb, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Carolyn Gibson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

conversation with staff about race and equity. Use book studies to build capacity and empower your leadership team.

Dawn Gibbons, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Thomas Anderson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

Jenny Sue Flannagan, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected] Rachel McMillan, Virginia Beach City Public School, Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

L19 PREPARING NEW TEACHERS FOR THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM Learn how to prepare novice teachers for effective co-teaching. Examine rationales and models of co-teaching. Learn about resources available to support co-teaching teams and study co-teaching models. Examine additional resources that can be used to support the inclusive classroom.

Lynn Nienstadt, Baltimore County Public Schools, Towson, MD, [email protected] Emily Caster, Baltimore County Public Schools, Towson, MD, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

L17 BOOK TALK: THE STARFISH AND THE SPIDER: THE UNSTOPPABLE POWER OF LEADERLESS ORGANIZATIONS Read The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations, by Ori Brafman and Rod. A. Beckstrom. Gain an appreciation for the starfish and spider leaders. Practice strategies that promote a "leaderful" organization. Compare opportunities working in a spider organization (shared leadership) and a starfish organization (hierarchical).

Walter Olsen, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] William Sommers, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

L15 TECHNOLOGY-ASSISTED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT See how videoconference technology allows observation and mentoring of new teachers by providing timely guidance. Discover how broadband Internet can alleviate restrictions of distance or schedules. Examine a process of professional development for novice teachers with observation, feedback, and discussion via iChat videoconference technology.

Frederick Burrack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, [email protected] Jana Fallin, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, [email protected] Strand: Technology

L20 MAINTAINING A DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN RURAL SCHOOLS Examine organizational structures used in a rural environment to foster collaborative school cultures. Align school and division professional development goals and actions to a common vision. Learn how walk-throughs, participation in PLCs, and lateral sharing support leadership development and continuous school improvement.

Richard Cameron, Northern Lights School Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Jimmi Lou Irvine, Northern Lights School Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] David Whan, Northern Lights School Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

L18 EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR SCIENCE TEACHERS Learn best practices and instructional strategies that will allow you to design professional development for science teachers in grades K-8. Gain clarity about how to use student assessment samples to create collaborative learning opportunities for science teachers. Practice using strategies that equip students with the ability to design investigative questions and make sense of content.

L16 LEADING TO EQUITY: BUILDING CAPACITY Learn how one high school's leadership team created equitable classrooms by learning to appreciate differences and build strong relationships. Learn ways to use video clips and articles to facilitate a

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L21 A CORE VALUES APPROACH TO SCHOOLWIDE DISCIPLINE Compare methods for introducing race and equity into a schoolwide discipline plan. Learn strategies for focusing on race and equity as they relate to schoolwide discipline. See how one school's efforts to eliminate the disproportionate representation of minorities in suspensions and referrals led to a dramatic change in culture and climate and fostered improved academic performance.

Marc Cohen, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Randy Gruber, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

L23 NAVIGATING A COURSE THROUGH CHANGE Help leaders understand the dynamics of change to increase effectiveness. Discuss emerging theories from the field of science and their implications for leaders. Learn protocols that promote the trust needed for collaborative work to begin.

Yvonne Shay, Vail, AZ, [email protected] Bertha Garza, Alamogordo Public Schools, Alamogordo, NM, [email protected] Lindsley Silagi, Alamogordo Public Schools, Alamogordo, NM, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

L25 ACADEMY OF MATHEMATICS: BEYOND WORKSHOPS Learn to foster a collaborative culture that increases teacher knowledge, enhances instructional practice, and improves student learning through inquiry-based analysis of mathematics instruction. Hear how the Academy of Mathematics uses live, streamlined lessons that build and align with the best math instructional practices across a district and increases curriculum fidelity while differentiating instruction.

Patty Oliphant, Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville, FL, [email protected] Eddie Kiep, Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville, FL, [email protected] Kathy Meeks, Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville, FL, [email protected] Khris Henderson, Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville, FL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

L24 CLOSING THE GAP BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY Learn strategies for closing the achievement gap one student at a time. Apply data effectively and promote increased student achievement. Develop the knowledge to replicate a professional development model successfully implemented in one diverse elementary school.

Patsy Roberson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Donna Arrendell, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Joella Thompson, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

L22 SUPPORTING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS Technology can offer equal access to the curriculum for students with diverse learning needs. Enhance teaching quality and student performance by utilizing technology in creative new ways. Examine professional learning models focused on expanding technology integration.

Cheryl Temple, Fairfax County Public Schools, Dunn Loring, VA, [email protected] Lisa Givens, Fairfax County Public Schools, Dunn Loring, VA, [email protected] Eleanor Stack, Fairfax County Public Schools, Dunn Loring, VA, [email protected] William Reeder, Fairfax County Public Schools, Dunn Loring, VA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

L26 SKILLS 101: 37 STAR-STUDDED STRATEGIES Discover ways to boost your presenter confidence, add to your presentation tool kit, engage your entire audience, and have fun at the same time. Explore the myths and truths of speaker success. Walk away with effective skills to use immediately.

Adrianne Roggenbuck, Bob Pike Group, Eden Prairie, MN, [email protected] Sheryl Frascht, Area Education Agency 267, Cedar Falls, IA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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Tuesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 9, 2008 -- 2:30 p.m. ­ 4:30 p.m.

L27 FOSTERING FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS TO SUPPORT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Learn how one school is promoting the academic success of its students by fostering trust and understanding between staff, students, families, and community. Address the successes and challenges of a family outreach program. Receive ideas and information to develop an action plan.

Kendra Shaw, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax Station, VA, [email protected] Kathryn Brown, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax Station, VA, [email protected] Gwen Ward, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax Station, VA, [email protected] Deborah Goldman, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax Station, VA, [email protected] Tammy Fagan, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax Station, VA, [email protected] Christie Hall, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax Station, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

L29 LEVERAGING DIVERSE ROLES AND PERSPECTIVES Learn to harness the perspectives of students, parents, administrators, teachers, and others to inform professional learning and improve schools from within. Explore and engage in activities including visioning, systems mapping, and action planning that help different stakeholders work toward shared goals.

Joanne Picone-Zocchia, Communities for Learning: Leading Lasting Change, Floral Park, NY, [email protected] Maria Pietrosanti, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

L31 HIGH-YIELD INSTRUCTION THE SMART WAY Review the research behind a goaldriven, job-embedded professional learning strategy for school improvement. Be able to describe how the SMART goals process involves teacher leaders in data-driven continuous improvement focused on student success. Articulate the advantages of a school-based process for improving student learning aligned to and supported at the district level.

Tammy Evans, School District of Manatee County, Bradenton, FL, [email protected] Lynn Gillman, School District of Manatee County, Bradenton, FL, [email protected] Anne Conzemius, QLD Learning, LLC, Madison, WI, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

L30 STATEWIDE COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE SUPPORT PRINCIPAL DEVELOPMENT Examine the principles and strategies that are effective in building a community of practice, both among the senior administrative leaders who design and deliver sessions, and among the principals and assistant principals who participate.

Nancy Iverson, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, [email protected] Sarah Armstrong, Leading and Learning Solutions, Nellysford, VA, [email protected] Stewart Roberson, Hanover County Schools, Ashland, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

L32 THE GIFT OF COACHING A powerful coach requires skill that is best developed by experiencing and observing coaching firsthand. Members of Coaching for Results Inc. are providing the gift of one-on-one coaching. Give yourself time to explore your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities ... a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a tough situation.

Diana Williams, Coaching for Results, Inc., Millersport, OH, [email protected] Edna Harris, Coaching for Results, Inc., Round Rock, TX, [email protected] Riva Korashan, Coaching for Results, Inc., Brooklyn, NY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

L28 TEACHER STORIES: A CATALYST FOR CHANGE Learn how stories are effective in changing thought and behaviors and ultimately classroom practice. Experience tools, strategies, and resources to initiate these actions and create positive results. Maximize the impact of teacher stories to build teacher capacity, enhance leadership skills, and increase student learning.

Deborah Jackson, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] Shaunna Pettigrew, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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December 10, 2008 -- 7:45 a.m. ­ 9:45 a.m.

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M01 BACK-UP KEYNOTE ADDRESS 7:45 a.m. ­ 8:45 a.m. CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE LEADERSHIP: AN ETHICAL IMPERATIVE FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT LEADERS AND PROVIDERS The challenge of transforming 21st century schools GWENDOLYN to better serve all WEBBJOHNSON learners is multifaceted. If our field is to teach to the promise of the racial, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, exceptional, religious, political, and socioeconomic differences across our vast learning communities, the ethical challenges must also be addressed. Culturally responsive staff development must confront disproportionate patterns of ineffective service delivery in PreK-16 settings. The values, beliefs, purposes, actions, and outcomes of our staff development efforts must be closely examined, assessed, and transformed if all is to truly mean all in education.

Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture Should Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson not be called upon during the conference as a back-up keynote speaker she will deliver her prepared keynote during the M01 session.

M02 BOOK TALK: THE LEARNING EDUCATOR Meet with Stephanie Hirsh and Joellen Killion, authors of The Learning Educator: A New Era for Professional Learning, to discuss the eight principles of effective professional learning. Please read the book before participating. Learn how to use the book to engage others in dialogue about powerful professional learning.

Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, Co, [email protected] Stephanie Hirsh, National Staff Development Council, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M04 LEADING WITH COURAGE Are you following the yellow brick road to leadership success? School leaders can have the biggest impact on student success. Earn your badge of courage and gain research-based tools, strategies, and models for leaders that focus on trust, relationship building, and results.

Heather Peterson, Hampton City Schools, Hampton, VA, [email protected] Beth Welch, Hampton City Schools, Hampton, VA, [email protected], Strand: Leadership

M03 CUSTOMIZED COACHING: PROMOTING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS Study a customized coaching program that enables individual teachers to set professional goals and receive personalized feedback. Experience strategies that clarify the coaching process. Develop an action plan to enhance professional partnerships within an organizational structure.

Peggy Pastva, Methacton School District, Norristown, PA, [email protected], Mary Ellen Barbuto, Methacton School District, Norristown, PA, [email protected], Joan Munro, Methacton School District, Norristown, PA, [email protected] Eileen Patram, Methacton School District, Norristown, PA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M05 BRAIN-COMPATIBLE STRATEGIES FOR MOTIVATING RELUCTANT LEARNERS Gain effective and practical strategies to help students become passionate learners in this dynamic and interactive session. Use these strategies immediately upon returning to school to motivate even the most reluctant students.

William DeMeo, Cincinnati Public Schools, Cincinnati, OH, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

This symbol indicates an Advanced Level Session This symbol indicates a Beginner Level Session

Know thyself! Sessions are labeled B for beginner or A for advanced. All others are for intermediate knowledge of the topic.

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Wednesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 10, 2008 -- 7:45 a.m. ­ 9:45 a.m.

M06 CHARTING PATHWAYS FOR PRE-K CENTERED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Explore an initiative to promote classroom quality and serve early childhood teachers and assistant teachers. Consider the barriers pre-K staff face when they seek professional development and learn how to overcome those barriers. Expand options for meeting the diverse needs of teachers who work with the youngest populations.

Lin Venable, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, [email protected] Janice Lovell, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, [email protected] Rick Vanosdall, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M08 MOTIVATING TEACHERS TO IMPLEMENT EMPIRICALLY-BASED INTERVENTION Learn how to motivate staff to use data effectively, to customize instruction to individual student needs, and to improve student learning. Learn how to use data to build capacity and improve application of research-based pedagogy.

David Foley, Grove City Area School District, Grove City, PA, [email protected] Brian Buchan, Grove City Area School District, Grove City, PA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Susan Stephenson, TNT Associates, Brampton, ON, Canada, [email protected] Gayle Rotenberg, TNT Associates, Brampton, ON, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M11 DEVELOPING COMMON SHORT-CYCLE ASSESSMENTS Examine a short-cycle assessment process aligned to state-adopted academic content standards. Learn how to develop a pacing guide for the standards; how to write quality, high-level questions; and how to analyze data to improve instruction and inform decision making with regard to student learning and achievement.

Betsy Moore, Teacher 2 Teacher Educational Consulting Services, Columbus, OH, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

M09 LEADING FOR LEARNING: AN ACTION PLANNING MODEL Examine a data-driven approach to establishing collaborative structures focused on professional development, distributed leadership, and student learning. Engage in activities aimed at adapting this action planning model to guide school improvement.

Kurtis Hewson, Livingstone Range School Division, Claresholm, AB, Canada, [email protected] Lorna Adrian, Livingstone Range School Division, Claresholm, AB, Canada, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M07 RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION: AN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT Hear about a highly successful RTI (Response to Intervention) model that was developed during a three-year action research project. Learn how to implement action research within a classroom or school to improve student achievement. Understand the value of educational research literature and its use in action research. See how a classroom teacher/leader can impact a school's staff development program.

Mindy Myers, Collier County Public Schools, Naples, FL, [email protected] Kathleen Lawler, Collier County Public Schools, Naples, FL, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M12 NO NEED FOR RAZZLE-DAZZLE Consider a book club as a powerful method for delivering professional development for lasting results. Examine components of a successful book club including knowledgeable central office facilitators, principal leadership, and teacher collegiality. Discuss the importance of trusting relationships when engaging in transparent conversations.

Jeanne Crocker, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected] Robin Kitsis, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected], Strand: Teaching Quality

M10 LAUGHING MATTERS IN LEARNING COMMUNITIES A culture of distrust, low morale, and resistance to change often blocks teamwork. Focus on the positive effects of laughter on educators and their students. Restore a sense of balance and rediscover the joy in learning.

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M13 ALIGNING SYSTEMS FOR LEADERSHIP OF CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT Learn to align curriculum, professional development, and assessment. Examine a district-designed rubric for professional learning communities and assess this district's journey on a change continuum.

Ron Kalicki, Sweetwater School District #1, Rock Springs, WY, [email protected] Brian Kaumo, Sweetwater School District #1, Rock Springs, WY, [email protected] Gayle Kendall, Sweetwater School District #1, Rock Springs, WY, [email protected], Stacey Court, Sweetwater School District #1, Rock Springs, WY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M15 A CHANGE IN CULTURE Shifting the culture of an entire district requires passion, persistence, and a solid plan. Creating change that is sustainable requires building leadership capacity, institutionalizing collaborative inquiry, and implementing a cycle of continuous improvement.

David Curry, Tahoe Truckee Unified School District, Truckee, CA, [email protected] Annette Cooper, Tahoe Truckee Unified School District, Truckee, CA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M18 A SYSTEMATIC AND SYSTEMIC LITERACY STAFF DEVELOPMENT PLAN Learn about "We Can R.I.S.E. Through Literacy," a literacy staff development plan embedded in the school improvement plan. See how data drives the plan and how it is monitored.

Terry Kirtz, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Moreno Carrasco, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected] Cary Dimmick, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD, [email protected], Strand: Teaching Quality

M16 REINVENTING THE FACULTY MEETING FOR TEACHER LEADERSHIP Faculty meetings offer opportunities for developing teacher leadership. Explore a process for transforming faculty meetings into collaborative experiences. Leave with practical tools to organize faculty meetings.

Beth Hebert, Winnetka Public Schools, Winnetka, IL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M14 TAKING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING FROM GOOD TO GREAT Examine the challenges of providing quality professional learning in a large district. Gain strategies for managing change and discover ways to embed learning within schools and departments.

Terri Breeden, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Scott Simmons, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M19 GOING WITH THE CONCEPTUAL FLOW The K-12 Alliance/WestEd, in partnership with schools, develops processes to build professional learning communities that enhance teaching quality. Learn how conceptual flow forms a basis for understanding content, aligning standards, selecting a flow of instruction, identifying an assessment plan, and evaluating instructional materials. Understand how teachers use conceptual flow to deepen and change their teaching practice.

Jo Topps, WestEd/K-12 Alliance, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Kathy DiRanna, WestEd/K-12 Alliance, San Francisco, CA, [email protected] Greta Smith, Garvey School District, Rosemead, CA, [email protected] Melissa Smith, Lake Elsinore School District, Lake Elsinore, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M17 WIKIS AND BLOGS: BOOTING UP TEACHER COLLABORATION Learn the critical steps in preparing teachers to use blogs and wikis for effective collaboration. Learn the pitfalls of these technologies and the types of teacher work and learning that are appropriate for online collaboration.

Joe Flora, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, [email protected] Strand: Technology

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December 10, 2008 -- 7:45 a.m. ­ 9:45 a.m.

M20 MASTER MENTORS: TEAM LEADERS FOR TEACHER INDUCTION Hear how Connecticut's Master Mentor Program provides a structure and support system for mentors. Review training and technical assistance that help master mentors assist mentors and beginning teachers. Leave with practical strategies and resources for developing and implementing a Master Mentor Program.

Lyn Nevins, Cooperative Educational Services, Trumbull, CT, [email protected] Laura Patterson, Education Connection, Danbury, CT, [email protected] Joan Lowney, Fairfield Public Schools, Fairfield, Connecticut, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M22 CULTURALLY PROFICIENT LITERACY COACHING TO IMPROVE INSTRUCTION Relate the research on the effects of class, culture, and race to the research on adapting learning to the individual to improve academic achievement. Expand literacy expertise to improve classroom instruction and close the achievement gap. Leave with a district and school model that has published data to prove its effectiveness.

Bonnie Davis, Cooperating School Districts, St. Louis, MO, [email protected] Janet Weber, Mehlville School District, St. Louis, MO, [email protected] Sue Heggarty, Cooperating School Districts, St. Louis, MO, [email protected] Mary Kim Schreck, Osage Beach, MO, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

M24 12 STRATEGIES FOR MOTIVATING CHALLENGING PARTICIPANTS From withdrawn to downright belligerent, all types surface in workshops and meetings. Sometimes educators display behaviors they would never tolerate in their own classrooms. Discover the three P's to preventing challenging behavior and 12 strategies for motivating reluctant learners.

Sheryl Frascht, Area Education Agency 267, Cedar Falls, IA, [email protected] Adrianne Roggenbuck, The Bob Pike Group, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M25 EFFECTIVE TEAM COLLABORATION: WHAT IT TAKES Review skills educators need to collaborate as effective group members in learning communities. Examine the phases through which teams evolve and learn specific skills to handle conflict during collaboration. Increase the impact of learning communities in student achievement.

Jay Roth, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, [email protected] Jana Loge, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M21 DEVELOPING ELL-FOCUSED PROFESSIONAL LEARNING LEADERSHIP TEAMS Learn how professional learning communities can lead to a shared mission and vision for English language learners' instruction and support districtwide. See how embedded staff development facilitates the development of teachers (mainstream, ESL, literacy, special education) who have the knowledge and skills to address the needs of ELLs.

Deb Carr, Hazleton Area School District, Hazleton, PA, [email protected] Erin McCarthy, Hazleton Area School District, Hazleton, PA, [email protected] JoAnn Buglio, Hazleton Area School District, Hazleton, PA, [email protected] Rebecca Freeman Field, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M23 BEGINNING TEACHERS: A CALL TO ACTION Learn about a multiyear professional development program for beginning teachers. Review the continuum of services focused on addressing needs, supporting a learning community, retaining new teachers, and developing educational leaders.

Renee Coward, NC Center for Advancement of Teaching, (NCCAT), Cullowhee, NC, [email protected] Karen Dameron, Edgecombe County Public Schools, Tarboro, NC, [email protected] Mary McDuffie, NC Center for Advancement of Teaching, (NCCAT), Cullowhee, NC, [email protected] Steve Hauge, NC Center for Advancement of Teaching, (NCCAT), Raleigh, NC, [email protected] Strand: Teacher Quality

Collaborate! Choose some sessions to attend with your colleagues and then split up for others.

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M26 LEARNING FROM LIFE: NURTURING SCHOOLS TO VITALITY Examine a biological model of school leadership called Learning From Life. Explore best practices among secondary schools focused on achieving rigor, relevance, and relationships and more than Adequate Yearly Progress. Adapt strategies for nurturing growth in school communities.

Richard Jones, RDJ Associates, Loudonville, NY, [email protected] Kathleen Weigel, Palm Beach County Schools, West Palm Beach, FL, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M28 LITERACY LEARNING COMMUNITIES: STAFF DEVELOPMENT IN ACTION Professional learning communities have a direct, positive impact on student learning. Literacy learning communities, an adaptation of PLCs, focus specifically on literacy. Learn how to create and sustain schoolwide literacy learning communities by using assessment tools and action plans that include study groups, action research, and coaching.

ReLeah Lent, Atlanta, GA, [email protected] Connie Cain, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, [email protected] Strand: Teacher Quality

Pamela Salazar, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M31 LEADERSHIP FROM WITHIN Design a program to develop aspiring administrators from within your own district. Learn about tools to gather data on critical issues facing new principals in your local context. Apply the 21 Leadership Responsibilities for principals from McREL's research that have been shown to have the highest impact on student achievement to your program design.

Terry Wilhelm, Riverside County Office of Education, Riverside, CA, [email protected] Diana Blackledge, Riverside County Office of Education, Riverside, CA, [email protected] Rowena Lagrosa, Moreno Valley Unified School District, Moreno Valley, CA, [email protected] Jeremy Cassara, Moreno Valley Unified School District, Moreno Valley, CA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M27 ENHANCING LEADERSHIP: MAKING SURE THAT IT MATTERS Hear how two districts shared resources to create school cultures where all students are invited to learn. Review professional development opportunities available through inter-district partnerships, including voluntary study groups and monthly articulation meetings. Learn why administrators are now able to redirect their efforts and reallocate their time to those tasks that promote student achievement.

Judith DeStefano-Anen, Stafford Township School District, Manahawkin, NJ, [email protected] Dawn Reo, Stafford Township School District, Manahawkin, NJ, [email protected] Margaret Hoffman, Stafford Township School District, Manahawkin, NJ, [email protected] Barbara Smith, Assistant Superintendent, Little Egg Harbor School District, Little Egg Harbor, NJ, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M29 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: WHAT WORKS Help school and central office personnel develop deeper understandings of what works in highly effective professional development. Explore the basic features of professional development that is job embedded, results driven, and standards based.

Sally Zepeda, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M32 LET THE INFORMATION FIND YOU Do you waste valuable time looking for new, updated information on the web? Learn how RSS technology allows professionals to streamline their learning resources and stay up-to-date in the global dialogue surrounding educational issues and ideas.

Pamela Newman, Bucks County Intermediate Unit #22, Doylestown, PA, [email protected] Mark Hoffman, Bucks County Intermediate Unit #22, Doylestown, PA, [email protected] Strand: Technology

M30 HIGH-IMPACT LEADERSHIP FOR HIGH-IMPACT SCHOOLS Examine the critical leadership actions that have a high impact on student outcomes, and, in turn, have a high impact on school success. Use new research, planning resources, tools, and strategies for leading school improvement focusing on students who are not academically successful. Establish a learning-focused community that promotes collaboration, knowledge sharing, and collective responsibility for improving teaching and learning.

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Wednesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 10, 2008 -- 7:45 a.m. ­ 9:45 a.m.

M33 MANAGEMENT SKILLS FOR TEACHER INDUCTION Examine a framework, strategies, and common language to facilitate new teachers' daily practice, reflection, and growth. Learn a model for helping new teachers excel in classroom management and gain ideas for integrating and implementing the key ideas into a district or school plan.

Rick Smith, Conscious Teaching, Fairfax, CA, [email protected] Audrey Jacques, Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District, Fairfield, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M35 LABYRINTH OF LEADERSHIP: INNER AND OUTER JOURNEY Enter the labyrinth. Encounter the paradox of your leadership style, power points and blind spots, and create powerful personal intentions. Learn seven core capacities and daily practices crucial for profound collective change. Bring new awareness and capacities to co-create plans for school improvement. Leave the labyrinth with new allies and a plan.

Carol Adams, School Lane Charter School, Ben Salem, PA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M37 CREATIVE STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SCHOOL CULTURE Learn how to diagnose a school's culture and identify actions to improve it. Gain proven strategies to turn around negative cultures. Identify data that provides indications of changes in school culture. Take home ideas that positively impact student learning.

Sheila Eller, Mounds View Public Schools, Shoreview, MN, [email protected] John Eller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Falls Church, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M34 LEADERS FOR NOW AND THE FUTURE Hear how the Leadership Fellows Program addresses succession planning while building leadership capacity in assistant principals and curriculum leaders. Examine components of the program including standards-based seminars, opportunities for both reflective and collaborative practice, and individual results-based coaching. Identify needs and gain ideas for implementing similar programs.

Gail Coffin, Howard County Public Schools, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] Mary Teague, Howard County Public Schools, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] June Wilson, Howard County Public Schools, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] David Morrocco, Howard County Public Schools, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M36 THEORY TO PRACTICE: JOB-EMBEDDED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Examine a professional development model that meets the challenge of turning "a nice workshop" into a catalyst for change. Consider how classroomconnected professional development structures move quality mathematics instructional theories into practice. Hear how these ideas impacted one highpoverty, high-performing research school.

Marco Ramirez, Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M38 DEVELOPING LEADERS THROUGH COACHING AND COLLABORATION Learn about a model to foster teacher leadership and prepare future administrative teams. Review highlights of a teacher-leader academy and a districtlevel leadership academy. Both academies are grounded in national leadership standards and embrace the collaborative coaching concept while modeling professional learning best practice.

Linda Sevigny, Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA, [email protected] Ann Moore, Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA, [email protected] Shauna Miller, Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Customize! If you'd like to identify sessions to address specific needs, email [email protected] with your request and a session recommendation will be sent to you.

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M39 MAKING A DIFFERENCE WITH DIFFERENTIATION Consider how differentiation can address issues of achievement with populations of different learning styles. Explore research-based differentiated strategies that support increased rigor in the classroom. Learn how to move from orator to facilitator to increase student engagement and success.

Norman Poole, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, [email protected] Charle Scott, Texas Staff Development Council, Odessa, TX, [email protected] Gail Leidy, Temple Independent School District, Temple, TX, [email protected] Martha Stone, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M41 ACTIVATING TEACHER LEADERSHIP: ONE APPROACH Building school capacity by investing in teacher leadership is critical to developing an authentic professional learning community. Examine one school's process for developing teacher leadership by engaging them in identifying instructional focus, conducting walkthroughs, assessing practice, and making data-based decisions.

Mary Boswell-McComas, Harford County Public Schools, Aberdeen, MD, [email protected] Christine Zatalava, Harford County Public Schools, Aberdeen, MD, [email protected] Jayme Hill, Harford County Public Schools, Aberdeen, MD, [email protected] Laura Loughlin, Harford County Public Schools, Aberdeen, MD, [email protected] Brad Spence, Harford County Public Schools, Aberdeen, MD, [email protected] Thomas Szerensits, Harford County Public Schools, Aberdeen, MD, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M43 A MULTI-LAYERED APPROACH TO INCREASING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Understand how different levels of district support enhance the quality of adult learning. Learn to use disaggregated student, teacher, department, school, and district data to determine learning priorities, monitor progress, and sustain continuous improvement. Evaluate and reflect on one system's approach and consider applications to another setting.

Monica Jordan, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, [email protected] Jada Askew, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, [email protected] Raquel Young, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, [email protected] Adrienne Hutton, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M40 BUILDING BEHAVIORAL CAPACITY WITH ALL STAFF MEMBERS Learn how coaches for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) impact organizational health, improve academic outcomes for students, and reduce office discipline referrals. Gain skills and tools needed to build behavioral capacity among all staff members. Think strategically to implement PBIS and create action steps for implementing this program in a school system.

Teresa Tosh, Haysville Public Schools, Haysville, KS, [email protected] Glenda Cowell, Haysville Public Schools, Haysville, KS, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M44 LEADING SMARTER WITH THE BRAIN IN MIND Apply brain research and gain insights into high-impact lesson design that transforms classroom instruction. Practice strategies that lead to powerful teaching and engage in "use tomorrow" techniques. Take home instructional templates and frameworks for guiding teachers toward developing braincompatible classrooms.

Sarah Armstrong, Leading and Learning Solutions, Nellysford, VA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamental of Professional Learning

M42 STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT: FROM ACCEPTABLE TO EXEMPLARY When adults in school learn, students learn. Hear the story of how one diverse, highly mobile, low socioeconomic elementary school progressed from an acceptable to an exemplary rating by implementing the National Staff Development Council's Standards. Learn how to apply the structures, standards, and strategies to a school or district.

Pam Smith, Garland, TX, [email protected] Darwin Spiller, Richardson Independent School District, Richardson, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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Wednesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 10, 2008 -- 7:45 a.m. ­ 9:45 a.m.

M45 TURNING AROUND MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT FOR SEVENTH GRADERS Learn about Teaching and Understanding Rational Numbers, a coaching model designed to assist teachers in planning and delivering lessons, anticipating student responses, and examining student work. Consider how this model supports critical understandings and impacts student achievement. Leave with a lesson plan structure and a compilation of teacher-created materials that support the critical understandings of fractions and ratio/proportion in the seventh grade classroom.

Wendy Milson, Bridgeport Public Schools, Bridgeport, CT, [email protected] Debra Crawford, Pearson, Greenville, SC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M47 BUILDING A FRAMEWORK OF CHANGE THROUGH DATA Learn how to guide instruction and inform professional learning through the effective use of data. Discover a proven process to engage faculties in continuous planning and see a model of a data room. Walk away with a method of organizing, using, and displaying data that will transform a school or system.

Jan Grogan, Muscogee County School District, Columbus, GA, [email protected] Janet LaFortune, Muscogee County School District, Columbus, GA, [email protected] Carol Ann Wood, Muscogee County School District, Columbus, GA, [email protected] Strand: Documenting the Impact

M49 DEVELOPING MIDDLE SCHOOL LITERACY COACHES Learn how North Carolina has successfully implemented the Governor's Initiative for 21st Century Middle School Literacy Coaches. Two hundred coaches have received staff development in both coaching and literacy. Hear how these coaches are sharing best practices with classroom teachers across the state. Examine literacy strategies and student data from this initiative.

Julia Kron, North Carolina Teacher Academy, Morrisville, NC, [email protected] Dutchess Maye, North Carolina Teacher Academy, Morrisville, NC, [email protected] Barbara Hux, North Carolina Teacher Academy, Morrisville, NC, [email protected] Jamon Flowers, Alexander County Schools, Taylorsville, NC, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M46 ENGAGING ONLINE CONTENT: FOCUSED PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES Learn about a successful contentfocused online mentoring program and how to design effective online professional development for beginning teachers, mentors, and facilitators. Explore ways to incorporate key professional development components into your online program. Identify key learnings and challenges in the development of an online professional learning community.

Kepp Lynn, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Alyson Mike, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Mary Dunn, Messalonskee School District, Oakland, ME, [email protected] Aaron Mathieu, Acton Public Schools/ Acton-Boxborough Regional School District, Acton, MA, [email protected] Strand: Technology 92

M48 SIMPLE PRINCIPLES FOR COMPLEX CHANGE IN SCHOOLS Consider the perplexing task of leading dramatic change in order to establish authentic learning organizations. Learn how a few simple principles from the complexity sciences and chaos theory helped shift the school culture of a secondary school community from one of isolation to collaboration.

LuAnne Forrest, Washington County School District, Saint George, UT, [email protected] Mike Smith, Southern Virginia University, Buena Vista, VA, [email protected] Anna Smith, New York University, New York, NY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M50 INVESTING IN SUPPORT STAFF TO IMPROVE SCHOOLS Does your district's professional development program include support staff? Get started designing and implementing powerful professional development for the "other half" of your district's employees, including secretaries, clerks, bus drivers, para-educators, and custodians. Learn about the strategies, tools, resources, and champions required to create and sustain a successful classified support professional development program.

Helen Ryley, St. Vrain Valley School District, Longmont, CO, [email protected] Karen Gralewski, St. Vrain Valley School District, Longmont, CO, [email protected] Linda Lohmann, St. Vrain Valley School District, Longmont, CO, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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M51 SOWING SEEDS OF GREATNESS: RE-CULTURING URBAN SCHOOLS Review why teacher expectations, the hidden curriculum, and self-fulfilling prophesies impact student achievement. Learn how an urban middle school and high school went from not making Adequate Yearly Progress to being nominated for the U.S. Dept. of Education Blue Ribbon Award through an inquiry of the school's practices, exploration of research-based ideas, and staff learning.

Regina Ellis, Kansas City, Missouri School District, Kansas City, MO, [email protected] Usha Saha, Lincoln College Preparatory Academy, Kansas City, MO, [email protected] Sharon Showalter, Lincoln College Preparatory Academy, Kansas City, MO, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

M53 BOOK TALK: MADE TO STICK: WHY SOME IDEAS SURVIVE AND SOME DIE Those attending this structured conversation should read Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Some Die, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath. Come prepared to discuss the six principles which underlie sticky ideas and help them succeed. This book describes how to craft messages that are memorable and lasting.

Diane Gross, USD 261 Haysville Public Schools, Haysville, KS, [email protected] Mori Kemper, Aqua Fria Union High School District, Avondale, AZ, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M55 NO LEARNER IS AN ISLAND Research is clear: Adults learn both academic and socio-emotional lessons in environments of interrelated and interdependent factors. Examine research from neurology, sociology, biology, and more for ways to maximize learning by addressing the needs of the learner as a whole person.

Deanna Woods, American Federation of Teachers, Washington, DC, [email protected] Janet Kujat, Minneapolis Public Schools, Special District No. 1, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

M54 LAUNCHING A DISTRICTWIDE TRAINER CERTIFICATION INITIATIVE Consider challenges involved in developing a districtwide trainer certification initiative. Examine cutting-edge skills representing best practices for a districtwide train-the-trainer initiative. Receive resources to start developing a districtwide trainer certification initiative.

Ernest Izard, Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Jenean Bellah, Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Wytonia Montgomery, Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Raul Trevino, Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Jacqueline Landry, Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX, [email protected] Rita Martin, Arlington, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M56 JOURNALISTS SHARE PERSPECTIVES Washington Post journalists will share insights into what qualifies as "education" news. Bring questions regarding the relationship between the press and the education community. Gain insights into how to make professional development issues "newsworthy."

Journalists representing The Washington Post Facilitated by Ted Haynie, Calvert County Public Schools, Prince Frederick, MD, [email protected] Strand: Policy and Advocacy

M52 TEACHER INDUCTION AND SUPPORT: RELATIONSHIPS TO RETENTION Discuss the organizational structures and resources necessary to support the implementation of successful teacher induction. Examine what research identifies as beginning teacher professional development needs. Examine the components of teacher induction and support that are beneficial and the relationship of these elements to teacher retention.

Lisa Mitchell, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, [email protected] Strand: Teacher Quality

Plan now! Attend NSDC's 40th Annual Conference to meet and learn from outstanding practitioners, researchers, authors, and consultants.

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Wednesday ­ 2-hour Sessions

December 10, 2008 -- 7:45 a.m. ­ 9:45 a.m.

M57 CREATING COMMON ASSESSMENTS: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TO PRACTICE Valid and reliable common assessments are essential tools for gathering the student performance data necessary for instructional decision making. Learn how one middle school improved the validity and reliability of its common assessments through school-based professional development.

Charley Shrack, Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools, Williamsburg, VA, [email protected] Christopher Gareis, The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, [email protected] Tracey Jones, Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools, Williamsburg, VA, [email protected] Monica Underwood, Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools, Williamsburg, VA, [email protected], Strand: Teacher Quality

M58 ADULT LEARNING THEORY IMPACT ON PRESENTATIONS Examine six learning theories that impact adult learning. Learn how these theories ensure deeper learning and how to incorporate them into learning sessions. Understand key aspects of adult learning theory and how they are crucial to develop and deliver highly successful professional development.

Dawn Applegate, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, Boston, MA, [email protected] Diane Alsager, Great Source Education Group, Cedar Rapids, IA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M60 NSDC'S NEW STANDARDS ASSESSMENT INVENTORY Learn about the Standards Assessment Inventory (SAI) and how to use it to assess the quality of professional development. Learn how the SAI has been revised and about its psychometric qualities. Explore ways to use the results of the SAI to improve the quality of professional learning in your school or district and to develop school and district professional learning plans.

Steven Preston, SI Consultants, Decatur, GA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M59 THE "SENSE" OF HUMOR Humor engages the brain, enhances retention, reduces stress, and improves achievement. Review the research and techniques for using humor, laughter, and improvisation to create engaged learning environments. Take away learning exercises that enhance spontaneity, bridge conflict, and create collaborative relationships.

Jim Winter, Wavelength Inc., Chicago, IL, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

M61 THE GIFT OF COACHING A powerful coach requires skill that is best developed by experiencing and observing coaching firsthand. Members of Coaching for Results Inc. are providing the gift of one-on-one coaching. Give yourself time to explore your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities... a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a tough situation.

Frances Shuster, Coaching for Results, Inc., Flower Mound, TX, [email protected] Reba Schumacher, Coaching for Results, Inc., Tyler, TX, [email protected] Linda Gross Cheliotes, Coaching for Results, Inc., Bayside, NY, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Search! Refer to the presenter, topic, and audience indices to choose sessions or use the online search functions.

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Post Conference

Wednesday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 10, 2008 -- 12:00 p.m. ­ 3:00 p.m.

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P05 HAVING HARD CONVERSATIONS As administrators, coaches, or teacher leaders, we often come up against situations where difficult topics must be addressed. What are the best strategies for those moments? Learn questions to ask oneself before speaking and what environments are best for difficult situations? Develop an action plan and acquire scripting tools for having hard conversations.

Jennifer Abrams, Palo Alto Unified School District, Palo Alto, CA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

P01 COOL COMMERCIALS TO CULTIVATE CONVERSATIONS Building a successful learning community requires constant conversation. TV commercials provide a window into tough subjects by raising an issue in a humorous way. Learn how to use commercials to promote crucial professional conversations. Leave with a list of Internet resources to support your use of commercials in your work.

Walter Olsen, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected] William Sommers, Austin, TX, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

P03 NEW TOOLS FOR CHOOSING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCES Use tools featured in the 2008 edition of Powerful Designs for Professional Learning to select the most appropriate professional development experiences for schools and districts. Review the NSDC Standards for professional learning and select effective strategies that help teachers help students learn.

Lois Easton, LBE Learning, Boulder, CO, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

P02 NINETY SECONDS TO GET THEIR ATTENTION Mentors, coaches, staff developers, and team leaders frequently take on the role of the "sage on the stage" to support adult learning that will increase student achievement. Learn techniques to capture attention, captivate with information, and close with keepers. Practice strategies that enhance professional learning and foster transfer to the job.

Brian Pete, Robin Fogarty and Associates, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Karyn Wright, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

P04 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR MENTORS AND COACHES Join us for an inside look at the New Teacher Center's Mentor Forum, an environment where mentors openly share challenging situations, seek feedback, and extend their skills. Experience how a structured format, collaborative processes, and specific protocols facilitate and encourage reflective mentor practice.

Janet Gless, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Cynthia Brunswick, New Teacher Center, Chicago, IL, [email protected] Ronni Mann, New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

P06 WHEN CONSEQUENCES DON'T WORK: MANAGING AND MOTIVATING DIFFICULT STUDENTS Consequences are often the last resort and usually don't produce results. What are the keys to developing and implementing invisible but powerful classroom management and motivational skills? Receive dozens of practical, eye-opening strategies for managing and motivating difficult students effectively, including brain-compatible ways for working with reluctant learners. Leave with your toolkit overflowing with resources you can use.

Rick Smith, Conscious Teaching, Fairfax, CA, [email protected] Strand: Teaching Quality

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P07 THE DYNAMIC TRAINER: ALL BRAINS ENGAGED

Post Conference

Wednesday ­ 3-hour Sessions

December 10, 2008 -- 12:00 p.m. ­ 3:00 p.m.

P08 MAXIMIZING OUR DIFFERENCES Educators today span several generations and therefore use multiple approaches to accessing and processing information. Explore the range of strengths, values, characteristics, and life experiences educators bring to the work place as defined by generational patterns. Examine striking contrasts that exist between traditionalists, baby boomers, gen-xers, and millennials, and then consider the implications for work with adult learners. Laugh out loud as we recognize ourselves and our colleagues in action. Consider how to take advantage of our diversity and work with one another more productively.

Paula Rutherford, Just ASK Publications, Alexandria, VA, [email protected] Strand: Race, Class, and Culture

P09 TOOLS FOR TEAMS Practice research-based techniques that enhance leadership capacity: developing trust, resolving conflict, solving problems, and using data. Leave the session with tools to equip high-functioning teams with processes they need to assure quality learning and student success every day.

Pam Robbins, Mt. Crawford, VA, [email protected] Strand: Leadership

Energize your presentations with easy-tolearn, fun-to-use, dynamic team-building and class-building structures. Learn five proven structures that improve relationships and morale, easily transfer to the classroom, and create a positive ripple through any school. Explore how structures align with brain-based learning, multiple intelligences, and cooperative learning.

Laurie Kagan, Kagan Professional Development, San Clemente, CA, [email protected] Strand: Fundamentals of Professional Learning

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About NSDC

A Network of Like-Minded Professionals Improving the quality of teaching through transformed professional learning is the most powerful way we can impact student learning.

Together we can make it happen. The National Staff Development Council (NSDC) is the largest nonprofit membership association committed to ensuring high levels of learning and performance for all students and staff members. The NSDC community of educational leaders is committed to professional learning that is sustained, job-embedded, practical, and tied directly to student achievement. NSDC offers district staff, principals, and teacher leaders the connections, tools, learning opportunities, and resources they need to promote meaningful and purposeful professional learning and embed it in the school day. You can depend on NSDC for solutions, cutting-edge strategies,

NSDC's Purpose: Every educator engages in effective professional learning every day so every student achieves.

success stories, and more. Field-tested standards, resources, and tools are available to support your work. Interact with and learn from your peers through newsletters focused on specific job roles and responsibilities, at internationally recognized annual conferences, at institutes and academies, and through online communities created to support you in your work.

Executive Office Stephanie Hirsh Executive Director [email protected] Carrie Freundlich Conference Manager [email protected] Elaine Gilbert Presentations Manager [email protected] Joel Reynolds Executive Assistant to Stephanie Hirsh, Secretary to the Board of Trustees [email protected]

Business Office Leslie Miller Director of Business Services [email protected] Christy Colclasure Member Online Services Manager [email protected] Niki Taylor Affiliate and Products Manager [email protected] Renee Taylor Assistant Director of Business Services/Exhibits and Sponsors [email protected] Stephanie Wagers Conference Registration and IT Solutions Manager [email protected]

Strategic Initiatives Joellen Killion Deputy Executive Director [email protected] Deanna Sanchez Program Manager [email protected] Communications Joan Richardson Director of Communications [email protected] Tracy Crow JSD and Web Editor [email protected] Valerie von Frank Book Editor [email protected]

Consultants Sue Francis Custom-Designed Services [email protected] Dale Hair Affiliate Coach [email protected] René Islas Federal Policies [email protected] Special Thanks, Cathy Owens NSDC Director of Learning Nov. 2006 ­ July 2008

Dennis Sparks Emeritus Executive Director [email protected]

Hayes Mizell Distinguished Senior Fellow [email protected]

Shirley Hord Scholar Laureate shirley.hor[email protected]

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The Official Travel Agency for the 2008 Annual Conference!

Call for special discounts on airfare for individuals and groups of 10 or more traveling together

For Reservations: Call Kay at the NSDC Travel Desk at 800.445.3265 or e-mail your request to [email protected] Include the following information in your email: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Name(s) Departure City Departure Date & Preferred Time Airline Preference Return Date & Preferred Time

STELLAR TRAVEL, located in Bellevue WA, is a travel agency specializing in exceptional personal care to each traveler. Under the same local ownership for twenty years, the company is recognized as one of the top travel businesses in the Pacific Northwest. Stellar Travel is a proud member of the Virtuoso network of travel agencies with expert travel-planning consultants that specialize in connecting travelers to the world's destinations - in the best ways possible. All Virtuoso travel specialists take the time to get to know you so your travel requirements and expectations really do become reality.

When buying a ticket on American or United Airlines please include the NSDC identification number. The numbers will benefit NSDC future contract negotiations. American Airlines Business ExtraAA account number 789086 United Airlines Perks Plus account number 065NS www.stellartravel.com

A I R P O R T T R A N S P O R TAT I O N G U I D E SHUTTLE to Gaylord National Resort From Reagan/National...$18.00 From Dulles...$32.00 From Baltimore...$39.00

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TAXI to Gaylord National Resort From Reagan/National...$20.00 From Dulles...$55.00 From Baltimore...$65.00

Hotel Inform ation

The NSDC 40th Annual Conference will be held at the new Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, MD. Just across the Potomac from our nation's capital, come and enjoy this beautiful new facility. Conference rates are $221.00 single, $231.00 double. Phone 301-965-2000 for reservations and ask for the NSDC conference rate, or go to www.nsdc.org and go to the annual conference link. Reserve your room today.

Registr ation Inform ation

How to Register Fill out the next two pages. Fill out 1, 2, 4, 5 (and 3 if you are not a current NSDC member). Taste Test memberships do not apply. Registration forms may also be downloaded from the NSDC web site (www.nsdc.org) or you can register online with a Visa or MasterCard. Registrations will be accepted online, via mail, or fax (see form for address and fax number). If you register online or by fax, do not mail a copy of your form. This can cause duplicate charges. All registrations require payment before they are processed. If you use a purchase order for payment, it must accompany the registration form and NSDC will issue an invoice on the P.O. which must be paid before the conference. Hall. Fees for the 3-day conference include the Sunday evening reception, breakfast and lunch on Monday and Tuesday, the Exhibit Hall reception and affiliate receptions, brunch on Wednesday, and materials. The Wednesday 1-day fee includes brunch, the post-conference, and materials. attend question and answer sessions with the conference keynoters.

Confirmation You will receive registration confirmation via email, so please make sure we have your current email address. Please call the NSDC Business Office 800-727-7288 if you have not received confirmation within two weeks of registering. Please bring your registration confirmation to the NSDC registration area at the Gaylord National to receive a nametag, session tickets, and conference materials.

Session Selection You must select sessions before your conference registration can be processed. In order to get the best selection of preconference and concurrent sessions, please register early. Because the number of participants for each session is limited, it is important that you indicate your 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choices for each time period. Full and cancelled sessions will be listed on our web site. Please list six choices if you register after October 15.

Post-Conference NSDC is offering specially selected three-hour sessions (12 p.m. ­ 3 p.m.) after the traditional brunch and close of the conference at noon Wednesday. This is available to participants who register for Wednesday only one-day regular conference. Three-day or five-day registrants may add the Wednesday postconference for $25.

Lecture Series Choose the Lecture Series, and you will receive tickets for all Keynote Q&A's, Scholar Lectures, and the Back-up Keynote.

Deadlines and Discounts If your registration is postmarked on or before October 13, 2008 you may take a $50.00 discount from a 3-day or 5-day registration. Presenters may take an additional $50.00 discount. A 10% discount may be taken if you are part of a group of 10 or more and you submit all your registrations in one envelope with one check paying for all the registrations.

Meals, Receptions, and Exhibits Fees for Saturday and Sunday include the Friday Meet and Greet, coffee breaks and lunches, materials, and entrance to the Exhibit

Roundtable Track Register for Roundtable sessions on Monday and Tuesday. This choice allows you to attend six 45-minute sessions. In addition attendees may select a longer session for Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday morning. Roundtable track attendees may also pick up tickets to

Cancellation Policy A full refund less a $50 administrative fee will be issued upon written request received in the NSDC Business Office by November 9, 2008; one-half refund less a $50 administrative fee by November 21, 2008; no refunds will be issued for cancellations received after November 21, 2008. No refunds will be issued until after the conference.

101

NSDC 2008 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

SAVE $50

on your 2008 Annual Conference 3- or 5-day registration fee when you register by Oct. 13, 2008

Registr ation Form

WA S H I N G T O N , D C · G AY L O R D N AT I O N A L R E S O RT

1

R E G I S T R AT I O N D ATA :

Please Check ()

This is my first NSDC Annual Conference I am willing to host a session(s) I am attending. Be eligible to win a free conference registration! Hosts will be contacted with details Special diet required: _________________________ _________________________ Check here if you do not wish to have special promotional material sent to you from our conference vendors.

Your membership number appears on your address label, or add a membership in 3 . Three people NSDC Member # ___________________________ can attend using one organizational membership number. "Taste Test" trial memberships do not apply.

First Name_______________________________________________________ Last Name________________________________________________________ (for your nametag) School Dist./Organization_________________________________________________________________ Position____________________________________ Address / Street_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Province / Zip ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Is this address: business home (All conference and membership materials will be sent to this address) Business Phone___________________________________________________ Home Phone_____________________________________________________ Fax______________________________________________________________ E-mail___________________________________________________________ Make sure we have your current e-mail as your conference confirmation will be e-mailed to you.

2

R E G I S T R AT I O N F E E S : check () each fee that applies

$250 _____

3

S P E C I A L C O N F E R E N C E / I N T R O D U C T O RY M E M B E R O P T I O N S A N D R E N E WA L P R I C E S

1­Day Preconference (indicate day attending) Saturday 12/6, or Sunday 12/7 (includes coffee break/lunch)

2­Day Preconference or two 1­Day Preconference $395 _____ Saturday 12/6 AND Sunday 12/7 (includes coffee breaks and lunch both days) 1­Day Regular Conference (indicate day attending) Monday 12/8, or Tuesday 12/9, or Wednesday 12/10 $199 _____

You may skip 3 if you are a current NSDC member. All nonmembers, MUST add the fee for one of the options below. These are one-year memberships. Go to page 104 in this program for complete membership benefits. Check () Non­member fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 50 ____ Teachers Teaching Teachers Introductory Membership . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 49 ____ Teacher Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 99 ____ Principal Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 99 ____ System Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 99 ____ Comprehensive Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$129 ____ Organizational Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$179 ____

(includes breakfast and lunch Mon. & Tues. and brunch and Post-Conference Wednesday)

3­Day Regular Conference Monday 12/8, Tuesday 12/9, Wednesday (a.m.) 12/10

$425 _____

(5 meals, Sunday Reception, Exhibit Reception, and Affiliate Receptions included)

5­Day BEST DEAL Saturday 12/6 through Wednesday (a.m.) 12/10

$699 _____

(7 meals, Sunday Reception, Exhibit Reception, and Affiliate Receptions included)

Add Wednesday afternoon Post-Conference to a 3­ or 5­Day Book Fee for preconference 107 ($48.00), 205 ($22.00), 206 ($36.00), 302 ($25.00), 319 ($65.21)

$25 _____

Add NSDC Book Club to any Membership (U.S. $49, Canada $59, all others $84) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ ________ Subtotal $ ___________

$ __________

Subtotal $ __________

5

T O TA L A N D PAY M E N T: Add 2 and 3 and subtract 4

4

D I S C O U N T: check () each discount that applies

­ $ _______

Subtotal Registration and Book Fees 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$___________ Subtotal Membership 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$___________ Subtotal Discount 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ­ $___________ TOTAL $ ___________

Deduct $50 early discount (on 3­ or 5­Day registration only) if postmarked before Oct. 13, 2008 Presenters deduct $50. Presenter Session #_____________

­ $ _______ Registration fees made payable to NSDC must accompany this form. Invoice(s) issued on purchase order(s) must be paid prior to the conference. Fees are payable by: Visa MasterCard Check Purchase order (must accompany form)

My registration is part of a goup of 10 or more, mailed together, and paid with a check. Deduct 10% of your subtotal from 2 here. ­ $ _______ Subtotal $ __________ The NSDC 2008 Conference will be held at the new Gaylord National Resort at National Harbor, MD, Dec. 6-10, 2008. Make your hotel reservations online through the NSDC web site. Go to http://www.nsdc.org/connect/events.cfm where you'll find a link to the conference hotel or call 301-965-2000 and ask for the NSDC group rate. Remember your conference fees include coffee breaks and lunch on preconference days, breakfast and lunch on Monday and Tuesday, and brunch on Wednesday. CANCELLATION POLICY: A full refund less a $50 administration fee will be issued upon written request received in the NSDC Business Office by Nov. 9, 2008; one-half return less a $50 administration fee by Nov. 21, 2008, no refunds will be issued for cancellations received after Nov. 21, 2008.

Card No. _______________________________________________ Exp. Date _______________ Signature ______________________________________ 3-Digit Security Code ______________

Send this page and the session page to:

By Mail:

NSDC Conference Registration 504 S. Locust Street, Oxford, OH 45056 800-727-7288 · 513-523-0638 (fax) [email protected] · www.nsdc.org http://www.nsdc.org/conference08/ 513-523-0638

On-line: By Fax:

Questions: Phone (800) 727-7288

102

Page 1 of 2. Go to page 103 to select sessions

NSDC 2008 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

SESSION SELECTION GUIDE

MORNING MON

AFTERNOON

Session Registration Form

Name __________________________________________________________

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP SELECTIONS

December 6th and 7th. Please indicate three choices (mark 1st, 2nd, and 3rd)

A&B C - D - RT 1 E - F - RT 2

TUE

G&H I - J - RT 3 M K-L

(postconference)

WED

P

SATURDAY | December 6, 2008 ____ PC101 Blumsack & Cox ____ PC102 Barkley ____ PC103 CampbellJones & CampbellJones ____ PC104 Knight ____ PC105 Duff, Stewart, Mayer & Cohan ____ PC106 Robinson & Kennedy ____ PC107 Easton (add $48.00 book fee) ____ PC108 Hord & Sommers

SUNDAY | December 7, 2008 ____ PC201 Almanzan ____ PC202 Seashore Louis & Kruse ____ PC203 Burke ____ PC204 Childs-Bowen ____ PC205 Delehant (add $22.00 book fee) ____ PC206 Jolly (add $36.00 book fee) ____ PC207 Tate ____ PC208 Love ____ PC209 Richardson ____ PC210 Jukes

SATURDAY & SUNDAY | December 6 & 7, 2008 ____ PC301 Walqui & Hamburger ____ PC302 Sparks (add $25.00 book fee) ____ PC303 Scott ____ PC304 Herrera & Klock Pershing ____ PC305 Champion ____ PC306 Lindsey & Lindsey ____ PC307 Cole & Dukess ____ PC308 Martin-Kneip ____ PC309 Bertani & Jackson ____ PC310 Chadsey & Dewitt ____ PC311 Moir & Gless ____ PC312 Chapman ____ PC313 Webb-Johnson ____ PC314 Peterson & Robbins ____ PC315 Bocchino & Bocchino ____ PC316 Anderson, Kee & Williams ____ PC317 Caro-Bruce & Klehr ____ PC318 Drago-Severson ____ PC319 Garmston & McTighe (add $65.21 book fees)

CONCURRENT SESSION SELECTIONS

December 8th, 9th, and 10th. Please indicate six choices (mark 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th choices). Please make sure you do not sign up for sessions with conflicting times. It is not necessary to sign up for all time periods.

MONDAY | December 8, 2008 Morning Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices for this time period from Set A, B, C, D, or Roundtable 1. Remember: Sessions A & B take the entire day and should also be marked in the same order in your afternoon schedule. 1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ___________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________ Afternoon Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices from Set A, B, E, F, or Roundtable 2. Remember: If you previously chose sessions from Set A or B, you need to list them in the same order below as they are all-day sessions. 1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ___________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________

TUESDAY | December 9, 2008 Morning Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices for this time period from Set G, H, I, J, or Roundtable 3. Remember: Sessions G and H take the entire day and should be marked in the same order in your afternoon schedule. 1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ___________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________ Afternoon Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices from Set G, H, K, L, or Roundtable 4. Remember: If you previously chose sessions from Sessions G or H, you need to list them in the same order below as they are all-day sessions. 1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ___________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________

WEDNESDAY | December 10, 2008 Morning Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top three choices from Set M. 1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ___________

POST-CONFERENCE | December 10, 2008 Post-Conference (Set P): Identify your top three choices from Set P. You must add $25 for post-conference unless you have registered for Wednesday only. 1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ___________

SESSION SELECTION MADE EASY

Streamline your conference experience with these alternatives. LECTURE SERIES Check here to register for all Keynote Speaker Q & A sessions, Scholar Lectures, and Back-up Keynote address. DO NOT register for concurrent sessions if you select this option. ROUNDTABLE TRACK Check here to register for Roundtable sessions on Monday and Tuesday. This choice allows you to attend six 45-minute sessions. You may select Q & A's C02 and I02 and Tuesday p.m. and Wednesday a.m. sessions with this option.

Send this page and the registration page to:

By Mail: NSDC Conference Registration 504 S. Locust Street, Oxford, OH 45056 800-727-7288 · 513-523-0638 (fax) [email protected] · www.nsdc.org On-line: http://www.nsdc.org/conference08/ By Fax: 513-523-0638 Questions: Phone (800) 727-7288

103

nsdc Membership Options

Special Conference and Introductory Prices!

NSDC CORE MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS ­ ALL MEMBERS RECEIVE: Connect with NSDC (monthly e-newsletter) Alerts you to postings at www.nsdc.org, new publications, learning events, and organizational news and updates.

CONNECT with NSDC

Annual and Summer Conference Programs Access both program books online or in print. Includes registration materials and is a valuable resource describing all sessions offered. Provides contact information for expanding your networking opportunities. N S D C P U B L I C AT I O N S JSD Develop your expertise by learning from practitioners who share their experiences and insights in each themed issue. Learn from those who face challenges of school improvement and organizational change. Use their tools and become inspired by their stories. (72 page magazine published 4x/year)

NSDC Bookstore NSDC members save 20% on all Bookstore purchases. Find ideas and resources to increase staff learning and improve student achievement. Order online, by phone, fax, or mail. www.nsdc.org The most extensive online library of its kind. The members-only area offers 3,500 pages of information including the full text of all NSDC publications since 1998.

NSDC Awards Program NSDC's prestigious awards include the Susan LoucksHorsley Award, Best Dissertation Award, Best Evaluation of Staff Development Award, Staff Development Book of the Year Award, and the Shirley Havens Support and Classified Staff Development Award. MEMBERSHIP ADD-ON NSDC Book Club Pay only $49 for books worth over $100. In cooperation with Corwin Press, four times a year NSDC will send you a hand-selected book.

($59 Canada, $84 other countries)

The Learning Principal Hear the voices of principals who understand their crucial role in improving the quality of teaching and leadership. Discover tools that you can use with school staffs to engage in effective professional learning. (8-page print newsletter published 8x/year)

The Learning System Explore the challenges of organizational change in a district or in a state. Learn how others address issues that challenge all system leaders with professional learning responsibilities. (8-page print newsletter published 8x/year)

Tools for Schools Support student and staff learning with tools and resources you can adapt and use right away. Focus on a single, essential component of school improvement in each issue and develop a professional tool kit of timeless resources. (8-page print newsletter published 4x/year)

Teachers Teaching Teachers ­ T3 Reward yourself with the opportunity to learn from staff developers on the cutting edge of reform -- schoolbased staff developers, teacher leaders, coaches, facilitators, team leaders, department and gradelevel chairs. (12-page enewsletter distributed 8x/year

MEMBERSHIP OPTIONS ATA-GLANCE

Core Benefits for all NSDC Member Categories: L Connect with NSDC e-newsletter (12X/year) Access to the online community for your specific job role or responsibilities 20% discount on all items in the Bookstore Access to members-only section of web site Annual Conference Program Summer Conference Program Member price for Summer Conference, Annual Conference, institutes, and workshops

Organizational

Comprehensive

System Leader

Principal Leader

Teacher Leader

T3

$179

$129

$99

$99

$99

$49

PLUS ALL BENEFITS

CORE

104

L

L L

PLUS ALL BENEFITS PLUS ALL BENEFITS

Three people may attend Summer and Annual Conferences using this membership.

CORE

PLUS ALL BENEFITS

PLUS ALL BENEFITS

CORE

CORE

L L L

CORE

View sample issues at www.nsdc.org/samples.pdf

PLUS ALL BENEFITS

CORE

Special Conference Pricing!

For additional Membership Information please call 1-800-727-7288 or visit www.nsdc.org.

Special Conference Happenings...

Keep Sunday evening, December 7 open... NSDC's Annual Conference begins with several special events. At 6:00 p.m., new attendees will be introduced to the NSDC conference culture at the annual first-timers orientation, at 6:45 p.m. members will get reacquainted with NSDC colleagues and be introduced to DC "celebrities" at the opening reception, and at 7:45 p.m. everyone will be treated to a special performance by Capitol Steps. Following the performance everyone is invited to dance with music arranged for by the DC metro host committee. Plan a special night out... Check out the DC City Guide at www.washingtonpost.com to plan a special evening with colleagues. Consider A Christmas Carol at the National Theater or the holiday celebration at Mount Vernon. December is a beautiful time in the city, but many events sell out early so take time before you arrive to schedule a special evening of entertainment. The hospitality table will be open daily to assist with last minute plans, including dinner and shopping. Bring your walking shoes... Join your colleagues at 6:00 a.m. Monday and Tuesday, December 8 and 9 for an early morning wellness walk. Meet at the hotel's main entrance and enjoy a brisk 30­45 minute walk around National Harbor. And bring a second pair... "Step Up" to the DC Metro Host Committee challenge by bringing a new pair of shoes in any size or color. These shoes will be donated to local shelters in Maryland, Virginia, and DC. Join the fun at the silent auction... Bid high and bid often. Former NSDC Trustees have organized a silent auction to raise money to support NSDC's Foundation: Impacting the Future Now. Check out new items offered each day in the exhibit hall at the auction booth next to the NSDC bookstore. About the Capitol Steps The Capitol Steps began as a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize the very people and places that employed them. In the years that followed, many of the Steps ignored the conventional wisdom ("Don't quit your day job!"), and although not all of the current members of the Steps are former Capitol Hill staffers, taken together the performers have worked in a total of eighteen Congressional offices and represent 62 years of collective House and Senate staff experience. Since they began, the Capitol Steps have recorded 27 albums, including their latest, Springtime for Liberals. They've been featured on NBC, CBS, ABC, and PBS, and can be heard 4 times a year on National Public Radio stations nationwide during their Politics Takes a Holiday radio specials.

Surgeon General's Warning: The Capitol Steps will cause your sides to split. ­ C. Everett Koop, 1/6/89

105

Topic Index

Adult Development/Learning A01, A02, B01, C07, D03, E06, E10, E16, E23, E25, E26, E26, E29, F08, F15, F20, G01, G09, G11, I04, I05, I08, I14, I16, I19, I28, J07, K16, L14, L26, L28, M06, M23, M24, M29, M32, M53, M54, M55, M58, M59 Aligning State, District and School Policies H01, J03, K05, L04 Assessment/Evaluation of Students A05, C18, C20, C31, C37, E11, E12, E27, F06, F15, F20, G06, I06, I09, I10, I27, J04, J12, K09, L05, L07, L13, L18, M10, M11, M57 Brain-Based Learning A01, A02, A05, C37, D07, E25, F18, G01, I14, L11, L26, M05, M12, M44, M53, M58, P06, P07 Case Studies of Successful Schools B04, C19, D11, E12, E20, E22, F11, F12, F17, G04, G08, H03, I12, I21, J10, K12, K17, L12, L21, L24, M14, M18, M33, M36, M42 Change B02, C11, D12, D15, D17, D19, E16, E18, E29, F03, F04, G04, H09, J02, J07, L01, L06, L23, M14, M26, M35, M48 Closing Achievement Gap A03, A07, B04, C06, C09, C27, C31, C35, D09, D11, D16, D18, E03, E08, E22, E28, F01, F17, G06, H03, H07, I18, J01, J20, K03, K04, K08, K15, K17, L04, L07, L11, L24, M02, M05, M11, M30, M36, M39, M42 Coaching and School Coaches A06, B03, C07, C08, C16, C21, C24, C26, C34, D03, D10, D14, D16, D21, E05, E19, F05, F08, F10, F14, F16, F18, F20, F23, F26, G02, I07, I13, J15, J21, K11, K14, L31, M03, M22, M40, M49, M61 Collaboration/Team Building A03, A04, C03, C05, C18, C26, C30, C35, D15, D16, D16, F06, F16, F23, F24, G09, G10, I21, I26, I29, J04, J11, J14, J17, K06, K10, L02, L03, M04, M15, M16, M17, M25, M28, M37, M47, P09 Curriculum Alignment/Development B08, C28, I07, K09, L13, M19, M40 Data-Driven Decision Making B05, B06, C04, C13, C15, C35, E02, E09, E11, E23, E24, F01, F04, F11, G03, G10, H03, H05, H06, H08, I07, I09, I10, I17, I21, I22, J06, J12, J16, K04, K08, L01, L05, L24, M07, M08, M09, M11, M43, M47, M51 Demonstrating Impact of Professional Development B05, C06, C23, C25, D08, D19, E20, F07, F19, G08, H05, H06, I03, I11, J11, J15, J19, M45, M52, M60 Distributive Leadership D17, E09, E15, F04, F11, F22, F24, G07, H02, H08, I25, I30, K04, M09 District Professional Development Planning B04, C16, C19, C22, D04, D05, D08, E13, E27, E29, E30, F05, F10, F19, H05, I03, I12, I19, I25, J08, K11, L13, L29, M13, M14, M31, M50, M54 106 Effective Teaching and Instruction A05, B03, C20, C24, C27, C30, D07, D08, D14, E08, E17, E20, E21, E28, F02, F09, F13, F18, F21, G06, H04, H05, I17, I18, I22, I27, I28, I29, J08, K07, K13, L08, L11, L12, L15, L19, L25, M05, M07, M10, M12, M19, M24, M33, M39, M44, M59 English Language Learners/ Linguistic Diversity E11, E28, I12, M21 Equity and Cultural Responsiveness A07, B02, B04, C12, C27, E04, E08, E28, H04, H07, I24, J05, J07, K03, K15, L16, L21, L22, L27, M01, M02, M39 Ethical, Moral, and Interpersonal Leadership C36, E15, I23, M35 Family Involvement F02, L27 Instructional Supervision C33, E07, F13, J06, J08, K16, L03, L07, M27, M41 Job-Embedded Professional Development A04, B07, C14, C18, C20, C21, C28, D03, D06, D10, D13, D14, D21, E26, E27, F26, G05, I04, I06, I19, I21, I26, J15, J16, J19, J21, K16, L09, L16, L31, M01, M03, M06, M15, M16, M17, M18, M29, M31, M40, M49, M61, P03 Leadership Development A06, C02, C03, C08, C11, C13, C33, C36, D01, D02, D04, D05, D06, D10, D11, D12, D20, D21, E01, E02, E03, E04, E05, E07, E13, E15, E18, E24, F07, F15, F24, F26, G02, I02, I08, I13, I15, I23, I30, J02, J17, J18, J21, K05, K06, K10, K12, K14, L02, L17, L30, L31, M04, M21, M34, M35, M38, M53, M61 Learning Communities A04, B01, B08, C03, C05, C11, C14, D06, D17, E23, F06, F23, G03, G09, H02, I10, I11, I22, J13, J19, K09, K10, K13, L02, L08, L17, L30, M09, M10, M13, M21, M25, M27, M30, M34, M41, M42, M46, M48, M56 Literacy E17, F01, F21, I26, K11, L12, M18, M22, M28, M49 Mathematics C06, D05, F08, F17, L08, L25, M36, M45 Mentoring and Induction B01, B03, C24, C30, C32, C34, D04, E10, E16, E30, G11, I05, I24, L09, L15, L19, M20, M23, M33, M46, M52, P04 Models of Professional Development B07, C16, C20, C22, C23, C29, C33, D09, D13, D19, E06, E10, E17, E18, F07, F09, F10, G02, G05, G10, I03, I06, I08, I16, J11, J13, K13, K14, L06, L14, L16, L22, L25, L28, M08, M23, M26, M29, M41, M45, M50, M55 National Board Certification E26 NCLB Alignment M07 Organization Development C15, E27, H01, H09, I15, I25, L09, L17, L29, M04, M13, M26, M38 Partnerships C23, C29, D16, D20, E05, H01, I13, J20, L29, L30, M06, M27, M56 Policy Development D12, E03, F19, J03, J10 Presentation and Facilitation Skills A01, A02, C04, C07, C14, D07, D15, E13, E21, E25, G01, I14, L26, M24, M37, M44, M54, M55, M58, M59, P01, P02, P05 Principal Recruitment, Support, and Retention C29, C36, F22, K12, M31, M52 Race, Class and Culture B02, C09, C12, D18, E04, H07, I18, J01, J05, K15, L21, M01, M22, P08 School Culture C04, C25, C32, D02, D17, H04, I16, J05, K08, L10, L23, L27, M25 School Reform/Improvement Process A07, B06, C05, C10, C15, C17, C31, D02, D09, D13, E09, E22, E24, E27, F12, G03, G05, H02, H05, H09, I09, I11, I15, I20, J12, J14, J16, K03, K05, K07, L01, L04, L05, M08, M11, M12, M15, M30, M34, M43, M47, M51, M57 School-Based Professional Development B05, C10, C17, E07, E18, E19, F03, F14, G07, I27, M03, M28, M57 Science B08, I28, L18, M19 Professional Development Resources F13, F25, I04, K07, L19, M32, M56, M60 Support Staff/Classified C13, C22, C25, L14, M50 Systems Thinking C10, D01, F03, F25, G04, G07, H01, H05, H08, J02, J10, K17, M37, M48 Teacher Evaluation G11, I05, L03 Teacher Leadership A06, B06, C08, C26, C32, D20, E12, E19, E26, F02, F14, F22, G08, I20, I24, I30, J14, J18, L10, L28, M16, M20, M38, M41 Technology Applications B07, C17, C21, D16, E06, E21, F05, F09, F16, F21, F25, H06, I17, I20, I29, J06, J13, J17, K06, L06, L10, L15, L22, M17, M32, M46 Urban Issues and Settings C09, C19, D01, D18, E30, F12, I23, J01, M43, M51

Audience Index

M O N D AY

Teacher Leaders, Coaches, Mentors A01, A02, A03, A05, B01, B03, B06, C04, C05, C06, C07, C08, C15, C17, C18, C20, C24, C26, C27, C30, C32, C34, C37, D05, D11, D15, D16, D18, D19, D21, D22, E04, E05, E07, E08, E09, E12, E19, E23, E26, E27, E28, E30, F02, F04, F07, F08, F11, F13, F14, F16, F18, F21, F22, F23, F24, F25 Superintendents, Assistant Superintendents A07, C01, C03, C06, C10, C11, C12, C13, C19, C29, C31, C35, C36, D01, D04, D11, D12, D13, D14, E10, E13, E15, E16, E18, E22, E29, F01, F03, F04, F05, F12, F15, F17, F19, F23 State/Regional Agency Personnel B02, C21, D08, D13, D22, E18, E24, F15, F19, F25 School-Based Staff Developers, Coaches A01, A02, A05, B05, C07, C13, C22, C22, C25, D02, D04, D18, D19, E07, E26, F01, F02, F15 School Board Trustee/Policymakers C01, C09, C12, C19, C37, D04, D12, D15, D17, D22, E01, E14, E17, E18, F12, F13, F25 Principals, Assistant Principals A02, A04, A05, A06, A07, B03, B04, B05, B06, C03, C04, C05, C10, C11, C14, C15, C17, C18, C23, C26, C27, C29, C30, C31, C32, C33, C35, C36, D01, D01, D02, D03, D06, D07, D10, D11, D14, D15, D17, D18, D19, D20, D21, D22, E07, E09, E12, E13, E15, E16, E17, E18, E19, E20, E21, E22, E23, E24, E29, F03, F04, F06, F07, F09, F11, F12, F13, F20, F21, F22, F23, F25 District-Level Staff Developers A03, A04, B01, B02, B04, B05, B07, B08, C06, C08, C09, C11, C16, C19, C20, C21, C22, C23, C24, C25, C28, C31, C33, C34, C36, C37, D03, D05, D06, D07, D08, D09, D10, D13, D14, D16, D17, D20, E05, E06, E08, E09, E10, E11, E12, E13, E16, E17, E20, E21, E24, E25, E27, E28, E29, E30, F05, F09, F10, F14, F15, F17, F18, F19, F20, F22, F24 District Office Personnel (Directors/consultants for instruction, technology, curriculum, human resources and assessment) A06, A07, B04, B06, B07, B08, C01, C03, C08, C09, C10, C12, C13, C14, C16, C17, C18, C19, C21, C24, C25, C28, C29, C32, C35, D01, D02, D04, D05, D06, D08, D09, D15, D17, E04, E05, E06, E10, E11, E15, E21, E22, E24, E25, E30, F01, F03, F05, F06, F08, F09, F10, F11, F13, F14, F17 Community, Educational Partners C01, C23, C29, C37, D12, D15, D19, D22, E01, E04, E14, E18, F02, F03, F25 107

T U E S D AY

Teacher Leaders, Coaches, Mentors G01, G03, G05, G06, G08, G09, G10, H03, H04, H05, H07, H09, I05, I06, I09, I10, I14, I16, I17, I18, I20, I21, I23, I24, I26, I27, I29, I30, J02, J04, J05, J11, J14, J19, J21, K04, K05, K06, K08, K09, K13, K15, L01, L02, L03, L04, L05, L06, L07, L17, L19, L21, L22, L24, L27, L29, L31, L32 Superintendents, Assistant Superintendents G07, H01, H02, H05, H08, I08, I13, I16, I19, I22, J01, J02, J10, J12, J14, J17, J18, J20, K03, K05, K10, K12, K17, L07, L12, L13, L17, L29, L30, L31 State/Regional Agency Personnel H01, I03, I07, I08, I13, I20, I25, J03, J08, K05, K14, L12, L26, L30 School-Based Staff Developers, Coaches G01, H09, I03, I04, J07, K08, K14, L02, L04, L14, L15, L30 School Board Trustee/Policymakers G09, H01, H09, I01, I03, I04, J01, J02, J03, J10, J18, J21, K01, K02, K10, L01, L02, L03, L13, L32 Principals, Assistant Principals G03, G04, G05, G06, G07, G08, G09, G10, G11, H02, H03, H04, H05, H06, H07, H09, I03, I08, I09, I11, I15, I18, I19, I21, I24, I26, I27, I28, I29, I30, J01, J04, J05, J06, J11, J12, J14, J15, J16, J17, J18, J20, J21, K03, K04, K06, K07, K09, K10, K11, K13, K15, K16, K17, L02, L03, L04, L05, L07, L08, L11, L13, L15, L16, L17, L18, L19, L21, L23, L24, L25, L27, L28, L29, L31, L32 District-Level Staff Developers G04, G07, G11, H02, H06, H07, H08, I03, I04, I05, I07, I10, I11, I12, I13, I14, I15, I16, I19, I22, I23, I25, I28, J03, J06, J07, J08, J13, J15, J16, J19, K04, K06, K07, K08, K11, K12, K13, K14, K15, K16, L06, L08, L09, L10, L11, L14, L16, L18, L22, L25, L26, L28 District Office Personnel (Directors/consultants for instruction, technology, curriculum, human resources and assessment) G04, G11, H01, H03, H06, H08, I04, I06, I07, I08, I09, I12, I17, I24, I28, I29, J03, J05, J07, J11, J12, J13, J17, J18, J19, K03, K05, K09, K10, K12, K17, L01, L04, L08, L10, L13, L22, L23, L28 Community, Educational Partners H04, H09, I01, I23, I25, J01, J02, J03, J10, J18 J21, K01, K02, L01, L02, L13, L17 L27, L29

W E D N E S D AY

Teacher Leaders, Coaches, Mentors M03, M04, M05, M06, M07, M08, M09, M12, M13, M16, M18, M19, M20, M21, M32, M33, M38, M41, M42, M45, M47, M49, M51, M53, M54, M55, M57, M59, P03, P04, P06, P07, P08, P09 M10, M25, M48, M61,

Superintendents, Assistant Superintendents M01, M02, M14, M26, M27, M30, M31, M34 State/Regional Agency Personnel M02, M23, M24, M31, M46, M49, M56, M60, P02, P05, P09 School-Based Staff Developers, Coaches M08, M50, P05, P08 School Board Trustee/Policymakers M01, M02, M14, M29, M34, M53, M56, M55 Principals, Assistant Principals M01, M04, M07, M08, M09, M10, M13, M16, M17, M18, M23, M25, M26, M27, M29, M30, M32, M33, M35, M36, M37, M40, M41, M42, M44, M47, M48, M51, M59, M60, M61, P01, P05, P06, P08

M15, M28, M39, M57,

District-Level Staff Developers M02, M03, M05, M11, M12, M15, M17, M19, M20, M21, M22, M23, M24, M27, M28, M29, M30, M32, M33, M34, M38, M39, M43, M44, M45, M46, M50, M52, M53, M54, M57, M58, M60, P01, P02, P03, P04, P05, P07, P09 District Office Personnel (Directors/consultants for instruction, technology, curriculum, human resources and assessment) M01, M02, M04, M05, M10, M11, M13, M14, M15, M22, M26, M31, M34, M35, M36, M37, M40, M43, M46, M50, M52, M56 Community, Educational Partners M02, M06, M14, M23, M29, M49, M53, M56, P06

ADVANCED SESSIONS INDEX B02, C08, C14, C24, C31, D08, D11, D22, E12, E15, F17, F25, G02, G09, J21, K10, K17, L32, M02, M14, M26, M61

Presenter Index

Abadie, Peggy Villars . . . . . . . .F09 Abrams, Jennifer . . . . . . .E16, P05 Adam, Eleanor . . . . . . . . . . . . .E17 Adams, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . .M35 Adrian, Lorna . . . . . . . . . . . . .M09 Albritton, Rick . . . . . . . . . . . . .J14 Albro, Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Allen, Char . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C32 Allen, Hank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E22 Allie, Catherine . . . . . . . . . . . .K15 Allred, Colleen . . . . . . . . . . . . .H08 Almanzan, Jamie . . . . . . . .PC201 Alonso, Andrés . . . . . . . . . . . .J02 Alsager, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . .M58 Amoroso, Cindy . . . . . . . . . . .C11 Andersen, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . .G04 Anderson, Karen . . . .PC316, D22 Anderson, Thomas . . . . . . . . .L16 Andrews, Susan . . . . . . . . . . .B06 Appelbaum, Martin . . . . . . . . .J04 Appelbaum, Maryln . . . . . . . . .J04 Applegate, Dawn . . . . . . . . . .M58 Appolloni, Sharyn . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Arason, Christine . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Armato, Nikki . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I04 Armstrong, Katie . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Armstrong, Sarah . . . . . .L30, M44 Arnau, Lea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D03 Arns, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . .E21 Arrendell, Donna . . . . . . . . . . .L24 Askew, Jada . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M43 Aste, Mahri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C23 Bailey, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K14 Bainer, Carolyn . . . . . . . . . . . .D19 Baldree, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . .J19 Baldwin, Beccy . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Ballering, Laurie . . . . . . . . . . .C14 Banks, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Barainca, Bridgit . . . . . . . . . . . .I23 Barakos, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Barbuto, Mary Ellen . . . . . . . .M03 Barkley, Stephen . . . .PC102, D10 Barnes, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . .F15 Barnish, MaryElin . . . . . . . . . .K09 Barrett, Kellie . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Bastress, Robert . . . . . . . . . . .C15 Bates, Sandi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C36 Batey-Bright, Pamela . . . . . . .K08 Bayles, Tracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Beasley, Tiffany . . . . . . . . . . . .L03 Behrman, Anita . . . . . . . . . . . .F16 Bell, Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K12 Bell, Theresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E20 Bellah, Jenean . . . . . . . . . . . .M54 Benitez, Melanie . . . . . . . . . . .K05 Bennett, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . .J19 Bensinger-Lacy, Molly . . . . . . . .I21 Berlinger, Sheila . . . . . . . . . . .H07 Bernard, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . .B05 Bernhardt, Victoria . . . . . . . . . .I09 Bertani, Al . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC309 Biancaniello, Steve . . . . . . . . .C04 Bibby, Angela . . . . . . . . . . . . .C34 Bickmore, Dana . . . . . . . . . . .C16 Bidlack, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F26 Bigham, Rita . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B07 Billings, Dawn . . . . . . . . . . . . .K10 Bisceglia, Sandi . . . . . . . . . . . .E18 Bishop, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Blackburn, Erika . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Blackledge, Diana . . . . . . . . . .M31 Blake, Vera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L01 Blanford, Thomas . . . . . . . . . .F16 Blank, Rolf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D08 Blickhan, Lorie . . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Bloom, Gary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I13 Blumsack, Kathryn . . . . . . .PC101 Bocchino, Kathleen . . . . . .PC315 Bocchino, Rob . . . . . .PC315, L02 Boehm, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . .C30 Bolds, Lori . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F12 Borelli, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Borgioli, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . .I10 Bossi, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I13 Boswell-McComas, Mary . . . .M41 Bowgren, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Brandl, Becky . . . . . . . . . . . . .D13 Breeden, Terri . . . . . . . . . . . . .M14 Brinkman, Annette . . . . . . . . .G11 Brittingham, Sharon . . . . . . . .RT1 Brown, Carolyn . . . . . . . . . . . .C10 Brown, Drema . . . . . . . . . . . . .F15 Brown, Janice . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Brown, Kathryn . . . . . . . . . . . .L27 Brown, Shandra . . . . . . . . . . .F06 Brown, Tressa . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Brown-Falu Mendoza, Johnnie L11 Brummel, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . .I20 Brunswick, Cynthia . . . . .B01, P04 Bryan, Betsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E20 Buchan, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . .M08 Buck, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Budge, Kathleen . . . . . . . . . . .D11 Buglio, JoAnn . . . . . . . . . . . . .M21 Bultinck, Howard . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Bunyan, Toddra . . . . . . . . . . . .J06 Burke, Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC203 Burkholder, Stephen . . . . . . . .K17 Burks, Betty . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C03 Burlinski, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . .F21 Burrack, Frederick . . . . . . . . . .L15 Bush, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Butz, Patty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C28 Byrne, Ava . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J06 Cain, Connie . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M28 Calderón, Margarita . . . . . . . . .F01 Cameron, Richard . . . . . . . . . .L20 CampbellJones, Brenda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC103, B02 CampbellJones, Franklin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC103, B02 Carbone, Diana . . . . . . . . . . . .E19 Cardichon, Jessica . . . . . . . . .RT3 Carey, Deborah . . . . . . . . . . . .E07 Carley, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . .F21 Carnahan, Danielle . . . . . . . . . .I15 Carnahan, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . .I22 Carney, Steven . . . . . . . . . . . .G10 Caro-Bruce, Cathy . . .PC317, H01 Carr, Deb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M21 Carrasco, Moreno . . . . . . . . .M18 Carrollton, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . .E24 Carter, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D22 Carter, Jessica . . . . . . . . . . . . .I17 Caruso, Jodi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Cassara, Jeremy . . . . . . . . . .M31 Caster, Emily . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L19 Castro, Mariana . . . . . . .E28, RT3 Catalano, Catherine . . . . . . . .RT3 Celentano, Nancy . . . . . . . . . .L09 Cerwin, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I22 Chadsey, Terry . . . . . .PC310, F03 Champion, Robby . . . . . . .PC305 Chapman, Carolyn . . . . . . .PC312 Cheliotes, Linda Gross . . . . . .M61 Childs-Bowen, Deborah . . .PC204 Clark, Brenda . . . . . . . . . . . . .H08 Clark, Patty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D05 Clayton, Don . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Clemmons, Charles . . . .C14, E22 Coates, Wanda . . . . . . . . . . . .C15 Coe, Lesley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E20 Coffin, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M34 Cohan, Michael . . . . . . . . . .PC105 Cohen, Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L21 Cohen, Mary Louise . . . . . . . .C15 Colbert, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . .B06 Cole, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . .PC307 Coleman, Tiffany . . . . . . . . . . .J15 Confer, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F17 Connolly, Faith . . . . . . . . . . . .D08 Conway, Brenda . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Conzemius, Anne . . . . . . . . . .L31 Cook, Jeri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A03 Cooper, Annette . . . . . . . . . . .M15 Cooper, Tonya . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Cooper-Baker, Gustava . . . . . .RT3 Coplen, Wade . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Court, Stacey . . . . . . . . . . . . .M13 Covey, Sean . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F02 Covey, Stephen . . . . . . .K01, K02 Covington McBride, Gail . . . . .E13 Cowan, D'Ette . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T3 Coward, Renee . . . . . . . . . . .M23 Cowell, Glenda . . . . . . . . . . . .M40 Cox, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C19 Cox, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . . .PC101 Cox-Ponder, Sharon . . . . . . . .C17 Crawford, Debra . . . . . . . . . . .M45 Crawford, Virginia . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Creel, Carolyne . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Crenshaw, Maria . . . . . . . . . . .L08 Crocker, Jeanne . . . . . . . . . . .M12 Cronk, Dorothy . . . . . . . . . . . .E12 Crow, Tracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Crowther, Sandee . . . . . . . . . .J21 Cucunato, Stephanie . . . . . . .C04 Cuddapah, Jennifer . . . . . . . . .RT1 Culp, Sandy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Cunningham, Diane . . . . . . . . .E23 Cuomo, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C17 Curry, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M15 Curry, Michelle . . . . . . . . . . . . .I18 Cutler, Sheri-Lyn . . . . . . . . . . .C34 D'Adamo, Lora . . . . . . . . . . . . .I12 Daehler, Kirsten . . . . . . . . . . . .B08 Dameron, Karen . . . . . . . . . . .M23 Dangerfield, Patricia . . . . . . . . .I07 Daniels, Debbie . . . . . . . . . . . .K05 Darling-Hammond, Linda . . . .E02 Darnell, Bobb . . . . . . . . . .I26, RT2 Davey, Keith . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G06 Davin, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J03 Davis, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . .E30 Davis, Bonnie . . . . . . . . .A07, M22 Davis, Royce . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Dawson, Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . .J19 de las Alas, Nina . . . . . . . . . . .D08 Dearing, Vicky . . . . . . . . . . . . .F25 Deasy, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D01 Decoste, Denise . . . . . . . . . . . .I29 DeFiore, Denise . . . . . . . . . . . .B05 DeHart, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 DeIvernois, Linda . . . . . . . . . . .E10 Delehant, Ann . . . . . . .PC205, I06 DeMeo, William . . . . . . . . . . . M05 Dempsey, Nan . . . . . . . . . . . . .I07 Denham, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 DePatsy, Dominic . . . . . . . . . .E05 DeStefano-Anen, Judith . . . . .M27 Devlin, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . .C12 Dewitt, Debbie . . . . . . . . . .PC310 Diaz, April . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C20 Dickson, Kate . . . . . . . . .J10, RT1 Dimmick, Cary . . . . . . . . . . . .M18 Dingman, Nicole . . . . . . . . . . . .I28 DiRanna, Kathy . . . . . . .RT1, M19 Do, Thuy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F10 Dolby, Dawn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I15 Donahue, Tara . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Donley, Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C14 Dorr, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L06 Downey, Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . .E06 Drago-Severson, Eleanor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC318, G09 Draper, Darren . . . . . . . . . . . . .J13 Duch, Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . .F11 Duff, Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . .PC105 Dugas, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L09 Duggan, Mary Anne . . . . . . . . .F22 Dukess, Laura . . . . . . . . . .PC307 Duma, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C23 Duncombe, Beth . . . . . . . . . . .K16 Dunn, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M46 Dunne, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . .C08 Dunsworth, Mardale . . . . . . . .K10 Durbin, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Durbin, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Duval, Geraldine . . . . . . . . . . . .I24 Easton, Lois . . . .PC107, H04, P03 Eller, John . . . . . . . . . . . .D15, M37 Eller, Sheila . . . . . . . . . .D15, M37 Ellicott, Jayne . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Ellis, Regina . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M51 Ellis, Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J13 Emeigh, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . .K03 English, Evelyn . . . . . . . . . . . .A05 Epps, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I24 Estes, Deborah . . . . . . . .A01, G01 Etienne, Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . .F15 Evans, Emily . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Evans, Tammy . . . . . . . . . . . . .L31 Everlove, Sandi . . . . . . . . . . . . .E29 Eyolfson, John . . . . . . . . . . . .D20 Fagan, Tammy . . . . . . . . . . . . .L27 Fail, Mathew . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H08 Fallin, Jana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L15 Fannin, Allison . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Fasick, Tracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Faulds, Ron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I08 Fauteux, John . . . . . . . . . . . . .D09 Fennessey, Rona . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Ferguson, Rachelle . . . . . . . . .J17 Feyt, Cathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K04 Finney, Carlesa . . . . . . . . . . . .B02 Firth, Becky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L06 Fish, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F10 Fisher, Anthony . . . . . . . . . . . .E07 Fisher, Douglas . . . . . . . . . . . .E29 Flaherty, Aileen . . . . . . . . . . . . .I21 Flannagan, Jenny Sue . . . . . . .L18 Fletcher, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Flora, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M17 Flowers, Jamon . . . . . . . . . . .M49 Fogarty, Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . .F20 Fogler, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . . . .C33 Foley, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M08 Foord, Kathleen . . . . . . . . . . .C11 Ford, Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C04 Forge, Michelle . . . . . . . . . . . .D09 Forget, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L12 Forget, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L12 Forrest, LuAnne . . . . . . . . . . .M48 Foster, Marcia . . . . . . . . .F05, D16 Fournier, Theresa . . . . . . . . . . .I19 Francis, Sue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Franco, José . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C06 Frascht, Sheryl . . . . . . . .L26, M24 Freeman Field, Rebecca RT1, M21 Froggett, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . .J07 Fry, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C32 Fulawka, Janice . . . . . . . . . . .H06 Fuller, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L05 Funk, Katherine . . . . . . . . . . . .C29 Gaither, Penny . . . . . . . . . . . . .K14 Gareis, Christopher . . . . . . . . .M57 Garmston, Robert . . . . . . . .PC319 Garner, Molly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H01 Garry, Adam . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F09 Gary, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . .C09 Garza, Bertha . . . . . . . . . . . . .L23 Geier, Robb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J12 Gerson, Kate . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F15 Gibbons, Dawn . . . . . . . . . . . .L16 Gibson, Carolyn . . . . . . . . . . . .L14 Gilbertson, Jeff . . . . . . . . . . . .K17 Gillman, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L31 Ginopolis, Marion . . . . . . . . . . .I08 Givens, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L22 Glassman, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Gless, Janet . . . .PC311, B01, P04 Goldberg, Stephanie . . . . . . . .RT3 Golding, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . .E05 Goldman, Deborah . . . . . . . . .L27 Gottlieb, Margo . . . . . . . . . . . .E11 Gralewski, Karen . . . . . . . . . .M50 Grant, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E26 Graves, Donna . . . . . . . .H07, K15 Graves, Terra . . . . . . . . . . . . .C34 Gray, Theresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I10 Gregory, Gayle . . . . . . . . . . . .K16 Grogan, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M47 Gross, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . . .M53 Gross, Vaughn . . . .D21, F24, J20 Grossman, Lori . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Groves, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Gruber, Randy . . . . . . . . . . . . .L21 Gschwend, Laura . . . . . . . . . .C24 Guevara, Andrew . . . . . . . . . .B08 Guglielmo, Elizabeth . . . . . . . .B03 Guthro, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I29 Haar, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C11 Hafen, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . .C25 Hair, Dale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E03 Hairston, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J02 Hall, Christie . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L27 Hall, Donna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Hamburger, Leslie . . . . . . . .PC301 Hamill, Bonnie . . . . . . . . . . . . .H05 Hamilton, Dianne . . . . . . .I27, K15 Hankins, Pam . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Harrington, John . . . . . . . . . . .K09 Harris, Edna . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L32 Harris, Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C13 Hart, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Hart, Cate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K14 Harts, Veronica . . . . . . . . . . . . .I04 Haslam, Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . .F19 Hauge, Steve . . . . . . . . . . . . .M23 Hawes, Katie . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E05 Haycock, Kati . . . . . . . . . . . . .J01 Haynie, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M56 Hebert, Beth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M16 Hefner, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Heggarty, Sue . . . . . . . . . . . . .M22 Helgeson, Stephen . . . . . . . . .E26 Helhoski, Kathleen . . . . . . . . . .E06 Henderson, Khris . . . . . . . . . . .L25 Hendrix, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I18 Herrera, Toby . . . . . . . . . . .PC304 Herriotts, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . .L05 Hess, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . .G03 Hewson, Kurtis . . . . . . . . . . . .M09 Hicks, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F06 Hildick, Sue . . . . . . . . . . .J10, RT1 Hill, Jayme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M41 Hirsh, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . .M02 Hirst-Loucks, Carolyn . . . . . . .RT1 Hobbs, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . .E13 Hoch, Jody . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I06 Hoffman, Margaret . . . . . . . . .M27 Hoffman, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . .M32 Holcomb, Edie . . . . . . . . . . . . .I25 Holcombe, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . .F12 Holden, David . . . . . . . . . . . . .E09 Hollen, Evelyn . . . . . . . . . . . . .J11 Hollingsworth, Toni . . . . . . . . .D14 Hollis, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J17 Hope, Shanika . . . . . . . . . . . .C10 Hord, Shirley . . . . . . . .PC108, I03 Horn, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Hornbeck, Darren . . . . . . . . . .F19 Howell, Annie . . . . . . . . . . . . .C19 Hrabowski, Freeman . . . . . . . .C02 Hughes, Melissa . . . . . . . . . . .B07 Humphrey, Patrizia . . . . . . . . . .L07 Hurst, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I04 Hutchinson, Kevin . . . . . . . . . .K13 Hutton, Adrienne . . . . . . . . . .M43 Hux, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . .M49 Hwang, Kathleen . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Inglis, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E12 Irvine, Jimmi Lou . . . . . . . . . . .L20 Islas, Rene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E03 Iverson, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . .L30 Izard, Ernest . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M54 Jackson, David . . . . . . . . . .PC309 Jackson, Deborah . . . . . . . . . .L28 Jackson, Robert . . . . . . .H02, J06 Jacques, Audrey . . . . . . . . . .M33 James, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F16 Jarrell, Beverly . . . . . . . . . . . . .C36 Jeffries, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Jimerson, Ashley . . . . . . . . . . .I18 Johns, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . .K09 Johnson, Kristy . . . . . . . . . . . .F06 Johnson, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . .F04 Johnson, Themis . . . . . . . . . . .E08 Johnson-Turnbull, Kelly . . . . . .RT1 Jolles, Dee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Jolly, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC206 Jones, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Jones, Richard . . . . . . . .RT2, M26 Jones, Steven (invited) . . . . . . .J02 Jones, Tracey . . . . . . . . . . . . .M57 Jonker, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . .K04 Jordan, Charlene . . . . . . . . . .C05 Jordan, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C11 Jordan, Monica . . . . . . . . . . .M43 Jukes, Ian . . . . . . . . .PC210, C37 Kagan, Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . . .P07 Kagan, Spencer . . . . . . . . . . .D07 Kalicki, Ron . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M13 Kamola, Lori . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Karmazin, Karen . . . . . . . . . . .L10 Kattan, Denise . . . . . . . . . . . . .A03 Kaufeldt, Martha . . . . . . . . . . .E25 Kaumo, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . .M13 Kay, Ken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L13 Kebeck, Denise . . . . . . . . . . . .A04 Kee, Kathryn . . . . . . . .PC316, F25 Kelly, Lisa Marie . . . . . . . . . . .C26 Kemp, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J14 Kemper, Mori . . . . . . . . . . . . .M53 Kendall, Gayle . . . . . . . . . . . .M13 Kennedy, Shana . . . . . . . . .PC106 Kiep, Eddie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L25 Killion, Joellen E03, G02, J03, M02 Kimball, LaVerne . . . . . . . . . . .E13 Kines, Amy . . . . . . . . . . .RT1, RT2 King, Kristi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G07 Kirn, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Kirtz, Terry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M18 Kise, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F23 Kissinger, Anita . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Kitsis, Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M12 Klehr, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC317 Klock Persing, Kathy .PC304, H09 Klopchin, Jeanann . . . . . . . . . .E06 Knight, Jim . . . . . . . . .PC104, C07 Koenig, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D05 Koenigsberg, Ruth . . . . . . . . .E13 Kohl, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E28 Kolarik, Jasey . . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Kollen, Patsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K07

108

Presenter Index

Koning, Sue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I20 Kopp, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E23 Korashan, Riva . . . . . . . .E19, L32 Kortman, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . .F22 Kral, Cathleen . . . . . . . . . . . . .C19 Krehbiel, Cheryl . . . . . . . . . . . .E30 Kron, Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M49 Krownapple, James . . . . . . . .B02 Krueger, Than . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I17 Kruse, Sharon . . . . . .PC202, D17 Kujat, Janet . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M55 LaFortune, Janet . . . . . . . . . .M47 Lagrosa, Rowena . . . . . . . . . .M31 Lalor, Angela Di Michele . . . . .RT3 Land, Lou-Ann . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Landry, Jacqueline . . . . . . . . .M54 Lane, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Lane, Brett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H01 Lane, Tina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C26 Lawler, Kathleen . . . . . . . . . . .M07 Layne, Melanie . . . . . . . . . . . .C23 Laytham, Janet . . . . . . . . . . . .C18 Lee, Mun Wah . . . . . . . . . . . . .E04 Leeser, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . .C22 Leidy, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M39 Lemerise, Gloria . . . . . . . . . . .C35 Lent, ReLeah . . . . . . . . . . . . .M28 Levin, Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L09 Levitz, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Levy, Jason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C05 Lieberman, Joyce . . . . . . . . . . .I15 Linden, Annemarie . . . . . . . . .RT1 Lindley, Tanya . . . . . . . . . . . . .F04 Lindsay, Ashley . . . . . . . . . . . .K08 Lindsey, Delores . . . . .PC306, B02 Lindsey, Randall . . . . . . . . .PC306 Linton, Curtis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A07 Lipscomb, Frank . . . . . . . . . . .L14 Littlejohn, Jim . . . . . . . . .RT2, J05 Lockard, Mijana . . . . . . . . . . . .J11 Loge, Jana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M25 Lohmann, Linda . . . . . . . . . . .M50 Lord, Wayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J08 Loucks, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Loughlin, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . .M41 Louis, Karen Seashore PC202, D17 Love, Nancy PC208, . . . . . . . .H03 Love, Jr., A. Richardson . . . . .E14 Lovell, Janice . . . . . . . . . . . . .M06 Lowney, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . .M20 Luebbe, Andy . . . . . . . . . . . . .D13 Luke, Todd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L12 Lungrin, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . .D13 Lynch, Jerome . . . . . . . . . . . . .E13 Lynn, Kepp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M46 Mackie, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I12 Maday, Traci . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C10 Malone, Janet . . . . . . . . . . . . .G10 Malone, Marnie . . . . . . . . . . . .G08 Mann, Ronni . . . . . . . . . .B01, P04 Mark, Sue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C31 Marple, Jorea . . . . . . . . . . . . .L13 Marren, Molly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L10 Marsho, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . .A06 Martin, Camilla . . . . . . . . . . . .E17 Martin, Moriah . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Martin, Rita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M54 Martin, Terri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I30 Martin, Victor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B04 Martin-Kniep, Giselle . .PC308, C05 Martinez, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Masick, Paulina . . . . . . . . . . . . .I29 Massey, Li . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E24 Massey, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . .F07 Mathieu, Aaron . . . . . . . . . . . .M46 Matthews, Donna . . . . . . . . . .L07 Matthews, Joseph . . . . . . . . . .I11 Matthies, Ericka . . . . . . . . . . . .I22 Mattis, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D04 Maxey, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . .F20 Maye, Dutchess . . . . . . . . . . .M49 Mayer, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . .PC105 Mayes, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F10 Mayfield-Ingram, Karen . . . . . .C06 Maynard, Brenda . . . . . . . . . .K05 McCain, Teresa . . . . . . . . . . . .J09 McCall, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F22 McCarthy, Erin . . . . . . . . . . . .M21 McCombe, Stephen . . . . . . . .G05 McDonough, Kym . . . . . . . . . .RT3 McDuffie, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . .A03 McDuffie, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . .M23 McElvain, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 McFadden, Ledyard . . . . . . . .RT1 McFarland, Mary . . . . . . . . . . .K05 McKinnon, Renee . . . . . . . . . .F12 McLeroy, Sandra . . . . . . . . . . .J17 McMackin, Howard . . . . . . . . .K09 McMillan, Rachel . . . . . . . . . . .L18 McTighe, Jay . . . . . . . . . . .PC319 Meeks, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . .L25 Meier, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F22 Meyer, Cassandra . . . . . . . . . . .I15 Meyer, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C21 Meyer, Mindy . . . . . . . . . . . . .C32 Michaels, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . .C17 Michailides, Dean . . . . . . . . . .E12 Michailides, Mary . . . . . . . . . . .E12 Middleton, Cathie . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Mike, Alyson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M46 Miller, Frances . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Miller, M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D12 Miller, Margaret . . . . . . . . . . . .K12 Miller, Shauna . . . . . . . . . . . . .M38 Milson, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . .M45 Minkel, Justin . . . . . . . . . . . . .L03 Minnich, Shawn . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Mitchell, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M52 Moir, Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC311 Montgomery, Wytonia . . . . . . .M54 Mooney, Timothy . . . . . . . . . .C25 Moore, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M38 Moore, Betsy . . . . . . . . . . . . .M11 Moore, Fannie . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Moore, Jodi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I17 Morgan, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . .J02 Morris, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E12 Morrison, David . . . . . . . . . . . .F11 Morrocco, David . . . . . . . . . . .M34 Morse, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H01 Mory, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I24 Moss, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Motter, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C34 Motzkus, T.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . .A06 Moyer, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Mueller, Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . .C22 Munro, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M03 Murdie, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G08 Murek, Sally . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C13 Murphy, Carlene . . . . . . . . . . .D13 Myers, Mindy . . . . . . . . . . . . .M07 Neal, Tony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C12 Neale, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . .E18 Nelson, Jessica . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Nepal, Amar . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F11 Neu, Cindy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C12 Nevins, Lyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M20 Newell, Cindy . . . . . . . . . . . . .F04 Newman, Janell . . . . . . . . . . .H01 Newman, Pamela . . . . . . . . . .M32 Nguyen, Diep . . . . . . . . . . . . .E11 Nielsen, Brenda . . . . . . . . . . . .I05 Nienstadt, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . .L19 Noli, Pamala . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C09 Norton, Blair . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H06 Nugent, Theresa . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Nunnaley, Diana . . . . . . . . . . .C35 O'Brien Vojtek, RoseAnne . . . .K06 O'Donnell, Kate . . . . . . . . . . . .I21 O'Neill, Kathleen . . . . . . . . . . .D04 Oakes, Abner . . . . . . . . . . . . .C10 Ogren, Sandy . . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Oldfield, Wanda . . . . . . . . . . . .E24 Oliphant, Patty . . . . . . . . . . . . .L25 Olsen, Donna . . . . . . . . . . . . .B06 Olsen, Walter . . . . . .I16, L17, P01 Owens, Cathy . . . . . . . . . . . . .L04 Owens, LaTaisha . . . . . . . . . . .L07 Parker, Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I21 Parker-McElroy, Marie . . . . . . .C26 Parks, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Parrett, William . . . . . . . . . . . .D11 Parscale, Geri . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Parsley, Danette . . . . . . . . . . .H01 Pastva, Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . .M03 Patram, Eileen . . . . . . . . . . . .M03 Patrick, Renee . . . . . . . . . . . . .E26 Patterson, Laura . . . . . . . . . . .M20 Paul, Cherryl . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G04 Pauling, Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K03 Pawski, Michelle . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Pearson, Joy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Peden, Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E17 Perzyk, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I08 Pete, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P02 Petersen, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . .E12 Peterson, Heather . . . . . . . . .M04 Peterson, Karen . . . . . . . . . . .D20 Peterson, Kent . . . . . . . . . .PC314 Pettigrew, Shaunna . . . . . . . . .L28 Phillips, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . . .K07 Piccirillo, Joseph . . . . . . . . . . .B03 Picone-Zocchia, Joanne . . . . .L29 Pietrosanti, Maria . . . . . . . . . . .L29 Pigman, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . .F14 Pilling-Whitney, Kathy . . . . . . .G08 Pinney, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . .L12 Pisarra, Jenn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Plumlee, Katherine . . . . . . . . . .J09 Poole, Norman . . . . . . . . . . . .M39 Popkess, Megan . . . . . . . . . . .E07 Porter, Edward . . . . . . . . . . . .C09 Porter, Rachel . . . . . . . . . . . . .E20 Portice, Terri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I20 Pottinger, Khita . . . . . . . . . . . .C19 Preston, Steve . . . .RT1, RT3, M60 Price, Brenda . . . . . . . . . . . . .C17 Psencik, Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C29 Purcell, Veronica . . . . . . . . . . .E17 Radford, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K14 Rafferty, Michael . . . . . . . . . . .E18 Ramesh, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I20 Ramirez, Marco . . . . . . . . . . .M36 Rasmussen, Mary Jo . . . . . . . .I04 Ratka, Jennifer Meka . . . . . . .RT1 Recht, Donna . . . . . . . . . . . . .A06 Reed, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Reed, Kyleen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F06 Reed, Ronni . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A04 Reeder, William . . . . . . . . . . . .L22 Rehak, Janice . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Rehberg, Carrie . . . . . . . . . . . .I17 Reilly, Marceta . . . . . . . . . . . . .J21 Reitan, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I14 Reo, Dawn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M27 Resnick, Naomi . . . . . . . . . . . .C33 Richard, Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .J11 Richardson, Cathleen . . . . . . .RT2 Richardson, Dayna . . . . . . . . .J21 Richardson, Joan . . . . . . . .PC209 Richardson, Wilma . . . . . . . . .C13 Ridd, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C16 Rivera, Hilda . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Robb, Dana . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H06 Robbins, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . .I21 Robbins, Pam . .PC314, G03, P09 Roberson, Patsy . . . . . . . . . . .L24 Roberson, Stewart . . . . . . . . .L30 Roberts, Laraine . . . . . . . . . . .D19 Robins, Maureen . . . . . . . . . . .F18 Robinson, Lacey . . . . . . . . . . .K15 Robinson, Stephanie . . . . .PC106 Rogers, Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K13 Rogers, Spence . . . . . . . . . . . .I14 Roggenbuck, Adrianne . .L26, M24 Rossini, Katie . . . . . . . . . . . . .E08 Rotenberg, Gayle . . . . . . . . . .M10 Roth, Jay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M25 Rothstein, Evelyn . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Roussin, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I16 Rowland, Paula . . . . . . . . . . . .J09 Rozzelle, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D14 Rumsey, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C29 Russell, Beth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F23 Rutherford, Paula . . . . . . . . . .P08 Ryley, Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M50 Sadki, Cherif . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B04 Saha, Dr. Usha . . . . . . . . . . . .M51 Salazar, Pamela . . . . . . . . . . .M30 Salerno, Rachelle . . . . . . . . . .E18 Salim, Ke nny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C19 Sandall, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . .C27 Satchwell, Karla . . . . . . . . . . . .E15 Sawyers, Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . .F04 Scanlon, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . .F11 Schaetzlein, Mark . . . . . . . . . .F21 Schirmer, Kris . . . . . . . . . . . . .K11 Schisler, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . .K17 Schmitt, Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . .K04 Schoeller, Dot . . . . . . . . . . . . .J15 Schreck, Mary Kim . . . . . . . . .M22 Schumacher, Reba . . . . . . . . .M61 Schuman, Denise . . . . . . . . . .E22 Schwartz, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Schwei, Mike . . . . . . . . .G07, RT1 Scott, Charle . . . . . . . . .H05, M39 Scott, Fred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C17 Scott, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D04 Scott, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . .PC303 Scuzzarella, Carla . . . . . . . . . .K13 Sechler, Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Segura Pirtle, Sylvia . . . . . . . .D06 Seitel, Rosemary . . . . . . . . . . .C14 Senseney, Alice . . . . . . . . . . . .D13 Seremet, Colleen . . . . . . . . . . .F19 Serino, Alison . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J16 Sernak, Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I27 Settles, Tanya . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Sever, Kathryn . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Sevigny, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . .M38 Sharp, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K13 Shaw, Kendra . . . . . . . . . . . . .L27 Shay, Yvonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L23 Sherriff, Jody . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C20 Shinohara, Mayumi . . . . . . . . .B08 Shipp, William . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Showalter, Sharon . . . . . . . . .M51 Shrack, Charley . . . . . . . . . . .M57 Shrode, Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . .E09 Shulman, Claudia . . . . . . . . . .E10 Shuster, Frances . . . . . . . . . . .M61 Shyers, Linette . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Silagi, Lindsley . . . . . . . . . . . . .L23 Silverstein, Roni . . . . . . . . . . .C15 Simmons, Scott . . . . . . . . . . .M14 Simons, Kathe . . . . . . . .D16, F05 Sioberg, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . .C36 Sluiter, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D20 Smith, Anna . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M48 Smith, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . .M27 Smith, Becky . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K11 Smith, Geoffrey . . . . . .PC108, F13 Smith, Greta . . . . . . . . .C20, M19 Smith, Melissa . . . . . . . .RT1, M19 Smith, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M48 Smith, Pam . . . . . . . . . .D22, M42 Smith, Rick . . . . . . . . . .M33, P06 Smith, Sherry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I17 Sneed, Cherrie . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Soglin, Audrey . . . . . . . . . . . . .I13 Sommers, William . . . . . . . . . .PC108, C03, L17, P01 Sorenson, Blaine . . . . . . . . . . .F13 Sourk, Cathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Spak, Helene . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I19 Sparks, Dennis . . . . . .PC302, D02 Spear, Vicky . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E22 Spence, Brad . . . . . . . . . . . . .M41 Spiller, Darwin . . . . . . . . . . . . .M42 Spinelli-Samara, Lori . . . . . . . .RT2 Squier, Randall . . . . . . . . . . . .C18 Stack, Eleanor . . . . . . . . . . . . .L22 Stanfield, Donna . . . . . . . . . . .F14 Stanford-Blair, Nancy . . . . . . .A06 Stanley, Debra . . . . . . . . . . . . .K11 Stanton, Shannon . . . . . . . . . .F10 Staples, Tiffany . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Steben, Jessica . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Steinberg, David . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Steindam, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . .I04 Stephanidis, Jaime . . . . . . . . .RT2 Stephenson, Susan . . . . . . . .M10 Sternfeld, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . .E19 Stewart, Courtney . . . . . . . . . . .I11 Stewart, Peggy . . . . . . . . . .PC105 Stipek, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Stirling, Terry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Stonaker, Lew . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Stone, Martha . . . . . . . .L11, M39 Strayer, Beverly . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Strayer, Troy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Streets, Phil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J09 Sweet, Ava . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Swift, Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . .L05 Swimpson, Inger . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Szerensits, Thomas . . . . . . . .M41 Tamburello, Linda . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Tarwater, Jolynn . . . . . . . . . . .E26 Tate, Marcia . . . . . . . .PC207, A02 Tatum, Alfred . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I02 Taub, Deborah . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Teague, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . .M34 Teehan, Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J11 Tejedor, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . .E06 Temple, Cheryl . . . . . . . . . . . . .L22 Thackston, Dryer . . . . . . . . . .C27 Thomas, James . . . . . . . . . . .K08 Thompson, Joella . . . . . . . . . .L24 Thompson, Peggy . . . . . . . . . .F12 Thompson, Sandy . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Thrash, Shawn . . . . . . . . . . . .F06 Thurber, Maggie . . . . . . .C29, G08 Tienken, Christopher . . . . . . . .RT3 Tilley, Emmett . . . . . . . . . . . . .C36 Timbs, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H03 Tobia, Edward . . . . . . . . . . . . .D06 Tomasetti, Debbie . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Topps, Jo . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1, M19 Torrence, Vera . . . . . . . . . . . . .C33 Toscano, Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . .F08 Tosh, Teresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M40 Trevino, Raul . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M54 Tribble, Debbie . . . . . . . . . . . .K12 Trocchi, Vince . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Trodden, James . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Trujillo, Francis . . . . . . . . . . . . .J18 Tryon Rogers, Susan . . . . . . .G08 Tseunis, Paula . . . . . . . . . . . . .G04 Turner, Marta . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Underwood, Monica . . . . . . . .M57 Unger, Christopher . . . . . . . . .H01 Unger, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . .C35 Uzamere, LeighAnn . . . . . . . . .B05 Valamides, Ernie . . . . . . . . . . .K12 Van Horn, Nicole . . . . . . . . . . .G08 Vanosdall, Rick . . . . . . . . . . . .M06 vanRoosmalen, Erica . . . . . . .D09 Vasbinder, Joan . . . . . . . . . . .H05 Vassallo, Rina . . . . . . . . . . . . .D14 Venable, Lin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M06 Verstandig, Viviane . . . . . . . . .F18 Villani, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C08 Vojtek, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . .K06 Waddell, Lanette . . . . . . . . . . .F08 Wagner, Teri . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D11 Wald, Penelope . . . . . . . . . . . .C30 Walker, Casel . . . . . . . . . . . . .D18 Walker, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . .E24 Wallach, Kenya . . . . . . . . . . . .L08 Walqui, Aída . . . . . . . . . . . .PC301 Walts, Steven . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J02 Ward, Granger . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Ward, Gwen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L27 Watkins, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . .C24 Watson, Amber . . . . . . . . . . . .J14 Weatherly, ElizaBeth . . . . . . . . .I07 Webb, Debra . . . . . . . . . . . . .G04 Webb-Johnson, Gwendolyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PC313, M01 Weber, Janet . . . . . . . . . . . . .M22 Weigel, Kathleen . . . . . .RT2, M26 Weil, Rob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J03 Weiland, Linnea . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Weiser, Corrine . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Welch, Beth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M04 Westbrook-Youngblood, Jody . .J03 Whan, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L20 Wheatley, Claudia . . . . . . . . . .K14 Whitley, Deborah . . . . . . . . . . .B05 Wiggins, Jodie . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3 Wilhelm, Terry . . . . . . . . . . . . .M31 Williams, Cheryl . . . . . . . . . . . .L03 Williams, Diana Raney PC316, L32 Williams, Ellen . . . . . . . . .G11, I11 Williams, Fred . . . . . . . . . . . . .C36 Williams, Margaret . . . . . . . . . .K11 Wills, Pam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I07 Wilson, Duncan . . . . . . . . . . . .J18 Wilson, Judith . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Wilson, June . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M34 Wilson, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . .C12 Wilson, Shannon . . . . . . . . . . .RT1 Winchester, Edward . . . . . . . .C09 Winter, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M59 Wolfe, Heather . . . . . . . . . . . .G08 Wolzak, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . .D16 Wong, Jenn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2 Wood, Carol Ann . . . . . . . . . .M47 Wood-Garnett, Stephanie . . . .C10 Woodbury, Carol . . . . . . . . . . .C35 Woods, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Woods, Deanna . . . . . . . . . . .M55 Wooles, Angela . . . . . . . . . . . .C28 Word, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C23 Worrell, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E27 Wren, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G06 Wright, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D19 Wright, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . .H05 Wright, Karyn . . . . . . . . . . . . .P02 Yates, Sigrid . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J14 Young, Raquel . . . . . . . . . . . .M43 Yuhaniak, Heather . . . . . . . . . .J16 Zamora, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . .B02 Zatalava, Christine . . . . . . . . .M41 Zepeda, Sally . . . . . . . . . . . . .M29 Zeroth, Lee Ann . . . . . . . . . . .RT1

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Affiliate Contacts

WHO ARE THE AFFILIATES? NSDC affiliates provide educators with the opportunity to advance the mission and purpose of NSDC at the local, state, and provincial levels. Affiliate contacts want to hear from individuals interested in getting involved with their work. For information on organizing an affiliate in a state or province, please e-mail [email protected] Alabama Staff Development Council Gloria Jemison [email protected] Alaska Staff Development Council Patricia Chesbro [email protected] Staff Development Council of Arizona Kristin Metler-Armijo [email protected] Arkansas Staff Development Council Marion Woods [email protected] Staff Development Council of British Columbia Sue Elliott [email protected] California Staff Development Council Steven Carney [email protected] Colorado Staff Development Council Mary Ann Grenawalt [email protected] Connecticut Staff Development Council Patrice Nelson [email protected] Florida Association for Staff Development Joyce Menz [email protected] Georgia Staff Development Council Kathy O'Neill [email protected] Illinois Staff Development Council Sallie Penman [email protected] Indiana Staff Development Council Jetta Tarr [email protected] Iowa Staff Development Council Linda Munger [email protected]

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Kansas Staff Development Council Sandee Crowther [email protected] Kentucky Staff Development Council Jana Beth Slibeck-Francis [email protected] Louisiana Staff Development Council Amy Allen [email protected] Maryland Council of Staff Developers Nancy Carey [email protected] Michigan Staff Development Council Sam LoPresto [email protected] Minnesota Staff Development Council Jenni Norlin-Weaver [email protected] Mississippi Staff Development Council Karen Burke [email protected] Missouri Staff Development Council Kathy Diehl [email protected] Nebraska Staff Development Council Karen Hayes [email protected] New Hampshire Staff Development Council Deb Roody [email protected] New Jersey Staff Development Council Linda Mayer [email protected] New Mexico Staff Development Council Virginia Ginn [email protected] New York State Staff Development Council Christine Lowden [email protected]

North Carolina Staff Development Council Debbie Rollins [email protected] Northern Interior Staff Development Council Jon Marshall [email protected] Staff Development Council of Ohio Sherri Houghton [email protected] Staff Development Council of Oklahoma Patti Cargill [email protected] Staff Development Council of Ontario Jacqueline Kemball [email protected] Oregon Staff Development Council Dawn Billings [email protected] Pennsylvania Staff Development Council Linda DeIvernois [email protected] South Carolina Staff Development Council Shelby Wiley [email protected] Tennessee Staff Development Council Barry Olhausen [email protected] Texas Staff Development Council Charle Scott [email protected] Utah Staff Development Council Christine Huley [email protected] Virginia Staff Development Council Rich Hall [email protected] Wyoming Staff Development Council Cynthia Nunley [email protected]

You can be an NSDC Ambassador!

$50 to Spend as You Wish With NSDC

for Each New Member Who Joins Based on Your Referral.

When a new member joins on your referral, we will mail you a $50 Certificate of Appreciation. You can apply it to an NSDC conference, institute or workshop, or bookstore purchase. The more members you refer the more $50 Certificates you earn.

Download and complete the Ambassador form from www.nsdc.org/ambassador.pdf. Return the form after your colleague joins and your $50 Certificate of Appreciation will be mailed to you. Questions? Call 800-727-7288 [email protected] · www.nsdc.org

Become an NSDC Ambassador today!

N S D C ' s 4 0 T H A N N U A L C O N F E R E N C E

IS THE LEARNING CONFERENCE

EXPERIENCE cutting-edge keynotes and interactive learning sessions BUILD new relationships during family-style meals before general sessions ADDRESS your priority issues through beginner and advanced learning tracks GUARANTEE time with that "must hear" speaker with pre-confirmed session tickets RUB ELBOWS with thought leaders, researchers, practitioners, authors, and more

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS FREEMAN HRABOWSKI · STEPHEN COVEY · ALFRED TATUM LINDA DARLING-HAMMOND · NEILA CONNORS

Save $50

National Staff Development Council 504 S. Locust Street Oxford, OH 45056

on a 3- or 5-day registration when you register by Oct. 13, 2008

NON-PROFIT U . S . P O S TA G E P A I D PERMIT NO. 79

WHEELERSBURG, OH 45694

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