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9 January, 2012

ISSN 0795-3089

Vol 7 No. 2

HME Inaugurates Visitation Panel to FUPRE

he Honourable Minister of Education (HME), Professor Ruqayyatu Ahmed Rufa'i, OON, on Wednesday, 4 January, 2012 inaugurated the Visitation Panel, constituted by the Federal Government, to the Federal University of Petroleum Resources, Effurun (FUPRE), at the Conference Room, Federal Ministry of Education. The Minister, who recalled that the University was established in 2007 as a specialized University for the training of students in Oil and Gas, noted that it took off with the appointments of the current Vice-Chancellor, Professor Babatunde Alabi and Regisrar, Mrs. L. O. Onwuka. Professor Rufa'i, however, said that the Ministry had been inundated with allegations of poor governance at both Council and Management levels as well as a total disregard for due process at the University. She highlighted some of the challenges faced by the University to include; inability to attract and employ qualified staff to fill critical vacancies, inability to deploy funds appropriately, inability of Management to midwife the successful accreditation of programmes; and loss of confidence by staff and students in university administration.

T

Prof. Ruqayyatu Ahmed Rufa'i Hon. Minister of Education

Madam Minister stressed that the allegations had resulted in full scale crises that had negatively affected academic activities as well as the development of the University, adding that this prompted the Federal Government to approve a visitation exercise to the University

from 2007 ­ 2011. She expressed confidence in the calibre of people in the Panel and expressed the hope that their recommendations would address the crises in the University. She also charged the Panel not to hesitate to invite any officer of the University who was relevant to the assignment and the exercise should be concluded within 30 days. In his remark, the Acting Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education, Dr. O. Akintola, noted that the exercise was very crucial and hoped that, with the composition of the Panelists, the lingering crises in the University would be addressed appropriately. The Terms of Reference of the Panel included the following: i. Determine the relationship between the Institution and the various statutory bodies it interacts with according to its laws for purposes of supervision, planning, finance, discipline, and guidance. Such bodies include the Governing Council and the Supervising Agency; NUC and the Federal Ministry of Education as well as the Visitor; ii. Look at the leadership quality of the Institution in terms of the role of the Governing Council, the Vice-Chancellor and other Principal Officers; iii. Look into the financial management of the Institution over the recommended period and determine whether it was in compliance with appropriate regulations; iv. Investigate the application of funds, particularly the special grants and loans meant for special projects in order to determine the status of such projects and their relevance for further funding; v. Examine the Law establishing the Institution and see in what ways the Law has been observed, in all its ramifications, by the competent authorities and also suggest any

Dr. O. Akintola Ag. Permanent Secretary, FME

Prof. Julius A. Okojie Executive Secretary, NUC

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neccessary modification to the law in order to enable the University to achieve its objectives better; vi. Study the general atmosphere of the Institution over the period in question. In particular, comment on the general conduct and comportment of the personnel of the Institution, especially the students, staff and managers, and advise as to whether the correct training is being given and how necessary corrections may be made. This should include the relationship between the university and the host community over the period in question;

Prof. Mahmood Yakubu Executive Secretary, TETFund

vii. Examine all the academic programmes, policies as well as the total academic and physical development, performance and direction of the Institution and advise as to whether the desired targets have been met and how modifications may be made to achieve maximum productivity, excellence and service to the nation; viii. Study in detail the management structure and performance of the Institution including fiscal, administrative, personnel and welfare policies; and advise on ways to cut cost, reduce waste and continue to develop, if necessary, by adaptation rather than expansion in the face of attenuated resources; and ix. Advise on any or other aspects of the Institution considered to be of interest to both the Visitor and the public and to the attainment of the objectives for which the Institution was set up. Responding on behalf of the members of the Panel, the Chairman, Professor Olurotimi Tayo thanked the Federal Government for the opportunity given them to serve their fatherland and assured the Minister that the Panel would work with the Terms of Reference to revamp the University.

Prof. Olurotimi Tayo Chairman, Visitation Panel

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The membership of the Visitation Panel is as follows: a. Professor Olurotimi Tayo Chairman b. Professor Ikenna Onyido Member c. Dr (Ms.) Chris Tamuno Member d. Professor Patrick Oshio Member e. Alh. Abdu Gimba Member f. Dr. Adamu Ahmed Member g. Mrs. Ori Okojokwu Member/ Secretary At the event were the Executive Secretaries of the National Universities Commission (NUC), Professor Julius A. Okojie, OON and the Tertiary Education Trust Fund (TETFund), Professor Yakubu Mahmood as well as the Director of Tertiary Education, Dr. Jemila Su'ara, amongst others.

A cross section of participants at the event

Prof. Rufa'i and Dr. Sua'ra with members of the Visitation Panel

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Citizenshipandsolidaritypracticesatuniversities Goodintentionsorfeasiblepractices?

In this article Victoria Kandel of the Universidad de Buenos Aires analyzes the tensions between the "citizenisation" model and the traditional conceptions of professional training. In recent years, slogans and definitions concerning the `social responsibility of universities' have been circulating internationally. These formulations attribute a fundamental role to universities in terms of complementing professional training with knowledge and experiences related to citizenship. This proposed new relationship between universities and their environment raises a number of questions: why should universities educate students as citizens? Is it possible to accomplish this? What tools are available to pursue this objective? Moreover, although there are points of consensus on this issue, there are also tensions between the `citizenisation` model we describe and traditional conceptions of professional training. We describe some of these tensions and conclude by offering a series of suggestions that could serve to frame further discussion and decision-making aimed at making the university a space where students are educated for engagement in civic life. In recent years, slogans and definitions concerning the `social responsibility of universities' have been circulating internationally. These formulations attribute a fundamental role to universities in terms of complementing professional training with knowledge and experiences related to citizenship. Universities have also been criticised for being `ivory towers', that is, for maintaining a degree of isolation, over the course of many years, from everything going on in their environment. The following quotations reflect these concerns: Relevance in higher education should be assessed in terms of the fit between what society expects of institutions and what they do. This requires ethical standards, political impartiality, critical capacities and, at the same time, a better articulation with the problems of society and the world of work, basing long-term

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orientations on societal aims and needs, including respect for cultures and environmental protection. (First World Conference on Higher Education, UNESCO, 1998, Article 6). Particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean, there is a need for education that effectively contributes to democratic relations, to tolerance, and to creating a spirit of solidarity and cooperation that makes up a continental identity, that creates opportunities for those who today do not have them, and that contributes, with the creation of knowledge, to the social and economic transformation of our societies. (Regional Conference on Higher Education, CRES, 2008, Article 4). The urgent need to take on board notions of social responsibility and educate students to become citizens who have a sense of solidarity and are engaged with their social context is widely recognised, but institutional responses have been rather slow, and it is impossible to identify general trends or uniform progress in a single direction. In the following pages, we consider several key questions: why should universities educate students as citizens? Is it really possible to accomplish this? What tools are available to pursue this objective? Citizenship on the political agenda The issue of citizenship has been on the higher education agenda in recent years, so it makes sense to take a closer look at citizenship and the role of universities with respect to this issue. Globalisation, migratory movements, and the current questioning and distrust of the institutions of representative democracy--among many other issues--invite us to consider the tensions generated by the very concept of citizenship. Now more than ever before, citizenship is a category that creates both equality and inequality. The equality derives from the legal system of the political community to which a citizen belongs: the equality of rights and obligations that exists within a particular state (and therefore within a particular territory). At the same time, however, statistical data points to situations of extreme social polarisation and deep inequalities in living conditions within these territories. Exclusion, individualism and social fragmentation limit the equalising and integrating potential contained in the legal and political figure of the citizen. In a scenario marked by the threat of social disintegration, it is essential to recover notions such as community, participation, commitment to the public and social sphere, and recognition of the other. In this context, many look to the educational system in the firm belief that it must be the starting point for building a more just and inclusive order. Apart from political arguments, there are reasons for pursuing education for citizenship that relate to the labour market in which future professionals will have to find a place. The labour market also demands forms of knowledge that are related to citizenship; employers are placing ever-greater emphasis on `transversal competences' that complement education in specific areas of knowledge. The ability to formulate arguments, thinking skills, critical skills and practical know-how are all essential in both professional and civic life. In other words, it is increasingly important that university education should foster an ethic for citizens as well as a professional ethic. Education for citizenship and dialogue with the university's external environment can have highly positive effects on the training of future professionals.

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This set of expectations appears to be gradually penetrating the academic world and the system as a whole as a result of public policies aimed at building and promoting notions of citizenship. But how is this process unfolding? Why is there a certain level of indifference and even resistance when it comes to implementing civic education projects? We will now briefly describe a number of tensions we have identified in order to facilitate a better understanding of the potential of civic education at universities and its limitations. Before considering these tensions, however, based on observations we have made in the case of Argentina (part of a broader research project, of which we offer only a brief summary here due to space limitations), we can conclude that institutional policy decisions have been oriented in three directions when it comes to developing specific action plans on education for citizenship:

·

·

·

Access and retention policies. Policies observed in this area include quotas for underrepresented populations; financial aid for low-income students; extension programmes and institution building in outlying regions to make university programmes accessible in areas that are distant from major urban centres; and tutoring sessions to promote retention of students, provide support, and thus prevent drop-outs. `Curricular justice' policies. Such policies include, among many other examples, the inclusion of topics related to human rights in curricula (as in the case of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, which recently decided to include human rights content as part of all undergraduate programmes); introduction of specific subjects such as professional ethics and deontology; strengthening of the humanistic and social content of curricula (including for technical studies) and teaching of history, philosophy and social issues; and the inclusion in curricula of approaches that emphasise the experience of disadvantaged social sectors. Institutional policies. Through the democratisation of decision-making processes and the opening of participatory channels for the various sectors that make up the university system; introduction of educational and training practices based on the service-learning model; and promotion, support and funding of traditional areas of extension, based on a renewed approach aimed at taking social needs and demands into account in both research and teaching.

Five tensions The policies listed above appear to suggest a trend, with institutions gradually recognising the importance of education for citizenship and implementing relevant practices. At the same time, however, one can observe attitudes of indifference and resistance to a transformation that would make universities more permeable to social issues--issues that ultimately challenge universities to produce graduates with a real awareness of the broader social impact of their professional activity. We will now briefly describe a number of dilemmas that we believe may serve as useful tools for thinking about the potential and the difficulties involved in conceiving of the university as an institution for producing citizens who are socially engaged, responsible, and possessed of a sense of solidarity. First tension: dilemmas inherent in the notion of citizenship. The complexity of the contemporary social world makes it difficult to establish any consensus on what form

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education for citizenship should take. We believe that one reason why it is difficult to address this issue is that certain key questions have not been discussed, including the following: should education for citizenship be limited to recognising lists of rights and obligations that apply within a territory or globally, or should it be aimed at promoting practices that transcend the notion of citizenship as a defined status? What are the implications of thinking about citizenship in the context of an increasingly global order? Who will the interlocutors be for future professional graduates: the market, the state, civil society? Who will be impacted by the actions of future professionals-citizens? Second tension: university versus lower educational levels. Some specialists argue that since university education is not obligatory, it should not deal with concepts already covered at lower educational levels. If only a minority of people attend university, why should we accentuate differences by introducing ideas that all individuals, as citizens, should already be aware of? And if one maintains that universities have a role in this area, what distinctive features should characterise education for citizenship in the context of professional training? A discussion involving the entire educational system needs to take place to consider these issues and the democratisation of access to higher education. Third tension: professional training versus comprehensive education. The increasing specialisation of knowledge and the need to prepare students to enter the labour market are leading us to abandon a broad, comprehensive approach to education that stresses analytical skills and critical thinking. The notion of `one-dimensionality' refers to the progressive abandonment of multiple areas of knowledge and educational experience in favour of a strategic focus, in which an emphasis on utility (`knowing how to do something') comes to pervade teaching spaces. Some authors note a shift from `knowing why' things happen to `knowing how things are done'--the approach to knowledge that now characterises university studies. Fourth tension: educating citizens versus educating producers. The previous tension raises a question about the role of universities--namely, what kind of knowledge is regarded as useful? Increasingly, and in accord with the expectations of many students entering university, utility is seen to lie in what is productive in terms of accumulation. Solidarity, empathy, democracy and participation do not generate immediate material gains. As a result, it can be difficult to establish the legitimacy of educational practices that focus on these areas. Fifth tension: ideas about what it means to be a professional. What attributes do professionals have? What does it mean to be a good one? What type of society will the professional have to work in? Is it a just society or one that needs to change? Universities appear to provide few spaces (formal or informal) for democratic discussion of what it means to be a professional in the contemporary world. `From university knowledge to pluriversity knowledge' In a well-known paper published in Argentina in 2005, Boaventura de Sousa Santos used these words to describe a contemporary trend that involves going beyond the traditional approach to knowledge. Knowledge used to be `produced in universities whose autonomy resulted in a production process that was relatively decontextualised in relation to the needs of the quotidian world of societies.' In contrast, pluriversity knowledge is `contextual insofar as the organising principle of its production is its application. [...] As this application occurs

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outside the university, the initiative of formulating the problems to be solved and the determination of their criteria of relevance are the result of agreement between researchers and users' (Sousa 33). While pluriversity knowledge has enormous potential for the planning of educational programmes that are inclusive, engaged with their social context, and solidarity-based, Sousa recognises that it `has most consistently been pursued within the framework of universityindustry partnerships, and consequently takes the form of commercial knowledge' (Sousa 36). Pluriversity knowledge presents a series of options in terms of social involvement and education for solidarity, provided it is the university community that makes the political and academic decisions that allow it to move in this direction. We conclude by offering a series of suggestions that we believe merit consideration. The points listed below should be discussed by members of the university community in a democratic setting that encourages deliberation.

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·

·

·

Professional and scientific training have a privileged status at universities to the detriment of education for citizenship. Institutional measures should be implemented to rebalance this relationship. This will involve formalising and establishing a hierarchy of actions to be taken by instructors and students to increase involvement in the community. In many countries, a lot of work remains to be done on evaluation of teaching performance. In addition to encouraging scientific productivity, quality evaluations should incentivise forms of social engagement. Ways should be found to include university volunteer programmes and traditional forms of extension (very much part of Argentinian institutional culture) in university curricula. This will allow students to gain experience that enriches their theoretical training as well as increasing their awareness of what living conditions are like in the community they will eventually work in. Academic programmes would be richer if they included curricular content that addresses deontology, professional ethics, history and changes in the way different professions are understood and approached. Dialogue between students and instructors about the meaning of what they are doing is a useful means of promoting reflection. Work at both the curricular level and the institutional level: promote practices such as discussion, deliberation, and participation in governing bodies; recover the notion of `university citizenship' or the `university demos'. It should be the university community as a whole that makes decisions about how and why to commit to an educational approach that pursues both professional and civic goals.

References BARNETT, Ronald (1994), The Limits of Competence: Knowledge, Higher Education and Society. Buckingham: SRHE & Open University Press. CONNELL, R. (2006), Escuelas y Justicia Social, Morata, Spain. DE ALBA, A. (Comp.) (1993), EL curriculum universitario de cara al nuevo milenio. Mexico: Universidad de Guadalajara ­ Universidad Autónoma de México.

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DEREK, Bok (2008), Más allá de la torre de marfil: la responsabilidad social de la universidad moderna, Universidad de Palermo, Buenos Aires. PINTO, M. (2010), `La enseñanza de Derechos Humanos en la Universidad de Buenos Aires', in Academia. Revista sobre Enseñanza del Derecho, Year 8, No. 16, UBA, Argentina. SOUSA SANTOS, B. (2005), La universidad del siglo XXI, Miño y Dávila, Buenos Aires. About the author Victoria Kandel: She holds a Bachelor degree in Political Science and and MA in Education at Latinamerican Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) She is candidate of a Phd at the same university and her thesis name is: "Students and citizens. The University of Buenos Aires as an space for the construction of citizenry"She is currently working as a universitary pedagogy at Faculty of Law of the University of Buenos Aires. Aditionally she is an active member of the voluntary program of the university titled "The Convention about the children rights" Friday, December 23, 2011 Culled from GUNI Newsletter of December, 2011

Official Telephone and PABX Lines in NUC Secretariat

The attention of the entire staff of the National Universities Commission is hereby drawn to the following new official telephone and PABX lines available now in the Commission. 1. 08027455412 2. 08027455413 3. 08027455418 4. 07054407741 5. 07054407742 6. 07054407743 7. 07039254081 8. 07039254082 9. 07054327029, 10. 07082024412 -

FAX LINE

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RE: Announcement of a Research Ethics Colloquium for March 2012 by the Society for Research at Godfrey Okoye University (GO) Enugu

The National Universities Commission (NUC) had received a notice from the Society for Research (SFR), a national organization devoted to advancing theory and research that a Research Ethics Colloquium will take place on Friday, 9 March 2012 at the Godfrey Okoye University, Enugu. The major objective of the colloquium is to: (1) (2) Develop a research ethics training package that will provide an online learning and certification platform for all who conduct research To prepare a research ethics guideline that is oriented to the Nigerian context in order to support the advancement of research generated in Nigeria

Interested participants from relevant professionals in academic and practice settings are advised to hand in their papers addressing the above objectives to SFR, c/o Rev. Sr. Dr. Mary Gloria Njoku, DDL through email [email protected] N. B The Colloquium will be devoted to the discussion and adoption of the document that will be generated from papers with scientific merit accepted for the research ethics training and guideline. SFR Goals · To promote the use of research to advance knowledge in the academic and practice setting; · To promote theory development and research that increase our understanding of our society and ways to advance economic, social, educational and spiritual dimension of growth; · To encourage the exchange of knowledge and skills in research among those in academic and practice settings; · To engage in research that promotes social responsibility; · To promote the development of careers in research. SFR Membership Benefits & Opportunities · A subscription to the Annuals of Research (a N2,000 value); · Involvement in formal and informal meetings of the Society for Research at institutional, regional and national conferences; and · Numerous activities to support members in their work, including student mentoring initiatives and advice for new authors and scholars. For information about SFR membership, send an email to [email protected] The colloquium is open to all.

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RE: Announcement of Employment Opportunities for Nigerian University Professors under the Namibia-Nigeria JCC

The National Universities Commission (NUC) had received a notice from the Office of the High Commissioner of Nigeria to the Republic of Namibia inviting Professors in different fields of engineering to apply for employment with the Polytechnic of Namibia under the Nigeria/Namibia Joint Consultative Commission (JCC). The Polytechnic is requesting for seasoned university Professors or professionals on secondment or full employment for two years in Civil, Electronic, Electrical, Mechanical, Mining, Metallurgy and Mineral Processing Engineering. The Polytechnic offers competitive remuneration ranging from 60, 000 to 120,000 United States Dollars. Interested and qualified candidates may obtain additional information from the following websites: (www.polytechnic.edu.na) or by personal enquiry at the Human Resources Department ([email protected] or tel+264 61207 2255.

Re: Admission of Foreign Students to Programmes of Study in the Public Universities of Ghana

The Executive Secretary, Vice-Chancellors Ghana (VCG), has drawn the attention of the National Universities Commission (NUC) to advertisements in some Nigerian Daily Newspapers by unscrupulous people and individuals holding themselves and their assigns and purporting to be Agents, Representatives and/or securing admissions to programmes of study at Public institutions in Ghana. The Public Universities of Ghana, through this medium, informs all prospective Applicants seeking admission to any of the universities in Ghana that, under no circumstances, should anyone enter into any contractual agreement or otherwise for the purposes so indicated, as no such persons or individuals or company have been authorised to act on their behalf as agents in recruiting foreign students from the Federal Republic of Nigeria. Interested Persons seeking Admissions to programmes of study at any of the Public Universities, are advised to forward such enquiries to any of the following addresses and/or visit the Websites for further information. · · · The Registrar of the prospective university The Deputy Registrar/ Senior Assistant Registrar (Academic Affairs/Admissions Office) of the prospective University Websites of the universities concerned: -www.ug.edu.gh (University of Ghana, Legon)

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-www.knust.edu.gh (Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi) -www.ucc.edu.gh (University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast) - www.uds.edu.gh (University for Development Studies, Tamale) - www.umat.edu.gh (University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa) -www.uew.edu.gh (University of Education, Winneba)

List of Approved Universities in Nigeria

UNIVERSITIES S/N Federal Year S/N State Year 1 University of 1948 1 Rivers State 1979 Ibadan, Ibadan University of Science & Technology, PortHarcourt 2 University of 1960 2 Ambrose Alli 1980 Nigeria, Nsukka University, Ekpoma 1962 3 Abia State 1981 3 Obafemi University, Uturu Awolowo University, IleIfe 4 Ahmadu Bello 1962 4 Enugu State 1982 University, Zaria University of Science & Tech, Enugu 5 University of 1962 5 Olabisi Onabanjo 1982 Lagos, Lagos University, AgoIwoye 6 University of 1970 6 Lagos State 1983 Benin, Benin University, Ojo, City Lagos 7 Bayero 1975 7 Ladoke Akintola 1990 University, Kano University of Technology, Ogbomoso 8 University of 1975 8 Imo State University, 1992 Calabar, Calabar Owerri 9 University of 1975 9 Benue State 1992 Ilorin, Ilorin University, Makurdi S/N Private Year 1 Babcock University, 1999 Ilishan Remo

2 3

Madonna Okija Igbinedion Okada

University, 1999 University, 1999

4

Bowen University, Iwo

2001

5

Covenant Ota

University, 2002

6

Pan-African University, 2002 Lagos Benson Idahosa 2002 University, Benin City

7

8 9

ABTI American 2003 University, Yola Redeemers University, 2005 Mowe, Ogun State

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S/N Federal 10 University Jos, Jos 11 University Maiduguri, Maiduguri 12 Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto 13 University of Port-Harcourt, Port-Harcourt 14 Federal University of Technology, Owerri 15 Federal University of Technology, Akure 16 Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola 17 Federal University of Technology, Minna 18 Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna 19 University of Abuja, 20 Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi 21 University of Agriculture,

UNIVERSITIES Year S/N State Year of 1975 10 Delta State 1992 University, Abraka of 1975 11 Adekunle Ajasin 1999 University, Akungba-Akoko 1975 12 Kogi State 1999 University, Anyigba

S/N Private Year 10 Ajayi Crowther 2005 University, Oyo 11 Al-Hikmah University, 2005 Ilorin 12 Caritas University, 2005 Amorji-Nke, Enugu

1975

13

Niger-Delta University, Yenagoa

2000

13

CETEP City University, 2005 Lagos Bingham University, 2005 Auta Balefi, Karu, Nasarawa State Katsina Katsina University, 2005

1980

14

1981

15

Anambra State 2000 University of Science & Technology, Uli Kano University of 2000 Science & Technology, Wudil Ebonyi University, Abakaliki State 2000

14

15

1981

16

16

Renaissance University, 2005 Enugu

1982

17

Nasarawa State 2002 University, Keffi

17

Bells University of 2005 Technology, Ota, Ogun State Lead City University of 2005 Ibadan, Oyo State

1985

18

Adamawa State 2002 University, Mubi

18

1988 1988

19 20

Gombe State 2004 University, Gombe Kaduna State 2004 University, Kaduna

19 20

Crawford University, 2005 Igbesa, Ogun State Wukari Jubilee 2005 University, Wukari

1988

21

Cross University

River 2004 of

21

Crescent Abeokuta

University, 2005

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S/N 22

23

Federal Makurdi University Agriculture, Abeokuta Nnamdi Azikiwe 1992 University, Awka University Uyo, Uyo

UNIVERSITIES Year S/N State Year S/N Private Year Technology, Calabar of 1988 22 Plateau State 2005 22 Novena University, 2005 University, Bokkos Ogume, Delta State 23 Ondo State 2008 University of Technology, Okiti Pupa. Ibrahim Babangida 2005 University, Lapai, Niger State Tai Solarin 2005 University of Education, Ijagun Umaru Musa Yar'Adua University, Katsina Bukar Abba Ibrahim University, Damaturu Yobe State Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero Osun State University, Osogbo 2006 23 University Mkar of Mkar, 2005

24

of 1991

24

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike National Open University of Nigeria, Lagos Fed. Univ. of Petroleum Resources, Effurun Federal University, Lokoja, Kogi State Federal University, Lafia, Nasarawa State Federal University, Kashere, Gombe State Federal University, Wukari, Taraba State Federal University,

1992

25

25

Joseph Ayo Babalola 2006 University, Ikeji-Arakeji Osun State Caleb University, Lagos 2007

2002

26

26

Fountain Oshogbo

University, 2007

2007

27

2006

27

Obong University, 2007 Obong Ntak

2011

28

2006

28

Salem Lokoja

University, 2007

2011

29

2006

29

Tansian University, 2007 Umunya, Anambra State

2011

30

Taraba State 2008 University, Jalingo

30

Veritas Abuja

University, 2007

2011

31

Kwara State 2009 University, Ilorin

31

Wesley Univ. of Science 2007 & Tech., Ondo

2011

32

Sokoto State 2009 University, Sokoto

32

Western Delta Univ., 2007 Oghara, Delta State

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S/N

33

34

35

36

Federal Dutsin-Ma, Katsina Federal University, Dutse, Jigawa State Federal University, Ndufu-Alike, Ebonyi State Federal University, OyeEkiti, Ekiti State Federal University, Otuoke, Bayelsa

Year S/N

UNIVERSITIES State Year S/N

Private

Year

2011

33

Akwa Ibom University, Ikpaden

State 2010 Ikot

33

The Achievers 2007 University, Owo

2011

34

2011

35

2011

36

Ignatius Ajuru 2010 University of Education, Rumuolumeni Ekiti State 2011 University, AdoEkiti. Bauchi State University, Gadau.

34

African Univ. of Science 2007 & Tech., Abuja

35

36

37 38 39 40

41 42 43 44 45

Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State Godfrey Okoye University, UgwuomuNike, Enugu State Nigerian Turkish Nile, University, Abuja Oduduwa University, Ipetumodu, Osun State Paul University, Awka, Anambra State Rhema University, Obeama-Asa, Rivers State Wellspring University, Evbuobanosa, Edo State Adeleke University, Ede, Osun State Baze University, Abuja Landmark University, Omu-Aran, Kwara State Samuel Adegboyega University, Ogwa, Edo State

2009

2009

2009 2009 2009 2009

2009 2011 2011 2011 2011

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NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES COMMISSION

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

List of Illegal Degree Awarding Institutions (Degree Mills) Operating in Nigeria*

The National Universities Commission (NUC) wishes to announce to the general public, especially parents and prospective undergraduates that the under-listed "Degree Mills" have not been licensed by the Federal Government and have, therefore, been closed down for violating the Education (National Minimum Standards etc) Act CAP E3 Law of the Federation of Nigeria 2004. The "Universities" are: 1) Christians of Charity American University of Sci. & Tech, Nkpor, Anambra State or any of its other campuses 2) University of Industry, Yaba, Lagos or any of its other campuses 3) University of Applied Sciences & Management, Port Novo, Republic of Benin or any of its other campuses in Nigerian 4) Blacksmith University, Awka or any of its other campuses 5) Volta University College, Ho, Volta Region, Ghana or any of its other campuses in Nigeria 6) Royal University Izhia, P.O. Box 800, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State or any of its other campuses 7) Atlanta University, Ayingba, Kogi State or any of its other campuses 8) Sunday Adokpela University, Otada Adoka, Otukpo, Benue State or any of its other campuses. 9) United Christian University, Macotis Campus, Imo State or any of its other campuses. 10) United Nigeria University College, Okija, Anambra State or any of its other campuses. 11) Samuel Ahmadu University, Makurdi, Benue State or any of its other campuses. 12) UNESCO University, Ndoni, Rivers State or any of its other campuses. 13) Saint Augustines University of Technology, Jos, Plateau State or any of its other campuses 14) The International University, Missouri, USA, Kano and Lagos Study Centres, or any of its campuses in Nigeria 15) Collumbus University, UK operating anywhere in Nigeria 16) Tiu International University, UK operating anywhere in Nigeria 17) Pebbles University, UK operating anywhere in Nigeria`

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18) 19) 20) 21) 22) 23) 24) 25) 26) 27) 28) 29) 30) 31) 32) 33) 34) 35) 36) 37) 38) 39) 40) 41) 42) 43) 44)

London External Studies UK operating anywhere in Nigeria. Pilgrims University operating anywhere in Nigeria. Lobi Business School Makurdi, Benue State or any of its campuses in Nigeria. West African Christian University operating anywhere in Nigeria. Bolta University College Aba or any of its campuses in Nigeria. JBC Seminary Inc. (Wukari Jubilee University) Kaduna Illegal Campus Westlan University, Esie, Kwara State or any of its campuses in Nigeria. St. Andrews University College, Abuja or any of its campuses in Nigeria. EC-Council University, USA, Ikeja Lagos Study Centre. Atlas University, Ikot_Udoso Uko, Uyo Akwa Ibom State or any of its campuses in Nigeria Concept College/Universities (London) Ilorin or any of its campuses in Nigeria Halifax Gateway University, Ikeja or any of its campuses in Nigeria Kingdom of Christ University, Abuja or any of its campuses in Nigeria Acada University, Akinlalu, Oyo State or any of its campuses in Nigeria. Fifom University, Mbaise, Imo State or any of its campuses in Nigeria Houdegbe North American University campuses in Nigeria. Atlantic Intercontinental University, Okija, Anambra State Open International University, Akure Middle Belt University (North Central University), Otukpo Leadway University, Ughelli, Delta State Metro University, Dutse/Bwari, Abuja Southend University, Ngwuro Egeru (Afam) Ndoki, Rivers State Olympic University, Nsukka, Enugu State Federal College of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Abuja. Temple University, Abuja Irish University Business School London, operating anywhere in Nigeria. National University of Technology, Lafia, Nassarawa State.

In addition to the closure, the following Degree Mills are currently undergoing further investigations and/or ongoing court actions. The purpose of these actions is to prosecute the proprietors and recover illegal fees and charges on subscribers. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) National University of Nigeria, Keffi, Nassarawa State North Central University, Otukpo, Benue State Christ Alive Christian Seminary and University, Enugu Richmond Open University, Arochukwu, Abia State. West Coast University, Umuahia. Saint Clements University, Iyin Ekiti, Ekiti State Volta University College, Aba, Abia State. Illegal Satellite Campuses of Ambrose Alli University

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For the avoidance of doubt, anybody who patronises or obtains any certificate from any of these illegal institutions does so at his or her own risk. Certificates obtained from these sources will not be recognized for the purposes of NYSC, employment, and further studies. The relevant Law enforcement agencies have also been informed for their further necessary action. * This list of illegal institutions is not exhaustive.

PROFESSOR JULIUS A.OKOJIE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES COMMISSION, ANNOUNCER

"VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY"

A TELEVISION DOCUMENTARY PROGRAMME

The Voyage of Discovery is an NUC-sponsored television documentary programme for Nigerian Universities to celebrate outstanding researchers, showcase their findings and promote their linkage with the industry. The programme is aired every Tuesday on: (a) (b) African Independent Television (AIT) - 4:30 - 5.00 pm Nigerian Television Authority (NTA) on Mondays - 1.30 - 2.00 pm

The current running episodes are on: RESEARCHES PRESENTED AT THE 2010 NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FAIR (NURESDEF) HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA (UNN) NSUKKA.

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This Week's Birthdays

NAME Miss Olarinoye Kudirat Tunrayo Miss Ochai Grace Agbenu Mr Bello Idris Miss Akongwubel V.U. Mr Rabo Salisu Abdullahi Wishing you many happy returns! Best wishes for the week. DATE OF BIRTH 10 January 10 January 10 January 10 January 12 January DEPARTMENT DMSS ES ES DMSS DIM

Shun Corruption. It Does Not Pay.

Courtesy: Anticorruption and Transparency Division

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