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STANDARD 3.1 (READING) ALL STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND AND APPLY THE KNOWLEDGE OF SOUNDS, LETTERS, AND WORDS IN WRITTEN ENGLISH TO BECOME INDEPENDENT AND FLUENT READERS, AND WILL READ A VARIETY OF MATERIALS AND TEXTS WITH FLUENCY AND COMPREHENSION. Big Idea: The ability to read a variety of texts requires independence, comprehension, and fluency. LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY CURRICULUM - GRADE 12 2009-2010

3.1.A CONCEPTS ABOUT PRINT

Essential Questions: How does understanding a text's structure help me better understand its meaning? Enduring Understandings: Understanding of a text's features, structures, and characteristics facilitate the reader's ability to make meaning of the text. Content: Symbols can communicate meaning. Graphic and text structures organize information. Grade Level Examples: Symbols ­ exit signs, area labels, icons Graphic ­ letters, words, graphs Text structures ­ parts of books, paragraphs, punctuation MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S) TECHNOLOGY

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

No additional indicators at this grade level.

3.1.B PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS

Essential Questions How are sounds represented by letters? Enduring Understandings Letters and letter combinations represent sounds. Content: Sound structure of language includes the ability to distinguish differences and similarities. Sounds are indentified and manipulated. Grade Level Examples: Sound structure of language ­ syllables, initial, middle, and final sounds. Sounds identified and manipulated ­ number of syllables, deleting or changing sounds, rhyming.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI) No additional indicators at this grade level.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

TECHNOLOGY

3.1.C DECODING AND WORD RECOGNITION

Essential Questions How do I figure out a word I do not know? Enduring Understandings Readers use language structure and context clues to identify the intended meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text. Content: Decoding includes knowledge of letters, sounds, word parts, and context clues. Grade Level Examples: Knowledge of letters ­ upper and lowercase letters, sight words, sequence Sounds ­ consonant blends, diagraphs Word parts ­ prefixes, suffixes, multi-syllable MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S) TECHNOLOGY

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI) No additional indicators at this grade level.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

3.1.D FLUENCY

Essential Questions How does fluency affect comprehension? Enduring Understandings Fluent readers group words quickly to help them gain meaning from what they read. Content: Basic principles of fluency include automaticity, proper phrasing, and expression. Grade Level Examples: Automaticity, proper phrasing ­ retelling, pacing Expression-dramatizing, infection MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

1.Collate reading assignments with History & Science

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Read developmentally appropriate materials at an independent level with accuracy and speed.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

1. In class, independent timed reading

TECHNOLOGY

Assigned internet web reading www.bookwire.com www.pbs.org www.classroom.net

2. Use appropriate rhythm, flow, meter, and pronunciation when reading. 3. Read a variety of genres and types of text with fluency and comprehension.

1.Read various forms of poetry aloud

1. Collate poems with history, math & music 1..Performing arts, public speaking, & history.

1.Create appropriate power point presentation 1.Listen to web based audio file in conjunction with in class reading. Create power point to coincide with the lesson. www.classroom.net www.inform.umd.edu www.pbs.org

1.Read from dramatic works, speeches, poems & short stories

3.1.E READING STRATEGIES

Essential Questions What do readers do when they do not understand everything in a text? Enduring Understandings Good readers employ strategies to help them understand text. Strategic readers can develop, select, and apply strategies to enhance their comprehension. Content: Strategic readers develop, select, and apply before, during, and after strategies to enhance their comprehension. Grade Level Examples: Before strategies ­ predictions, anticipation guides, set purpose for reading During strategies ­ visuals, Venn diagram, questioning, context clues MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

1 .Implement reading strategies through science based texts.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Identify, assess, and apply personal reading strategies that were most effective in previous learning from a variety of texts. 2. Practice visualizing techniques before, during, and after reading to aid in comprehension.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

TECHNOLOGY

1.Establish pre reading questions Create a summary of text based on sets of questions. 1.Make predictions based on "Picture Walk" * Inference through picture prompts. *Illustrate main events in text. * Identify & analyze use of imagery within text.

1.Create computer based audio files

1. Create visual/physical representation of events with text. Visual & Performing Arts

1.Powerpoint based upon elements of that time period.

3. Judge the most effective graphic organizers to use with various text types for memory retention and monitoring comprehension.

1Conduct a survey, comparing & contrasting pre-filled graphic organizers and make in class judgments on which is most effective.,

1.

Determine statistics of sample math

2.

Make computer graph of statistics.

3.1.F VOCABULARY AND CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

Essential Questions Why do readers need to pay attention to a writer's choice of words? Enduring Understandings Words powerfully affect meaning. Content: Recognition of words, knowledge of word meaning, and understanding vocabulary concepts, affects reading comprehension. Grade Level Examples: Recognition of words ­ high frequency and irregular sight words Knowledge of word meaning ­ printed or electronic dictionaries Understanding vocabulary concepts ­ prefixes, suffixes, antonyms, synonyms, homophones, homographs MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

1.World Languages & history of a particular language

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Use knowledge of word origins and word relationships, as well as historical and literary context clues, to determine the meanings of specialized vocabulary. 2. Use knowledge of root words to understand new words.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

TECHNOLOGY

1.Utilize dual language dictionaries Deconstruct word parts to analyze its Components.

1.Online dictionaries www.dictionary.com

1.Review & reinforce the study of word elements (roots, prefixes & suffixes) 1.Write a short story incorporating correct use of vocabulary words. Match game

1.Dual language dictionary to incorporate commonly used Latin/Greek root words. 1.Identify specific vocabulary words that are used in the career workplace.

1.www.dictionary.com www.pbskids.com

3. Apply reading vocabulary in different content areas.

1 2

www.careerbuilder.com Naviance Program

3.1.G COMPREHENSION SKILLS AND RESPONSE TO TEXT

Essential Questions How do readers construct meaning from text? Enduring Understandings Good readers compare, infer, synthesize, and make connections (text to text, text to world, text to self) to make text personally relevant and useful. Content: Text features, structures, and formats affect the construction of meaning in a variety of genres. Grade Level Examples: Text features ­ central idea, themes, supporting details, cause/effect, compare/contrast, fact/opinion, sequencing Structures ­ plot, setting, characters Formats ­ journal writing, dramatization, oral presentation Variety of genres ­ storybooks, fairytales, informational text, poetry MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION(S)

Read & analyze a political editorial to decipher what is biased/rhetoric View live speeches on CSpan.com Read articles on microfilm.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Identify, describe, evaluate, and synthesize the central ideas in informational texts.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Write a summary of essential information from informational text. Review list of tenants of major literary theories and apply to literary text. Create a timeline that demonstrates the development of literary movements/ Read & compare both authentic and fictional contemporary slave narratives. Read and Analyze newspaper entries that represent the time period as well as journals and diaries. Read and dissect a text from theatre of the absurd genre and explore use of jargon.

2. Understand the study of literature and theories of literary criticism.

Read biographical & historical accounts of social conditions that led to development of theory. Analyze artwork that helped influence said literary movements.

Factsonfile:bloomsliteraryreference.com

3. Understand that our literary heritage is marked by distinct literary movements and is part of a global literary tradition. 4. Compare and evaluate the relationship between past literary traditions and contemporary writing. 5. Analyze how works of a given period reflect historical and social events and conditions.

Greenwood Press: dailylifeonline.com Metmuseum.org

Listen to and evaluate different slave spirituals.

Pbs.org Historychannel.com

Conduct interview of a veteran or survivor of war/war torn areas

View a movie such as Schindler's List, Bridge Over River Kwai, etc.

6. Recognize literary concepts, such as rhetorical device, logical fallacy, and jargon, and their effect on meaning.

Conduct a skit containing jargon

Record, view and post said skit

7. Interpret how literary devices affect reading emotions and understanding.

Read fictional work and identify author's use of literary devices (foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, and allegory) Read and compare/contrast poems by Paul L. Dunbar to show differences in diction. Dissect a website for essential information and determine credibility of sources.

Read historical journal and compare use of literary devices

View film of speech, read in class and determine if visual perception affects emotional impact

8. Analyze and evaluate the appropriateness of diction and figurative language (e.g., irony, paradox). 9. Distinguish between essential and nonessential information, identifying the use of proper references and propaganda techniques where present. 10. Differentiate between fact and opinion by using complete and accurate information, coherent arguments, and points of view. 11. Analyze how an author's use of words creates tone and mood, and how choice of words advances the theme or purpose of the work. 12. Demonstrate familiarity with everyday texts such as job and college applications, W-2 forms, and contracts. 13. Read, comprehend, and be able to follow information gained from technical and instructional manuals (e.g., how-to books, computer manuals, or instructional manuals).

Evaluate a historical perspective of the Harlem Ren. & slang of the era.

Watch and listen to poets perform their pieces at poets.org & youtube.com

Examine the samples of relevant statistics to show credibility of the sample.

Wikipedia Njdoe.gov

Analyze current editorials from the local paper to identify pertinent information. Read and analyze gothic short story and discuss how themes and subjects reflect the genre. Build content brag sheet highlighting activities & honors.

Determine essential information about the geography of a particular place.

Starledger.com for articles

Analyze works of art that contain gothic elements.

www.metmuseum.org

Career Education

Word processing software Naviance

Students create how to brochure in conjunction with demonstration speech

Culinary Arts: How to bake/cook/etc.

Microsoft publisher

3.1.H INQUIRY AND RESEARCH

Essential Questions Why conduct research? Enduring Understandings Researchers gather and critique information from different sources for specific purposes. Content: Ideas, questions, and posting problems initiate the inquiry and research process. Basic principles of inquiry and research include gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing data from a variety of sources. Grade Level Examples: Gathering ­ choose books, use library classification system Evaluating ­ drawing conclusions MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S) History: Author Biography TECHNOLOGY Biography.com factsonfile: fofweb.com

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Select appropriate electronic media for research and evaluate the quality of the information received.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES Use internet databases to locate and select themes, biographies and information pertaining to novel. Review, analyze and select a career from listing of 15 career clusters.

2. Develop materials for a portfolio that reflect a specific career choice.

Career Education

Ferguson's Career Guidance Center

3. Develop increased ability to critically select works to support a research topic.

Analyze and select valid websites from a list of sites which include invalid sites Write a summary highlighting major points of newspaper article based upon a controversial issue.

Business and Technology: Find appropriate way to check validity of sites Environmental Science: Global Warming

Internet

4. Read and critically analyze a variety of works, including books and other print materials )e.g., periodicals, journals, manuals), about one issue or topic, or books by a single author or in one genre, and produce evidence of reading.

Science-online.com Nj.com

5. Apply information gained from several sources or books on a single topic by a single author to foster an argument, draw conclusion, or advance a position. 6. Critique the validity and logic or arguments advanced in public documents, their appeal to various audiences, and the extent to which they anticipate and address reader concerns.

Recreate an historical courtroom History: Biography: Lindberg trial. baby

www.biography.com aetv.com

Analyze Thomas Payne's "Common Sense" for evidence of logic.

History: Analyze social conditions that prompted work.

Use "Age of the Empires" or "Colonial City" to recreate Utopia

STANDARD 3.2 (WRITING): ALL STUDENTS WILL WRITE IN CLEAR, CONCISE, ORGANIZED LANGUAGE THAT VARIES IN CONTENT AND FORM FOR DIFFERENT AUDIENCES AND PURPOSES. Big Idea: Writing is the process of communicating in print for a variety of audiences and purposes. LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY CURRICULUM - GRADE 12 2009-2010

3.2. A. WRITING AS A PROCESS (PREWRITING, DRAFTING, REVISING, EDITING, POSTWRITING)

Essential Questions: How do good writers express themselves? How does process shape the writer's product? Enduring Understandings: Good writers develop and refine their ideas for thinking, learning, communicating, and aesthetic expression. Content: Basic principles of the writing process include prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and post-writing. Grade Level Examples: Pre-writing ­ generate ideas, use graphic organizers Drafting ­ put ideas into writing using pictures and developmental spelling, compose from prewriting, develop voice. Revising ­ elaborate with detail Editing ­ spelling and mechanics Post-writing ­ checklist, scoring rubric MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION(S) History: Read a slave narrative View media such as Amistad or journal of historical figure Business: Create a sales chart Microsoft Publisher Video tape a commercial

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Engage in the full writing process by writing daily and for sustained amounts of time. 2. Use strategies such as graphic organizers and outlines to plan and write drafts according to the intended message, audience, and purpose for writing. 3. Analyze and revise writing to improve style, focus and organization, coherence, clarity of thought, sophisticated word choice and sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES Maintain a daily journal.

Design a marketing advertisement based on a fictional product Self-edit a beginning draft of a persuasive essay

Politics: Base essay on a political opinion

Read political articles: www.nj.com

4. Review and edit work for spelling, usage, clarity, and fluency.

Use a rubric to self-edit a first draft of an essay

World Language: Use predetermined Latin based words within the essay

dictionary.com Princeton Review

5. Use a computer and word-processing software to compose, revise, edit, and public a piece.

Write a news story about a new course offering within the Science Department Write an essay criticizing or defending a political issue based on a controversy Create a writing portfolio and reflect on scored samples of writing and design strategies for improvement

Science: Evaluate course based Microsoft Word upon information found

6. Use a scoring rubric to evaluate and improve own writing and the writing of others.

History: Evaluate a political newspaper article

Microsoft Word

7. Reflect on own writing and establish goals for growth and improvement.

Technology: Edit using Various software software designed for optimum feedback capability

3.2. B. WRITING AS A PRODUCT

Essential Questions: How do writers develop a well-written product? Enduring Understandings: Good writers use a repertoire of strategies that enables them to vary form and style, in order to write for different purposes, audiences, and contexts. Content: Application of a variety of self-selected strategies to generate, select, narrow, and develop ideas, results in formal products or publications. Grade Level Examples: Self-selected strategies ­ sentence types such as declarative, interrogative, exclamatory. Formal products or publications ­ stories from personal experience, narratives, letters, procedures, biographies, reports.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Analyzing characteristics, structures, tone; and features of language of selected genres and apply this knowledge to own writing. 2. Critique published works for authenticity and credibility.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Review elements of gothic genre and write a short story utilizing those elements Compare two works and speculate originality and authenticity of authorship Determine an author's use of specific literary techniques and supply proof of its use in two or more texts

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History: utilize a specific historical setting and use diction and writing style of the time period Art: Examine artwork allegedly created by Adolf Hitler

TECHNOLOGY

Facts on File History Reference Online Daily Life Through History Google Images.com

3. Draft a thesis statement and support/defend it through highly developed ideas and content, organization, and paragraph development.

History: read a series of Holocaust poems and decide on their merit, historically

Poetry.com

4. Write multi-paragraph, complex pieces across the curriculum using a variety of strategies to develop a central idea (e.g., cause-effect, problem/solution, hypothesis/results, rhetorical questions, parallelism). 5. Write a range of essays and expository pieces across the curriculum, such as persuasive, analytic, critique, or position paper. 6. Write a literary research paper that synthesizes and cites data using researched information and technology to support writing. 7. Use primary and secondary sources to provide evidence, justification, or to extend a position, and cite sources, such as periodicals, interviews, discourse, and electronic media. 8. Foresee readers' needs and develop interest through strategies such as using precise language, specific details, definitions, descriptions, examples, anecdotes, analogies, and humor as well as anticipating and countering concerns and arguments and advancing a position. 9. Provide compelling openings and strong closure to written pieces. 10. Employ relevant graphics to support a central idea (e.g., charts, graphic organizers, pictures, computer-generated presentation).

Analyze pre-Darwinian texts based on evolution theory and critique its merits

Science: analyze texts based on evolution theory

Facts on File

Students will create a writing portfolio comprised of a variety of writing styles Research a topic using database articles and use word processor to write a reflective response Read novel and associated literary criticism and highlight evidence cited to reconsider initial response

Tech: use Microsoft Office to create documents saved to one folder

Microsoft Office Microsoft Word

Health/Science: analyze statistical data regarding world hunger issues

Facts on File (World Atlas)

History: read Governor Wallace of Alabama's speech during Jim Crow south

Youtube

Write a literary sketch and review to determine if diction and historical references correctly reflect time period.

History: review political cartoons of the Revolutionary War

Googlimages.com

Write a news story with a vignette lead Create a comic book that addresses a topical health issue

Health: news story addressing a teen health issue Health: review H1N1 symptoms

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.PubMed

www.webmd.com

11. Use the responses of others to review content, organization, and usage for publication. 12. Select pieces of writing from a literacy folder for a presentation portfolio that reflects performance in a variety of genres.

Small groups design and produce a travel brochure Read, review, and critique contents of writing portfolio

Tech: Use Publisher software to create brochure Science: Select and revise sciencebased essay

Facts on File (World Atlas)

Facts on File (Science Online)

3.2.C. MECHANICS, SPELLING, AND HANDWRITING

Essential Questions: How do rules of language affect communication? Enduring Understandings: Rules and conventions of language help readers understand what is being communicated. Content: Application of language structures, language conventions, and media techniques affect communication in academic and personal writing. Grade Level Examples: Language structures ­ spelling patterns Language conventions ­ sentences, punctuation, capitalization Media techniques ­ use word processing software MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

Science: edit scientific based journal entry

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Use Standard English conventions in all writing, such as sentence structure, grammar and usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling. 2. Demonstrate a well-developed knowledge of English syntax to express ideas in a lively and effective personal style. 3. Use subordination, coordination, apposition, and other devices effectively to indicate relationships between ideas.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Review grammar/punctuation unit and perform grade level assessment

TECHNOLOGY

Dictionary. com

Create list of synonyms for common words used in dialogue

Dramatic Arts: compose a scene based on historical events

Dictionary.com Word

Revise an essay without altering main ideas

History: rewrite a passage of the Bill of Rights without altering original intended meaning

History Reference Online (ABC-CLIO)

4. Use transition words to reinforce a logical progression of ideas. 5. Exclude extraneous details, repetitious ideas, and inconsistencies to improve writing. 6. Use knowledge of Standard English conventions to edit own writing and the writing of others for correctness. 7. Use a variety of reference materials, such as a dictionary, grammar reference, and/or internet/software resources to edit written work. 8. Write legibly in manuscript or cursive to meet district standards.

Write a short story keeping events in chronological order Edit a state provided sample essay for repetition and ambiguity

History: Write a summary of events involving Paul Revere's ride Science: edit an essay based on a recent scientific discovery

History Reference Online (ABC-CLIO) Facts on File (Science Online)

Peer edit to improve diction and clarity

Math: edit a biographical sketch based on a mathematician

Daily Life Online: Greenwood Press

Peer edit to improve diction and clarity using a variety of reference materials

Culinary Arts: edit a recipe and utilize proper abbreviations for measurements

Allrecipes.com FoodTv.com

Write the alphabet in both capital and in lowercase and cursive

History: copy a historical document in cursive writing

History.com

3.1.D. WRITING FORMS, AUDIENCES, AND PURPOSES

Essential Questions: Why does a writer choose a particular form of writing? Enduring Understandings: A writer selects a form based on audience and purpose. Content: Writers experiment with a variety of forms and techniques, which suit a topic, audience, and purpose. Grade Level Examples: Forms and techniques ­ letters, plays, biographies and use of humor. Topic/audience ­ self, peers, community Purpose ­ inform, entertain, persuade MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION(S)

Culinary Arts: compose a recipe and prepare in a small group Health: view and write a review of the film "A Beautiful Mind" Foodtv.com Allrecipes.com IMDB.com

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Employ the most effective writing formats and strategies for the purpose and audience. 2. Demonstrate command of a variety of writing genres, such as: ersuasive Essay P ersonal narrative P esearch report R iterary research paper L escriptive essay D ritique C esponse to literature R arody of a particular narrative P style (fable, myth, short story)

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Write a how-to essay to demonstrate a process Write a film review after reading the screenplay

oetry P

3. Evaluate the impact of an author's decisions regarding tone, word choice, style, content, point of view, literary elements, and literary merit, and produce an interpretation of overall effectiveness. 4. Apply all copyright laws to information used in written work. Write a multi-genre research paper based on a unifying theme History: write a literary response based on the novel Frankenstein and consider the social and economic conditions of the era History.com Bloom's Literary Reference

Cite the parenthetical references in a literary research paper using correct MLA format Compose an outline in chronological order of major events in a dramatic work

History: write a biography sketch based on a figure in American history

Biography.com

5. When writing, employ structures to support the reader, such as transition words, chronology, hierarchy or sequence, and forms, such as headings and subtitles. 6. Compile and synthesize information for everyday and workplace purposes, such as job applications, resumes, business letters, and college applications. 7. Demonstrate personal style and voice effectively to support the purpose and engage the audience of a piece of writing.

World Languages: compose an outline of major events in a non-English film using subtitles

www.IMDB.com

Compose a newspaper utilizing student efforts in a variety of job titles and career clusters

Tech: use InDesign software to design layout of newspaper

www.my.hsj.org highschooljournalism

Spend 15 minutes free-writing about an actual lifetime experience

Science: view a take off of an astronaut into space and write a fictional description of the event using sensory imagery

www.nasa.gov

STANDARD 3.2 (WRITING): ALL STUDENTS WILL WRITE IN CLEAR, CONCISE, ORGANIZED LANGUAGE THAT VARIES IN CONTENT AND FORM FOR DIFFERENT AUDIENCES AND PURPOSES. Big Idea: Writing is the process of communicating in print for a variety of audiences and purposes. LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY CURRICULUM - GRADE 12 2009-2010

3.2. A. WRITING AS A PROCESS (PREWRITING, DRAFTING, REVISING, EDITING, POSTWRITING)

Essential Questions: How do good writers express themselves? How does process shape the writer's product? Enduring Understandings: Good writers develop and refine their ideas for thinking, learning, communicating, and aesthetic expression. Content: Basic principles of the writing process include prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and post-writing. Grade Level Examples: Pre-writing ­ generate ideas, use graphic organizers Drafting ­ put ideas into writing using pictures and developmental spelling, compose from prewriting, develop voice. Revising ­ elaborate with detail Editing ­ spelling and mechanics Post-writing ­ checklist, scoring rubric MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION(S) History: Read a slave narrative View media such as Amistad or journal of historical figure Business: Create a sales chart Video tape a commercial/infomercials History: Base essay on a political opinion Read editorials on nj.com www.nj.com

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Engage in the full writing process by writing daily and for sustained amounts of time.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES Write daily journal entries

2. Use strategies such as graphic organizers and outlines to plan and write drafts according to the intended message, audience, and purpose for writing. 3. Analyze and revise writing to improve style, focus and organization, coherence, clarity of thought, sophisticated word choice and sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning.

Design a marketing advertisement based on a fictional product Self-edit a first draft of a persuasive essay

4. Review and edit work for spelling, usage, clarity, and fluency.

Use a rubric to self-edit a first draft of an essay

World Language: Use predetermined Latin based words within the essay Science

Dictionary.com Princeton Review (thesaurus) Word processor Microsoft Word

5. Use a computer and word-processing software to compose, revise, edit, and public a piece.

Write a news story about school topic/event (i.e. new course offering) within the Science Department Students self-edit own writing using rubric.

6. Use a scoring rubric to evaluate and improve own writing and the writing of others.

Write an essay criticizing or defending a political position based on a controversial issue. Edit using software designed for optimum feedback capability. (Tech)

Write/Edit in Word

7. Reflect on own writing and establish goals for growth and improvement.

Create a writing portfolio and reflect on scored writing samples and design strategies for improvement.

Utilize software

3.2. B. WRITING AS A PRODUCT

Essential Questions: Content: How do writers develop a well-written product? Application of a variety of self-selected strategies to generate, Enduring Understandings: select, narrow, and develop ideas, results in formal products or Good writers use a repertoire of strategies that enables them to vary form and publications. style, in order to write for different purposes, audiences, and contexts. Grade Level Examples: Self-selected strategies ­ sentence types such as declarative, interrogative, exclamatory. Formal products or publications ­ stories from personal experience, narratives, letters, procedures, biographies, reports.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Analyzing characteristics, structures, tone; and features of language of selected genres and apply this knowledge to own writing. 2. Critique published works for authenticity and credibility.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Review elements of gothic genre and write a short story with some of these elements. Compare two works and speculate originality and authenticity of authorship. Determine an author's use of specific literary techniques and supply proof of its use in two or more text.

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

Use a specific historical setting and utilize diction and writing style of the time periods. Examine art allegedly created by Adolph Hitler and speculate artist's intention. Read a series of poems written by Holocaust survivors and discuss their historical & literary merits.

TECHNOLOGY

Facts on File Greenwood Press Daily life through history Google Images

3. Draft a thesis statement and support/defend it through highly developed ideas and content, organization, and paragraph development.

Poetry.com

4. Write multi-paragraph, complex pieces across the curriculum using a variety of strategies to develop a central idea (e.g., cause-effect, problem/solution, hypothesis/results, rhetorical questions, parallelism). 5. Write a range of essays and expository pieces across the curriculum, such as persuasive, analytic, critique, or position paper. 6. Write a literary research paper that synthesizes and cites data using researched information and technology to support writing. 7. Use primary and secondary sources to provide evidence, justification, or to extend a position, and cite sources, such as periodicals, interviews, discourse, and electronic media. 8. Foresee readers' needs and develop interest through strategies such as using precise language, specific details, definitions, descriptions, examples, anecdotes, analogies, and humor as well as anticipating and countering concerns and arguments and advancing a position. 9. Provide compelling openings and strong closure to written pieces.

Students will analyze Pre-Darwinian texts based on evolution and critique its merits.

Science Read Pre-Darwinian science texts based on evolutionary theory.

Facts on File Science On-Line

Students will create a writing portfolio comprised of a variety of writing styles. Research a topic using data-based articles and use word processor to write a reflective response. Read a novel and associated literary criticism and highlight evidence cited to reconsider initial response. Write a literary sketch and review to determine if diction and historical references correctly reflect time period.

Technology: Use Microsoft Office to create documents saved to one folder. Health/Science Analyze data regarding world hunger issues. Review speech of Gov. Wallace during Jim Crow South.

Microsoft Word

Facts on File World Atlas

www.youtube.com

Review political cartoons of the Revolutionary War.

www.google.com (image)

Write a news story with a vignette lead.

Health news story Story Addresses Teen Health Issue Review H1N1 symptoms

www.ncbi.nlm.nlm.nih.gov.pubmed

10. Employ relevant graphics to support a central idea (e.g., charts, graphic organizers, pictures, computer-generated presentation).

Create a comic book that addresses a topical health issue

www.webmd.com

11. Use the responses of others to review content, organization, and usage for publication. 12. Select pieces of writing from a literacy folder for a presentation portfolio that reflects performance in a variety of genres.

Small groups design and produce travel brochure. Read, review and critique contents of writing portfolio

Tech: Publisher

Facts on File World Atlas Facts on File Science on line

Select and revise science-based essay

3.2.C. MECHANICS, SPELLING, AND HANDWRITING

Essential Questions: How do rules of language affect communication? Enduring Understandings: Rules and conventions of language help readers understand what is being communicated. Content: Application of language structures, language conventions, and media techniques affect communication in academic and personal writing. Grade Level Examples: Language structures ­ spelling patterns Language conventions ­ sentences, punctuation, capitalization Media techniques ­ use word processing software MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

Edit a science based journal entry

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Use Standard English conventions in all writing, such as sentence structure, grammar and usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling. 2. Demonstrate a well-developed knowledge of English syntax to express ideas in a lively and effective personal style. 3. Use subordination, coordination, apposition, and other devices effectively to indicate relationships between ideas. 4. Use transition words to reinforce a logical progression of ideas. 5. Exclude extraneous details, repetitious ideas, and inconsistencies to improve

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Review grammar/punctuation unit and perform grade-level assessment.

TECHNOLOGY

1. Dictionary.com

Create list of synonyms for common words used in dialogue.

Compose a scene based on historical event.

1. 2.

Microsoft Word Dictionary.com

Revise written essay without altering main ideas.

1

writing. 6. Use knowledge of Standard English conventions to edit own writing and the writing of others for correctness. 7. Use a variety of reference materials, such as a dictionary, grammar reference, and/or internet/software resources to edit written work. 8. Write legibly in manuscript or cursive to meet district standards.

3.1.D. WRITING FORMS, AUDIENCES, AND PURPOSES

Essential Questions: Why does a writer choose a particular form of writing? Enduring Understandings: A writer selects a form based on audience and purpose. Content: Writers experiment with a variety of forms and techniques, which suit a topic, audience, and purpose. Grade Level Examples: Forms and techniques ­ letters, plays, biographies and use of humor. Topic/audience ­ self, peers, community Purpose ­ inform, entertain, persuade MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S) TECHNOLOGY

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Employ the most effective writing formats and strategies for the purpose and audience. 2. Demonstrate command of a variety of writing genres, such as: ersuasive Essay P ersonal narrative P esearch report R iterary research paper L escriptive essay D ritique C esponse to literature R arody of a particular narrative P style (fable, myth, short story) oetry P 3. Evaluate the impact of an author's decisions regarding tone, word choice, style, content, point of view, literary elements, and literary merit, and produce an interpretation

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

of overall effectiveness. 4. Apply all copyright laws to information used in written work. 5. When writing, employ structures to support the reader, such as transition words, chronology, hierarchy or sequence, and forms, such as headings and subtitles. 6. Compile and synthesize information for everyday and workplace purposes, such as job applications, resumes, business letters, and college applications. 7. Demonstrate personal style and voice effectively to support the purpose and engage the audience of a piece of writing.

STANDARD 3.3 (SPEAKING) ALL STUDENTS WILL SPEAK IN CLEAR, CONCISE, ORGANIZED LANGUAGE THAT VARIES IN CONTENT AND FORM FOR DIFFERENT AUDIENCES AND PURPOSES. Big Idea: Oral language is a tool for communicating, thinking, and learning. LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY CURRICULUM - GRADE 12 2009-2010

3.3. A. DISCUSSION (SMALL GROUP AND WHOLE CLASS)

Essential Questions: How can discussion increase our knowledge and understanding of an idea(s)? Enduring Understandings: Oral discussion helps to build connections to others and create opportunities for learning. Content: Application of verbal and nonverbal language affects communication in personal, group, public, and global situations. Speakers integrate techniques and media forms. Grade Level Examples: Verbal and nonverbal language ­ compound sentences, gestures, tones Techniques and media forms ­ role-playing, taking turns, offering opinions. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

Science ­ select an event that reflects scientific progress or discovery

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Support a position integrating multiple perspectives.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Read a series of news reports relating to a specific event and compare/contrast the news coverage Small groups will discuss the effectiveness of an editorial's use of evidence and rhetoric Assign students to take turns mediating a debate based on a controversial issue Assign students to take turns recording key points in a group discussion covering a select group of ideas during a timed exercise

TECHNOLOGY

Discovery.com (Discovery Channel) Facts on File database

2. Support, modify, or refute a position in small or large-group discussions.

History ­ select an editorial that relates to a social/political situation, i.e. homelessness, poverty History ­ select an issue that addresses constitutional rights

Nytimes.com

3. Assume leadership roles in student-directed discussions, projects, and forums.

crf-usa.org

4. Summarize and evaluate tentative conclusions and take the initiative in moving discussions to the next stage.

History ­ select a group of ideas that impact large global populations while considering the country's physical traits and location

geography.about.com worldbookonline.com

3.3. B. QUESTIONING (INQUIRY) AND CONTRIBUTING

Essential Questions: When is it appropriate to ask questions? How do speakers express their thoughts and feelings? Enduring Understandings: Questioning and contributing help speakers convey their message, explore issues and clarify their thinking. Content: Acquisition of new knowledge requires posing relevant questions, listening to the ideas of others, and contributing information or ideas in group discussions or interviews. Grade Level Examples: Relevant questions ­ ask and answer Ideas of others ­share in conversations and groups

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Ask prepared and follow-up questions in interviews and other discussions.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Assign pairs to interview their partners about a major life event

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History- Interview partner about his/her reaction to a historical event , i.e. 9/11, presidential election History ­ Summarize orally the main points of a historical speech Science- assign a non-fiction scientific text and prepare written/oral presentation History ­ consider historical influence of major events in a novel

TECHNOLOGY

Facts on File database ABC-CLIO

2. Extend peer contributions by elaboration and illustration. 3. Analyze, evaluate, and modify group processes.

Summarize the responses from an interview orally to a group Assign specific duties, i.e. recorder, summarizer, questioner, and clarifier to members of a small group Meet one-on-one with students and ask each to elaborate on the supporting textual evidence of a thesis Read and discuss the merits of literary criticism based on the text/research of chosen theme Implement a discussion forum exercise based on an author's viewpoint that addresses the author's

Historyplace.com

Sciencedailly.com

4. Select and discuss literary passages that reveal character, develop theme, and illustrate literary elements.

Facts on File database ABC-CLIO

5. Question critically the position or viewpoint of an author.

History ­ discuss the social and historical conditions that influence a piece of literary criticism History - select an author who has written an account of a major historical event

History.com

6. Respond to audience questions by providing clarification, illustration, definition, and elaboration.

Facts on File database ABC-CLIO

merits of the viewpoint 7. Participate actively in panel discussions, symposiums, and/or business meeting formats (e.g., explore a question and consider perspectives). Conduct a mock interview in which students role play as employers or potential employees Career Education Ferguson's Career Guidance Center (database)

3.3. C. WORD CHOICE

Essential Questions: How does the choice of words affect the message? Enduring Understandings: Questioning and contributing help speakers convey their message, explore issues and clarify their thinking. Content: Application of precise vocabulary affects the topic and audience. Speakers organize information to achieve particular purposes and to appeal to the background and interest of the audience. Grade Level Examples: Precise vocabulary ­ descriptive words, figurative language Organize information for particular purposes ­ persuade, explain, or seek information.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Modulate tone and clarify thoughts through word choice. 2. Improve word choice by focusing on rhetorical devices (e.g., puns, parallelism, allusion, alliteration).

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Conduct speeches based on a researched topic Record speeches and improve content and elements of presentation by interspersing rhetorical devices

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History - research remote locations and compare/contrast cultural traditions History ­ view and discuss famous political speeches

TECHNOLOGY

Worldbookonline.com

Youtube.com

3.3. D. ORAL PRESENTATION

Essential Questions: How does a speaker communicate so others will listen and understand the message? Enduring Understandings: A speaker selects a form and organizational pattern based on the audience and purpose. CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Speak for a variety of purposes (e.g., persuasion, information, entertainment, literary interpretation, dramatization, personal expression). 2. Use a variety of organizational strategies (e.g., focusing idea, attention getters, clinchers, repetition, transition words). 3. Demonstrate effective delivery strategies (e.g., eye contact, body language, volume, intonation, articulation) when speaking. 4. Edit drafts of speeches independently and in peer discussions.

Content: Organizational strategies and delivery techniques should be appropriate to a particular purpose and audience. Grade Level Examples: Organizational strategies and delivery techniques ­ choral reading, role play, read aloud, eye contact MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History ­ base speeches on events or ideas relating to global affairs, i.e. the economy, unemployment, poverty

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Conduct a unit of speech activities designed to persuade, inform, entertain, interpret, dramatize and express personal ideas Prepare a 3-part outline for a speech focusing on motivation, persuasion, and influence Organize, prepare, and deliver a speech to develop effective delivery strategies

TECHNOLOGY

FactsonFile database

Science ­ base speeches on scientific discovery/inventions

Sciencedaily.com

History ­ view and discuss political speeches that reflect effective delivery strategies History ­ edit drafts of historical speeches and discuss how content can be altered to reflect current diction and usage Mathematics ­ focus student attention

Youtube.com

Peer edit in pairs the texts of studentwritten oral presentations

History.com

5. Modify oral communications through

Reword, rephrase, and adjust

Math.com

sensing audience confusion, and make impromptu revisions in oral presentation (e.g., summarizing, restating, adding illustrations/details). 6. Use a rubric to self-assess and improve oral presentations .for effective presentations.

presentation based on audience confusion

on audience response to a lengthy explanation of a mathematical theorem

Aplusmath.com

In a group discussion, design a rubric that reflects successful oral presentations and speeches

Computer Science ­ use Excel software to design and implement rubric

Excel software

STANDARD 3.4 (LISTENING) ALL STUDENTS WILL LISTEN ACTIVELY TO INFORMATION FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES IN A VARIETY OF SITUATIONS. Big Idea: Listening is an active process to gain understanding. LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY CURRICULUM - GRADE 12 2009-2010

3.4. A. ACTIVE LISTENING

Essential Questions: Can one hear but not listen? Enduring Understandings: Listening is the process of receiving, constructing meaning from, and responding to spoken and nonverbal messages. Content: Listening involves identifying purposes. Listening behaviors include listening critically to oral communications. Grade Level Examples: Identifying purposes ­ instructions, oral directions Oral communications ­ class discussions, jokes, rhymes, songs

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Research time period while listening to Middle English lessons

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History Historical fact and the effect of English language on writing throughout the old English period World Languages Listening to tone of voice to defer a persuasive voice

TECHNOLOGY

Georgetown.edu labyrinth

2. Listen skillfully to distinguish emotive and persuasive rhetoric.

Decipher and Analyze souiluquess and monologues in Shakespearean tragedy. Students will demonstrate the ability to disseminate ideas in order to prepare and evaluation written and or spoken in response to a speech or presentation

Language Lab

3. Demonstrate appropriate listener response to ideas in a persuasive speech, oral interpretation of a literary selection, or scientific or educational presentation.

Language/Science

Language Lab

3.4. B. LISTENING COMPREHENSION

Essential Questions: How does a listener understand a message? Enduring Understandings: Effective listeners are able to interpret and evaluate increasingly complex messages. Content: Effective listeners comprehend and analyze what is heard, listen for unfamiliar words, and learn their meaning. Grade Level Examples: Comprehend and analyze what is heard ­ answer questions, make predictions, paraphrase information shared by others.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Listen to summarize, make judgments, and evaluate.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Listening to an audio recording of a political speech/statement and summarize the main theme of the speech Determine the speakers' credibility greed to evaluation of the speech or specific speaker's topic. Analyze and evaluate on a controversial speech on a specific topic, separating fact from fiction. Listen; formulate question and response on theories, proposal and proposition on a debate team.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

Recording of the Declaration Of Independence

TECHNOLOGY

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19785/19785-index.html

2. Evaluate the credibility of a speaker.

All subject areas

Skype

3. Determine when propaganda and argument are used in oral forms.

History-read World War II propaganda ads and posters.

http://www. history.com

4. Listen and respond appropriately to a debate.

Science and History

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/MovieSpeeches/moviespeechabelincolnillinois.html

STANDARD 3.5 (VIEWING AND MEDIA LITERACY) ALL STUDENTS WILL ACCESS, VIEW, EVALUATE, AND RESPOND TO PRINT, NONPRINT, AND ELECTRONIC TEXTS AND RESOURCES. Big Idea: A media literate person can evaluate how words, images, and sounds influence a message. LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY CURRICULUM - GRADE 12 2009-2010

3.5.A. CONSTRUCTING MEANING FROM MEDIA

Essential Questions: What's the media message? Enduring Understandings: People experience the same media message differently. Content: Through the examination of different media forms, data interpretation, and advertising techniques, people experience the media message different. Grade Level Examples: Different media forms - films Data interpretation ­ graphs, charts Advertising techniques ­ target audience

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Understand that messages are representations of social reality and vary by historic time periods and parts of the world. 2. Identify and evaluate how a media product expresses the values of the culture that produced it. 3. Identify and select media forms appropriate for the viewer's purpose.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Evaluate Greco-roman law to determine social norms of the time period. View online videos of well know poems read by non-American actors.

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History- research philosophy during the Greco-Roman time period.

TECHNOLOGY

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/platoethics-politics/

Media Studies- compare online videos.

Youtube.com

Group presentations utilizing PowerPoint tailored for a specific audience.

All content areas

PowerPoint/ Microsoft office

3.5.B. VISUAL AND VERBAL MESSAGES

Essential Questions: What values, lifestyles, and points of view are represented in, or omitted from, media messages? Enduring Understandings: Media have embedded values and points of view. Content: Verbal and nonverbal messages are embedded in media. Visual and verbal techniques are used in media messages for a particular audience. Text and images affect the reader's or viewer's emotion. Grade Level Examples: Text and images ­ impact on cultural and global understanding.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Analyze media for stereotyping (e.g., gender, ethnicity). 2. Compare and contrast three or more media sources.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Viewing television, radio and mobile ads to determine stereotyping. Viewing similar commercials on the radio, TV and internet.

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

Health ­ view medical ads online. Science- views various forms of scientific, technical ads.

TECHNOLOGY

http://medicaladsnetworking.com/

Discovery.org

3.5.C. LIVING WITH MEDIA

Essential Questions: What affects media choice? Enduring Understandings: Media choice is affected by personal experience and sense of need. Content: Verbal and nonverbal messages are embedded in media. Visual and verbal techniques are used in media messages for particular audience. Text and images affect the reader's or viewer's emotion. Grade Level Examples: Text and images ­ impact on cultural and global understanding.

CUMULATIVE PROGRESS INDICATOR (CPI)

1. Use print and electronic media texts to explore human relationships, new ideas, and aspects of culture (e.g., racial prejudice, dating, marriage, family, and social institutions). 2. Determine influences on news media based on existing political, historical, economical, and social contexts (e.g., importance of audience feedback). 3. Recognize that creators of media and performances use a number of forms, techniques, and technologies to convey their messages.

SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Research husband and wife relationships during the Dark Ages Europe.

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONNECTION(S)

History- read about and outlines the chain of being during the Dark ages.

TECHNOLOGY

http://www.kheper.net/topics/greatchainofbeing/index.html

Listening to post-speech interviews on political missions and/or agendas.

History- reading political blogs during an election process.

www.gop.com

Formulate a collage using a number of media and performance forms, techniques etc about various messages.

History- research political messages of various presidents.

History.com

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­PUBLICSPEAKING

SEPTEMBER

Research and read models of past speeches, biographies, autobiographies. Subjects vary from humor to travel experience in preparation for the speech of personal experience-three to four minutes in length.

OCTOBER

Fear confession speech-two minutes. Students are to research the most common fears and rank them according to their own. i.e. fear of flying, claustrophobia, etc.

NOVEMBER

Personality profile speech. Three-five minutes. Students gather background and family information from birth to present. They are to organize and prepare a collage of their life working around a quote or a word that sums up their personality.

READING

MECHANICS

Memory tricks Limericks Tongue twisters

Listen to and critique in writing the evaluated speeches of peers.

Organizing Gathering background material Interviewing

VOCABULARY

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Workbook. 100-150 word outline for speech of introduction. 100-150 word outline for personal experience speech.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Workbook.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Workbook.

100-150 word outline and summary for personality profile speech. The summary should explain and clarify their quote as it relates to their everyday life.

100-150 word outline for fear confession speech

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­PUBLICSPEAKING

DECEMBER

The Pet Peeve Speech: Students gather information concerning things, items, people, and places, anything that might infuriate them or cause angst. Students may use family, friends, school, or work environments. Most Embarrassing Moment Speech: Students brainstorm, organize, and prepare to deliver a three to five minute speech explaining and demonstrating their most

JANUARY

The Pantomime Speech: Students research the biography of a famous person highlighting an incident, scene, or act that helped create their fame. Students then will present a four/five minute famous person pantomime.

FEBRUARY

The speech to develop bodily actions and gestures/ the how-to speech: students use the library and computer room to research actions and activities that they can demonstrate to the class in a speech of five / six minutes.

READING

embarrassing moment.

MECHANICS

Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

VOCABULARY

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Workbook. 100-150 word outline for Pet Peeve Speech.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Workbook. 100-150 outline for the pantomime speech Summary of biography.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Workbook.

100-150 word outline for the speech to develop bodily actions and gestures.

WRITING

100-150 word outline for Most Embarrassing Speech.

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­PUBLICSPEAKING

MARCH

The speech to stimulate or arouse an audience-the motivational speech 5/6 minutes: Students have the option of delivering their own original speech or use a "canned" speech (Patrick Henry's Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death speech). Students must finish leaving directions or activities for the audience to follow in support of their topic.

APRIL

Students will research, read and evaluate a fairy tale- i.e. Grimm's, Aesop's Fables, etc., and prepare, organize, and deliver a pantomime presentation. Requires group participation with each participant having one ­ two minutes on stage. Groups may have the maximum of six participants. Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

MAY

Students will outline, prepare, and organize for a speech to convince the audience: the sales speech. Debate-Students will be given a list of debate terms and organizational skills. Students will then prepare an outline for the non-researchable debate. Students will also be given the format and organizational rules for the educational classroom debate. Debate teams will consist of two members ­the affirmative case. Two members of the negative case, a moderator, timer, and three judges

JUNE

Students will research and develop topics for the educational classroom debate. Students will prepare an outline on a researchable topic. Prepare briefs, note cards, and evidence cards. Speakers will deliver a constructive round, a rebuttal round, and a cross examination round. Speaking times will be broken down into four minute, four minute, and two minute segments. The debate will conclude with an open floor for questions.

READING

MECHANICS

Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

Research Outline Brainstorm List Critique Evaluate

VOCABULARY

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude 100-150 word outline for the motivational speech.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude 100-150 word outline for fairy tale speech. A summary of the pantomime speech.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude 100-150 word outline for persuasive speech.

Ten step outline for the nonresearchable debate.

Twenty words a week taken from Barron's Verbal Aptitude Ten step outline to include the topic, a resolution, proposition, definition terms, and an affirmative and negative plan to include five advantages for each.

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER

READING

MECHANICS

VOCABULARY

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­

DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY

READING

MECHANICS

VOCABULARY

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­

MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE

READING

MECHANICS

VOCABULARY

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12AP

SEPTEMBER

Literature: elements of literature, heroic concept, epic characteristics Antigone - Sophocles Beowulf ­ Anonymous Philosophy: Intro to logic epistemology Music/Art: elements of art & music, Greek art

OCTOBER

Literature: Sir Gawain & the Green Knight ­ Anon. The Song of Roland ­ Anon. The Nibelungenlied ­ Anon. Philosophy: Plato Music/Art: Roman art

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

NOVEMBER Literature: Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer Philosophy: Descartes, Hume, Locke, Kant Music/Art: Medieval art

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

READING

MECHANICS

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

VOCABULARY

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book AP test preparation writing Literary analysis of three summer reading novels

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book

AP test preparation writing Literary analysis paper: The Medieval Hero Research paper: Seminar topic and subtopic

AP test preparation writing Creative paper: heroic couplet morality tale

WRITING

Creative paper: Autobiography

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12AP

DECEMBER

Literature: Hamlet - William Shakespeare

JANUARY

Literature: Crime and Punishment ­ Fyodor Dostoyevsky Philosophy: Aristotle's "Prime Mover" Music/Art: Baroque art

FEBRUARY

Literature: Select Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnets Philosophy: "proofs" of God's existence Music/Art: Classical era

READING

Philosophy: Philosophy of religion Theology Music/Art: Renaissance art

MECHANICS

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

VOCABULARY

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book AP test preparation writing

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book AP test preparation writing

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book AP test preparation writing Creative paper: Shakespearean and Petrarchan sonnets

Literary analysis paper: Hamlet WRITING Film analysis paper: Directorial staging of Hamlet

Research Paper: Seminar topic and subtopic Literary analysis paper: Crime and Punishment

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12AP

MARCH

Literature: Romantic poetry

APRIL

Literature: Twentieth century poetry Philosophy: Plato's Republic Music/Art: Post-Romanticism

MAY

Literature: Cry, the Beloved Country ­ Alan Paton Philosophy: The Problem of FreedomBerlin, Dostoyevsky, Socrates, Plato, Thoreau, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau Music/Art: Impressionism Modern art Jazz Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

JUNE

Review for final exam

READING

Philosophy: Upanishads/Bhagavad Gita Confucius Music/Art: Romanticism

MECHANICS

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Thesis statements Comma usage Sentence structure Parallelism Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Review for final exam

VOCABULARY

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book

Vocab taken from texts AP exam vocab Literary terms from AP book Creative paper: Artistic analysis ­ poetry and art Research paper: Seminar topic and subtopic Literary analysis paper: Cry, the Beloved Country

Review for final exam

AP test preparation writing Research paper: Seminar topic and subtopic

AP test preparation writing

Review for final exam

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12HONORS

SEPTEMBER

"The Seafarer" From Beowulf From Canterbury Tales Madame Bovary

OCTOBER

Madame Bovary From Sir Gawain and the Green Knight From Morte D'Arthur

NOVEMBER

"Desiree's Baby" Sonnets of Edmund Spenser, Petrarch, Shakespeare Selections from the King James Bible

READING

MECHANICS

Parenthetical references Works Cited entries Compound predicates Appositives and appositive phrases Use of colons and semi-colons

Parenthetical references Works Cited entries Comparative / Superlative forms Review use of colons, semi-colons

Parenthetical references Works Cited entries Comma usage review

VOCABULARY

Latin word roots SAT ­ Freq. used words

Latin word roots SAT ­ Freq. used words

Shakespeare word bank SAT ­ Freq. used words

WRITING

Expository writing College essay Summary Critical questioning in paragraph form

Literary analysis in MLA format Reader response journal College essay

Reader response journal Short literary analysis Critical questioning

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12HONORS

DECEMBER

Works of Jon Donne and Ben Jonson Works with the theme of Carpe Diem Selections from Paradise Lost

JANUARY

Non-fictions texts based on theory, philosophy Night From Mein Kampf Holocaust poems, selections

FEBRUARY

Holocaust selections; Resistance "Montgomery Bus Boycott" Things Fall Apart Author biography

READING

MECHANICS

Parenthetical references Works Cited entries Irregular verbs Use of "who" and "whom"

Parenthetical references Works Cited entries Active / passive voice Irregular verbs

Parenthetical references Works Cited entries

VOCABULARY

SAT ­ Freq. used words Renaissance word bank

SAT ­ Freq. used words German and Yiddish word bank

Things Fall Apart word bank

Literary analysis Film response Open-ended question response

Literary analysis Reader response journal Essay on racial theory

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12HONORS

MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE

READING

MECHANICS

VOCABULARY

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12AP

SEPTEMBER "Antigone" OCTOBER Selections from the European Romantics: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats From Sir Gawain and the Green Knight From Morte D'Arthur

Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Review: There, Their, They're

Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

NOVEMBER Chronicle of a Death Foretold Poems of William Blake "The Oval Portrait," Poe Canterbury Tales

READING

"Oedipus" From Beowulf

MECHANICS

VOCABULARY

S.A.T. Frequently used words Vocabulary in context Reader response journal Expository essay Literary analysis (summer reading) College essay

S.A.T. Frequently used words Vocabulary in context

S.A.T. Frequently used words Vocabulary in context

Film analysis Literary analysis Poetry College essay

Literary response Open-ended questions response with textual support Expository writing

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12AP

DECEMBER Macbeth JANUARY Poems based on the theme Carpe Diem Early feminism: Austen, Wollstonecraft, Shelley (biographical sketches, excerpts from essays, fiction, dramatic works)

Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

FEBRUARY Night Excerpt from Mein Kampf Additional Holocaust texts including poems, stories of resistance, historical sketches

READING

Sonnets from Shakespeare, Petrarch Dante's Inferno

MECHANICS

Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Shakespeare word bank

VOCABULARY

College-level word bank

German/Yiddish word bank Holocaust terms Film analysis re: dramatic elements Reader response journal Essay on racial theory with supporting evidence

Film analysis: compare/contrast Reader response journal

Dramatic sketch Essay on feminist elements in fiction

WRITING

CURRICULUMMAPPING/LANGUAGEARTS­GRADE12AP

T

MARCH

APRIL

Senior theme: additional genres Joseph Conrad, "The Lagoon" James Joyce, "Araby"

MAY Nadine Gordimer, "The Train from Rhodesia" Gothic short fiction

JUNE Review for final exam

Things Fall Apart

READING

George Orwell, "Shooting an Elephant" Author's biography Senior theme fiction

D.H. Lawrence, "The Rocking Horse Winner"

Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions Sentence structure Comma review Parenthetical reference Works cited entries Citation formats/Works Cited Quote Usage Transitions

Review for final exam

MECHANICS

VOCABULARY

Vocab taken from texts College-level word bank Summary of literary literary influences Senior theme draft(s)

Vocab taken from texts College-level word bank Literary analysis Senior theme final

Vocab taken from texts College-level word bank

Creative paper: Artistic analysis ­ poetry and art Research paper: Seminar topic and subtopic Literary analysis paper: Cry, the Beloved Country

Review for final exam

Review for final exam

WRITING

Film analysis

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