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NORTHWEST WASHINGTON CHAPTER

WWW.NWCICC.ORG NEWSLETTER May 2010 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

WOW! The spring 2010 education seminar is over. All the comments so far have been positive. What a job our education committee has done. Sharon, Milt, Mike, Don & Joyce have put together a good venue with an exceptional instructor team. Special thanks to Tim Nordvedt CBO and BO of Mill Creek, David VanBeek, Asst Fire Marshal of Marysville Fire District, Jim Tinner CBO and BO of City of Bellingham and Willie Hill CBO and manager of the Building and Construction Code Compliance division at BHC Consultants. My hat's off to all of them. There is energy code training around the area. Keep your ears open and find some. We're trying to schedule a commercial workshop to follow up the residential update we had 2 months ago. Stay tuned to this newsletter and our website. Take a few minutes to help us and your organization. Ask your co-workers and employees to join us. $15 a year is almost free. Then bring them to a workshop. CEUs are always important. Job Opening ­ We are looking for a permit tech to write a column in our newsletter. Simple job ­probably spend less than an hour each month. Tell a coworker about the need. Thanks. See you at a meeting!

WHO'S WHO FOR 2010

Officers

President: Tom Radford [email protected]

Vice President: Jerry Berndt [email protected] Treasurer: Secretary: Joyce Gundry [email protected] Vacant Position

Past President: David W. Anderson [email protected]

Executive Board Members:

Don Stout [email protected] Milton Thompson [email protected] Sharon Pettit [email protected] Michael Fitzgerald [email protected]

Education Committee

Don Stout Milton Thompson Jerry Berndt Sharon Pettit Michael Fitzgerald

Newsletter Committee

Jerry Berndt [email protected]

Tom Radford

Chapters Web Site Link http://www.nwcicc.org/ UPCOMING EVENT UPCOMING EVENT

Board Meeting May 6, 2010

Meeting moved to May 13th

May 13, 2010

Location:

Workshop Meeting

Location: Best Western 3228 Marine Drive Marysville WA 98271 Time: 5:00 PM to 7:30PM RSVP: Tom Radford (425) 587-3600 [email protected]

Best Western PRESENTATION OUTLINE 3228 Marine Drive Marysville WA 98271 FIRE ALARM Time: 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM COMMUNICATION Instructor: LeRoy McNulty ­ Lynnwood Fire Marshal REQUIREMENTS Cost: $20.00 SEE PRESENTATION RSVP: Don Stout OVERVIEW ON NEXT PAGE [email protected]

BEST WESTERN LOCATION MAP - CLICK ON LINK BELOW

http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&where1=3228%20Marine%20Dr%20NE%2C%20Tu lalip%2C%20WA%2098271-7456&encType=1

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Northwest Chapter May Workshop Speaker and Presentation

Speaker: LeRoy McNulty ­ Lynnwood Fire Marshal

Presentation: With the diminishment of traditional telephone lines, and the advent of internet and cable communications brings new issues to the requirements for Fire Alarm Communications. Does the current edition of NFPA 72 (National Fire Alarm Code) allow for these Other Technologies of communicating fire alarm conditions? Does the 2007 edition or 2010 edition allow for internet transmission of fire alarms? If so, can we utilize editions of NFPA 72 that are not yet referenced in the State of Washington adoptions? Do internet systems have adequate battery backup of their system to provide adequate communication of fire alarm systems? Come and hear these questions addressed, as well as any other questions you may have about the Communications provisions Fire Alarm Systems in IBC, IFC, and NFPA 72. Mark Bunje, Shoreline Fire Marshal along with Lynnwood Fire Marshal LeRoy McNulty and industry leaders will discuss their experiences and highlight the issue of achieving code compliance utilizing new technology. This will be a great discussion for fire and building officials, inspectors and fire alarm, internet, and cable industry providers.

UPCOMING EVENTS

April 8, 2010

This date should be May 13th

Location: Best Western Time: 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM Instructor: LeRoy McNulty Lynnwood Fire marshal Cost: $20.00 Menu: T.B.A. RSVP: Sharon Pettit (360)282-3158 [email protected]

Workshop Meeting PRESENTATION OUTLINE FIRE ALARM COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS

June 17, 2010

Location: Best Western Time: 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM Instructor: QED TESTING LAB FIELD TRIP Cost: Menu: RSVP: $20.00 T.B.A. Sharon Pettit (360)282-3158 [email protected]

Workshop Meeting QED TESTING LAB FIELD TRIP THERE WILL BE BOTH A LAB & FEILD

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DEMONSTRATION WHICH INCLUDES A BLOWER DOOR TEST (BBQ LUNCH BEING PROVIDED BY QED)

NORTHWEST WASHINGTON CHAPTER of ICC

NORTHWEST CHAPTER TRAINING QUESTIONNAIRE

TOPICS YOU WOULD LIKE YOUR CHAPTER TO SPONSOR? 1st __________________________________________________ 2nd ________________________________________________ 3 rd__________________________________________________ 4th ________________________________________________ 5th ___________________________________________________ LOCATION THAT WORKS BEST FOR YOU? 1st _____________________________2nd_________________________________ CAN YOU OFFER ANY TRAINING? ____________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ WHAT PRICE RANGE COULD YOU OR YOUR JURISDICTION SUPPORT?____________________________________________

EMAIL YOUR REPLY TO:

Don Stout, NWCICC [email protected]

NORTHWEST WASHINGTON CHAPTER

WWW.NWCICC.ORG

May 13, 2010 WORKSHOP

FIRE ALARM COMMUNICATIONS

With the diminishment of traditional telephone lines, and the advent of internet and cable communications brings new issues to the requirements for Fire Alarm Communications. Does the current edition of NFPA 72 (National Fire Alarm Code) allow for these Other Technologies of communicating fire alarm conditions? Does the 2007 edition or 2010 edition allow for internet transmission of fire alarms? If so, can we utilize editions of NFPA 72 that are not yet referenced in the State of Washington adoptions? Do internet systems have adequate battery backup of their system to provide adequate communication of fire alarm systems? Come and hear these questions addressed, as well as any other questions you may have about the Communications provisions Fire Alarm Systems in IBC, IFC, and NFPA 72. Mark Bunje, Shoreline Fire Marshal along with Lynnwood Fire Marshal LeRoy McNulty and industry leaders will discuss their experiences and highlight the issue of achieving code compliance utilizing new technology. This will be a great discussion for fire and building officials, inspectors and fire alarm, internet, and cable industry providers.

Location:

Pacific Rim Supper Club & Ballroom - Best Western 3228 Marine Drive Marysville WA 98271

www.pacificrimsupperclub.com

Time: 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM Facilitator: LeRoy McNulty, Lynnwood Fire Marshal Cost: $20.00, includes Dinner. ICC CREDIT GIVEN Membership with NWCICC not required to attend. RSVP: Don Stout [email protected]

NOTE: June 17 Workshop ­ QED Testing Lab Field Trip (BBQ lunch being provided by QED). There will be

both a lab and field demonstration which includes a blower door test.

WASHINGTON STATE ENERGY 2009 CODE

The WSU Energy Program Website for the 2009 Washington State Energy Code has been updated and now is live. When you get to the site, you have a choice of going to information about the 2006 WSEC or 2009 WSEC. To avoid confusion, 2006 and 2009 information is posted on two separate pages. Included in the 2009 page are updated Prescriptive Path Compliance Forms, Component Performance Worksheets, duct testing affidavits for new and existing construction, compliance certificates, standards, fact sheets and other related information. Also, you can download the complete 2009 WSEC from this site. To access this site, go to: www.energy.wsu.edu and click on Energy Code.

2009 Energy Code Resources

Listserv Sign up to receive e-mail updates about energy code changes and educational opportunities from the Energy Code listserv. The following archive link will direct you to previous "hot topic" newsletters. "Hot Topic" Archives Link to resource (coming soon)

Code Text:

2009 WSEC - Chapters 1 through 10 (Single-Family Residential) 2009 WSEC - Chapters 11 through 15 (Multi-Family and Non Res)

Jack's Corner "Just What is Conventional Construction?"

Jack's Corner ­ 4-10-10 In early 2009, as part of my own continuing education program, I worked my way through a number of on-line courses. There was some pretty interesting information in the courses so I spoke with Sharon and Jerry about the possibility of including some of the elements of these courses in the Corner Series. As a result, with a little direction and encouragement from Sharon and Jerry, what follows is the first of this series. Each course required a test necessary to gain certification and credit. There was a lot of content and the tests were no "cake-walk" so, just to make things a bit more interesting, we will add a question of two to the end of each of the "Corner" segments...and, yeah, OK, we will include the answer. If what you read here sparks a follow-up question, just send a response e-mail and I will try to provide the answer. The first course, called Basics of Wood Construction, and founded within the 2006 IRC & IBC, consisted of 10 sections, the first section being "What is Conventional Construction?". There are probably some of you who may find this segment pretty simple or Ancient History; if so, I'm sorry and that's OK. As a matter of fact, I have learned to be very pleased when one of my write-ups or specifications is deemed "too simple"...far too often, the engineer's write-ups are just too complicated, too confusing, or too confounding...or all of the above. Anyway, here goes:

"Just What is Conventional Construction?"

Conventional Construction is one of 3 design methodologies recognized in IBC Chapter 23 for wood construction: 1) allowable stress design, 2) load & resistance factor design and 3) conventional construction. Conventional construction establishes the provisions for "time-tested (and occasionally lab tested) prescriptive framing methods"...used...primarily for residential construction. These methods can "be used without design analysis or load calculations." IBC Chapter 23 limits the application of conventional construction to: Maximum of 3 stories above the grade "plane" (and, let's remember, per IBC 2308.2, in seismic category D & E, a "pony wall" greater than 14" is considered a "story"). Bearing wall heights limited to 10 ft. (and the height of the floor framing is limited to 16 ") Roof spans of 40 ft. Limited loads (average deadloads are limited to 15 psf (there is an exception for masonry veneers); liveloads to 40 psf) Wind speeds are limited to 100 mph for 3 sec gust (110 mph for Exp B) There are a couple of more limitations but the above probably effect construction the most.

Jack's Corner "Just What is Conventional Construction?"

Cont.

The Scope of the IRC defines this conventional construction methodology and makes it available for "Code" construction. The basis of conventional construction is not engineering analysis but mostly historic methods of construction. By the way, just because it is "historic", doesn't make it right. My neighbors son-in-law, a pilot that lives back east, was visiting. The son-in-law said he having a house built and had a question. He was concerned about the walls of his new Great Room "sort of bowing out"...said his builder was "very experienced". A few photos later, it was determined that the nice big exposed rafters of his new great Room had no ridge beam or ceiling ties or collar ties, so the roof framing was deflecting down and pushing the walls out... 3-4 inches lateral push within a month or so! Later, the builder expressed surprise, said he had built a lot of houses "the old way"...so the construction he used might have been "conventional" by one standard; however, it did not prevent the walls from bowing out and it certainly was not good construction (a ridge beam was installed to correct the son-in-law's problem; I don't know what happened with the other houses). One other consideration, older structures, even large multi-story structures, usually consisted of a lot of relatively small rooms which provided there own inherent stiffness and stability. The lesson is pretty obvious, just because it is "conventional" doesn't make it right. The IRC content provides methods that instill the required strength and stability into the structure; that said, whether it is IRC or IBC, if it looks wrong or doesn't make sense, I recommend you raise a warning flag. The IRC, as the basis of conventional construction, includes consideration of lateral loading, most notably wind and earthquake. This is not done by engineering analysis but by limitation of building configuration and recognized lateral resistance of the accepted framing materials and framing methods. In fact, if you start at the roof framing requirements of the IRC and follow the requirements through the wall framing, the floor framing and the foundation, a load path can be defined just as is required for standard lateral analysis. The seismic category used limits the use of conventional construction. What you can "conventionally" construct in seismic design category C is different than D. Conventional construction ­ What it is not: Beam loading in the IRC (Conventional Construction) is considered uniform and consistent; concentrated beam loads are not considered. If design or construction results in concentrated ("point") loads on beams, the design is outside conventional construction. Engineered wood products, like glulams, LVLs, Parallams, are not addressed in Conventional Construction (the IRC). They are different than solid sawn lumber and must be used within their respective limits. Heavy timber framing, especially the connections, are outside the IRC.

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Jack's Corner "Just What is Conventional Construction?"

Cont.

Large wood buildings may have elements of Conventional Construction (like interior bearing walls); however, wide spans and multi-level construction can create loadings outside the IRC jurisdiction. Trusses, whether built-up or manufactured, are outside the IRC. Obviously, manufactured trusses are used every day in residential construction but note that each truss will have it's own engineered design analysis. That analysis is limited to the truss and the truss manufacturers are careful to tell you so. Remember such things as additional bracing to provide lateral resistance especially when using mono-trusses or high heel trusses and, with ever more popular girder trusses, remember the much higher bearing loads exerted on the wall framing at the support points for the girder truss. And the Unique...like an irregular structure built from some undulating tree trunk...let's give that one to the engineer...and watch his eyes get strange. Well, that's enough for a first time. Here's a question or three: 1. In seismic category D, Conventional Construction (the IRC) can be used to build a 3 story house on a foundation that requires a 24" pony wall. T or F? 2. The IRC has provision to allow headers supporting a girder truss at mid-span. T or F? 3. Conventional Construction is an accepted design methodology of the IBC. T or F? ...and the answers: 1) F - if it is seismic cat D, the pony wall is limited to 14"; 2) F - Conventional Construction (the IRC) does not deal with concentrated loads on beams (headers) and a girder truss will surely provide a heavy conc load; 3) T - Conventional Construction is accepted by 2006 IBC section 2308.1)

Let me know what you think.

Jack H.

The above design and engineering considerations and discussions are for educational and rhetorical purposes only. Specific designs should be reviewed by the appropriate agency and, if required, a registered engineer or architect.

Code Question of the Month This Month's Question: A deli that does not have a sitting or dining area is regulated as having a Group ______ occupancy. A) M B) A-2 C) A-3 D) B ANSWER TO FOLLOW IN NEXT MONTH'S NEWSLETTER Code Question Last Month Last Month's Question: The height of an office building that is fully sprinkled in accordance with NFPA 13 is permitted to be increased: A) The height measured and established by the architect and approved by the Building Official B) Two stories C) 20 feet D) 15 feet Correct! The answer comes from IBC Table 504.2.

Northwest Washington

Chapter of ICC

NWCICC.ORG

2010 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Membership Renewal

New Membership Application

Name: ____________________________________ Title: _________________________________ Mailing Address: __________________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________ State: ______________ Zip Code: _____________ Jurisdiction / Company Name: _______________________________________________________ Business Phone: ___________________________ Home Phone: ___________________________ FAX #: _________________________________ E-MAIL: __________________________________

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Alternate mailing Address: ___________________________________________________________ City: ___________________________________ State: ______________ Zip Code: ___________ Dues Schedule: Active = City/County/State/Federal Agencies Associate = All others ASSOCIATE MEMBER = $15.00 / YR

ACTIVE MEMBER = $15.00 / YR

Please make checks payable to: NWCICC (Northwest Washington Chapter of I.C.C.) REMIT TO: Joyce Gundry, Treasurer NWCICC/Membership P.O. Box 1510 Monroe, WA 98272 (360) 863-4544 [email protected]

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