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NORTHWEST WASHINGTON CHAPTER

WWW.NWCICC.ORG NEWSLETTER

WHO'S WHO FOR 2010

October 2010

Officers

President: Tom Radford [email protected]

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Hello NWCICC, Change is good! We're moving the board meetings back to the Pine Street Grill in Everett starting this month. Mark your calendar for Oct 7th at 5:00 PM. All members are welcome to attend. We value your input and ideas. The education board is busy lining up programs for our benefit and training. I'm looking forward to this month's training with Mark Tullis and Bob Lloyd combining to discuss the changes to the UPC and new electrical requirements for maintaining electrical grounding. Jerry has a bio that you can read for more information. The website is updated ­ please check it out. NWCICC.org Take a few minutes to help us and your organization. Ask your co-workers and employees to join us. $15 a year is almost free. Then bring them to a workshop. CEUs are always important. Job Opening ­ We are STILL looking for a permit tech to write a column in our newsletter and a secretary for the chapter board. These are important jobs that don't take a lot of time ­ Thanks. See you at a meeting in October! Tom Radford

Vice President: Jerry Berndt [email protected] Treasurer: Secretary: Joyce Gundry [email protected] Vacant Position

Past President: David W. Anderson [email protected]

Executive Board Members:

Don Stout [email protected] Milton Thompson [email protected] Sharon Pettit [email protected]

Education Committee

Don Stout Milton Thompson Jerry Berndt Sharon Pettit Michael Fitzgerald

Newsletter Committee

Jerry Berndt [email protected]

Chapters Web Site Link http://www.nwcicc.org/

October 14, 2010

Location:

UPCOMING EVENT

Workshop Meeting

Best Western 3228 Marine Drive Marysville WA 98271 Time: 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM Instructor: Mark Tullis (City of Bellevue) Cost: $20.00 RSVP: Sharon Pettit (360)282-3158 [email protected]

PRESENTATION

OUTLINE

UPCOMING EVENT

Board Meeting October 7, 2010

Location: Pine Street Grill Everett, WA 98201 Time: 5:00 PM to 7:30PM RSVP: Tom Radford (425) 587-3600 [email protected]

2009 UNIFORM PLUMBING CODE OVERVIEW OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

BEST WESTERN LOCATION MAP - CLICK ON LINK BELOW

http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&where1=3228%20Marine%20Dr%20NE%2C%20Tu lalip%2C%20WA%2098271-7456&encType=1 .

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UPCOMING EVENTS

October 14, 2010

Location: Time: Instructor: Cost: Menu: RSVP: Best Western 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM Mark Tullis (City of Bellevue) $20.00 T.B.A. Sharon Pettit (360)282-3158 [email protected]

Workshop Meeting PRESENTATION OUTLINE 2009 UNIFORM PLUMBING CODE OVERVIEW OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

Mark Tullis, Worked for Sweeney Plumbing and Heating from 1971 to 1975 as a laborer and then got into the Union Apprenticeship program in 1976 at Local 32 in Seattle. I turned out in 1980 and worked for McDonald Miller Mechanical, University Mechanical and the Botting Co. I went to work for the City of Bellevue in 1989 and I am still here after 21 years working as a Plumbing Inspector and Plumbing Plan Reviewer. I taught for Local 32 for approx. 13 years but I quit approx. one year ago. I have a Company called M-Tull Plumbing Consultant and I do Plumbing Plan reviews for the City of Monroe, and for CWA Consultants November 18, 2010 Workshop Meeting

WORKSHOP CHANGED DATE CHANGED DUE TO HOLIDAY

Location: Time: Instructor: Cost: Menu: RSVP: Best Western 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM To Be Determined $20.00 T.B.A. Sharon Pettit (360)282-3158 [email protected]

PRESENTATION

OUTLINE

TO BE DETERMINED

MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL NOTICE

GREETINGS I.C.C. NORTHWEST CHAPTER MEMBERS IT IS THAT TIME OF YEAR TO RENEW YOUR CHAPTER MEMBERSHIP FOR 2011 AN APPLICATION IS PROVIDED ON THE NEXT PAGE FOR YOU, IF YOU WANT IT SENT TO YOU IN A WORD DOCUMENT EMAIL JERRY AT [email protected] OR YOU CAN GO TO THE Chapters Web Site Link http://www.nwcicc.org/ REMEMBER THAT YOUR MEMBERSHIP AND PARTICIPATION IN THIS CHAPTER IS VALUED. YOUR BOARD STRIVES TO SERVE ALL MEMBERS

Northwest Washington

Chapter of ICC

NWCICC.ORG

2011 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Membership Renewal

New Membership Application

Name: ____________________________________ Title: _________________________________ Mailing Address: __________________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________ State: ______________ Zip Code: _____________ Jurisdiction / Company Name: _______________________________________________________ Business Phone: ___________________________ Home Phone: ___________________________ FAX #: _________________________________ E-MAIL: __________________________________

This is very important. Newsletters are sent by e-mail

Alternate mailing Address: ___________________________________________________________ City: ___________________________________ State: ______________ Zip Code: ___________ Dues Schedule: Active = City/County/State/Federal Agencies Associate = All others ASSOCIATE MEMBER = $15.00 / YR

ACTIVE MEMBER = $15.00 / YR

Please make checks payable to: NWCICC (Northwest Washington Chapter of I.C.C.) REMIT TO: Joyce Gundry, Treasurer NWCICC/Membership P.O. Box 1510 Monroe, WA 98272 (360) 863-4544 [email protected]

Space below is for Chapter use only. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DATE RECEIVED: ___________ RECEIPT NO.___________

AMOUNT PAID: __________ RECEIPT DATE: __________

CHECK NO: ___________

Jack's Corner "Design Consideration for Log Structures"

Within the last month I was asked to develop repair procedures for a 2 story log house damaged by fire. Log house design is classic in one way, mystifying in another and very different from stud wall (bearing wall) or moment frame design reflected in today's residential design. Hopefully the case described below will provide some insight into log design and construction when subjected to the loads of current code (especially lateral loads). It would be too lengthy to go through the design process and details; however, if there is adequate interest on behalf of the NWICC members, I believe we could turn this into a log design short course. But, first things first, here's the story: The fire damaged house, constructed in 1982, was not a "kit" type log house; it was hand built. The fire, which started on the 2nd floor, destroyed the 2nd story. The 1st story, approximately 25' x 30' x 9 ft (to the 2nd floor), was not damaged by fire except for the localized charring of sections of the top courses of wall logs. The charring on these "top" logs is important as these are the continuous top intersecting linkage logs above doors and windows. The foundation was in good condition, consisting of concrete footing and stemwall with the sill log attached with 1/2" ABs at about 6 ft c/c. Part of my job was to provide the structural requirements to support the repair (reconstruction) of the house. To develop the structural requirements, I had to design the new 2nd story and the interface to the 1st floor to current code. In this instance, the lateral design parameters were controlled by earthquake and it was necessary for me to provide the load path that carried the EQ loads to the ground. This became quite a design challenge due to 3 factors: 1) EQ lateral loads are influenced by the weight of the structure and logs are heavy, 2) the design process I used (from ASCE 7-05) required the application of an "overstrength factor"; this OS factor is a coefficient driven by discontinuous wall lines and basically results in higher lateral loads, 3) log construction can employee a variety of techniques to hold logs together from wood pins to continuous steel dowels to, in this case, sections of rebar driven vertically through the logs. The log walls consisted of a variety of 6" diam to 12" diam doug fir logs held together with interconnecting coved (curve cut) joinery at the corners, steel angles at large openings and a series of 1/2" diam x 3 ft long staggered rebar driven vertically through the logs at several places along each wall. Additional design considerations included: 1) shrinkage; the log courses experience considerable and cumulative radial shrinkage; 2) log longitudinal edge preparation ("long groove") which influences friction resistance between courses; 3) openings and how to transfer load around them. There is an ICC Standard for log design and construction, ICC 400-2007 Standard on Design & Construction of Log Structures. I obtained a copy but I am sorry to report I could find little design guidance; Sections 403.1 & 404.2.2 & 406 noted the need for load transfer but not the how. Several articles provided sound design technique such as Tom Hahney's 2000 article "How Log Buildings Resist Lateral Loads". I looked into the Canadian Log Builders Association and the American equivalent and discovered they appear to have merged into the International Log Builder's Assoc. (http://www.logassociation.org/ ); however, they were targeted on new construction, not repair. In the end I combined three techniques to resist the rather significant EQ lateral loads: 1. The embedded rebar but only after evaluating the six failure modes required by the 2005 NDS (National Design Standard), which, by the way, significantly limited the rebar effectiveness. 2. The corner joinery but I was pretty conservative due to the curved cove used in the original construction. 3. Several shear resistance panels which was my own technique and utilized 4'x8' x ½" plywood panels attached to every other log course, and the sill log, using both nails and 3/8" diam "ledgerlok" screws.

Jack's Corner "Design Consideration for Log Structures"

Cont. PAGE 2 0F 3

The cumulative resistance result allowed me to move the lateral loads through the walls to the foundation. Fortunately, the foundation had been installed with significant reinforcing and appeared in excellent shape. The attachment to the foundation had been accomplished with ½" diam anchor bolts at 6 ft c/c. There is still one outstanding issue and that is the depth of the charring on the top continuous logs. My own spot investigation revealed a maximum depth of 3/8" charring which was acceptable; however, there were areas I could not access. Once demolition takes place and the existing logs are "blasted" (with peanut hulls I think) to remove the charring, I will need to see if there is more significant loss of material. Well, hopefully that gives some insight in log structure design, construction and repair. It gives me a new appreciation for log construction and its many variants. So, what do you say? Do you want to try to create a log design training? Jack H. The above design and engineering considerations and discussions are for educational and rhetorical purposes only. Specific designs should be reviewed by the appropriate agency and, if required, a registered engineer. PLEASE LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS

Tom Radford NWCICC President and City of Kirkland Plan Review says "Ethics are always scrutinized and challenged. Especially when a problem arises. Did you design properly? Did I review competently? Sound engineering judgment is approvable. Design requirements are always tweaked." If you have comments regard last month's jack's Corner article on "Engineering Ethics" you would like to have posted in the newsletter email them to Jack at Jack H. Husband or the newsletter committee at Jerry Berndt

CODE TIP FOR MEANS OF EGRESS

ACCORDING TO THE 2009 INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE (IBC), SECTION 1022.7: A stairway in an exit enclosure shall not continue below its level of exit discharge unless an approved barrier is provided at the level of exit discharge. Why? 2009 IBC Commentary explains... So that building occupants using an exit stairway during an emergency situation will be prevented from going past the level of exit discharge, the run of the stairway is to be interrupted by partitions, doors, gates or other approved means. These devices help the users of the stairway to recognize when they have reached the point that is the level of exit discharge. Exit signs, including tactile, are to be provided for occupant guidance at the door leading to the way out (i.e., directly to the exterior, or via exit passageway, lobby or vestibule). Furthermore, signs are to be placed at each floor landing in all interior exit stairways connecting more than three floor levels that designate the level or story of the landings in accordance with Section 1022.8.

2009 IRC & IBC BRACED WALL PANEL DESIGN VALUES

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NEW 2009 UPC DRAIN REQUIREMNTS FOR TOWNHOMES DUE TO COMMON WALL REQUIREMENTS

NEW 2009 WASHINGTON STATE ENERGY CODE "WHOLE HOUSE FAN ALTERNATE DESIGN METHOD"

If you have any pictures you would like to put in the newsletter please email Newsletter Committee [email protected]

NEW CODE QUESTIONS ARE BASED ON 2009 CODE Code Question of the Month This Month's Question: A building must be regulated as a high rise if the uppermost floor level is how many feet above the lowest level of fire department vehicle access. A) 75ft B) 65ft C) When determined by the Code Official D) When determined by the Fire Marshall

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ANSWER TO FOLLOW IN NEXT MONTH'S NEWSLETTER Code Question Last Month Last Month's Question: A congregate living facility for 16 persons is classified as a Group _________ occupancy. A) I-1 B) R-2 C) R-3 D) R-4 Correct! The answer comes from 2009 IBC Section 310.1

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