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Dear Friends The 2010 Annual Report of the Department of Ophthalmology of The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary covers our activities during our 190th year of continuous service. Again, as has been the case, US News and World Reports as one of the leading Ophthalmology Departments in the USA again ranked The Infirmary Eye Department. This report attests to our continuing fulfillment of the mission our founders, Dr. John Kearny Rogers and Dr. Edward Delafield, in 1820 empowered for The Infirmary: to bring the highest quality of eye care, education for future generations and research to improve vision for all. This report represents the work and dedication of many individuals who contributes of their time, treasure and talent. As you read the report, hopefully you will understand the magnitude of these individuals work and the debt owed. Academic appointments and promotions are a measure and acknowledgment of the intellectual attainment and service contributed to the Department of Ophthalmology at The Infirmary and New York Medical College. The quality of our residents and fellows are supported by their commitment to excellence, research projects and excellent fellowships achieved. This report highlights these and many other aspects of our program. If upon reading this report, you have any questions or comments please do not hesitate to contact us. Please remember The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary's Department of Ophthalmology in your gift planning.

Sincerely,

Joseph B. Walsh

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2010 ANNUAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY CHAIR REPORT 2010, our 190th Year, was a most successful and productive year for The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary Department of Ophthalmology. This report highlights many of the events and accomplishments of the year. For a complete listing of Honors, Research and Presentations see the complete report. APPOINTMENTS/PROMOTIONS NYMC/NYE&EI In recognition of service to The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary Academic Promotions and Appointments are earned and when made are definitely well deserved. The following were granted in 2010 and each adds immeasurably to the Department of Ophthalmology our founders' mission of: education, research and patient care. NEW YORK MEDICAL COLLEGE PROMOTIONS PROFESSOR OF OPHTHALMOLOGY GENTILE, Ronald Concetta PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OPHTHALMOLOGY MULDOON, THOMAS O wen

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF OPHTHALMOLOGY FORMAN, Scott MILMAN, Tatyana 2ary Appointmets: Neurology and Neurosurgery

CLINCAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF OPHTHALMOLOGY BORTZ, John G SILBERT, Glenn R APPOINTMENTS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HARIZMAN, Noga KORNSTEIN, Howard Strong CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OKSMAN, Henry C STEIN, Mitchell Brian

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RESEARCH SHELLY AND STEVEN EINHORN CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER In continuting to fulfill The Infirmary mission exposed in 1820 by our Founders, Dr. Edward Delafield and Dr. John Kearny Rogers, on March 18, 2010 The Department joined with the Board of Directors and many donors, including the NYE&EI Foundation, for the grand opening of the Shelly and Steven Einhorn Clinical Research Center. The evening was hosted by Mr. Mc Kessler, President and Professor Robert Ritch, Surgeon-Director and Director of Glaucoma Service. In an impassioned and scientifically stimulating speech, Dr. Ritch outlined the advances made by Infirmary Research, the present status and in a challenge to all THE BRILLIANT FUTURE OF INFIRMARY RESEARCH. To show the breadth of research taking place in this beautifully designed space on the Fifth Floor South Building the following are active IRB protocols by areas of interest: OPHTHALMOLOGY GLAUCOMA 27 RETINA/UVEITIS 55 (includes 13 uveitis/ocular inflammation) Neuro-Ophth 3 Cornea 5 ENT 22 PENDING RETINA 3-uveitis/ocular inflammation) ENT 2 For a the full extent of the Infirmary Research please refer to the IRB section included in this Annual Report. IRB AUDIT RESULTS 05/27/2010: Letter from Kathy Weil, Acting Chief Program Reinforcement Brand B, Division of Compliance, Center for Radiological Devices and Radiological Health DHHS " FDA inspection conducted at your site during the period of March 23, 2010 to March 25, 2010, revealed no significant concerns. As a result, no response is necessary at this time". ARVO NYMC/NYE&EI had 72 Poster/Presentations at ARVO in 2010. Also a Great Beach Bash hosted by Dr. Richard B Rosen on 05/03/10 at Lago Mar ­ 78 in attendanceThe Department congratulates and is most cognizant of the yoeman work done by so many that bring this research to fruition. The KEEP THE INFIRMARY BANNER FLYING HIGH. 14th ANNUAL RESIDENT/FELLOW RESEARCH DAY There were 32 high quality presentations at the 05/21/10 -14th Annual Resident/Fellow Research Day. RESIDENCY and FELLOWSHIPS The Infirmary is most fortunate to attract highly qualified candidates for its residency and fellowship positions. Each year over 400 applicants for the 7 residency positions are received. The Residency Selection Committee, upon reviewing the applications, extends invitations for Interviews to 60 of the candidate applicants. The fellowships also are highly competitive. For example 50 applications were received for the 2 Vitreal-Retinal Fellowship positions. It is the education and research component of our Department that allow the completion of our tripartite mission of those plus the delivery of the highest quality patient care.

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RESIDENCY MATCH CLASS OF 2014 NYE&EI CHANG, Peter Yuwei HUANG, GINTIEN JENKINS, Travis Clarke LEUNG, Ella Hoshuen OZGUR,Omar TONGBAI, Ronald Ronpob VINOD, Kateki BS Brown U BS UCLA BS C Charleston BS U Miami BS UC Irvine BS UCLA BA U Penn NYMC BS CCNY SD BA Cornell MD Tufts MD St Louis MD NYMC MD U Miami MD U Vermont COM MD MPH UCLA MD Jefferson

INAGANTI, Smitha R McCULLOUGH, April J

MD NYMD MD NYU

FRENZI, Carl VO, Anne

BROOKLYN-QUEENS MD Drexell MD Jefferson

SU, Emily

NYMC CLASS OF 2011 MATCH OPHTHALMOLOGY GOLLOGLY, Heidrun E Mayo Clinic INAGNATI, Smitha R NYMC JENKINS, Travis NYE&EI LaMATTINA, Kara C Stroger/Cook Chicago

FELLOWSHIP MATCH CLASS OF 2010 NYE&EI AMDE, Wendewessen Kresge Eye Institute Vitreal-Retina GRIPPO, Tomas M UC SD Glaucoma Dr. Weinreb GUPTA, Arusha Wilmer/Johns Hopkins Cornea JANGI, Anisha NYE&EI Cornea Drs. Seedor/Ritterband KIM, Julie MEEI/Harvard Glaucoma SHULMAN, Julia Moran Eye Institute Vitreal-Retina MACKOOL, Richard J Mackool Eye Institute Anterior Segment NYMC KHORAMIAN, David I Eye Plastics UCLA- Dr. Robert A. Goldberg LAGONIGRO, Paul Vitreal-Retinal Memphis - Dr. John Linn NYE&EI FELLOWS Medical School VITREAL-RETINA LANDA, Gennady LOWE, Robert J CORNEA Drs. Seedor Ritterband Technion Institute Tech UC SF Residency Kaplan MC/Rehovot George Washington

SL-R

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JANGI, Anisha KURLAN, Jocelyn

Columbia AECOM

NYE&EI Montefiore

GLAUCOMA: Drs. Ritch, Tello and Liebmann CASTILLEJOS, Alfredo National Autonomous University of Mexico HAYES, Daniel SUNY Upstate RAGUSA, Nikola SUNY Downstate SCHOR, Kenneth U of Michigan EYE PLASTICS Drs. Della Rocca ALLEN, Meredith Brooke Texas Tech USM OCULAR ONCOLOGY Dr. Paul Finger RAUT, Robert MD, B Pharm, MSc

NYE&EI Research Glaucoma Fellow North Shore/LIJ North Shore/LIJ Baylor College of Medicine

UT SWMC at Dallas

CLASS OF 2011 - FELLOWSHIPS NYE&EI CHAN, Ian Retina/Vit UC IrvIne Dr. Kuppermann DORAIRAJ, Syril Glaucoma UC SD Dr. Weinreb FRANCIS, Jasmine Ocular Oncology M-SK Drs. Abramson/Marr McGLYNN, Rob Glaucoma IllinoisE&EIDr.Jacob Wilensky MUKKAMALA, Krishna Retina/Vit ColumbiaDr. Chang PANARELLI, Joseph Glaucoma BPEI Dr. Budenz TRUBNIK, Valerie Glaucoma Wills Dr. Katz NYMC PERAGALLO, Jason Peds J STEIN/UCLA Drs. Demer/Eisenberg

FELLOWS MATCHED NYE&EI 2011 MEDICAL SCHOOL VITREAL-RETINAL Dr. Muldoon and Staff PATEL, ANU PATEL, Apurva Wayne State Univ Harvard RESIDENCY

Kresge Eye Institute Scheie Eye Institute

Corneal External Disease: Drs. Seedor, Ritterband, Koplin and Wu PATEL Chirag Vanderbilt University KNOLL, Faye LIJ/North Shore 2009 ­ 2010 INTERNATIONAL FELLOWS COUNTRY OF ORIGIN Jordan, Peoples Republic of China, Kirgyzstan, Thailand, Afganistan, Lithuania, Moldova, Egypt. Russia, Equador, Korea, Sri Lanka, Nigeria, India etc VISITING SCHOLARS REN, Ruojin, MD An attending physician from Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Ruojin Ren, MD, PhD, received one of the two ARVO/Pfizer Collaborative Research Fellowships that are awarded annually to promising investigators in ophthalmology. Dr. Ren will study at The New York Eye and Ear

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Infirmary with Robert Ritch, MD, Shelley and Steven Einhorn Distinguished Professor of Ophthalmology, and Surgeon Director and Chief of Glaucoma Services. They will work on research related to Exfoliation Syndrome, the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma worldwide. It also is associated with systemic disorders, such as transient ischemic attacks, myocardial infarction, Alzheimer's disease and even hearing loss. ADMINISTRATIVE CHIEF RESIDENTS 2010 ­ 2011 Dr. Paul A. Sidoti, Program Director, announced the following: JASMINE FRANCIS, MD JOSEPH PANRELLI, MD

ICO FELLOWSHIPS 2009 AWARDEES Becomes a World Leader in Providing International Ophthalmology Fellowships The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary has been awarded six International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) fellowships for 2009. These Fellowships are considered among the most prestigious international training awards in ophthalmology. Robert Ritch, MD, NYE&EI Chief of Glaucoma Services and Director of International Training, is instrumental in arranging these fellowships. He says, "The goal is to help promising young ophthalmologists from developing nations to acquire specialized diagnostic, medical and surgical techniques that they can take back to their home countries." Fewer than thirty ICO Fellowships are granted worldwide each year. In just the past four years, NYEEI has received over a dozen. This is also one of the largest numbers of fellowships at any medical center worldwide. 2010 FELLOWS at NYE&EI: PHILANTHROPHY FELLOWSHIP ENDOWMENT Senior Retinal Fellow will be designated: The Samuel Chung-Hang Lo, MD and Fiona Kin-Ping Lo Retinal Fellow from 07/01/09 ­ 06/20/14 due to 5-year $50,000.00/year grant. Dr. Lo, MD, OD was a member of the Class of 1991 and upon graduation of his residency, he completed a retinal fellowship at Mt. Sinai. He is private practice in Hawaii and a generous supporter of the Infirmary. Madhavi Kurli, MD is the second occupant of this endowed Fellowship. INFIRMARY ALUMNI AND STAFF Over 150 attended the NYE&EI STAFF & ALUMNI/AE PARTY at the AAO in Chicago Westin Hotel SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010 hosted by Drs. Richard Louis De Luca. President. One of our failings as an institution has been the lack of communication with our talented alumni world-wide in location. To begin to correct this gap, Dr. de Luca in cooperation with the Alumni Officers and NYE&EI Infirmary Development Office have re instituted regular news letters to

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our the many members of this most distinguished group. At the June 21, 2010 Annual Spring Meeting at the City Winery the NYE&EI DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI of the YEAR AWARDED TO: ROSENBLUM, Harvey LINSTROM, Christopher SIWICK, Joseph R'83 Ophth A `83 ­ present A ENT/H A '90 - present OR Technician '76 ­ present Honorary

LATKANY, Robert MD R'Ophth ,01 Director NYE&EI DRY EYE CLINIC Interview in Review of Ophthalmology Nov 2010 P 47 -51 Dr. Dweck Receives Distinguished Service Award Monica M. Dweck, MD R' Ophth '90 (Brooklyn, NY) was honored as the 2010 recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from VISIONS, a non-profit rehabilitation and social service organization assisting the blind and visually impaired to lead active and productive lives in their homes and communities. Dr. Dweck is a member of VISIONS Brooklyn Advisory Board helping to connect people with vision loss to vision rehabilitation and other services offered by the organization. According to the Executive Director of VISIONS, Dr. Dweck is an exemplary model of the collaboration between ophthalmologists and community based organizations POLLACK, PETER J R'Ophth`94 Has a monthly Column in Ophthalmology Management: `The Path To Papeles` He is comanaging partner for Ocala Eye (Florida) and founder of Emedikon, and online practice managemernt resource for physicians and administrators HAMMER, Mark E R'Ophth ,77 Named president of the American Retina Foundation ­ the charitable arm of American Society of Retinal Specialists. He is Clinical AssociateProfessor of Ophthalmology at the University of South Florida from which he recently earned an MBA. HONORS 2010 ATLANTIC COAST RETINA CONFERENCE ­ BALTIMORE MD Macula 2010 Resident/Fellow's Presentations night at Wilmer TOP PRESENTATIONS FRANCIS, Jasmine AZOR Preceptor Paul Latkany, MD MUKKAMALA, Krishna Choroideremia in Patient with Ectodermal Dysplasia Preceptor: Ronald C. Gentile, MD ROSEN, Richard B The imaging maven fresh from Milan then to Paris 03/23/10 High Resolution OCT, Microperimetry Retinal Function Image Les Judis De La Retine Le Docteur Richard Rosen. JUNE 2, 2010 ANNUAL RESIDENTS NIGHT NYAM C Michael Samson, MD Chair Sanjay R Kedhar, MD Secretary SIR KRISHNA MUKKAMALA Relationship between Central Serous Choroidopahty (CS-CR) and Helicobactor pylori Co-authors Spielberg, L, Kurli M, Strauss M, McCormick AS, Gentile RC, Rosen RB

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DAVID K ISAACS R'Ophth `10 NYMC Eylid Reconstruction using Harvested Nasal Septal Grafts Co-author: Schwarcz RM RITCH, ROBERT Served as Scientific Coordinator for Glaucoma, World Ophthalmology Congress 2010, June 6-9, Berlin, Germany Appointed International Coordinator, Glaucoma, 26th Annual Congress of the Asia Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Sydney, Australia, March 20-24,2011. Accepted the position of Scientific Coordinator for Glaucoma, World Ophthalmology Congress, Feb 16-20, 2012, Abu Dhabi, UAE International guest lecturer - Japan Glaucoma Summer Camp, Kyoto, Japan Aug 4, 2010. 2. SLEEP DISORDERS AND GLAUCOMA. THE VON GRAEFE LECTURE. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 17, 2010 Also 3 other lectures at the Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing Recipient of the 2010 HRH Prince Abdul Aziz al Blindness Award, Saudi Arabia Saud Prevention of

Honorary Presidency of the International Congress of Glaucoma Surgery to be held in 2012.

ARBAMSON, David H Sometimes Counsultant DAVID H. ABRAMSON, MD was given a tenure appointment at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where he is the first Chief of the Ophthalmic Oncology Service. He is the first ophthalmologist to ever receive tenure. He is Professor in the Department of Surgery, Pediatrics and Radiation Oncology. ASCRS Foundation Review Committee awarded 2010 Research Award: Rela HONORS RETINA STUDY CLUB 04/22/10 MEETH Drs. Doshi, Muldoon, Rosen and Walsh in attendance 4 OUTSTANDING NYE&EI PRESENTATONS Francis, Jasmine: Methymalonic Aciduria Maculopathy Mukkamala, Krishna: Torpedo Retinopathy Kurli, Madavi: Shaken Baby Syndrome: Bilateral Pathology Rao, Llewelyen: Coats` with HFS Relationship Between CS-CR and H Pylori. 10 $5,000.00 awards given Preceptor: R B Rosen, MD.

SHARMA, Sansar PhD Professor of Ophthalmology NYMC Speaker at the Lasker/IRRF (Initiative for Innovation in Vision Science) 03/01/ 03/03/10 Held a the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus, Loudon County, Virginia

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Dr. Sharma spoke on Effects of Elevated IOP on Celluar Changes in Glaucomatous Retina. FIGHT FOR SIGHT 2010 AWARDS ARATA, Zimena A awarded Summer Student Fellowship Grant. Preceptor Robert Ritch, MD. RETINA SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP for the 6th Annual MENTORING PROGRAM IN OPHTHALMOLOGY focusing on VITREALRETINAL PRACTICE 09/26 ­ 27 Chicago post Retina Society Meeting KURLI, Madavi The Samuel Chung-Hang Lo, MD and Fiona Kin-Ping Lo Senior Retina Fellow.

SOPRS Fall Scientific Symposium in Chicago "The spectrum of periocular atypical mycobacterial infections: a case series." The spectrum of periocular atypical mycobacterial infections: a case series. Authors: Kasra Eliasieh, Christopher Zoumalan, Ronald Gentile, Steven McCormick, Tatyana, Milman, Elizabeth Maher AAO Selects Joseph Nezgoda, MD As a representative to theAMA Meeting June 11 - 12, 2010 Residents/Fellows Section AMA House of Delegates

ARATA. Andrea summer medical student has been awarded Fight for Sight Research Award for a Summer Student Fellowship "Estimating the Prevalence of Central Visual Field Defects in Normal Tension Glaucoma Patients with Achromatic Perimetric Loss" TSENG, Christopher T, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Associate Adjunct Surgeon at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, recently received the American Glaucoma Society Clinician Scientist Research Award, a one-year, $10,000 grant to help develop new investigators. The award was for his paper, entitled, "Determining Relationships Between Optic Nerve Parameters and Rates of Visual Field Progression in Patients with Beta-Zone Perapapillary Atrophy." Gustavo De Moraes, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, received first place in the 2010 PanAmerican Association of Ophthalmology's Allergan Research Incentive Awards in Glaucoma, "Risk Factors" category. In March, he received the Santen Pharmaceutical Travel Grant from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology NEW YORK MEDICAL COLLEGE AWARD FOR EXTRAORDINARY ACHIEVEMENT 01/12/10 NYMC Academic Department with the 2nd highest percentage of published faculty during FY 2008/09 (PS Medicine was 1st) ARVO ORCHESTRA 2010 PRISCILLA LUKE PG-Y 3 NYMC 1. Dvorak Quintet. and Priscilla Luke, Viola 2. Duvernoy Trio for Piano Priscilla Luke REN, Ruojin, MD PhD Attending Physician Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hosptial

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ARVO NEWS: Summer/Fall 2010 page 3 & 21 Interviewed about her ARVO/Pfizer Fellowship that resulted in colloboration with Professor Robert Ritch FARVO at NYE&EI. Developed 2 study protocols on XFS Glaucoma. NEW YORK OCULAR SYMPOSIUM 11/13/10 New York Society for Clinical Ophthalmology John, M. Aljian, MD Coordinator and Moderator NYE&EI Speakers Dr. Meredith Allen Fellow Eye Plastics Lacrimal Complications of Orbital & Eye Lid Trauma Dr. Rudrani Banik Attending Neuro-Ophthalmology Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Dr. David A Della Rocca Attending Eye Plastics Ocular Plastic Trauma at NYE&EI Dr. Ronald C Gentile Attending V-R Silicone Oil Retention Sutures Dr. Alice Hong Eye Resident with Dr. R Koplin Slit Lamp Repair of Dislocated LASIK Flap Dr. Adrian Jachens Eye Resident (NYMC) Management of Visually Significant Corneal Lacerations in the Pediatric Population: A Review of Cases with Dr. G Zaidman Dr. Priscilla Luke Eye Resident (NYMC) Canalicular Dog Bite Injury in the Pediatric Population Dr. Richard J Mackool Attending Comprehensive Trauma Surgical Cases Dr. Tatyana Milman Attending Eye Path & Comprehensive Pathology of Non-Surgical Eye Trauma Dr. Joseph Nezgoda Eye Resident The Economic Implications of Corneal Foreign Bodies Dr. E Alfonso Ponce Attending V-R Penetrating Screwdriver Injury: Timing of V-R Srugery Dr. Richard B Rosen Vice-Chair Attending V-R Managment of Traumatic Subretinal Hemorrhage OCT Look at Macula Trauma Dr. Kenneth J Rosenthal Attending Comprehensive Iris Repair Dr. C Michael Samson Attending Uveitis/Ocular Immunology Sympathetic Ophthalmia AMERICAN ACADEMY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY ASSOCIATION FOR ADVANCEMENT IN VISION AND OPHTHALMOLOGY SILVER FELLOWS CLASS OF 2010 McCORMICK, Steven A SEIPLE, William H NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE: 30 YEAR FELLOWS DELLA ROCCA, Robert C RITCH, Robert

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NEZGODA, Joseph MD Res Ophth ,12 Was awarded 2nd Prize at the recent 2010 AMA-RFA Research Symposium Poster Competition

CASTLE-CONNOLLY AMERICA'S BEST DOCTORS 8th Ed.

CASTLE-CONNOLLY NEW YORK`S BEST DOCTORS (70) PRIMARY AFFILIATION (52) 2ary AFFILIATION (18)

SUPERDOCTORS 2010: NY Times Magazine supplement 04/25/10 ABRAMSON, Davvid H* BARILE, Gaetano R* CAMPLOTARRO, Brian N CHU, Wing COONEY, Michael J DELLA ROCCA, Robert C DOUROS, Stella FINGER, Paul T GENTILE, Ronald C KELLY, Stephen E KUNG, John S LICHTENSTEIN, Eric A MANDEL, Eric R MOSSERI, Maurice PAMEL, Gergory J RITCH, Robert ROSEN, Richard B RUBIN, Jeffery S SEIDENFELD, Andrew SOLOWAY, Barry D STEELE, Mark S WALSH, Joseph B WELSELEY, Peter E YAGODA, Arnold D KANE, Stephen A *consultants ACCARDI, Frank E BREINGAN, Peter J CEISLER, Emily J COAD, Christopher T CYKIERT, Robert DeLUCA, Richard L ESPOSITO, Donna A FRIEDMAN, Alan J GIBRALTER, Richard P KOPLIN, Richard LAROCHE, Daniel LIEBMANN, Jeffrey M MANDELBAUM, Sidney NEWTON, Michael J PRINCE, Andrew M RITTERBAND, David C ROSENTHAL, Jeanne L SAMSON, C Michael SHABTO, Uri R SPEAKER, Mark G TELLO, Celso WANG, Frederick M WISNICKI, H Jay DODICK, Jack M* KEDHAR, Sanjay R BAREST, Jessica L BUXTON, Douglas F CHAIKEN, Barry G COHEN, Leber DAYAN, Alan R DITKOFF, Robert R EVIATAR, Joseph A FURLAN, Louis E HALL, Lisabeth S KRAMER, Philip W* LESTER, Richard D MACKOOL, Richard J McDERMOTT, John A PACCIONE, Jeffrey C RAVIV, Tal RODRIGUEZ-SAINS, Rene ROTHBERGER, Melvin J SCHIFF, William M* SIDOTI, Paul S SPERBER, Lawrence T WALD, Kenneth J WEINTRAUB, Dina WONG, Raymond F GUERRIERO, Paul N SORENSON, John A

NEW YORK MAGAZINE BEST DOCTORS 06/14-21/10 ATTENDINGS GENTILE, Ronald C GIBRALTER, Richard HALL, Lisabeth

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LIEBMANN, Jeffery M SAFFRA, Norman SHABTO, Uri WALSH, Joseph B WANG, Frederick CONSULTANTS ABRAMSON, David H LISMAN, Richard McKOOL, Richard J ZAIDMAN, Gerald W US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT 2010 BEST HOSPITALS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Bascom Palmer Wilmer Wills Mass E&E Jules Stein UCLA Iowa Duke Dohney USC UCSF Cleveland Mayo Clinic Methodist Hospital The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary Emory Barnes/Jewish Wash U Scheie U Pa Kellog U Mich Harkness Columbia

Past for reference 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 12/13 13/15 13/17 16/18 14/16 13/17 11/15 9/18 12/17 12/19 16/20 12/19 12/18 9/18 13/17 15/16

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2009 2010

15/17 13/18

SUPERB EVENT FOR ALL Both Dr. Robert Ritch (force behind) and Dr. Teresa Prevetti (Pfizer) were the powers that helped this event occur. Dr Khaw succeeded Professor Noel Rice at Moorfields and the Institute. In addition, was the driving force in the building of the world's first EYE CHILDREN'S EYE HOSPITAL. In addition to the formal lectures: Dr. Khaw participated in Glaucoma Clinics and Peds. Glaucoma Clinic as well as the OR (Dr. Richard J Mackool arranged). PFIZER VISITING PROFESSOR IN OPHTHALMOLOGY MEDICAL ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP Peng Tee Khaw PhD FRCS FRCOphth FRCP FRCPath FIBiol FMedSci Professor of Glaucoma and Ocular Healing Glaucoma Unit and ORB (Ocular Repair and Regeneration Biology) Divisions of Cell Biology, Pathology and Glaucoma Institute of Ophthalmology and Moorfields Eye Hospital 02/03/10 02/03/10 02/04/10 02/05/09 Modulation in Wound Healing in Glaucoma Congenital & Developmental Glaucoma The Moorfields Safer Surgery System GRAND ROUNDS: Case Presentations Mixed Mechanism Glaucoma ROP Child Pigmented Angle Glaucoma ­ Melanocytosis Dr. Khaw Dr. Khaw Dr. Khaw Dr. Khaw Dr. Huang Dr. Bert

Professor Peng Khaw is professor of glaucoma and ocular healing at University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, consultant ophthalmic surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital, and also Director of the National Institute of Health Research Biomedical Research Centre in Ophthalmology. Professor Khaw's interests include repair and regeneration of the eye, improving surgical techniques, developing new anti-scarring agents and more recently repair of the optic nerve. He has won several prizes including the first ARVO Pfizer Translational Award, the Alcon Research Award for Scientific Excellence and has given various named lectures including the Sir Stuart Duke Elder Lecture. He is also the ARVO glaucoma trustee and was elected to the British Academy of Medical Sciences. ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR: Angela L Moore, MHA On May 12, 2010 Angela L Moore, MHA assumed the position as Administrator for the Department of Ophthamology. Since 2006 she as served as Administrator of Hematology/Oncology at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Previous positions Senior Manager ­ Strategy & Business Development Evanston NW Health Care Consultant ­ Health Care Practice Price-Waterhouse- Coopers Chicago Administrative Resident National Rehabilitation Hospital DC MHA Emory University 2001

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Ms Moore departed on 06/11/10 to pursue greener pastures KUZNETSOV, Vlad PA, MBA assumed this position September 20, 2010. Mr. Kyzentsov was awarded a BS/PA from SUNY-Downstate/The College of Staten Island and his MBA in Health Care Administration Baruch College/Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. In additon to extensive experience as a PA, Vlad has been Clinical Supervisor for Head & Neck Surgery/Otolarangology at SL-R and for the last five years Chief Executive Administrator for a large Ophthalmology Practice/ASU in Brooklyn NECROLOGY GIRARD, Louis J, MD died 12/29/10 at age 92. In 1985, Louis J. Girard, M.D., established this award to be awarded annually at graduation for the best ophthalmology resident research paper for that academic year. This was first awarded in 1985. The awardees name is engraved on a permanent plaque. In addition there is a $1000.00 prize from the Louis J. Girard Ophthalmological Foundation. The deadline for the award is April 15 of the academic year. A committee selects the recipient. The initial committee consisted of Drs. Jorge N. Buxton, Robert C. Della Rocca and Michael W. Dunn. Dr. Girard is a distinguished alumnus of The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary having graduated in 1951 as a resident and he subsequently then spent two years as a fellow in Ophthalmic Surgery and was Director of Research and established the Ophthalmic Research Department a the Infirmary. Dr. Girard received the Alfred Huidekopher Bond Memorial Award for outstanding ophthalmology resident in 1950 Dr. Girard left a strong record at The Infirmary and has continued as a strong loyal supporter even as his reputation in Anterior Segment Surgery became known throughout the World. Dr. Girard has received many honors and awards and was the Distinguished Alumni of The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary in 1986. Dr. Girard is presently Emeritus Professor of Ophthalmology at the Baylor College of Medicine. He was an innovator and surgeon active throughout the world. By establishing this award, Dr. Louis J. Girard could not have chosen a better way to encourage our residents to emulate the best in The Infirmary and to encourage future residents to follow in the exemplary pathway forged by Dr. Girard. KOVERMAN, James died 08/27/10 at age 73. Jim Koverman was the long-time director (1962 ­ 2003) of The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary's Contact Lens Clinic and a true pioneer and visionary in this field. His ability to fit complicated cases was world-renowned. Jorge N. Buxton, MD, and Mr. Koverman made the Infirmary a CONTACT LENS CENTER both in research and clinical practice. Many generations of residents, fellows and attendings learned from them and, in turn, thousands of patients had improved sight and comfort due to Mr. Koverman. In recognition of his distinguished service, he was honored by The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Alumni Association May 15, 2003. A true giant in his field and a strong supporter of the Infirmary, he will be forever remembered. The Infirmary family has lost a good friend. His wife, June, a wonderful, gentle and generous person, died in May of 2009. John R. Barely, MD (R'Ophth. '90) with whom Mr. Koverman has been working since his retirement from the Infirmary, called to let us know of Jim's passing.

LEWIS SCHACHNE, MD died 12/20/09 at the age of 86 of a malignant brain tumor.

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Lew was a long time member (55 years) of the Ophthalmology Department at The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary a teacher, surgeon and true gentleman NYE&EI Attending Staff 1954 ­ 1999 Honorary Attending 1999 ­ 2009 NEW YORK UNIVERSITY MD 1937 Clinical Professor NYU Survived by his wife: Mary Hilton Schachne former Head of the Women's Auxiliary. and Member of the Board of Directors at The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary (1970 ­ 1987) Son Douglas Schachne an Artist Daughter Elizabeth Schachne Safran, MD internist and medical epidemiologist Son-in law Marc Safran, MD USPHS Officer CDC Atlanta Georgia JBW Rememberances expressed in a letter to Mrs. Schachne The memorial service for Lew was most impressive and captured this extraordinary person. From 1954 till 1999 as active staff and from 1999 ­ 2010, as honorary ­ he was a vital, cherished, valued and beloved member of the Department of Ophthalmology at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary. Many people at the Infirmary ­ secretaries, social service and various attendings ­ joined in the above on hearing of his passing. When I began my residency in July 1970, one soon got to know whom to trust and rely on. It became quickly apparent that Professor Lewis Schachne was one of those individuals. He took patient care and resident education seriously and committed. A resident never had to worry about being left without support when Dr. Schachne was schedule to be in Clinic, the OR or on Call ­ HE ALWAYS THERE. Even when not scheduled, a resident could always count on him to advise and even change his schedule to help in the OR especially in his field of expertise, Ocular Plastics. He was a true gentleman physician and wonderful conversationalist. His knowledge of history and fund of funny stories (my favorite was his post-appendectomy hospital visit by his neighbors ­ the Marx brothers) was astounding. In good, and not so good weather, we would often be with him in the parking lot as he put on his pant guards and mounted his bike for his homeward journey up First Avenue. The memorial service truly expressed that those of us that had the honor to know and work with him (several generations of residents at NYE&EI and NYU), his patients for whom he cared deeply and friends truly are better for this encounter and the world is a sadder place with his absence. The entire Infirmary Family joins with me in expressing our sincerest sympathy to you and your remarkable children. Joseph B. Walsh, MD, FACS, FRCOphth

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THE NEW YORK EYE & EAR INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 2010 DONORS $250,000 - $500,000.00 Estate of Marcelle Meyers Robert Reid, Esq. Richard B. Rosen, MD Gennady Landa MD AMD Research

$100,000 ­ $249,000 HPB Foundation (Pliny Jewell IV) Ophthalmology (Ongoing) HPB Foundation (Pliny Jewell IV) (Ongoing) The Belinda Bingham Pierce and Gerald G. Pierce, M.D. Distinguished Chair of

The Gerald G. Pierce, M.D. Memorial Consultation Suite

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Hyman Ocular Immunology In honor of C. Michael Samson, MD (Final Installment)

$ 50,000 - $ 99,999

Dr & Mrs. Samuel Lo, MD King-Ping Lo Fund (Ongoing)

The Samuel Chung-Hang Lo, MD & Fiona

$ 10,000 - $ 49,000 The Wise Charitable FoundationRichard B. Rose, MD Mr. Robert Wise Retina Research

$ 1,000 - $ 9,000

The Milbank Foundation

Dr. Richard B Rosen's Research

16

Mary Lea Johnson Richards Mrs. Justine Lawrence

Dr. Richard B. Rosen's Research Richard B. Rosen, MD Retina Research

Mr. Al Maiolo

Ophthalmic Research

Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence Najarian Eye Research Martha Washington & Harry Ophthalmic Research H Strauss Foundation

$100 - $1,000.00 The Reverend Canon John G B In honor of Dr. Paul A. Sidoti Andrew, DD, OBE Dr. Robert C. Della Rocca Dr. David A. Della Rocca Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Langman Judge & Mrs Burton Sherman Ophthalmic Research Ophthalmic Research Ophthalmic Research Bendheim Retina Center Research In honor of Richard B Rosen, MD In Memory of Mr. James Koverman

Joseph B. Walsh

THE JUDITH CORCORAN MEMORIAL FUND Dr. & Mrs. Robert C. Della Rocca Joseph B Walsh & Don W Lundquist

17

OPHTHALMOLOGY DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION 2010 The Board of Directors of The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary has entrusted the administration of the Department of Ophthalmology to the Chair of Ophthalmology, who by consent, concurrently serves as Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology of New York Medical College. The Chair, therefore, is selected by and reports directly to the Board of Directors of The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary and New York Medical College. ADMINISTRATION Chair..............................................................................Joseph B. Walsh, MD* Vice Chair and Director of Research ........................................Richard B. Rosen, MD*. Program Director...............................................................Paul A. Sidoti, MD* Director, Medical Education..................................................................Joni G. Grandin Residency Coordinator.........................................................Ana Limjoco Medical Student Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........Lois M. McNally, MD* ............................................................Coordinator.........Ruth Moses Coordinator Refraction Service..............................................David Krumholz, OD DIRECTORS OF CLINICAL SERVICES: Ophthalmic Plastic, Orbital & Reconstructive Surgery ..................Robert Della Rocca, MD* ...............................................................................Coordinator.............Janet Roen, MD .......................................................... Assistants............Elizabeth Maher, MD* ...............................................................................................................David Della Rocca, MD Glaucoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .......................Robert H. Ritch, MD* Co-Directors of Glaucoma Clinic ...........................................Noga Harizman, MD ..............................................................................................................Chris Teng, MD Coordinator .........Arthur Tortorelli Retina-Vitreous. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ........................Thomas O. Muldoon, MD* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assistant .............Jeanne L. Rosenthal, MD* ...........................................................Program Coordinator E. Alfonso Ponce, MD ...........................................................Fellow Coordinator Ronald C. Gentile, MD Comprehensive Ophthalmology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paul A. Sidoti, MD* Assistant..............Anne Ko, MD Corneal, External Disease & Vision Correction ............................John A. Seedor, MD* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assistant..............David C. Ritterband, MD Pediatric & Motor Anomaly. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . ...............Lisabeth Hall, MD* ...........................................................Assistant............. Steven Rosenberg, MD Orthoptics.......................................................................Sara Shippman, CO Assistant............. Larisa Heiser, CO Ocular Oncology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paul Finger, MD Low Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ......Benjamin Freed, OD Ocular Trauma Co-Directors . . . . . . . ..Anterior Segment... John Aljian*, MD, Posterior .............Ronald C. Gentile, MD* Neuro-Ophthalmology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..................Mark J. Kupersmith, MD* . Assistant..............Flora Levin, MD ....................................................................................(Until 6/30/10) ...............................................................................................................Rudrani Banik, MD ...............................................................................................................(As of 07/01/10) Pathology & Laboratory Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........Steven A. McCormick, MD

18

Associate..............Codrin E. Iacob, MD Director Eye Pathology .............................................Tatyana Milman, MD Director Tissue Culture Laboratory. ..............................Dan-Ning Hu, MD Supervisor Microbiology........................................... Mahendra Shah, MA Uveitis & Ocular Immunology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....................C. Michael Samson, MD* ....................................................................................Paul Latkany, MD ...........................................................Consultant............Sanjay K Kedhar, MD* Beth Israel Affiliation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sanjay Kedhar, MD* Aborn Eye Research Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Richard B. Rosen, MD ELECTED STAFF REPRESENTATIVES-AT-LARGE Jeanne L. Rosenthal*, MD, Kenneth Felder*, MD, Elliott Feinman, MD*, Kira Manusis, MD Alumni Association President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................Richard L De Luca, MD Alumni Association Secretary/Treasurer....................................John M. Aljian Medical Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............J. Robert Rosenthal, MD CHIEF RESIDENTS* (07/09 ­ 06/10).................................................................Anisha Jangi, MD, .....................................................................................Julia P. Shulman, MD (07/10 - 06/11).......................................................................................Jasmin Francis, MD ................................................................................................................Joseph Panarelli, MD *The above listed individuals collectively form the Executive Committee of the Department of Ophthalmology. This committee forms a collegial body wherein activities related to education, clinical care and research are discussed. Resident evaluations are performed and past departmental policies are evaluated and modified and new policies formulated and promulgated.

19

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE MEDICAL BOARD

Continuing Medical Education Robert Ritch, M.D., Ophthalmology ­ Chairman Lisabeth Hall, M.D., Ophthalmology Jeffrey Liebmann, M.D., Ophthalmology Michael Pitman, M.D., Otolaryngology Richard Rosen, M.D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., CMO, Medical Affairs Steven Schaefer, M.D., Otolaryngology Celso Tello, M.D., Ophthalmology Donald Wood Smith, M.D., Plastic Surgery D. McWilliams Kessler Kimberly Corbin, CCMEP, Director, Institute for Continuing Medical Education Credentials Committee Christopher Linstrom, M.D., Otolaryngology ­ Chairman Jonathan Ascher, M.D., Anesthesiology George Alexiades, M.D., Otolaryngology Daniel Branovan, M.D., Otolaryngology Jay Galst, M.D., Ophthalmology Sharon Giese, M.D., Plastic Surgery Leigh Lachman, M.D., Otolaryngology John McDermott, M.D., Ophthalmology Navin Mehta, M.D., Otolaryngology David Ritterband, M.D., Ophthalmology Richard Rosen, M.D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs Steven Schaefer, M.D., Otolaryngology Anthony Sclafani, M.D., Otolaryngology Michael Strauss, M.D., Medicine Theresa Tretter, M.D., Ophthalmology Joseph Walsh, M.D., Ophthalmology Donald Wood-Smith, M.D., Plastic Surgery D. McWilliams Kessler Infection Control Committee David Ritterband, M.D., Ophthalmology ­ Chairman Jonathan Ascher, M.D., Anesthesiology Steven McCormick, M.D., Pathology David Ritterband, M.D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs Michael Strauss, M.D., Medicine Joseph Walsh, M.D., Ophthalmology Institutional Review Board Joseph Walsh, M.D., Ophthalmology Retina/Vitreous (Scientific) ­ Chairman Ron Baken, Ph.D. - Co-Chair, Scientific, Voice Center/ENT (Retired) Ralph Andrew, B.A., Non-scientific, Government Relations Geraldine Caponong, LCSW, Non-scientific, Social Work

20

Institutional Review Board (continued) Elena Ilitchev, MD, Scientific, Ophthalmology (Glaucoma) Philomena Kennedy, LCSW, Non-Scientific, Social Work (Non-Affiliated) Hae Ok Kim, MD (Scientific), Otolaryngology Alexander Ovchinsky, MD (Scientific), Otolaryngology David Ritterband, M.D. (Scientific), Ophthalmology(Cornea) Richard B. Rosen, M.D. (Scientific), Ophthalmology (retina/vit/imaging) Eleanor Schleider (Scientific), Retired William Stratis, R.Ph. (Scientific), Pharmacy Sonja Tennaro, Ed.D., R.N. (Scientific), Nursing/Education Alternates: Potucek, Mary Ellen, R.Ph. (alt. to W. Stratis) (Scientific), Pharmacy Linda Tiersten, LCSW (alternate to G. Caponong) (Non-Scientific), Social Work Stimson Schantz, MD (alternate to Ovchinsky) (Scientific), Otolaryngology Jean Thomas (alt. to R. Andrew) (Non Scientific), External Affairs Katrina Sweeney, RN (alt. to S. Tennaro) (Scientific), Nursing Ex-Officio: D. McWilliams Kessler, President & CEO Observers/Consultants: Linda Klingos, RN (Scientific), Quality Assurance Sara Shippman, CO (Scientific), Pediatrics/Orthoptics Allan Fine (Non-Scientific), VP, Strategy Medical Library Committee Richard Rosen, M.D., Ophthalmology - Chairman George Alexiades, M.D., Otolaryngology Ben Bert, Resident, M.D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs Paul Sidoti, M.D., Ophthalmology Joseph Walsh, M.D., Ophthalmology Don Ushak, Information Systems Mary Ann Lach, Medical Library (me) Medical Records Committee John Aljian, M.D., Ophthalmology ­ Chairman Jonathan Ascher, M.D., Anesthesiology J. George Braun, M.D., Otolaryngology Jay Dolitsky, M.D., Otolaryngology Millie Fell, M.D., Ophthalmology Douglas Finn, M.D., Co-Chair Steven Koenig, M.D., Ophthalmology Richard Rosen, M. D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M. D., Administration Iris Slater, M. D., Ophthalmology Editha Esquieres, RN, VP/Peri-Operative Services Charles Figliozzi, Administration Debra Hallgren, Admitting

21

Medical Records Committee (continued) Min Jeon, NCC, Ambulatory Care Linda Klingos, RN Director/Quality Michelle Morris, Ambulatory Care Ann Marie Palladino, RN, Ambulatory Care Karen Alfano, R.N., Quality Melanie Pratts, Information Systems Barbara Straub, RN, Nursing Administration Patricia Tischler, RN, Nursing Administration Eye Resident Krishna Mukkamala, MD ENT Resident cc: Linda Tomasello, Sally Capasso, Aida Alvarado Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee Steven McCormick, M.D., Pathology ­ Chairman George Alexiades, M.D., Otolaryngology Douglas Buxton, M.D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs Paul Sidoti, M.D., Ophthalmology William Stratis, Director/Pharmacy Sonja Tennaro, RN, Ed.D., Sr. VP/Clinical Operations/CNO Linda Klingos, RN, Director/Quality Ms. Patricia Tischler Editha Esquieres, RN, VP/Peri-Operative Services Ms. Anne Marie Palladino Ms. Mary Ellen Potucek Mary Lynne Magnus And a few more physicians as needed Invitees Operating Room/Perioperative Services Committee Thomas Muldoon, M.D., Ophthalmology ­ Chairman Dr. J. Seedor, Chairman Medical Board, Co-Chairman O.R. Com., Dir. Cornea Service Mr. D.M. Kessler, President & CEO Dr. R. Rosenthal, SVP Chief Medical Officer Dr. J. Walsh, Chairman Ophthalmology Service Dr. S. Schaefer, Chairman Otolaryngology Service Dr. D. Wood-Smith, Chairman Plastic Service Dr. J. Ascher, Director Anesthesia Dept. Dr. P. Sidoti, Medical Director Outpatient Clinic Dr. N. Mehta Dr. C. Linstrom Dr. M. Strauss Dr. D. Godin Dr. M. Goldstein Dr. M. Pitman Dr. D. Buxton Dr. L.S. Angioletti

22

Operating Room/Perioperative Services Committee (continued) Dr. B. Bert (Primary) / Dr. A. Hoguet (Alternate) Dr. S. Tennaro, RN, Senior Vice President, Clinical Operations, CNO Ms. E. Esquieres, RN, Vice President, Perioperative Services Ms. P. Tischler, RN, Division Director Inpatient Nursing Ms. P. Watkins, RN, NCC PACU Ms. C. Walker, RN, NCC 2nd Floor OR Ms. L. Klingos, RN, Director Quality Ms. E. Acosta, RN, ANCC 2nd Floor OR Mr. R. Reynon, Manager Central Booking Ms. T. Ignacio, RN, NCC 4th Floor OR Ms. E. Monticello, RN Staff 4th Floor O.R. Ms. D. Hallgren, Director Admitting Office Mr. J. Calderon, Materials Management Coordinator, Central Supply, 2nd Floor OR OR / Standardization Committee Members, 2011 Dr. Thomas Muldoon, Chairman Dr. J. Seedor, Chairman Medical Board, Co-Chairman / Director, Cornea Service Mr. D.M. Kessler, President & CEO Dr. R. Rosenthal, SVP Chief Medical Officer Dr. J. Walsh, Chairman, Ophthalmology Service Dr. S. Schaefer, Chairman, Otolaryngology Service Dr. D. Wood-Smith, Chairman, Plastic Service Dr. P. Sidoti, Medical Director, Outpatient Clinic Dr. D. Godin Dr. N. Mehta Dr. M. Pitman Dr. M. Goldstein Dr. D. Buxton Dr. L.S. Angioletti Dr. B. Bert (Primary) Dr. A. Hoguet (Alternate) Dr. S. Tennaro, RN, Senior Vice President, Clinical Operations, CNO Ms. E. Esquieres, RN, Division Director Perioperative Services Ms. C. Walker, RN, NCC 2nd Floor OR Ms. E. Acosta, RN, ANCC 2nd Floor OR Ms. T. Ignacio, RN, NCC 4th Floor OR Mr. G. Marrano, Director Purchasing Dept. Dr. W. Stratis, Director Pharmaceutical Dept. Mr. C. Figliozzi, SVP Finance Mr. Jovel Calderon, Materials Management Coordinator, Central Supply, 2nd Floor OR Quality Council J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs ­ Chairman Jonathan Ascher, M.D., Anesthesiology Steven McCormick, M.D., Pathology Steven Schaefer, M.D., Otolaryngology Paul Sidoti, M.D., Ophthalmology Michael Strauss, M.D., Medicine Joseph Walsh, M.D., Ophthalmology

23

Quality Council (continued) Donald Wood-Smith, M.D., Plastic/Reconstructive Surgery Editha Esquieres, RN, VP/Peri-Operative Services Leonid Gorelik, RN/NCC Randy Judson, Director/Communicative Sciences Linda Klingos, RN Director/Quality Mary Lynne Magnus, RN, Manager/Infection Prevention Dennis O'Connell, Director/Support Services Ann Marie Palladino, RN, Division Director/Ambulatory Care Barbara Siegel, Director/Medical Records Susan Singer, Director/Human Resources William Stratis, Director/Pharmacy Barbara Straub, RN, Nurse Informatic Specialist Katrina Sweeney, RN, Director/Nursing, Practice Education & Research Sonja Tennaro, RN, Ed.D., Sr. VP/Clinical Operations/CNO Patricia Tischler, RN, Division Director/Inpatient/ASU/Nursing Shirley Waite, Manager/Radiology Radiation Safety Committee Roy Holliday, M.D., Radiology - Chairman Douglas Buxton, M.D., Ophthalmology Paul Finger, M.D., Ophthalmology J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs John Seedor, M.D., Ophthalmology Surgical Case Review Committee J. Robert Rosenthal, M.D., Medical Affairs ­ Chairman Navin Mehta, M.D., Otolaryngology Steven McCormick, M.D., Director, Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Thomas Muldoon, M.D., Ophthalmology C. Michael Samson, M.D., Ophthalmology Steven Schaefer, M.D., Chairman, Otolaryngology Stimson P. Schantz, M.D., Otolaryngology Joseph Walsh, M.D., Chairman, Ophthalmology D. Wood-Smith, M.D., Chairman, Plastic Surgery Editha Esquieres, RN, Division Director/Per-operative Services Teresita Ignacio, RN, NCC, 4th Floor O.R. Evangeline Quindoy, RN, NCC/In-patient Sonja Tennaro, Ed.D., R.N., Sr.VP/Clinical Operations/CNO Linda Klingos, RN, Director/Quality

24

AM CONFERENCES

07/26/10 08/02/10 08/03/10 08/04/10 08/05/10 08/05/10 08/05/10 08/06/10 08/06/10 08/09/10 08/10/10 08/11/10 08/12/10 08/13/10 08/17/10

Cornea Cornea Retina Microsurgical Lab Plastics Plastics Pediatrics NeuroOphthalmology Uveitis Cornea Retina Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics NeuroOphthalmology Retina

E. Kaplan, M.D. E. Kaplan, M.D. M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D. Mr. A. Tortorelli D. Della Rocca, M.D. E. Maher, M.D. A. Panarelli, M.D. R. Banik, M.D. S. Kedhar, M.D. E. Kaplan, M.D. P. Garcia, M.D., J. Garcia, M.D. and G. Landa, M.D. A. Ko, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. R. Banik, M.D. J. Nezgoda, M.D., K.Mukkamala, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. N. Harizman, M.D. and C. Teng, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. R. Banik, M.D.

Basics on Fluorescein and ICG angiography Laser Safety / Intro to Microsurgical Lab invite ENT Intro to Minor Surgery / Orbital Anatomy & Fractures Intro & Overview to Oculoplastics and Orbit The Optic Disc: Topographic Analysis

SLO-OCT, Ultrasound (B, 3D scan), HRA, RFI Suturing Session

Management of Optic Neuritis and the Longitudinal Optic Neuritis Study (LONS) Age Related Macular Degeneration (Dry, Wet [classic, occult], Basal Lenticular Drusen

08/18/10 08/19/10 08/19/10 08/20/10 08/24/10

Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics NeuroOphthalmology Retina

Quiz - Chapters 1-3

Visual Fields in Neuro-0phthalmology

08/26/10 08/26/10

Pathology Pediatrics

J. Nezgoda, M.D., K.Mukkamala, Current treatment modalities for AMD M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. Congenital Anomalies L. Hall, M.D.

25

08/26/10

Cornea

08/31/10

Retina

09/02/10 09/02/10 09/07/10

Pediatrics Glaucoma Retina

09/07/10 09/08/10 09/14/10

Cornea Cornea Retina

09/14/10 09/15/10 09/15/10 09/16/10 09/16/10 09/21/10

Glaucoma Microsurgical Lab Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics Retina

J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, Patient Selection and Pre-operative M.D. evaluation for lasik and Intro to Lasik Surgery J. Nezgoda, M.D., K.Mukkamala, Other causes of CNV (POHS, Idiopahtic, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, Myopia, Angioid Streaks) M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. F. Wang, M.D. C. Teng, M.D. Not mandatory J. Nezgoda, M.D., K.Mukkamala, Macular Pathology (acute and chronic M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, CSR, PED, CME) M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. D. Buxton, M.D. Julie Brain from Inspire contact D. Ritterband, M.D. J. Nezgoda, M.D., K.Mukkamala, ERM, Macular Hole, Vitreo-Macula M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, tractions Sx M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. Mr. A. Tortorelli Visual Fields In-Service training Lecture Mr. M. Dial Mr. B. Smith Introduction / Demonstration to new surgical probes Advanced Phaco Wetlab - 3rd yr only

09/22/10 09/23/10 09/23/10 09/27/10

Phaco Course Lens Loading Pediatrics Cornea Cornea

J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. M. Lustig, M.D. J. Francis, M.D., W. Huang, M.D., Valsalva, Purtcher's retinopathy; Choroidal M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., ischemia, Terson's syndrome G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. Mr. A. Tortorelli S. Rosenberg, M.D. M. Speaker, M.D. J. Lippman, M.D.

Femtosecond laser vision surgery Introduction to Cataract Surgery

26

09/28/10

Retina

09/29/10 09/30/10 09/30/10 10/04/10 10/05/10

Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Uveitis Glaucoma Retina

J. Francis, M.D., W. Huang, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. C. Teng, M.D. and N. Harizman, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. Douglas. Jabs, M.D. K. Schor, M.D. J. Francis, M.D., W. Huang, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D., D. Ritteband,M.D. and K. Manusis, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. H.J. Wisnicki, M.D. E. Wu, M.D. J. Francis, M.D., W. Huang, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. E. Lichtenstein, M.D. D. Della Rocca, M.D. and M. Allen, M.D. H. Killer, M.D.

Retina Vascular Changes (HTN, macroaneurysm, Parafoveal telangiectasis

Suturing Session

Longitudinal Data Analysis of Immunosuppression for Posterior Uveitis Pigmentary Dispersion Peripheral Vascular Lesions (SCD, Coats' disease, Retinopathy of Prematurity)

10/06/10

Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics Cornea Retina

Suturing Session

10/07/10 10/07/10 10/11/10 10/12/10

Infectious Disease of the External Eye Basic Concept and Clinical Aspects

Bacterial Keratitis Diabetic Retinopathy (NPDR without and with CSME)

10/13/10 10/14/10 10/20/10 10/20/10

Pathology Pediatrics Microsurgical Lab NeuroOphthalmology

Intraocular Tumors Incision and Suturing Techniques Fundamental Consideration of the Optic Nerve in Glaucoma or How Compartmental of the Optic Nerve Interfaces with Glaucoma Pediatric Oculoplastics

10/21/10 10/21/10 10/25/10 10/26/10

Plastics Pediatrics Cornea Retina

D. Della Rocca, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. S. Mandelbaum, M.D. HSV/HZV J. Francis, M.D., W. Huang, M.D., Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR), Lasers in M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., Diabetic Retinopathy G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D.

27

10/27/10 10/28/10 10/28/10 10/28/10 11/02/10 11/03/10 11/04/10 11/04/10 11/08/10 11/09/10

Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Pediatrics Cornea Uveitis Plastics Pathology Pediatrics Cornea Retina

D. Kroll, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. D. Buxton, M.D. S. Kedhar, M.D., C. M. Samson, M.D. and P. Latkany, M.D. J. Roen, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. F. Wang, M.D. Cornea Fellows Exotropia

Uveitis Ectropion/Entropion Inflamation External Disease/Infectious/Dermatol

11/10/10 11/10/10 11/11/10 11/11/10 11/15/10 11/15/10 11/16/10

Cornea Trauma Cornea Pediatrics Pathology Cornea Retina

V. Trubnik, M.D., B. Bert, M.D., Retina Vein Occlusion (Acute, Chronic) M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., and J. Walsh, M.D. K. Manusis, M.D. Pre-operative evaluation/ iol selection J. Aljian, M.D. and G. Silbert, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, Quiz - Chapters 8-11 M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. Trauma J. Seedor, M.D. Toric Lens Lecture - PGY4 residents only V. Trubnik, M.D., B. Bert, M.D., Retina Artery and Ophthalmic Artery M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., Occlusion G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., and J. Walsh, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. L. Hall, M.D. Felipe Medeiros, M.D. T. Raviv, M.D. S. Kedhar, M.D., C.M. Samson, M.D. and P. Latkany, M.D. F. Wang, M.D. L. Hall, M.D. Cornea "An Elephant in my Imaging Room" Anesthesia, Viscoelastics, Fluidics, Surgical techniques Posterior Uveitis 1 Congenital Isotropic Pediatric Cataract

11/17/10 11/18/10 11/18/10 11/18/10 11/22/10 11/23/10 11/24/10 11/29/10

Microsurgical Lab Pathology Pediatrics Glaucoma Cornea Uveitis Pediatrics Pediatrics

28

11/30/10

Retina

12/01/10 12/02/10 12/02/10 12/06/10 12/06/10 12/07/10

Cornea Cornea Pediatrics Glaucoma NeuroOphthalmology Retina

V. Trubnik, M.D., B. Bert, M.D., Phakomatoses M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., and J. Walsh, M.D. D. Buxton, M.D. Basic Steps in Cataract Surgery/videos J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. H.J. Wisnicki, M.D. D. Hayes, M.D. Neovascular Glaucoma R. Banik, M.D. we have reserved the 3rd floor conference room if needed V. Trubnik, M.D., B. Bert, M.D., Electrophysiology (ERG, EOG, M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., mERG)Vitelliform Degeneration, G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., Stargardt's T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., and J. Walsh, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. Suturing Session for Strabismus G. De Moraes, M.D. E. Lichtenstein, M.D. V. Trubnik, M.D., B. Bert, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., and J. Walsh, M.D. D. Kroll, M.D. M. Lustig, M.D. Randy Kardon, M.D. Exfoliation Syndrome Bull's eyes Maculopathy Differential Diagnosis (Chloroquine, R-C dystrophy)

12/08/10 12/09/10 12/09/10 12/14/10

Microsurgical Lab Glaucoma Pediatrics Retina

12/16/10 12/16/10 12/16/10

Plastics Pediatrics NeuroOphthalmology

Orbital Surgery Clinical Application of the Physiology of the Melanos in Retinal Ganglion Cell and Pupil Light Reflex for Diagnosing Retinal and Optic Nerve Posterior Uveitis 2 Conjunctiva Sclera, iris and lens M&M

12/21/10 12/22/10 12/23/10 12/23/10 12/28/10

Uveitis Pathology Pathology Pediatrics Retina

12/30/10 01/03/11

Pediatrics Glaucoma

S. Kedhar, M.D., C.M. Samson, M.D. and P. Latkany, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. V. Trubnik, M.D., B. Bert, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., and J. Walsh, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. C. Teng, M.D.

Normal Tension Glaucoma

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01/04/11

Retina

01/05/11 01/06/11 01/10/11 01/11/11

Glaucoma Pediatrics Cornea Retina

J. Panarelli, M.D., K. Eliasieh, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. T. Tai, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. A. Terraciano, M.D. J. Panarelli, M.D., K. Eliasieh, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. K. Manusis, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. L. Hall, M.D. J. Panarelli, M.D., K. Eliasieh, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. K. Manusis, M.D., R. Koplin, M.D., and ALCON tech S. Rosenberg, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. J. Panarelli, M.D., K. Eliasieh, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. J. Roen, M.D. K. Manusis, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. H.J. Wisnicki, M.D. K. Rosenthal, M.D. A. Ponce, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. A. Panarelli, M.D.

Tumors (Retinoblastoma, IO lymphoma, Leukemia, CAR)

Express Shunt - Phil Pivnik External Dz/Imm.Disorders/Dry Eye Neuroretinitis, Toxoplasmosis, ARN, CMV Endoophthalmitis (post op, endogenous)

01/12/11 01/13/11 01/13/11 01/18/11

Cornea Cornea Pediatrics Retina

Endokeratoplasty/Lamellar Surgery Quiz - Chapter 15

Choroidal Folds, Uveal effusion syndrome, Sympathetic Ophthalmia Vitreous Diseases (Asteroid Hyalosis

01/19/11 01/20/11 01/24/11 01/25/11

Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Pathology Retina

Phil Pivnik

Vitreous Miscellaneous (Albinism, IPCV, Juvenile retinoschisis)

01/26/11 01/26/11 01/27/11 01/27/11 01/31/11 02/01/11 02/02/11 02/03/11 02/03/11

Plastics Cornea Pediatrics Pediatrics Cornea Retina Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics

Management of Adnexal Trauma Baush and Lomb - Mike Towey Leukocoria - It's assessment & Treatment BS Chapter XX1,XXX1 Advanced Phaco/ Capsular complications / ECCE Retinopathy of Prematurity (Pediatrics)

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02/08/11

Retina

02/09/11 02/09/11 02/10/11 02/14/11 02/15/11

Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics Cornea Retina

02/16/11 02/16/11 02/17/11 02/17/11 02/22/11 02/23/11 02/24/11 02/24/11 02/28/11 03/01/11

Pediatrics Plastics Plastics Pediatrics Uveitis Oncology Pathology Pediatrics Cornea Retina

J. Panarelli, M.D., K. Eliasieh, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. R. Rosen, M.D. and A. Ponce, M.D. K. Manusis, M.D. L. Hall, M.D. E. Wu, M.D. J. Panarelli, M.D., K. Eliasieh, M.D, M. Kurli, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. A. Panarelli, M.D. B. Moskowitz, M.D. B. Moskowitz, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. S. Kedhar, M.D., C.M. Samson, M.D. and P. Latkany, M.D. P. Finger, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D.

Trauma (Choroidal rupture, C. retinae)

AMO POC Mr. Brian Smith Fungal/Parasitic Keratitis Optic Nerve abnormalities (melanocytoma, ON drusen, Optic pit, Morning glory, MNFL)

Esotropia Botox Course Lacrimal Disorders

Retina I

03/02/11 03/03/11 03/03/11 03/07/11 03/09/11 03/10/11 03/10/11 03/10/11

Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics Glaucoma Oncology Pathology Pediatrics Spring Annual Evening Microsurgical Lab Cornea

New IOL Technology/Sutured IOLs/ Astigmatism Management I. Chan, M.D., A. Hong, M.D., M. Peripheral Retinal Pathology Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. A. Ko, M.D. and L. McNally, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, OKAP Review M.D. F. Wang, M.D. A. Castillejos, M.D. Anterior Segment Imaging for Glaucoma P. Finger, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. M. Lustig, M.D. R. Rosen, M.D. and A. Ponce, M.D.

Retina II

03/14/11

Staff

OKAP Cornea Practice Test

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03/15/11

Retina

03/16/11 03/17/11 03/22/11 03/23/11 03/24/11 03/24/11 03/28/11 03/29/11 03/30/11 03/31/11 03/31/11 04/04/11 04/05/11

Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Retina Plastics Optics Pediatrics Plastics Retina Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Pathology Glaucoma Retina

I. Chan, M.D., A. Hong, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D., J. Walsh, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. R. Rosen, M.D. K. Keyhani, M.D. B. Freed, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. J. Milite, M.D. R. Rosen, M.D. and A. Ponce, M.D. C. Teng, M.D. and N. Harizman, M.D. A.A.P.O.S. Patricia Chever-Barrios, M.D. N. Ragusa, M.D. S. Dorairaj, M.D., Y. Kashyap, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D. and J. Walsh, M.D. D. Buxton, M.D. and A. Wen, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. A. Panarelli, M.D. R. Del Rosario, M.D. S. Dorairaj, M.D., Y. Kashyap, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D. and J. Walsh, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. B. Campolattaro, M.D. K. Cohen, M.D. R. Najac, M.D.

Retinal Tears and Detachments

Interpretations and Diagnosis Thyroid Orbitopathy All residents must attend Orbital Tumors OKAP (April 16 2011) Retina Review

Update on Retinoblastoma: Evaluation Risks and Prognostic Factors Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome OKAP (April 16 2011) Retina Review

04/06/11 04/07/11 04/07/11 04/14/11 04/19/11

Microsurgical Lab Cornea Pediatrics Pediatrics Retina

Medical / Surgical Retina Video

04/20/11 04/21/11 04/21/11 04/25/11

Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Pediatrics Cornea

Discuss Path physiology of Pediatric nystagmus and appropiate examination Corneal Toxic/Traumatic Injuries

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04/26/11

Retina

04/27/11 04/28/11 04/28/11 04/28/11

05/09/11 05/10/11 05/11/11 05/11/11

Pediatrics Pathology Pediatrics Spring Annual Evening Microsurgical Lab Cornea Uveitis Microsurgical Lab Spring Annual Evening Microsurgical Lab Pathology Pediatrics Retina

S. Dorairaj, M.D., Y. Kashyap, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D. and J. Walsh, M.D. P. Sidoti, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. S. Rosenberg,M.D., L. Hall, M.D.

Medical / Surgical Retina Video

Pediatrics Glaucoma Eyelid Strabismus Surgery Suturing Course

M. Speaker, M.D. Corneal Dystrophies S. Kedhar, M.D., C.M. Samson, M.D. and P. Latkany, M.D. C. Teng, M.D. and N. Harizman, M.D. N. Harizman, M.D., A. Jue, M.D., Trab Flaps? C. Teng, M.D.

05/12/11 05/12/11 05/17/11

05/18/11 05/19/11 05/19/11 05/19/11 05/23/11 05/24/11

Microsurgical Lab Pediatrics Pediatrics Cornea Cornea Retina

T. Milman, M.D. Orbit and Optic Nerve L. Hall, M.D. S. Dorairaj, M.D., Y. Kashyap, M&M M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D. and J. Walsh, M.D. R. Rosen, M.D. and A. Ponce, M.D. Ms. Sara Shippman Intro to Orthoptics for upcoming 2nd yr K. Cohen, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. R. Koplin, M.D.

05/25/11

Pediatrics

S. Dorairaj, M.D., Y. Kashyap, M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D. and J. Walsh, M.D. Ms. Sara Shippman Intro to Orthoptics for upcoming 2nd yr

Sponsored by Phil Pivnik Advanced Phaco/ Intraoperative complications Medical / Surgical Retina Video

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05/26/11 05/26/11 05/31/11

Cornea Pediatrics Retina

06/01/11 06/02/11 06/02/11 06/03/11

Pediatrics Oncology / Pathology Pediatrics Visiting Professor Oncology / Pathology Cornea Pathology Pediatrics Pediatrics Pediatrics Glaucoma Plastics Cornea Pathology Pathology Cornea Plastics Cornea Pathology Cornea Glaucoma Cornea Plastics Pathology Glaucoma Cornea Cornea

J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. S. Dorairaj, M.D., Y. Kashyap, Medical / Surgical Retina Video M.D., M. Kurli, M.D., R. Lowe, M.D., G. Landa, M.D., R. Gentile, M.D., T. Muldoon, M.D., A. Ponce, M.D., J. Rosenthal, M.D., R. Rosen, M.D. and J. Walsh, M.D. Ms. Sara Shippman Intro to Orthoptics for upcoming 2nd yr J. William Harbour, M.D. H.J. Wisnicki, M.D. J. William Harbour, M.D. New Breakthroughs in Uveal Melanoma

06/08/11 06/09/11 06/09/11 06/16/11 06/30/11 08/01/11 08/04/11 08/08/11 08/10/11 08/11/11 08/18/11 09/08/11 09/12/11 09/14/11 09/22/11 10/03/11 10/10/11 10/26/11 11/02/11 11/07/11 11/09/11 11/17/11

E. Wu, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. H.J. Wisnicki, M.D. M. Lustig, M.D. S. Rosenberg, M.D. TBA E. Maher, M.D. E. Kaplan, M.D. and O. Lee, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. T. Milman, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. D. Kroll, M.D. E. Kaplan, M.D. and O. Lee, M.D.

postoperative complications and management Intraocular Tumors

Management of Ocular Emergencies Fitting KC/Post PK/Post Trauma Congenital Anomalies

Botox and Fillers Soft Contact Lens and Care Systems

T. Milman, M.D. J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D. TBA K. Manusis, M.D. Congen. Anomalies/Ant Seg Dysgen K. Keyhani, M.D. Blepharoplasty T. Milman, M.D. TBA E. Kaplan, M.D. and O. Lee, M.D. Bifocal/Toric/Next Generation Lenses J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D.

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11/23/11 11/30/11 12/01/11 12/05/11 12/07/11

Pathology Pediatrics Plastics Glaucoma Cornea

T. Milman, M.D. H.J. Wisnicki, M.D. J. Roen, M.D. TBA TBA

Strabismus Disorders Management of Adnexal Trauma Neoplastic Disorders Conj/Cornea

12/14/11 12/15/11

Pediatrics Cornea

A. Panarelli, M.D. Paralytic Strabismus J. Seedor, M.D. and D. Ritterband, M.D.

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GLAUCOMA SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY THE NEW YORK EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY NEW YORK MEDICAL COLLEGE ANNUAL REPORT 2010

GLAUCOMA SERVICE In 2010, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Glaucoma Service, under the direction of Robert Ritch, MD, Shelley and Steven Einhorn Distinguished Chair in Ophthalmology, and Celso Tello, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Director of the Glaucoma Clinic, continued its local, national and international leadership in research, education, and the advancement of diagnostic and treatment modalities for all forms of glaucoma. The Glaucoma Service welcomed to its leadership Noga Harizman, MD as the Assistant Director of Glaucoma Services and Christopher Teng, MD as Coordinator of Glaucoma Services. Dr. Harizman and Dr. Teng coordinate all issues related with the glaucoma service, including daily schedules for the attending physicians, surgical and laser schedules, call schedules, glaucoma lecture series, journal club and surgical teaching sessions. In 2010, the glaucoma service welcomed the addition of Andrea Jue, MD, as a full time glaucoma attending physician. Dr. Jue sees patients daily in the glaucoma clinic with the residents and performs laser and surgical procedures. GLAUCOMA SERVICE PERSONNEL Robert Ritch, MD Shelley and Steven Einhorn Distinguished Chair in Ophthalmology Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology New York Medical College Chief, Glaucoma Service Surgeon Director New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Celso Tello, MD Clinical Associate Professor Director, Glaucoma Clinic New York Eye and Ear Infirmary New York Medical College Noga Harizman, MD Assistant Chief, Glaucoma Clinic New York Eye and Ear Infirmary New York Medical College Christopher Teng, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Coordinator, Glaucoma Clinic New York Eye and Ear Infirmary

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New York Medical College Andrea Jue, MD Glaucoma Service Attending New York Eye and Ear Infirmary New York Medical College Adult Glaucoma Clinic Attending Physicians and Surgeons Maria Basile, MD Andrea Jue, MD Ronald Hagadus, MD Noga Harizman, MD Kerline Marcelin, MD John McDermott, MD Morris Podolsky, MD Robert Ritch, MD Rhonda Rosenberg, MD Valerie Rubinstein, MD Edwin Schottenstein, MD Paul Sidoti, MD Mark Tannenbaum, MD Tania Tai, MD Celso Tello, MD Christopher Teng, MD Dina Weintraub, MD David Witzel, MD Pediatric Glaucoma Clinic Attending Physicians and Surgeons Andrea Jue Steven Kane, MD Paul Sidoti, MD Celso Tello, MD Christopher Teng, MD Clinical Fellows 07/1/2009 - 06/30/2010 Sandra Fernando, MD Matthew Hosler, MD Sung Chul Park, MD Anzhelika Vaccaro, MD 07/1/2010 ­ 12/31/10 Alfredo Castillejos, MD Daniel Hayes, MD Nikola Ragusa, MD Kenneth Schor, MD Glaucoma Service Staff

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Mr. Arthur Tortorelli, Director, Glaucoma Technical Services Mrs. Patricia Wong, Senior Ophthalmic Technician Mrs. Doris Verdosoto, COA Ms. Jean Walker, COT Mrs. Kelly Santana, COA International Federation of Ophthalmological Societies/International Council of Ophthalmology Fellows ICO Fellows in Glaucoma 1. Nov 2009 ­ Jan 2010 - Hernan Andres Diaz Carrasco, MD ­ Guayaquil, Ecuador. 2. Feb ­ Apr 2010 ­ Diana Liuxin ­ Harbin, China. 3. May-July 2010 ­ Yasser Ali Moustafa, MD ­ Saudi Arabia (Egyptian). 4. Oct ­ Dec 2010 - Sharafeldin Mustafa, MD ­ Atbara, Sudan. International Observers 1. February 2010 ­ Ernesto Strobbe, MD ­ Teramo, Italy. 2. February 2010 ­ Corrado Gizzi, MD ­ Bologna, Italy. 3. June 2010 ­ Jung Hye Lee, MD ­ Seoul, Korea. 4. July 2010 - Yasser Ali Hamed Moustafa, MD ­ Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. 5. August 2010 - George Tomais, MD ­ Athens, Greece. 6. Sept 2010 ­ Jonathan Ho, MD ­ Hong Kong. Medical students who rotated through the Glaucoma Service X. Andrea Arata - Stony Brook School of Medicine Victoria S. Hill - New York Medical College Julia Nemiroff ­ New York University School of Medicine Director of Clinical Research Elena Ilitchev, MD Director of Research Fellowship Gustavo de Moraes, MD Research Fellows 07/1/2009 - 06/30/2010 Gustavo de Moraes, MD Aashish Anand, MD Alfredo Castillejos, MD 07/1/2010 ­ 06/30/2011 Saman Kiumehr, MD Sung Chul Park, MD

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National Institute of Health Clinical Trials/Coordinators African Americans with Glaucoma: Structure and Function (ADAGES) - Oliver Antequera, MD - May Lee, BA - Christine Ahn, BA Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) - Yokasta Abreu, MD CD - 44 Receptor in Aqueous Humor in Glaucoma - Alexander Rialdi, BA Surgical Trials/Coordinators Oliver Anteguera, MD - SOLX Gold Shunt Alexander Rialdi, BA - Inspire Study, genetic studies Imaging Studies/Coordinators May Lee. BA Christine Ahn, BA Director, Glaucoma Technical Services Mr. Arthur Tortorelli RESIDENT EDUCATION Overview Glaucoma comprises a group of related disorders that are diagnosed and differentiated based upon particular characteristics of the slit-lamp examination, anterior chamber angle architecture, optic nerve head appearance, visual function and other clinical findings. At the core of the clinical teaching program is the emphasis on the residents becoming skilled in the techniques of gonioscopy, slit-lamp examination, stereo disc ophthalmoscopy and imaging of the anterior chamber angle, optic nerve and nerve fiber layer. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Glaucoma Clinic continues to be a major referral center for congenital glaucoma, juvenile glaucoma and all other forms of unusual forms of glaucomas. Ophthalmology residents are introduced to complicated glaucomas and more unusual, difficult surgical procedures such as trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, non-penetrating viscocanalostomy, angle surgery (Goniotomy and Trabeculotomy) and glaucoma implant surgery. The glaucoma lecture series was extremely effective in attracting top quality lecturers from both within the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and from outside institutions. Ten separate topics were covered including basic anatomy, ocular physiology, various glaucoma etiologies, gonioscopy, glaucoma detection, review of glaucoma clinical trials and screening and approaches to surgery. The glaucoma section of the Infirmary's Ophthalmology Knowledge Assessment Program Board Review Course was well received.

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Glaucoma Services residents had the opportunity to participate in national and local glaucoma meetings which were organized and directed by members of the glaucoma service. The Glaucoma Visiting Professor Lecture Series were well attended and it gave the opportunity to general ophthalmologist, ophthalmology residents, glaucoma specialist and ophthalmic technologist to review the most updated information on basis sciences, research and clinical and surgical treatment of glaucoma. Other meetings that our residents had the opportunity to participate include the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Pan-American Academy of Ophthalmology, Asia Pacific American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Academy of Ophthalmology. In these meetings, our Residents had the opportunity to present their research carried out throughout the Academic year and also attend several lectures and courses related to underlying pathophysiology of the glaucomas, and other topics about medical and surgical treatment of glaucoma. The wet-lab in our facility is used to introduce and train our second and third year residents prior to real surgery. Our Glaucoma Fellows also had the opportunity to utilize the wet-lab facility to train routine glaucoma surgery as well as to be introduced and trained in new surgical procedures to control glaucoma. Glaucoma Clinics Glaucoma Clinic is held seven sessions weekly and is staffed by three residents on rotation and two or three attending physicians. The second and third year residents remain on the service for six consecutive weeks. First-year residents rotate throughout the year. The Glaucoma Clinic functioned smoothly throughout the year in Area B. In 2010, 9,942 glaucoma patients were examined and treated. Pediatric glaucoma clinic, under the supervision of Drs. Jue, Kane, Sidoti, Tello and Teng continues to attract a wide range of patient pathology and provides a continuous flow of congenital glaucoma which enhances resident education. The concentration of these patients in a subspecialty clinic allows for continuity of care and increased attention to the myriad refractive, motility, and other problems these children face. All emergency cases on the glaucoma service have been successfully cared for by our on-call team: Drs Andrea Jue, Noga Harizman, Robert Ritch, Paul Sidoti, Tania Tai, Celso Tello, Christopher Teng and David Witzel. Resident Glaucoma Surgery Glaucoma clinic laser surgery is performed by the second year resident assigned to the glaucoma clinic. Elective surgery is scheduled for Monday afternoons and is supervised by an attending surgeon. 485 glaucoma laser surgeries were performed in 2010, consisting of laser iridectomy, argon laser trabeculoplasty, selective laser trabeculoplasty and argon laser peripheral iridoplasty. Intraocular glaucoma surgery is performed by the senior resident assigned to the glaucoma service. During 2010, 269 surgeries were performed, and consisted primarily of cataract extraction, filtering surgery with or without antifibrosis chemotherapy, express shunt implants, canaloplasty, trabectome, seton implantation (Baerveldt, Ahmed, and Molteno), cyclodestructive procedures, combined cataract and glaucoma surgery, angle surgery (trabeculotomy and goniotomy), transconjunctival needling revisions and clear corneal cataract extraction in the presence of a filtering bleb with or without antifibrosis therapy.

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Glaucoma Technical Services Glaucoma Technical Services, directed by Mr. Arthur Tortorelli, continues to expand in the numbers of services provided and performed. At the current time two Goldmann and two Humphrey perimeters run full-time, 5 days per week. In 2010, 4,264 computerized fields and 1,720 Goldmann visual fields were obtained. Currently, besides Mr. Tortorelli, the glaucoma technical staff consists of three full-time technicians, Mrs. Patricia Wong, Ms. Jean Walker, Mrs. Kelly Santana and one part time technician Mrs. Doris Verdosoto.

MAJOR AREAS OF RESEARCH Laser Studies NYGRI supported projects have developed new laser and incisional surgical techniques that have made eye surgery easier and safer. One of these, the titanium-sapphire laser, has just received FDA approval. Surgical Studies Current studies involve the development of new glaucoma drainage implants, and a new operation to widen Schlemm's canal (the final portion of the drainage pathway in the eye. The gold shunt is an implanted in such a way as to drain fluid from the anterior chamber to behind the iris, thus avoiding the bleb associated with trabeculectomy. In the next stage of these investigations, awaiting FDA approval, tiny "chads" in the front portion of the shunts will be lasered to create tiny openings in order to increase the ability of the shunts to drain fluid. Canaloplasty is another new operation designed to attempt to avoid formation of a bleb by threading a suture around the 360 degrees of Schlemm's canal and tightening it, thus widening the canal and permitting more efficient drainage of aqueous humor. Studies are also underway evaluating the Trabectome, an instrument designed to peel away the trabecular meshwork and expose Schlemm's canal directly to the fluid in the anterior chamber in order to bypass the blocked meshwork and allow aqueous humor to enter Schlemm's canal directly. Ologen, a microtechnology-based, biodegradable membrane, developed in Taiwan to create a safer, effective, less complication-prone filtering bleb than currently obtained with the commonly used antiscarring drugs, 5-FU and mitomycin C, has just been approved by the FDA and will be undergoing both a comparative prospective protocol and investigations into new uses during glaucoma surgery. Objective Perimetry Multifocal visual-evoked potentials as a potential avenue for objective assessment of visual function and to enhance our understanding of glaucoma pathophysiology and the relationships between structural and functional injury in glaucoma. NYGRI supports research fellowships in this field in collaboration with Professor Donald Hood, PhD, Departments of Psychology and Ophthalmology, Columbia University.

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Microperimetry Also known as fundus perimetry, microperimetry is a new technique which allows for exact topographic correlation between portions of the central retina and their light sensitivity. The principle rests on the possibility to see - in real time- the retina under examination by infrared light and to project a defined light stimulus over an individual, selected location. Microperimetry allows quantification of retinal threshold in the macular area. Sequential examinations allow evaluation of the natural history of disease, and monitoring of the effect of therapeutic intervention. We are using this tool to image in fine detail early glaucomatous visual field defects in the central fixation area, especially common in normal-tension glaucoma, and to monitor both their progression and the response to treatment. Our recent studies support its use to detect early central visual field loss before conventional perimetry. It also shows good correlation and better repeatability when compared with other devices that evaluate the central retina and its function. Retinal Functional Imaging This new device is the only commercially available technology that provides real-time calculation of the velocity of the retinal blood flow. By using a sequence of high-quality photographs of the retina and its vessels, the device measures the velocity of each red cell and based on the caliper of the vessels one can estimate the blood supply at each retinal region, such as the macular or parapapillary retina. This is particularly useful to understand the role of blood flow and new modalities of treatment (independent of the IOP) that could potentially prevent glaucomatous visual loss. Glaucoma genetics research Glaucoma genetics research involves normal-tension glaucoma, primary open angle glaucoma, exfoliation syndrome, pigmentary glaucoma and congenital glaucoma. A major breakthrough in 2007 was the discovery of the mutations causing exfoliation syndrome and exfoliative glaucoma. Not everyone with these mutations develops exfoliation syndrome. We are now engaged in a search for modifier genes which determine whether or not someone with these mutations will develop exfoliation syndrome or exfoliative glaucoma. We are investigating the presence of modifier genes in various glaucomas and correlating these with the age of onset and severity of the glaucoma. Ocular Imaging The Ocular Imaging Center is among the best equipped in the world. NYGRI has made significant strides in the development of new diagnostic modalities. Virtually all early research related to ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) was first performed in NYGRI laboratories. These studies have allowed us to accumulate a huge amount of data that may be helpful to better understand the diseases of the anterior segment of the eye, such as angle closure glaucoma. Research instrumentation includes confocal scanning laser polarimetry, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal visual evoked potentials. Ocular imaging includes: ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), time-domain and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (GDx Access), retinal thickness analyzer (RTA) and Heidelberg retinal tomography (HRT). Confocal scanning microscopy provides high resolution in vivo imaging of anterior segment structures, being capable of detecting signs of early disease not seen during slit-lamp examination.

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Recently, we have been using three different types of Fourier-Domain OCT (FD-OCT), which provide 3-dimensional images of the anterior and posterior segments of the eye. It allows, for example, obtaining real-time, high-resolution images (up to 3 microns) of the optic nerve, retinal nerve fiber layer and retina. These are the main sites of glaucomatous injury and therefore also allow early detection of the disease before the patient presents any symptoms, Moreover, because of its ultra-high speed of image acquisition this technology allows better repeatability of measurements being able to detect change (worsening) more accurately, if it occurs. The Shelley and Steven Einhorn Clinical Research Center at NYEEI opened in Autumn 2010. This center is one of the most advanced such facilities in the world, with numerous imaging devices both currently used and in development, for study of every structure of the eye. Studies Sponsored by the National Eye Institute African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES) Multi-center study sponsored by the National Eye Institute. Design to acquire visual function and optic nerve structure data on eyes of black adults. This data will be compared to analogous data obtained on predominantly white adults through two prospectively designed longitudinal studies funded by NEI through 2007. NYGRI is providing transitional and financial support during the grant resubmission process Ocular Hypertension Study (OHTS) In this clinical trial, patients with newly diagnosed ocular hypertension were randomized to either close observation or medical therapy to lower IOP. The goal of the project was to determine whether early treatment of ocular hypertension prevents or delays the onset of glaucoma. Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Ancillary Study The OHTS Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Ancillary Study seeks to add information regarding disc topography to this outstanding database of ocular hypertensive individuals. Dr. Liebmann is the principal investigator and Dr. Ritch is the co-investigator. A New View of Normal Tension Glaucoma: Autoregulation and Systemic Blood Pressure (NEI) This study is being performed in collaboration with Mary E. Charlson, MD, William Foley Professor of Medicine and Chief of General Internal Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical School. The objective of this prospective longitudinal study is to determine how blood pressure at night correlates with the risk of visual field loss and progression of glaucoma. Dr. Ritch is the principal investigator at NYEEI and Dr. Liebmann is the co-investigator. FUNDED STUDIES - 2010 Partnership with Columbia University Multifocal visual evoked potential. (mfVEP):

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The current gold standard for assessing visual field loss in glaucoma patients is the Humphrey visual field (HVF), a subjective test. An objective visual field test, the multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) is currently under development. The mfVEP measures a brain-evoked electric field and can predict dysfunction caused by damage of the optic nerve and its projections onto the visual cortex of the brain. It is hoped that this new method of testing visual fields objectively will lead to better understanding and earlier diagnosis of the disease. NYGRI funds a joint fellowship at Columbia College designed to assess objective visual function as a novel method of assessing the visual field. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI): The recent discovery that MRI can be used to map changes in brain hemodynamics that correspond to mental operations extends traditional anatomical imaging to include maps of human brain function. The ability to observe both the structures and also which structures participate in specific functions is due to a new technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI, and provides high resolution, noninvasive reports of neural activity detected by a blood oxygen level dependent signal. Currently we are conducting research to map functional changes secondary to glaucoma in an attempt to better understand how the visual image is represented in the brain and to be able to describe the functional and structural changes that occur. NYGRI-Funded Studies - 2010 IOP - disc ­RNFL. The New York Glaucoma progression Study (GAPS) Because of the huge amount of data collected at GANY during the past years, we have been able to develop a series of longitudinal studies investigating the role of various risk factors on the development and progression of glaucomatous damage. In the last years, our publications allowed better understanding of the etiology of disc hemorrhages, a well-known and strong risk factor for glaucoma deterioration. Also, along with imaging devices that provide high-resolution images of the retina and optic nerve head (FD-OCT and HRT), GAPS has brought up knowledge on previously unknown risk factors, such as parapapillary atrophy. With a database that exceeds 40,000 patients and 132,000 visual field tests, we have been able to investigate the role of each risk factor for progression. This will ultimately be used to develop the first risk calculator for patients with treated glaucoma. This tool will allow to physicians to treat more aggressively patients at greater risk of disease worsening, preventing irreversible loss of vision. Each patient will therefore be classified as low, medium, or high risk of progression, allowing to tailor treatment more precisely. MMC and 5-FU on Corneal Endothelium A Prospective Assessment of the Effect of Trabeculectomy with Mitomycin or 5-FU on Corneal Endothelium Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) This new modality of tonometry allows estimation of the intraocular pressure (IOP) that are very similar to the true IOP, that is, measurements that are not affect by the artifact of corneal properties. The true IOP is the pressure that actually causes damage to the optic nerve, and we are now getting an almost precise estimate of these values. Enhances treatment can therefore be provided and prevent glaucomatous worsening. Also, by investigating one the parameters derived

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from the ORA, called corneal hysteresis, we will be able to understand why specific populations have higher prevalence of normal-tension glaucoma, which may allow optimization of treatment. Among other findings, we were the first to report that this new parameter is associated with more rapid velocity of glaucomatous visual field loss, and thus know what patients require more aggressive therapy. Aqueous Humor Studies CD-44 Receptor in Aqueous Humor in Glaucoma and its role in causation of the disease. This molecule appears to be present in several glaucomas and may be a common denominator underlying susceptibility. Analysis of aqueous humor, ocular tissue, and blood in patients with and without exfoliation syndrome. Stem Cells in Trabecular Meshwork Isolation of Stem Cells from Human Trabecular Meshwork, in conjunction with Ting Xie, PhD, Senior Investigator, Stowers Institute, Kansas City, KS Myocilin (GLC1A) Glaucoma - Ultrastructural Studies Electron Microscopic Examination of Trabecular Meshwork from Primary Open Angle Glaucoma Patients with Mutations in the GLC1A (Myocilin) gene. In collaboration with Professor Ernst Tamm, Department of Anatomy, University of Erlangen, Germany UBM and Slit-lamp adapted OCT for Narrow Angles Biometric Evaluation of Iridocorneal Angle and Ciliary Body of Patients with Narrow Angles General Imaging Protocol Functional and Structural Testing For Optic Nerve Disease. The new technologies available in our center (OCT, GDx, HRT) provide high quality images of the optic nerve and retinal nerve layer, the initial sites of glaucomatous damage. These studies have helped understand the relationship between the amount of neuronal cell loss and the extension of visual field defects in glaucoma. Such information was only available in animal models, and we are now able to provide better estimates and correlation using real-time, in vivo devices. We have also been able to image structures unbeknownst to be involved in glaucomatous pathogenesis, such as the choriocapillaris, retinal pigmented epithelium, and photoreceptors. Effect of new treatment modalities on the survival and function of filtering blebs Effect of laser cautery of blood vessels on the bleb surface on the success rate of transconjunctival needle revision Effect of injections of Avastin, a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, on the success rates of both bleb development and transconjunctival needle revision Normal-tension Glaucoma and High-tension Glaucoma

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Evaluation of patients with normal visual fields and imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer to analyze correlations of function and structure in early glaucoma Examination of the frequency of disc hemorrhages in different glaucomas and their effect on the rate of progression of glaucoma Assessment of the risk factors and perimetric characteristics of initial glaucomatous visual field defect threatening fixation. This study confirms that normal-tension glaucoma patients tend to have visual field defects closer to fixation compared with other types of glaucoma and a detailed visual field test for central 10 degrees is essential for evaluation and follow-up of initial visual field defect threatening fixation. Identified systemic risk factors can be modified to stop or minimize the visual field progression. This study also demonstrates that glaucoma may be classified based on its perimetric characteristics. Progression of initial glaucomatous visual field defect threatening fixation compared with initial nasal step is under investigation. The progression rate and pattern will be compared between those two groups, and the results will be useful for clinicians in making therapeutic plans for early open-angle glaucoma patients, based on the individual visual field defect pattern. Alpha-1 Adrenergic Receptor Antagonists To identify iris structural alterations associated with intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) in patients using systemic -1-adrenergic receptor antagonists (-1ARA). Short duration transient visual evoked potentials Short duration transient visual evoked potentials (SD t-VEP, EnfantTM NOVA, Diopsys Inc., Pine Brook, NJ) is a relatively new VEP device designed to increase the clinical applicability by using a more efficient signal acquisition technique that decreases the test duration, and by using a postprocessing algorithm that provides less subjectivity in the waveform assessment. The automated statistical analysis of the waveforms allows objective determination, and the test can be performed as well as interpreted without extensive training. The device has been shown to have high test-retest repeatability. We are investigating the SD t-VEP technology as an objective method for visual field testing in glaucoma patients. SD t-VEP may be a useful alternative or confirmatory test in patients with an inability to perform subjective visual field testing and/or unreliable subjective visual field tests. We also believe that this new SD-VEP can be extremely useful for screening glaucoma. In addition, since macula makes the strongest contribution to a VEP response, SD t-VEP may be a sensitive objective test for vision-threatening central field defects in patients with glaucoma or macular pathology. Effect of Acupuncture on Intraocular Pressure Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the most important known risk factor for the development and progression of glaucomatous damage. Acupuncture is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that has been in existence for over two thousand years and is used to treat a wide variety of diseases. Recent studies have illustrated the use of acupuncture to treat a wide variety of ophthalmologic disorders, including glaucoma, macular degeneration, amblyopia and Graves ophthalmopathy.

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Kurusu et al. highlighted the potential effect of acupuncture on IOP lowering in patients with diagnosed glaucoma and Uhrig et al. demonstrated a decrease in IOP in glaucoma and ocular hypertensive patients after 15 minutes and 24 hours after acupuncture needling. We will soon initiate a study investigating the effect of acupuncture on ocular hypertensive patients. PUBLICATIONS AND SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATIONS ORIGINAL PUBLICATIONS 2010 Robert Ritch, MD 1. Shih CY, Ritterband DC, Palmiero PM, Seedor JA, Papachristou G, Harizman N, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: The use of postoperative slit-lamp optical coherence tomography to predict primary failure in Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty. Am J Ophthalmol 2010;148:835-843. Liu S, Li H, Dorairaj S, Cheung CYL, Rousso J, Liebmann JM, Ritch R, Lam DSC, Leung CKS: Assessment of scleral spur visibility with anterior segment optical coherence tomography. J Glaucoma 2010;19:132-135. Prata T, Rozenbaum I, de Moraes CGV, Lima VC, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Retinal vascular occlusions occur more frequently in the more affected eye in exfoliation syndrome. Eye 2010;24:658-667. Hood DC, Salant JA, Arthur SN, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: The location of the inferior and superior temporal blood vessels and interindividual variability of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. J Glaucoma 2010;19:158-166. Ritch R, Prata TS, de Moraes CGV, Vessani RM, Costa VP, Konstas AGP, Liebmann JM, Schlötzer-Schrehardt U: Association of exfoliation syndrome and central retinal vein occlusion: an ultrastructural analysis. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2010;88:91-95 Anand A, Tello C, Sidoti PA, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Sequential glaucoma implants in refractory glaucoma. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;Epub Oct. 19. 2010;149:95-101. Ahrlich K, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Visual field progression differences between normal-tension and exfoliative high-tension glaucoma patients. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:1458-1463. 2009;Epub Dec 30. Lee GA, Ritch R, Liebmann JM, Rojanapongpun P: Tight orbit syndrome: A previously unrecognized cause of open-angle glaucoma. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2010;88:120-124. Tello C, de Moraes CGV, Prata TS, Derr P, Siegfried J, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Repeatability of short-duration transient visual evoked potentials in normal subjects. Doc Ophthalmol 2010;Epub Jan 29. Folgar FA, De Moraes DGV, Prata TS, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Glaucoma surgery decreases the rate of localized and global visual field progression. Am J Ophthalmol 2010;149:258-264.

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Teng CC, de Moraes CGV, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: ß-zone parapapillary atrophy and the velocity of glaucoma progression. Ophthalmology 2010;Epub Feb 3. 117:909915. Ritch R, Zarbin M, Montemagno C, Leary JF: Nanomedicine and nano-ophthalmology: The world of tomorrow. Saudi J Ophthalmol, 2010;24:9-16. Trastman-Caruso E, Dorairaj S, Barocas VH, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Pigment dispersion syndrome patients do not have larger-than-normal irides. J Glaucoma 2010;Epub Feb 15. Lin CC, Ritch R, Lin SM, Wu Q, Lai HJ, Lu YL, Chang YC, Lin FH: A new fish-scale derived scaffold for corneal regeneration. European Cells Materials 2010;19:50-57. de Beaufort HC, DeMoraes CGV, Teng CC, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Recurrent disc hemorrhage does not increase the rate of visual field progression. Graefes Arch Clin Exp 2010;Epub Feb 25. Cheung CY, Liu S, Weinreb RN, Liu J, Li H, Leung D, Dorairaj S, Liebmann J, Ritch R, Lam DSC, Leung CK: Dynamic analysis of iris bowing with anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010, Epub March 13. Thonginnetra O, Greenstein VC, Chu D, Liebmann JM, Ritch R, Hood DC: Normal versus high tension glaucoma: a comparison of functional and structural defects. J Glaucoma 2010;19:151157. Sbeity Z, Ritch R: Annual World Glaucoma Day. Enhancing awareness of glaucoma: a leading cause of preventable blindness. Lebanese Medical J, 2010;58:120-121. De Moraes CGV, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Bridging the major prospective National Eye Institutesponsored glaucoma clinical trials and clinical practice. J Glaucoma 2010;E-pub Apr 29. Prata TS, Dorairaj S, De Moraes CGV, Tello C, Liebmann J, Ritch R: Indentation slit-lamp adapted optical coherence tomography technique for anterior chamber angle assessment. Arch Ophthalmol, 2010;Epub May 8. 2010;128:646-647. De Moraes CG, Ritch R, Tello C, Liebmann JM: Modified visual field trend analysis. J Glaucoma 2010;Epub June 16. Anand A, De Moraes CG, Teng CC Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Lower corneal hysteresis predicts laterality in asymmetric open angle gluacoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:65146518. Epub June 23. Park SC, De Moraes CGV, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: In vivo microstructural anatomy of beta-zone parapapillary atrophy in glaucoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci, 2010;51:6408-6413. Epub July 14. Olawoye O, Teng CC, Liebmann JM, Wang FM, Ritch R: Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome in a 16-year-old. J Glaucoma 2010;Epub July 8.

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Leung CKS, Palmiero PM, Weinreb RN, Li H, Sbeity Z, Dorairaj S, Leung D, Liu S, Liebmann JM, Congdon N, Ritch R, Lam DSC. Comparisons of ocular biometry between Chinese and Caucasians with anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Br J Ophthalmol 2010;94:11841189. Prata TS, de Moraes CG, Kanadani FN, Ritch R, Paranhos A Jr: Posture-induced intraocular pressure changes: considerations regarding sleep position in glaucoma patients. Surv Ophthalmol 2010;Epub July 15. Zarbin M, Montemagno C, Leary JF, Ritch R: Nanomedicine: the new frontier. Am J Ophthalmol 2010; Epub July 28. Goldberg I, Ritch R: Useful pointers to maximize your chances for manuscript acceptance (editorial). Asian J Ophthalmol 2010;11:49-50. Thonginnetra O, Sbeity Z, Liebmann J, Ritch R: Juvenile glaucoma in monozygotic twins with optic disc coloboma. Asian J Ophthalmol 2010;11:98-100. Hayes DD, Shih CY, Shamie N, Terry MA, Price FW Jr, Price MO, Ritterband DC, Hannush SB, Gorovoy MS, Weisenthal RW, Ritch R, Liebmann JM, Udell IJ: Spontaneous reattachment of Descement stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty. A case series of 12 patients. Am J Ophthalmol 2010;Epub Aug 31. Radcliffe NR, Sehi N, Wallace I, Greenfield DS, Krupin T, Ritch R: Comparison of stereo disc photos and alternation flicker using a novel matching technology for detecting glaucoma progression. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2010;Epub Aug 30:1-6. Xin D, Greenstein V, Ritch R, Liebmann, JM, De Moraes CV, Hood DC: A Comparison of Functional and Structural Measures for Identifying Progression of Glaucoma, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;Epub Sept 16. Hood DC, Raza AS, De Moraes CGV, Odel JG, Greenstein, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Initial arcuate defects within the central 10 degrees in glaucoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;Epub Sept 30. Chen LJ, Tam POS, Tham CCY, Liang XY, Chiang SWY, Canlas O, Ritch R, Rhee DJ, Pang C: Evaluation of SPARC as a candidate gene of juvenile-onset primary open-angle glaucoma by mutational and copy number analyses'. Mol Vis 2010;16:2016-25. Radcliffe NM, Musch DC, Niziol LM, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: The effect of trabeculectomy on the intraocular pressure of the contralateral eye. Ophthalmology 2010;117:2055-2060. Zhao JH, Lam DSC, Chen LJ, Wang YX, Zheng Z, Lin Q, Rao S, Fan DSP, Zhang M, Ritch R: A randomized trial of patching versus acupuncture for anisometropic amblyopia in older children: 6 month results. Arch Ophthalmol 2010;128:1510-1518. Syed ZA, Radcliffe NM, De Moraes CG, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Detection of progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy using alternation flicker with stereophotography ­ a new technique. Arch Ophthalmol 2010;128:Online.

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Prata TS, Lima VC, Guedes LM, Magalhaes FP, de Moraes CGV, Teixeira SH, Ritch R, Paranhos A Jr: Factors associated with topographic changes of the optic nerve head induced by acute intraocular pressure reduction in glaucoma patients. Eye 2010;Epub Dec. 3.

Paul Sidoti, MD 1. Mukkamala K, Gentile RC, Rao L, Sidoti PA. Recurrent hemolacria. A sign of scleral buckle infection. Retina 30:1250-1253, 2010 Anand A, Tello C, Sidoti PA, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Sequential glaucoma implants in refractory glaucoma. Am J Ophthalmol 2010;149:95-101.

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Christopher Teng, MD 1. Prata TS, De Moraes CG, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Factors Affecting Rates of Visual Field Progression in Glaucoma Patients with Optic Disc Hemorrhage. Ophthalmology. 2010;117:24-9. Ahrlich KG, De Moraes CG, Teng CC, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Visual Field Progression Differences between Normal-Tension and Exfoliative High-Tension Glaucoma Patients. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010;51:1458-63. Folgar FA, De Moraes CG, Prata TS, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Glaucoma Surgery Decreases the Rates of Localized and Global Visual Field Progression, Am J Ophthalmol. 2010;149:258-264.e2. Teng CC, De Moraes CG, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JL. Beta-zone Parapapillary Atrophy and the Velocity of Glaucoma Progression, Ophthalmology. 2010;117:909-15. de Beaufort HC, De Moraes CG, Teng CC, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Recurrent disc hemorrhage does not increase the rate of visual field progression. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2010;248:839-44. Anand A, De Moraes CG, Teng CC, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R. Lower Corneal Hysteresis Predicts Laterality in Asymmetric Open Angle Glaucoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Jun 23. [Epub ahead of print] Olawoye O, Teng CC, Liebmann JM, Wang FM, Ritch R. Iridocorneal Endothelial Syndrome in a 16-Year-Old. J Glaucoma. 2010 Jul 8. [Epub ahead of print] BOOK CHAPTERS 2010 Robert Ritch, MD 1. Tello C, Radcliffe N, Ritch R: Pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Chapter 38 in: The Glaucoma Book. A Practical, Evidence-Based Approach to Patient Care, Schacknow PN, Samples JR, eds. Springer, 2010:497-503.

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Zelefsky J, Ritch R: Alternative and non-traditional treatments of glaucoma. Chapter 56 in: The Glaucoma Book. A Practical, Evidence-Based Approach to Patient Care, Schacknow PN, Samples JR, eds. Springer, 2010:655-657. Konstas AGP, Holló G, Ritch R: Exfoliation Syndrome and Glaucoma. Chapter 39 in: The Glaucoma Book. A Practical, Evidence-Based Approach to Patient Care, Schacknow PN, Samples JR, eds. Springer, 2010:505=514. Ritch R, Schlötzer-Schrehardt U: Exfoliation syndrome and exfoliative glaucoma. In: Ocular disease: mechanisms and management, Levin LA, Albert DM, eds., Elsevier, London 2010:184-192. Ritch R: Pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. In: Encyclopedia of the eye. Dartt DA, Besharse JC, Dana R eds. Vol 3. Oxford: Academic Press. 2010;451-460. Zarbin MA, Montemagno C, Leary JF, Ritch R: The future of nanotechnology in ophthalmology. In: The Eye in History, FJ Goes, ed, Jaypee Brothers, New Delhi, in press. 7. Ritch R, Araie M, Leung D: Non-pharmaceutical therapy for glaucoma. In: Medical treatment of glaucoma. WGA consensus series 7. Weinreb RN, Liebmann JM, eds. Kugler Pub, 2010.

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Christopher Teng, MD 1. Video Atlas of Glaucoma Surgery. C Teng. Editors: Dada T, Barkana Y, Ahmed IK et al. Jaypee Medical Publishers, 2010. Laser Iridotomy and Peripheral Iridoplasty. CC Teng and JM Liebmann. Albert and Lucarelli's Clinical Atlas of Procedures in Ophthalmic Surgery, in press. ORIGINAL PRESENTATIONS 2010 Robert Ritch, MD 1. Sbeity Z, Loeshe CC, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Diagnosis of early blebitis using non-contact in vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy. 2010 Saudi Ophthalmology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 1, 2010. Anand A, etc: Lower corneal hysteresis predicts laterality in asymmetric open-angle glaucoma. Am Glaucoma soc, Naples, FL, March 5, 2010. Radcliffe N, De Moraes CG, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: The relationship between optic disc hemorrhage and corneal hysteresis. Am Glaucoma Soc, Naples, FL, March 5, 2010 De Moraes CGV, Liebmann JM, Teng CC, Tello C, Susanna R Jr, Ritch R: Risk factors for rapid visual field progression in treated glaucoma. Am Glaucoma soc, Naples, FL, March 6, 2010. Hosler M, De Moraes CG, Ritch R, Liebmann JM, Tello C: Argon laser suture lysis in Baerveldt glaucoma drainage. Am Glaucoma soc, Naples, FL, March 6, 2010. Park SC, De Moraes CGV, Tello C, Liebmann RM, Ritch R: Delta-zone parapapillary atrophy and the structural anatomy of the optic nerve. Am Glaucoma soc, Naples, FL, March 6, 2010.

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Spielberg L, Lima VC, Prata TS, Sabates FN, Sabates NR, Gallimore G, Seiple WH, Ritch R, Rosen R: Regional age-related changes on macular function as measured by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy microperimetry. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 2, 2010. Kim E, Sharafieh R, Sarfarazi M, De Moraes CG, Sbeity Z, Liebmann J, Ritch R: Lysyl oxidaselike 1 polymorphisms in children of patients with exfoliation syndrome (XFS). Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 3, 2010. De Moraes CG, Demirel S, Gardiner SK, Liebmann JM, Cioffi GA, Ritch R, Gordon MO, Kass MA: Effect of treatment on rates of visual field change in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 3, 2010. Folgar FA, De Moraes CVG, Juthani VV, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JK: The effect of filtering surgery on rates of visual field change in treated glaucoma patients. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 3, 2010. Juthani VV, de Moraes CG, Liebmann CA, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: IOP parameers and visual field progression with treated glaucoma. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. Also Pan-American Research Day, May 1, 2010. Fernando SM, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Exfoliaton syndrome, intraocular pressure and disc hemorrhage. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. Park S, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Nature and risk factors of initial glaucomatous visual field defect threatening fixation. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. Anand A, De Moraes CG, Liebmann JM, Ritch R, Tello C: Short-duration visual evoked potential as an objective tool for screening refractive errors. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. Teng CC, De Moraes CGV, Prata TS, Liebmann CA, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: The region of largest beta-zone parapapillary atrophy area predicts the location of most rapid visual field progression. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. Cho J, Raza AS, de Moraes GV, Wang M, Zhang X, Kardon RH, Liebmann JM, Ritch R, Hood DC: A comparison of local retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer thickness to local losses in visual field sensitivity in patients with glaucoma. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. Forchheimer I, De Moraes CG, Folgar FA, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Intraocular pressure, baseline visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD), and glaucoma progression. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010.

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Castillejos AR, Dorairaj SK, De Moraes CGV, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: In-vivo imaging of the trabecular pathway and Schlemm's canal with anterior segment Fourier-Domain (AS FD OCT) optical coherence tomography. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, May 5, 2010. Hill VS, De Moraes CG, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Corneal hysteresis is associated with visual field progression. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. Also Pan-American Research Day, May 1, 2010. Dorairaj S, Prata TS, Lima VC, Sebates FN, Gallimore GS, de Moraes CGV, Seiple W, Rosen R, Ritch R: Regional age-related changes on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness as measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. Vaccaro A, Kim E, de Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Rates of visual field (VF) progression in pigmentary glaucoma (PG) and juvenile primary open angle glaucoma (JPOAG). Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. Chan IH, Dorairaj SK, Prata TS, Panarelli J, Sidoti PA, Ritch R: A semi-automatic linear regression-based method to measure the ciliary body-sclera angle in ultrasound biomicroscopy images. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. Raza AS, de Moraes CG, Xin D, Odel JG, Liebmann JM, Ritch R, Hood DC: Small arcuate "comma" defects within 10 degrees of the fovea in patients with glaucoma. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. Demirel S, de Moraes CG, Gardiner SK, Liebmann JM, Cioffi GA, Ritch R, Gordon MO, Kass MA: Rates of change of mean deviation in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. Ritch R, Schiewe M, Zink RC, Lemp M, Kaufman PL, Haque R, Brazell RK, Vittitow JL: Latruncuin B (INS115644) reduces intraocular pressure in ocular hypertension and primary openangle glaucoma. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. Lin C, Ritch R, Lin S, Ni MH, Chang YC, Lai H, Lin FH: Fish scale-derived biocornea. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. De Moraes CGV, Raza AS, Hood DC, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Comma defects: Glaucomatous arcuate scotomas in the central 10 degree field. Am Ophthalmol Soc, White Sulphur Springs, WV, May 21, 2010. De Moraes CGV, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM: Optimizing the detection of visual field change using automated pointwise linear regression analysis: the "truncated" trend-event based approach. World Ophthalmology Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 7, 2010. Lam DSC, Zhao JH, Leung PC, Ritch R: Results of two RCTs on using acupuncture as complementary or alternative treatment for children (aged 3-6 and 7-12) with anisometropic amblyopia. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 18, 2010.

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Lin CC, Ritch R, Lin SM, Ni MH, Chang YC, Lin FH: Biocornea: a new fish scale-derived scaffold for corneal regneration. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 18, 2010. De Moraes CGV, Juthani VJ, Liebmann JM, Teng CC, Tello C, Susanna R Jr, Ritch R: Risk Factors for Rapid Visual Field Progression in Treated Glaucoma. Am Acad Ophthalmol, Chiacago, IL, Oct 17, 2010. Park SC, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Risk factors for development and progression of initial visual field defect threatening fixation compared to initial nasal step in glaucoma. Am Acad Ophthalmol, Chicago, Ill, Oct 18, 2010. Castillejos A, Arata XA, De Moraes CGV, Dorairaj S, Liebmann JM, Ritch R: Sequential imaging of the trabecular pathway structures with anterior segment Fourier domain OCT. Am Acad Ophthalmol, Chicago, Ill, Oct 19, 2010. Ritch R: Normal-tension glaucoma: a nocturnal disease. Keynote address. Asia-Pacific Joint Glaucoma Congress, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC, Dec 3, 2010.

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Paul Sidoti, MD 1. Jangi AA, Spielberg L, Landa G, Sidoti PA, Tai K, Vasquez C, Rosen RB. Peripapillary blood flow velocity in glaucoma evaluated by the Retinal Functional Imager (RFI). Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. Chan IH, Dorairaj SK, Prata TS, Panarelli J, Sidoti PA, Ritch R. A semi-automatic linear regression-based method to measure the ciliary body-sclera angle in ultrasound biomicroscopy images. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. Panarelli J, Gupta A, Sidoti PA. Transscleral Diode laser cyclophotocoagulation following Baerveldt glaucoma Implant surgery. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010.

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Christopher Teng, MD 1. Ahrlich KG, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Prata TS, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Visual Field Progression: Differences Between Normal-Tension and Exfoliative High-Tension Glaucoma Patients. · ASCRS annual convention, Boston, MA, April 9, 2010. · Winner, best glaucoma poster of ASCRS annual convention. Fernando SM, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Exfoliation Syndrome, Intraocular Pressure and Disc Hemorrhage. · ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. · The NYEEI Annual Research Day, New York, NY, May 21, 2010. Park S, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R. Nature and Risk Factors of Initial Glaucomatous Visual Field Defect Threatening Fixation.

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· ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 4, 2010. · The NYEEI Annual Research Day, New York, NY, May 21, 2010. 4. Vaccaro A, Kim E, de Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Rates of Visual Field (VF) Progression in Pigmentary Glaucoma (PG) and Juvenile Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (JPOAG). · ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. · The NYEEI Annual Research Day, New York, NY, May 21, 2010. Forchheimer I, De Moraes CGV, Folgar FA, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Intraocular Pressure, Baseline Visual Field (VF) Mean Deviation (MD), and Glaucoma Progression. ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. Hill VS, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Ritch R, Liebmann JM. Corneal Hysteresis is Associated With Visual Field Progression. ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 5, 2010. Eliasieh K, Dorairaj SK, Kashyap Y, Nezgoda JT, Teng CC. Evaluation of Argon Laser Peripheral Iridoplasties Performed by Residents: Does It Really Work? · ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. · The NYEEI Annual Research Day, New York, NY, May 21, 2010. Kashyap Y, Dorairaj SK, Eliasieh K, Nezgoda J, Teng CC. Evaluation of Laser Iridotomy Performed by Ophthalmology Residents in a Teaching Institution. · ARVO annual convention, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, May 6, 2010. · The NYEEI Annual Research Day, New York, NY, May 21, 2010. Park SC, De Moraes CGV, Teng CC, Tello C, Liebmann JM, Ritch R. Risk Factors for Development and Progression of Initial Visual Field Defect Threatening Fixation Compared to Initial Nasal Step in Glaucoma. American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting, Chicago, IL, October 18, 2010. NAMED LECTURES 2010 Robert Ritch, MD 1. EXFOLIATION SYNDROME ­ A POTENTIALLY CURABLE DISEASE. Prevention of Blindness Shield Lecture, Saudi Ophthalmological Society, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 1, 2010. 2. SLEEP DISORDERS AND GLAUCOMA. THE VON GRAEFE LECTURE. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 17, 2010 ORAL PRESENTATIONS TO SOCIETIES, COURSES AND MEETINGS Robert Ritch, MD 1. NORMAL-TENSION GLAUCOMA ­ A NOCTURNAL DISEASE. Saudi Ophthalmological Society, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 1, 2010.

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NANOTECHNOLOGY ­ A NEW WORLD FOR OPHTHALMOLOGY. Saudi Ophthalmological Society, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 1, 2010. CONGENITAL GLAUCOMA ­ DIAGNOSIS AND SURGICAL MANAGEMENT. Saudi Ophthalmological Society, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 2, 2010. TREATMENT OF OVERFILTERING AND LEAKING BLEBS. Saudi Ophthalmological Society, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 3, 2010. ALTERNATIVE THERAPY FOR GLAUCOMA. Saudi Ophthalmological Society, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 3, 2010. EXFOLIATION SYNDROME. SUNY Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, April 19, 2010. NORMAL-TENSION GLAUCOMA. SUNY Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, April 19, 2010. EXFOLIATIVE GLAUCOMA ­ AN OPEN WINDOW TO NEURODEGENERATION AND NEUROPROTECTION. World Ophthalmology Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 7, 2010. NOW THE PRESSURE IS LOW, WHAT THEN? World Ophthalmology Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 8, 2010. ORGANIZATION OF TEACHING PROGRAMS IN GLAUCOMA FOR THE WORLDWIDE OPHTHALMIC COMMUNITY. World Ophthalmology Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 7, 2010. ICO FELLOWSHIPS: THE HOST EXPERIENCE. World Ophthalmology Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 7, 2010. PRESSURE-INDEPENDENT FACTORS IN GLAUCOMA. World Ophthalmology Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 8, 2010. LASER AND SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ANGLE-CLOSURE. Japan Glaucoma Summer Camp, Kyoto, Japan, Aug 4, 2010. GONIOSCOPY AND MECHANISMS OF ANGLE-CLOSURE. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 17, 2010. TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVING THE SUCCESS OF TRABECULECTOMY. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 18, 2010. LIMBUS-BASED TRABECULECTOMY. Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Beijing, China, Sept. 19, 2010 GLAUCOMA AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE. 5th annual ocular immunology and uveitis foundation physician education conference. Cambridge, Mass, Sept 25, 2010. ARGON LASER IRIDOPLASTY: ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW. Am Acad Ophthalmol, Chicago, Ill, Oct 19, 2010.

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EXFOLIATION SYNDROME: A POTENTIALLY REVERSIBLE DISEASE. Burleigh Court, Leicestershire, England, Nov 1, 2010. NORMAL-TENSION GLAUCOMA; A NOCTURNAL DISEASE. Sunderland Eye Infirmary, Sunderland, England, Nov 1, 2010. EXFOLIATION SYNDROME: A POTENTIALLY REVERSIBLE DISEASE. St. James Hospital, Leeds, England, Nov 2, 2010. NORMAL-TENSION GLAUCOMA; A NOCTURNAL DISEASE. Manchester, England, Nov 2, 2010. EXFOLIATION SYNDROME: A POTENTIALLY REVERSIBLE DISEASE. St. Thomas Hospital, London, England, Nov 3, 2010. NORMAL-TENSION GLAUCOMA; A NOCTURNAL DISEASE. Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, England, Nov 3, 2010. IS IMAGING NECESSARY IN GLAUCOMA? Asia-Pacific Joint Glaucoma Congress, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC, Dec 3, 2010. CURRENT APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF ANGLE-CLOSURE. Asia-Pacific Joint Glaucoma Congress, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC, Dec 4, 2010. NORMAL-TENSION GLAUCOMA; A NOCTURNAL DISEASE. Teleconference with University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, Dec 15, 2010.

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Paul Sidoti, MD 1. AQUEOUS SHUNT PLACEMENT: SUPERIOR VS. INFERIOR SURGERY FOR OPEN ANGLE GLAUCOMA: WHERE ARE WE TODAY? Glaucoma Drainage Devices Annual Meeting of the American Glaucoma Society Naples, FL, March 4-7, 2010. CHILDHOOD GLAUCOMAS. Ophthalmology Resident Conference. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, May 19, 2010.

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Christopher Teng, MD 1. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE AND TONOMETRY, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, January 4, 2010. OCULAR BLOOD FLOW AND GLAUCOMA, The Glaucoma Foundation, January 16, 2010. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE AND GLAUCOMA, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, July 23, 2010. GONIOSCOPY, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, July 28, 2010.

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THE OPTIC NERVE COMPLEX: A UNIFIED CONCEPT FOR INVESTIGATING GLAUCOMATOUS CHANGES AT THE POSTERIOR POLE, Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting, Beijing, China, September 18, 2010. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE AND GLAUCOMA, NYU Medical Center, October 22, 2010. GONIOSCOPY, NYU Medical Center, October 25, 2010.

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OCULOPLASTIC AND ORBITAL SURGICAL SERVICE The oculoplastic and orbital service has had an excellent and long tradition at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary. Indeed this subspecialty in ophthalmology began at the Infirmary in 1936 and continuing under it present leadership since 1982. The mission of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of providing outstanding specialty care, resident and fellowship training has been continued effectively implemented on this service. We are pleased that 35 National fellows and over 65 international fellows have been trained at the Infirmary during the past thirty-five years. The great majority of international fellows have superb achievements as clinicians and directors of service in their respective countries. Over thirty-five countries have been represented by our international fellowship program. The national and international fellowship programs at the Infirmary remain vigorous and superb. In recent years several new attendings on the service are making positive contributions as teachers and clinicians. They include Drs. Debra Kroll, David Della Rocca, Keyvan Keyhani and Alex Rabinowitz. The continued contributions of the attendings and fellows on the service serve as the foundation for care for many with complicated oculoplastic and orbital diseases and injuries. The complexity of patients' disease and treatment is challenging and rewarding to all attendings, residents and fellows. We are grateful to clinic personnel for their dedication and support for the service. The dynamic mission of our service parallels the Infirmary. We are utilizing the availability and enhance web based teaching to international sites and institutions. Expansion of the clinic "footprint" for a clinical information center and rapid availability of imaging and photographic procedures within the clinic is near completion. The positive association with the pathology, radiology and otolaryngology departments is meaningful to all. Frozen section technique developed by Dr. Steven McCormick has been most important in the treatment of malignant eyelid and adnexal tumors. We are a referral center for the treatment of these tumors. This cooperative work involving the oculoplastic and pathology department has an important publication co authored by F. Levin, M. Khalil, S. McCormick, D. Della Rocca, E. Maher and R. Della Rocca, "Excision of Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma with Stereoscopic Microdisection of Surgical Margins for Frozen Section Control: Report of 200 cases", in Arch Ophthalmology 2009: 127(8):1011-1015. The service also looks forward to accumulation of the final data in the study of adiponectin levels in the various stages of thyroid related eye disease and study of complex orbital fractures. Attendings and past fellows have continued to conduct prominent courses at the American Academy of Ophthalmology including Surgical Anatomy of the Eyelids and Surgical Anatomy of the Orbit and Lacrimal Systems. These courses have been presented for over fifteen years consecutively. Former fellows of the service, Dr. Ned Bedrossian (course director) and Bryan Arthurs also contributed to the course We can add as a final note that for the past 15 years many of the services' attendings and fellows have worked diligently and faithfully in medical mission work in Ophthalmology with the Volunteer Health Program in the Dominican Republic and for 8 years in the Philippines. We are humbled and honored to be part of these worthy efforts. International fellows continue to visit and be part of our service; typically visiting for 3 ­ 6 months. The present and future of New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and the members of our service are honored to be part of it.

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THE NEW YORK EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY TEACHING CURRICULUM The Oculoplastic and Orbital Clinic meet weekly for a four-hour session. One resident fromeach class spends approximately eight weeks on rotation with the Oculoplastic Service. Patients are evaluated with the assistance of the fellow and then presented to the attendings or discussion of the appropriate management. The two-month rotation allows for continuity of patient care and effective academic and surgical experience for the residents. The senior resident has block surgical time every week to complete approximately 35 major cases with assigned members of the Oculoplastic Service.

During academic clinical session, 1,275 patients have annual visits and 248 major surgical procedures are preformed. Many of the major procedures are quit complex, dealing with tumors of the eyelids and orbits, trauma, congenital and acquired abnormalities. The residents evaluate additional patients who present to the Emergency Room with orbital trauma and other urgent oculoplastic problems. A rotating schedule of oculoplastic trauma attendings assures that senior staff members are available in cases that require immediate surgery. During the second year, the residents rotate through Beth Israel Medical Center and are often called to evaluate and treat patient with orbital and oculoplastic problems. An additional 350 minor surgical procedures are preformed in the clinic.

The residents are involved with the management of eyelid malposition, orbital and eyelid neoplasms, blowout and tripod fractures, and a significant number of anophthalmic socket problems. They also commonly see systematic illnesses that may affect the orbit, including thyroid disease and lymphproliferative disorders. The residents receive consultations from and work closely with their otolaryngology colleagues. The didactic program of the Oculoplastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary includes 14 formal lectures covering various topics in this subspecialty. The lectures are given during the second six months of each academic year followed by a comprehensive written examination that is graded and reviewed with the residents. Lecture topics are updated yearly. By the completion of the rotation, the residents become proficient in nasolacrimal duct probing and intubation, dacrycystorhinostomy, entropion and ectropion repair, eyelid laceration repair, enucleation, blepharoplasty, and ptosis repair. CT and MRI studies are reviewed weekly with the Chief of Radiology. The residents also have the opportunity to examine the histopathology from all surgical cases and may participate in clinical research with the attendings. Chief of Service Asst Chief of Service Coordinator of Trauma Service Robert Della Rocca, MD Elizabeth A. Maher, MD Chief Associate Chief Attending Surgeons Fellows Int'l Fellows James Milite, MD David A. Della Rocca,MD Bruce Moskowitz, MD Keyvan Keyhani MD Deborah Kroll, MD Alex Rabinovich, MD Janet Roen, MD Director of Trauma

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Ophthalmology Associates Professional Corporation (PC) Who we are... The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary Ophthalmology Associates Professional Corporation (PC) is a for-profit business entity which assists the Department of Ophthalmology of the Infirmary by contracting and working with the physicians who serve as faculty. The PC contracts, credentials, and compensates physicians while managing the revenue cycle and overseeing compliance and regulatory matters. The PC also maintains a cooperative relationship with the Infirmary. The PC, however, is legally separate and distinct from The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary. The PC commenced as a functioning entity on September 1, 1992.

Purpose... The original concept of a PC was driven by the desire to enhance the educational experience while continuing to provide exceptional care to this under-served community. There was a need for increased attending participation in the teaching effort and greater continuity in the delivery of care.

Governance... The PC Board (also referred to as the PC Advisory Committee) serves as the governing body and is comprised of the following: 1. President ­ (By-laws appoint NYEEI Chairman of Ophthalmology to serve in this capacity) 2. Chief Administrative Officer ­ (only member of leadership team that is full time PC employee) 3. Vice-Chairman of the NYEEI Department of Ophthalmology 4. Director of Residency training 5. The Chief's of the major services (Retina, Glaucoma, Comprehensive, Pediatrics, Cornea) 6. At-large representatives (6): i. (2) ­ representing the Clinical Directors ii. (2) ­ representing members of the Comprehensive Eye Service iii. (2) ­ representing members of all the specialty services 2010 PC Board Joseph B. Walsh, MD Thomas O. Muldoon, MD Robert H. Ritch, MD Richard B. Rosen, MD Paul A. Sidoti, MD Lloyd G. Stanford John Aljian, MD Noga Harizman, MD Steven Koenig, MD Jeanne Rosenthal, MD

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President, Chairman of NYEE Dept of Ophthalmology Treasurer Secretary Vice-Chairman of NYEE Dept. of Ophthalmology Program Director of NYEE Dept of Ophthalmology Chief Administrative Officer Lisabeth Hall, MD Anne Ko, MD Steven Rosenberg, MD Glenn Silbert, MD

Ronald Gentile, MD Sanjay Kedhar, MD David Ritterband, MD John Seedor, MD Christopher Teng, MD

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Clinical Directors & Associate Clinical Directors... Members are appointed the rank of Clinical Directors/Associate Clinical Director (ACD) based on commitment to the academic program. All have regular schedules and devote a significant amount of time each week for clinical/OR supervision, teaching and patient care.

Relevant Rules & Structure... All physicians who work with the residents - in any capacity (clinical/OR training and supervision, lectures, participation in on-call rotations) must be credentialed and approved by the PC Board. Exception is made for guest lecturers. Approval of applications for membership is generally based on clinical need, credentials, prior academic experience, and recommendations. Of the 500 ophthalmologists on staff at the Infirmary, approximately 130 are PC members.

Faculty Practice Plan... The faculty practice is a completely separate operation with its own administrative and operational infrastructure. The faculty practice plan (FPP) sees only "private" patients and does not pilfer from the clinics. There are no funds co-mingled or exchanged between the PC and the FPP. Residents do not rotate through the FPP offices. All faculty practice members are also PC members. Currently, in addition to private patient care, the faculty practice group renders care to approximately 20% of PC patients.

Physician Staff... Most PC members serve in a part-time per diem capacity; the extent of which varies widely. * 92% of the physician members are voluntary, 8% are faculty * 85% are recognized as independent contractors (1099's), including the FP * 15% are recognized as PC employees (w-2's) * 1% are full-time PC employees

Malpractice... All PC members are required to maintain malpractice coverage at appropriate levels.

The Clinical Experience & Education... All clinics are run by attending physicians who serve as instructors. Patients are triaged through the system and then seen by residents and attending physicians.

The Surgical Experience... All surgery is performed under direct supervision of a teaching physician.

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Patient Info... Approximately 95,000 patients per year Demographics: 22% Medicare 18% Medicaid (fee for service) 46% Managed care (including `Caid HMO's) 10% Self-pay / no pay (indigent) 4% Other Reimbursement: 32% Medicare 14% Medicaid (fee for service) 51% Managed care (including `Caid HMO's) 2% self pay / no pay (indigent) 1% Other

Funding... Most of the operating revenue is derived from third party billing and reimbursement. Third party carriers are billed for the professional (Part B) services provided by the teaching physicians. All

billing claims utilize the PC's group tax identification numbers as well as the individual group supplier numbers. Hospital/PC Cost sharing... The Infirmary bills and is reimbursed for the technical (Part A) component and receives 100% of GME monies. The Infirmary supplies and maintains the patient care facility and assumes responsibility for residents, nursing staff, technicians and hospital administrative staff. The PC supplies and oversees the professional component - the teaching physicians - and assumes the return, burden, and risk associated with such engagement.

Physician Compensation... Physician compensation (and related) currently represent approximately 70% of the PC's operating budget. Earnings are based on a point system; most services rendered have a point value. The point value is based on the level of skill required, complexity, value as part of academic program, and average level of third party reimbursement. The unit value of a point is $50. . PC compensation is typically between 70% - 85% of the amount a physician would garner in private practice. However, it should be noted that PC compensation to physicians is the same for all patients and not a derivative of reimbursement (which in a "clinic" environment is a propitious arrangement for the physicians due to the high percentage of indigent, underinsured or poorly insured cases which produce no-pay and/or low reimbursement). Physicians are compensated directly by the PC on a quarterly basis.

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Role of PC Administrative Office... Responsibility for: Physician Member Relations Financial Management and Reporting Operational Management Regulatory Compliance & Risk Management Strategic planning Systems Management Overseeing billing, reimbursement & credentialing Conclusion... The professional corporation has proven to be an extraordinarily successful enterprise. Under the direction of the Advisory Committee and specifically, Joseph B. Walsh, M.D., (President), Thomas O. Muldoon, M.D. (Treasurer), and Lloyd G. Stanford (Chief Administrative Officer), the P.C. has steadily generated revenues while limiting expenses and maintaining regulatory compliance. By employing sound business practices and instituting comprehensive financial and operational systems, the professional corporation has generated in excess of $50 million. The leadership of the professional corporation maintains a sense of optimism about the future. The long term strategic plan is designed to maintain a strong financial position while continuing to play a role in furthering the rich tradition of medical education at the Infirmary. NY Eye & Ear Infirmary Ophthalmology Associates, PC Roster of Active Physicians SPECIALTY Physician John Meredith Louis Rudrani Maria Alessandra Anna Peter Douglas Phillip Brian Kenneth Nancy Mary Alan Regina David Robert Richard Aljian Allen Angioletti Banik Basile Bertolucci Boyman Breingan Buxton Calenda Campolattaro Cohen Coles Davidian Dayan Del Rosario Della Rocca Della Rocca DeLuca PRIMARY SECONDARY COMPREHENSIVE TRAUMA COMPREHENSIVE RETINA NEURO-OP GLAUCOMA RETINA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE TRAUMA PEDIATRICS PEDIATRICS COMPREHENSIVE CORNEA RETINA PEDIATRICS PLASTICS PLASTICS COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE CORNEA PEDIATRICS

TRAUMA

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Eric Vicente Vatsal Jonathan Harry Elliot Howard Paul John Seymour Jay Ronald David Jack Edward Ronald Lisabeth Noga Robyn Lawrence Andrea Neil Steven Sanjay Kayvan Maayan Noah Anne Steven Richard Debra M. Stephen Mark Madhavi Gennady Sean Paul Robert Olivia Joan Eric Robert Marc Elizabeth Kira Kerline John John

Dessner Diaz Doshi Ellant Faivus Feinman Fiedler Finger Flanagan Fradin Galst Gentile Gorman Greenberg Griggs Hagadus Hall Harizman Horowitz Jacobson Jue Katz Kane Kedhar Keyhani Keshet Klein Ko Koenig Koplin Kroll Kronenberg Kupersmith Kurli Landa Lalin Latkany Latkany Lee Li Lichtenstein Lowe Lustig Maher Manusis Marcelin Mauro McDermott

PEDIATRICS RETINA RETINA TRAUMA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE RETINA TRAUMA RETINA COMPREHENSIVE RETINA TRAUMA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE GLAUCOMA PEDIATRICS GLAUCOMA COMPREHENSIVE TRAUMA GLAUCOMA PEDIATRICS PEDS-Glaucoma RETINA PLASTICS COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE PLASTICS COMPREHENSIVE NEURO-OP COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE RETINA RETINA CORNEA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE PEDIATRICS COMPREHENSIVE PEDIATRICS PLASTICS COMPREHENSIVE GLAUCOMA RETINA GLAUCOMA

COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE

PEDIATRICS PEDIATRICS

COMPREHENSIVE

COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE

CORNEA

CORNEA CORNEA TRAUMA

CORNEA

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Brian Lois James Tatyana Bruce Richard Boris Anthony Jai Morris Aryeh Estuardo Almerindo Madelyn Alexander Tal Robert David Janet Richard Rhonda Steven E. Arlene Harvey Jeanne Kenneth Robert Allen Valeria Earl Michael Edwin Peter Kenneth John Belinda Paul Glenn Marc Regina Mark Jeffrey Marla Hilla Tai Mark Christopher Celso

McGuinness McNally Milite Milman Moskowitz Najac Ovodenko Panarelli Parekh Podolsky Pollack Ponce Portfolio Pullman Rabinovich Raviv Ritch Ritterband Roen Rosen Rosenberg Rosenberg Rosenberg-Henick Rosenblum Rosenthal Rosenthal Rothstein Rubin Rubinstein Sandor Samson Schottenstein Schwartz Schor Seedor Shirkey Sidoti Silbert Sirota Smolyak Speaker Spitzer Sultan Steinberg Tania Tannenbaum Teng Tello

COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE PLASTICS COMPREHENSIVE PLASTICS CORNEA COMPREHENSIVE PEDIATRICS CORNEA GLAUCOMA RETINA RETINA COMPREHENSIVE PEDIATRICS COMPREHENSIVE PLASTICS CORNEA GLAUCOMA CORNEA PLASTICS RETINA GLAUCOMA PEDIATRICS PEDIATRICS TRAUMA RETINA COMPREHENSIVE GLAUCOMA COMPREHENSIVE GLAUCOMA COMPREHENSIVE RETINA GLAUCOMA TRAUMA GLAUCOMA CORNEA RETINA GLAUCOMA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE GLAUCOMA CORNEA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE GLAUCOMA GLAUCOMA GLAUCOMA GLAUCOMA

COMPREHENSIVE

PEDIATRICS

TRAUMA TRAUMA

COMPREHENSIVE

COMPREHENSIVE TRAUMA

COMPREHENSIVE

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Anthony Joseph Dina Angie Peter Jules Jay David Elaine Arnold Sherry Rumei James

Terraciano Walsh Weintraub Wen Weseley Winokur Wisnicki Witzel Wu Yagoda Yang Yuan Zellner

CORNEA RETINA GLAUCOMA COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE CORNEA RETINA CORNEA PEDIATRICS GLAUCOMA CORNEA RETINA PEDIATRICS COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE

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MEDICAL LIBRARY COMMITTEE YEAR 2010 ANNUAL REPORT In the year 2010 use of Samuels Medical Library as compared to 2009 showed some decreased staff demand for services overall, but a notable increase in requests from other libraries. Total staff requests for articles and books were down somewhat (16%). The explanation may be easier access to current materials online, but a decrease in the number of libraries with historical holdings such as those of the Infirmary. The yearly statistics were as follows: 517 staff requests for in-house articles (down 10%), 331 for interlibrary loan services (down 25%) and 111 requests from other libraries for articles (up 27%). In addition to Residents and Attendings, the Infirmary's Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Center, Voice and Swallowing Institute and the enlarged Communicative Service's Centers for Balance, Hearing, Speech and Vestibular Rehabilitation continued to require research materials. In 2010 journal binding was not done, but was postponed to 2011 in order to accumulate the minimum of 200 complete volumes required for free pickup and delivery by Bridgeport Binders. Assuming favorable budgetary conditions, journal binding will go forward on an alternate year basis. Library funds for books were used to partially update the Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology, Pharmacy, and Nursing areas of the Infirmary collections. A technology grant for 2010 from METRO, the New York Metropolitan Library Agency was awarded to the Library. Although NYS funds were not forthcoming for METRO collection development grants in 2010, it is anticipated that they will be reinstated for 2011. Extensive online resources from the New York Medical College Library were available for Residents and NYMC Faulty. Library services continued to be available at Beth Israel Medical Center, a Continuum Health partner, to all Infirmary staff who visited the Phillips Health Science Library in Fierman Hall at 317 East 17th Street. The committee members of the Medical Library Committee, chaired by Richard B. Rosen, M.D., Vice Chairman and Director of Research for Ophthalmology, continued to provide guidance to the Librarian and to be proactive in setting goals to promote the Library's visibility at the Infirmary. In 2011 the METRO technology grand funds will be expended to buy a new computer for the Librarian to use in the creation of a Library World online book catalog and web presence. A new initiative moving forward to preserve archival records and seek funding for their conversion to digital records will be led by Joseph B. Walsh, M.D., Chairman of the Ophthalmology Department. Respectively Submitted, April 22 2011. Mary Ann Lach Director, Medical Library Richard B. Rosen, M.D. Chairman, Medical Library Committee

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ARVO 2010 FORT LAUDERDALE MAY 2 ­ May 6 THE NEW YORK EYE & EAR INFIRMARY NEW YORK MEDICAL COLLEGE 71 PRESENTATIONS/POSTERS Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 192/A415 - Impact of Corneal Thickness on the Observed Incidence of Glaucoma N.I. Hayashi1, M. Shimmyo2, N.M. Radcliffe3, A. Gruner4. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; 4Ophthalmology, Moorefield Hospital, London, United Kingdom. Poster Session 109. Clinical Research and Drug Studies in Glaucoma Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 380/D867 - Knockdown of HO-2 but Not HO-1 Impairs Corneal Wound Healing A. Halilovic1A, K.A. Patil1A, K. Castellano1A, L. Bellner1A, G. Cullaro1A, S. Inaganti1A, M.W. Dunn1A,1B, M.L. Schwartzman1A,1B. APharmacology, BOphthalmology, 1New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 114. Corneal Wound Healing I Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 213/A481 - Does Ganglion Cell Complex Scan Predict Glaucoma Earlier Than Retinal Fiber Layer Thickness Map in Suspects and Glaucoma Patients Using Fourier Domain OCT? F.N. Kanadani1,2, T.C. Kanadani3A, E.R. Diniz3A, V. Rezende3B, S.K. Dorairaj4, N.V. Lima5, T.S. Prata6. 1Ophthalmology/Glaucoma, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Ophthalmology/Glaucoma, SANTA CASA OF BELO HORIZONTE/UNIFESP, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; AOphthalmology, BOphthalmology/Glaucoma, 3Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 4Glaucoma, Einhorn Rsch Center, NYEE, New York, NY; 5Ophthalmology/Glaucoma, Hospital Sao Geraldo, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 6Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 110. Retinal Imaging in Glaucoma Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 272/D625 - Relationship Between Drusen Autofluorescence Changes Exposed by Heidelberg Retina Angiograph and Drusen Ultrastructure Revealed by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Dry AMD Patients G. Landa1,2, R.B. Rosen3A,2, J. Pilavas1, P.M. Garcia3B,2. 1Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; AOphthalmology, BRetina Center, 3New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 111. Posterior Imaging I Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM

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333/D686 - Correlation Between Retinal Sensitivity, Tested by Microperimetry, and the Status of Underlying Inner/outer Segment Junctional Photoreceptor Layer, Assessed by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Central Serous Retinopathy J.T. Nezgoda1, G. Landa1,2, E. Su2, P.M.T. Garcia1,2, R.B. Rosen1. 1Ophthalmology, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 112. Posterior Imaging II Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 380/D867 - Knockdown of HO-2 but Not HO-1 Impairs Corneal Wound Healing A. Halilovic1A, K.A. Patil1A, K. Castellano1A, L. Bellner1A, G. Cullaro1A, S. Inaganti1A, M.W. Dunn1A,1B, M.L. Schwartzman1A,1B. APharmacology, BOphthalmology, 1New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 383/D870 - A Randomized, Double-Mask, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Response, Phase 2 Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Thymosin Beta 4 in the Treatment of Diabetic Patients' Corneal Wounds Resulting From Epithelial Debridement During Vitrectomy B.H. Jeng1, G. Sosne2, S. Srivastava3, D.M. Marcus4, R.C. Gentile5, L. Martin6, D. Crockford6. 1Ophthalmology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; 2Ophthalmology and Anatomy & Cell Biology, Wayne State Univ Sch of Med, Detroit, MI; 3Emory University Eye Center, Atlanta, GA; 4Ophthalmology, Southeast Retina Center, Augusta, GA; 5Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 6RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc, Bethesda, MD. Poster Session 114. Corneal Wound Healing I Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 386/D873 - Targeted Suppression of Heme Oxygenase (HO)-2 Gene Expression Impairs the Innate Anti-Inflammatory and Repair Responses of the Cornea to Injury L. Bellner1A, K.A. Patil1A, A. Halilovic1A, K. Castellano1A, G. Cullaro1A, M.W. Dunn1B,1A, M.L. Schwartzman1A,1B. APharmacology, BOphthalmology, 1New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 114. Corneal Wound Healing I Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 416/D1076 - Proteomics, Lipidomic & Angiogenesis- Normal & Allergic Tears R.A. Sack1, P. Iserovich1, S. Sathe1, A. Beaton1, A. Leonardi2, K.H. Gotlinger3, L. Bellner3, M. Dunn3, M. laniado Schwartzman3. 1Biological Sciences, SUNY-Opt, New York, NY; 2Dept. of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology Uni, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 3Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 115. Immunity, Inflammation and Degeneration Sunday, May 2, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 508/A154 - Analysis of Drusen Reduction in Dry AMD Patients in Copaxone Study Assessed by High Resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography A. Patel1, G. Landa1,2, P. Garcia1,2, R. Rosen1,2. 1Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY. Poster Session

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121. AMD II Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 555/A351 - Methods for Intraocular Pressure Measurement: Evaluation of Agreement Between Goldmann Applanation Tonometry and Goldmann Correlated Intraocular Pressure With Reichert's Ocular Response Analyzer C.E. Fraser1, J.R. Ehrlich1, S.J. Haseltine1, M. Shimmyo2, N.M. Radcliffe1. 1Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY. Poster Session 123. Intraocular Pressure and Modifiers Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 581/A377 - Comparison of Intraocular Pressure by Goldmann Applanation Tonometry vs. Dynamic Contour Tonometry in Normal Subjects and Glaucoma Patients Treated by Ganfort and Duotrav Before, During and After Aerobic Exercise E.R. Diniz1, N.V. Lima2, F.N. Kanadani3, H.H. Russ4, B.P. Figueiredo2, T.C.M. Kanadani1, A.P. Tupynamba5, S.K. Dorairaj6. 1Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte - MG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Hospital Sao Geraldo - UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Ophthalmology/Glaucoma, Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte - MG / UNIFESP, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 4Ophthalmology, Instituto Graefe de Oftalmologia, Curitiba, Brazil; 5Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal, Brasilia, Brazil; 6Glaucoma, Einhorn Rsch Center, NYEE, New York, NY. Poster Session 123. Intraocular Pressure and Modifiers Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Sunday May 2, 2010 22:25 ­ 1:00 PM 647/A555 Spectral Domain OCT Parameters to Measure Papilledema due to Intracranial Hypertension G.M. Mandel1, M. Durbin2, M.J. Kupersmith3, R.H. Kardon4. 1NeuroOphthalmology, St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, Brooklyn, NY; 2R & D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc, Dublin, CA; 3Neuro-Ophthalmology, Roosevelt Hospital and NYEE, New York, NY; 4Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. Poster Session 126. Retinal and Optic Nerve Imaging Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 646/A554 - Is Papilledema the Reverse of Glaucoma? OCT Demonstration of Biomechanical Alterations of the Optic Nerve M.J. Kupersmith1, P. Sibony2, G. Mandel1, M. Durbin3, R.H. Kardon4. 1Neuro-Ophthalmology, Roosevelt Hospital and NYEE, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, SUNY, University Hospital Medical Center/Stony Brook, NY; 3R & D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc, Dublin, CA; 4Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. Poster Session 126. Retinal and Optic Nerve Imaging Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 659/A567 - Retinal Ganglion Cell and Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness Measured With fdOCT in Regions of Severe Sensitivity Loss in Patients With Ischemic Optic Neuropathy A.L. Moura1,2A, A.S. Raza2A, J. Cho2A, M.A. Lazow2A, C.G. De Moraes3, J.G. Odel2B, D.C. Hood2A,2B. 1Department of Psychology, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; APsychology Department, BOphthalmology, 2Columbia University, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 126. Retinal and Optic Nerve Imaging

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Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 748/D900 - Incidence of Intraocular Pressure Rise and the Need for Anti-Hypertensive Treatment After Descemet Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty V. Trubnik, N. Harizman, T. Jenkins, A. Jangi, J.A. Seedor, D.C. Ritterband. Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 872/D1104 - Curcumin Induces Cell Death in Human Uveal Melanoma Cells Through Mitochondrial Pathway D.-N. Hu1A, C. Lu2, M. Chen1B, E. Song2, R.B. Rosen1C, S.A. McCormick1B. APathology & Ophthalmology, BPathology, COphthalmology, 1New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, China. Poster Session 133. Melanocytic Lesions of Conjunctiva and Molecular Pathology Mechanisms in Malignant Melanoma Sunday, May 2, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 1:15 - 2:45 PM SIG Organizer R. Ritch. New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Special Interest Group (SIG) 140. Imaging of Neuronal Function in Optic Neuropathies Sunday, May 2, 2010 1:15 - 2:45 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM 1036/A599 - Regional Age-Related Changes on Macular Function as Measured by Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Microperimetry L. Spielberg1, V.C. Lima2, T.S. Prata2, F.N. Sabates3, N.R. Sabates3, G. Gallimore3, W.H. Seiple4, R. Ritch1,5, R. Rosen1,5. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 3Ophthalmology, UMKC School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO; 4Lighthouse International, New York, NY; 5Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 150. Novel Imaging Technologies and Functional Imaging Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM 1047/A610 - Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Resolved Uveitic Cystoid Macular Edema: Features Associated With Permanent Vision Loss P.Y. Chang1, V. Diaz2, D.M. Hinkle1, J. Mauro1, C.S. Foster1, C.M. Samson2. 1Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 150. Novel Imaging Technologies and Functional Imaging Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM Organizing Section/Contributing Sections: Multidisciplinary Ophthalmic Imaging Group/Visual Psychophysics/Physiological Optics, Retina+ Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM 1049/A612 - Microperimetry and Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients With Retinal Vein Occlusion M. Kurli1A, G. Landa1B, E. Su2, P.M. Garcia3A, R.B. Rosen3B. ARetina, BDepartment of Ophthalmology, 1New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY;

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2New York Medical College, New York, NY; ARetina Center, BOphthalmology, 3New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 150. Novel Imaging Technologies and Functional Imaging Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM 1051/A614 - Cilioretinal Arteries in Diabetic Eyes Are Associated With Increased Retinal Blood Flow Velocity and Occurrence of Diabetic Macular Edema A. Ponce1,2, G. Landa1,2, W. Amde1, R.B. Rosen1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 150. Novel Imaging Technologies and Functional Imaging Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM 1055/A618 - Retinal Functional Imaging of Peri-Foveal Blood Flow Velocities in Diabetic Retinopathy K. Mukkamala, L. Spielberg, G. Landa, S. Balasubramanian, R.B. Rosen. Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM 1129/D951 - Long Term Corneal Endothelial Cell Loss in Eyes With Clear Grafts After Penetrating Keratoplasty for Keratoconus A. Vong1, G.W. Zaidman2,1. 1New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 2Ophthalmology, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 154. Keratoplasty II/ Keratoprosthesis/Corneal Surgery Sunday, May 2, 2010 2:45 - 4:30 PM Monday, May 3, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 1318/A149 - Incidence of Pediatric Conjunctivitis in the Urgent Care Setting A. Gupta, K. Mukkamala, L. Spielberg, L. Hall. Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/ViewSession.aspx?sKey=80a5681b-96e9-4bea-b07017c82638794a&mKey=%7b1EA90E66-C548-49E0-9F05-30DA7938D511%7d Monday, May 3, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 1459/A608 - Neurologic Findings Following the Cutaneous Erythema Migrans of Early Lyme Disease: A Five Year Prospective Report D.H.K. Jokl. Ophthalmology,, New York Medical College, Columbia University, New York, NY. Poster Session

Monday, May 3, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 PM - 5:30 AM 2413/D961 - Infectious Keratitis: A Laboratory Survey of 30 Years (1980-2009) M.K. Shah1A, S. Poopalaratnam1B, W. Perez1A, P. Kunkler1A, J.A. Seedor1B, D. Ritterband1B. APathology and Laboratory Medicine, BOphthalmology, 1New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 291. Corneal Infections: Clinical I Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Monday, May 3, 2010 4:15 - 4:30 PM 2049 - Effect of Treatment on Rates of Visual Field Change in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study C.G. De Moraes1,2, S. Demirel3, S.K. Gardiner3, J.M. Liebmann1, G.A.

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Cioffi3, R. Ritch2, M.O. Gordon4, M.A. Kass4, Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. 1Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Devers Eye Institute, Legacy Health, Portland, OR; 4Ophthal & Vis Sciences, Washington Univ Sch of Med, St Louis, MO. Paper Session 277. New Insights into Glaucoma Disease Progression Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 2178/A277 - Lysyl Oxidase-Like 1 Polymorphisms in Children of Patients With Exfoliation Syndrome (XFS) E. Kim1, R. Sharafieh2, M. Sarfarazi2, C.G. De Moraes1,3, Z. Sbeity1,4, J. Liebmann1,3, R. Ritch1,4. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT; 3New York University, New York, NY; 4New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 282. Glaucoma Genetics and Proteomics Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 2299/A508 - Retinal Functional Imaging for Evaluating Blood Flow After Encircling Scleral Buckles J.P. Shulman, G. Landa, L. Spielberg, T. Muldoon, R. Rosen. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 285. Posterior Imaging III

Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 PM - 5:30 AM 2413/D961 - Infectious Keratitis: A Laboratory Survey of 30 Years (1980-2009) M.K. Shah1A, S. Poopalaratnam1B, W. Perez1A, P. Kunkler1A, J.A. Seedor1B, D. Ritterband1B. APathology and Laboratory Medicine, BOphthalmology, 1New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 291. Corneal Infections: Clinical I Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Monday, May 3, 2010 4:30 - 4:45 PM 2050 - The Effect of Filtering Surgery on Rates of Visual Field Change in Treated Glaucoma Patients F.A. Folgar1, C.G.V. De Moraes1,2, V.V. Juthani1, C.C. Teng1,2, C. Tello2, R. Ritch2, J.M. Liebmann1,2. 1Ophthalmology, NYU Medical Center, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Paper Session 277. New Insights into Glaucoma Disease Progression Monday, May 3, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM ANNUAL NYE&EI/NYMC BEACH BASH LAGO MAR 19:30 HOST: Richard B. Rosen, MD

Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Moderator R. Ritch. Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Paper Session 309. Neural Rescue in Glaucoma Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM

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Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 2681/D670 - Exfoliation Syndrome, Intraocular Pressure and Disc Hemorrhage S.M. Fernando1,2, C.G.V. De Moraes1,2, C.C. Teng1,2, C. Tello1,3, R. Ritch1,3, J.M. Liebmann1,2. 1Ophthalmology, Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; 3New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 317. Glaucoma Risk Factors, Biomarkers and Blood Flow Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 2692/D681 - Peripapillary Blood Flow Velocity in Glaucoma Evaluated by the Retinal Functional Imager (RFI) A.A. Jangi1A, L. Spielberg1A, G. Landa1B, P.A. Sidoti2A, K.W. Tai2B, C. Vasquez1A, R.B. Rosen2B. AOphthalmology, BDepartment of Ophthalmology, 1New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; ADepartment of Ophthalmology, BOphthalmology, 2New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 317. Glaucoma Risk Factors, Biomarkers and Blood Flow Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 2696/D685 - Comparison of Ocular Perfusion Pressure in Normal Subjects and Glaucoma Patients Using Travoprost/timolol and Bimatoprost/Timolol Fixed Combination Before, During and After Aerobic Exercise B.P. Figueiredo1, N.V. Lima2, F.N. Kanadani3, H.H. Russ4, T.C.M. Kanadani5A, E.R. Diniz5B, A. Tupynambá6, S.K. Dorairaj7. 1Glaucoma, Cataract, Santa Casa Belo Horizonte / UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Glaucoma, Cataract, Hospital São Geraldo, UFMG ­ Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Ophthalmology/Glaucoma, Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte/UNIFESP, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 4Glaucoma, Cataract, Instituto Graeffe ­ Curitiba ­ Paraná, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; ARetina, Cataract, BCornea, Cataract, 5Santa Casa - Belo Horizonte, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 6Glaucoma, Cataract, Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal, Brasília, Brazil; 7Glaucoma, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary - New York, New York, NY. Poster Session 317. Glaucoma Risk Factors, Biomarkers and Blood Flow Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 2703/D692 - Nature and Risk Factors of Initial Glaucomatous Visual Field Defect Threatening Fixation S. Park1,2, C.G.V. De Moraes1,3, C.C. Teng1,2, C. Tello1,2, J.M. Liebmann1,3, R. Ritch1,2. 1Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 3Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Poster Session 317. Glaucoma Risk Factors, Biomarkers and Blood Flow Tuesday, May 4, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM 3279/A595 - Short-Duration Visual Evoked Potential as an Objective Tool for Screening Refractive Errors A. Anand1, C.G. De Moraes1,2, J.M. Liebmann1,2, R. Ritch1,3, C. Tello1,3. 1Einhorn Clinical Research Center, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; 3Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 357. Electrophysiology of Visual Disorders in Patients Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM

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Tuesday, May 4, 2010 2:00 - 2:15 PM 2917 - An Open-Label Proof-Of Concept Study to Assess the Efficacy of AIN457 in Patients With Noninfectious Uveitis C.M. Samson1, C.S. Foster2, R. Kim3, N. Falk4, D.S. Chu5, D. Callanan6, Q. Nguyen7, T.P. Dryja8. 1New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA; 3Vitreoretinal Consultants, Houston, TX; 4Retina Consultants, Slingerlands, NY; 5Cornea and Laser Eye Institute, Teaneck, NJ; 6Texas Retina Associates, Arlington, TX; 7Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, MD; 8Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA. Paper Session 337. Clinical Studies in Ocular Inflammatory Disease Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM

Tuesday, May 4, 2010 3:15 - 3:30 PM 2979 - The Region of Largest Beta-Zone Parapapillary Atrophy Area Predicts the Location of Most Rapid Visual Field Progression C.C. Teng1,2, C.G.V. De Moraes1,3, T.S. Prata1, C.A. Liebmann1, C. Tello1,2, R. Ritch1,2, J.M. Liebmann3. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 3Ophthalmology, NYU Medical Center, New York, NY. Paper Session 345. Clinical Science in Glaucoma Imaging Tuesday, May 4, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM Tuesday, May 4, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 3618/A227 - Face Processing by Patients With Age-Related Macular Degeneration W.H. Seiple1, M.E. Schneck2, J.V. Odom3, P.M. Garcia4A, R.B. Rosen4B. 1Research, Lighthouse International, New York, NY; 2Univ of CA, Berkeley & Smith-Kettlewell, Berkeley, CA; 3Ophthalmology, West Virginia Univ Eye Inst, Morgantown, WV; ARetina Center, BOphthalmology, 4New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 378. (Low) Vision, Task Performance, Plasticity and Rehabilitation Tuesday, May 4, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Tuesday, May 4, 2010 4:45 - 5:00 PM 3496 - IOP Parameters and Visual Field Progression in Patients With Treated Glaucoma V.V. Juthani1, C.G. de Moraes2, C.A. Liebmann3, C.C. Teng4, C. Tello4, R. Ritch4, J.M. Liebmann5. 1Ophthalmology, New York University, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary and NYU Medical Center, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 4Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and New York Medical College, New York, NY; 5Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and NYU Medical Center, New York, NY. Paper Session 371. Clinical Science of Intraocular Pressure Tuesday, May 4, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Moderator R.B. Rosen. Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Paper Session 410. Imaging III Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 4020/A299 - Rates of Visual Field (VF) Progression in Pigmentary Glaucoma (PG) and Juvenile

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Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (JPOAG) A. Vaccaro1,2, E. Kim1, C.G.V. de Moraes1,2, C.C. Teng1,3, C. Tello1,3, R. Ritch1,3, J.M. Liebmann1,2. 1Ophthalmology, Einhorn Clinical Research Center, NY Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY; 3Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 417. Glaucoma Progression Studies Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 4022/A301 - Intraocular Pressure, Baseline Visual Field (VF) Mean Deviation (MD), and Glaucoma Progression I. Forchheimer1, C.G. De Moraes1,2, F.A. Folgar1, C.C. Teng2,3, C. Tello2,3, R. Ritch2,3, J.M. Liebmann1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 417. Glaucoma Progression Studies Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 4025/A304 - Corneal Hysteresis is Associated With Visual Field Progression V.S. Hill1, C.G. De Moraes2,3, C.C. Teng1,2, C. Tello1,2, R. Ritch1,2, J.M. Liebmann2,3. 1Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY. Poster Session 417. Glaucoma Progression Studies Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:45 - 9:00 AM 3852 - In-vivo Imaging of the Trabecular Pathway and Schlemm´s Canal With Anterior Segment Fourier-Domain (AS FD OCT) Optical Coherence Tomography A.R. Castillejos1, S.K. Dorairaj2, C.G.V. De Moraes2,3, J.M. Liebmann2,3, R. Ritch1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY. Paper Session 409. Novel Imaging Techniques in Glaucoma Wednesday, May 5, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM 4385/A218 - Bilateral Papillomacular Folds in Nanophthalmos: Advanced Retinal Imaging A. Hong, L. Spielberg, S. Rao, J. Panarelli, K. Mukkamala, G. Landa, R. Rosen, A. Ponce. Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 449. Clinical Retinal Imaging Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM 4417/A250 - Regional Age-Related Changes on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness as Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography S. Dorairaj1, T.S. Prata2, V.C. Lima2A, F.N. Sebates3, N.R. Sebates3, G.S. Gallimore3, C.G.V. de Moraes1, W. Seiple1,4, R. Rosen1A,5, R. Ritch1A,5. AGlaucoma, 1New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; ADepartment of Ophthalmology, 2Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MT; 4Lighthouse International, New York, NY; 5New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session

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449. Clinical Retinal Imaging Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM 4427/A360 - Effectiveness of Repeat Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty on Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) Patients J.H. Peragallo1, M. Malen2, P.C. Lai3. 1Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 2Ophthalmology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; 3Ophthalmology, Metropolitan Hospital Center, New York, NY. Poster Session 450. Glaucoma Lasers and Aqueous Drainage Devices Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM 4428/A361 - Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty as Primary and Secondary Therapy in Patients With Glaucoma: 8 Year Experience L.F. Jindra1,2, J.A. Donnelly3, A. Gupta4, E.M. Miglino5. 1Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY; 3Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY; 4Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 5Floral Park Ophthalmology, Floral Park, NY. Poster Session 450. Glaucoma Lasers and Aqueous Drainage Devices Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM 4624/D746 - Corneal Hysteresis: Variability in Race J.H. Pae1A, J.R. Ehrlich1, M. Shimmyo2, N.M. Radcliffe1A. AOphthalmology, 1Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY. Poster Session 458. Corneal Biomechanics Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:45 - 3:30 PM

Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 4897/A320 - A Comparison of Local Retinal Ganglion Cell (RGC) Layer Thickness to Local Losses in Visual Field Sensitivity in Patients With Glaucoma J. Cho1, A.S. Raza1, G.V. De Moraes2, M. Wang3, X. Zhang1, R.H. Kardon4, J.M. Liebmann5, R. Ritch2, D.C. Hood1. 1Columbia University, New York, NY; 2New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 4University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; 5New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 476. Structure Function Associations in Glaucoma Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 4939/A556 - Inner Segment-Outer Segment Junctional Layer Integrity and Corresponding Retinal Sensitivity in Dry and Wet Forms of Age-Related Macular Degeneration R.B. Rosen1A, G. Landa2, E. Su3, P.M. Garcia1B, W.H. Seiple4. AOphthalmology, BRetina Center, 1New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY; 4Ophthalmology, Lighthouse International, New York, NY. Poster Session 477. AMD - Assessment, Pathology and Therapy Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM

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Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 4988/D784 - RIGITEST - A New Method to Estimate Corneal Hysteresis? A Comparison Between Normal Subjects vs. Keratoconus Patients V.R. Couto1, L. Gontijo1A, F.N. Kanadani2, A.D.C. Gontijo3, S.K. Dorairaj4. AOphtalmology, 1Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte - MG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Ophthalmology/Glaucoma, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Medicine, Faculdade da Saude e Ecologia Humana, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 4Glaucoma, Einhorn Rsch Center, NYEE, New York, NY. Poster Session 478. Keratoconus and Collagen Crosslinking Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 5:00 - 5:15 PM 4768 - Retinal Pigment Epithelial Detachments and Tears in Light Chain Deposition Disease A. Leys1, L. Spielberg2, J.R. Heckenlively3. 1Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthal & Vis Sciences, Univ of Michigan-Kellogg Eye Ctr, Ann Arbor, MI. Paper Session 465. Posterior Segment Tumors Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM 5140/D1136 - Seed Position (Anisotropy) Can Affect Macular Dose During Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy R.H. Mcglynn, Jr.1,2, P.T. Finger1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2The New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, NY. Poster Session 483. Uveal Malignant Melanoma - Diagnosis and Treatment Wednesday, May 5, 2010 3:45 - 5:30 PM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5278/A131 - Role of Early Patching on Visual Outcomes in Pediatric Ruptured Globes B.B. Bert, K. Mukkamala, S. Yang, L. Hall. Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 513. Pediatric Ophthalmology Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 6405/A265A - Prospective Trial of Botulinum Toxin (Botox&reg) to Control Post-Operative Pain in Eye Enucleation and Evisceration Surgeries J. Schonfeld1, K. Keyhani2, M. Ashenhurst3, J. McWhae3, M. Deschênes4. 1New England Retina Associates, Hamden, CT; 2New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Ophthalmology, Rockyview General Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada. Poster Session 514. Drug Delivery II Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5352/A280 - Comparative Analysis Between Preferential Hyperacuity Perimetry and Microperimetry Test in Detection of the Change of Retinal Sensitivity in Patients With a Variety of Retinal Diseases W. Huang1, G. Landa2A, P.M. Garcia3A, V.C. Lima2B, R.B. Rosen3B. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear, New York, NY; ADepartment of Ophthalmology, BOphthalmology, 2New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; ARetina Center, BOphthalmology, 3New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 515. Tumors and Clinical/Experimental Study

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Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5520/A575 - Rates of Change of Mean Deviation in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study S. Demirel1, C.G. de Moraes2,3, S.K. Gardiner1, J.M. Liebmann2,3, G.A. Cioffi1, R. Ritch2, M.O. Gordon4, M.A. Kass4, Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. 1Devers Eye Institute, Legacy Health, Portland, OR; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 3Ophthalmology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY; 4Ophthal & Vis Sciences, Washington Univ Sch of Med, St Louis, MO. Poster Session 522. Electrophysiology and Visual Fields in Glaucoma Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5357/A302 - Uveitis in Relation to Perceived Stress: A Prospective Study J. Paa1, A. Ou1, S.R. Kedhar1,2, J. Chau1, B. Niknam1, J. Lewis1, M. Rivas1, C.A. Samson1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 516. Correlates and Outcomes of Eye Diseases Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5514/A569 - Small Arcuate "Comma" Defects Within 10 Degrees of the Fovea in Patients With Glaucoma A.S. Raza1, C.G. de Moraes2, D. Xin1, J.G. Odel1, J.M. Liebmann2, R. Ritch2, D.C. Hood1. 1Columbia University, New York, NY; 2New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 522. Electrophysiology and Visual Fields in Glaucoma Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5533/A588 - A Semi-Automatic Linear Regression-Based Method to Measure the Ciliary BodySclera Angle in Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Images I.H. Chan1, S.K. Dorairaj2, T.S. Prata3A, J. Panarelli1, P.A. Sidoti3B, R. Ritch3A. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Glaucoma, Einhorn Rsch Center, NYEE, New York, NY; AOphthalmology, BDepartment of Ophthalmology, 3New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 523. Anterior Segment Imaging and Biomechanics in Glaucoma Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM

Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5668/D821 - Correlation Between Ultrasound Biomicroscopy (UBM) and Intraoperative Findings in Patients With Congenital Corneal Opacities (CCO) S.Y. Hu1, G.W. Zaidman2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Medical College Ophthalmology, Valhalla, NY; 2Ophthalmology, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 527. Corneal Topography Transparency and Imaging Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5711/D917 - A Comparison of the in-vitro Susceptibility Profile of Ceftobiprole Against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Ocular Isolates R.P. Conley1A, M.K.

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Shah1B, G. Thompson1A, W. Perez1B, J.A. Seedor1A, D.C. Ritterband1A. AOphthalmology, BPathology and Laboratory Medicine, 1New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 529. Antibiotics/Infections Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM 5771/D993 - Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Measurements of Anterior Uveal Thickness in Healthy Subjects: Initial Study J.P. Garcia, Jr.1,2, L. Spielberg1, P.T. Finger1,3. 1Retina Center, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 3The New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, NY. Poster Session 532. Imaging I Thursday, May 6, 2010 8:30 - 10:15 AM Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 5870/A23 - Intravitreal Methotrexate Use in Cystoid Macula Edema and Other Retinal Diseases: Lessons Learned From Intrathecal Administration J.H. Francis1, P. Latkany1A. AOphthalmology, 1New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 543. Posterior Uveitis I Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 5873/A26 - The Holy Grail Treatment for Pars Planitis. What Are the Options? Cryopexy, Steriods, Immunosuppressives, Immunomodulators, Lasers, Anti-Angiogenics, or Observation? R.G. Josephberg1, D.M. Esposito2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Yonkers, NY; 2Ophthalmology, NYMC, Westchester Medical Center, Rye, NY. Poster Session 543. Posterior Uveitis I Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 5990/A211 - MicroRNA-1 Inhibits Uveal Melanoma Cell Proliferation and Migration X. Chen1, J. Wang1, J. Lu1, H. Shen1, D. Hu2, D. Yan1. 1Sch of Ophthal & Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, China; 2New York Medical College, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Poster Session 548. Ocular Biochemistry Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 6321/D1018 - Evaluation of Argon Laser Peripheral Iridoplasties Performed by Residents: Does It Really Work? K. Eliasieh1, S.K. Dorairaj1, Y. Kashyap1, J.T. Nezgoda1, C.C. Teng1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session 559. Ocular Structures in Human & Animal Models Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 6322/D1019 - Evaluation of Laser Iridotomy Performed by Ophthalmology Residents in a Teaching Institution Y. Kashyap1, S.K. Dorairaj1, K. Eliasieh1, J. Nezgoda1, C. Teng1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Poster Session

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559. Ocular Structures in Human & Animal Models Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 6432/D1050 - Latrunculin B (ins115644) Reduces Intraocular Pressure (iop) in Ocular Hypertension (oht) and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (poag) R. Ritch1, M. Schiewe2, R.C. Zink2, M. Lemp3, P.L. Kaufman4, R. Haque2, R.K. Brazzell2A, J.L. Vittitow2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; AOphthalmology, 2Inspire Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC; 3 Ophthalmology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; 4Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. Poster Session 570. Late Breaking Posters Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM 6439/D1057 - Fish Scale-Derived Biocornea C. Lin1,2, R. Ritch3,4, S. Lin5, M.-H. Ni2, Y.-C. Chang2, H. Lai2, F.-H. Lin1. 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Research, Aeon Astron Europe B.V., Leiden, The Netherlands; 3 Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 4Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 5Department of Materials and Textiles, Oriental Institute of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan. Poster Session 570. Late Breaking Posters Thursday, May 6, 2010 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM

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Resident/Fellow Research Day May 21, 2010 Retinal Functional Imaging for Evaluating Blood Flow After Encircling Scleral Buckles Julia P Shulman, MD, Gennady Landa, MD, Leigh Spielberg, MD, Alina Genis, BS, Thomas O. Muldoon, MD, Richard B. Rosen, MD New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, NY, NY

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an encircling scleral buckle (SB) on retinal blood flow in eyes that underwent rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) repair utilizing the Retinal Functional Imager (RFI). Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 32 patients who had undergone retinal functional imaging of both eyes ­ the eye that had a RRD repair with SB and the un-operated fellow eye, serving as the control. The RFI is a novel non-invasive imaging system which allows for quantitative analysis of retinal blood flow. Results: Eighteen patients had lower arterial and venous blood flow velocities in the eye with the scleral buckle. The average age of the buckle for this group was 37 months. Seven patients had higher arterial and venous blood flow in the buckled eye, with an average buckle age of 170 months. Conclusions: Scleral buckling affects the arterial and venous blood flow in the posterior pole. This constrictive effect of the scleral buckle appears to resolve many months after surgery.

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Title: Analysis of Anterior Chamber Angle Following Boston Keratoprosthesis Placement Author: JF Panarelli, A. Ko, MR Banitt Background: Boston Keratoprosthesis (K-Pro) insertion is a therapeutic alternative in patients who have failed multiple corneal and stem cell transplants. Unfortunately, the development of glaucoma following insertion of the Boston K-pro is a potential complication that is difficult to monitor. Digital palpation of intraocular pressure can be compromised due to changes in the dynamics of the scleral tissue induced by the presence of the prosthesis and by insertion of a glaucoma drainage implant (GDI). Although the development of angle closure is presumed to be one of the primary factors in the development of glaucoma in these patients, it has not previously been systematically evaluated. In this study, we qualitatively evaluated the anterior chamber angle before and after K-pro insertion using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT). Methods: A retrospective analysis of the pre- and postoperative ASOCT images acquired by a single examiner on eyes that underwent keratoprosthesis placement between May 2006 and June 2007 was performed to qualitatively evaluate angle width and development of synechial closure. Horizontal scans were acquired and for all patients the three and nine o'clock positions were examined and compared. For each case, the scleral spur was identified and it was determined whether the angle was open or closed at the time of the preoperative and postoperative scans. On average, the initial post-operative scan was obtained at 4.38 months from the time of K-pro placement; follow-up scans were then obtained at an average of 12.1 and 19.73 months postoperatively. Results: Seven eyes were identified, of which six had pre-operative OCT. The preoperative diagnoses were Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) (n=2), chemical injury (n=2), granular dystrophy (n=1), uveitic glaucoma (n=1) and ocular amyloidosis (n=1). Mean follow-up time was 27.98 months. Five of seven eyes had an open angle preoperatively, including one patient who did not have preoperative OCT, but was shown to have an open angle by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Two eyes showed a closed angle at preoperative evaluation. Of the five open-angle eyes, three showed no change and none had a pre-existing diagnosis of glaucoma. The two eyes that developed angle closure postoperatively did so within 3 and 4 months. Repeat scans at 6 months and after 1 year confirmed progression of the initial findings. Of the two eyes that developed angle closure, one patient had ocular amyloidosis and a pre-operative diagnosis of glaucoma, which required placement of a GDI; the second had SJS but did not have a pre-existing diagnosis of glaucoma. In these cases of synechial angle closure, the initial sign of angle compromise was adherence of the iris to the keratoprosthesis back plate. Over time, further adhesion led to greater angle closure. Conclusion: Keratoprosthesis placement may pose a risk of synechial angle closure due to adherence of the iris to the K-pro back plate in the months following surgery. Post-operative follow-up with serial vertical and oblique scans may be indicated in order to monitor patients for progressive angle closure and its utility should be further explored.

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Title: Outcomes Post Laser-In-Situ Keratomileusis in HIV+ Patient Population Authors: Gupta, A; Coad, C; Eviatar, J; Newberry, A Purpose: To compare the rate of complications and outcomes post LASIK in a group of HIV+ patients and a control population. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 71 patients (134 eyes) who underwent LASIK (customvue intralase) between 2006-2008, with a minimum 3 month follow up period, was performed. 35 patients (67 eyes) were HIV+. Post-op target visual acuity (Va) and complications such as dry eye syndrome, infectious keratitis and flap dislocation were identified. Results: The mean age of the control and study group was 40.9 and 42.0 years respectively. The mean pre-op sphere and cylinder was -3.8/-0.9 for the control group and -2.7/-0.9 for the study group. The intended post-op Va was achieved in 65/67 eyes (97%) in the control group and 64/67 eyes (95.5%) in the study group (p>0.5). In each group 2 eyes (1 patient) had flap dislocations. In the study group, 3 eyes (2 patients) developed dry eyes (p<0.5) for a period of 1 year or less that was alleviated with the use of prescription dry eye medication or punctal plugs. There were no developments of infectious keratitis in either group. Conclusion: In this series, there is no significant difference between the post-op Va outcome and rate of infectious keratitis in patients with HIV versus control patients but patients with HIV may have a higher incidence of developing dry eyes after LASIK.

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Visual prognosis of penetrating eye injuries with posterior segment foreign body

Francis JH, Engelbert M, Shah M, McCormick S, Ritterband D, Rosen R.

Purpose: To identify visual prognostic factors related to penetrating eye injuries with posterior segment foreign bodies. Methods: A retrospective review of 90 patients who underwent foreign body removal during a 14-year period with a mean follow-up of 10.4 months (range 1 to 67 months).

Results: Final visual acuity was worse in eyes with endophthalmitis (p=0.044), retinal tears (p=0.002), retinal detachments (p=0.000001), macular scars (p=0.00000002) and pre-operative vision of 20/400 or less (p=0.006). Positive cultures in general, lens rupture and delay in presentation did not impact vision (p> 0.05).

Conclusions: Visual prognosis in penetrating eye injuries with posterior segment foreign bodies is most heavily influenced by pre-operative vision and subsequent retinal sequelae.

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Regional Age-related Changes on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness as Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

Author Block: S. Dorairaj1, T.S. Prata2, V.C. Lima2A, F.N. Sebates3, N.R. Sebates3, G.S. Gallimore3, W. Seiple1,4, R. Rosen1A,5 New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; ADepartment of Ophthalmology, 2Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MT; 4 Lighthouse International, New York, NY; 5New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between age and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in normal subjects, as determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods: We prospectively enrolled 144 normal subjects (144 eyes), ranging from 16 to 84 years of age. After a complete ophthalmological examination, all patients underwent RNFL thickness measurement using SD-OCT (Spectral OCT/SLO, OPKO-OTI, Miami, FL). Two scans were performed per eye, each with 3 images analyzed (automatic tracking of the optic disc; diameter of 3.4 mm; resolution of 6 µm). The correlation between age and RNFL parameters (global and sectoral) was analyzed using linear regression analysis. The slope for each parameter was also calculated. Results: The average RNFL thickness decreased significantly with increasing age, with a slope of 0.14 µm/year (r2=0.04, p<0.01). Six of the 30-degree sectors (12 clock hours) were significantly and inversely correlated with age, with slopes ranging from -0.10 to -0.23 µm/year (r20.02, p0.04). While most (5/6) were localized in the inferior and temporal sectors, none of the nasal sectors correlated significantly with age (p 0.06). Conclusion: Our data suggest that both global and regional RNFL thickness, as assessed by SD-OCT, decrease with age. This reduction seems to be more pronounced in the infero-temporal sectors, resembling that found in glaucomatous eyes. It suggests a possible age-related pattern of regional susceptibility that should be considered when assessing eyes over time. Figure. Slopes of change for each clock hour (eyes were converted to right eye format for

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analysis).

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Macular and Peri-papillary Retinal Blood Flow Velocities in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome using the Retinal Functional Imager (RFI) K. Mukkamala,1 L. Spielberg,1 G. Landa 1,2, L. Rao,1,2 S. Dorairaj,1 K. Tai 1, C. Vasquez 1,R. Rosen 1,2 1 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY 2 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY PURPOSE: Pseudoexfoliation (PXE) syndrome is a systemic condition associated with secondary open angle glaucoma. In PXE, amyloid-like material coats ocular surfaces including the trabecular meshwork, lens and capsule, iris, and corneal endothelium. This material has also been shown to accumulate throughout the body including in the heart, kidneys, and lungs as well as in systemic vasculature. Previous studies used color Doppler imaging to show decreased retrobulbar blood flow velocities and increased vessel resistances in the ophthalmic and central retinal arteries.1 Others have used scanning laser doppler flowmetry to show reduced optic nerve head and peri-papillary blood flow velocities compared to non-exfoliative fellow eyes and control eyes.2 Thus far, no one has reported on peri-foveal blood flow in PXE patients. We hypothesize that deposition of PXE material in peri-foveal vasculature can result in decreased macular blood flow velocities. Deposition in the retinal circulation may contribute to the loss of retinal vascular auto-regulation that has been observed in eyes with glaucoma. METHODS: Prospective, cross-sectional study. The Retinal functional imager (RFI) was used to quantitatively measure peri-foveal and peri-papillary arterial and venous blood velocities in eyes of patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome. Control data was extrapolated from a previously published study using the same device.3 RESULTS: This study included 25 eyes of 13 patients with PXE with or without associated glaucoma. The mean age was 70 ± 11 years, 54% were male, 15% were diabetic, 38% were hypertensive and 70% had PXE associated glaucoma. Mean arterial peri-foveal retinal blood flow velocities (RBFV) (mm/sec) were 4.19 ± 0.99 (Control2) and 3.96 ± 0.46 (PXE). The mean peri-foveal venous velocities were 3.03 ± 0.59 (Control2) and 3.28 ± 0.51 (PXE). In PXE, mean arterial peri-papillary RBFV were 6.73 ± 3.66 while venous RBFV were 6.68 ± 3.93. Student's t-test did not reveal a statistically significant difference between the mean peri-foveal arterial or venous velocities of control and PXE eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Eyes with PXE did not have significantly different peri-foveal retinal arterial or venous blood velocities when compared to controls. 1 Martinez A, Sanchez M. Retrobulbar hemodynamic parameters in pseudoexfoliation syndrome and pseudoexfoliative glaucoma. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2008 Sep;246(9):1341-9. 2 Ocakoglu O, Koyluoglu N, Kayiran A, Tamcelik N, Ozkan S. Microvascular blood flow of the optic nerve head and peripapillary retina in unilateral exfoliation syndrome. Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2004 Feb;82(1):49-53. 3 Burgansky-Eliash, Z. Nelson, D. Pupko Bar-Tal, O., et al. Reduced Retinal Blood Flow Velocity in Diabetic Retinopathy. Retina. E-publish ahead of print. 2009. Table 1: Demographics of Study Patients Control3 PXE N=patients 32 13 Mean age ± SD, 58 ± 9 70 ± 11 years

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Male (%) Glaucoma (%) Diabetes Mellitus (%) HTN (%)

17 (53) n/a 0 (0) 11 (34)

7 (54) 9 (70%) 2 (15) 5 (38)

Table 2: Peri-foveal Arterial and Venous Blood Flow Velocities (mm/sec) Arterial Blood Flow Velocity Venous Blood Flow Velocity Control PXE Control PXE N=eyes 51 20 51 20 Mean 4.19 3.833 3.03 2.7755 (mm/sec) Standard 0.99 0.53 0.59 0.55 Deviation Table 3: Peri-papillary Arterial and Venous Blood Flow Velocities in PXE (mm/sec) Arterial Blood Flow Velocity Venous Blood Flow Velocity PXE PXE N=eyes 25 25 Mean (mm/sec) 6.7276 6.6812 Standard Deviation 3.66081 3.937785

Figure 1: Sample image of peri-papillary arterial (red) and venous (purple) blood flow velocity measurements (mm/sec)

Figure 2: Sample image of macular arterial (red) and venous (purple) blood flow velocity measurements (mm/sec)

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The Incidence and Implications of Preventable Ocular Foreign Bodies in a Major Urban Eye Trauma Center

Author: Joseph T. Nezgoda, MD, MBA; Jean-Paul J. Abboud, PhD; Leigh Spielberg, MD; Jon Kristan, BS; John Aljian, MD; Sanjay R. Kedhar, MD Purpose: To examine the epidemiology and cost of preventable ocular foreign body (FB) injuries. Methods: A retrospective review of Emergency Department (ED) logs, charts and billing data of a tertiary referral eye center for 2 calendar years (2008-09) for corneal and conjunctival FBs. Results: 1,235 FB (988 corneal) cases composed 7.6% of ophthalmic ED visits (n=16,316), the third most common diagnosis. Mean age was 38.3+/-14.6 years, 78.7% were male, average ED visit cost was $380.75+/-$788.44). Total cost per incident (with medication, follow-up, estimated lost wages) is $1,035. Industry approved safety goggles cost $7.70. Conclusion: Preventable eye trauma is a significant financial burden. For the cost of one incident nearly 135 workers could be protected.

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RFI and CRAO Author: S Rao, L Spielberg, G Landa, R Rosen, T Muldoon Departments of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Infirmary, New York, NY and New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Support: Supported by the Department of Ophthalmology Research Fund of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Norma Lazar Ophthalmology Research Fund. Objective: To determine and characterize the the arterial velocity in eyes that have had central retinal artery occlusions. Methods: A retrospective case series of eyes with a history of central retinal artery occlusion. All eyes underwent complete ophthalmic examination as well as fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and RFI evaluation. Results: Seven patients were included (6 male, 1 female). Average age was 71 (range: 57 to 87). Arterial velocities in the affected eyes on average were 2.16 mm/second (range: 1.18 to 3.75). In the unaffected fellow eye of five patients the average arterial velocity was 3.28 mm/second (range 2.22 to 5.12). Conclusion: Eyes that have had central retinal artery occlusions appear to have decreased arterial velocities following the vascular event. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of these findings.

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Retinal Functional Imaging for the Evaluation of Peri-Foveal Blood Flow Velocities in Diabetic Retinopathy K. Mukkamala MD,1 L. Spielberg MD,1 G. Landa MD,1,2 S. Balasubramanian MBA,1 R. Rosen MD 1,2 1 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY 2 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY PURPOSE: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a micro-angiopathic disease that has been associated with decreased arterial and venous retinal blood flow velocities (RBFV). This study investigates the use of a novel non-contrast angiographic imaging device, the Retinal Functional Imager (RFI), to measure RBFV in patients with both non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). METHODS: Prospective, cross-sectional study. The RFI device was used to quantitatively measure perifoveal blood flow velocities in patients with NPDR and PDR. Control data was extrapolated from a previously published study using the same device. RESULTS: The study included patients with NPDR (n=10, 20 eyes) and PDR (n=10, 20 eyes). The mean age was 58 ± 9.3 years, 45% were male, 55% were non-insulin dependent. 45% of eyes had clinically significant macular edema (CSME2). Mean duration of DM diagnosis was 12.3 years. Mean arterial RBFV (mm/sec) were 4.19 ± 0.99 (Control1), 3.83 ± 0.53 (NPDR), and 3.36 ± 0.33 (PDR). The mean venous velocities were 3.03 ± 0.59 (Control1), 2.78 ± 0.55 (NPDR), and 2.43 ± 0.35 (PDR). Compared to control eyes, PDR eyes had a lower arterial (p<.001) and venous (p<.001) velocities. When compared to NPDR eyes, PDR eyes had a lower arterial (p<.001) and venous (p<.05) velocities. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis showed that RBFV were not closely correlated with age, gender, visual acuity, insulin use, presence of CSME, years of DM diagnosis, or history of pan-retinal or focal laser. CONCLUSIONS: Eyes with PDR were shown to have a slower peri-foveal retinal arterial and venous blood velocities compared to healthy controls and NPDR. 1 Burgansky-Eliash, Z. Nelson, D. Pupko Bar-Tal, O., et al. Reduced Retinal Blood Flow Velocity in Diabetic Retinopathy. Retina. E-publish ahead of print. 2009. 2 CSME as defined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study

Table 1: Demographics of Study Patients Control1 N=patients 32 Mean age ± SD, years 58 ± 9 Male (%) 17 (53) CSME (%) 0 (0)

NPDR 10 56 ± 9 5 (50) 6 (60)

PDR 10 60 ± 10 4 (40) 7 (70)

Combined 20 58±9.3 9 (45) 13 (65)

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Mean # yrs of DM Diagnosis NIDDM (%) IDDM (%) HTN (%)

0 0 (0) 0 (0) 11 (34)

11.3 13.3 5 (50) 6 (60) 5 (50) 4 (40) 10 (100) 10 (100)

12.3 11 (55) 9 (45) 20 (100)

Table 2: Arterial and Venous Blood Flow Velocities Arterial Blood Flow Velocity All Control NPDR PDR Diabetics N=eyes 51 20 20 40 Mean (mm/sec) 4.19 3.833 3.357 3.595 Standard 0.99 0.53 0.33 0.50 Deviation

Venous Blood Flow Velocity All Control NPDR PDR Diabetics 51 20 20 40 3.03 2.7755 2.4285 2.602 0.59 0.55 0.35 0.49

Table 3: Statistical Significance of Mean Velocity Differences (Student's t-test) Arterial Blood Flow Velocity Venous Blood Flow Velocity p ­ Value p ­ Value Control vs. NPDR Not statistically significant Not statistically significant Control vs. PDR <.001 <.001 Control vs. All Diabetics <.001 <.001 NPDR vs. PDR <.001 <.05 NIDDM vs. IDDM Not statistically significant Not statistically significant History of focal laser vs. Not statistically significant Not statistically significant No focal laser

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Analysis of drusen reduction in dry AMD patients in Copaxone study assessed by High Resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography. Amar Patel1, MD, Gennady Landa1,2, MD, Patricia MT Garcia1,2, MD, Richard B Rosen1,2, MD 1 Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, USA 2 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA Purpose: Copaxone (Glatiramer acetate) has been recently used to treat dry AMD patients resulting in a reduction of total drusen area measured on color fundus photos in Copaxone treated versus sham treated patients. Using high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), it is possible to analyze various morphologic parameters of drusen such as shape, internal reflectivity, homogenicity, and presence of overlying foci of hyper-reflectivity. Our purpose was to determine which drusen parameters are more likely to result in drusen shrinkage or disappearance in Copaxone treated dry AMD patients. Methods: Subjects with a clinical diagnosis of dry AMD were enrolled in the study. The subjects received either Copaxone or sham cutaneous injections weekly for 12 weeks. SD-OCT images were obtained prior to treatment and after 12 weeks of therapy to analyze morphologic parameters of drusen within the macular region. Pre and post treatment drusen were compared. Results: 26 eyes of dry AMD patients were included in the study of which 14 eyes (7 patients) were treated with Copaxone and 12 eyes (7 patients) received sham treatment. Overall, between baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment, the percentage of drusen which disappeared/shrank in the Copaxone treated group was 19.1% versus 6.5% in the sham treated group (p=0.13). Convex shape and low/medium internal reflectivity were found to be favorable parameters in prediction of drusen reduction in Copaxone treated patients. Conclusions: Dry AMD patients may benefit from Copaxone treatment which may result in drusen reduction. Drusen patterns demonstrating convex shape and low/medium internal reflectivity tend to shrink or disappear after Copaxone treatment. Further investigation is needed in order to determine statistical significance.

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Bilateral Papillomacular Folds in Nanophthalmos: Advanced Retinal Imaging Author: A. Hong, L. Spielberg, S. Rao, J. Panarelli, K. Mukkamala, G. Landa, R. Rosen, A. Ponce. Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Purpose: To report the results of the retinal imaging of a rare case of bilateral partial-thickness papillomacular retinal folds in pediatric nanophthalmos. Methods: A patient referred for nanophthalmos underwent advanced retinal imaging, including fundus exam, color fundus photography (CFP), scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectraldomain optical coherence tomography (SLO/OCT), retinal function non-contrast angiography, autofluorescence (AF) and perimacular retinal blood flow velocity using the retinal functional imager (RFI). Results: Imaging report of a 9-year-old female with axial lengths of 18.2mm OD and 18.3mm OS, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/30 OD and 20/50 OS and refractive error of +14.00 OD and +15.00 OS. Fundus exam revealed bilateral papillomacular retinal folds and absent foveal light reflexes. CFP showed crowded optic discs and a normal macular pigment distribution. SLO/OCT revealed bilateral partial-thickness retinal folds and bilateral absence of the foveal depression. Non-contrast angiography showed a rudimentary foveal avascular zone in the left eye and an unusually small one in the right eye. AF and retinal blood flow velocity were normal bilaterally. Conclusions: This is the first report of comprehensive imaging of bilateral papillomacular retinal folds in nanophthalmos. OCT revealed that the retinal folds are in fact partial-thickness and exclude the inner segment/outer segment junction. Non-contrast angiography confirmed previous reports of a rudimentary foveal avascular zone in nanophthalmos that, along with an absent foveal depression, may be the main limitation to obtaining an optimal visual acuity. In contrast to previous reports, the macula is not hyperpigmented. This report also highlights the utility of noncontrast angiography in unusual situations in which the patient is unable to get FA due to fear of allergic complications. :

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Title: Whole-body PET/CT in Staging and Post-radiation Therapy Surveillance of Orbital MALT-type Marginal B-cell Lymphoma Authors: Julie Kim MD,1 Peter Ahn MD,2 David A. Della Rocca MD,1 Elizabeth Maher MD,1 Bruce Moskowitz MD,1 Paul T. Finger MD,1 Kenneth Hu MD2

1 2

Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Cancer Centers of

New York

Abstract: Purpose- We review the utility of PET-CT in staging, after radiotherapy, stratified according to sites of involvement for mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type marginal zone B-cell lymphomas. Design- A retrospective case series Participants- 22 patients who had biopsy-proven orbital lymphoma underwent hybrid whole body F18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT for pre-therapy staging. Methods- 8 of the patients underwent post-radiotherapy scans after receiving a mean dose of 30.6 Gy in 1-8 Gy fractions. Maximum standard uptake value was measured for each lesion. Main Outcome Measures- Whole-body PET/CT maximum SUV in lesions, the contralateral site and systemic metastases

Results- There were 7 males and 15 females. The median age at presentation was 52.7 years (range 21.7-82.4 years). The median follow-up after radiation treatment was 14.8 ± 24.6 months after the end of radiation treatment. Based on PET/CT SUV threshold of 3.0, the accuracy of primary lesion detection on PET/CT was low, as sensitivity for biopsied conjunctival, eyelid and orbital lesions did not exceed 60%. PET/CT was adept at delineating systemic lesions, there is no definite advantage over CT imaging alone. Out of 25 reactive systemic lymph nodes, 8 were biopsy-positive. 4 out of those 8 lesions were confirmed as lymphatic dissemination. Sensitivity was 100%, specificity 81%, with a 50% PPV and 100% NPV. Two out of the 22 patients (9.0%) demonstrated metastases. Surveillance of primary and systemic lesions in 13 patients on post-radiotherapy PET/CT, with a median follow-up time of 21.5 ± 17.1 months, showed insignificant changes and no new metastases.

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Conclusions- Pre-radiotherapy PET-CT is a poor modality for identifying most primary MALT lymphoma lesions, especially after biopsy. However, it was highly effective in detecting systemic involvement. In our series, which is the largest to date in the literature for MALT lymphomas and PET-CT, we found a lower incidence of systemic involvement, compared to prior reports. Post-radiotherapy PET-CT for the purpose of surveillance showed no new metastases or worsening of lesions.

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Peripapillary Blood Flow Velocity in Glaucoma Evaluated by the Retinal Functional Imager (RFI) L. Spielberg 1, A. Jangi 1, G. Landa 1,2, P. Sidoti 1,2, K. Tai 1, C. Vasquez 1, A. Monsef 1, R. Rosen

1,2 1 2

Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

PURPOSE: To determine the mean peripapillar retinal blood flow (RBF) velocity in patients with various types of glaucoma, using the retinal functional imager (RFI). METHODS: A prospective study was performed on 48 eyes of 24 subjects referred from an outpatient glaucoma clinic. Diagnoses included primary open angle glaucoma (POAG; n=6); glaucoma suspect (GS; n=9) and chronic angle closure glaucoma (CACG; n=5). Using the RFI and proprietary software processing, peripapillar vessels were visualized and their blood flow velocities measured. The main outcome measures were the mean RBF velocity in vessels within one disc diameter of the optic disc rim. RESULTS: The mean age of subjects included was 65 ± 10.1 years. There were 14 females and 10 males. Mean peripapillary RBF velocity was 5.7±1.3 mm/s in CACG, 5.1±1.3 mm/s in POAG and 4.7±1.0 mm/s in GS. In subjects with IOP 16 mmHg, peripapillary RBF velocity was 5.4±1.8 mm/s; in those with IOP < 16 mmHg, arterial velocity was 4.8±1.4 mm/s. Similarly, mean peripapillary RBF velocity was 5.3±2.0 mm/s in patients whose cup disc (c/d) ratio was 0.6, whereas velocity was 4.9±1.7 mm/s in subjects with a mean c/d ratio <0.6. CONCLUSIONS: The RFI is a novel, non-invasive imaging system that allows for quantitative analysis of RBF velocity. The results of this study suggest that mean peripapillary RBF velocity is correlated with glaucoma type, c/d ratio, and IOP, the main alterable glaucoma risk factor. This might be due to a steal phenomenon in which retinal vessels experience increased flow as retinal capillary perfusion decreases. The results of this study suggest that peripapillary RBF velocity might be a useful measure of glaucoma progression risk.

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Comparative analysis between Preferential Hyperacuity Perimetry and Microperimetry test in detection of the change of retinal sensitivity in patients with a variety of retinal diseases. Wendy Huang1, MD Gennady Landa1,2, MD, Patricia MT Garcia1,2, MD, Veronica Castro Lima1,3, MD, Richard B Rosen1,2, MD 1 Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, USA 2 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA 3 Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Purpose: The Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP) is a noninvasive and noncontact exam, evaluating macular perimetry, based on the human visual function of hyperacuity. PHP has the capability of detecting functional changes and was designed for the early detection of central and paracentral alterations in the visual field. Microperimetry (MP) is a complementary diagnostic tool that aids in the assessment of the visual function and its relation to the structural changes of the retina and fovea. MP is an add-on feature of Spectral OCT/SLO (OPKO/OTI, Miami, FL, USA) and runs simultaneously with the SLO imaging and provides real time tracking of retinal movement and patient fixation, and performs mapping of the macular blind spots. Methods: Patients with a variety of ocular diseases underwent PHP and MP tests on the same day. PHP results were superimposed on MP maps "Seen" distortions, representing metamorphopsia and "not-seen" distortions, representing scotoma were assessed and graded by PHP and afterwards were compared to corresponding loci of numeric MP values. Pearson's correlations were calculated between MP values and PHP values. Results: 30 eyes were identified and categorized into 4 groups: Wet Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), Early Dry AMD, Advanced Dry AMD, and Inner Retina Edema. PHP data measuring metamorphopsias and scotomas were compared to MP data. The wet AMD group had the highest metamorphopsia correlation with a value of 0.4. The advanced dry AMD group had the highest scotoma correlation with a value of 0.62. In contrast the weakest correlation of 0.02 with metamorphopsia and 0.18 with scotoma values was found in the inner retina edema group. Conclusions: Both devices, Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP) and Microperimentry (MP) were found to be sensitive in detection of retinal functional pathology. A positive correlation exists between both modalities suggesting MP and PHP can provide complimentary data when used in concert. Both machines provided quantitative data of qualitative impairment of vision and can be used for close monitoring of functional retinal changes and for detection of progression in a variety of patients with retinal diseases.

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Evaluation of Argon Laser Peripheral Iridoplasties Performed by Residents: Does It Really Work? K. Eliasieh, S.K. Dorairaj, Y. Kashyap, J.T. Nezgoda, C.C. Teng Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of Argon Laser Peripheral Iridoplasty (ALPI) performed by second year ophthalmology residents at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary on patients with Plateau Iris Syndrome (PIS), under the supervision of attending physicians. Method: Eyes with PIS that underwent ALPI from 2002 to 2008 were evaluated. Prior to performing ALPI, second year residents had an instructional lecture but no clinical experience. Demographic data, refractive error, laser settings including duration, power, laser-spot number and size, complications, and length of follow-up were collected and evaluated. Data including intraocular pressure (IOP), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), number of medications, and Shaffer angle grading on dark room gonioscopy (DRG), were compared between the preprocedure and last recorded clinic examination. PIS was defined as an anteriorly positioned ciliary body causing irido-trabecular contact in spite of a patent iridotomy. Results: Twenty-six eyes of 20 patients with a diagnosis of PIS were enrolled. There were 7 males and 19 females. Ages ranged from 42 to 79 years with an average of 58.6 years ± 10.2. Average refractive error was +3.00. The follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 6.4 years with an average of 19 ± 15 months. Laser settings were: power, which ranged from 140 to 550 mw, laser spot size of 500 um, and duration of 0.5 seconds. The mean number of spots was 31.1 (SD 6.4). The mean length of the procedure was 8.2 minutes with a range of 5-15 minutes. ALPI was associated with an increase in the number of open quadrants from 0.54 to 1.79 (p < 0.001). However, in 29% of eyes there was no increase in the number of open quadrants, and in 63% of eyes, only 0-1 quadrants were opened. There was no difference in IOP immediately after ALPI. There was a slight, clinically insignificant increase in IOP from 14.36 mmHg pre-procedure to 15.88 mmHg at the last clinic examination (p=0.25). BCVA declined by at least 1 Snellen line in 58% of eyes and was stable or improved in 42%. There was no significant change in the mean number of pressure-lowering medications pre-procedure (0.72) as compared with the last clinic examination (0.68), p= 0.89. The failure rate for ALPI was 15.4%. Six (27%) eyes had progressive angle closure and had PAS noted on the last DRG. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that although resident performed ALPI can result in the opening of closed angles in patients with PIS, there is room for improvement in resident training for this challenging procedure.

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In-vivo Imaging of the Trabecular Pathway and Schlemm´s Canal with Anterior Segment FourierDomain (AS FD OCT) Optical Coherence Tomography Alfredo R Castillejos, MD1 Andrea Arata1 Carlos Gustavo V. De Moraes, MD1,2 Syril Kumar Dorairaj, MD1 Jeffrey M. Liebmann, MD1,2 Robert Ritch, MD1,3

1 2

Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; Ophthalmology, New York University Medical Center, New York.3New York Medical College,

Valhalla, New York, NY Keywords: Anterior segment, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, open angle glaucoma, Schlemm's canal, trabecular meshwork. Word count: 2,106 Running title: Imaging of the trabecular outflow pathway. Support: Supported in part by the Joseph Cohen Research Fund of the New York Glaucoma Research Institute, New York, NY and Glaucoma Research and Education Fund of Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (CGVDM) Corresponding author: Alfredo R Castillejos, MD. 310 East 14th Street, New York, NY 10003 Tel: (212) 477-7540, Fax: (212) 420-8743 E-mail address: [email protected] Financial disclosure: Instrument support: Optovue, Inc., Fremont,CA.

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Abstract Purpose: To describe and compare the in vivo morphology of the trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm´s canal (SC) area in normal, glaucoma suspect and glaucomatous eyes using anterior segment Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (ASFDOCT). Methods: One hundred and ten consecutive subjects, were imaged at the four limbal quadrants of either eye using the Angle Scan Mode of the AS FD OCT (Optovue, Inc., Fremont, CA). The highest quality images in which SC and the TM morphology could be outlined for each of the quadrants were selected and analyzed by a masked investigator (AC) using the standard automated software of the device. Based on the information collected from the patients' charts, 220 individual images were assigned to one of the following groups: normals (N), glaucoma suspect (S) and glaucoma (G) eyes. The area, width and length of SC, as well as the length and width of the TM were assessed for every image. A qualitative assessment of the images was done by two masked investigators (AC, SD), who evaluated for the presence of a prominent Schwalbe's line, intrascleral vessels or channels, and communications between the TM and the suprachoroidal space Results: Normal patients were younger, had a larger area, longer width and length of SC, as well as a smaller portion of non filtering meshwork when compared to either the suspect or glaucoma groups (p<0.05) . However, when the S and G groups were compared, we found no statistical differences in any of the variables assessed between these two groups. Only the Total TM length remained similar among the three groups. The area (p<0.05) and the mean length of SC (p<0.05) were statistically different among quadrants but the width was not (p=0.81). Conclusions: The anatomy of the trabecular pathway structures including SC can be visualized and objectively measured using ASFDOCT. There was a significant decrease in SC area related to age but not to glaucoma.

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Planned Argon Laser Suture Lysis in Baerveldt Glaucoma Drainage Devices Matthew Hosler, M.D., Ph.D.1,2 Celso Tello, M.D.1,3 Robert Ritch, M.D.1,3

1

Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2New York

University School of Medicine, New York, NY; 3Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of planned argon laser ligature suture lysis in optimizing aqueous flow in Baerveldt glaucoma drainage devices (GDD). Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients undergoing Baerveldt GDD implantation by a single surgeon (CT) at our institution between September 2008 and August 2009. Pre- and postoperative IOPs and the presence of perioperative complications were recorded. Hypotony was defined as IOP <6.0 mmHg. Results: 35 eyes of 34 patients underwent Baerveldt implant with 7-0 polyglactin suture ligature to provide complete occlusion. All patients were scheduled for argon laser ligature suture lysis (LSL) at 5-weeks. 27 eyes (77.2%) had elevated IOP at the week 5 visit and underwent LSL at that time. Mean IOPs before and after LSL were 24.3±4.5 mmHg and 5.9±2.9 mmHg respectively. All eyes with IOP <9.0 mmHg were managed with intracameral viscoelastic injection to elevate IOP to a low teens target. The mean IOP after injection was 12.7±2.3 mmHg. Mean IOP at the week 6 visit was 12.1±7.0 mmHg. In this group, 14.8% presented with hypotony one week post-injection. The five week follow-up visit was delayed in eight patients (22.8%), in whom the ligature biodegraded spontaneously. 25% of these eyes developed hypotony.

Discussion: Hypotony-related complications, choroidal effusion and shallow anterior chamber, occur in 16% and 11% of Baerveldt GDD recipients respectively. Planned laser suture lysis with viscoelastic injection for immediate hypotony can aid in controlling these problems. Conclusions: Planned LSL after Baerveldt GDD placement is an effective method to optimize aqueous flow, decrease morbidity, and potentially decrease complications associated with spontaneous hypotony..Our data suggest that frequent follow up after LSL should maximize detection of hypotony after tube opening.

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References: 1. Fechter HP, Parrish RK II, Preventing and Treating Complications of Baerveldt

Glaucoma Drainage Device surgery. Int Ophthalmol Clin. 2004;44:107-36. GET RID OF CAPS

2.

Complications of Baerveldt Glaucoma Drainage Implants. Nguyen QH, Budenz DL,

Parrish RK 2nd. Complications of Baerveldt Glaucoma Drainage Implants. Arch Ophthalmol. 1998;116:571-5. SAME

3.

Gedde SJ, Herndon LW, Brandt JD, Budenz DL, Feuer WJ, Schiffman JC.Surgical

complications in the Tube Versus Trabeculectomy Study during the first year of follow-up. Am J Ophthalmol. 2007;143:23-31. SAME Financial Disclosure: C Alcon Laboratories, Inc. C Allergan, Inc. S Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. C Danube Pharmaceuticals, Inc. S Diopsys, Inc. S Heidelberg Engineering, GmBH. C, S Optovue, Inc. C Pfizer Ophthalmics, Inc. C, S Topcon, Inc.

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Lower Corneal Hysteresis Predicts Laterality in Asymmetric Open Angle Glaucoma

Aashish Anand, MD Glaucoma Fellow

Purpose: To investigate the association of corneal biomechanical parameters with asymmetric primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using the Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA).

Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study, ORA parameters were measured in 117 POAG patients with asymmetric visual fields (VF). The asymmetry in VF was defined as a five point difference between the eyes using the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS) scoring system. Subjects with previous intraocular or refractive surgery, ocular co-morbidities and diabetes were excluded.

Results: In worse eyes, mean AGIS scores were significantly higher (8.1±4.3 vs. 1.0±1.6, p<0.001) and mean corneal hysteresis (CH) was significantly lower (8.2±1.9 vs. 8.9±1.9 mmHg, p<0.001). Median ORA-corrected intraocular pressure was higher in the worse eyes (IOP cc , 17.4 mmHg vs. 16.9 mmHg, p<0.001). Worse eyes had a slightly lower mean corneal resistance factor (CRF) (p=0.04) and more myopic mean spherical equivalent (P=0.02). No difference was seen in the corneal thickness (CCT) (p=0.63) and Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) (p=0.32). On multivariate analysis, only CH retained association with the worse eye (OR: 25.9, 95% CI: 10.166.5). ROC curves showed that only CH and IOP cc had a discriminative ability for the eye with worse VF (AUC: 0.82 and 0.70, respectively).

Conclusions: Asymmetric POAG was associated with asymmetry in ORA parameters but not in CCT and GAT. Lower CH was associated with worse eyes independently of its effect on IOP measurement, and was the best predictor for the eye with the worse VF.

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Evaluation of Laser Iridotomy Performed by Ophthalmology Residents in a Teaching Institution Authors: Y. Kashyap1, S.K. Dorairaj1, K. Eliasieh1, J. Nezgoda1, C. Teng1,2. 1Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2 Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of Laser Iridotomy (LI) performed on patients with anatomically narrow angles, with appositional closure on dark room gonioscopy (DRG), by second year ophthalmology residents under the supervision of attending physicians at a teaching institution. METHODS: A retrospective chart analysis of LI's performed by different second year residents between 2007 and 2009. Demographical data, refractive error, pre- and post-procedure intraocular pressure (IOP), laser settings with duration, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), Shaffer angle grading on DRG of all 4 quadrants, complications, and time of follow-up were collected and evaluated. RESULTS: We enrolled fifty-five eyes (31 patients), average age 64+/-8.9yrs, majority were Hispanic, 81% were females, and 85% of eyes were hyperopic (average refractive error +1.37 +/1 diopter). The follow up period ranged from 1 week to 25 months with an average of 10.27+/-7.8 months. Both Argon and Yag lasers were used. Laser settings were on average 661mw (range: 300 to 1350mw), with spot size of 50um and duration of 0.02 seconds. The mean number of burns was 66.5+/- 65. The average duration of procedure was 8+/-4 minutes with a range of 3-26 minutes. Upon comparison of the number of open angle quadrants using the Shaffer angle grading, there was an increase in the number of open angle quadrants from 0.17 (pre-procedure) to 2.81 (one week post-procedure) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the mean IOP pre and immediate post procedure, from 15.4mmHg to 14.8mmHg (p>0.2). BCVA on average improved by 0.6 Snellen line. There was a 29% failure rate de fined as persistent closed angles (Shaffer grade 0 or 1). Of these failures, non patent opening requiring touch up LI occurred in 5 eyes (29%), plateau iris syndrome requiring PICP occurred in 5 eyes (29%), phacomorphic narrow angle requiring cataract extraction occurred in 4 eyes (23.5%), and one eye developed PAS needing surgical intervention with glaucoma drainage implant in addition to IOP lowering medications. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study suggest that although residents have no prior experience in performing laser iridotomy, they are successful in opening a closed angle in majority of patients with relative pupillary block without any complications.

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Anisotropy and Macular Radiation Exposure in Eyes Plaqued for Melanoma.

Robert H. McGlynn, M.D., Paul T. Finger, M.D., FACS. The New York Eye Cancer Center, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary

Purpose To compare the macular radiation exposure in eyes treated for intraocular melanoma with plaques that have seeds oriented in traditional configuration versus oriented radially to the macula to determine tumor positions and thicknesses where this method can be effective in limiting the incidence of radiation maculopathy. To examine the effect of orienting radioactive seeds radially to the macula in plaques used for treating intraocular melanoma on macular radiation exposure and determine its feasibility as a method to limit the incidence of radiation maculopathy. To determine intraocular tumor positions and thicknesses where exploiting anisotropy in radioactive plaque construction can be an effective method of limiting the incidence of radiation maculopathy. Methods Bebig Plaque Simulator X 5.3.6 was used to determine macular radiation exposure in eyes with 12 mm tumors of varying thickness and location and compare the difference between plaques with traditional seed distribution and those with seeds oriented radially towards the macula. Tumor thicknesses used were 2.5, 5 and 7.5mm. Locations were tumors centered on the ciliary body, equator, fovea and half way between the equator and the fovea. Plaques were tested with gold seed guides and silastic inserts and with Pd 103 and I 125 seeds. Seed strength was set to deliver 85 Gy to the tumor apex over a 7 day period. Results For a plaque with a gold seed guide insert loaded with I 125 seeds treating a 5mm thick tumor located at ciliary body there was a decrease in macular radiation exposure of 1.3% when the seeds were oriented radially to the macula. At the equator position it was 3.6%, the half equator position 15% and at the fovea 0.5%. When the plaque was loaded with Pd 103 seeds the magnitude of decrease at these four locations was 2.3%, 8.7%, 24% and 4.3%, respectively. Similar degrees of decrease were found with tumor thicknesses of 2.5 and 7.5 mm as well as when the plaques were fitted with silastic inserts. Conclusion Orienting radioactive seeds radially towards the macula when treating intraocular melanoma produces the greatest effect when tumors are located near but not directly under the macula. It is precisely at this distance where exposure approaches the threshold that causes radiation maculopathy with certainty and therefore the 15 -25% reduction found can produce clinically significant differences.

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Use of mdivi-1 and nutlin-3 to block apoptosis in cybrids containing Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) mutation I Chan1, DN Hu1, M Chen1, MJ Kupersmith1, J Walsh1, J Guy2 1 The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York NY 2Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami FL Purpose: To investigate the use of mdivi-1 and nutlin-3 to block apoptosis in cybrids containing LHON mutation. Mdivi-1 is a dynamin related protein(Drp) inhibitor which plays a key role in mitochondrial fission and mitochondrial permeability transition(MPT) pore formation. Nutlin-3 is a MDM2 antagonist on the p53 apoptosis pathway but may also block Bax/Bak oligomerization on mitochondria surface. Methods: LHON cybrids derived from osteosarcoma cell line with LHON patient-derived mitochondria containing mtDNA mutation (G11778A) is cultured in multi-well culture plates with Dulbecco Modified Eagle Medium(DMEM). Upon reaching 80% confluence, cybrids were switched to a glucose-free galactose (GFGM) media, which induced apoptosis. Mdivi-1 at concentrations of 5µM, 10µM and 20µM and nutlin-3 at 3µM and 5µM were added. After 2 days of incubation, cell survival was estimated by morphological inspection and MTT assay and results were compared to controls on glucose-rich and glucose-free media without treatment. Analogous experiments were performed with uveal melanoma M21 and ARPE-19 cell lines. Results: The MTT assay results reveal that after 2 days of incubation with glucose-free medium, the LHON cybrids survival rate was 40%. The mdivi-1 treated cybrids at concentrations of 5µM, 10µM and 20µM survived at 37%, 33% and 24% respectively. The nutlin-3 treated cybrids at concentrations of 3µM and 5µM survived at 45% and 43% respectively. LHON cybrids treated with a combination of 20µM mdivi-1 + 5µM nutlin-3 survived at 25%. After 2 days of incubation with glucose-free medium, the M21 uveal melanoma cell line survival rate was 53%. The mdivi-1 treated M21 at concentrations of 5µM, 10µM and 20µM survived at 51%, 51% and 38% respectively. The ARPE-19 cell line after 2 days of incubation with glucose-free medium was 79%. The mdivi-1 treated ARPE-19 at concentrations of 5µM, 10µM and 20µM survived at 83%, 79% and 69% respectively. Conclusion: Our study shows that mdivi-1 demonstrates dose-dependent cytological toxicity on LHON cybrids and ARPE cell lines and offers preliminary evidence for anti-tumor effects in M21 uveal melanoma cell line. Nutlin-3 demonstrates mild dose-dependent protective effects for LHON cybrids. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of nutlin-3 as a neuroprotective agent and mdivi-1 as a chemotherapeutic agent.

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Exfoliation Syndrome, Intraocular Pressure and Disc Hemorrhage SM Fernando,1 CGV De Moraes,1 CC Teng,1 C Tello,1,2 JM Liebmann,1,3 R Ritch1,2 Einhorn Clinical Research Center New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 3New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY

1

Purpose: To assess the relationship of unilateral disc hemorrhage (DH) and ocular parameters in subjects with bilateral exfoliation syndrome (XFS). Methods: The medical records and disc photographs of all patients seen in a glaucoma referral practice between January 2009 and October 2009 were reviewed by two glaucoma specialists. Age, ethnicity, presence or absence of XFS, CCT, visual field MD, intraocular pressure (IOP), the location of the DH, and number of clock hours of beta-zone parapapillary atrophy ( PPA) were recorded. Results: We identified 40 subjects with unilateral DH and bilateral XFS. Mean age was 75.4±8.9 yrs, 27 (66%) were female, and 39 (98%) were of European descent. The majority of DH (25 eyes, 63%) occurred inferotemporally. There was no significant difference in spherical equivalent refractive error (-0.77±2.40 vs. -0.97±2.59, p=0.4 diopters), visual field mean deviation (8.84±8.9 vs. -8.48±7.5 dB, p=0.6), or CCT (535.2±36.9 and 536.4±40.2 µm, p=0.7) in eyes with or without DH. Mean IOP prior to DH (17.2±3.7 vs. 15.9±3.7, p=0.004) and IOP at the time of DH detection (17.16±4.25 vs.15.08±5.08, p=0.001) were higher in the DH eyes. DH eyes also had a significantly greater amount of PPA than fellow eyes (5.1±3.1 vs. 3.5±2.6, p,0.001). There was a 45% (p=0.8) concordance between the eye with DH and the eye with the worse visual field MD, a 55% (p=0.9) concordance between the location of the DH with the worse visual field hemifield, a 43% (p=0.6) concordance between the eye with DH and the eye with worse XFS, and a 65% (p=0.07) concordance between the eye with DH and the larger disc size. Conclusions: The development of DH in XFS patients is strongly associated with elevated IOP and size of zone PPA. Other ocular covariates did not reach statistical significance to explain DH laterality in patients with a systemic disease known to increase the risk of glaucoma onset and progression. These findings may suggest more aggressive IOP lowering if DH is detected in XFS. Supported in part by Lionel Harwood Research Fund of the New York Glaucoma Research Institute, New York, NY.

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Title: Late capsulorhexis with small gauge high speed vitrectomy: A new technique for optic capture of dislocated IOLs Author: Richard J. Mackool Jr., Richard J Mackool Sr. Purpose: Late capsular fixation of dislocated IOL's Methods: Ten patients (10 eyes) with dislocated posterior chamber IOL's and irregular posterior capsular openings underwent pars plana vitrectomy with a high speed (2500 cuts/minute), 23 gauge vitrectomy system. The posterior capsular openings were enlarged to form a continuous capsulorhexis and the IOL optic was then captured through the opening. Results: IOL position has remained stable in all patients for up to 2 years, with no recurrent or induced episodes of IOL decentration/dislocation, uveitis, glaucoma or hyphema. Conclusions: High speed pars plana vitrectomy can be used to create a capsulorhexis that allows capsular fixation of the optic of subluxated posterior chamber lenses. This technique eliminated the need for suture fixation of the IOL or IOL exchange in these patients with sufficient posterior capsule.

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Lysyl Oxidase-like 1 Polymorphisms in Adult Children of Patients with Exfoliation Syndrome. Author Block: Edward Kim1, Roshanak Sharafieh2, Mansoor Sarfarazi2, Gustova De Moraes1,3 ,Zaher Sbeity1,4, Jeffrey M. Liebmann1,3, and Robert Ritch1,5 New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2 University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT; 3 New York University, Department of Ophthalmology, New York, NY; 4 Evangelic Hospital Mulheim an der Ruhur, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Dusseldorf, Mulheim an der Ruhr, Germany; 5 New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

1

Purpose: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the LOXL1 gene have been implicated as the principal genetic risk factor for exfoliation syndrome. We investigated and compared the LOXL1 polymorphisms in adult children of patients diagnosed with exfoliation syndrome. Methods: We recruited 30 adult children (12M, 28F) of 21 patients (4M, 17F) diagnosed with exfoliation syndrome/glaucoma. LOXL1 gene polymorphisms (R141L, G153D, and Intron-1) were genotyped in all 51 subjects by direct sequencing. Association studies were carried out with kappa inter-rate agreement test. Results: Parent-child genotypic comparisons of R141L(.766, =.40) and G153D (.733, =.45) were significant for strong hereditary correlations and Intron-1(.387 =.04) was not. The allelic frequencies for R141L were .667 for both parents and children. The allelic frequencies for G153D were .667 and .850 for parents and children respectively. In view of this observation, clinically significant correlations were established in both R141L and G153D between parent and offspring. LOXL1 genotyping can be used to detect the presence of LOXL1 SNPs as a significant risk factor for glaucoma.

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Drusen Characteristics Revealed by Spectral Domain OCT and Their Corresponding Fundus Autofluorescence Appearance in Dry AMD. Drusen. Gennady Landa 1,2, MD, Richard B Rosen1,2*, MD, John Pilavas3, BA, Patricia MT Garcia1,2, MD 1 Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, USA 2 Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA 3 University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA Abstract Purpose: To analyze the relationship between drusen morphology revealed by Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and corresponding fundus autofluorescence features (FAF) of the same drusen using the Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2 (HRA2), in dry AMD patients. Methods: Dry AMD patients were imaged with SD-OCT and HRA2 on the same day. SD-OCT B-scans were then precisely overlaid onto the HRA2 images and the SD-OCT morphologic characteristics of the drusen were correlated with the corresponding FAF appearance. The morphologic features of the drusen which were analyzed included: size, status of IS-OS junctional layer above the drusen, shape of the drusen, internal reflectivity, homogeneity, and presence of overlaying hyperreflective foci. The fundus autofluorescence characteristics of each druse were rated as hyperautofluorescent, hypoautofluorescent or normal autofluorescent. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlation between the two primary outcomes: SD-OCT morphology of the drusen and their autofluorescent appearance. Results: 431 drusen in 32 eyes of 16 dry AMD patients were evaluated. Of the seven morphologic characteristics assessed by SD-OCT, only drusen size and the status of IS-OS layer above the drusen appeared to be strongly correlated with the autofluorescent appearance (r=0.78; p<0.001 and r=0.58; p<0.001, respectively). The strength of correlation with other features appeared less robust: homogeneity (r=0.38; p=0.001), shape (r=0.29; p=0.004), reflectivity (r=0.28; p=0.004), presence of overlaying foci (r=0.25; p=0.12). Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that autofluorescent changes most strongly correlate to drusen size and disruption of the IS/OS layer. This suggests that autofluorescent appearance may be useful as an additional functional-morphologic feature by which drusen and their impact upon overlying photoreceptors may be judged.

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Rates of Visual Field Progression in Pigmentary Glaucoma and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in Younger Patients. Author Block A. Vaccaro1,2, E. Kim1, C.G.V. de Moraes1,2, C.C. Teng1,3, C. Tello1,3, R. Ritch1,3, J.M. Liebmann1,2. 1Ophthalmology, Einhorn Clinical Research Center, NY Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY; 3Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Abstract: Purpose: To compare the rates of VF progression in treated patients with pigmentary glaucoma (PG) and primary open angle glaucoma in younger patients (YPOAG). Methods: The charts of all patients seen in a glaucoma referral practice between 1999 and 2009 were reviewed. Only treated eyes with 8 SITA Standard 24-2 VF tests with a diagnosis of PG or YPOAG were included. Age at initial diagnosis, sex, refractive error, central corneal thickness (CCT) and IOP were recorded. Eyes with underlying conditions known to affect the VF were excluded. Automated pointwise linear regression analysis determined global and localized rates (dB/yr) of change. A VF series was considered progressing by two criteria: A) sensitive criterion: when at least one point showed a threshold sensitivity decline at a rate of 1.0 dB/yr with p<0.01; B) specific criterion: two adjacent points in the same hemifield using the above (A) criteria. Results: 59 YPOAG and 24 PG eyes were enrolled. YPOAG patients were younger (35.7±9.2 vs 47.5±12.0, p<0.01) and more often female (58% vs 38%, p=0.15, but refractive error (-3.6±3.4 vs -4.2±4.0 D, p=0.49), number of VF tests (10.5±3.0 vs 11.3±3.1, p=0.27), f/u time (105±47 vs 117±56 months, p=0.3), mean CCT (549.4±39.8 vs 530.5.±41.6 µm, p=0.06), mean IOP (15.4±3.5 vs 14.5±3.2 mmHg, p=0.3), and peak IOP (mean 20.3±4.8 vs 18.9±4.8 mmHg, p=0.23) were similar. In the univariate analysis, PG eyes showed faster global rates of VF change (mean 0.40±0.4 vs -0.20±0.6 dB/yr, p=0.02) and similar localized rates (mean, -2.2±0.7 dB/yr vs 2.0±0.7 dB/yr, p=0.45) compared to YPOAG eyes (Mann-Whitney rank test), but the difference in global rates became non-significant after adjusting for age and CCT (p=0.5, ANCOVA). The numbers of eyes reaching a progression endpoint using both the sensitive (PG, 11/24 vs YPOAG, 18/59, p=0.21) and specific (PG, 7/24 vs YPOAG, 12/59 p=0.39) criteria were statistically similar between groups. Conclusions: PG and YPOAG share similar epidemiological features (age of onset, myopia) despite different pathogeneses. Yet when treated, both diseases tend to behave similarly regarding rates of VF progression.

Author Disclosure Information: A. Vaccaro, None; E. Kim, None; C.G.V. de Moraes, None; C.C. Teng, None; C. Tello, Diopsys, Inc., F; Alcon Laboratories, Inc., R; Allergan, Inc., R; R. Ritch, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., F; Diopsys, Inc., F; Heidelberg Engineering, GmBH, F; Topcon, Inc., F; Alcon Laboratories, Inc., C; Allergan, Inc., C; Danube Pharmaceuticals, Inc., C; Pfizer Ophthalmics, Inc., C; J.M. Liebmann, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., F; Diopsys, Inc., F; Heidelberg Engineering, GmbH, F; Optovue, INC., F; Topcon Medical Systems, Inc., F; Alcon Laboratories, Inc., C; Allergan, Inc., C; Diopsys, Inc., C; Optovue, Inc., C; Pfizer, Inc., C; Topcon Medical Systems, Inc., C.

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A comparison of the in-vitro susceptibility profile of Ceftobiprole against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ocular isolates. Author: Ryan Conley DO, Mahendra Shah MS, Glenn Thompson MD, Wilma Perez, John Seedor MD, David Ritterband MD. Departments of Ophthalmology and Laboratory Medicine, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, NY, NY and New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. Purpose: To study the in-vitro susceptibility profiles of ceftobiprole, a novel 5th generation cephalosporin against ocular isolates of Methicillin Resistant Staph aureus (MRSA). Methods: 15 MRSA, 3 Methicillin Sensitive Staph aureus (MSSA), 3 Staph epidermidis, 1 Strep viridans group, and 1 each of Serratia marcescens, Haemophilus influenzae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cases of corneal ulcers were tested for in vitro susceptibility against ceftobiprole, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin using a Kirby Bauer method. Results: Ceftobiprole was active against all 15 MRSA strains tested with zones of inhibition ranging from (18 to 38 mm). Moxifloxacin and Gatifloxacin had 8/15 resistant and 10/15 resistant MRSA strains respectively. Gentamicin had 3/15 resistant MRSA organisms. All 15 MRSA strains were sensitive to vancomycin. In addition ceftobiprole was active against all the other isolates. Conclusions: Ceftobiprole is the first of a new class of broad-spectrum anti-MSRA cephalosporins with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and gram negative organisms. With increasing concern of resistance among MRSA ocular isolates to currently available antimicrobials ceftobiprole may be a promising new therapeutic alternative.

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In-Vivo Microstructural Anatomy of Beta-Zone Parapapillary Atrophy in Glaucoma Authors: Sung Chul Park, M.D.,1,2 Carlos Gustavo V. De Moraes, M.D.,1,3 Celso Tello, M.D.,1,2 Jeffrey M. Liebmann, M.D.,1,3 Robert Ritch, M.D.1,2 Affiliations: 1Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; 2Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; 3New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY

Purpose: To assess the microstructural anatomy of clinical beta-zone parapapillary atrophy (ßPPA) using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Methods: Color photographs and horizontal cross-sectional FD-OCT images of the optic disc and parapapillary retina were obtained from 24 eyes (24 glaucoma patients or suspects) with ßPPA. The distances between the temporal disc margin and parapapillary landmarks (clinical ßPPA margin and the edges of retinal pigment epithelium [RPE], Bruch's membrane [BM], and photoreceptor inner/outer segment [IS/OS] junction) were measured in 5 equally-spaced horizontal meridians (total 120 meridians). Results: Mean age was 56±13 (SD) years. Mean distances from the temporal disc margin to the temporal ßPPA margin and the edges of RPE, BM, and IS/OS junction in the 5 meridians were 388±173, 371±174, 214±204, and 502±167 µm, respectively. The RPE edge corresponded to the ßPPA margin in 78/120 (65%) meridians and ended within the ßPPA in 42/120 (35%) meridians. The BM edge corresponded to the RPE edge in 13/120 meridians (11%) and was closer to the disc in 107/120 meridians (89%). The disc margin corresponded to the BM edge in 20/120 meridians (17%) and to the edge of the border tissue of Elschnig in 100/120 meridians (83%). The IS/OS junction edge was further from the disc than the temporal ßPPA margin in all 24 eyes. Conclusion: The ßPPA was not completely denuded of RPE and there was a crescent-shaped area of photoreceptor degeneration or atrophy peripheral to ßPPA. The termination of the border tissue of Elschnig constituted the temporal disc margin in most eyes with conspicuous ßPPA. Sung Chul Park, MD Clinical Glaucoma Fellow New York Eye and Ear Infirmary New York, NY

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Microperimetry and Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Retinal Vein Occlusion Author Block: Madhavi Kurli1, MD, Gennady Landa1,2, MD, Emily Su2, MD, Patricia MT Garcia1,2, MD, Richard B Rosen1,2 Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, USA2Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the retinal sensitivity tested by Microperimetry (MP) and structural abnormalities of the outer retina, assessed by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) in patients with retinal vein occlusion. Methods: Thirteen patients with retinal vein occlusion were included in the study. Six patients had a branch vein occlusion and 7 had a central retinal vein occlusion. All patients underwent MP and SD-OCT imaging. Microperimetry results were superimposed on retinal topography maps (SD-OCT). Point-to-point analysis between microperimetric retinal sensitivity and underlying integrity of Inner segment-Outer segment (IS-OS) junctional layer was performed. Nine patients had a fluorescein angiogram (FA) and these findings were correlated with the MP and SD-OCT results. Results: Decreased mean retinal sensitivity weakly correlated with the disruption of the IS-OS layer both in branch and central retinal vein occlusion (correlation coefficient (r) ­0.2, weak inverse correlation). Ischemia on FA correlated positively with decreased retinal sensitivity but had no significant relation with the integrity of the IS-OS junction. Conclusions: In patients with retinal vein occlusion, retinal sensitivity and ischemia do not correlate with the integrity of the underlying IS-OS junctional layer. As retinal vein occlusion is a disease of the inner retina, structural disruption of the outer retinal layers may not be seen as observed in this study. A larger study to evaluate the functional and structural changes in the retinal layers in central and branch retinal vein occlusion is warranted.

1

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Outcomes of Large White-to-white Corneal Transplants Author: Glenn W Thompson, MD, David C Rittrband, MD, John A Seedor, MD, Ryan P Conley, DO

Purpose: Classical teaching states that large white-to-white grafts are highly prone to rejection and failure. This study looks at outcomes of all large grafts from a single surgeon. Methods: Retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty by a single surgeon since 2004 that were 10.0 mm or larger. Clarity of graft at most recent follow-up was evaluated. Additionally, uncorrected and best-corrected visual acuity was evaluated, as well as the need for additional procedures. Indication for large graft was also identified. Results: Sixteen patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. Most recent follow-up visits ranged from 3 to 39 months. Nine patients (56%) had clear grafts at most recent follow-up. Six patients (38%) had 20/30 best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) or better. Three patient's (19%) BCVA was 20/50 - 20/60. The remaining seven patients (44%) had 20/400 or worse BCVA. Of those better than 20/400, the average manifest cylinder was 2.47 diopters. Ten patients (63%) required additional surgery varying from PRK to cataract extraction to repeat keratoplasty. Conclusion: Results of large white-to-white corneal transplants are mixed. Approximately half of patients had excellent visual acuity after completion of therapy; however, the other half had very poor outcomes. The poor outcomes have to be evaluated in the context of the severity of the disease requiring the emergent transplant.

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A prospective evaluation of the relationship between multifocal visual evoked potentials latency values and visual field loss progression on achromatic automated perimetry. A preliminary analysis. 1. Grippo TM, Hood DC, Kanadani FN, Ezon I, Greenstein VC, Liebmann JM, Ritch R. A comparison between multifocal and conventional VEP latency changes secondary to glaucomatous damage. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2006; 47:5331-5336

PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship between latencies of the multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) and progression of visual field loss over time. We report a subgroup of these patients that were prospectively followed over time with the HVF and describe the relationship between baseline latency values and visual field loss progression over time. METHODS: Seventeen patients (34 eyes) with glaucoma and 4 patients (8 eyes) with suspected glaucoma were followed over a mean period of 36.6 months (range 21.4 to 52.7) with the static automated perimetry (SAP). Chosen from a group of 93 previously studied patients with mfVEP latency analysis.(1) Three to 8 (mean 4.3) visual fields were measured with SAP (24-2 program, Zeiss). Patients with other ocular conditions known to affect the visual fields or with fewer than 3 fields were excluded. Point-wise linear regression analysis (Progressor®) was used to calculate global rates of progression. A test point was identified as progressing if the slope of sensitivity over time exceeded 1 dB loss/year with p<0.01. The mfVEP stimulus was a scaled dartboard with 60 sectors; each sector was a pattern-reversing checkerboard. The average latency of the initial mfVEP was determined.(1) RESULTS: Seventeen patients showed visual field loss progression in either eye while 4 did not. For 64.7 % (11/17) of the patients with visual field loss progression, the eye with the more delayed latency value showed a higher rate of progression. For 64.7 % (11/17 patients); the eye with the more negative baseline mean deviation on the HVF showed a higher global rate of progression. No significant correlation was found between monocular average latencies and rate of global progression (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The latency of the monocular mfVEP was not helpful in identifying eyes at risk of glaucomatous progression

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Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty: Clinical Outcomes and Post-operative Visual Improvement Anisha Jangi, MD, Carolyn Shih, MD, David Ritterband, MD, John Seedor, MD, Gustavo De Moraes, MD, Pat-Michael Palmiero, MD, Shaina Rubino Purpose: To report clinical experience in best corrected visual outcomes after Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of 125 consecutive eyes that underwent DSAEK was commenced. Data collected included patient demographics, indication for surgery, prior surgeries, presence or absence of co-morbid diseases, pre- and postoperative refraction, and pre- and postoperative visual acuity. Visual acuity was recorded in Snellen and logMAR forms. Results: Patients ranged in age from 32-93 with a mean age of 71.05. The majority of cases were performed for Fuch's endothelial dystrophy (51) or pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (49). Other indications included: aphakic bullous keratopathy, previously failed PK or DSAEK, unspecified corneal edema, corneal edema secondary to a glaucoma implant and Descemet's rupture. Preoperative vision (logMAR) was 1.152±0.580. The average month of BCVA was 5.735 with a mean BCVA of 0.562±0.449. In a statistical analysis with a paired sample t test, the mean difference was 0.5917 (95%CI = 0.4840 to 0.6995) with a p-value < 0.0001, indicating a statistically significant improvement in vision after DSAEK. At POM2, we found that patients gained an average of 2.056±3.749 Snellen lines or 0.322±0.689 logMAR lines. At the month of best-corrected visual acuity, we found that Snellen lines gained were 4.040±3.694 and logMAR lines gained were 0.581±0.644. Conclusion: Our study documents a statistically significant improvement in visual acuity in patients who underwent DSAEK. Further analysis is currently underway to determine factors correlated with improvement in post-operative visual acuity. VISUAL OUTCOMES: All Patients Without posterior pole pathology With posterior pole pathology (retinal disease, optic nerve disease) 20/200 20/40-HM

Pre-op Snellen Vision Mean Range Pre-op LogMAR

20/15020/200 20/40-HM

20/100-20/150 20/40-HM

1.152 Mean 0.3-2.2 Range 0.580 StDev POM 2 Snellen Vision Mean Range 20/80 20/20-HM

1.025 0.3-2.2 0.568

1.274 0.3-2.2 0.578

20/70 20/30-HM

20/100 20/20-HM

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POM2LogMAR 0.811 Mean 0-2.2 Range 0.549 St Dev Number of lines gained @ POM2 (Snellen VA) 2.056 Mean 3.749 St Dev Range Number of lines gained @ POM2 (LogMAR) Mean St Dev Range Month of Best VA (month#) Mean Range Best Month Snellen Vision Mean Range Best Month LogMar Mean Range St Dev Number of lines gained @ Best Month (Snellen VA) Mean St Dev Range Number of lines gained @ Best Month (logMAR) Mean St Dev Range -1-9 4.112 -9-9 3.338 -3-9 2.435 1.677 0.526 0.543 0.18-2.2 0-2.2 0.676 0.944

0.322 0.689 -1.9-1.8

0.316 0.722 -1.9-1.8

0.330 0.659 -1.0-1.6

5.735 1-21

4.818 1-16

6.637 1.5-21

20/60-20/70 20/20-HM 0.562 0-2.2 0.449

20/50-20/60 20/20-HM 0.480 0-2.2 0.464

20/70 20/20-CF 0.639 0-1.9 0.423

4.040 3.694 -8-13

4.355 4.110 -8-13

3.726 3.230 -3-10

0.581 0.644 -1.9-1.9

0.527 0.705 -1.9-1.9

0.634 3.230 -3-10

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Role of Early Patching on Visual Outcomes in Pediatric Ruptured Globes B. Bert, MD, K. Mukkamala, MD, S. Yang, MD, L. Hall, MD Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Purpose: To evaluate visual outcomes after early patching in pediatric patients in both the amblyogenic and non-amblyogenic ages after a ruptured globe repair. Methods: Retrospective chart review. We reviewed the charts of patients under the age of 15 that presented between the years 1990-2000 with severe globe trauma. Results: Thirty-three charts were analyzed. Mean patient age was 5.5 ± 3.5 years. Average length of follow up was 19.7 months. Of the 33 cases, 24 were in the amblyogenic period ( 7 years of age in our study) and 9 were 8 years of age. Of the 24 eyes in the amblyogenic period, 82% of patients that received early patching achieved Snellen VA of 20/20-20/60 compared to 43% of those that were not patched. 57% of those that were not patched had VA of 20/200 or less. Of the 9 patients 8 years, 8 had a visual acuity (VA) between 20/20-20/60 while one eye required enucleation. Conclusion: In the amblyogenic period, early patching of the non-affected eye after a ruptured globe injury can improve visual outcomes when compared to children who were not patched (P<0.05). Table 1: Final Visual Outcomes of Affected Eye after Pediatric Ruptured Globes Visual acuity in patients <7 years of age Final Va N 20/20-20/60 15 20/70-20/200 1 <20/200 6 Enucleation 1 Visual acuity in patients > 7 years of age Final Va N 20/20-20/60 8 20/70-20/200 0 <20/200 0 Enucleation 1

Table 2: Final Va of Ruptured Globes in the Amblyogenic Period Classified by Use of Patching 20/20-20/60 3 9 4 20/70-20/200 0 1 0 <20/200 4 1 1 Enucleation 1

No patching Patching Unknown

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Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Resolved Uveitic Cystoid Macular Edema: Features Associated With Permanent Vision Loss. Author Block P.Y. Chang1, V. Diaz2, D.M. Hinkle1, J. Mauro1,S. Kedhar1, C. Foster1, C.A. Samson2. 1 Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA; 2Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Purpose: Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of uveitis, resulting in significant vision loss. Vision typically recovers with the resolution of CME. However, a subset of patients experience permanent decrease of central vision despite resolution of CME and absence of pathology in other ocular structures. Using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technology, we intended to identify retinal features that may be associated with the vision loss. Methods: This is a case-control retrospective comparative series. We reviewed medical records of patients with uveitic CME and identified two groups of patients: 1) Study group consisted of patients who failed to regain pre-CME BCVA following resolution of CME, and the vision loss could not be accounted for by other ocular pathologies; 2) Control group consisted of patients who regained their pre-CME BCVA following resolution of CME. Once all patients were identified, we reviewed the OCT scans obtained from the RTVue (Optovue Inc, Fremont, CA) of each patient. Patients were excluded if macular cystic space, epiretinal membrane, or distorted macular anatomy was noted. Two variables were then assessed in the qualified subjects: 1) Photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction, hypothesized to be represented by the highly reflective band immediately inner to the retinal pigment epithelium; is graded as intact, partially intact, or absent by two observers who are masked to the patient grouping. 2) Foveal thickness, as calculated by the software program included with the RTVue. Pre- and post-CME BCVA were also recorded. Results: There were 7 subjects (8 eyes) in Study and 8 subjects (8 eyes) in Control. The mean pre-CME BCVA were 20/25 in Study and 20/20 in Control. The mean post-CME BCVA were 20/75 in Study and 20/20 in Control. The mean foveal thickness were 170.3µm in Study and 232.6µm in Control, with a difference of 62.4µm (p<0.01). IS/OS junction was graded as intact in 2, partially intact in 4, and absent in 2 of the Study eyes, while it was graded as intact in all 8 Control eyes. All Study eyes had a foveal thickness of less than 180µm, a non-intact IS/OS junction, or a combination of both. Conclusions: This preliminary study suggests that reduced foveal thickness and disrupted photoreceptor IS/OS junction as seen on spectral-domain OCT may be associated with permanent vision loss following CME resolution in uveitic patients.

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Title: Comparison of Anterior Segment Time and Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (AS OCT) in the Evaluation of Patients with Narrow Angles Author: V. Trubnik, S Kiumehr, A. R Castillejos, R Ritch.

Purpose: To assess the reproducibility of Time (TD) and Fourier domain (FD) AS OCT and their correlation with gonioscopy grading in the evaluation of eyes with narrow angles. Methods: Twenty four eyes of fourteen patients (age 61±9 years, 71% women) with a Schaffer's classification grading of 2, were imaged on the horizontal quadrants under standardized dark conditions using AS TD and FD OCT. The angle opening distance (AOD 750µ), trabecular-iris space area (TISA 750µ) and angle width were compared between the two devices using a Wilcoxon's test. Afterwards, the agreement between the angle values of both devices and the gonioscopy grading obtained from the patients' existing charts and done by a masked observer, were assessed using a Kappa (k) test. Results: No statistically significant differences was found in the parameters assessed with the two devices, while interclass correlation coefficients confirmed a strong correlation (ICC=0.66) between them. However, k values showed a low agreement when either TD (k=.02) or FD (k=.03) were compared to gonioscopy grading. Conclusions: Precise and reproducible measurements can be obtained using either TD or FD OCT in the evaluation of eyes with narrow angles; however they may differ from those values obtained with clinical gonisocopy grading.

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INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD ANNUAL SUMMARY 2010 VOTING MEMBERS: R. Andrew R. Rosen, MD S. Schantz, MD(alt.) R. Baken, PhD G. Caponong, MSW J. Walsh, MD E. Ilitchev, MD P. Kennedy, LCSW M. Potucek, RPh(alt.) A. Ovchinsky, MD Hae-Ok Kim, MD J. Thomas (alt.)

E. Schleider S. Tennaro, RN L. Tiersten, MSW (alt) W. Stratis, RPh D. Ritterband, MD

GUESTS/OBSERVERS: L. Klingos, RN K. Tai, CRC N. Suslina, CRC CM Samson, MD R. Gentile, MD S. Kedhar, MD P. Latkany, MD J. Collins, MD D. Fox, DM R. Hoffman, MD A. Lebowitz, MS M Pitman, MD N. Suslina C. Teng, MD A. Sclafani, MD K Rosenthal, MD W. Seiple, PhD R. Jordan, coord. MEETING DATES: January 12 February 9 March 9 April 13 May 11 June 8 July 13 September 14 October 12 November 9 December 14

NEW PROTOCOLS Protocol Number PI Last Name Protocol Title

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Second Primaries after Major Salivary Gland Cancer Visual outcomes and morbidity in infantile and pediatric corneal transplantation Clinical features and treatment modalities for peripheral ulcerative keratitis and other autoimmune corneal melts A retrospective analysis of variables correlated with open-angle glaucoma prevalence, diagnosis and progression Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature Variability of post-operative esophagram after endoscopic cricopharyngeal myotomy: technique dependence PROGRESSION IN TREATED GLAUCOMA Review of Outcomes and Adverse Events Associated with the Use of Autologous Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix in the Face, Alone or in Conjunction with Surgery Critical Review of Adjuvant Treatments and Ultimate Patient Outcomes after Reconstructive Facial Surgery with Local Skin Flaps and Grafts The Incidence and Implications of Preventable Ocular Foreign Bodies in a Major Urban Eye Trauma Center Decompression Retinopathy: A Review Determining Relationships between Optic Nerve Parameters and Rates of Visual Field Progression in Patients with Beta-Zone Parapapillary Atrophy Retrospective Review of Syphilis Testing in Andalucia, Spain Laser tube ligature release following aqueous shunt implantation in young children Characteristics of Uveitis Patients That Impact Quality of Life (COUPTIQOL) Alloderm wrapped diced cartilage graft as a modified "Turkish Delight" graft in nasal dorsal augmentation. Iris Heterochromia After Listeria Monocytogenes Endogenous Endophthalmitis Macular Hole Formation, Progression, and Surgical Repair: Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Time Lapse Morphing Video Study. Comparison between Home Macular Perimeter and OCT visual field defects in patients with CNV Brilliant Blue G Vital Stain for Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling in Macular Hole and Macular Pucker Surgery A Phase 3 Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Masked Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Difluprednate 0.05% Ophthalmic Emulsion Compared to Prednisolone Acetate 1% Ophthalmic Suspension in the Treatment of Endogenous Anterior UveitisProtocol C-10-034 Prospective, Multicenter Trial of the PresVIEW Scleral Implant (PSI) for the Improvement of Near Visual Acuity in Presbyopic Patients Baerveldt Plate Area Comparison (BPAC)

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Shimmyo Latkany Pitman Ritch Sclafani

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Kedhar Gentile Teng

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Genetic and environmental factors influencing T-effector cell orchestration in mucosal inflammation in chronic sinusitis. Conjunctival-sparing Technique with use of Fibrin Adhesive in Pterygium Surgery A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Mask, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of 20 mg Tasimelteon versus Placebo in Totally Blind Subjects with N24HSWD followed by an OLE PhaseProtocol Number VPVEC-162-3201 A PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED, DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, MULTICENTER, PHASE 1B STUDY OF OTO-104 GIVEN AS A SINGLE INTRATYMPANIC INJECTION IN SUBJECTS WITH UNILATERAL MENIERE?S DISEASE Autologous Fat Augmentation of Orbital Volume Using a Closed Cannula Technique Request for Compassionate Use Device Exemption for the Safety and Effectiveness of the CustomFlex Artificial Iris Prosthesis to treat a patient with Congenital Aniridia Patient Experience After Selphyl? Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix Injections A PHASE I/II MULTI-CENTER, RANDOMIZED, DOUBLEMASKED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, DOSE-ESCALATION STUDY TO EVALUATE THE TOLERABILITY, SAFETY, PHARMACOKINETICS, AND PHARMACODYNAMICS (EFFICACY) OF CHRONIC TWICE-DAILY TOPICAL MONOCULAR APPLICATION OF INO-8875 OPHTHALMIC FORMULATION IN ADULTS WITH OCULAR HYPERTENSION OR PRIMARY OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA Functional and Structural Testing Using the Campimeter and WaveScan WavefrontTM in detection and evaluation of macular pathology in central scotoma and macular holes Comparative Study of the Safety and Effectiveness of ologen® Collagen Matrix versus Mitomycin-C in Glaucoma Filtering Surgery A Multicenter Open-Label Study of the Long-term Safety and Efficacy of the Human Anti-TNF Monoclonal Antibody Adalimumab in Subjects with Non-Infectious Intermediate-, Posterior-, or Pan-uveitis #M11-327 Protective Function of Hormones in Intraocular Inflammation Association of corneal hysteresis with the glycemic control and severity of retinopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus Protocol QRK.007: A Phase I, Open-label, Dose Escalation Trial of QPI-1007 Delivered by a Single Intravitreal Injection to Patients with Optic Nerve Atrophy (Stratum I) and Acute NonArteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (NAION) (Stratum II) The use of the Biometric Imaging Metabolic Mapper for evaluation of retinal metabolism and retinal function changes in patients with Geographic Atrophy (advanced dry AMD)

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The use of the Biometric Imaging Metabolic Mapper for evaluation of retinal metabolism and retinal function changes in ophthalmic disease. A 28-week multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo controlled, dose-ranging phase III study to assess AIN457 versus placebo in inducing and maintaining uveitissuppression in adults with active, non-infectious, intermediate, posterior or panuveitis requiring immunosuppression (INSURE Study) The use of the Biometric Imaging Metabolic Mapper? for evaluation of retinal metabolic changes in relationship to visual field defects in patients with glaucoma The use of the Biometric Imaging Metabolic Mapper for evaluation of changes in retinal metabolism and retinal function in patients undergoing intravitreal therapeutic injections. Effect of Acupuncture on Intraocular Pressure Acoustic and aerodynamic correlates of "the belt" and "the yell" Language processing in children with cochlear implants A Multicenter Study of the Efficacy and Safety of the Human Anti-TNF Monoclonal Antibody Adalimumab as Maintenance Therapy in Subjects Requiring High Dose Corticosteroids for Active Non- infectious Intermediate-, Posterior-, or Pan-uveitis #M10-877 A Multicenter Study of the Efficacy and Safety of the Human Anti-TNF Monoclonal Antibody Adalimumab in Subjects with Inactive Non-infectious Intermediate-, Posterior-, or Pan-uveitis #M10-880 CHEER Network: OTOLOGY DATA COLLECTION PROJECT Prospective Feasibility Study of the Apnex Medical Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulation (HGNS) System to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea Moisture chamber goggle therapy for the treatment of dry eye as a result of nocturnal lagophthalmos Near-infrared Light (NIR) Therapy for Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Study DE-SENSITIZATION TO ASPIRIN RENEWALS

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Kim Park

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Latkany Rosen Sperber

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Principal Investigator Ritch, Robert MD Rosenthal, Kenneth MD Ritch, Robert MD Liebmann, Jeffrey MD

Protocol Title CD-44 Receptor In Aqueous Humor In Glaucoma Continued Access Compassionate Study Model 311 Iris Reconstruction Lens (NEW TITLE) Analysis of Aqueous Humor, Ocular Tissue, and Blood In Patients With and Without Exfoliation Syndrome African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES)(was African Americans with glaucoma (AAG): Structure and function Version #6 06/06 ) (NEI

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1U0EY14267-01) Schantz, Proteomic and Immunologic analyses of thyroid cancer Stimson MD Schantz, RNA microarray analysis of thyroid cancer Stimson MD Linstrom, Charachteristics of Patients With Cochlear Implants Christopher MD Kupersmith, Scanning Laser Polarimetry (GDx) And Optical Coherence Mark MD Tomography (OCT3) To Detect Changes In The Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Layer With Optic Nerve Damage Samson, C. Uveitis Clinical Registry Michael MD Ritch, Robert Functional And Structual Testing For Optic Nerve Disease MD Gentile, An Open-Label, Multicenter Extension Study To Evaluate The Ronald C. MD Safety And Tolerability Of Ranizumab In Subjects With Subfoveal Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV) Secondary To Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Who Have Completed The Treatment Phase Of A Genentech-Sponsored Ranizumab Study (FVF3426g) Latkany, Paul Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment Trial (MUST) MD Bertolucci, A Two Year Open Label, Randomized, Parallel Group, Blinded Alessandra Assessment Ophthalmologic Safety Study Of Pramipexole IR MD Versus Ropinirole In Early Parkinson?s Disease Patients (protocol #248.538) Rosen, A three year, phase 3, randomized, sham-controlled trial to Richard MD access the safety and efficacy of 700 uG and 350 uG Dexamethasone posterior segment drug delivery system (DEX PS DDS Applicator System) in the treatment of patients with diabetic macular edema. Rosen, A Natural History of Macular Telangectasia - The MActel Study Richard MD Samson, C. Immunotherapy for Treatment of Anterior Uveitis Michael MD Rosen, Diagnostic imaging using the AC cornea OCT Richard MD Sidoti, Paul Retinal nerve fiber layer imaging A. MD Rosen, Melatonin levels in macular degeneration Richard MD Rosen, Age-Related Eye Disease Study II (AREDS II): A Multi-Center, Richard MD Randomized Trial Of Lutein, Zeazanthin, And Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Docosahexaenoic Acid [DHA] And Eicosapentaenoic Acid [EPA]) In Age-Related Macular Degeneration Liebmann, Non-Invasive, Non-Contact Imaging of the Anterior Segment by Jeffrey MD Anterior Segment OCT Schantz, Diintholimethane (DIM): Anti-Proliferation Agent In Thyroid Stimson MD Disease ? Non-Surgical Protocol

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Sclafani, A Double-masked randomized, multicenter 2-arm parallel study Anthony MD comparing the safety and effectiveness of Aquamid and REstylane in the treatment of nasolabial folds Schantz, Connexin Protein Expression In Suspicious Thyroid Stimson MD Rosen, Comparison of the OTI Spectral OCT/SLO with The Nidek MP-1 Richard MD for Microperimetry Testing Samson, C. A DOUBLE-MASKED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, Michael MD PARALLEL-GROUP, MULTI-CENTER, DOSE-RANGING STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF LX211 AS THERAPY IN SUBJECTS WITH ACTIVE SIGHTTHREATENING, NON-INFECTIOUS INTERMEDIATE-, ANTERIOR AND INTERMEDIATE-, POSTERIOR-, OR PAN- UVEITISPROTOCOL LX211-01-UV Samson, C. A DOUBLE-MASKED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, MULTIMichael MD CENTER, PARALLELGROUP, DOSE-RANGING STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OFLX211 AS THERAPY IN SUBJECTS WITH CLINICALLY QUIESCENT SIGHT THREATENING, NON-INFECTIOUS, INTERMEDIATE-, ANTERIOR AND INTERMEDIATE-, POSTERIOR-, OR PAN- UVEITIS PROTOCOL LX211-02-UV Samson, C. A DOUBLE-MASKED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, Michael MD PARALLEL-GROUP, MULTICENTER, DOSE-RANGING STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFICACY AND SAFETYOF LX211 AS THERAPY IN SUBJECTS WITH ACTIVE SIGHT THREATENING, NON-INFECTIOUS ANTERIOR UVEITIS PROTOCOL LX211-03-UV Rosen, A Phase II Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Masked, PlaceboRichard MD Controlled, Dose-Comparison Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Fenretinide in the Treatment of Geographic Atrophy in Subjects With Age-Related Macular Degeneration Gentile, Intravitreal Ranibizumab or Triamcinolone Acetonide in Ronald C. MD Combination with Laser Photocoagulation for Diabetic Macular EdemaProtocol I Gentile, Intravitreal Ranibizumab or Triamcinolone Acetonide as Ronald C. MD Adjunctive Treatment to Panretinal Photocoagulation for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Gentile, Analysis of Cytokine, Chemokine, And Growth Factors in the Ronald C. MD Vitreous of Patients With Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Associated With Proliferative Vitereoretinopathy Liebmann, Efefct of Needle Bleb Revision with Ranibizumab as a Primary Jeffrey MD Intervention in a Failing Bleb Following Trabeculectomy Rosen, Emotional Social Understanding and Self-Efficacy Measures in Richard MD Type I and Insulin Dependent TypeII Diabetic Patients Pitman, FEESST Asessment of Swallowing Dysfunction and Sensory Micheal MD Deficit in Head and Neck Patients After Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Linstrom, Sudden SensorineuralHearing Loss Multicenter Treatment Trial Christopher MD Rosen, Serial retinal Thickness Changes And Scotoma Size Measured

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With Lucentis Therapy Measured Using The OCT Ophthalmoscope (OCT/SLO) And The Foresee Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter Gentile, A Phase III Double-Masked Muliticenter Randomized ShamRonald C. MD Controlled Study Of The Efficacy and Safety Of Ranibizumab Injection in Subjects With Clinically Significant Macular Edema With Center Involvement Secondary to Diabetes Mellitus Buxton, Multi-Center Placebo-Controlled Randomized Parallel Group Douglas MD Dose-Ranging Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of LX201 for Prevention of Corneal Allograft Rejection Episodes or Graft Failure Following Penetrating Keratoplasty with LX201 Inplantation in Subjects Who are at increased Immunological Risk Buxton, A Multicenter Placebo-Controlled Randomized Parallel Group Douglas MD Dose-Ranging Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of LX201 Implantation for the Prevention of Corneal Allograft Rejection Episodes or Graft Failure In Subjects Who have Experienced One Or More Rejection Episodes Following Penetrating Keratoplasty Rosen, *A Randomized, Double-Masked, Active Controlled Phase III Richard MD Study of the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Repeated Doses of Intravitreal VEGF Trap in Subjects with Neovascular AgeRelated Macular Degeneration - (VIEW 1) Park, Steven Minimally Invasive Genoglossus and Hyoid Advancement for MD Obstructive Sleep Apnea Using Sihouette Sutures: A pilot Study Rosen, A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Masked, Parallel-Assignment Richard MD Study of Intravitreal Bavsiranib Sodium,Administered Every 8 or 12 weeks as maintenance therapy Following Threee Injections of Lucentis COmpared With Lucentis Monotherapy Every 4 Weeks in PAtients With Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Rosen, Retinal Functional Imaging (RFI) for Evaluating the Vascular Richard MD Status of the Retina and Optic Nerve Ritch, Robert Unilateral Exfoliative Glaucoma: Comparing Functional Tests MD Using Short-Wavelength Automated Perimetry, Frequency Doubling Technology Perimetry and Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential Ritch, Robert In Vivo Three-Dimensional Confocal Laser Scanning MD Microscopy of Anterior Segment Structures Using the HRT II Rostock Cornea Module Gentile, Evaluation of the REproducibility of Electronic -ETDRS Visual Ronald C. MD Acuity Measurements in Eyes with Diabetic Macular Edema Stern, Jordan Use of the Oxiholter Device for Detection of Obstructive Sleep MD Apnea in the Unattended Home Environment Rosen, Weekly Vaccination with Copaxone as a potential Therapy for Richard MD Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration Samson, C. Protective Function of Estrogen in Recurrent Intraocular Michael MD Inflammation Samson, C. The Assessment of the Changes in the Amplitude of Michael MD Accommodation in Patients With Intraocular Inflammation Kim, Hae-Ok Quality of Life: Tai Chi Vestibular Rehabilitation Ana MD Gentile, A Randomized, Double-Mask, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-

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Ronald C. MD Response, Phase 2 Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Thymosin Beta 4 in the Treatment of Diabetic Patient's Corneal Wounds Resulting from Epithelial Debridement During Vitrectomy Pitman, Efficacy of Potasssium-Titanyl-Phosphate Laser Surgery for the Micheal MD Treatment of Reinke's Edema Sclafani, Pilot Evaluation of Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix (PRFM) for the Anthony MD Correction of Nasolobial Folds Sidoti, Paul Primary Tube Versus Trabeculectomy A. MD Sidoti, Paul Primary Tube Versus Trabeculectomy A. MD Ritch, Robert Curcumin in Exfoliaiton Syndrome MD Hoffman, *NEW TITLE: The MED-EL EAS (Electric-Acoustic System) Ronald MD using the PULSARCI100 FLEXeas / SONATATI100 FLEXeas and the DUET Speech Processor / PROTOCOL Version 6.0 Latkany, Paul The Vitreous Proteoma and Inflammatory Mediators in Ocular MD Inflammatory Disease Study (The Vitreome Study) Rosen, Diagnostic Imagiong Using the Spectral Anterior Segment Richard MD Optical Coherence Tomogograhy (Spectral AS-OCT) Rosen, Diagnostic Imagiong Using the Spectral Anterior Segment Richard MD Optical Coherence Tomogograhy (Spectral AS-OCT) Tejada, Elena Intraoperative Administration of the Medication Zofran Versus RN Administration of Combined Medications Zofran and Decadron in Managing Postoperative Nausea and/or Vomiting in Tonsillectomy and/or Adenoidectomy Pediatric Patients: A Noninferiority Trial Rosen, Anti-Glaucoma Therapy and Blood Flow in Peripapillary Retinal Richard MD Blood Vessels, Assessed by Retinal Functional Imager (RFI) Samson, C. An Open-Label Proof-of Concept Study to Assess the Effects of Michael MD Two AIN457 Doses (on day 1 and 22) in Patients With Noninfectious Uveitis Samson, C. An Open-Label Proof-of Concept Study to Assess the Effects of Michael MD Two AIN457 Doses (on day 1 and 22) in Patients With Noninfectious Uveitis Rosen, Comparison of Optical Density of Macular Pigments Between Richard MD Diabetic and Normal Patients Hoffman, Retrospective and Prospective Review of Patient Charts to Ronald MD Assess Benefit from Cochlear Implants Kupersmith, Proteomics and Genomics of Giant Cell Arteritis Mark MD Sislian, Effects of Matched and Mismatched Stimulation Rate on Speech Nicole MA, Perception and Localization of Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users CCC/A Ritch, Robert A New View at Normal Tension Glaucoma: Autoregulation and MD Systemic Blood Pressure Ritch, Robert Anterior Segment Imaging Using SL-OCT and UBM in PAtients MD Using Alpha-Adregergic Blcoking Agents Rosen, Comparison Between Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter and Richard MD Microperimetry Sensitivity in Detection and Evaluation of Macular Pathology in a Variety of Retinal Diseases

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Seiple, Eye Movement Training For Reading Rehabilitation William PhD Samson, C. A Prospcetive, Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Masked, Michael MD Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy Study of Four Iontophoretic Doses of Dexamehtasone Phosphate Ophthalmic Solution in Patients With Non-Infectious Acute Anterior Segment Uveitis Rosen, The Effect of Vinpocetine on Retinal Blood Flow, Assessed by Richard MD Retinal Functional Imager (RFI), in Patients with Diabetic Retinnopathy, Macular Degeneration, Glaucoma and Other Chronic Ocular Diseases Kedhar, Expression of Heme Oxygenase and Inflammatory and Sanjay MD Angiogenic Lipid Measures in Pterygia Ritch, Robert Correlation Between Intraocular Pressure, Ocular Pulse MD Amplitude and Blood Flow in Glacomatous Optic Neruopathy and Retinal Diseases Ritch, Robert Testing For LOXL-01 Polymorphisms in the Adult Children of MD Exfoliation Syndrome Patients Madhere, Safety and Efficacy of Injection Lipolysis in the Jowl Region Shirley MD Rosen, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ADVANCED GLYCATION Richard MD ENDPRODUCTS LEVELS IN AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION Kim, Hae-Ok A Controlled Clinical Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy Ana MD of the BrainPort Balance Device When USed to Improve Balance in Subjects with Vestibular Dysfunction Ilitchev, Elena Effect of Eyelid Gel Masks on Intraocular Pressure MD Ilitchev, Elena Effect of Sleep Masks on Intraocular Pressure MD Rosen, A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Richard MD Evaluate the Ocular Safety aof SCH530348 in Subjects Participating on the Schering-Plough P04737 Study (TRASMSecondary Prevention Ocular Safety Study) Protocol No. P05183 Ilitchev, Elena Analysis of Autoantibodies Against Human Optic Nerve MD Antigens in Patients with Pigmentary, Exfoliative and Normal Tension Glaucoma Ilitchev, Elena Water Drinking Test in Patients with Unilateral Exfoliation MD Syndrome Rosen, A Randomized, Placebo Controlled, Double-Masked, Multicenter Richard MD Trial of Microplasmin Intravitreal Injection for Non-Surgical Treatment of Focal Vitreomacular Adhesion Ritch, Robert Compassionate Use of Anecortave Acetate in Patients Who MD Require Glauocoma Filtration Surgery Rosen, Retinal Blood Flow Alteration Associated with Scleral Buckling Richard MD - A Functional Retinal Imaging Study Alexiades, An Open-Label Study To Assess The Efficacy Of FST200, A George MD Combination Povidone-Iodine 2.0% (w/w) / Dexamethasone 0.1% (w/w) Otic Suspension, In The Treatment Of Acute Otitis Externa Ritch, Robert INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE INFECTIOUS AGENTS MD ASSOCIATED WITH EXFOLIATION SYNDROME

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09.28

09.29 09.30 09.32

Rosen, Richard MD Hoffman, Ronald MD Samson, C. Michael MD Ritterband, A Randomized, Masked, Vehicle-Controlled Phase II Trial To David MD Assess The Efficacy Of 0.4% PVP-I / 0.1% Dexamethasone In The Treatment Of Acute Adenoviral Conjunctivitis Seiple, Sensory Substitution System for Blind Mobility William PhD Latkany, Paul Applicability of CCHIT scripts for ophthalmology MD Gentile, Comparison of Time Domain OCT and Spectral Domain OCT Ronald C. MD Retinal Thickness Measurement in Diabetic Macular Edema (Protocol O) Rosen, Usability Study NAVILAS?: A New Best Practices Richard MD Technological Advancement in Laser Photocoagulation Planning and Treatment Rosen, Biochemical Analysis of Mitochondrial Function in People with Richard MD Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Sclafani, Evaluation of the Mechanism of Action of Platelet Rich Fibrin Anthony MD Matrix (PRFM) in Producing Skin Volume Augmentation Gentile, A Pilot Study in Individuals with Center-Involved DME Ronald C. MD Undergoing Cataract Surgery (Protocol P) Hoffman, Inflammatory Mediators in Sudden Sennsorineural Hearing Ronald MD Loss/Autoimmune Hearing Loss Gentile, An Observational Study in Individuals with Diabetic Retinopathy Ronald C. MD without Center-Involved DME Undergoing Cataract Surgery (Protocol Q) Gentile, An Evaluation of Intravitreal Ranibizumab for Vitreous Ronald C. MD Hemorrhage Due to Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (Protocol N) Rosen, MD7110852, A Phase 2b Dose-Evaluation Study of Pazopanib Richard MD Eye Drops versus Ranibizumab Intravitreal Injections for theTreatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Tello, Celso COMPARISON BETWEEN TRABECULECTOMY WITH MD MYTOMCIN C AND BAERVELDT GLAUCOMA IMPLANT SURGERY IN THE SULCUS AS INITIAL SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF GLAUCOMA IN PSEUDOPHAKIC PATIENTS Rosen, Immunopathology and Molecular Pathology of Ocular Diseases Richard MD in Humans Rosen, Near-infrared Light (NIR) Therapy for Diabetic Macular Edema: Richard MD A Pilot Study Chen, Autologous Lymph Node Transfer: A Double-Blind Randomized Constance MD Controlled Clinical Trial

The Evaluation of the Frequency of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Associated Genes, Specifically the Complement Factor H Polymorphism Alleles Among White and Non-White Populations - CFH Study eyeGENETM - National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping Network Emergence of auditory, memory and cognitive skills in children with hearing loss Uveitis in Relation to Perceived Stress: A Prospective Analysis

135

09.33

09.36

09.37

09.38

93.01 96.00 96.20 97.11

98.19

99.20 99.22

Pitman, FEESST Assessment of Swallowing Dysfunction and Sensory Micheal MD Deficit in Head and Neck Patients After Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Rosen, Comparison of Macular Pigment Optical Density before and after Richard MD Oral Carotenoid Supplementation in Type 2 Diabetic Patients using Two-Wavelength Autofluorescence Imaging Banik, A Multicenter, Double-blind, Randomized,Placebo-controlled Rudrani MD Study of Weight-Reductionand/or Low Sodium Diet plus Acetazolamide vsDiet plus Placebo in Subjects with IdiopathicIntracranial Hypertension with Mild Visual LossIIHTT Study Rosen, An Open-label, Long-term, Safety and Tolerability Extension Richard MD Study of Intravitreal VEGF Trap-Eye in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration - Protocol VGFT-OD-0910 Liebmann, Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study Jeffrey MD Ritch, Robert Blood Studies of Hereditary Eye Diseases MD Liebmann, Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study Ancillary Investigation: Jeffrey MD Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy of the Optic Disc Gentile, Prophylactic Diode LAser Photocoagulation for the Prevention of Ronald C. MD Choroidal Neovascularization in Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) Savage, Pilot Studies of: 1) Fluorescence and Nonlinear Optical Methods Howard PhD to Investigate Normal and Tumor Tissues and 2) Laser Tissue Welding and Spectroscopy of Welded Tissues Chaglassian, McGhan Medical Corporation Slicone-Filled Breast Implant Ted MD Adjunct Clinical Study Sidoti, Paul Tube Versus Trabeculectomy (TVT) Study A. MD TERMINATIONS

Protocol 04.25 05.13

Principal Investigator Pitman, Micheal MD Tello, Celso MD

Protocol Title Motoneuron Activity in Patients With Neorological Disease

06.24 07.06

07.08

Randomized, controlled, multicenter comparative trial to evaluate for the SOLX Gold Shunt for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) in glaucomatous eyes following medical and conventional surgical treatments Ko, Anne MD Anterior Segment Tomographic Imaging of Post-Infectious Corneal Opacities Rosen, Richard A Phase II Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Masked, MD Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Comparison Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Fenretinide in the Treatment of Geographic Atrophy in Subjects With Age-Related Macular Degeneration Gentile, Intravitreal Ranibizumab or Triamcinolone Acetonide as Ronald C. MD Adjunctive Treatment to Panretinal Photocoagulation for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

136

Protocol 07.16

Principal Investigator Buxton, Douglas MD

Protocol Title

08.00 08.01 08.03 08.10

08.10

08.36

08.37 08.46 08.46 08.48

08.49 09.01

09.01

09.03

Multi-Center Placebo-Controlled Randomized Parallel Group Dose-Ranging Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of LX201 for Prevention of Corneal Allograft Rejection Episodes or Graft Failure Following Penetrating Keratoplasty with LX201 Inplantation in Subjects Who are at increased Immunological Risk Pitman, Efficacy of Potasssium-Titanyl-Phosphate Laser Surgery for Micheal MD the Treatment of Reinke's Edema Sclafani, Pilot Evaluation of Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix (PRFM) for Anthony MD the Correction of Nasolobial Folds Ritch, Robert Curcumin in Exfoliaiton Syndrome MD Tejada, Elena Intraoperative Administration of the Medication Zofran RN Versus Administration of Combined Medications Zofran and Decadron in Managing Postoperative Nausea and/or Vomiting in Tonsillectomy and/or Adenoidectomy Pediatric Patients: A Noninferiority Trial Tejada, Elena Intraoperative Administration of the Medication Zofran RN Versus Administration of Combined Medications Zofran and Decadron in Managing Postoperative Nausea and/or Vomiting in Tonsillectomy and/or Adenoidectomy Pediatric Patients: A Noninferiority Trial Kim, Hae-Ok A Controlled Clinical Study to Evaluate the Safety and Ana MD Efficacy of the BrainPort Balance Device When USed to Improve Balance in Subjects with Vestibular Dysfunction Schwartz, Lexical Access, Memory and Executive Function Richard PhD inChildren with Cochlear Implants Ilitchev, Elena Evaluation of Normal Subjects Without Glaucoma: MD Normative Genetic Blood Testing Study Ilitchev, Elena Evaluation of Normal Subjects Without Glaucoma: MD Normative Genetic Blood Testing Study Rosen, Richard A Randomized, Placebo Controlled, Double-Masked, MD Multicenter Trial of Microplasmin Intravitreal Injection for Non-Surgical Treatment of Focal Vitreomacular Adhesion Schwartz, Discrimination of Phonemes in Infants and Toddlers with Richard PhD Cochlear Implants Ritterband, An Open-Label Study To Assess The Efficacy Of A David MD Combination Povidone-Iodine 0.4% (w/w)/Dexamethasone 0.1% (w/w) Ophthalmic Suspension In The Treatment Of Acute Adenoviral Conjunctivitis Ritterband, An Open-Label Study To Assess The Efficacy Of A David MD Combination Povidone-Iodine 0.4% (w/w)/Dexamethasone 0.1% (w/w) Ophthalmic Suspension In The Treatment Of Acute Adenoviral Conjunctivitis Alexiades, An Open-Label Study To Assess The Efficacy Of FST200, George MD A Combination Povidone-Iodine 2.0% (w/w) / Dexamethasone 0.1% (w/w) Otic Suspension, In The Treatment Of Acute Otitis Externa

137

Protocol 09.08 09.09 09.12

Principal Investigator Hoffman, Ronald MD Hoffman, Ronald MD Samson, C. Michael MD

Protocol Title Emergence of auditory, memory and cognitive skills in children with hearing loss Development of Auditory Skills in Young Deaf Children with Bilateral Cochlear Implants THE RPS ADENO DETECTOR AND QUANTITATIVE PCR FOR MONITORING THE NATURAL PROGRESSION OF ADENOVIRUS VIRAL CONJUNCTIVITIS A Randomized, Masked, Vehicle-Controlled Phase II Trial To Assess The Efficacy Of 0.4% PVP-I / 0.1% Dexamethasone In The Treatment Of Acute Adenoviral Conjunctivitis A Pilot Study in Individuals with Center-Involved DME Undergoing Cataract Surgery (Protocol P) HEAD POSITION AND ENDOTHELIAL CELL LOSS IN PATIENTS WITH DRAINAGE DEVICES: IS THERE A RISK? A NEW METHOD TO ASSESS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DRAINAGE DEVICES AND ENDOTHELIAL INSULT Outcomes and Patient Experience After Soft Tissue Dermal Filler Injections Normal Ciliary Body, Iris, Sclera and Corneal Thickness Measurements by High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging (UBM) DE-SENSITIZATION TO ASPIRIN

09.13

Ritterband, David MD

09.20 09.21

Gentile, Ronald C. MD Ritch, Robert MD Ritch, Robert MD Sclafani, Anthony MD Finger, Paul MD

09.25

09.27 09.31

10.02 10.04 e-09.17

Sperber, Kirk MD Latkany, Moisture chamber goggle therapy for the treatment of dry Robert MD eye as a result of nocturnal lagophthalmos Rosen, Richard Pattern of treatment for Wet AMD and health outcomes of MD anti-VEGF therapy in ophthalmic clinics in the US: a medical chart review (PRACTICE)

Respectfully submitted,

Joseph B. Walsh, MD

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