Read Temple Times template text version

Undefeated!

Women's basketball 12-0 in conference play.

See page 3.

Research and solutions

New center aims to improve lives through policy.

See page 4.

Jazzed up

Temple University Hospital fine-tunes brain surgery.

See page 5.

www.temple.edu/temple_times

TEMPLE TIMES

February 22, 2007

Vol. 37, No. 21

SCT prof wins grant to explore copyright

By Hillel J. Hoffmann hillel.hoffmann@temple.edu

Out of

the dark

Eduard Schmieder's long, arduous journey has brought him from behind the Iron Curtain to the streets of North Philadelphia.

By Hillel J. Hoffmann hillel.hoffmann@temple.edu

Temple faculty member Renee Hobbs, one of the nation's leading experts on media literacy education, has received a $600,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to tackle one of the thorniest issues in her profession: In this age of burgeoning digital media and litigious intellectual property owners, how can educators effectively teach students how to analyze mass media without the threat of lawsuits every Hobbs time an image, audio clip or video clip is used in class? Hobbs -- director of Temple's Media Education Lab and an associate professor in the School of Communications and Theater's department of broadcasting, telecommunications and mass media -- will use the grant over the next two years to develop and distribute a "code of best practices" that reflects the emerging consensus among educators

Hobbs on page 5

Photo by Dana Ross Photography

As a violinist and conductor, Eduard Schmieder, the Boyer College of Music and Dance's new Laura H. Carnell Professor of Violin, has performed in some of the world's most prestigious concert halls. As an educator, he has been praised by the giants of his field, including Lord Yehudi Menuhin, who called him "one of the outstanding teachers of the violin today." Boyer Dean Robert T. Stroker said he "fosters and promotes the professional careers of the most talented string players around the world." Yet Schmieder's journey from youthful prodigy to beloved maestro and prized Temple faculty recruit has been long, at times lonely, and all too often cruel -- an experience that colors every aspect of his professional life. Schmieder was born in the Soviet Union in the city of Lvov (now L'viv, Ukraine), where he lived in a small apartment with his parents and grandparents. Raised in a family proud of their Jewish heritage

Schmieder on page 4

Announcement

Physics' Burkhardt named fellow Health System launches plan to balance budget of American Physical Society

To achieve a balanced budget in fiscal year 2008, Temple University Health System last week announced the implementation of a comprehensive Financial Remediation Plan that includes expense-reduction initiatives (including a reduction in work force) and revenue-enhancement measures. By the end of the fiscal year, TUHS will eliminate slightly more than 500 positions -- which represents 6 percent of its total work force of 8,000. Of the 500 positions eliminated, 350 employees will be displaced. The remaining 150 positions are vacancies. The work force reduction is the result of unrelenting financial pressures on the Health System -- including continued cuts to reimbursements, increasing costs for mandatory reporting and nonfunded mandates, and ever-escalating costs for medical malpractice. The Financial Remediation Plan is also the result of Temple's unique challenge of serving as the leading "safety net" provider in Philadelphia. During fiscal year 2006, TUHS provided $117.5 million in charity and under-reimbursed care -- and that level of uncompensated care contributed significantly to the Health System's reported financial loss. Included in the layoffs are those affected by program closures that will occur over time -- including the Maternal Child Health Program at Jeanes Hospital, the Adult Day Care Program at Northeastern Hospital, and the School of Nursing at TUH-Episcopal Campus.

TUHS on page 3

By Preston M. Moretz preston.moretz@temple.edu

Physics Professor Theodore W. Burkhardt has been named a 2006 fellow of the American Physical Society, the fifth Temple faculty member to be so honored in the past three years. The APS Fellowship program was created to recognize members who have made advances in knowledge through original research and publication, or have made significant and innovative contributions in the application of physics to science and technology. They may also be recognized for significant contributions to the teaching of physics or for service and participation in the activities of the society. Each year, no more than one-half of one percent of the thencurrent membership of the society is recognized by their peers for election to the status of fellow in the APS.

In selecting Burkhardt, the APS cited his "contributions to the theory of phase transitions at surfaces and interfaces, and his contributions to the statistical mechanics of polymers." A member of the Temple physics faculty since 1981, Burkhardt's primary research interest is the area of theoretical statistical physics. "My work on phase transitions is mainly concerned with the universal behavior at the surfaces and interfaces of materials undergoing phase transition," Burkhardt said. "The freezing and melting of a liquid are familiar phase transitions, but there are many other examples. For example, a magnet loses its magnetism above a certain temperature, and below a certain temperature, superconducting materials conduct electrical currents without friction." By 1960, he added, experiments had revealed that in a wide variety of phase transitions the same "univer-

Temple faculty named APS fellows

· Robert Levis, chemistry chair (2005) · Marjatta Lyyra, physics (2005) · Rongjia Tao, physics (2004) · Zein-Eddine Meziani, physics (2004) · Hai Lung-Dai, dean of the College of Science and Technology (1992, while at the University of Pennsylvania)

sal" mathematical description seems to apply. The theoretical explanation of this phenomenon came about 10 years later and earned a Nobel Prize for Kenneth G. Wilson of Cornell University. Burkhardt's other area of research activity involves polymers, which are long, flexible molecules that in solution constantly change form due to thermal agitation, analogous to

Burkhardt on page 6

Temple's weekly newspaper for the University community

Page 2

February 22, 2007

Bits&PCs

Ctrax music service to be discontinued

Computer Services was recently informed that Cdigix, the company that provides Temple's Ctrax music subscription service, will be closing its music business. The company will be shutting down Ctrax at the end of February. Computer Services is currently looking at alternative legal music downloading solutions for the Temple community and will announce any new developments.

N

Computer Services battles virus outbreak

By Alix Gerz alix.gerz@temple.edu

Tips for securing your computer

· Keep your computer's antivirus software updated · Swear off peer-to-peer file sharing · Turn on your computer's automatic Windows updates · Change your AccessNet password frequently · Never share your password · Never open an e-mail attachment from someone you don't know · Avoid sharing your e-mail address with unknown sources · Beware of phishing scams · Don't download IM files from unknown sources

Photo by iS tockPhoto

Creating groups in TUmail

If you frequently send the same message to more than one individual, consider taking advantage of the group feature in TUmail. When you create a group, you create a name for the group and select the addresses from your TUmail address book. Creating a group: 1. Log in to TUmail and click on Address Book on the TUmail menu. 2. Go to the top of the Contacts window, click on Groups and then click on Add Group. 3. In the Add/Edit Group window, enter a name for the group in the Group Name box and then click Set. 4. Next, press the Ctrl key while you select each name that you wish to include in the group, and then click on Add. 5. When you have finished adding the names, click on Done. Sending mail to a group: 1. Click on Compose and then click on Address Book. 2. At the top of the Contacts window, click on Groups. 3. To select the group, click in the To, Cc, or Bcc column to place a checkmark. 4. Finally, click on Compose, and then Compose again to begin writing your message to the group. For more information on using TUmail features, go to www.temple. edu/cs/tumail.

N

Remove flash drives safely

Flash drives are a convenient method for storing and saving files. These devices, which plug in to a USB port on your computer, also make it easy to back up files. It is important to keep in mind, however, that to safely remove the device from your computer, you must follow a specific process. Otherwise, you run the risk of corrupting files on the drive. For a PC: 1. Go to the System Tray at the bottom right corner of the screen and double-click on the Safely Remove Hardware icon. Note that this icon contains a green arrow. 2. At the Safely Remove Hardware window, highlight USB Mass Storage Device and then click on Stop. 3. At the Stop a Hardware device window, highlight the USB drive on your computer and click on OK. 4. The "Safe to Remove Hardware" message displays above the icon in the System Tray. You can then detach the flash drive safely from your computer and close the window. For a Mac: 1. Click on the icon for the flash drive. 2. Go to the File menu and select Eject. 3. When the light on the device stops flashing, you can safely remove the flash drive from your computer.

In a world full of Trojan horses, worms and other ominously named computer viruses, Temple has remained largely unaffected by their destructive powers. But on Jan. 27, Temple was hit with a zeroday outbreak, a set of viruses for which there is no existing protection. According to Jim Papacostas, director of the Help Desk and Technical Support, the zeroday outbreak was composed of Spybot and IRCbot viruses, which installed themselves on vulnerable Windows computers within Temple's network. Macintosh and Linux systems were not attacked by these viruses. "Infected computers sought out vulnerable systems with the goal of flooding the network with so much traffic that no one could access it," Papacostas explained. "It's known as a denial-of-service attack." On the evening of Jan. 27, an investigation into the cause of network sluggishness uncovered the virus outbreak. Members of the Computer Services staff immediately began working around to clock with Symantec Corp. -- the university's antivirus software provider -- to identify the virus and develop tools to stop and destroy it. In order to prevent the spread of the virus, Computer Services staff used all the network tools available to contain it until Symantec had a solution. Computer Services had effectively contained the virus by Feb. 2, but its effects were still strongly felt for another week. Students in Temple's residence halls were the most vulnerable to

"We cannot stress enough the seriousness of this outbreak. Zero-day outbreaks are difficult to contain. ... Please remember that your actions on our network may affect all users of our network. Security is everyone's responsibility."

Seth Shestack Acting chief information security officer

the attack; no faculty or staff computers were affected. Temple's residence halls are home to approximately 4,500 student computers; all told, nearly 1,700 students affected by the outbreak brought their infected systems for virus removal to Temple's Help Desk in the two weeks following the attacks. This situation created a tremendous surge for assistance from

Computer Services, which in response needed to deploy staff members from its various areas to assist the Help Desk staff meet the demand. The Help Desk team worked continuously, through the nights and on weekends, for two weeks with students to remediate their systems. In order to keep the network protected, all on campus users are required to upgrade their Symantec antivirus software to version 10.1.4.4000. To upgrade a computer, go to http://antivirus.temple. edu. Those who fail to upgrade their software will lose Internet access. "We cannot stress enough the seriousness of this outbreak. Zeroday outbreaks are difficult to contain," said Seth Shestack, acting chief information security officer. "Therefore, we need everyone to update their antivirus version, keep their definition files up to date, and make sure that the Windows Update feature is enabled. Please remember that your actions on our

Virus protection and Temple

Installing virus protection software on your computer is key to keeping it safe from outbreaks. Temple requires use of its free Symantec antivirus protection to on-campus users, available at http://antivirus. temple.edu. Temple students, faculty and staff can also purchase a Symantec AntiVirus CD for use in their home computers for $8. In addition, Computer Services is offering free Symantec upgrades for those who purchased Temple's antivirus CD for home use before the outbreak. To download the free upgrade, go to http://download. temple.edu. network may affect all users of our network. Security is everyone's responsibility." For more information on Temple University and computer security, visit www.temple.edu/cs/security. N

Announcement

Nominations sought for 2007 Academic Advising Awards

The Temple community is invited to nominate professional advisors, advising administrators and faculty advisors for the 2007 Academic Advising Awards, which recognize the major contribution of advisors and advising units to the Temple community. The universitywide nominating process opened on Feb. 14. Nominations, due by March 9, can be submitted by writing to AcademicAdvisingAwards@ temple.edu. Self-nominations are accepted. Nominees should be selected based on their contribution to the advising process, their personal help to advisees, their enhancement of advising skills and their understanding of advising in the context of Temple's policies. In the nomination, please include the following information: the nominee's name; Temple email address; campus mailing address; campus phone number; school, college or department; and title. Only advisors who work with undergraduates are eligible. After the three-week nomination period, nominees will be asked to develop a packet consisting of a professional statement and recommendations. A university selection committee will choose one awardee in each category (professional advisor, faculty advisor and academic advising administrator) to receive a plaque, a cash award and professional development funds during the coming academic year. Awards will be presented at the Advisor Appreciation Luncheon on May 3. The Academic Advising Awards are sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies. N

TEMPLE TIMES

www.temple.edu/temple_times February 22, 2007 Vol. 37, No. 21

Vice President: Associate Vice President: Director of Communications: Editor: Assistant Editor: Director, Health Sciences PR: Contributing Writers:

Stuart Sullivan stuart.sullivan@temple.edu Mark Eyerly mark.eyerly@temple.edu Ray Betzner rbetzner@temple.edu Betsy Winter Hall betsy.winter@temple.edu Kevin Gardner kevin.gardner@temple.edu Eryn Jelesiewicz eryn.dobeck@temple.edu Jazmyn Burton jazmyn.burton@temple.edu Denise Clay denise.clay@temple.edu James Duffy james.duffy@temple.edu Alix Gerz alix.gerz@temple.edu Hillel J. Hoffmann hillel.hoffmann@temple.edu Lisa Z. Meritz lisa.meritz@temple.edu Preston M. Moretz preston.moretz@temple.edu Anna Nguyen anna.nguyen@temple.edu Joseph V. Labolito joseph.labolito@temple.edu Ryan Brandenberg ryan.brandenberg@temple.edu Betsy Manning betsy.manning@temple.edu Cheryl Afonso cheryl.afonso@temple.edu Leslie Saunders times@temple.edu

For a complete beat list, visit www.temple.edu/news_media/staff.html. Contributing Photographers:

Temple Times Online: Calendar Editor:

Submit news to times@temple.edu and calendar items, at least two weeks in advance, to TUcalendar at http://calendar.temple.edu.

1601 N. Broad St. 302 University Services Building Temple ZIP #083-43 Philadelphia, PA 19122 Phone: 215-204-8963 Fax: 215-204-4403

Temple Times is published by Institutional Advancement each Thursday of the academic year.

TEMPLE TIMES

February 22, 2007

Page 3

Diversity discussed, celebrated at Temple

In workshops, guest lectures, special events and official recognitions, the university community has begun 2007 with a strong focus on one of Temple's core strengths -- diversity, in every sense of the word.

"You'll see the world walking about on the Temple campus. It's part of the signature here."

President Ann Weaver Hart Associated Press interview, Feb. 13

Diversity a focus in the classroom and on the field

Photo by Ryan S. Brandenberg/Temple University

Celebration of Color

Jeffrey Montague (left), assistant dean of the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, and Dick Englert, interim provost (right), join Vice President for Multicultural Affairs Rhonda Brown at the Celebration of Color reception held in the Student Center on Feb. 13. The purpose of the annual reception was to bring together the university's staff, faculty and administrators of color in an informal setting. About 30 percent of Temple University's full-time employees are people of color.

Photo by Joseph V. Labolito/Temple University

Promoting diversity in hospitality management

Gerry Fernandez (left), president of the Multicultural Foodservices and Hospitality Alliance, stands with Greg DeShields (center), director of industry relations for the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, and Jeffrey Montague, STHM assistant dean. Fernandez visited Temple recently as STHM's executive in residence and spoke to Montague's senior seminar class about the importance of diversity in the hospitality industry.

The Temple University Department of Intercollegiate Athletics recently hosted Keith Lee and Robert Weathers of the National Consortium for Academics and Sports to speak with athletic administrators and student athletes about the importance of diversity in college athletics. "The administrators and the student athletes addressed issues that transcended the usual diversity issues such as gender and race," Assistant Athletic Director Gary Bundy said. "We explored the need for sensitivity concerning issues that are often taboo to talk about. Homophobia, cultural differences and learning styles are topics that we wanted to confront. "Workshops such as this one allow Temple to continue to create an environment that is both diverse and inclusive," Bundy said. Earlier this year, the department, under the direction of Bill Bradshaw, received an "A" grade in the 2006 Football Hiring Report Card from the Black Coaches Association. Temple, which named Al Golden as head coach for the 2006 season, was one of four Division I-A schools to receive an "A" out of the 10 universities that hired new head football coaches last year.

-- Karen Shuey For the Temple Times

Photo by Joseph V. Labolito/Temple University

Senior guard Fatima Maddox eyes the rim as she drives toward the basket, avoiding the reach of a Saint Louis player during last week's final home game of the season at the Liacouras Center. The Colorado native scored nine points during the game to lead the Owls to a 74-64 win, improving their record to 21-5.

Owls drive toward NCAA tournament

By Karen Shuey For the Temple Times

For the past two years, Temple has been considered a sure bet to reach the NCAA women's tournament. With two games left in the Atlantic-10 Conference season, the hope for postseason play still hangs in the balance. So far, things look bright. After winning their 19th game in their last 21 outings Sunday against Charlotte, the Owls remain unbeaten in conference play at 12-0, and their overall record stands at 22-5. But the season's future will depend on more than just stats -- it will most likely come down to a showdown with unbeaten George Washington for the conference title. On Friday night, the Owls will take on Duquesne in Pittsburgh with

hopes that a victory will help build momentum for a very important game on Sunday against old rival George Washington. While the last two games are on the road, the highly anticipated battle at George Washington will be televised on CSTV, available on cable by request and also online through www.owlsports.com, at 2 p.m. If the Owls win their game against George Washington, they will clinch the regular-season conference title and earn a No. 1 seed in the Atlantic 10 tournament. And even if the team loses the conference tournament, it's possible -- even probable -- that Temple would be given an at-large bid, which would put the team into a pool, chosen by NCAA committee members, to be given a place in the tournament. N

Temple University Health System announces plan to balance budget

TUHS from page 1

"Clearly, this is a very challenging time for all of us at Temple University Health System," said Joseph W. "Chip" Marshall III, chairman and CEO of the Health System. "In the face of growing financial challenges, we needed to consider all necessary expense-reduction options. "For those valued employees whose positions have been eliminated, we are committed to assisting them through the transition process," Marshall continued. "Every effort will be made to redeploy affected employees into other appropriate jobs throughout the Health System and they will be given priority

consideration for re-hire when positions become available." University President Ann Weaver Hart said this was an important step for the Health System. "The Temple University Health System serves an essential role in education and research as the primary teaching sites for the Temple School of Medicine, while providing superior medical care to patients from all walks of life," Hart said. "The system must take steps to regain its financial health. "Where practical and feasible, we will work with the Health System to help employees who are losing their jobs, and we will absolutely continue the high quality of patient care and

"The Temple University Health System serves an essential role in education and research as the primary teaching sites for the Temple School of Medicine, while providing superior medical care to patients from all walks of life. The system must take steps to regain its financial health."

President Ann Weaver Hart

medical education and research that are synonymous with Temple," Hart said.

In addition to the position and program eliminations, TUHS earlier implemented significant cost-saving measures -- including the elimination of discretionary spending, restrictions on the use of agency/temporary labor and overtime hours, and adoption of a more stringent hiring-review process. The Health System also will continue to expand revenue opportunities by further improving its revenue cycle, maintaining focus on key clinical services, and enhancing its payer mix and case mix. "We have great pride in our past, and great expectations for our future," Marshall added. "We will continue to meet our patient-care and educational-support missions. And we will do so from a more robust financial platform." N

Temple's weekly newspaper for the University community

Page 4

February 22, 2007

Think tank aims to help black community

By Denise Clay denise.clay@temple.edu

Throughout its existence in this country, the African-American community has been the subject of various studies, many of them done by organizations with very little interest in creating policies that act on their conclusions. A new center created by the Department of African American Studies will produce studies on the community, as all think tanks do, but also will back those studies up with policy and possibly will create this community's next generation of political leaders. The Center for African American Research and Public Policy, located in Gladfelter Hall, will take an interdisciplinary approach, studying the impact of such things as economics, education, health and family life, and criminal justice on the black community, said Nathaniel Norment, codirector of the center and chair of the African American Studies Department in the College of Liberal Arts. The center will work with the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Philadelphia Alliance of Black Social Workers and the Delaware Valley Association of Black Psychologists. It's an idea that had been germinating for a long time, said Thaddeus Mathis, a professor of social work in the School of Social Administration and co-director of the center. "It took a year or two after all parties came to an agreement to work though the process," Mathis said. "Many of us involved in getting the center created wanted to use the research to help solve problems in the community." But to do something that ambitious requires money, and the African American Studies Department's budget wouldn't allow for creating a center. Enter Rep. Dwight Evans, Democratic chair of the House Appropriations Committee and candidate for mayor of Philadelphia. Evans, who had taught a course on "Blacks in Public Policy" for the African American Studies Department, liked the idea of the center enough to give those involved a $100,000 grant to get it started. What he liked most about the idea, Evans said, was how it might be able to ensure a place at the public policy table for African Americans. "I supported it because one of the things that I think is lacking, particularly in the African-American community, is a pipeline around public policy; sort of like a training ground," Evans said. Among the things planned by the researchers and staffers at the center is a Map of Black Philadelphia, which would detail how the city's black community is distributed, and an annual report, the State of Black Philadelphia, which would be disseminated to local policy-makers. N

Photo by Dana Ross Photography

iPalpiti, an orchestral ensemble conducted by Eduard Schmieder and made up of 26 prize-winning young professional musicians from more than 20 different countries, will perform in Philadelphia and New York City the first week of March.

Schmieder goes from USSR to TU

Schmieder from page 1

at a time when the open expression of such attitudes was not tolerated, a young Schmieder and his family fled to Soviet Central Asia in 1953 to avoid the last of Stalin's purges. There, in the Tajik city of Stalinabad (now Dushanbe), Schmieder found himself in an improbably vital community of intellectuals and musicians, many of whom had been prisoners in the Gulag. Stalinabad, he said, "was an island of the highest culture in the wild forest." His parents found a violin teacher, and Schmieder's artistry blossomed. So did his knowledge and love for Jewish culture, which he learned from his father, a Holocaust survivor and underground teacher of Jewish history, traditions and language. After auditioning for a famous Russian violinist who had stopped in Stalinabad while on tour, Schmieder was invited to live and learn in Leningrad (today's St. Petersburg) -- an opportunity too great to pass up, even though it meant traveling alone across a continent at age 13. He studied there for four years, seeing his family once or twice a year, before moving to Moscow, where he received his higher education, met his wife, Laura (also a violinist), fathered his first child, Hanna, and enjoyed a burgeoning career as one of the nation's finest young solo performers and instructors. Yet like many Jewish citizens, Schmieder entertained another dream: to leave the Soviet Union for Israel or the United States. Soviet authorities didn't trust him enough to let him travel to the West, where he could seek asylum. So in 1972, he applied for permission to emigrate, a risky move that made Schmieder and his family targets of official harassment for disloyalty to the state. For seven years, the family's application was denied or delayed -- a dark time full of mental and physical trials that Schmieder is reluctant to discuss. Finally their request was accepted in 1979. Although their luggage was sent to Israel, the Schmieders made an impulsive, last-minute decision to move to the United States. A sponsor family was found in Chicago, where Schmieder took freelance work wherever he could find it before eventually landing an academic position in Texas. Although his career since then has been stellar -- before Temple, he held a prestigious post as Jascha Heifetz's successor at the University of Southern California and a named professorship at Southern Methodist University -- Schmieder has never forgotten the hardships of his youth. He has dedicated his life to the teaching and mentorship of gifted young musicians, especially those who have had to overcome life's many obstacles.

Photo by Joseph V. Labolito/Temple University

Violinist and conductor Eduard Schmieder (left), the Boyer College of Music and Dance's new Laura H. Carnell Professor of Violin, has brought to Temple 10 promising young musicians, including Catharina Chen, who has performed as a soloist since the age of 8 and already has been accompanied by a number of professional orchestras.

That desire to reach talented and motivated students of all backgrounds was one of the factors that helped lure Schmieder to Temple. "During the last two decades, I have had the great fortune of teaching many young musicians from around the globe who have become leaders in the classical music world," Schmieder said. "Many of these young people suffered from a lack of resources -- they were gifted and hungry, but they needed support. I want to bring that legacy to Temple, where Dean Stroker, the Boyer College of Music and Dance, and the whole university have a tradition of both excellence and access. Our mission is shared." One of the fruits of Schmieder's commitment is Young Artists International, the organization he and his wife, Laura, founded in 1997 with the support of Lord Menuhin. Dedicated to the career development of exceptionally gifted musicians, YAI and the Schmieders launched iPalpiti, an orchestral ensemble conducted by Schmieder and made up of 26 prizewinning young professional musicians (four of whom have enrolled at Boyer, along with six other violin students who've followed Schmieder to Temple). A United Nations of musical prodigies, the ensemble's players come from more than 20 different countries and every imaginable background. Under Schmieder's direction, iPalpiti has presented more than 100 concerts around the world; 13 CDs of their live performances have been released on TELOS and YAI Records. The ensemble will make its Philadel-

Schmieder to perform in Philadelphia, Carnegie Hall

Eduard Schmieder will make his Philadelphia and New York debuts as a faculty member at Temple's Boyer College of Music and Dance when he conducts iPalpiti, his worldrenowned international ensemble, in the first week of March. iPalpiti will perform a "Jewels of Russia" program of Shostakovich (Prelude and Scherzo, Op. 11; and Piano Concerto No. 1 in C minor, Op. 35) and Tchaikovsky ("Serenade for Strings," Op. 48; and "Souvenir d'un lieu cher," Op. 42) at Congregation Rodeph Shalom's historic synagogue at 615 N. Broad St. in Philadelphia at 8 p.m. on Monday, March 5. The concert is free and open to the public. Two evenings later, on Wednesday, March 7, at 7:30 p.m., Schmieder and iPalpiti will perform the same program at Carnegie Hall's 599seat Zankel Hall stage in New York City. To buy tickets or obtain more information about this performance, go to www.carnegiehall.org. phia and Carnegie Hall debuts in early March (see box). "Young Artists International, iPalpiti and my new position at Temple are the manifestation of my desire to support the next generation," Schmieder said. "I want to give young artists hope. The future of classical music is in their hands." N

TEMPLE TIMES

February 22, 2007

Page 5

Gamma Knife makes brain surgery sound a bit better

Jazz musician Walter Bell was back on stage days after his treatment at Temple Hospital.

By Jordan Reese For Temple University Health System PR

The human brain may be the universe's most complex creation. It controls and regulates all human activity, from the involuntary processes of respiration and heart rate to the complexities of emotion and reason. But as singularly important as the human brain is to life, it is also singularly delicate. In the case of Walter Bell, dangerously so. In October 2004, a fragile mass of expanding blood vessels suddenly burst in his head, releasing blood into the brain. Bell suffered a stroke, the second-leading cause of death in the United States. But he was fortunate. The nationally renowned jazz flutist and West Philadelphia native, whose higher brain function helped him release 10 albums under his own record label, survived the bleed. But Bell still faced a frightening reality. He was not cured. The stroke only helped provide the diagnosis: a malformation in the cerebellum -- the region that controls balance, coordination and fine movements of the hands. What followed is an example of how Temple University Hospital clinicians -- and advanced technology -- are treating sometimes-deadly arterio-venous malformations (AVMs) without surgery and sending patients back to work in days, not months. Bell's stroke was caused by an AVM, abnormal blood vessels where arteries connect directly to veins, instead of properly supplying blood through the capillaries. For Bell, the stroke was mercifully just a very severe warning sign. He received immediate treatment, spending a month in recovery at a downtown hospital. But a follow-up embolization designed to stabilize the AVM dealt the world-class musi-

Photo courtesy Daniel Burke Photography

Chief Medical Physicist Harold Perera (left) and radiation oncologist Nicolas Kuritzky make Walter Bell comfortable in his head frame before treatment. The frame allows specialists to map the brain during imaging, and keeps the target -- a dangerous arterio-venous malformation -- immobile.

cian a severe blow to his motor skills, making it difficult to walk and impossible for him to play. Bell was concerned about more than just a return to form; the AVM remained a time bomb. But what do you do when you need surgery on the brain that took you to the Kimmel Center, to tours in the Americas and the Caribbean, and made you a teacher of black history and musicology? Bell looked for less-invasive ways to treat the AVM. Like the melody and harmony in a song, a delicate balance had to be struck between destroying the runaway vessels that threatened his life, and protecting the tissue that made his music, his memories and his very life possible. In September 2006, Bell came to Temple University Hospital. He'd seen the "Temple LifeLines" program on KYW-TV about the Temple Cancer Center, in which the benefits of Gamma Knife surgery were profiled. Gamma Knife is one way to treat AVMs and other malformations of the brain, particularly when the malformation is close to areas that cannot be harmed without impairing the patient. While embolization therapy is a common treatment, Gamma Knife surgery is the latest technique. "Being able to provide the very best for patients is a satisfying feeling," said Curtis Miyamoto, profes-

sor and chair of radiation oncology at the School of Medicine. "Now many patients who would have previously required brain surgery have the non-invasive option of the Gamma Knife at Temple." A team of specialists is required to successfully employ the Gamma Knife. It begins with an oncologist and a neurosurgeon, in this case Miyamoto and Michael Weaver, a neurosurgeon with experience in the use of the Gamma Knife. They assured Bell this was the right step, and convinced him that even a Dec. 15 treatment date wouldn't keep him from playing on Dec. 17, his late mother's birthday -- a gig he'd never missed. The Gamma Knife is not a knife at all, but rather an instrument that harnesses 201 cobalt-60 sources into precise beams of ionizing radiation. For AVMs, the beams are directed into the malformation, where they damage the DNA of the cells. Gamma Knife specialists spend hours and multiple examinations ensuring that the gamma irradiation is guided to the proper target. During treatment, all 201 beams pass through hair, skin and bone to intersect at a single point within the brain, leaving neighboring tissue unharmed. The radiation damages the tangle of vessels, forming scar tissue that eventually clogs and seals off the vessels. When Temple acquired the Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife 4C in the fall

Photo courtesy Daniel Burke Photography

Less than 48 hours after Gamma Knife surgery, Walter Bell is playing with his band, the Latin Jazz Unit.

of 2005, only 15 existed in the nation. Today, more than 100 total Gamma Knives are in operation, but few have the targeting capability of new models like Temple's. Once Bell arrived at TUH, Jungyoon Ro, a registered nurse, walked him through the procedure. First, a lightweight aluminum frame was placed on his head to prevent movement during the procedure. The frame also acted as a map during the imaging process. When the goal is to leave normal tissue out of harm's way, precise brain imaging is required. The frame provides a map "around" Bell's head, labeled with precise coordinates that showed up on subsequent angiograms, MRIs or CT scans. Bell's final scans provided clinicians with the remainder of the information they needed to confirm the radiation dosage and location of the malformation. The information was then locked into the computer as Bell's personal treatment plan. Bell was treated with 17 bursts of

gamma radiation. Clinicians watched him on two separate cameras while the musician listened to his music through the hourlong procedure. Two hours after the procedure, Bell was discharged. He will now return to Temple periodically to ensure that the runaway blood vessels are shrinking. Once they are completely closed, he can return to his normal life without the fear of having another stroke from the AVM. In fact, two days after surgery, Bell led his usual Sunday morning "gig" -- playing for a crowd at a local waterfront restaurant on Penn's Landing. Patrons, friends and family listened to Bell's jazz quartet and were noticeably impressed when Bell revealed that he was playing less than 48 hours after brain surgery. "It wasn't just the technology that led me to Temple," he said, "but the way everyone made me feel. I knew I could trust Temple." N

SCT's Hobbs receives grant to study issues in media rights

Hobbs from page 1

concerning the application of fair use and copyright clearance to media literacy education. Without such a document, Hobbs said, educators' and students' ability to use common teaching tools such as editing segments of television shows or adding voiceover to video clips will be increasingly paralyzed by the fear of cease-and-desist letters from lawyers. Statements of best practices have been used as powerful tools by other professional communities who use media in their work, such as documentary filmmakers. By establishing principles of fair use -- the notion that users have rights to use copyrighted material depending on

the purpose of their work and other factors -- documentary filmmakers have been able to reduce crippling restrictions, such as having to pay for the rights to use the copyrightprotected song "Happy Birthday" if it had been captured during the filming of a birthday party. "Like documentary filmmakers, art historians, DJs and artists, media literacy educators also use media to do our work," said Hobbs, author of the recent book Reading the Media (see box). "By developing our own statement of best practices, we will empower educators and students with the recognition that copyright law protects us, too." With the recent explosion of media-sharing Web sites such as YouTube.com and new creative

forms such as video mash-ups and audio sampling, Hobbs said the need for clarity and consensus among media literacy educators is more urgent than ever. "In this age of user-generated content," Hobbs said, "the goal is balancing the needs of the creators and the users." Hobbs and her collaborators, Pat Aufderheide and Peter Jaszi of American University, will first conduct research on challenges faced by media literacy educators. Then, after working with media literacy professional organizations to develop consensus, Hobbs and her colleagues will draft a statement of best practices and conduct outreach and publicity efforts to maxiN mize its use.

A case study in high school media literacy

American teenagers consume a bewilderingly broad diet of mass media -- television, popular music, film and a growing menu of new digital media -- a fact that presents challenges for high school English teachers who are trying to teach students to read well, reason and write clearly. In her new book, Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English (Teachers College Press), Renee Hobbs chronicles one high school's attempt to teach students how to analyze contemporary media culture as a means to strengthen critical thinking and literacy skills. Using qualitative and quantitative approaches to explore the impact of incorporating media literacy into curricula, she documents dramatic results: Students at Concord High School in New Hampshire significantly improved their reading comprehension, writing, critical analysis, motivation and citizenship skills.

Temple's weekly newspaper for the University community

Page 6

February 22, 2007

StudyVolunteers

The Temple Lung Center is looking for heavy smokers and ex-heavy smokers 40 to 80 years old for a medical study to understand why only some smokers develop lung disease. Study participants perform a breathing test, give a blood sample (2 Tbsp.), and receive $20 compensation for 20 approximately minutes of their time. To find out if you can participate in this research study, call the Temple Lung Center study office at 215-707-1359. Visit www.templehealth.org/pulmonary for more information about the Lung Center and its clinical trials.

Calls for Temple research participants are published the last Thursday of every month. For information on how have your study included, contact Eryn Jelesiewicz, director of Health Sciences PR, at eryn.dobeck@temple.edu.

Research

Discovery advances understanding of molecular processes in cells

A new discovery by Temple's Dale Haines and Natalia Shcherbik advances our knowledge of basic cell biology and leads scientists to a better understanding of molecular processes that occur within the cell. Haines, an associate professor of biochemistry at the Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology at the School of Medicine and senior author of the study, and Shcherbik, a postdoctoral fellow, recently had their work published in the Feb. 9 issue of the highly prestigious journal Molecular Cell. "We were able to show a novel molecular process by which protein-protein interactions are controlled at the cell membrane," Haines said. Specifically, Haines and Shcherbik demonstrated, using unique biochemical approaches, that protein interactions are disrupted by a protein tag termed poly-ubiquitin and a separase complex called Cdc48/p97. This is important because the expression of Cdc48/p97 is known to be perturbed in human diseases such as Paget's Disease and cancer. A better molecular understanding of this separase complex could lead to new therapeutic approaches. "Like any discovery of this nature, it is very important to determine the universality of this mechanism and if it is perturbed in human disease," Haines said. "These are areas of active investigation in the laboratory. Considering the abundance of Cdc48p/p97 [estimated to represent 1 percent of total protein in the cell], we feel that this activity will impinge on a large number of cellular processes." The Haines laboratory receives funding for this project from the National Institutes of Health and the Fels Research Foundation.

-- Eryn Jelesiewicz

IntheMedia

Feb. 18: Associated Press. As she prepares for her inauguration, Temple President Ann Weaver Hart is thinking less about being the university's first female president and more about raising standards while keeping Temple accessible to a broad group of students. "You'll see the world walking about on the Temple campus," she told AP reporter Kathy Matheson. "It's part of the signature here." Feb. 18: Daily News. WRTI's Bob Perkins will be honored by the City of Philadelphia and the state House of Representatives tomorrow for a lifetime of promoting jazz radio. Feb. 16: Associated Press/Philadelphia Inquirer. Ancient Americans where cultivating chili peppers more than 6,000 years ago, according to new research based on microfossils being studied at Temple. Anthony Ranere, an anthropologist at Temple, excavated an early agriculture site in Panama known as Aguadulce in the 1970s, he said, "long before anyone knew you could recover the microfossils." After starch grains were identified on stone tools that had lain around his lab for years, Ranere headed back to Panama in 1997 to collect more examples.

For more Temple news mentions, visit In the Media online at www.temple.edu/ news_media/in_news.html.

Announcement

Daylight savings change may cause problems

For the first time in 20 years, Daylight Saving Time will be extended by four weeks. In 2005, Congress passed this energy-savings measure, which is designed to take advantage of early evening daylight, in hopes of translating sunlight into savings. DST will now begin the second Sunday in March (Mar. 11) and end the first Sunday in November (Nov. 7). In addition to the standard practice of changing your clocks, it is important to recognize that this new time frame may affect many devices that process or manipulate dates and times. These devices include your computer and some software applications (especially calendar programs), as well as cell phones, PDAs, VCRs and fax machines. Many computers and devices are set to automatically adjust to DST. If these settings are based on the old DST period, you will need to make adjustments for the new extended DST. These adjustments are particularly critical for calendars and scheduling functions or any resources that use a time or date stamp. To get ready for the extended DST, keep in mind the following recommendations from Computer Services: 1. Apply software patches as they are released. To make things easier, turn on automatic Windows Update so you will be notified when new patches are ready. Also, be aware that there may be patches for PDA devices. For example, Blackberry will supply a universal patch through its web site within the coming weeks. 2. Pay close attention to your time/date-sensitive resources. Calendar programs in particular will need special attention since they may be greatly affected by the extended DST. 3. Take extra measures when scheduling calendar events, particularly if you are using Microsoft Outlook. Some of the patches released to accommodate the extended DST may cause confusion and result in meeting times being listed incorrectly in your calendar. Computer Services will continue to test and evaluate the impact that the extended DST will have on university resources, and will share information through e-mail and also through a special Daylight Saving Time web site at www.temple.edu/cs/dst. The web site features updates on popular resources used at the university, such as Microsoft Windows and Outlook. For further information about DST, contact the Help Desk at 215204-8000 or help@temple.edu. N

Awards&Achievements

On Feb. 14, Antonio Giordano, director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine and director of the Center for Biotechnology in the College of Science and Technology, received the 2007 Saint Valentine Prize in Terni, Italy, the home of St. Valentine. In the summer of 2006, Giordano founded the Human Health Foundation, a nonprofit group based in Umbria, Italy, which will fund laboratories across Europe. Moshe Porat, dean of The Fox School of Business, was honored in January at a dinner given by Lubavitch of Bucks County. Porat was honored for his leadership at The Fox School of Business. In January, graduate students from the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management and The Fox School of Business competed in Houston at the 12th annual Graduate Education and Graduate Student Research Conference in Hospitality and Tourism. Two papers written by Temple students were selected among the five best out of 266 competing submissions from all over the world. The selected papers were "Strategic Group Analysis of Destination Management Organizations: A Study of the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Region," written by Tanvi Kothari, and "Designing a Performance Measurement for Tourism Organizations: The Case of SMART-Elkhart," written by Zheng Xiang, Florian Zach, Tanvi Kothari and Todd Alexander. The students were under the guidance of Daniel Fesenmaier, a professor at STHM.

Burkhardt named Temple's 5th APS fellow in 3 years

Burkhardt from page 1

ResearchNotes

Presentations

Sheri Stahler, associate vice president, and Gerald Hinkle, director, both of Computer Sciences, gave a presentation titled "From Labs to Collaborative Spaces: Development of Temple University's TECH Center" at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference of Educause, held Jan. 16­19 in Baltimore. Michael Jackson, a sports and recreation management professor at the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, was the featured photographer in January at an exhibit at the Lemuria Gallery in Manayunk, Philadelphia. The exhibit, "Living in an Image: 4" x 6" View of Africa," displayed some of the original photographs Jackson captured during a trip to Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia in September. The trip was part of an effort to find ways to increase tourism in the region while conserving area resources.

Grants

Renee Hobbs of the School of Communication and Theater has received a two-year, $600,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for her project titled "Copyright and Fair Use for Media Literacy." (See story, page 1.)

Publications

Simon Hakim, Andrew Buck and Erwin Blackstone, economics professors at The Fox School of Business, published an article titled "Funding the Local War on Terror" in the first-quarter 2007 issue of the Milken Institute Review.

Temple staff and faculty: We want to hear from you! Submit your new presentations, publications, grants and awards to Temple Times editor Betsy Winter at betsy.winter@temple.edu.

the motion of a strand of limp spaghetti in boiling water. "Another Nobel Prize winner, P.G. de Gennes, showed that in analyzing the statistics of polymers in solution, one can use the same mathematical methods as for phase transitions," Burkhardt said. "I have studied the theoretical behavior of polymers near planar surfaces or polymers confined in narrow channels. Some of the results have been used in interpreting recent experiments on DNA, the polymer that plays such a prominent role in biology." Before coming to Temple, Burkhardt, who earned his bachelor's degree in physics at Vanderbilt University and his master's and doctorate from Stanford University, spent four years as an assistant professor at Lincoln University and worked for 13 years at institutes for basic research in France and Germany. "Temple had developed a dis-

"Temple had developed a distinguished reputation for research on phase transitions following the addition of Professor Melville S. Green to the physics faculty, as well as some other key appointments beginning in the late 1960s. That is one of the main reasons I was attracted to Temple."

Theodore W. Burkhardt Professor of physics

tinguished reputation for research on phase transitions following the addition of Professor Melville S. Green to the physics faculty, as well as some other key appointments beginning in the late 1960s," he said. "That is one of the main reasons I was attracted to Temple." Burkhardt is currently spending

six months of a yearlong sabbatical at the Research Center Juelich in Germany, working in a group focused on soft matter and biological physics. In addition to his research at Temple, Burkhardt has taught 17 different courses, ranging from introductory courses for non-science majors to advanced graduate courses in physics. He has received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching while at Lincoln University and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award for U.S. senior scientists. Burkhardt is the fifth Temple faculty member in the past three years to be elected a fellow of APS. He joins chemistry chair Robert Levis (2005) and physics Professors Marjatta Lyyra (2005), Rongjia Tao (2004) and Zein-Eddine Meziani (2004). College of Science and Technology Dean Hai Lung-Dai is also a fellow of the APS, having been elected in 1992 while on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. N

TEMPLE TIMES

February 22, 2007

Page 7

TUcalendar

Continued from page 8 215-204-7600. Sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

This Week's Scores

Women's Tennis Feb. 12: Temple 7, Lehigh 0 Feb. 17: Temple 6, NJIT 1 Men's Tennis Feb. 17: Richmond 5, Temple 2 Feb. 18: Temple 5, Rhode Island 1 Men's Basketball (11-14, 5-7 A-10) Feb. 14: La Salle 77, Temple 72 Feb. 17: George Washington 84, Temple 72 Women's Basketball (22-5, 12-0 A-10) Feb. 12: Temple 68, La Salle 55 Feb. 15: Temple 74, Saint Louis 64 Feb. 18: Temple 72, Charlotte 55 Baseball Feb. 16: UNC Wilmington 5, Temple 4 Feb. 17: UNC Wilmington 7, Temple 4 Feb. 18: UNC Wilmington 15, Temple 3 Softball Feb. 16: Middle Tennessee State 12, Temple 11 Feb. 16: Arizona 9, Temple 1 Feb. 17: Virginia 11, Temple 8 Feb. 17: Texas Tech 10, Temple 2 Women's Track Feb. 17: Eighth of 12 at Atlantic 10 Championship Men's Track Feb. 17: Eighth of 10 at Atlantic 10 Championship Men's Gymnastics Feb. 17: Temple 187.75, MIT 179.6 Feb. 18: Temple 202.950, Springfield College 187.700 Women's Gymnastics Feb. 17: Fourth of six at Towson Invitational

Temple University's Nursing Program. Learn about the program, admissions requirements, study tips and more. For more information, contact Donesha Locklear-Hood at Locklear@temple.edu. Sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center.

sented by Michael Autieri, assistant professor of physiology, Temple University School of Medicine. For more information, e-mail Cathy Spiotta at cspiotta@ temple.edu. Sponsored by the Thrombosis Research Center in the School of Medicine.

your self-image is self-destructive and find out how to get help. For more information, contact Rosa Kim at 215-2047276. Sponsored by Tuttleman Counseling Services.

ON SALE AT THE LIACOURAS CENTER

Tickets available at the Liacouras Center box office (cash only), online at www. liacourascenter.com or by calling 888OWLS-TIX.

Men's gymnastics vs. Army and UIC

7:30 p.m. McGonigle Hall.

TLC Seminar Series: "Gen Ed Focus"

3­4:30 p.m. TECH Center, room 107. Facilitated by Terry Halbert, Department of Legal Studies in Business and director of General Education. Faculty and teaching assistants only. Registration required. For more information or to register, visit www.temple.edu/tlc or call 215-204-8761. Sponsored by the Teaching and Learning Center.

Campaigns and Elections Speaker Series: "The Plurality Formula and Electoral Fractionalization: Implications of the Canadian Case"

1:30 p.m. Gladfelter Hall, Russell Weigley Lounge, room 914. Professor Richard Johnston, University of Pennsylvania, answers two questions: Why have the procedures for elections in Canada not resulted in a two-party system, as they have in the United States and most countries with similar procedures? Why has Canadian government been dominated by a party of the center? For more information, contact the Institute for Public Affairs at ipa@temple.edu, or visit www.temple.edu/ipa. Sponsored by the Institute for Public Affairs.

My Chemical Romance

Feb. 25. $30.25. My Chemical Romance and the Black Parade with Rise Against. Students can purchase discount tickets for $15 with student OWLcard at the Student Center Cinema box office.

M.F.A. Dance Concert featuring Jumatatu Poe and Noemi Segarra

8 p.m. Conwell Dance Theater, Conwell Hall, fifth floor. Tickets $10 general admission; $8 students and senior citizens; free for students with OWLcard. Tickets available at the Liacouras Center box office (cash only), online at www. liacourascenter.com or by phone at 1-888OWLS-TIX. Part of the Conwell Dance Theater's 2006­07 season.

Inspiration Fest featuring Hezekiah Walker

March 3. $29.50­$49.50. Featuring Hezekiah and the Love Fellowship.

Stomp the Step Show

March 10. $22­$27. Featuring Greek and non-Greek steppers.

"Serious Subjects (and Verbs): Intensive Workshops on Grammar and Punctuation (Part Two)"

4 p.m. Tuttleman Learning Center, room 201D. A workshop reviewing rules for grammar and punctuation. Students only. Registration required. To register, visit www.temple.edu/writingctr/workshops/ incenter_reservations.htm. For more information, contact Dan Gallagher at dagallag@temple.edu. Sponsored by the University Writing Center.

The Harlem Globetrotters

March 10. $15­$102. The most loved and recognized sports team in the world, the Globetrotters bring their "Nothing Like It" tour to the Liacouras Center.

SUNDAY, Feb. 25 AAAI cycling certification

9 a.m.­5 p.m. IBC Student Recreation Center, room 204. $99 plus materials. Registration required. For more information or to register, call 609-397-2139. Sponsored by Campus Recreation.

"Man to Man"

4 p.m. 1700 N. Broad St., room 208. An open discussion about issues concerning men. Facilitator: Jay Sellers, tutorial coordinator, and John King, counselor. One of the daily workshops sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center. For more information, call 215-204-1252, or visit www.temple.edu/rcc.

Sesame Street Live

March 15­18. $14­$40. Teaching lessons of healthy habits through song and dance, your favorite Sesame Street friends will explore exercise, nutrition, sleep, energy and hygiene.

Men's gymnastics: Temple Boys Invite: Session 4

9:30 a.m. McGonigle Hall.

"Woman to Woman"

4 p.m. Student Center, room 200B. An open discussion about issues concerning women. Facilitator: Donesha Locklear, counseling coordinator. One of the daily workshops sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center. For more information, call 215-204-1252, or visit www.temple. edu/rcc.

Jamie Foxx

March 24. $51.75­$97.25. Part of a 30-city national arena and theater tour that showcases Foxx performing songs from his hit album Unpredictable. His performance will be a combination of songs and comedy.

Women's lacrosse vs. Penn

4 p.m. Geasey Field.

Women's lacrosse vs. Virginia

1 p.m. Geasey Field.

Men's basketball vs. Dayton

7 p.m. Liacouras Center. Individual tickets: $10-$35. Tickets are available at the Liacouras Center Box Office, 1776 N. Broad St. (in person cash-only sales), online at www.liacourascenter.com, or by telephone at 1-800-298-4200.

Women's basketball at George Washington

2 p.m. Broadcast: CSTV and 1210 AM WPHT.

MAIN CAMPUS CINEMA SERIES

Student Center Cinema (the Reel). $2 with OWLcard; $4 all others. Show times: Mon.­Wed.: 7:30 p.m. Thu.: 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. Fri.­Sat.: 4:30, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. Sun.: 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Visit www.temple.edu/sac/studact/ thereel.htm for more information.

"From Taboo to Icon: Images of the Black Body"

5:30­8:30 p.m. Tuttleman Learning Center, room 105. The second symposium in a three-part series to explore modern and contemporary art from the perspective of African influences and voices. For more information, e-mail Maureen Gordon at mgordon@temple.edu. Sponsored by the Art History Department in the Tyler School of Art.

Men's gymnastics: Temple Boys Invite: Session 5

2:30 p.m. McGonigle Hall.

Temple University Singers and Women's Chorus

7:30 p.m. Rock Hall auditorium. Jeffrey Cornelius and Tram Sparks, conductors. For more information, visit www.temple. edu/boyer or call 215-204-7600. Sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Temple University Concert Choir

4 p.m. St. John Lutheran Church, 1802 Skippack Pike, Center Square, Pa. Alan Harler, conductor. For more information, visit www.temple.edu/boyer or call 215204-7600. Sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

"Stranger Than Fiction"

Feb. 22.

Exploring Leadership Series: "Challenging the Process"

6 p.m. Student Center, room 217CD. Presented by Marie Amey-Taylor, director of Human Resources. The Exploring Leadership Series features interactive workshops that offer students an opportunity to examine each of the five leadership principles in depth. Students attending this event earn five Diamond Points toward their LeaderShape applications. No leadership experience required. For more information, contact Marianne Croft at lead@temple.edu, or visit www. temple.edu/studentleadershipchallenge/ exploringleadershipschedule.htm. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Students.

"Happy Feet"

Feb. 23­March 1.

Guest artist recital

7:30 p.m. Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1700 W. Montgomery Ave., Philadelphia. Robin Rimbaud and guests. Featuring Robin Rimbaud's new work, The Order of Things. For more information, visit www.temple.edu/boyer or call 215-204-7600. Sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Deadline to register: "A Field Guide to GenBank and NCBI Molecular Biology Resources"

Event held March 15. Lecture: 9 a.m.­noon, Ritter Hall Annex, Kiva Auditorium. Computer workshops: 1:30­3:30 p.m. or 3:45­5:45 p.m., Paley Library, room 130. Temple University Libraries and the National Center for Biotechnology Information present a lecture and hands-on computer workshop on GenBank and related databases covering effective use of the Entrez databases and search service, the BLAST similarity search engine, genome data and related resources. Registration required. To register, visit http://library.temple.edu/services/ forms/ncbi. For more information, contact Katherine Szigeti at 215-204-4725 or kszigeti@temple.edu. Sponsored by Temple University Libraries.

REGIONAL ALUMNI EVENTS

For more alumni events, visit www. temple.edu/alumni_friends.

"Lack of Time Management Anonymous"

This workshop is located on the web at www.temple.edu/rcc/workshops. Make plans to include time for all aspects of your life. One of the daily workshops sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center. For more information, or for additional group and individual tutorial services, contact the Russell Conwell Center at 215204-1252, or visit www.temple.edu/rcc.

School of Communications and Theater alumni brunch and men's basketball game

Saturday, Feb. 24. Brunch: 11:30 a.m., Annenberg Hall. Temple vs. Charlotte: 2 p.m. Adults $25; children $15. To register online, visit www.temple.edu/alumni_ friends, click on Alumni Events and click on the link to the reservation form, which can be found in the Feb. 24 listing. For more information, contact Jane Moses at 215-204-1384 or jane.moses@temple.edu.

My Chemical Romance

7:30 p.m. Liacouras Center. My Chemical Romance and the Black Parade with Rise Against. Tickets: $30.25. Tickets available at the Liacouras Center Box Office (cash only), online at www.liacourascenter.com or by calling 800-298-4200. For more information, call Fran Rodowicz, general manager, at 215-204-2400. Discount tickets are available for students at the Student Center Cinema box office: $15 with OWLcard.

TUESDAY, Feb. 27 "Getting Articles Published: Ins, Outs and Ethics"

11 a.m.­12:30 p.m. Anderson Hall, sixth floor, Religion Department Lounge. Nancy Krody, managing editor of the Journal of Ecumenical Studies housed here at Temple, presents tips for graduate students on getting articles published in scholarly journals. Krody draws on her thirty-plus years of experience to address how to go about making submissions, how to maximize your chances of acceptance, questions about submitting to multiple journals, and other topics of interest to participants. For more information, e-mail Amy Weigand at aweigand@temple.edu. Sponsored by the Religion Department.

Information session: City Year

6­7:30 p.m. Tuttleman Learning Center, room 300AB. City Year corps members from Temple University discuss their experiences in community service. Students only. For more information, call Career Development Services at 215-2047981. Sponsored by Career Development Services.

College of Engineering alumni lunch and men's basketball event

Saturday, Feb. 24. Lunch: Noon. Engineering and Architecture Building. Temple vs. Charlotte: 2 p.m. Liacouras Center. For more information, contact Cheryl Sharp at 215-204-9609 or csharp@temple.edu.

Deadline to register: Music Prep: Emergency repair/maintenance for brass (rotor/slides) instruments

Event held March 3, 8:30 a.m.­4:30 p.m. Temple University Center City. A hands-on class. Cost: $120 includes materials. Discount available for those enrolling in this and the April 14 workshop. Registration required. For more information or to register, call 215-204-1512, e-mail musicprep@ temple.edu, or visit www.temple.edu/boyer/ musicprep. Sponsored by the Music Preparatory and Enrichment Program of the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Deadline to register: George Washington Carver Science Fair judges

Fair held March 6, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. McGonigle Hall. The George Washington Carver Science Fair needs judges for the annual fair for seventh-through-12th graders. To volunteer as a judge, fill out an online registration form at www.temple. edu/carversciencefair, or e-mail Kathleen Fadigan at kfadigan@temple.edu. Sponsored by the College of Engineering.

Temple Young Alumni 2007 kickoff happy hour

Thursday, March 1. 5:30­8 p.m. World Café Live, 3025 Walnut St., Philadelphia. Open to all Temple Young Alumni. Free appetizers from 6­7 p.m. E-mail your full name, class year and school to Marena Ariffin at mariffin@temple.edu.

Guest artists recital: Momenta Quartet

7:30 p.m. Rock Hall auditorium. Featuring Beethoven's String Quartet in F Major (Op. 135) alongside works by Boyer College students Michael Galgansky, Merissa Martignoni, Richard McIntyre and James Falconi. For more information, visit www.temple.edu/boyer or call 215-2047600. Sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

List your events

If you would like your Universitysponsored event included in the TUcalendar, fill out the "Submit an Event" form at http://calendar. temple.edu. All submissions must be received at least two weeks prior to the event.

MONDAY, Feb. 26 Nursing student panel

3­4 p.m. Student Center, room 217A. An open panel discussion with students from

Health Sciences Center: Thrombosis Research Seminar Series: "The Role of Inflammatory Proteins in Vascular Proliferative Diseases"

Noon­1 p.m. Health Sciences Center, Kresge Science Hall, lecture room C. Pre-

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28 Body image and eating attitudes screening day

10 a.m.­4 p.m. Tuttleman Learning Center, lobby. Take a free screening to see if

Early bird workout rewards end

IBC Student Recreation Center. Campus Recreation access required. For more information, call 215-204-1267, or visit www.temple.edu/campusrec. Sponsored by Campus Recreation.

Temple's weekly newspaper for the University community

Page 8

February 22, 2007 ter lobby. Meet representatives from the Walt Disney Co., and hear about the internships that the company offers. For more information, call Career Development Services at 215-204-7981. Sponsored by Career Development Services.

TUcalendar

ONGOING Tyler Annual Exhibition

Peer advisor information session

1:10­2 p.m. 1810 Liacouras Walk, Academic Resource Center, room 101. Learn about being a peer advisor in the Academic Resource Center from a professional adviser and current peer advisers. Students only. For more information, e-mail Lisa Brooks at ldbrooks@temple.edu. Sponsored by University Studies.

`Taboo to Icon'

Events Feb. 22 to Feb. 28

All events free unless otherwise noted. For the most up-to-date listings, visit the TUcalendar at http://calendar. temple.edu.

"Work-Study and Other Financial Aid Opportunities"

10:10­11 a.m. 1810 Liacouras Walk, Academic Resource Center, room 101. A review of work-study and other financial aid opportunities. Students only. For more information, e-mail Lisa Brooks at ldbrooks@temple.edu. Sponsored by University Studies.

Through Feb. 24. Tyler School of Art, Tyler Gallery in Tyler Hall; Penrose Gallery in Penrose Hall. Work by Tyler students in all media selected by Tyler professors. Sponsored by the Exhibitions and Public Programs Department in the Tyler School of Art. N

"Boyz n the Hood"

2:30­5 p.m. 1700 N. Broad St., room 208. Film by John Singleton. A look at internal struggles within the African-American community. Facilitator: El-Java Abdul Qadir and James Sellers, counseling and tutorial coordinators. Refreshments served. One of the daily workshops sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center. For more information, or additional group and individual tutorial services, call 215204-1252, or visit www.temple.edu/rcc.

"Washboard Stomach," C-print, 2000, by Debra Willis

"Citizenship and the Urban Environment"

11:45 a.m.­1 p.m. Gladfelter Hall, 10th floor, CHAT lounge. Presented by Shelley Wilcox, Philosophy Department and CHAT Faculty Fellow. For more information, e-mail the Center for the Humanities at humanities@temple.edu, or visit www.temple.edu/humanities/CHATs/index. htm. Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities in the College of Liberal Arts.

Early bird workout rewards

Through Feb. 28. IBC Student Recreation Center. Campus Recreation access required. For more information, call 215204-1267, or visit www.temple.edu/campusrec. Sponsored by Campus Recreation. N

Study-abroad opportunities

2:40­3:30 p.m. 1810 Liacouras Walk, Academic Resource Center, room 101. Learn about various study abroad programs and hear study abroad alumni talk about their experiences. Students only. For more information, e-mail Lisa Brooks at ldbrooks@temple.edu. Sponsored by University Studies.

Temple University Rome: "Body and Mind"

Through March 2. Temple University Rome, Gallery of Art, Lungotevere Arnaldo da Brescia 15. Antony Gormley and Oliviero Rainaldi, best known as sculptors and creators of sculptural installations, present a selection of recent drawings, using different materials and techniques that reveal their interests in the body and space. Curated by James Putnam. Sponsored by Temple University Rome.

Information session: Non-Temple study abroad programs and scholarships

Noon. Tuttleman Learning Center, room 200. Learn about studying abroad on nonTemple programs. Scholarship information will also be provided. For more information, contact International Programs at study.abroad@temple.edu or 215-204-0720, or visit www.temple.edu/studyabroad. Sponsored by International Programs.

Health Sciences Center: Clinical and Translational Research Conference: "Stem Cell Research: Basic Science and Clinical Implications"

4­5 p.m. Health Sciences Center, Temple University Hospital, Rock Pavilion, first floor, Erny Auditorium. Presented by Steve Houser, Cardiovascular Research Center; Ausim Azizi, Neurology Department; and Mahender Macha, Cardiothoracic Surgery Section, Surgery Department. A multidisciplinary conference and workshop with the goal of publicizing current research and stimulating further clinical and translational multidisciplinary research at Temple. Refreshments provided. For more information, contact Henry Parkman at 215-707-7579. Sponsored by the School of Medicine.

To cap off Black History Month, the Art History Department in the Tyler School of Art presents a symposium on artists who are reflecting on entrenched racial constructs and shifting attitudes in popular culture and contemporary art. "From Taboo to Icon: Images of the Black Body" is the second in a three-part series to explore modern and contemporary art from the perspective of African influences and voices. Susanna Gold, lecturer in art history, will moderate the panel, which includes experts from New York University, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Brandywine Workshop. For more information, e-mail Maureen Gordon at mgordon@ temple.edu or visit www.temple.edu/tyler. When: Feb 27, 2007 5:30­8:30 p.m. Where: Tuttleman Learning Center, room 105

Become familiar with Career Development Services. Learn how to discover potential careers and get firsthand experience. Students only. For more information, e-mail Lisa Brooks at ldbrooks@temple.edu. Sponsored by University Studies.

THURSDAY, Feb. 22 NIRSA National Recreational Sports & Fitness Day: IBC "Strength Test"

6:30 a.m.­midnight. IBC Student Recreation Center. Trio of events: Abdominal curls, bench press and leg press. Top male and female patrons with the highest number of repetitions from each category win a T-shirt. Campus Recreation access required. For more information, call 215204-1267, or visit www.temple.edu/campusrec. Sponsored by Campus Recreation.

Off-campus living fair

Noon.­2 p.m. Student Center atrium. For more information, e-mail Lisa Prestileo at lisa.prestileo@temple.edu. Sponsored by University Housing and Residential Life.

Application deadline: Summer conference positions

Spend the summer, from May through August 2007, living and working on campus. The summer conference program brings many groups, institutes, camps and individuals to stay on campus throughout the summer. Employment package includes living in an assigned residence hall, limited meal plan and salary. To apply, visit www.temple.edu/summerconference. For more information, contact Lisa Prestileo at lisa.prestileo@temple.edu. Sponsored by the Office of University Housing and Residential Life.

"10 Ways to Do Scholarly Research in Your Pajamas"

1­2 p.m. TECH Center, Green Lab, room 205A. Temple University Libraries offer thousands of online resources and services. Join a Temple University librarian to learn how to make the library come to you. Takeout menu provided. For more information, call Susan Golding at 215204-3842. Sponsored by Temple University Libraries.

Math review session

12:40­1:30 p.m. 1700 N. Broad St., room 204. Ask questions and get extra help in math review sessions. Math 55: 12:40­1:30 p.m. One of the daily workshops sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center. For more information, or additional group and individual tutorial services, call 215-204-1252, or visit www. temple.edu/rcc.

The Walt Disney Co. information table

10 a.m.­2 p.m. Tuttleman Learning Cen-

Tyler School of Art: "Learning from Learners: Being Open to Possibility and Dialogue"

4 p.m. Tyler School of Art, President's Hall, room 102. Lecture presentation given by Judith M. Burton, professor and director of art and art education at Columbia University Teachers College. For more information, call 215-204-7191. Sponsored by the Art and Art Education Department, Tyler Student Services and Tyler School of Art.

SATURDAY, Feb. 24 Tyler annual exhibition closing day

Tyler School of Art, Tyler Gallery in Tyler Hall; Penrose Gallery in Penrose Hall. Work by Tyler students in all media selected by Tyler professors. Sponsored by the Exhibitions and Public Programs Department in the Tyler School of Art.

Be a science fair judge

Faculty and guest artists recital

7:30 p.m. Rock Hall auditorium. Jeffrey Solow, cello, and others. Featuring works by Bach and Handel arranged for solo cello accompanied by string quartet, oboe and harpsichord. For more information, visit www.temple.edu/boyer or call 215204-7600. Sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

"Employee to Entrepreneur"

6­8 p.m. 1510 Cecil B. Moore Ave. This seminar features some of the issues you will face if you decide to leave a career as an employee to create a new career as an entrepreneur. Cost: $10. Registration required. For more information or to register, e-mail the SBDC at sbtrain@temple.edu. Sponsored by the Small Business Development Center.

Men's gymnastics: Temple Boys Invite: Session 2

9:30 a.m. McGonigle Hall.

M.F.A. Dance Concert featuring Jumatatu Poe and Noemi Segarra

8 p.m. Conwell Dance Theater, Conwell Hall, fifth floor. Tickets $10 general admission; $8 students and senior citizens; free for students with OWLcard. Tickets available at the Liacouras Center box office (cash only), online at www. liacourascenter.com or by phone at 1-888OWLS-TIX. Part of the Conwell Dance Theater's 2006­07 season.

Men's basketball vs. Charlotte

2 p.m. Liacouras Center. Broadcast: CSN and 1210 AM WPHT. Individual tickets: $10­$35. Tickets are available at the Liacouras Center box office, 1776 N. Broad St. (in-person, cash-only sales), online at www.liacourascenter.com, or by telephone at 1-800-298-4200. Today's special promotion: The Owl Club Auction. Patrons have the opportunity to bid on sports memorabilia, exciting trips, restaurant certificates and more.

Men's basketball at Saint Joseph's

Photo by Ryan S. Brandenberg/Temple University

Keyshamar Correa (at right), a student at the Philadelphia Military Academy at Elverson, listens intently as Temple electrical and computer engineering professor and judge John Helferty (left) discusses her project during last year's George Washington Carver Science Fair. Looking on is Uche Ofoegbu, a doctoral student in electrical and computer engineering at Temple, who also served as a judge at the fair.

8 p.m. Broadcast: CSTV and 1210 AM WPHT.

Information session: The Walt Disney Co.

Times: 2­4 p.m. and 5­7 p.m. Ritter Hall Annex, Kiva Auditorium. Meet representatives from the Walt Disney Co., and hear about the internships that the company offers. Temple students who participated in the Disney internship program will also be at the information session. Students only. For more information, call Career Development Services at 215-204-7981. Sponsored by Career Development Services.

"Free Food and Fun Fridays"

10 p.m. Student Center atrium. '90s trivia night. For more information, e-mail Kim Moores at kimoores@temple.edu, or visit www.temple.edu/sac. Sponsored by Student Activities.

Help encourage Philadelphia seventh- through 12th-graders to pursue academic achievement and careers in science by being a judge for the annual George Washington Carver Science Fair. This year's fair will be held March 6, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., in McGonigle Hall. To volunteer as a judge, fill out an online registration form at www.temple.edu/carversciencefair, or e-mail Kathleen Fadigan at kfadigan@temple.edu, by Feb. 25. The Carver Fair is jointly sponsored by Temple University, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the School District of Philadelphia, and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It is open to all students in grades four through 12 who attend Philadelphia County public, charter, parochial and private schools, as well as to home-schooled students residing in the county.

Men's gymnastics: Temple Boys Invite: Session 3

2:30 p.m. McGonigle Hall.

Men's tennis vs. NJIT

4 p.m. Arthur Ashe Tennis Club.

"10 Traps that Prevent Successful Study"

This workshop is located on the web at www.temple.edu/rcc/workshops. A look at some of the pitfalls that could interfere with your study plans. One of the daily workshops sponsored by the Russell Conwell Center. For more information, call 215-204-1252, or visit www.temple.edu/rcc.

Guest artist recital

7:30 p.m. Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1700 W. Montgomery Ave., Philadelphia. Robin Rimbaud and guests. Featuring Robin Rimbaud's new work, The Order of Things. For more information, visit www.temple.edu/boyer or call Continued on page 7

FRIDAY, Feb. 23 "Making `Major' Decisions? Use Career Development Services"

10:40­11:30 a.m. Mitten Hall, second floor, Career Development Services.

TEMPLE TIMES

Information

Temple Times template

8 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

1118058


Notice: fwrite(): send of 197 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531