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DEKALB COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2006-2007

___ Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) District Wide Accreditation ___ Georgia Department of Education Annual School Improvement Plan ___ AYP NI School Improvement (Title I and Non-Title I) ___ Corrective Action (Addendum to 05-06 School Improvement Plan) ___ Restructuring (Addendum to 05-06 School Improvement Plan) ___ Title I ___ New Title I Schoolwide Plan ___ 5-Year Renewal Schoolwide Plan ___ Annual Addendum (Addendum Number ___) ___ Targeted Assisted Plan Required for all DeKalb Schools

DOE Mandate Required for all DeKalb Schools Due September 29, 2006. NI, Corrective, and Restructuring Plans must be implemented in same year written with a 2-year plan required. Due September 29, 2006

Required for all Title I DeKalb Schools New Schoolwide Plans and 5-Year Plans requires a stakeholder survey and an intensive year-long research and planning process. Due March 2, 2006 Five-Year School wide Plan Due March 2007 Required for all DeKalb High Schools Reflects HSTW Key Practices Required for all DeKalb Schools (PL Budget located in CSIP Appendix) Required for all DeKalb Schools

___ High Schools That Work (HSTW) Plan ___ Professional Learning Plan ___ Library/Media Plan

Quality Assurance: Includes alignment to Federally Mandated "No Child Left Behind" guidelines, Georgia Department of Education regulations, Georgia School Standards, SACS Accreditation Standards, HSTW Key Practices School: _____Lakeside High School________________________________________________

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Statement of Assurance

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization; Student, Family, and Community Support SACS Standards: 2 and 10 HSTW: High Expectations and Culture of Continuous Improvement

To assure that the principal, his/her Area Assistant Superintendent, and the appropriate district level personnel have a common understanding regarding the School Improvement Planning Process, and that the Plan is appropriately reviewed prior to its approval, each party is asked to carefully review this section and, by his or her signature on this page, attest to the fact that he or she carefully reviewed the planning process and the School Improvement Plan, and believes that the proposed strategies and processes are based on best practices that are known to be effective, when implemented effectively. Assurance is provided that the Improvement Planning Team consists of a variety of representative stakeholders including parents, community members, school staff persons (e.g., teachers, principals, and assistant principals), business leaders, students and central office representatives and that the overarching organizational structure and leadership roles facilitated effective and sustained involvement of all staff members throughout the school improvement process. Both parties also agree that the Plan is comprehensive in nature and simultaneously addresses (a) the need to immediately begin the process of improving the quality of teaching in every classroom, and (b) the longer-term issue of building a culture that supports high expectations for student achievement.

I hereby certify that, to the best of my knowledge, the information contained in the attached Schoolwide Program Plan is correct and complete and addresses all components required under Federal and State law, policy and regulation, and that all specified assurances have been and/or will be met within the operating period of this plan.

Principal's Signature: Area Assistant Superintendent's Signature: Department of Curriculum and Instruction Director Office of School Improvement Coordinator: Office of School Improvement Executive Director: Department of Assessment & Accountability Executive Director: Department of Special Education Executive Director Department of English Language Learners Director

Date: Date: Date: Date: Date: Date: Date: Date:

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Sections 1 2 3 4

Table of Contents School Achievement Planning Process........................................................................................ 5 School Improvement Support ..................................................................................................... 12 Leadership and Governance....................................................................................................... 13 School System Mission and Vision ............................................................................................ 15 A. School Mission and Vision ......................................................................................... 16

5 6 7 8

School Improvement Plan Review.............................................................................................. 18 Developing a Comprehensive Needs Assessment ...................................................................... 21 Scientifically Based Research..................................................................................................... 36 Reading/English/Language Arts Action Plan ........................................................................... 39 A. Mathematics Action Plan ........................................................................................... 40 B. Science Action Plan .................................................................................................... 41 C. Social Studies Action Plan.......................................................................................... 44 D. HSTW Action Plan ................................................................................................... .24 E. Attendance/Graduation Action Plan .......................................................................... 25 F. Special Education Action Plan ................................................................................... 26 G. Library/Media Action Plan ­ Goal 1 .......................................................................... 27 H. Library/Media Action Plan ­ Goal 2 .......................................................................... 28

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Table of Contents...continue 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Professional Learning for 2006-2007 ........................................................................................ 53 School Culture/Climate .............................................................................................................. 54 Teacher Involvement in Decisions Regarding the Use of Academic Assessments .................. 56 Stakeholder Communication ...................................................................................................... 58 Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers ................................................................................. 60 Support for Classroom Teachers................................................................................................ 61 Focusing Daily Lessons to Meet Student Needs........................................................................ 62 Differentiated Instruction to Respond to Identified Student Needs ......................................... 64 Providing Students with Effective, Timely Additional Assistance to Meet Student Needs...... 68 Support Services for Student Learning..................................................................................... 70 Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement ............................................................................. 73 Plans for Assisting Children During Transitions...................................................................... 74 Financial Resources ................................................................................................................... 77 Coordination and Integration of Federal, State, and Local Services and Programs .............. 78 Physical Resources...................................................................................................................... 79 Bibliography ................................................................................................................................ 81

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School Achievement Planning Process

Establishing a School Improvement Team (SIT) and subcommittees

The principal assures that the SIT is representative of all stakeholders. The SIT and subcommittees are responsible for the development, the on-going monitoring, and implementation of the CSIP. The SIT will make necessary revisions to the Plan, collect evidence files for Quality Assurance and perform the End-of-Year Review of the school's success in implementing the Consolidated School Improvement Plan. The SIT is comprised by the members of all Subcommittees.

Subcommittee: VISION and MISSION

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Keith Kidd Mary Scot Ashley Blackwood Sidney Sider Gloria Stephens Mai Moffitt Joan Weiss Cheryl Powell Marina Costarides Sharon Matthews

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: DATA COLLECTION

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Kim Baldonado Bill Harris Deborah Davis Eric McArdle Keisha Hanson

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

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Subcommittee: RESEARCH

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Jennifer Meredith Adrienne Keathley Valerie Paige James Perrotta

Names

James Lavender

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: CONTENT ACTION PLAN (Reading/ELA)

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Susan Ricks Mary Beth Smith Donnie Borden La'Monica Nettles

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: CONTENT ACTION PLAN (Math)

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Troyce Brown Holland Miller

Names

Anthony Stinson

Signatures

Position/Role

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Subcommittee: CONTENT ACTION PLAN (Science)

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Sheila Asher Nancy Brim Kathy Switzer Annette Parrott Monica Baker-Eady Michael Pasterik Dan Key

Names

Gregory Hendrix

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: CONTENT ACTION PLAN (Social Studies)

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Bill Newsome Larry Pierce Jean Carter Sandra Scott Daryl Fleming Candace Hinchey Michael Fitch Diane Meah

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

7

Subcommittee: CONTENT ACTION PLAN (Advanced Academics)

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Barbara Johnson Kathleen Morawetz Susan Staggs Jennifer Schultz Garry Saltmarsh Rick Barbe Talya Salus

Names

Tracy Anderson

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: SCHOOL CULTURE/SCHOOL-WIDE DISCIPLINE

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Ron Volz Mary Giambruno Laurenti Patton Terrance Banks Anne Arancio David Fairchild

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

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Subcommittee: PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PLC)

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Kymberly Nash Chris Kern Gloria Sanders Erin Richardson Tammie Ross Randy Bole Syrena Rainey Carolyn Stephens King Brenda Scott

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: FACILITIES

Participants Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member

Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member

Names Chuck Cass Nancy Ulbricht Angela Thompson Rosemarie Sapp

Pam McKee Aneesah Ali Janice Crawford Ava Spinks

Signatures

Position/Role

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Subcommittee: LIBRARY/MEDIA

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Peggy Aiken Miriam Martin

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: ATTENDANCE/GRADUATION RATE

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Cheryl Bloom Misty Bradley Yatta Collins Yolanda McKinney Sharlee Dunnavant

Names

Signatures

Position/Role

Subcommittee: SPECIAL EDUCATION

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Sharon Johnson Wanda Mahfuz Brittney Dewey Debbie Hartzell Richard Couture

Names

Colleen Johnson

Signatures

Position/Role

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Subcommittee: WRITING AND EDITING

Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Nancy Zarvosky Henri deVastey Terry Krugman Margaret Hyman

Names

Nancy Zarovsky

Signatures

Position/Role

Parent Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member

Names

Pam Mason Northsworthy Kim Creviston Barbara Bowman

Signatures

Subcommittee

Community Participants

Chairperson Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Mark Woodworth Michael Reeves

Names

Signatures

Subcommittee

Student Advisory

Committee Member Committee Member Committee Member Stewart Bohan

Names

Lauren Levin

Signatures

Grade

Whitney Hancock

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School Improvement Support

DeKalb County School System Department of Curriculum and Instruction Gloria Talley, Deputy Superintendent Dr. Wanda Gilliard, Associate Superintendent

DeKalb County School System Department of School Administration Frankie Callaway, Senior Associate Superintendent

DeKalb County School System Office of School Improvement Dr. Audria Berry, Executive Director

DeKalb County School System Department of Assessment and Accountability Anthony Eitel, Executive Director

Title I Technical Assistance School Support Team Title I NCLB Mandate Southeastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE)

Region 5 Georgia Department of Education State Leadership Facilitators Barbara Leutz [email protected]

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Leadership and Governance

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Leadership, Assessment, and Planning and Organization; SACS Standard 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 5, 10; HSTW: Culture of Continuous Improvement

Write a brief narrative for each question describing your perception of this school's status. Describe the school's overall strengths and opportunities for improvement.

Lakeside's greatest strength lies in the diversity of its student body. Within the community of world citizens Lakeside has provided a learning environment conducive to academic rigor. The implementation of the High Schools That Work improvement model expanded Lakeside's workbased learning program and addresses the needs of its increasingly diverse student body. In addition, HSTW increases the participation of area businesses and employers in the educational mission of the school. Academic performance on standardized performance instruments continues to be a hallmark of Lakeside. SAT scores are at their highest level in school history, and Newsweek Magazine ranks Lakeside as the highestranked high school in the state of Georgia in its 2005-2006 listing. Community growth is driven by parent desire to gain admission to Lakeside High School for arriving students. Data important in supporting Lakeside's strengths include standardized test results, Georgia State Report Card data, Newsweek Magazine's listing of America's 1,000 Best High Schools, rising real estate values in the community, and college and university admissions data for graduating seniors from Lakeside. The greatest areas of potential improvement, as identified by HSTW survey and Technical Assistance Visitation interviews include offering a challenging, student-centered curriculum and engaging students in learning throughout the entire school. Achievement gaps continue to be a challenge to close. Graduation tests results show that while our white population excels at ninety-nine percent and ninety-five percent in English Language Arts and Math, respectively, our racial subgroups are lower in the same areas. 2005-2006 Georgia High School Graduation Test results show that in English Language Arts, ninety-three percent of African Americans, eighty-five percent of Hispanics, and ninety-one percent of Asians met or exceeded the standard. In math, the gap is even more significant for African-Americans and Hispanics. Only seventy-three percent of African-Americans and sixty-seven percent of Hispanics met or exceeded the standard. Asians fared much better, however, meeting or exceeding standards in math by ninety-three percent. Our Lower English Proficiency (LEP) and Economically Disadvantaged (ED) groups tell an even more startling story. Only sixty-four percent of our LEP subgroup met or exceeded standards in English Language Arts and forty-four percent met standards in math. Eighty-six percent of our ED subgroup met or exceeded standards in English Language Arts and sixty-five percent met standards in math. Finally, comparison for each of these subgroups by year showed a rapid decline in performance from the 2004-2005 school year. The Hispanic subgroup experienced a ten percentage point decrease in English Language Arts while the LEP subgroup dropped thirty points in the same area from 2004-2005 to 2005-2006. In math, African-Americans decreased twenty whole percentage points. Hispanics dropped twenty-four percentage points. Lower English Proficiency students dropped forty-seven percentage points and the Economically Disadvantaged group dropped twenty-eight percentage points. It may be worth mentioning that in September of the 2005-2006 school year, 13

Lakeside High School was one of the designated receiving schools for the districts No Child Left Behind failing schools. There was also an influx of displaced students from the gulf coast as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Each of these instances may have impacted student performance that year. Lakeside High School is aware of its challenges, however, and prepared to meet them with the resources that are allotted to the school. Our population of Students with Disabilities (SWD) did not sufficient numbers to compose a subgroup. In analyzing the data of first time GHSGT participants, we see it was administered to a total of 23 SWD students. Of these one was Hispanic, seven were African American and fifteen were white. Of the seven African Americans, four passed and three did not. Our Hispanic student passed all four parts as did our white students. A Complete implementation of a structured advisement/counseling program is important in order to improve transition performance for ninth grade students. A challenge to all implementations for improvement includes constant student growth throughout the year, impacting team planning in ninth grade, and impacting maximum class sizes. Growth in the ESOL population at Lakeside offers an opportunity to improve instruction for language-acquisition students in all areas of the curriculum. Career-technical offerings and program development offers an additional opportunity to meet student needs for non-college-prep students. Professional development for teachers in using research-based strategies and in studentcentered instruction will further enhance the opportunities for all Lakeside students.

Describe the current governance structure/decision-making process of the school.

Lakeside operates under a shared-decision making model. Each academic department within the school has a department chairperson sitting on the leadership team with administration, and a very active school council meets regularly in addition to a similarly active PTSA body. Decisions are reached in consensus among involved stakeholders where possible.

Describe the procedures used for schoolwide planning and organization based on data and scientifically-based research.

The school improvement team consists of every faculty member in the school. Department chairs and other identified school leaders are asked to chair committees upon which they have expertise. Each committee is given scheduled time during Wednesday faculty meetings to address specific areas of concern. One teacher is the named to chair the overall school improvement team. That person reports to the administration on a regular basis. Overall, decisions that are made for the school are based on data from standardized results as well as surveys from parents, students, and teachers. Finally, the administration uses the board adopted High Schools That Work framework as a baseline for planning all instructional practices for the year.

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School System Mission and Vision

Quality Assurance: SACS Standard: 1.1, 1.2 Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization HSTW: High Expectations, Guidance and Advisement, and Culture of Continuous Improvement

MISSION The mission of the DeKalb County School System is to form a collaborative effort between home and school that maximizes students' social and academic potential, preparing them to compete in a global society.

VISION "Premier DeKalb Schools ­ Setting the standard for Excellence through unity and purpose" VALUES · · · · ·

Value and promote parent involvement Regard quality public education as essential Honor universal human rights Contribute to the common good of our community Hold high expectations for ALL

PARAMETERS · · ·

Educationally sound Philosophy based Fiscally responsible

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES · · · · ·

Improve student achievement Ensure quality personnel Provide a risk free learning environment Create financial stability Increase the effectiveness of educational programs

STRATEGIC ACTIONS · · · · ·

Define and communicate priorities Establish curricula Improve all instructional delivery Establish monitoring systems Develop leaders

ANNUAL GOALS ·

To narrow the achievement gap by creating a high performance learning culture in all schools and sites To increase rigor and academic achievement in language arts, mathematics, and science in PreK-12 To increase rigor and academic achievement in middle schools through SpringBoard To increase rigor and academic achievement in high schools through High Schools That Work To ensure quality personnel in all positions

·

·

·

·

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School Mission and Vision

Quality Assurance: SACS Standard: 1.1, 1.2 Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization HSTW: High Expectations, Guidance and Advisement, and Culture of Continuous Improvement

Briefly express the school's values, vision, and mission. All DCSS school visions and missions should be aligned with that of the district.

VALUES

We believe that: · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Students must accept the responsibility for learning and must commit to an active learning process. Students are valued individuals with unique needs: physical, social, emotional, and intellectual. Students will enhance their learning opportunities by attending school regularly and conducting themselves appropriately. Positive relationships and mutual respect among and between students and staff enhance student self-esteem. The main responsibility is to teach by incorporating learning activities that accommodate different learning styles. Teachers parents, student and community share the responsibility for the support the of the school's mission. Challenging, appropriate, and attainable expectations increase individual student performance. Teachers should be positive role models for the students and community. The school setting should simulate a model of our society and prepare students to contribute to the local, national, and global community. The learning environment should be instep with technological advances, incorporating state-of-the-art-computer and media equipment to prepare students for the twenty-first century. The learning environment should be challenging and supportive with high expectations. The learning environment should be safe, clean, and physically comfortable. The educational curriculum must be consistently strong throughout elementary, middle, and high school in order for students to achieve optimal academic success. The curriculum should be varied and challenging and should empower students academically, physically, emotionally, and socially to make positive contributions to society. The educational process should be a proactive effort of the school, the family, and the community, resulting in the development of students who possess self-discipline, self-motivation, self-actualization, and decision-making skills.

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VISION

Lakeside High School will continue to strive to provide a culture of high expectations for all students to achieve academic excellence, leadership, service and social responsibility in a safe, orderly, collaborative setting. In order to accomplish this vision we must: · · Increase academic learning across all curricula. Increase professionalism and customer service towards students and our stakeholders.

MISSION

Our Mission is to Educate. Lakeside High School empowers each student to learn and each teacher to teach in a student-centered environment with a curriculum that is meaningful and relevant.

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School Improvement Plan Review NCLB Mandate End of Year Review of 2005-06 Consolidated School Improvement Plan (CSIP) x x x x x Principal School Administrators District Level Administrators Core Area Teachers Special Education Teachers Special Area Teachers x x x x x Counselors Teacher-Librarian Classified Staff Students Parents Other Stakeholders

2005-2006 CSIP Review (check all that apply)

x___ Review CSIP components to ensure that proposed actions have been carried out. x__ Review follow-up data to determine effectiveness of school improvement plans and activities. x___ Review budgets to ensure appropriate expenditures have been made under district, state, and federal guidelines. x_ Review available student achievement data and update school profile.

Were CSIP goals for the 2005-2006 met and/or progress made?

Target Goal

Increase 9th grade passing rate Increase Teacher Collaboration across Disciplines

Actual Data

Forty-six 9th grade students were retained in 2004-2005 No professional learning was held to address collaboration; teachers often complained about the lack of training and lack of time to prepare for collaboration

Met (Y or N)

No- Fifty-six 9th students were retained in 2005-2006 Yes-Six professional learning workshops were held to address various methods of collaboration among regular education and special education teachers; Teachers also were notified before the end of the school year of collaborative teaching

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Raise levels of expectation for academic performance

Seven hundred twenty-eight Advanced Placement Exams administered in 2004-2005; 13.3% of total grades earned were D&F grades in 2004-2005

assignments, giving teachers adequate time to prepare for collaboration. Yes-Seven hundred ninety-four Advanced Placement Exams administered in 2005-2006; No13.8% of total grades earned were D&F grades.

What internal challenges to student achievement were faced in the previous year?

The biggest internal challenge to achievement currently is moving from lecture-based instruction to differentiated instruction. With the continued growth of our English Language Learner (ELL) and Economically Disadvantaged (ED) subgroups, the traditional teaching methods that many teachers are accustomed to just do not meet the students' needs. The average Lakeside teacher has more than ten years of experience in education. This seniority represents a double-edged sword, however. Finding appropriate professional learning that will meet this need for a senior staff is challenging. As our student body demographic continues to change, relevant professional learning is needed to address differentiated instruction for a more diverse population.

What external challenges to student achievement were faced in the previous year?

We do not receive federal grant money to address the specific needs of our developing subgroups. This is a considerable external challenge. As we incorporate new programs, it has been difficult to ask teachers to participate in program implementation without compensation. Also, lack of funding to improve technology resources (computer labs and software) is an external challenge. Continuing physical plant constraints to growth of new and innovative work-based programs hamper Lakeside's opportunities to serve students with career technology interests. Limitations of physical campus space for growth further impact these opportunities. Aging equipment and physical facility pose challenges that instructional personnel cannot fully compensate for.

Review the 2005-2006 Professional Learning plan and activities. Describe administrative follow-up that was provided and summarize the impact of these activities on classroom practices.

Lakeside spent a great deal of time on a monthly basis working on collaboration between teachers. This was a beneficial activity for all as teachers were able to get a better understanding of collaboration. Pre-professional learning surveys proved that many teachers did not know enough about collaboration. Best practices were also presented each month during professional learning with the different departments presenting ideas. Surveys to evaluate the professional learning workshops were not implemented, however. We realize in order to plan more effectively we need to incorporate surveys into this years evaluations of professional learning. . The senior project, now renamed Academic 19

Yearbook, made some progress with teachers becoming more familiar with what is involved. Teachers were asked to get involved with no more than three seniors and help guide them through the academic year book.

List ways that the 2005-2006 End-of-Year Review results will be shared and communicated with all stakeholders: __x_ Staff Meeting _x_ School Newsletter _x__ Web Page __x_ PTA/PTO _x_ Conferences/Open House __x_ Other/Describe: results will be included on the Data Wall in

Our counseling conference area, and will be available in print form in both the administrative offices and the media center.

List the dates that the 2005-2006 CSIP was reviewed for quality assurance: Date Met Mid-Semester 1 End of Semester 1 Mid Semester 2

End of Semester 2

Comments

March 22, 2006 Post planning

Reviewed data received so far and what still needed to be collected. Learned of possible Title III grant for ELL students; discussed GHSGT and EOCT datanoted different conclusions from test data: EOCT shows specific deficiencies by domain. Each department encouraged to plan extra help segments to address EOCT deficiencies. Three week assessment tool discussed.

Briefly describe other school improvement activities that occurred during the 2005-2006 school year: (retreats, school improvement trainings, consultations with school improvement support personnel, etc.).

Numerous consultations were conducted during 2005-2006, with county and state personnel in various areas. High Schools That Work personnel visited for a Technical Assistance Review, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) visited for an accreditation visit, a faculty retreat was held during the summer of 2005, trainings were held for school improvement and Georgia Performance Standards implementation for administration and for all departments, and county High Schools That Work consultants began visitations on a regular basis, focusing on implementation of the HSTW framework of school improvement, and administrative mentoring was begun for the principal.

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Developing a Comprehensive Needs Assessment NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Instruction, Curriculum, Assessment, Planning and Organization, Leadership SACS Standards 2.5, 3.6, 4.2, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5 HSTW: Culture of continuous Improvement

Describe the process used by the school in the completion of a comprehensive needs assessment. Include when the process occurred and who was involved. This process must include reflections on all data included in the school's profile. Additionally, include information from all school surveys, focus groups, interviews, classroom observations, and professional learning evaluations to support your conclusion.

Prior to the start of the 2005-2006 school year, the CSIP chairperson was named. In August of 2005, teachers were given the opportunity to volunteer for CSIP committee work with the knowledge that the administration expected one hundred percent participation from the faculty. The administration designated Wednesday afternoons for committees to meet. Each committee was given a timeline to present their piece to the chairperson for compilation. The committees reconvened to hear a consolidated report on the data from the CSIP chair. The following data was presented: GHSGT- White students (99%) out perform African-American (93%), Asian (91%), and Hispanic (85%) students in English Language Arts. Limited English Proficiency students performed even lower at 64% and Economically Disadvantaged students performed at 86%. In math, again white (95%) students out performed African-American (73%) students and Hispanic (67%) students. LEP students only met standards in math by 44% while ED students performed at 65%. · EOCT- In every area of the End of Course Tests, the trend was similar to the GHSGT. White students led the performance standards with African-American and Hispanic students trailed by at least eleven percentage points. The gaps were more pronounced in ninth grade courses and courses that involve an emphasis on reading comprehension. · Advanced Placement- AP data is traditionally a source of pride for Lakeside. Of the twenty-one courses that were taught, ten courses boast of more than fifty percent of the students scoring a three or better on the exam. · SAT/ACT- Overall, Lakeside increased its composite scores on both national assessments. The gains in SAT scores reflect 24 points increase (1116 without writing score; 1660 with the writing score). The ACT scores increased from twenty-three to twenty-four points. In addition to standardized test data, other feedback was presented from the High Schools That Work Technical Assistance Visit and Southern Accreditation of Colleges and Schools visit. Overall both groups noted the following as weaknesses for Lakeside: · Lack of differentiated instruction · Over-use of lecture as main teaching strategy · Professional learning needed to address lack of teaching variety. 21 ·

Summarize data using tables, charts and graphs to display subjects, grades, and percentages.

Student Data: total enrollment 1518 1374 1356 % Black 25 24 27 % White 46 47 49 % Hispanic 14 14 19 % Asian 3 9 9 0

% American Indian

Year 2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004

% Multi Racial 4 4.9 3.1

% Male

% Female

50 50

50 50

Number and Percent of Student Population 2005-2006 number Free and Reduced Lunch Special Education ESOL Gifted Education 111 88 332 % 28 7 5.8 22 2004-2005 number 388 113 17 314 % 27 8 5 34 2003-2004 number 310 99 281 383 % 22 7 20 27.2

Retention Rate

total number

percentage rates 9th 65 67 55 10th% 27 25 30 11th% 6 6 14 3 12th

2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004

103 69 138

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Attendance:

All students

% Absent more than 15 days

Black white Hispanic Asian multi racial other male female SWD LEP SES

2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004

17 16 16

14 17 13

16 12 13

32 30 35

11 12 14

12 16 14

0 0 0

16 16 16

18 17 16

23 26 25

31 29 25

25 26 22

Faculty Staff Data:

Percent of Teacher Population Grade or subject with greatest turnover

Attrition Rate of Teachers

Number

2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004

8 4.5 3

9% 5% 4%

Math Spanish Math

Attrition Rate of Administrators 2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004

Number 1 1 1

Percent of Administrative Staff 25% 25% 25%

23

Highly Qualified Teachers Number of Certified Teachers (2005-2006) (2004-2005) 86 85

Percent of Highly Qualified Teachers teaching in field for entire day Number of core teachers teaching out of field for one or more periods during the day

100 100

0 0

Current Report

Mathematics Met 95% participation Met AMO for all students without a second look Met AMO for all students with a second look (confidence interval, multiyear average, safe harbor) Met AMO for all subgroups without second look Met AMO for all subgroups with a second look (confidence interval, multiyear average, safe harbor) Did not meet AMO for the following subgroup(s) Met second indicator for all students yes yes yes English Language Arts yes Yes

Yes yes

yes no

yes

no Hispanic, Econ. Disadvantaged yes

24

Previous Year Report 2004-2005 Mathematics Met 95% participation Met AMO for all students without a second look Met AMO for all students with a second look (confidence interval, multiyear average, safe harbor) Met AMO for all subgroups without second look Met AMO for all subgroups with a second look (confidence interval, multiyear average, safe harbor) Did not meet AMO for the following subgroup(s) Met second indicator for all students yes yes yes yes English Language Arts yes yes

yes

yes

Previous Year Report 2003-2004 Met 95% participation Met AMO for all students without a second look Met AMO for all students with a second look (confidence interval, multiyear average, safe harbor) Met AMO for all subgroups without second look Met AMO for all subgroups with a second look (confidence interval, multiyear average, safe harbor) Did not meet AMO for the following subgroup(s) Met second indicator for all students Mathematics yes yes English Language Arts yes yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

25

(Data taken from 2005-2006 school report card) Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) English Language Arts % Meeting/Exceeding Standard on GHSGT All American Multi students Black White Hispanic Asian Indian racial SWD LEP 2005-2006 95 93 99 85 91 0 81 84 64 2004-2005 99 99 93 94 79 91 90 94 2003-2004 96

Econ. Disadvantage. 86 97

Data taken from 2005-2006 school report card) Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) Mathematics % Meeting/Exceeding Standard on GHSGT All American Multi students Black White Hispanic Asian Indian racial SWD LEP 2005-2006 95 73 95 67 93 * 93 53 44 2004-2005 97 93 98 91 100 * 100 70 91 2003-2004 96 92 99 74 100 * 0 91 59

Econ. Disadvantage. 65 93 84

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End of Course Tests (EOCT) Algebra all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 45 56 Black 40 % Passing the EOCT White 62 Hispanic 39 Asian Multi racial SWD 39 LEP 34 Econ. Disadv. 34

Geometry all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 Us History all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 78 88 Black 56 White 96 67 82 Black 51 White 85

% Passing the EOCT Multi Hispanic Asian racial 38 71 73

SWD 41

LEP 39

Econ. Disadv. 40

% Passing the EOCT Multi racial Hispanic Asian 57 79 74

SWD 72

LEP 21

Econ. Disadv. 51

Economics all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 81 86 Black 58 White 93

% Passing the EOCT Multi racial Hispanic Asian 53 89 91

SWD 41

LEP *

Econ. Disadv. 61

27

Biology all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 Physical Science all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 9th Grade Literature all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 American Literature all students 2005-2006 2004-2005 91 99 . Black 87 White 98 90 76 . Black 59 White 93 67 73 . Black 65 White 82 68 83 . Black 58 White 88

% Passing the EOCT Hispanic 26 Asian 65 Multi racial 76 SWD 39 LEP 17 Econ. Disadv. 42

% Passing the EOCT Hispanic 54 Asian 74 Multi racial 54 SWD 57 LEP 50 Econ. Disadv. 55

% Passing the EOCT Hispanic 46 Asian 78 Multi racial 90 SWD 48 LEP 24 Econ. Disadv. 52

% Passing the EOCT Multi Hispanic Asian racial 70 90 95

SWD 100

LEP 35

Econ. Disadv. 74

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Advance Placement Exams (AP) Year 20052006 2004200520032004 20052006 20042005 20032004 20052006 2004200520032004 20052006 2004200520032004 20052006 2004200520032004 # students taking course 149 171 145 15 18 9 6 6 5 8 9 3 19 189 10 # of students taking Test 149 171 145 15 18 9 6 6 5 8 9 3 19 18 10 % of scores 3 or higher 37% 36% 48% 47% 83 56 33% 17 11 88% 56 33 79% 67 100

1. US History

2. Art History

3. Art- Drawing

4. Art- 2D Design

5. Biology

29

6. Chemistry

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

26 37 56 18 23 13 0 10 14 51 51 104 63 75 92 76 45 22 0 12 16

26 37 56 18 23 13 0 10 14 51 51 104 63 75 92 76 45 23 0 12 16

88% 87 68 56% 52 77

7. Comp. Sci A

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

8. Comp Sci. B

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

60 79 29% 20 30 71% 88 71 30% 40 22

9. Econ- Micro

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

11. Eng. Lit Comp.

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

12. Env. Sci.

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

13 French Lang.

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

25 6

30

14. German Lang.

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

8 6

8 6 NA

75% 50 NA 40% 36 40 85% 90 100 100% 100 100

15. Gov't & Pol. US

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

45 22 15 40 29 37 15 18 19 0 18 19 35 17 25 0 3 2 0 3 2 31

45 22 15 40 29 37 15 18 19 0 18 19 35 17 25 0 3 2 0 3 2

16. Cal AB

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

17. Cal BC

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

18. Cal Subgrade

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

100 100 40% 36 48

19. Physics

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

20. Physics CMech.

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

100 50

21. Physics C E & M

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

100 50

22. Psychology

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

81 51 107 7 27 20 29 28 42

81 51 107 7 27 20 29 28 42

68% 61 64 71% 48 50 14% 11 24

23. Spanish Lang.

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

24. Statistics

2005-2006 2004-20052003-2004

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) : Use the students highest verbal and math scores Year 2005-2006 # taking Test 270 Average Verbal 557 Average Math 559 Average Writing 544 Total 1660

2004-2005

268

548

544

1092

2003-2004 American College Test (ACT) Year 2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004 # taking test 113 109 90

266

552

553

1105

English 24 23 23

Math 24 23 23

Reading 24 23 23

Science 23 22 22

Composite Score 24 23 23

32

Graduation Data: Number of students and percent of student population 20052004Diplomas 2006 2005 Number College Prep and Tech/Career Seal College Prep Seal Tech/Career Prep Seal Special Education Total all Diplomas Certificate of Attendance Total Graduates 15 262 17 9 289 11 300 3 Percent 5 87 6 3 Number 1 234 14 4 253 0 253 Percent 0.3 92 6 2

20032004 Number 2 256 11 4 273 13 286 4 Percent 0.6 90 4 1

Completion Rate: Percent of 9th grade enrollment in graduation class by year.

2005-2006 (2002 9th grade

enrollment in class of 2006)

2004-2005 (2001 9th grade enrollment in class of

2005)

2003-2004

(2000 9th grade enrollment in class of 2004)

Completion Rate:

85

85

81

33

Course Pass Rates

Year 2005-2006 Course 9th Grade Literature 10th grade Literature 11th grade Literature 12 grade Literature 2004-2005 9th Grade Literature 10th grade Literature 11th grade Literature 12 grade Literature Enrollment 970 817 706 665 891 762 718 579 Pass Rates 76% 81% 95% 98% 83% 89% 92% 99%

Year 2005-2006

Course 9th Grade Mathematics 10th grade Mathematics 11th grade Mathematics 12 grade Mathematics

Enrollment 898 756 636 553 848 725 666 465

Pass Rates 73% 84% 86% 95% 82% 82% 92% 98%

2004-2005

9th Grade Mathematics 10th grade Mathematics 11th grade Mathematics 12 grade Mathematics

34

Write a descriptive paragraph explaining the implications of presented data.

Two things happened in the 2005-2006 school year that make the necessary work clear for Lakeside: Our Hispanic population finally reached the minimum required quantity (40 or 10% of group) to become a subgroup and End of Course Test data was disaggregated for the first time by domain. These two pieces of information painted a valuable picture of what was beneath our AP, SAT, and GHSGT scores. Furthermore, the symmetry of the HSTW TAV and SACS reports was telling as well. To improve our subgroups- Hispanic, African-American, Lower English Proficiency, and Economically Disadvantaged- we must search for meaningful and relevant professional learning to address differentiated instruction. As a school, we need to search for grants that will fund programs that can assist our students in basic reading comprehension and math computation. The master schedule in the 2006-2007 school year must reflect a willingness to meet the specific needs of our lower performing students with more reading classes, daily extra help opportunities, and ESOL-sheltered classes in more core areas.

35

Scientifically Based Research NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Instruction, Curriculum SACS Standards 3 and 4 HSTW: Students Actively Engaged

Cite and describe scientifically-based research and best practices that will be used to address identified areas of need. A minimum of three citations for each barrier and/or content area is required. Research should align with identified needs/barriers and should address the following areas: A. The scientifically-based research foundation that a need will be successfully met B. Data-supported evidence of effective implementation and increased student achievement C. Evidence of ability to replicate ­ studies take place in similar locations with similar student demographics, timelines, available resources, etc. Research on addressing barriers to success in Reading/ELA:

http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/ReadingWritingBrief.asp Dekalb R.E.A.D.S Coordinators. 2003 What Every DeKalb Administrator needs to Know about the Balanced Approach to Literacy: A Guide to Successful Implementation. Freeman, David, Freeman, Yvonne 1988. Sheltered English Instruction. Eric Clearing House on Languages and Linguistics Washington, DC.ED301070. Helmar-Salasoo, Ester. 1995 A National Study of States' Roles in Choosing Reading and Literature for Second language Learning. Jacob, Walter R. Seven Tips for Improving Instructional Skills: Reminders for Teachers. Higher Education and Leadership Prep. Phelps, Stevens. 2005 Ten Years of Research on Adolescent Literary, Learning Point Associates.

36

Strategies for Teaching. Limited English Proficient (LEP). http://www.doe.virginia.gov/VDOE/Instruction/ESL/LEPenglishResource.pdf.

Research on addressing barriers to success in Mathematics:

Gamoran, Adam, Andrew C. Porter, John Smithson, and Paula A. White. 1997. Upgrading High School Mathematics Instruction: Improving Learning Opportunities for Low-Achieving, Low-Income Youth. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 19 (4):325­338. Hoffer, T.B, K.A. Rasinski, and W. Moore. 1995. Social Background Differences in High School Mathematics and Science Course Taking and Achievement. In U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Oakes, Jeannie. 1990. Multiplying Inequalities: The Effects of Race, Social Class, and Tracking on Opportunities to Learn Mathematics and Science. Santa Monica, CA: The RAND Corporation. Rock, D.A., and J.M. Pollack. 1995. The Relationship Between Gains in Achievement in Mathematics and Selected Course Taking Behaviors. In U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Research on addressing barriers to success in Science:

Byrne, Gregory. 1995. Study Suggests There's No Place like Home for Math and Science. Education Week:8. Hoffer, T.B, K.A. Rasinski, and W. Moore. 1995. Social Background Differences in High School Mathematics and Science Course Taking and Achievement. In U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Oakes, Jeannie. 1990. Multiplying Inequalities: The Effects of Race, Social Class, and Tracking on Opportunities to Learn Mathematics and Science. Santa Monica, CA: The RAND Corporation.

Research on addressing barriers to success in Social Studies:

Anstrom, Kris, Steeves, Kathleen. Preparing Secondary Education Teachers to work with English Language Learners: Social Studies. NCBE Resource Collection, No 13, June 1999 Freeman, David, Freeman, Yvonne 1988. Sheltered English Instruction. Eric Clearing House on Languages and Linguistics Washington, DC ED301070.

37

Research on addressing barriers to success in Attendance/Graduation Rate:

Levin, Henry M. 1988. Structuring Schools for Greater Effectiveness with Educationally Disadvantaged or At-Risk Students. Paper read at annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, April, at New Orleans, LA.

Research on addressing barriers to success for Subgroups:

Levin, Henry M. 1988. Structuring Schools for Greater Effectiveness With Educationally Disadvantaged or At-Risk Students. Paper read at annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, April, at New Orleans, LA. Quality Education for Minorities Project. 1990. Education That Works: An Action Plan for the Education of Minorities. Cambridge, MA.

Research on addressing barriers to success for School Culture/Climate:

Marshall, Hermine H., and Rhona S. Weinstein. 1984. Classroom Factors Affecting Students: Self Evaluation: An Interaction Model. Review of Educational Research 54 (3):301­325. Rosenthal, Robert, and Lenore Jacobson. 1968. Pygmalion in the Classroom: Teacher Expectations and Pupils' Intellectual Development. New York: Rinehart and Winston. Young, ClaraY., Wright, JamesV. Laster, Joseph. 2005 Instructing African American Students. Education V.125n3p.516

38

Reading/English/Language Arts Action Plan

NCLB Mandate

Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Professional Learning; SACS Standards: 3,4,5,6 and 10; HSTW: High Expectations, Program of Study, Career/Technical Studies, Work-Based Learning, Students

Annual Measurable Objective(s): Increase ninth grade Lit EOCT scores from 90 to 93 %

Improve GHSGT scores in the Hispanic subgroup from 71-80% Improve writing scores on the GHSGT for the LEP subgroup from 67-72% Formative Indicators of Success: Weekly assignments from teacher lesson plans

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

Off-campus time for teachers to review newly adopted English textbooks. Training for new ESOL teachers

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

$900 for substitute teachers

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Instruction 1 Curriculum 1 Assessment 1

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

2006-2007

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Monitoring (Artifacts) Data)

Research assignment from Academic Yearbook GHSGT scores

All Students Tutoring for GHSGT for writing and reading comprehension

Extra Help Coordinator

Subgroup- Hispanic/LEP -more students scheduled into sheltered English classes and additional elective ELL course for reading and language acquisition Subgroup-ED Economically Disadvantaged- more ED students with assigned to reading classes during school day.

None

Teachers

Curriculum 1,2 Instruction 4

2006-2007

Progress reports Attendance logs

GHSGT

none

none

Academy teachers Volunteers

Instruction 1, 4 Curriculum 1-3

2006-2007

Weekly assessments

EOCT scores

Domain Basic reading skills and language acquisition addressed to increase ELL and ED students' ability to read and comprehend in English Domain

Training for ESOL teachers and regular education teachers.

None

API Teachers

Assessment 1, 2

2006-2007

Attendance logs Progress reports

EOCT scores

Technology Integration PLATO

Completed

Site-based PLATO instructors

Assessment 2,1 Instruction 1

2006-07

Progress tests

EOCT scores GHSGT scores

39

Mathematics Action Plan NCLB Mandate

Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Professional Learning; SACS Standards: 3,4,5,6 and 10; HSTW: High Expectations, Program of Study, Career/Technical Studies, Work-Based Learning, Students

Annual Measurable Objective(s): Increase math scores for the Hispanic Subgroup on the GHSGT from 67-75% passing

Increase Algebra 1 EOCT passing rate from 45-55% Formative Indicators of Success: Three week assessments (pilot)

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

None

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

none

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Instruction 1,2,3

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

Sept-06- May 07

Evidence of Monitoring (Artifacts)

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Data)

Pre and Post test scores

All Students Make EOCT and GHSGT practice available to all students during the school day and before or after school. Subgroup-Hispanic/LEP Pair Hispanic students with university mentor from Hispanic Scholarship Fund initiative and encourage more LEP students to attend tutorial.

Math teachers Extra Help Coordinator

Student work

ESOL strategies in math content area

$300-500 for after school bus; possible PA or Principal's fund

Counselors, Hispanic mentors, Teachers, Extra Help Coordinator PL Coordinator Math teachers Extra Help Coordinator PL Coordinator

Instruction 1,2,3

Nov. 2006May 07

Mentor Attendance logs Lesson Plans Walkthrough observations

EOCT GHSGT

Subgroup-ED / Algebra I students Algebra 1 students tutoring by National Honor Society, Senior Mentors, and teachers.

SREB training

None

Instruction 1,2,3

Oct. 2006May 2007

Attendance logs Practice test

EOCT Pass rate in Algebra I

Domain Extra Help - Increase teacher tutorial availability for individual student help

None

None

Teachers

2006-2007

Attendance logs

Pass rate in all math courses, specifically Algebra I

Technology Integration PLATO

None

None

Site-based PLATO Instructors

Instruction 1,2,3

Oct. 2006May 2007

Computer log in

EOCT GHSGT

40

Science Action Plan

Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Professional Learning; SACS Standards: 3,4,5,6 and 10; HSTW: High Expectations, Program of Study, Career/Technical Studies, Work-Based Learning, Students

Annual Measurable Objective(s):

Maintain (or increase) scores of the GHSGT Science at 93%. Increase GHSGT Science scores for subgroup LEP students from 32% to 50%. Maintain (or increase) GHSGT Science scores for subgroup Students with disabilities at 78%. Increase current pass rate for Physical Science and Biology on the EOCT. Formative Indicators of Success: Increased use of Plato Increased attendance at Science Under the Stars 1. 2. 3. 4.

41

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

None

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

none

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Curriculum standard 3

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

Fall 2006Spring 2007

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Monitoring (Artifacts)

Practice tests Sign in logs

Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Data)

GHSGT results

Extra Help Coordinator

All Students 4th period tutorial for any students that scored poorly on Biology or Physical Science EOCT and students that failed science graduation test.

ESOL training in content area Subgroup LEP/Hispanic students Add science-sheltered classes to master schedule

SREB training

Science teachers PL Coordinator API

Curriculum standard 3 Student supportstandard 1

Fall 2006Spring 2007

Master Schedule Attendance records

GHSGT EOCT

None Subgroup ED/9 grade students Increase participation in Science Under the Stars biology tutorial program for freshman

th

$600 for snacks and materials; sources varyprincipal's fund, PTA

SUTS Coordinator th 9 Grade Administrator

Student, community, family ­ Standard 1

Fall 2006Spring 2007

Sign in Logs

EOCT

42

Domain Extra Help - Increase teacher tutorial availability for individual student help

None

none

Teachers

Student, community, family ­ Standard 1

Fall 2006Spring 2007

Sign in Logs

EOCT and GHSGT results

Technology Integration http://usatestprep.com www.dekalb.k12.ga.us/~lakeside on-line test preparation for all students

None

none

Teachers API

Instruction - 1

Fall 2006Spring 2007

Teacher Logs

EOCT GHSGT

Technology Integration PLATO

PLATO instruction for all teachers

none

Site-based PLATO Coordinators

Instruction - 1

Fall 2006Spring 2007

EOCT GHSGT

Technology Integration GIZMO

GIZMO instruction for all teachers

none

Site-based GIZMO Coordinators

Instruction - 1

Fall 2006Spring 2007

EOCT GHSGT

43

Social Studies Action Plan

Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Professional Learning; SACS Standards: 3,4,5,6 and 10; HSTW: High Expectations, Program of Study, Career/Technical Studies, Work-Based Learning, Students

Annual Measurable Objective(s):

1. Maintain (or increase) scores of GHSGT Social Studies at 96%. 2. Increase scores of GHSGT Social Studies for LEP students from 55% to 65%. 3. Increase scores for Students w/Disabilities on the GHSGT from 71% to 75%. Formative Indicators of Success: Increased use of map and graph reading as sponge activities

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

None

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

None

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Instruction 1

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

October 06May 07

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Monitoring (Artifacts) Data)

Attendance logs GHSGT

All Students Increase tutorial participation for any student that scored poorly on the US History EOCT or failed the Social Studies graduation test. Subgroup LEP/Hispanic students Increase collaboration among Social Studies and English teachers to doubledose in reading comprehension Subgroup ED Increase variety of strategies used to teacher reading comprehension through social studies.

Teachers Extra Help Coordinator

ESOL training in content area

SREB Training

Teachers API

Instruction 1, 2 Assessment 2

Sept. 06- May 07

Attendance logs Practice tests

GHSGT results, EOCT results,

Differentiated Instruction

SREB training

Teachers Administration

Instruction 1

Mid Oct. 06May 07

Attendance logs Feedback from tutors

GHSGT EOCT

Domain Increase practice in information processing area by including map and chart reading activity each week. Technology Integration Htt://usatestprep.com

Differentiated Instruction

SREB training

Teachers Administration

Instruction 1

2006-2007

Lesson Plans

GHSGT results, EOCT results

None

none

Teachers API CTSS

Curriculum 1 Assessment 1,2,

Sept. 06- May 07

Test feedback

EOCT GHSGT

44

HSTW Action Plan

Georgia Standards for School Performance: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Professional Learning; SACS Standards: 3,4,5,6 and 10; HSTW: High Expectations, Program of Study, Career/Technical Studies, Work-Based Learning, Students

Annual Measurable Objective(s): All subgroups to meet or exceed AYP (516 English, 511 Math) Formative Indicators of Success: Practice test scores,

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

None

PERSON(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Instruction 1 Assessment 3 Curriculum 3

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Monitoring (Artifacts)

Homeroom collection of materials every three weeks

Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Data)

Final collection of Academic Yearbook by Homeroom teachers.

All Students All students will participate in the Academic Yearbook which includes research, reading, writing, and collection of student artifacts as evidence of student progress. Subgroup LEP/Hispanic students Students will have extra help opportunities during and after school through external Hispanic Scholarship Fund Peer Counseling Organization

Training on components of Academic Yearbook

HSTW Coordinator Administration teachers Homeroom teachers

Sept.06- May 07

None

Subgroup ED students Increase variety of instructional strategies used in all classrooms Domain Double dose in reading comprehension in all core classes

Differentiated Instruction

$300-600 for evening transportation; possible funding through PTA or Principal's fund GA State- Goizetta Foundation SREB funding

Counselors

Community 1 Curriculum 3

Sept. 06- May 07

Attendance logs

GHSGT results, pass rates in core subject areas, EOCT results

SREB trainers Teachers Administrators SREB trainers Teachers Administrators

Instruction 1,3,4 Curriculum 3

Sept. 06-May 07

PL attendance

Pass rates in all classes

Differentiated Instruction

SREB

Instruction 1

2006-2007

PL attendance

ELA GHSGT scores

Technology Integration Plato

PLATO instruction

None

Site-based PLATO Coordinators

Instruction 1 Curriculum 1

Sept. 06-May 07

Plato feedback

Pass rates in all core areas

45

Attendance/Graduation Action Plan

Quality Assurance : Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization, Leadership and School Culture, SACS Standards: 2, 7, 8, 9 and 10, HSTW: High Expecations and Culture of Continuous Improvement

Annual Measurable Objective(s): Average Daily Attendance is 95% or higher. Formative Indicators of Success: three week cumulative daily attendance report analysis

46

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

Peer mentoring training

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

DCSS Professional Learning Dept.

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Planning and organization 1-3 Leadership 1

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

Sept. 2006May 2007

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Monitoring (Artifacts) Data)

Attendance records Drop out rates Progress reports Graduation rates Decrease in retention rate

All students Peer mentoring groups Prevention Intervention Specialist Graduation Specialist Focus Groups- support groups for any referred students (social-emotional learning) Peer Meditation

Prevention Intervention Specialist Graduation Specialist

Subgroup Freshman Academy

Small Learning Communities

Freshman Academy Coordinator

Planning and organization 1-3

Sept. 2006May 2007

Progress reports Attendance histories

EOCT test scores Decrease in retention rate

Subgroup Hispanic- attendance May end up in support groups Possible parent student meeting to explain school attendance policies.

Graduation Specialist, Prevention Intervention Specialist Assistant Principal for Attendance SST training Local school funds Teachers Counselors Prevention Intervention Specialist SST chairperson

Planning and organization 1-3

Sept. 2006May 2007

Attendance records Progress reports

EOCT test GHSGT

Subgroup Socio economic- referred to SST if needed for additional support

Planning and organization 1-3

Sept. 2006May 2007

Attendance records Progress reports

Decrease in retention rate

47

Special Education Action Plan NCLB Mandate

Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Professional Learning; SACS Standards: 3,4,5,6 and 10; HSTW: High Expectations, Program of Study, Career/Technical Studies, Work-Based Learning, Students

The improvement initiatives selected by the Department of Exception Education and Support Services can be found in the System Consolidated LEA School Improvement Plan for 2006-07. The improvement initiatives are aligned to the current mission and goals of the DeKalb School System. Goals:

Increase the achievement of students with disabilities Reduce the over identification of any ethnic subgroups in any area of disability Provide services to students with disabilities in the least restrictive environment appropriate to meet their needs Increase the high school graduation rate for students with disabilities Formative Measures of Success: More students in general education classes. IEP objectives correlate with areas of weaknesses on testing.

INTERVENTIONS Based on Scientifically-Based Research PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

NO Establish a plan to make sure that all students with disabilities are participating in state and local mandates.

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Assessment Standard 3

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

On-going

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Monitoring (Artifacts) Data)

Data Collection, Tally Increase in achievement scores for standardized tests such as the EOCT, increase in passing scores on GHSGT

NO Incorporate test data into the development of the academic goals on the IEP

Assign special education teachers in area of content perceived as their area of strength

NO

System Test Coordinator, Asst. Principals for Instruction, Special Education and Vocational Lead Teacher , General Education Teacher (SEVLT) SEVLT, Special Education Teachers, General Education Teachers Principals, Asst. Principals of Instruction, SEVLT

Instruction Standard 3

On-Going

Reviewing IEPs

Increase cohesiveness of goal and objectives to content in academic classes Improve special education teachers content knowledge and aptitude, which in turn will increase academic test scores and grades Improve role of special education teacher in

Curriculum Standard 2

On-Going

Survey of teachers, observation, Praxis II Exam scores

YES Allow teachers to participate in best

Professional Learning,

Professional Learning

Throughout the school

Survey, Sign in sheet

48

practices staff development for content area YES Establish areas of staff development to support the instructional goals of special education students

Explore other factors that impact learning for individual students

NO

Special Education and Vocational Lead Teacher to scrutinize individual school data to make specific recommendations to add to the local School Improvement Plan Ensure that all special education teachers are actively participating in the GPS trainings

NO

Principals, Local Staff Development Liaisons, SEVLT Professional Learning, Support services, Principal, SEVLT, Asst. Principal for Instruction Support Services, SEVLT, Principal, Prevention Intervention Specialist, Graduation Specialist Accountability Department, SEVLT, Principal Numeracy and Literacy Teams, Principal, General and Special Education teachers. Coordinators, SEVLT, General Education Teachers, Special Education Teachers, General Education Teachers. Principal, Coordinators, EESS Staff, SVELT, General Education Teachers, Special Education Teachers Professional Learning, EESS staff, General Education Teachers EESS staff Special Education Teachers, SVELT

Standard 3

year

collaborative settings

Professional Learning Standard 2

Throughout the school year

Survey, Sign in Sheet

Increase overall knowledge of goal for special education students. Improved grades and test scores Allow for a better understanding of all students to create more appropriate goals and objectives for each student. Improve graduation rates. Improve course offerings, and tutorials to increase grades and better meet IEP goals Increase attendance at training sessions for improved adherence to GPS standard

Assessment Standard 3

Throughout the school year

Review of Eligibility, Reports, Teacher Observation, Parent Conferences

Leadership Standard 4

On-Going

Review of School Improvement Plans

YES

Planning and Organization Standard 3

Throughout the school year

Survey, Sign-in Sheet

Ensure that IEP goals and objectives are aligned with the GPS and QCC

NO

Curriculum Standard 1

Throughout the school year

Review of IEP

Increase effectiveness of goals and objectives in academic classes. Align instruction of special education students with general education students Increase use of data collected

Provide more opportunities for training on data collection and analysis for all special education teachers

YES

Professional Learning Standard 2

Throughout the school year

Survey, Talley Sheet

Explore more staff development to plan courses addressing specific topics such as instructional strategies, behavior management collaborative teaching, etc. Continue to provide AGS training to all special education teachers

YES

Professional Learning Standard 1

Throughout the school year

Needs Assessment

Increase effectiveness of delivery of content to improve classroom management Increase use of AGS materials in lesson plans. Improve student test scores. Improve opportunities for reading

YES

Professional Learning Standard 3

Throughout the school year

Needs Assessment

49

Explore creative ways to revise the InSchool Suspension (ISS) programs an d to address Out-Of-School Suspensions (OSS)

YES

Prevention Intervention, Administration Special Education Teachers, General Education Teacher

School Culture Standard 2

Throughout the school year

Needs Assessment

across the curriculum Decrease occurrences of ISS and OSS. Utilize time in ISS and OSS for instructional purposes.

50

Library/Media Action Plan

Georgia Standards for School Performance; American Association of School Librarians ­ Nine Literacy Standards; SACS Standards, GBOE Rule ; Technology Standards

Annual Measurable Objective(s)/Goal #1: Students will increase the number of books read independently and the amount of time reading

at home.

Formative Indicators of Success/Goal #1:

measured by the GHSGT.

Increase the number of students in the subgroup meeting standards from 40% to 66.7% as

INTERVENTIONS ACTION PLANS ­ GOAL #1 Based on Scientifically-Based Research

All Students Students will read independently Subgroup Hispanic- speaking to all ESOl classes about reading initiative Domain Reading Comprehension Writing paragraphs

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

None

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

LMC allotment

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE

STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

GSS Instruction 4 GSS Instruction 4

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

Sept. 06- May 07 Sept. 06- may 07

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Monitoring (Artifacts) Data)

Reading Log % passing GHSGT

None

$500.00 Bilingual English/Spanish books

Teachers Librarians ESOL Teachers Teachers Librarian

none

Media Specialist ESOL Teacher

GSS Instruction 4

Sept. 06- 07

Reading Log Reporting to LMS using technology ­ Power point Book talk Oral telling of story to media specialist Paragraph written about story Picture story boards, power point presentations on story

GHSGT

% passing reading portion of GHSGT

51

Library/Media Action Plan

Georgia Standards for School Performance; American Association of School Librarians ­ Nine Literacy Standards; SACS Standards, GBOE Rule ; Technology Standards

Annual Measurable Objective(s)/Goal #2:To increase the reading comprehension of level one students. Formative Indicators of Success/Goal #2:

increase.

INTERVENTIONS ACTION PLANS ­ GOAL #1 Based on Scientifically-Based Research

All Students Teacher ­ Librarian will provide materials for all students to increase their reading comprehension and build their vocabulary skills

As measured by the Language Arts GHSGT and EOCT scores, student performance will

POSITION(S) RESPONSIBLE STANDARD ALIGNMENT Georgia School Standards (GSS)

Curriculum- 2-3 Instruction 3,4 ELA9RLS ELA9RC1 ELA9RC2 ELA9RC3 ELA9RC4 Curriculum- 2-3 Instruction 3,4 ELA9RLS ELA9RC1 ELA9RC2 ELA9RC3 ELA9RC4 Curriculum- 2-3 Instruction 3,4 ELA9RLS ELA9RC1 ELA9RC2 ELA9RC3 ELA9RC4

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (PL) NEEDED

Teachers will receive on going modules to help students increase their reading comprehension and build their vocabulary skills. Teachers will receive on going modules to help students increase their reading comprehension and build their vocabulary skills. None

ESTIMATED COST AND FUNDING SOURCES

Library Allotment Funds

TIMELINE (Start/End Date)

August 2006May 2007

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Monitoring (Artifacts) Data)

Librarian will prepare reading modules. Acquire materials that will increase reading comprehension and build vocabulary skills. Acquire high interestlow vocabulary books Prepare reading lists Increase student passing rate on the ECOT and GHSGT. Increased circulation of books from Media Center.

Principal, API, Teachers Librarian

Subgroup Level one reading students-

Library Allotment Funds

Principal, API, Teachers Librarian

August 2006May 2007

Increased scores on EOCT

Library Allotment Funds

Technology Integration Teacher-librarian will instruct teachers and students in using Spectrum online database, Novelist, and other online services. Teacher ­librarian will develop lesson plans that integrate technology into their classroom activities. Lesson plans will include methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize student learning.

Principal, API, Teachers Librarian

August 2006May 2007

Student use of NoveList Increase use of Spectrum catalog Use of computers to practice standardized tests.

More lesson plans designed with integrating technology in classroom activities. Increased use of Spectrum catalog EOCT GHSGT

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Professional Learning for 2006-2007

Quality Assurance:

Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization, Professional Learning, Leadership and School Culture SACS Standards: 2, 6, and 10 HSTW: Culture of Continuous Improvement This plan will also serve as the Professional Learning Comprehensive Plan. A copy of the plan and the CSIP cover page with signatures should be submitted to the Professional Learning Department by the site-based PL Liaison by the required due date. The supporting budget should also be submitted to the Professional Learning Department for approval and a copy should be placed in the CSIP Appendix.

Professional Learning Activities (Write a brief description of each activity)

Alignment to Needs and Interventions (Goal to Improve Student Achievement)

GSS planning 3, professional learning1,3, school culture 2 Planning- 3, professional learning- 1, 2

TIMELINE (Start and End Date)

Sept. 06 Through out the year Oct. 06

MEANS OF EVALUATION Evidence of Monitoring Evidence of Impact (Artifacts) (Student Learning Data)

Attendance log Teacher feedback Attendance Log Collaboration between teachers. EOCT and GHSGT EOCT GHSGT

Team Building

Plato and First Class training Test Taking Strategies Differentiated Instruction in dealing with our subgroups; Hispanic and Low socio economic students

Professional learning- 1,2,3 School culture 2, Professional learning- 1,2,3 School Culture 1,2 Leadership 4

Sept. 06-May 07 Sept. 06-May 07 Administrative walk through Scores on EOCT and GHSGT

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School Culture/Climate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Instruction, Curriculum, Planning and Organization, Student, Family and Community, Leadership and School Culture SACS Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 HSTW: All 10 Key Practices Describe what policies, procedures, programs, and innovations are in place to ensure a school culture that is pervasively academic in nature. A high academic culture has always been the staple of Lakeside High School. There are several programs in place to ensure that all students have an opportunity to succeed academically. The programs are developed and monitored by department chairs and the administrative team. The various policies and programs include: · Ninth grade Academy transition program · Hispanic Scholarship Fund outreach program for college Hispanic students · 8th period recovery courses for students that failed an End-of-Course-Test course with sixty to sixty-nine percent · Mandatory 4th period graduation test tutorial, focus on Science and Social Studies · Ninth Grade Academy tutoring with National Honor Society students · Word Walls and sponge activities are in use in every classroom · Saturday SAT prep courses sponsored by PTA · Extensive Science Fair participation · Academic Yearbook participation in every grade, including senior project · Mandatory basic reading classes for all Level I reading students · ELL-sheltered English classes for ninth and eleventh grade students; ELL electives in grammar and reading for all ELL students · ACCESS testing for all ELL students to monitor English language acquisition · Equal access to a variety of Advanced Placement courses · Collaboration courses in all core areas and fine arts for Students with Disabilities Describe how the school administrators and staff demonstrate high expectations for student behavior through school rules, policies, and procedures that are implemented in a fair and consistent manner to provide an environment conducive to learning. The administrative staff and leadership team model professional expectations. High expectations are communicated to students through class meetings at the beginning of the school year and regular meetings with student government leaders. Additional demonstrations of high expectations for student behavior include: · Ensuring that all students successfully pass the county discipline test each year. · Use of Student Support Team services meet to discuss modification plans for students with specific needs. · Prevention and Intervention Specialist works with students that have been identified by teachers as needing additional support in specific areas. · Graduation Specialists works with students to find appropriate programs to help them stay on track for graduation · SVELT, Special Education teachers, classroom teachers, and school psychologist work together to create Individual Education Plans for students that have a documented need for such services. · Counselors and the school social worker work with students who have immediate intervention needs. 54

Describe how the school culture support the social and emotional growth and development of all learners, ensuring that they have the ability to self evaluate and interact positively and effectively with adults and peers in a diverse environment. Lakeside High School teachers and community members sponsor a number of clubs and organizations to help students find their place for appropriate social and emotional growth at school. There are academic organizations such as Beta and National Honor Society, Special Interest groups such as Gay Straight Alliance, Fellowship of Christian Teens, and Black History club, and several sports organizations for males and females. Additionally, the Prevention and Intervention Specialist and the SST committee work to ensure that all students with social or emotional deficiencies are addressed through meetings with key stakeholders, individual counseling, or group counseling. Describe how the school celebrates and acknowledges the achievements and accomplishments of school stakeholders. To make sure that all stakeholders are aware of the accomplishments of Lakeside students, the following vehicles are used: · Monthly scholarship update to announce availability of scholarships and announce recipients of awards · Monthly PTA newsletter · Annual Honors Night Banquet · Ninth Grade Academy bulletin board accolades · School Website · School ZoneLive web communication vehicle to all parents and community members. Describe how the school reinforces the self-governance and self-improvement of all stakeholders. In what ways do school decisions involve stakeholders and promote change and risk-taking. Throughout the school year, we have several opportunities to assess improvement attempts. These opportunities include completing the Consolidated School Improvement Plan, preparing for Office of School Improvement, High Schools That Work, and Southern Accreditation of Colleges and Schools visits. Once feedback is received by one of the aforementioned groups, the information is shared with the department chairs, full faculty, and parent council at their monthly meetings.

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Teacher Involvement in Decisions Regarding the Use of Academic Assessments NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Leadership, Planning and Organization; SACS Standards: 3, 4, 5 and 10 HSTW: All 10 Key Practices

Explain how data resulting from academic assessments are used, schoolwide and in individual classrooms, to increase student achievement.

A data wall has been developed in the teachers work room so that teachers can see the data on a daily basis. When test results come in, they are shared with the faculty. Scores are looked at to see what areas are in need of improvement and what we can do to improve those areas.

Describe how benchmark and daily assessments are used to inform and revise daily instruction. Descriptions should include but are not limited to: flexible grouping/student placement, instructional strategies, mastery of content material, and performance tasks based on standards.

Students are given quizzes over homework to assess how well they understand the content in some classes. Instruction can be adjusted once the quizzes are graded. Teachers review units each year to see what went well and what needs to be revised for the next year. Students are also placed in flexible grouping for some classes to provide more academic assistance.

Describe the involvement of teachers in the decision-making process of selecting, implementing and monitoring academic assessments.

Department chairs take a leadership role as true instructional leaders for their teachers. Each department meets to discuss common means of assessing students. This year, three-week assessment program was piloted in the math department with Algebra I and Geometry classes. Teachers met to determine which problems best represent the standards that every student should know at specific intervals in the school year. Additionally, all departments have gone to a common syllabi and grading scale for every course. This will allow a smooth transition if a child is moved from one class to another. The 9th grade academy teachers meet daily through team planning meetings to monitor, analyze and report failure and achievement rates to determine the effectiveness of the 9th grade academy.

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Describe the professional learning needed to interpret data from academic assessments and to effectively implement changes based on an analysis of the data.

Overall, there is overwhelming evidence that much professional learning is needed to help our lowering performing students achieve academic success. Professional learning funds need to be dedicated to the following areas: · Creating and implementing 3-week assessments · Differentiated Instruction · Vertical planning with middle school and time to understand skill expectations between grades 9 through 12.

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Stakeholder Communication

Quality Assurance:

NCLB Mandates

Georgia School Standards: Assessment, Planning and Organization, Student, Family and Community Support, Leadership and School Culture SACS Standards: 2, 5, 7, 8 and 10 HSTW: Guidance and Advisement and Culture of Continuous Improvement

NCLB Mandate

Provide Individual Student Assessment Results and Interpretation to Parents Describe how teachers and administration are able to interpret and effectively articulate assessment results to stakeholders.

Administrative and teacher-leader personnel have been trained in data assessment, and professional learning is planned to expand the learning to all members of the Lakeside staff. Data are presented to staff upon receipt from state and county sources, in both aggregate and disaggregated forms, with study groups to analyze and interpret impact. Data of all types are posted on a data wall in the counseling conference center for teachers, administrators and community leaders to study and use in making school-based decisions. Further, data are disaggregated and studied by administration and faculty teams to develop strategies and programs to address sub-group challenges and opportunities.

NCLB Mandate

Provisions for Public Reporting of Disaggregated Data

Describe the various ways by which your school will communicate to the widest possible range of stakeholders (e.g., parents and community) the results of the disaggregated data.

All data are made available to parents via the DeKalb County Schools website, the Lakeside High School website, PTSA newsletters and group emails, as well as at parent meetings devoted to that purpose. Annually, a State of the School address by the principal addresses data and the school status.

Describe the various ways by which your school will communicate the CSIP to the widest possible range of stakeholders.

CSIP information will be made available to all stakeholder groups in the same manner as all data. We will publish pertinent information in the Lakeside PTSA newsletters, post on our website, refer to available information on the marquee, and hold public meetings of parents during PTSA 58

meetings, devoted to the CSIP information. All CSIP information is available in final printed form on the website and in hardcopy in the Lakeside administrative offices as well as the media center.

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Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, SACS Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 10, HSTW: All 10 Key Practices

Describe the qualifications of the staff (teachers, paraprofessionals, and administrators). Certifications must match the responsibilities of each staff member.

Only highly qualified teachers, administrators and support staff are selected and hired at Lakeside. Personnel are selected and hired in highly qualified status at the time of hiring. The Lakeside High School Faculty and Staff consist of 138 total members. The staff consists of one Head Principal, and four assistant principals; they have a support staff of three administrative assistants, a bookkeeper and a registrar. The counseling center has four counselors, one graduation specialist and an administrative assistant. The Media Center is made up of two Media Specialists and an administrative assistant. The school has 9 paraprofessionals, six assigned to the Special Education Department. The School also has one CTSS and four members of the campus security force. The faculty includes 93 certified teachers, plus a posting for a teacher to be hired in math. All teachers are highly qualified.

Describe strategies to attract high-quality, highly qualified teachers to your school.

Administrative concentration on creating and supporting an atmosphere of academic integrity and success coupled with ongoing professional support, training and mentoring have allowed selection of teachers from among highly qualified, high quality, highly motivated and dedicated professionals at Lakeside.

Describe in detail the mentoring program available for teachers new to the profession and teachers new to the school.

Lakeside provides a mentor teacher for each new teacher for their first three years. Teacher Support Specialists from among current veteran teachers work with all new staff, and secure mentor teachers to continue the support effort. Additionally, the principal meets regularly throughout the first two years with new teachers, to further support them in their acclimation. Additional administrative personnel meet with new teachers in each area of specialty, to assure that all new teachers are supported in instruction, attendance, discipline and academy policies and procedures. PTSA support for new teachers includes personal support, immediate provision of logo and culture items to make new teachers feel a part of the school, and ongoing support and appreciation activities throughout the time teachers remain at Lakeside.

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Support for Classroom Teachers

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization, Student, Family, and Community Support, Professional Learning, Leadership and School Culture SACS Standards: 2, 6, 8 and 10 HSTW: Guidance and Advisement, Extra Help, and Culture of Continuous Improvement

Describe how non-classroom teachers (Instructional Coaches, EIP teachers, Title I teachers, Counselors, and Special Area teachers etc) will be used to support the classroom teachers in meeting the school's targets. Non-classroom support personnel from county and resource areas will be invited to analyze Lakeside data in concert with administrative and leadership team personnel, who will then present out their findings at professional learning sessions, as well as in-class observation and coaching opportunities from SREB and HSTW consultants. Observation opportunities will be presented under release-time plans for teachers to observe master teachers at work, and to implement new and innovative techniques in their classrooms.

Describe how parents, community members, business partners etc. not employed by the school system may be of assistance to support the school's targets.

Business partners support Lakeside's initiatives by way of providing off-campus learning space, and supporting our release-time efforts for teacher collaborative training and planning, as well as professional observation of master teachers. Parent volunteers support our efforts extensively during key times of testing, registration, graduation, recognition opportunities and extra-curricular offerings. School Council members support our efforts to reach into the business community for resource personnel, material and financial support, placement opportunities and participate in planning of new initiatives as well as ongoing program evaluations and improvements. Students and community volunteers are helping develop our emerging Hispanic Initiative through planning, resource personnel, and program support.

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Focusing Daily Lessons to Meet Student Needs NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Leadership SACS Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 10 HSTW: All 10 Key Practices Note: The use of assessment data to design and adjust instruction has been addressed in the Teacher Involvement in Decisions Regarding the Use of Academic Assessments section.

Describe how content area teachers align instructional design and implementation with state standards and district expectations for learning.

Classroom teachers align their daily instruction per Georgia Performance Standards and according to QCC Objectives where GPS have not been implemented. DeKalb County pacing guidelines are implemented to aid in course planning and alignment with state standards. Teachers assess for learning through the unit instruction. If mastery is not achieved by the students the insturctor must make adjustments to their instructional methods and redeliver the objectives in a varied technique. Many teachers use pre and post tests to determine whether objectives have been met and which ones may need additional work.

Decribe what steps are taken to ensure that research-based instruction is standard practice.

All instructional design is driven by GPS standards and implemented by way of the HSTW framework of design. HSTW guidelines are driven by research-based design.

Describe how teachers demonstrate high expectations for student work product through in-depth instruction, higher order thinking, challenging assignments, and student responsibility.

Teachers demonstrate high expectations for student work through challenging daily instruction, use of research projects and papers, problems that require higher order thought and creativity and constant challenge in assignments and assessments. Heavy investment in the Advanced Placement program further establishes high expectations for students. College-bound students are expected to take several AP courses. Every student is encouraged to enroll in at least one AP course during their high school career.

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Describe how instructional planning and implementation is monitored to ensure schoolwide cross-curricular learning opportunities and technology integration.

Department chairs and the administrative team routinely collect and check lesson plans for technology integration and interdisciplinary opportunities. Cross-Curricular learning is evident in every grade level: · Ninth Grade- Academy teaming provides an opportunity for English, science, and social studies classes to create interdisciplinary units throughout the semesters. · Tenth Grade- Science and English teachers work with students' Science Fair projects. Students receive a grade in each class for their science project. · Eleventh and Twelfth Grades- Two year process to complete the Senior Project. All students must select a post-secondary career to shadow, interview, and research. Student findings are developed into a formal research paper that is scored by the English teacher. Every Lakeside teacher serves as product mentor for a maximum of three senior projects.

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Differentiated Instruction to Respond to Identified Student Needs NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia Standards for School Performance: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Leadership SACS Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10 HSTW: All 10 Key Practices

Describe how instructional personnel make appropriate use of differentiation using the following criteria:

A. Process: Professional Learning workshops were held where teachers shared non-lecture best practices with each other. Daily focus walks by the administrative team to check for non-lecture moments in classrooms. B. Product: Students show mastery through paper quizzes and tests, oral presentations, project learning, and manufacturing products. C. Performance: Performance is determined mostly through rubrics, GPS, and teacher and administrative feedback-written and oral. D. Learning Environment: The administration encourages a variety of learning environments. Students are often in small groups, paired learning, jigsaw groups, and individual settings. The teachers are tasked with updating the physical environment to reflect current learning through the use of word walls and daily agendas.

Describe how instructional planning and implementation is monitored to ensure differentiated instruction is based on ability, skills level, learning style, and student choice.

Instructional planning and implementation is monitored through: · Monthly department meetings where the agenda is centered on developing a variety of teaching strategies · Development of master schedule based on student needs · Walkthroughs by department chairs and administrative team · Regular IEP and SST meetings to adjust strategies for Students with Disabilities

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Explain the role of the Student Support Team (SST) in identifying students at risk and the process established to customize, monitor, and evaluate effective strategies used to address students academic barriers.

The Student Support Team provides a process for identifying and planning interventions for students at-risk. The Student Support Team includes all professional staff. A committee of at least 5-7 people is formed from the team and this committee facilitates the SST process and monitors the adherence to legal mandates and compliance to state and local procedures. The committee is lead by a chairperson appointed by the principal. If a teacher is appointed, a SST planning period is given. The SST process has 2 phases. Phase I is the regular education emphasis. During this phase, regular meetings are held to review referrals completed on students and provide assistance to teachers and students in the general education setting. Prevention and Intervention are emphasized and the Student Support Team develops a modification plan or a 504 plan. In order to ensure that all students attain their maximum academic, social and emotional potential, the Student Support Team adheres to the following objectives during this phase: 1. Provide a systematic process for responding to student problems through an immediate, efficient in-school approach. 2. Establish a better flow of communication among professional personnel within the school setting. 3. Provide opportunity for all professional personnel to improve their coping skills in dealing with students who have learning and/or adjustment difficulties. 4. Plan, implement and document alternative strategies for meeting the needs of students "at-risk." 5. Provide an environment in the general education setting within which the learning and/or adjustment needs of individual students may be meet. Phase II is the special education support phase. If strategies implemented are not successful and disability is suspected, or if disability suspected based on cumulative records and teacher/parent referral, the student is considered for special education services. In-depth evaluations by special education personnel are involved in the phase. A 504 Plan can also be developed during Phase II. If the student qualifies for Special Education Services, then an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is developed. In order to provide a free appropriate education to all students with disabilities, the Student Support Team adheres to the following objectives during this phase: 1. Follow all aspects of due process. 2. Identify students with disabilities through in-depth, comprehensive educational evaluations. 3. Provide a broad range of competencies and share responsibilities in planning educational programs.

Describe the procedures in place to develop and utilize Level 1 Plans in order to inform and revise daily instruction. Level I plans are mainly developed for ninth grade students only. The process is as follows:

1. Level I students are identified based on 8th grade CRCT reading and math scores 2. Reading teacher received copy of each student's reading score. 3. Basic reading classes built into the master schedule. 65

4. Algebra I or Applied Algebra class assigned to each student deficient in math. 5. 9th grade teachers meet daily in teams to monitor student achievement.

Describe the school-wide policies, procedures and programs in place to address the needs of gifted, talented, and high achieving students through academic rigor (advanced academics). How does the school schedule and classroom instruction ensure the academic rigor required to promote student engagement and increase student achievement for students with high ability levels?

Thirty percent of Lakeside students receive gifted services. 58 percent of all juniors and seniors take Advanced Placement classes. The master schedule is built to give students the best chance of taking every gifted and or AP class that they wish to take. While the gifted program involves actual testing for inclusion in the program, the AP program is offered to any student interested regardless of prior academic ability. Teachers in both the gifted and AP programs must meet certification standards that are set by the district and College Board, respectively. Finally, Lakeside offers advanced courses in all core areas for students that decide that they can handle accelerated work. Students are scheduled into advanced classes at the parent's request or if the student's transcript represents success at that level. PolicyGifted: Lakeside identifies gifted students twice each year through use of the official DeKalb and Georgia processes of testing and profiles. Students that want to test for gifted services must complete an application with the Gifted Coordinator. Full acceptance into the program includes a number of standardized achievement and ability tests as well as tests designed to assess creativity. Finally teacher recommendations are also involved. Advanced Placement: Counselors host individual scheduling meetings with each student and their parents to determine course selections for the following year. Students that elect to take AP courses must sign a form stating that they understand that they are required to remain in the course and that they must take the national exam in May. ProceduresGifted: In order to remain in the gifted program, students must maintain a B average in their gifted classes. There is an academic probation period for students that fall below eighty percent. If the student does not earn a B or better in the following semester, they are removed from the gifted program in that subject area. Advanced Placement: Students that elect to take AP courses must remain in the course for the duration of the year. Students also must sit for the national AP exam to receive the extra quality point in their final grade.

Programs ­ Gifted: Currently Lakeside offers gifted classes in Ninth Grade Literature, World Literature, American Literature, Algebra II, Analysis, Biology, and Chemistry

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Advanced Placement: Currently Lakeside offers AP classes in the following areas: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Physics, Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Statistics, Computer Science, Literature, US History, European History, Psychology, Economics, German, Spanish, French, Art History, Drawing, and Music Theory. Any newly identified students are counseled in the process of selecting gifted classes for their next semester of work. Twenty-one Advanced Placement classes are offered across all disciplines. Enrollment in Advanced Placement is urged for all students at least once during their high school career, to experience a high level of academic rigor. The master schedule is built around the Advanced Placement offerings, to assure all students an equitable opportunity to participate. These classes extend high levels of academic rigor not just to high achievers, but to all students who wish to accept the challenge to participate and succeed.

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Providing Students with Effective, Timely Additional Assistance to Meet Student Needs NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia Standards for School Performance: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, Planning and Organization, and Leadership SACS Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10 HSTW: Extra Help and all 10 Key Practices

Complete the following to address how the school provides effective and timely assistance, beyond the classroom, to students who experience difficulty in mastering standards:

A. Describe how specific, content-related feedback is provided to students in order for them to identify instructional needs

and set goals (include student/parent conferences, grade reports, rubrics, daily grades, etc.).

All Lakeside students receive progress reports at six-week intervals. Students enrolled in the Freshman Academy receive progress reports at three-week intervals. Certain EOCT courses are using three-week assessments to measure students' success in the standards. The school arranges two student/parent conference evenings per semester. The school also facilitates SST meetings with students, teachers, and parents. Teachers are encouraged to provide feedback, through telephone or email communication, to parents, and arrange conferences when necessary or requested. Also, all academy team teachers meet regularly and host conferences in which the student, parent, and academy teachers are present.

B. Explain how students at risk are identified and include the intervals that student data is reviewed for identification.

At-risk students are identified by teacher/faculty observation, student records, behavioral referrals, grade reports, periodic assessments, discipline report, and counselor conferences. There is a Graduation Specialist and Prevention and Intervention Specialist on campus that assists with making sure students do not go unidentified. Student data is reviewed in the ninth grade formally every three weeks through progress reports. The entire school receives progress reports every six weeks.

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C. Include the professional learning that will be provided for teachers in the identification of students at risk and

strategies used to address academic barriers.

HSTW will continue to provide professional learning opportunities to help identify students at risk and to provide strategies to address academic barriers. SREB training in Biology, Physical Science, and Algebra I was scheduled throughout the year to assist teachers in these areas. We continue to focus on best practices through department meetings.

D. What additional assistance will be available beyond regular school hours? This includes school and community

activities.

Teachers and students will assist students through a variety of programs. The National Honor Society and the Senior Mentoring Program provide before, during, and after school tutorials for students needing academic assistance. For freshmen and their parents, Science Under the Stars meets once a month to provide information about study skills and other science-related topics valuable to the high school learning experience. There is also an online tutorial, PLATO that will be available for students in algebra, science, and other academic courses. The PTSA provides students with an SAT preparatory course three times during the year on Saturday mornings.

E. How are the processes identified in A, B, C, and D monitored?

These processes are monitored through administrative walkthroughs, department meeting feedback sheets, Professional Learning attendance logs, and attendance logs at tutorials and special extra help programs.

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Support Services for Student Learning

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization, Student, Family and Community Support, Leadership and School Culture SACS Standards: 6, 7, 8 and 10 HSTW: Culture of Continuous Improvement

Describe how the school provides support through counseling and academic advisements to enhance the academic achievement of all learners in a diverse student population. How is each student ensured access to an adult advisor, mentor, or counselor?

Every student in the building has a counselor; counselors are assigned to students alphabetically. The counseling department meets with students at each grade level prior to the start of a new school year. The students receive academic advisement to ensure they are taking the appropriate courses for their career and diploma choice. The counselors make sure that students are on track to graduate on time. Seniors have conferences that are held only with a parent present. The graduation coach assists with keeping students on track for graduation. The coach particularly works with students at risk of dropping out.

How does the school provide student services in the areas of health, nutrition, safety, and transportation?

When students are identified as needing non-educational assistance, individual conferences with appropriate professionals are initiated. Parents are contacted to assist with identifying the needs or to provide background information to help solve the issue. Students in need of food, clothing or shelter, are referred to the Counseling Office. When outside agencies are needed to assist, the School Social Worker is contacted. Minor medical issues (prescriptions) are handled by the school attendance office. Major medical needs are referred to the parents/Social Worker. In many instances, the school has provided Hospital Homebound services to students while they are managing their illness. Additionally, the assigned Prevention/Intervention Specialist assists the school with teaching appropriate decision-making skills that include health and safety issues.

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How does the school provide appropriate support for students with special needs?

The Student Support Team is a joint effort of regular and special education to identify and plan instructional programs for students at-risk. The Student Support Team includes all professional staff. A committee of at least 5-7 people is formed from the team and this committee facilitates the SST process and monitors the adherence to legal mandates and compliance to state and local procedures. The committee is lead by a chairperson. In secondary schools, the principal appoints a chairperson. If a teacher is appointed, a SST planning period is given. The counselor serves as chair in the elementary school. Every school in the DeKalb County School System has an SST that meets on a regular scheduled basis. The SST process has 2 phases. Phase I is the regular education emphasis. During this phase, regular meetings are held to review referrals completed on students and provide assistance to teachers and students in the general education setting. Prevention and Intervention are emphasized and the Student Support Team develops a modification plan or a 504 plan. In order to ensure that all students attain their maximum academic, social and emotional potential, the Student Support Team adheres to the following objectives during this phase: 1. Provide a systematic process for responding to student problems through an immediate, efficient in-school approach. 2. Establish a better flow of communication among professional personnel within the school setting. 3. Provide opportunity for all professional personnel to improve their coping skills in dealing with students who have learning and/or adjustment difficulties. 4. Plan, implement and document alternative strategies for meeting the needs of students "at-risk." 5. Provide an environment in the general education setting within which the learning and/or adjustment needs of individual students may be meet. Phase II is the special education support phase. If strategies implemented are not successful and disability is suspected, or if disability suspected based on cumulative records and teacher/parent referral, the student is considered for special education services. In-depth evaluations by special education personnel are involved in the phase. A 504 Plan can also be developed during Phase II. If the student qualifies for Special Education Services, then an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is developed. In order to provide a free appropriate education to all students with disabilities, the Student Support Team adheres to the following objectives during this phase: 6. Follow all aspects of due process. 7. Identify students with disabilities through in-depth, comprehensive educational evaluations. 8. Provide a broad range of competencies and share responsibilities in planning educational programs. 9. Develop Individual Educational Programs (IEP) for identified students. Professional learning in provided in instructional strategies for teaching students with special needs. Collaborative planning and special programs are implemented. There is a full time Special Education coordinator at the school (SVELT) to assist with planning, training and monitoring the Special Education program. ELL/LEP students: Our growing ELL program is served by five ELL teachers. These teachers meet with the counselors and administrative team regular to make decisions for student achievement. Instructional strategies for our ELL students include: · Annual ACCESS testing to determine English Language acquisition level. 71

· · · ·

ELL students scheduled into ESOL-sheltered classes in English courses Additional ELL elective courses in basic reading and grammar Media Center Specialist outside reading initiative for extra credit. Future plans include: Professional Learning to address specific learning styles of ELL students, adding more sheltered classes in science and social studies, grant search to fund after school program.

If a student's needs cannot be met by the school, how does the site facilitate the assistance of other agencies?

The social worker and counselor intercede on behalf of the child and teacher. They contact the parent in order to gain permission to seek assistance from outside agencies.

Describe how the school maintains secure, accurate, and complete student record systems in accordance with state and federal law and regulation.

There is a system in place for establishing and maintaining permanent records. The counseling department and registrar are responsible for student records. These records are strictly confidential. A student's grade file, which contains previous transcripts, disciplinarian reports, shot records, etc, is kept in the counseling center in a secure area. If a student receives SST services or has a 504 plan, that information is kept in a secure area designated by the SST chair. The SST chair does not share that information with anyone outside of the student's teachers. If a student has an IEP, the file is kept with the student's case manager. This information is also strictly confidential and shared in part with only the student's teachers for academic purposes.

How does the school provide educational opportunities to help parents and teachers understand the various stages of student development?

In the spring, the administration hosts a rising 9th grade parent night for middle school students. There are also daytime tours available for parents that want to see the school in action. At each of these meetings, parents receive information about the academic expectations that we have for all of our students. Programs such as gifted, AP, extra help, and 9th grade academy are also highlighted. Parents learn about graduation requirements, testing, and the school's rules and regulations. Finally, parents have the opportunity to sign up for weekly Lakeside newsletters from the school and PTA. The school provides additional opportunities to parents through parent-teacher conference nights that are held every six weeks. Additionally, parents can call the counseling center at any time to request a meeting with all of their child's teachers. Ninth grade teachers have planning time built into the school day to host such meetings as well.

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Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Student, Family, and Community Support, Leadership SACS Standards: 8, 9 and 10 HSTW: Guidance and Advisement and Culture of Continuous Improvement

Describe how the School Improvement Plan will include the meaningful involvement of parents and community members in planning and implementing school improvement activities. Be sure to include details about how the school will build parents' capacity for involvement and design ways in which parents can be brought into the instructional program and contribute to the academic achievement of their children. The description of the strategies should include:

The school establishes a network between parents and community to support student learning. · PTSA newsletter is printed in Spanish · Scholarship Under the Stars for freshman academy students and their parents once a month. Focuses on study skills and what parents can do to help their student make the transition to high school work more successful. · Guidance Nights: class night for the parents to come and learn more about what specifics that year entails 1. Seniors: Financial Aid Night 2. Juniors: What to expect in your senior year. 3. Freshman /Sophomores : Course Offerings 4. Upcoming freshman: What to expect in your freshman year. · All 9th grade students receive progress reports every three weeks with an opportunity for parents to schedule conferences. · Freshman Academy Scholars Breakfast There have been class meeting this year to explain the standards and what will be expected of the students in that class. Parent conferences are scheduled after each 6 week progress report so that parents can meet with teachers. Teachers also contact parents of students who are not making progress on standards.

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Plans for Assisting Children During Transitions NCLB Mandate

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standard: Planning and Organization, Leaadership and School Culture SACS Standards: 2, 7, 8, 9 and 10 HSTW: Teachers Working Together and Culture of Continuous Improvement

Describe your plans for assisting all other levels of student transition (new students, grade to grade, elementary to middle, middle to high, early childhood programs, Special Education, English Language Learners Program, group home participants, etc.)

Grade to Grade The following are key indicators and expectations for student learning: QCC's, GPS, IEP goals and objectives, SST Plans, Course Syllabi and Resumes, SAT scores, ACT scores, AP scores, EOCT scores, GHSGT scores, participation in levels in Governor's Honors programs, post secondary option participation and early admission to major colleges and universities. Throughout a student's career, data to evaluate the student's learning is collected and disaggregated. Parents and guardians are kept up to date on their child's progress through progress reports, report cards, parent conferences, notes, letters, emails, and phone calls, Level 1 Plans, IEP goals and objectives. In addition data from the following standardized assessments are used to evaluate student learning: GHGT, GAA, PSAT, SAT, ACT, AP, and EOCT. Lakeside maintains a current comprehensive profile of student performance data through confidential and individual student records held in counseling, instruction, attendance and discipline offices. Community and school characteristics are also available on Smartweb, the DeKalb County Schools database, school issued agenda books and completed applications for free and reduced lunch applications. Lakeside uses the following data in making decisions for continuous improvement: Middle school CRCT scores for the development of Level 1 Plans, IEP goals and objectives, SST referrals, SST goals and objectives, student tutorials for GHSGT and parent referrals in addition to the standardized test results listed above. Faculty uses this information to better understand their students. In the 2005-2006 school year, an advisement period was implemented. The 2006-2007 school year, sees the program developing more with homeroom and homeroom teachers being the same until the student graduates. The homeroom teacher is responsible for maintaining the students' portfolios from year to year. Though the curriculum for the advisement is still being developed, students are able to ask questions (career, academic, life choices) of their advisor, receive information about school events, and study. The PTA sponsors recovery classes in Biology, Geometry, Algebra I after school. These are for students who did not pass the course and are given another opportunity to comprehend the curriculum. Counselors advise students based upon their grade level needs as well as provide referrals to the social worker as needed. Seniors tutor 9th graders. As well, the National Honor Society members tutor all grades. Teachers offer tutorial sessions before and/or after school. 74

Middle to High School Lakeside High school implemented the Ninth Grade Academy in the fall of 2005. F.I.R.S.T. stands for Freshman Inclined to Reach Success Together. Teachers will also collaborate across the disciplines. Administration and counseling will assure students are correctly placed in their classes and assure that each student has mastered the 8th grade curriculum prior to entering high school. One way that teachers monitor the FIRST Academy is by sending home detailed progress reports every three weeks informing parents of their student's average and any behavior concerns. Parents should be aware of their student's progress throughout the school year in order to prevent failure or stop behavior problems immediately. Lakeside provides parent conference times after each progress report cycle to support struggling students and their parents. The Academy allows parents to meet with teachers during the teachers' common planning period. The Academy teachers discuss those students who need remediation and come up with a plan to help the students who are in danger of failing. They offer advisory time daily for the ninth grade academy to personalize high school and begin the planning process for students' futures. There are several resources offered to the incoming ninth graders to help them adjust to high school. Senior mentors are paired with ninth graders to show them around the school, help them get organized, and to be a peer leader in their lives. Teachers offer tutorials during the week. National Honor Society students offer once a week tutoring during advisement period or before or after school to assist students with homework and to help study for tests and quizzes. Special Needs The new federal guidelines for IDEA require a transition plan that includes measurable goals and objectives. The Law also requires a Summary of Educational Performance for all students exiting High School. The LHS special services department completes the transition plan first during the IEP meeting. There will be one transition plan that follows the students through their High School Career. The original plan will be maintained in the student's IEP folder. The transition plan is part of the IEP. A copy will be submitted each year with the annual IEP. The first page of the transition plan will be completed each school year. Page 1 of the transition plan will be completed during the 8th grade year before the student enters high school. Included will be results from the Future Focus and any other relevant test scores. Case managers, SEVLT's, and students complete the new transition plan. Under each main area ­ a minimum of 2 goals and 2 objectives should be targeted for each school year. At the annual review, all relevant parties review what has been accomplished and select those goals and objectives to be addressed during the next year ­[ addressing and updating the transition plan during each annual review (or more often if needed).] All IEP students should work on and complete the portfolio goal as part of their high school program. The Summary of Educational Performance is completed by the RVI instructors and case managers. They will include a sentence in each area to describe the student's current status. Attached will be a student transcript when appropriate. This will be completed on all students including those who participate in the Independent Living Program.

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ESOL Entering students enroll in the International Center for approximately 6 weeks. The center releases them based on a standardized test. Once at LHS, they are enrolled in ESOL and are tested again. Students remain in ESOL until they attain a minimum score of 25% on the Language Arts Battery, or 40% on the Gates MacGinite test. Students must sit for the ACCESS exam each year to assess their level of English language acquisition in writing, speaking, hearing, and reading. Once the student scores a five or above, they are exited from the ELL program. Students remain in the ELL program until the score at least a four or better. At this point, students are put on an ELL-monitored status. ELL teachers and content teachers discuss strategies to help ELL students succeed in the regular classroom. As our program continues to grow, the search for relevant professional learning in this area is mandatory.

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Financial Resources

Quality Assurance: Georgia School Standards: Planning and Organization, SACS Standards: 2, 6.13, 6.14, 6.15, 6.16, 10. HSTW: Culture of Continuous Improvement

Describe how the school will ensure that budgets are sufficient resources to support the school's vision, mission, beliefs, educational programs, and action plans for improvement.

All budgets derive from the Board of Education. Each school is allotted funds based on per pupil totals. Each school is also allotted a budget for equipment, special education and special education equipment. When these budgets are given, the principal and the bookkeeper sit down together and based on the spending of the previous year, the budget is divided among the various school departments based on need.

Describe how all financial transactions will be monitored through a recognized and regularly audited accounting system.

All budgets are placed on a separate spreadsheet that is used to tracks what is purchased, vendor and spending dollars.

Describe how all funds raised in the name of the school will comply with financial controls.

All funds that are raised in the name of the school are placed into said account and deposited into Bank of America by way of receipt book, tally form and transported via Dunbar Security.

Describe the process for implementing a remuneration plan for all members of the staff that recognizes the administration head as the highest paid employee.

The DeKalb County School System has established a salary schedule for all staff members that meets the SACS standard for remuneration.

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Use the chart on the following page to describe how the CSIP will coordinate funds from state, local, and Federal programs.

Coordination and Integration of Federal, State, and Local Services and Programs

Funding Sources Title I, Part A Title I (School Improvement Grant) Title I, Part F (Comprehensive School Reform) Title II A ­ Reduced Class Size Title V, Part A (Innovative Education/Textbooks) Professional Learning Funds State Technology Smaller Learning Communities Grants (list) PTSA Partners in Education Other (list) Title III funds Title III funds will be used for tutoring ESOL students. Do not have any at the present time; we have teachers that will start looking into applying for grants. Grants for classroom enrichment N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Teacher release time to observe peer teachers, HSTW initiatives, professional content conference. Provide a narrative explanation of how funds will be used to support student achievement and/or school improvement in relation to the components of this plan. Please be specific.

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Physical Resources

Quality Assurance: Georgia Standards for School Performance: Planning and Organization, Leadership, School Culture SACS Standards 6.17, 6.18, 6.19, 6.20

Describe how the school will comply with applicable local, state, and federal laws, standards and regulations.

The school maintains the student population within the limits set by state standards concerning maximum class size. We incorporate portable units as needed to relieve classroom overcrowding. Lunchroom schedules have been modified and balanced to prevent violation of county fire codes. All buildings are regularly inspected and maintained to insure compliance with all local, state and federal safety regulations.

Describe how the school will develop and implement a plan for maintaining and improving the site, facilities and equipment.

Surveys of teachers, parents and community leaders are conducted to get their feedback on improvements that should be implemented in relation to the site, facilities, and equipment. Coordinate with school district personnel to make needed repairs and improvements in a timely and least disruptive way to the educational environment.

Describe how the school will provide facilities, equipment and a site necessary for effective implementation of the instructional and extracurricular programs.

Five computer labs provide approximately 150 computer stations for student class and lab use in mathematics, English language arts, business education and technology education at Lakeside. Two of the five labs are available for support of science and social studies instruction on an as needed basis. The media center contains another twenty stations for student and teacher use. Multi-media production, editing and projection equipment are available through the media center and the technology lab for both student and teacher use. In addition to the permanent instructional facility, Lakeside has 20 portable classrooms on campus. Each portable unit is a traditional singlewide trailer type unit capable of accommodating twenty-eight students for classroom instruction. Computer usage is facilitated in the portable units by way of wireless technology.

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Athletic facilities at Lakeside include a gymnasium with performing arts stage and wrestling balcony, and boys' and girls' locker rooms inside the building. Exterior facilities include a regulation size football field for varsity practice as well as junior varsity and ninth grade competition. The field is surrounded by a 440-yard asphalt track complete with high jump, long jump and pole vault pits. This field is used as a soccer facility in the spring season. A softball field, baseball field and a double tennis court complete the athletic complex. None of the outdoor facilities are lighted for night use. In anticipation of a replacement HVAC project, tennis courts have temporarily been used to house eight of the 20 portable classrooms, until the replacement project has been completed. In the interim, local neighborhood tennis clubs and the DeKalb Tennis Center are accommodating tennis practices and competitions. Classroom facilities are available before and after school for meetings of extracurricular clubs and organizations.

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Bibliography

Bibliography

Anstrom, Kris, Steeves, Kathleen. Preparing Secondary Education Teachers to work with English Language Learners: Social Studies. NCBE Resource Collection, No 13, June 1999 Dekalb R.E.A.D.S Coordinators. 2003 What Every DeKalb Administrator needs to Know about the Balanced Approach to Literacy: A Guide to Successful Implementation. Freeman, David, Freeman, Yvonne 1988. Sheltered English Instruction. Eric Clearing House on Languages and Linguistics Washington, DC.ED301070. Gamoran, Adam, Andrew C. Porter, John Smithson, and Paula A. White. 1997. Upgrading High School Mathematics Instruction: Improving Learning Opportunities for Low-Achieving, Low-Income Youth. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 19 (4):325­338 Helmar-Salasoo, Ester. 1995 A National Study of States' Roles in Choosing Reading and Literature for Second language Learning. Hoffer, T.B, K.A. Rasinski, and W. Moore. 1995. Social Background Differences in High School Mathematics and Science Course Taking and Achievement. In U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.. Jacob, Walter R. Seven Tips for Improving Instructional Skills: Reminders for Teachers. Higher Education and Leadership Prep. Levin, Henry M. 1988. Structuring Schools for Greater Effectiveness With Educationally Disadvantaged or At-Risk Students. Paper read at annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, April, at New Orleans, LA. Marshall, Hermine H., and Rhona S. Weinstein. 1984. Classroom Factors Affecting Students: Self Evaluation: An Interaction Model. Review of Educational Research 54 (3):301­325. Oakes, Jeannie. 1990. Multiplying Inequalities: The Effects of Race, Social Class, and Tracking on Opportunities to Learn Mathematics and Science. Santa Monica, CA: The RAND Corporation. Phelps, Stevens. 2005 Ten Years of Research on Adolescent Literary, Learning Point Associates.

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Quality Education for Minorities Project. 1990. Education That Works: An Action Plan for the Education of Minorities. Cambridge, MA. Rock, D.A., and J.M. Pollack. 1995. The Relationship Between Gains in Achievement in Mathematics and Selected Course Taking Behaviors. In U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Of Byrne, Gregory. 1995. Study Suggests There's No Place Like Home for Math and Science. Education Week:8. Rosenthal, Robert, and Lenore Jacobson. 1968. Pygmalion in the Classroom: Teacher Expectations and Pupils' Intellectual Development. New York: Rinehart and Winston. Strategies for Teaching. Limited English Proficient (LEP). http://www.doe.virginia.gov/VDOE/Instruction/ESL/LEPenglishResource.pdf.

Van Lehn, K., S. Siler, and W.B. Baggett. 1998. What Makes a Tutorial Event Effective? In Proceedings of the Twenty-First Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, edited by M. A. Gernsbacher and S. Derry. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. www.gaosa.org http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/ http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/ReadingWritingBrief.asp

Surveys with Results Surveys with Results (blank copies of any survey or questionnaire instruments, accompanied by any charts, table, or graphs depicting summarized results from the administration of these instruments)

Appendix Table of Contents

Profile SpringBoard Diagnostic Results 82

Survey Results SAI Results Professional Learning Budget Quality Review--Monitoring Process AYP NI Assurance Form AYP NI Action Plans Additional Supporting Documents

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