Read Microsoft Word - Bus Stop Guidelines 10-4-06.doc text version

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES

Prepared for

By

Darnell & ASSOCIATES

October 4, 2006

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 1 DISCLAIMER The purpose of these guidelines is to develop suggested design criteria that should be considered when designing and placing transit facilities. This information is not to be used as a set of standard details on which to base a final design, but rather as recommended criteria and general guidance for the placement and safe design of transit facilities. It cannot be overemphasized that these guidelines must be used in conjunction with sound evaluation of the facts and engineering judgment. These guidelines are intended to be used for actions on new or revised stop locations, and do not intend to apply to existing stop locations. Local jurisdictions, in adopting these guidelines, indicate their general acceptance of the information provided. Their acceptance of these guidelines does not modify or supersede their current standards and/or policies otherwise adopted by the jurisdiction.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was developed by and for OMNITRANS, a joint powers authority governed by a 20-member Board of Directors representing the County of San Bernardino and the 15 cities OMNITRANS serves. OMNITRANS staff was assisted by Darnell & Associates of San Diego, who was the contractor hired by OMNITRANS to assist them in completing the project. Mervin Acebo of OMNITRANS was the project manager, and worked with the input of Rohan Kuruppu, Allen Wild, Gabe Serna, Steve Markovic, and Don Frazier. Jonathan Levy of Darnell & Associates led the consultant team. Portions of the development and the review of the guidelines were performed by a committee of representatives of the cities in the service area, the County of San Bernardino, SANBAG, and CALTRANS. Those participating included, Cliff Shieh, Gary Green, Ray Desselle, Lorna Foster, Charles Lau and Eric Bessell (Caltrans), Henry Noh (Chino Hills), Sky Warden and Chris Winters (Colton), Anthony Riely, (San Bernardino County), Leticia Ortiz, Paul Balbach and Eric Lewis (Fontana), Richard Shields (Grand Terrace), Dennis Barton and Larry Williams (Highland), Jeffrey Peterson (Loma Linda), Mauricio Diaz (Ontario), John Martin, Michael Diaz and Jerry Dyer (Rancho Cucamonga), David Jump (Redlands), Brian Foote (San Bernardino), Steve Hinajos and Dave Phelps (Sheriff), Alex Qishta (Upland), Fermin Preciado (Yucaipa). We would also like to thank those involved in previous work on bus stop guidelines, as these were used as base information to develop our local guidelines. Most notable of these were TCRP Report 19 by the Transportation Research Board, the Orange County (CA) Transportation Authority, Metropolitan Transit Development Board of San Diego, CA, PalmTran of Palm Beach County Florida, and Arlington County (VA). Other valuable information was obtained from CalTrans documents, including the CalTrans Design and Traffic Manuals. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .............................................................................................................. 1 INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................. 5 Goals ............................................................................................................................................. 5 1. BUS STOP POLICIES ............................................................................................................. 6 1.1. Bus Stop Siting And Review Policy and Procedures........................................... 6 1.2. Background ..................................................................................................................... 6 1.3. Requests For Changes In Bus Stops ....................................................................... 6 1.4. General, Community And Specific Plans ................................................................ 7 1.5. Development Plan Review........................................................................................... 8 1.6. Construction Impacts ................................................................................................... 8 1.7. Resolution Of Conflicts Between OMNITRANS And Jurisdictions .................. 9 1.8. Point of Contact.............................................................................................................. 9 BUS STOP PLACEMENT..................................................................................................... 10 2.1. Stop Spacing................................................................................................................. 10 2.2. Placement of Bus Stops............................................................................................. 11 2.3. Curb Clearance for Bus Stopping Zones .............................................................. 12 2.4. Placement in Relation to Roadway ......................................................................... 13 2.5. Abutting Property Owners / Tenants ...................................................................... 19 2.6. Parking Restrictions at Bus Stops .......................................................................... 20 2.7. Bus Stops and Driveways.......................................................................................... 20 2.8. Additional Factors in Selecting a Bus Stop Location ........................................ 20 MINIMUM BUS STOP ELEMENTS................................................................................... 22 3.1. Landing Area................................................................................................................. 22 3.2. Pedestrian Connections............................................................................................. 26 3.3. Curb Ramps................................................................................................................... 28 3.4. Signage........................................................................................................................... 28 3.5. Safety and Security ..................................................................................................... 29 3.6. Newspaper and Vendor Boxes................................................................................. 30 PASSENGER AMENITIES AT BUS STOPS...................................................................... 31 4.1. Shelters........................................................................................................................... 31 4.2. Bus Benches ................................................................................................................. 32 4.3. Trash Receptacles ....................................................................................................... 33 4.4. Lighting........................................................................................................................... 34 4.5. Landscape Features.................................................................................................... 34 4.6. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Features............................................. 34 4.7. Transfer Centers .......................................................................................................... 34 4.8. Developer Responsibilities ....................................................................................... 35

2.

3.

4.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 3 4.9. Bus Stop Maintenance................................................................................................ 35 4.10. Bicycle Parking......................................................................................................... 35 5. DESIGN PARAMETERS ...................................................................................................... 37 5.1. Bus Turnouts ................................................................................................................ 37 5.2. Bus Shelters .................................................................................................................. 37 5.3. Bus Stop Signs............................................................................................................. 49 5.4. Transit Priority Measures .......................................................................................... 52 5.5. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Guidelines....................................................................... 54 5.6. Bus Bulbs / Nubs ......................................................................................................... 55 5.8. Street Design for Buses ............................................................................................. 59 5.9. Construction Impacts to Bus Operations.............................................................. 67 BACKGROUND INFORMATION ...................................................................................... 69 6.1. Summary Of Requirements....................................................................................... 69 6.2. Bibliography .................................................................................................................. 71 6.3. Glossary of Terms ....................................................................................................... 72

6.

APPENDIX A - OMNITRANS Vehicle Fleet Information...................................................... 74 APPENDIX B: Point of Contact Information.......................................................................... 76 APPENDIX C: Distance Conversion Table ............................................................................ 78

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 4

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 2-1: Typical Dimensions For Farside Bus Stops .............................................16 Figure 2-2: Typical Dimensions for Nearside Bus Stops............................................17 Figure 2-3: Typical Dimensions for Midblock Bus Stops ............................................18 Figure 3-1: Typical Stop Dimensions - Contiguous Sidewalks...................................23 Figure 3-2: Typical Stop Dimensions - Sidewalk Behind Parkway .............................24 Figure 3-3: Typical Stop Dimensions - Meandering Sidewalk.....................................25 Figure 5-1: Farside Turnout Design ..............................................................................38 Figure 5-2: Nearside Turnout Design ............................................................................39 Figure 5-3: Midblock Turnout Design (Type 1A) ..........................................................40 Figure 5-4: Midblock Turnout Cross Section Design (Type 1A) .................................41 Figure 5-5: Mid-Block Turnout Design (Type 1B).........................................................42 Figure 5-6: Dimensions Of Multiple Berth Bus Turnouts ............................................43 Figure 5-7: Typical Shelter Layout ................................................................................45 Figure 5-8: Shelter Clearance ........................................................................................46 Figure 5-9: Shelter Placement........................................................................................47 Figure 5-10: Typical OMNITRANS Bus Shelter Plan ....................................................48 Figure 5-11: Bus Stop Sign Placement Criteria............................................................50 Figure 5-12: Typical Post Anchor Detail .......................................................................51 Figure 5-13: Typical Queue Jumper Installation ..........................................................56 Figure 5-14: Bus Bulb / Nub Design ..............................................................................57 Figure 5-15: Bus Bulb / Nub Design ..............................................................................58 Figure 5-16: Concrete Bus Pad Design .........................................................................60 Figure 5-17: Concrete Bus Pad Cross Section Design ................................................61 Figure 5-18: Curb Design For Bus Turning...................................................................62 Figure 5-19: Typical Dimensions ­ 40' Transit Bus .....................................................63 Figure 5-20: Typical Dimensions - Articulated (60') Transit Bus ................................64 Figure 5-21: Design Turning Template For 40' Bus Design ........................................65 Figure 5-22: Design Turning Template For Articulated Bus Design...........................66

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 5

INTRODUCTION This document summarizes the recommended guidelines for bus stop design in OMNITRANS Service Area. Purpose of the Design Guidelines The purpose of this manual is to develop suggested design criteria that should be considered when designing and placing transit facilities. These guidelines are developed by OMNITRANS, working with the jurisdictions they serve with the goal of providing comfortable and convenient high quality facilities at bus stop locations, while considering the operational needs of the Transit Agency, the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), other federal and state accessibility mandates, and public safety. These guidelines are intended for use by city planners, designers, traffic engineers, developers, and other public officials. The general public may also find these guidelines useful in understanding the current practices for the placement of transit facilities. By no means is this information to be used as standard details on which to base a final design, but rather as recommended criteria and general guidance for the placement and safe design of transit facilities. It cannot be overemphasized that these guidelines must be used in conjunction with sound evaluation of the facts and engineering judgment. Each particular site must be thoroughly examined and each particular project must be evaluated from the aspect of safety, operational requirements, and cost-effectiveness. Design solutions may need to be adjusted accordingly to satisfy site specific constraints and applicable local ordinances. These guidelines are intended to be used for actions on new or revised stop locations, and do not intend to apply to existing stop locations. Goals The goals of the guidelines are to: · Promote consistency in bus stop placement and design throughout the OMNITRANS service area; · Encourage local jurisdictions to design bus stops to be served by OMNITRANS, meeting operational requirements of their fleet; and · Encourage the members of the community to use public transit through the provision of safe, comfortable, and convenient transit facilities. The guidelines are organized in the following five sections: Section 1: Bus Stop Policies, which discusses policies and procedures to be used in adding, changing and removing bus stops, and related amenities within the service area. Section 2: Bus Stop Placement, which discusses factors to be considered in selecting new bus stop locations along a route.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 6 Section 3: Minimum Bus Stop Elements, which addresses the minimum characteristics needed in order for a bus stop to be functional for bus and customer use, including persons with disabilities. Section 4: Passenger Amenities at Bus Stops, which discusses additional bus stop features that enhance the attractiveness of transit as a transportation alternative. Section 5: Design Parameters, details of geometric design guidelines for Bus Stops and Bus Routes Section 6: Background Information, information that is useful in designing and reviewing proposed designs

1.

BUS STOP POLICIES

1.1. Bus Stop Siting And Review Policy and Procedures This policy establishes a systematic process for the purpose of siting new bus stops and reviewing current bus stops. The policy specifies the processes for making these decisions, and sets the process for developing transit plans and for the review of projects that may affect transit operations. This policy and procedure also ensures that the bus stops receive the proper assessment and technical review before they are moved or established. 1.2. Background OMNITRANS is a joint powers authority governed by a 20-member Board of Directors representing the County of San Bernardino and the 15 cities OMNITRANS serves. It is the intent of OMNITRANS that all bus stops are in compliance with the regulations that govern these types of uses in each applicable jurisdiction. It is also OMNITRANS' intent to provide an established and consistent method for the review of proposed and current bus stops. 1.3. Requests For Changes In Bus Stops Potential bus stop locations or concerns regarding existing stops may originate from any number of sources. These requests or complaints include issues such as requests to add, move, or remove bus stops or bus service, add, move or remove amenities at existing bus stops, and operational or safety issues related to the stop location. Intake: If the request is received directly by OMNITRANS, they will process as described below. If the local jurisdiction receives the request, they will initially review the request, and forward it to OMNITRANS with their recommendations. Review: When OMNITRANS receives the request, OMNITRANS staff will consult with the affected jurisdictions as necessary to respond to the request. Both Omnitrans and local jurisdiction staff will review the request and determine if the stop should be included, Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 7 relocated, or removed; requires the placement or removal of amenities; or if the stop in question raises any safety or operational challenges. If the issue with the stop affects the safety of OMNITRANS passengers, an analysis of the site by both OMNITRANS and the local jurisdiction should be performed to identify alternatives that reduce the dangerous condition. Careful consideration should be taken to ensure that removal of the stop may have a direct impact on persons that utilize the stop on a daily basis. Implementation: For requests forwarded to OMNITRANS by a jurisdiction, OMNITRANS will notify the jurisdiction of its recommendation either by copy, or separate correspondence. If as the result of request, the local jurisdiction is required to perform work such as placement of signs, and/or painting of red curbs, OMNITRANS will notify the jurisdiction in writing of the required work to be completed. Notification of adjacent property owners will be made by the jurisdiction if necessary. 1.4. General, Community And Specific Plans As the member agencies create or update their general, community plans, or specific area plans, there is an opportunity to review development patterns and incorporate transit planning into the planning process. OMNITRANS should be included early in the planning process, and a transit element should be included in the plan. The transit element should include proposed bus routes, transit centers, and special services such as bus rapid transit (BRT). Plan Initiation: Once the local jurisdiction begins the process to revise an existing, or create a new plan, OMNITRANS should be informed. OMNITRANS staff should be invited to meetings regarding transportation infrastructure, and access to communities, neighborhoods or developments. Initial drafts and scoping letters should be coordinated with OMNITRANS to ensure that transit needs are considered prior to the formal public review process. Review: OMNITRANS shall be provided the opportunity to review and respond to all proposed plan changes before and during the public review process. Implementation: Local jurisdictions will be responsible for implementing General, Community, and Specific Plans as approved by their councils and commissions. Any amendments to these plans that will have a direct impact on the location of stops should be forwarded to OMNITRANS for review and comment.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 8 1.5. Development Plan Review Development plans are processed by the member cities and county on a regular basis. These plans may directly impact bus stops and bus routes. In addition, jurisdictions also use their Capital Improvement Programs (CIP) to build or improve streets that may affect transit. The intent of this process is to determine which plans are likely to affect transit service now, or in the future so they can be reviewed, and necessary space and amenities provided for needed bus stops and routes. It is also the intent of this process to avoid reviewing plans which will not have affects on transit, to avoid wasted effort, and unnecessary delays to projects. Intake: Development and roadway improvement plans received by jurisdictions will be evaluated for potential impacts on current or future transit operations using the following criteria. Plans which meet one or more of the following criteria should be sent to OMNITRANS for review. · Identified Transit Streets in General, Community or Specific Plans · Existing streets with transit routes · Major Streets · Projects that affect streets serving high density residential, commercial, industrial areas or educational or medical institutions. · Streets that would logically connect existing or planned transit routes or connecting areas which have or are planned to have transit service. · Any other project that in the jurisdiction's opinion should be assessed for current or future transit needs. Review: The jurisdiction should send one (1) set of development plans to OMNITRANS with a letter or checklist that indicates why the plans were selected for review, basic project information such as proposed usage should be on the plans or included on the letter, the name of the contact person at the jurisdiction, and the name and contact information of the contact person of the developer, or project manager for CIP projects. OMNITRANS will review the plans, and consult with the jurisdiction or others as necessary to properly comment on the plans. OMNITRANS will provide comments on the plans to the jurisdiction by marking on the proposed plans, and/or by separate letter. Revised plans should be returned to OMNITRANS along with prior comments for subsequent reviews. OMNITRANS approval will be documented by a signature on the check plans, or on a separate document. 1.6. Construction Impacts Some projects will disrupt the street system and/or bus stops during the construction process, even if there is no long term affect on transit operations or bus stops. An example would be a water pipeline replacement project that may require temporary displacement of bus stops or routes, but no permanent route or stop changes. Prior to approval of these plans, OMNITRANS should be contacted by the jurisdiction, or the project proponent. OMNITRANS staff will work with the jurisdiction to develop a plan that maintains reasonable transit access and operations while the project is being constructed. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 9 Projects that will create short-term impacts to bus stops and routes (e.g. street resurfacing) shall be provided to OMNITRANS at least 5 working days prior to work being performed. Longer term disruption should be reviewed and discussed in a manner similar to the development plan review process discussed above. 1.7. Resolution Of Conflicts Between OMNITRANS And Jurisdictions The decision on the location of bus stops is the responsibility of the local jurisdiction, who considers the recommendations made by OMNITRANS prior to making a final decision. Jurisdictions have the authority to remove bus stops in cases where safety issues exist. When jurisdictions remove stops for safety concerns, they shall notify, and work in conjunction with OMNITRANS in an effort to solve the safety problem and reopen or relocate the stop in a timely manner. If situations occur where the staff of OMNITRANS and that of the jurisdiction are unable to agree on proposed plans, bus stop locations, or other issues, the issue is to be raised to higher levels. Normally a meeting will be held at the director level in an attempt to resolve issues. If the issue remains unresolved, an additional meeting will be held at the General Manager / City Manager level. If the issue is still unresolved, the jurisdiction, through its representative may address the issue to the OMNITRANS Board of Directors at the next regular meeting. 1.8. Point of Contact A table summarizing the point-of-contact for each local jurisdiction, Caltrans, SANBAG, and OMNITRANS is included as Appendix B. These can be used as your first point of contact to address transit issues.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 10

2.

BUS STOP PLACEMENT

Each new bus stop location should take into consideration a number of factors including: · spacing along the route, · location of the expected passenger traffic generator, either based on population density and/or specific use (i.e. major employment centers, regional shopping centers, hospitals, etc.), for the stop, · traffic safety, · pedestrian safety and access to stop, pathways leading to and from bus stop areas should be level, have a firm surface, and be free of obstacles, · availability of adequate right-of-way to ensure that the bus stop meets the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility standards, · curb clearance ­ adequate space for buses to stop, and return to the traffic flow, · operational effectiveness issues (including relation to the nearest intersection, bus turning requirements, and re-entering the travel lane). Because of the number of factors involved, each new or relocated stop must be examined on a case-by-case basis. However, general guidelines for stop spacing and placement are as follows.

2.1. Stop Spacing Stops should be provided no greater than 1/5-mile apart (0.2 miles) at: · At major trip generators: Employment centers with 1,000+ employees Residential areas with 500+ units or minimum population density of 5000 per square mile Retail centers with 400,000+ square feet of leasable space Education centers with 2,500+ students Major medical facilities with out-patient care · Provide bus stops at transit system transfer points · Provide intermediate stops based on the walking distance Central Business Districts or Major Commercial District: maximum 500 feet walking distance (1000' spacing) High to medium density areas: 750 to 900 feet (1,500 to 1,800' spacing) 5,000+ persons/square mile Residential: Over 18 DUs/acre, Commercial: Over 0.50 FAR Medium to low density areas: 900 to 1,300 (1,800 to 2,600' spacing) 3,500 ­ 5,000 persons/square mile Residential: 7 to 18 DUs/acre, Commercial: 0.35 to 0.50 FAR Low density to rural areas: 1,500 to 2,500 feet (3,000' to mile spacing) less than 3,500 persons/square mile Residential: Below 7 DUs/acre, Commercial: Below 0.35 FAR

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 11 2.2. Placement of Bus Stops The proper location of stops is critical to the safety of passengers and motorists, and to the proper operation of the transit system. Bus stop locations are recommended by OMNITRANS, and approved by the local jurisdictions. Local jurisdictions can suggest bus stop locations at their discretion. It is important to consider the unique circumstances at each intersection when selecting bus stop locations, including the: · Proximity to major trip generators · Presence of sidewalks and curb ramps leading to trip generators and nearby pedestrian circulation system · Width, placement and condition of sidewalks; · Protected crossings at signalized or stop controlled intersections, or at crosswalks · Convenient passenger transfers to other routes; and · Effect on adjacent property owners. · Conflict between buses, other traffic, and pedestrians · Pedestrian activity through intersections · Open and visible spaces for personal security and passenger visibility · Street illumination · Ability to restrict parking if needed, feasibility to move or provide parking and truck delivery zones · Adequate curb space for the number of buses expected at the stop at any one time · Volumes and turning movements of other traffic, including bicycles · Proximity and traffic volumes of nearby driveways · Street and sidewalk grade · Ease for bus re-entering traffic stream · Bus route turns · Unusual intersection angles or predominant turning movements · Proximity to rail crossings or emergency driveways · Sight Distance at adjacent intersections and driveways Bus stops are generally located at intersections where they may be placed on the nearside or farside of an intersection. This maximizes pedestrian accessibility from both sides of the street and provides connection to intersecting bus routes. Under certain situations, bus stops may also be placed at a mid-block location.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 12 Table 1 summarizes the major advantages and disadvantages related to locating bus stops before crossing the intersection (near-side), after crossing the intersection (far-side), and mid-block (not close to any intersection), as well as conditions under which each of these locations are recommended. The placement of bus stops at intersections varies from site to site. The drawing below shows the general placement options for bus stops along a route. However general considerations for the placement of bus stops at intersections include: · When the route alignment requires a left turn, the preferred location for the bus stop is on the farside of the intersection after the left turn is completed. · When the route alignment requires a left turn and it is infeasible or undesirable to locate a bus stop farside of the intersection after the left turn, a mid-block location is preferred. A mid-block bus stop should be located at least 500 feet from the intersection so a bus can maneuver into the proper lane to turn left. · If there is a high volume of right turns at an intersection, the preferred location for a stop is on the farside of the intersection after the turn. · If the transit route turns right at an intersection, the preferred location for a stop is after the bus has turned. · In circumstances where the accumulation of buses at a farside stop would spill over into the intersection and additional length is not available, the stop should be placed on the nearside of the intersection. This removes the potential for queuing buses to overflow into the intersection. · At complex intersections with multi-phase signals or dual right or left turn lanes, farside stops are preferred because they remove the buses from the area of complicated traffic movements at that intersection. · When transfer activity between two lines exhibits a strong direction pairing (i.e., heavy volumes from westbound to northbound) placing one stop nearside and one farside can minimize pedestrian activity within the intersection.

BUS STOP LOCATIONS

MID-BLOCK

NEARSIDE

FARSIDE

2.3. Curb Clearance for Bus Stopping Zones The preferred minimum requirements for curb clearance for one 40-foot bus are indicated in Figures 2-1 to 2-3. It must be noted that these clearances are not always feasible in the urban environment of OMNITRANS, but should be aimed for wherever possible to ensure Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 13 that buses have room to service the stop parallel to the curb with comfortable space to exit and re-enter the travel lane. At an absolute minimum, an additional 25 feet would be needed for pulling in and pulling out (totaling 50 feet for both), plus the length of the vehicle (totaling 90 feet for a mid-block stop. Where the parking lane is over 8 feet in width, or where turnouts are used, additional space is needed for the bus to reenter the traffic flow, thus the clearance area must be increased a corresponding amount. For bus stops at which more than one bus may be stopped at a given time, additional curb clearance is needed. A general rule of thumb is to add one bus length plus 10 feet for each additional bus to be accommodated at the stop at the same time. Additional curb clearance will be needed for stops following right-hand route turns and may also be needed following left-hand turns. 2.4. Placement in Relation to Roadway On streets where traffic moves quickly (40 miles per hour or more), at stops where buses may need to lay over longer than the time it takes passengers to board and alight the bus, and in areas where the impact of the bus blocking a travel lane creates unacceptable delay or potential hazard, the bus should not stop in the travel lane. These conditions warrant a turnout, paved shoulder, or other area of adequate curbside clearance at least 12 feet wide. Bus turnouts have advantages and disadvantages: Advantages: · Allows traffic to proceed around the bus, reducing delay for general traffic · Maximizes vehicular capacity of roads · Clearly defines the bus stop · Passenger loading and unloading can be conducted in a more relaxed manner · Eliminates potential rearend accidents Disadvantages: · More difficult to re-enter traffic, increasing bus delay and increasing average travel time for buses · Uses additional space and may require right-of-way acquisition

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 14 Table 1: ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF STOP PLACEMENT RELATIVE TO THE NEAREST INTERSECTION Bus Stop Advantages Disadvantages Recommended When the Following Location Location Conditions Exist Nearside · Less potential conflict · Potential conflicts with right · When traffic is heavier on the farside Located with traffic turning onto turning traffic due to cars cutting than on the approaching side of the immediately the bus route street from in front of the bus. intersection. before an a side street. · The stopped bus obscures the · When pedestrian access and existing intersection sight distance of drivers and landing area conditions on the · The bus boarding door is close to the pedestrians entering from the nearside are better than on the crosswalk. right. farside. · Bus has intersection to · The stopped bus may block · When street crossings and other merge into traffic. visibility of the stop signs or pedestrian movements are safer traffic signals. when the bus stops on the nearside · Bus Driver can see than the farside. oncoming buses with · At signalized intersections, may transfer passengers. result in schedule delays. · When the bus route goes straight through the intersection. · When adequate sight distance can be achieved at the intersection. Farside · Does not conflict with · The stopped bus obscures the · When traffic is heavier on the Located vehicles turning right. sight distance to the right of nearside than on the farside of the immediately drivers entering from the cross intersection. · Appropriate after the after an street to the right of the bus. route has made a turn. · At intersections where heavy left or intersection right turns occur. · If the bus stopping area is of · The stopped bus does inadequate length, the rear of not obscure sight · When pedestrian access and existing the stopped bus will block the distance to the left for landing area conditions on the farside cross street (especially an issue vehicles entering or are better than on the nearside. for stops where more than one crossing from the side · At intersections where traffic bus may be stopped at a time). street. conditions and signal patterns may · If the bus stops in the travel cause delays. · At signalized lane, it may result in queued intersections, buses can · At intersections with transit signal traffic behind it blocking the more easily re-enter priority treatments. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 15 Bus Stop Location · Advantages traffic. The stopped bus does not obscure traffic control devices or pedestrian movements at the intersection. The stopped bus does not obstruct sight distances at an intersection. May be closer to major activity centers than the nearest intersection. Less conflicts between waiting and walking pedestrians. Disadvantages intersection. Recommended When the Following Location Conditions Exist

Mid-Block Located 300 feet or more beyond or before an intersection

·

· ·

· Requires most curb clearance of the three options (unless a midblock sidewalk extension or bus bulb is built). · Encourages mid-block jaywalking. · May increase customer walking distances if the trip generator is close to an intersection. Length of mid-block stops can vary due to depth of a turn-out and a bus' ability to maneuver in/out of traffic lanes.

· When traffic or street/sidewalk conditions at the intersection are not conducive to a near-side or far-side stop. · When the passenger traffic generator is located in the middle of a long block. · When the interval between adjacent stops exceeds stop spacing standards for the area. · When a mid-block stop is compatible with a corridor or district plan.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 19 Bus turnouts are desirable where street traffic speeds are 40 mph or more and one of the following conditions exist: · Peak period boarding average exceeds 20 boardings per hour. · Average peak period dwell time exceeds 30 seconds per bus. · The local jurisdiction becomes aware of a high frequency of accidents involving buses and/or pedestrians within the past year. · When traffic in the curb lane exceeds 250 vehicles during the peak hour and the curb lane is less than 20 feet wide or when bus volumes exceed 10 or more per peak hour. · Where bus stops in the curb lane are prohibited. · Where sight distances prevent traffic from stopping safely behind a stopped bus (e.g. hills, curves). · At stops where there are consistent wheelchair lift boardings. · Where buses are expected to layover at the end of a trip. · Where there is adequate space for turnout length and depth given to allow a bus to safely exit and enter into the flow of traffic. The farside of an intersection is the preferred location for turnouts. Nearside turnouts typically should be avoided because of conflicts with right turning vehicles, delays to transit service as buses attempt to re-enter the travel lane, and obstruction of pedestrian activity as well as traffic control devices. The exception would be where buses would use a right turn lane as a queue jump lane associated with a bus signal priority treatment at an intersection (where a farside pullout is not possible). Turnouts in mid-block locations are not desirable unless associated with key pedestrian access to a major transit-oriented activity center and subject to the general guidelines above. Guidelines for bus turnouts · Turnout should be placed at signalized intersections where the signal can create gaps in traffic allowing the bus to re-enter the street. · Twelve foot width is desirable to reduce sideswipe accidents, ten foot width is minimum. On streets with bike lanes and where bus layovers occur, the turnout should be wide enough so that buses do not impede the bike lane. The design of Bus Turnouts is discussed in detail in Section 5 ­ Design Parameters. 2.5. Abutting Property Owners / Tenants To promote good public relations, it is desirable that bus stops be placed at locations where they will minimize the annoyance to the adjacent residents or business owners. Some commercial establishments are interested in having a bus stop placed in front of their establishment, while residents may object to the presence of a bus stop in front of their home, especially if the stop is used for layovers. All efforts should be taken to minimize the impact to each property owner, but vehicle and pedestrian safety should be the over-riding factor in determining the final bus stop location.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 20 2.6. Parking Restrictions at Bus Stops Parking restrictions (either red curb or "No Parking" signs) should be placed at bus zones when parking is expected to impact bus operations. The lack of parking restrictions could impact bus operations, traffic movement, safe sight distance, and passenger access. Potential issues include: · The bus may have to double park when servicing a stop, which would interfere with traffic movements. · Passengers would have to maneuver between parked vehicles when entering or exiting the bus, which can endanger the passengers. · The bus would lack access to the curb/sidewalk area to board or alight wheelchair passengers. It is important that these parking regulations should be enforced in a consistent and expedient manner by the appropriate local jurisdiction (See Figs. 2-1 ­ 2-3). 2.7. Bus Stops and Driveways Whenever possible, bus stops should not be placed near a driveway. However, if placement near a driveway is unavoidable: · Attempt to keep at least one exit and entrance open to vehicles accessing the property while a bus is loading or unloading passengers. When there are two driveways to a parcel on the same street, the upstream driveway should be blocked forcing vehicles to turn behind the bus to access the driveway. · It is preferable to fully rather than partially block a driveway to prevent vehicles from attempting to squeeze by the bus in a situation with reduced sight distance. · Locate bus stops to allow good visibility for vehicles leaving the property and to minimize vehicle/bus conflicts. This is best accomplished by placing bus stops where driveways are behind the stopped bus. · Ensure that passengers have a safe area to wait when loading must occur in or adjacent to a driveway. 2.8. Additional Factors in Selecting a Bus Stop Location · Sidewalk Conditions - Stops should be located and constructed to make use of existing sidewalk facilities, or new sidewalk facilities should be constructed to provide pedestrian access to the bus stop. At stops with heavy ridership, additional passenger waiting/standing areas should be constructed off of the main sidewalk so that waiting passengers do not block passage of other pedestrians. · Crosswalks - Bus stops should ideally be located close to existing crosswalks to encourage safe pedestrian crossings, but also located so that a stopped bus will neither block a crosswalk nor obstruct pedestrian visibility of oncoming traffic and vice-versa. In general, it is safer to locate the bus stop on the far side of a crosswalk, so that passengers will cross behind, rather than in front of, the bus.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 21 · Landscaping Issues - The presence of trees and bushes at a bus stop may necessitate periodic trimming at the stop to prevent buses from hitting tree branches and bushes from encroaching on sidewalks. Tall bushes are also a potential security problem, and additional lighting should be considered at stops with this issue. Lighting - Adequate lighting is important for passenger comfort and security as well as for visibility of waiting passengers to the bus and other oncoming traffic. Bus stops which are served after dark should be located where they will be illuminated at night, preferably from an overhead street light. If this is not possible, lighting should be installed at the stop. Limited Visibility Over Hills and Around Curves - Bus stops should not be located over the crest of a hill, immediately after a road curve to the right, or at other locations that limit the visibility of the stopped bus to oncoming traffic. If the bus stops in the travel lane at such locations, it is in danger of being struck from the rear. Even if the bus pulls off the road at such stops, pulling back into the travel lane presents accident potential. If a bus stop must be located at such a stop, approaching cars should be warned of the need to be prepared to stop. On-Street Parking - Locating a bus stop in an area with existing curbside parking requires either removal of enough parking to permit the bus to pull off, service the stop, and re-enter the travel lane, or installation of a sidewalk extension or curb bulb to provide passenger access to the bus. Proximity to Major Trip Generators - When feasible, a bus stop should be located to minimize walking distances to the activity center that is expected to generate the most ridership. Right-of-Way Considerations - If a bus stop may be a future candidate for transit shelter or bench installation, a site should be selected that includes adequate rightof-way for constructing improvements. Transfer Locations - Bus stops where transfer activity between routes is heavy, stops should be located to minimize street crossings of passengers transferring to other routes. Compatibility with Adjacent Properties - Care should be taken to avoid locating a bus stop immediately adjacent to land uses which are highly sensitive to the effects of bus fumes and noise. Drainage - Areas which tend to accumulate standing water should be avoided or improved. However, bus stops should not be located so that passengers are required to step over catch basins when alighting the bus, as this creates a potential tripping hazard. Bicycle Facilities - To the extent feasible, bus stops should be located so they do not block bicycle travel lanes. Bus stops should also be located so that bicycle racks do not block pedestrian access to the bus boarding and alighting area.

·

·

·

· · · · ·

·

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 22

3.

MINIMUM BUS STOP ELEMENTS

3.1. Landing Area Bus stop sites shall be chosen such that, to the maximum extent practicable, lifts or ramps can be deployed on a firm, stable surface as to permit a wheelchair or mobility aid user to maneuver safely onto or off the bus and bus stop. · Dimensions: The minimum landing area requirement for a bus stop (the area from which passengers board the bus and onto which passengers alight from the bus) is a continuous, unobstructed solid area contiguous to the curb that measures at least 5' parallel to the street and at least 8' perpendicular to the street at the front door, and at least 10' parallel to the street and at least 8' perpendicular to the street at the back door. Distance between front and rear boarding area is 18 feet. These are the minimum dimensions needed to deploy a lift or ramp and allow a customer in a wheelchair to board or alight the vehicle. Typical Dimensions are shown in Figures 3-1 to 3-3. To provide for rear-door alighting from larger buses, the landing area should ideally be at least 30 feet long for stops served by 40' buses and at least 40' long for stops served by 60' articulated buses. Stops where more than one bus is boarding/alighting passengers at the same time will need additional boarding and alighting areas to be determined by the size and placement of the buses serving each stop. · Slope: The slope of the landing area must be parallel to the slope of the roadway in order for the bus wheelchair lift or ramp to be effectively deployed. The slope should not exceed 1 foot vertical over 20 feet horizontal (5%), and the cross slope should not exceed 1 foot vertical over 50 feet horizontal (2%)

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 26 · Surface Material: The landing area must be firm, stable, and slip-resistant. Concrete is the preferred surface for the landing area. It is possible for the lift or ramp to span an area of another material, such as a grass or soil in a planter strip between the curb and the sidewalk. However, for the safety of ambulatory customers who may stumble on an uneven surface, it is strongly recommended to construct a continuous concrete pad. In newer developments where a new bus stop will be placed, a continuous surface from the curb and the sidewalk should be provided for the purposes of deploying a bus ramp or lift for wheelchairs or other mobility devices. In uncurbed shoulder areas, the landing area may be constructed of asphalt. Height Relative to the Street: It is also preferable that the landing area be elevated above street level for pedestrian safety. For stops served by low-floor, rampequipped buses a standard curb provides an acceptable ramp slope. Clearances: A horizontal clearance between obstructions of 48 inches, and a vertical clearance of 84 inches should be maintained in boarding area

· ·

3.2. Pedestrian Connections To be fully useable, a landing area of 5 feet wide and 8 feet in length (ADAAG, 10.2.1) must be connected to a sidewalk of sufficient width and condition for a person in a wheelchair to use (ADAAG 4.3, 4.5) - the narrowest useable width is four (4) feet. Curb cuts with slopes no steeper than 1 inch of level change across 12 inches (ADAAG, 4.8.2) of distance are needed where level changes occur (such as a crosswalk). If items such as newspaper boxes, utility poles, trash cans, and encroaching grass or bushes constrict a portion of the sidewalk to less than 4', the sidewalk is not accessible to wheelchair users. If necessary, the existing sidewalk should be widened or new sidewalk constructed to ensure that customers are able to get to and from the bus stop. To the extent feasible, sidewalk connections around bus stops should provide safe pedestrian access to the passenger trip generators near the bus stop. Land uses should be designed to facilitate the movement, and minimize the distances between the development and the transit services. Good pedestrian access can be achieved by considering the following guiding principles: · Pedestrian routes to bus stops should be designed to meet the needs of all users (including disabled, elderly, and children). · The pedestrian system should provide convenient connections between destinations including residential areas, schools, shopping centers, public services and institutions, recreation, and transit. · Provide a dedicated sidewalk and/or bike paths through new development that are safe and direct to the nearest bus stop or transit center. · Minimize the distance between buildings and the bus stop through proximity and orientation. This can be encouraged by including transit accessibility concerns in zoning policies, setback guidelines, building orientation guidelines, and parking requirements to encourage transit-oriented development.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 27 · · · Minimize the use of elements that restrict pedestrian movement such as meandering sidewalks, walled communities, and expansive parking lots. Pathways should be designed so pedestrians traverse as straight of path as possible. Eliminate barriers to pedestrian activity. This includes sound walls, landscaping, berms, or fences which impede pedestrian access or visibility. If there is restricted access, gates should be installed at access points. Pave pedestrian pathways and ensure they are accessible to everyone. Provide accessible circulation routes that include curb cuts, ramps, visual guides, signage (visual and Braille) and railings where needed. Place ADA compliant curb ramps at each corner of an intersection. Adequate drainage should be provided to avoid pooling and muddy conditions. Provide street lighting along bus stop access routes and safety lighting at intersections to promote safety and security for transit patrons. Ideally bus stops should be illuminated by street lighting, if not, consider installation of lighting at the bus stop. New residential development should provide breaks in walls between properties to allow pedestrian access to bus stops. In rural areas without sidewalks, a minimum 4 foot wide paved shoulder, or of decomposed granite, compacted and stabilized, should be provided if possible. At rural bus stops, a concrete waiting area should be provided if possible. The paved area 35 feet long and 8 feet wide is desirable, with a minimum of 5 feet long by 8 feet wide as needed for lift operation. A tactile warning device should be place between the roadway and the bus waiting area to allow visually impaired pedestrian to identify the bus stop position. Where a bus stop serves as a transfer point, there should be a paved connection to the connecting route stops. Pathway slope should not exceed 1 foot vertical over 20 feet horizontal (5%). Pathway cross slope should not exceed 1 foot vertical over 50 feet horizontal 0(2%). A minimum horizontal clearance of 48 inches (preferable 60 inches) should be maintained along the entire pathway. A vertical clearance of 84 inches should be maintained along the entire pathway.

· ·

· · ·

· · · ·

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 28

The clear access zone is shown in the photograph below.

3.3. Curb Ramps Curb ramps are usually installed at corners or intersections to allow entrance to the street surface. Curb ramps are an integral part of the pedestrian access route leading to and from bus stop locations. Ramps shall be designed to conform to state and federal ADA design standards. 3.4. Signage · Header Sign: Each bus stop must be marked with a sign indicating the transit operator(s) that serve(s) the stop. Bus stop signs indicate to passengers and drivers where buses stop, as well as publicize the availability of the service. The sign must be securely mounted on its own post or a light standard, at an angle perpendicular to the street. The sign must be easily visible to the approaching bus driver, ideally within 4 feet of the edge of the street. The bus stop sign should neither block nor be blocked by other jurisdictional signs. To prevent the sign from being struck by the bus, mirrors, signs should be placed at a sufficient distance not to impede with bus mirrors and affect the pedestrian path of travel (See Fig. 5-11). The header sign is the point at which the front of the bus Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 29 should be aligned when the bus is servicing passengers and thus should be placed approximately one foot beyond the far side of the landing area for stops served by front-lift buses. The bottom edge of the sign should be positioned at a height of at least 80 inches from the ground. Each header sign should contain the names of routes that service the stop as well as the telephone number to call for more information. In order for the bus stop sign to meet ADA minimum specifications for signs posted at 80 inches, the letters and numbers must be at least 3" high. The ADA standards further specify that the characters have a width-to-height ratio between 3:5 and 1:1, and a stroke-to-width ratio between 1:15 and 1:10. These standards make signage accessible to persons with low vision. These requirements do not apply to route and schedule information posted at bus stops. · Route and Schedule Information: At bus stops that are near major trip generators, or where attracting additional ridership is desirable, an up-to-date route and schedule should be posted as well as information about fares, holiday schedules. Space must be provided on all four sides for a passenger to inspect posted information. The schedules should be mounted on the side away from the street.

3.5. Safety and Security Traffic safety issues are discussed within the context of bus stop placement considerations. Curbside safety and security issues include: · location of storm drains and catch basins, which put passengers at risk of catching a foot under one when boarding or alighting the bus · uneven surfaces, which could result in a fall · slope of the terrain surrounding the landing area, which can put passengers in danger of falling in an adjacent ravine or into the travel lane · presence of hazardous objects, such as broken street furniture and jagged edges · surface traction (for example, stone aggregate can be exceedingly slippery when wet for wheelchair users) · water accumulation areas, which can also result in muddy and slippery surfaces · overgrown bushes, which could potentially present a security hazard as well as encroach on the sidewalk and landing area · other obstacles in the sidewalk that, in addition to making it inaccessible, force pedestrians to walk in the street · area lighting Bus stops that are served after dark should be lit to promote passenger safety and security and to improve visibility of waiting passengers to approaching bus drivers. Ideally, bus stops should be located to take advantage of existing street lights or other outside facility lighting. Alternately, installation of new lighting at the bus stop should be considered.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 30

3.6. Newspaper and Vendor Boxes Newspaper and vendor boxes can provide waiting transit customers with convenient access to reading material. However, newspaper boxes that obstruct access to the landing area, sidewalk, shelter, or posted transit information must be removed or relocated. Newspaper boxes should not be chained or otherwise affixed to the bus stop sign pole, shelter, or bench. Currently, laws or ordinance restricting placement of vendor boxes are instituted by the cities where they are located. Vendor boxes for free publications should be discouraged as they contribute to trash related problems at bus stops.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 31

4.

PASSENGER AMENITIES AT BUS STOPS

The design of bus stop waiting areas and provision of amenities that enhance security and comfort plays a significant role in a person's decision to use transit. Passenger amenities are installed at selected bus stops to improve passenger comfort and the relative attractiveness of transit as a transportation alternative. Selection of bus stops at which to install amenities takes into account a number of factors, including: · average daily boardings, · proximity to major trip generators, · passenger transfer activity, · planned neighborhood improvements, · transit corridor marketing efforts, · equity among communities in the County, · proximity of other nearby sheltered areas, and · customer and community requests.

4.1. Shelters Transit shelters are installed at selected bus stops to provide weather protection as well as seating for waiting passengers. Bus stops with ridership exceeding 40 boardings per day are priority candidates for new shelters. OMNITRANS has developed a shelter program that provides for the installation of shelters by a private provider, which installs and maintains the shelter without cost to OMNITRANS or local jurisdictions by including advertising in the shelter design. Some cities have restrictions on outdoor advertising, and thus do not participate in the program. Shelters can also be provided by local jurisdictions, and may be required of development in the area of the stop. Maintenance of shelters not provided by OMNITRANS should be provided by the jurisdiction that constructs or requires the construction of the shelter. The design factors for shelters should include: · strength and durability of structure and materials · resistance of materials and paint treatments to weather conditions, graffiti, cutting, fire, and other forms of vandalism · Potential greenhouse effect of roof design during hot weather · Existence of, or provision of external lighting in the area, and provision of internal lighting for the shelter Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 32 · · · · · · · Appropriateness of the design to the neighborhood Required dimensions of the concrete pad to ensure wheelchair accessibility Accommodation of trash can and newspaper boxes within the location design. Easy maintenance of the shelter and other amenities Provide communications conduits for future use Semi-transparent enclosure that allows a Coach Operator to see inside the shelter Wheelchair marking/placard that indicates the space underneath the shelter dedicated for wheelchairs.

4.2. Bus Benches Benches are installed inside all standard shelters. Benches may also be installed independently at bus stops that do not have shelters. OMNITRANS BLUE Local communities may also install benches as one BUS BENCH element of an improved streetscape; in this case, efforts should be made to locate benches near bus stops where they do not create barriers to accessible bus boarding or sidewalk usage. The design factors for benches should include: · Benches should be placed facing the street · Strength and durability of structure and materials · Resistance of materials and paint treatments to weather conditions, graffiti, cutting, fire, and other forms of vandalism · Appropriateness of the design to the "OMNI" BUS BENCH neighborhood Benches should be placed on the back side of sidewalk a minimum of six to nine feet from the bus sign post, to allow pedestrians to move past people sitting on the bench. Ensure that there are no conflicts with wheelchair accessibility and loading at the bus stop Benches should be anchored to prevent unauthorized movement. Construct furniture for easy relocation to allow for bus route changes, street improvement projects, etc.

·

·

· ·

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 33

The OMNI Bus Benches, as pictured are provided and maintained by a private contractor through the Passenger Amenity Program. OMNITRANS relies on the private sector and local jurisdictions to provide additional benches. Developers and local jurisdictions may design a special style of bench or shelter to fit into the landscape and complement the architectural style of their project or streetscape. However, benches and shelters that are provided through the private sector or local jurisdictions are to be maintained by the developer, land owner, or local jurisdiction. Placement of benches and receptacles must maintain proper clearances for passage and wheelchair boarding areas as indicated in Section 5, Design Parameters. While bench designs vary among manufacturers, some standards do exist. Benches usually seat three to four people and may have an upright back support. Some bench designs come with a metal bar in the center of the bench or with fold-down seats to discourage sleeping on the bench. 4.3. Trash Receptacles Trash Receptacles are installed at all standard shelters. They may also be installed independently at bus stops that do not have shelters. Local communities may also install receptacles as part of an improved streetscape; in this case, efforts should be made to locate benches near bus stops where they do not create barriers to accessible bus boarding or sidewalk usage. The design factors for trash receptacles should include: · strength and durability of materials · resistance of materials and paint treatments to weather conditions, graffiti, cutting, fire, and other forms of vandalism · appropriateness of the design to the neighborhood · ensure that there are no conflicts with wheelchair accessibility and loading at the bus stop · trash receptacles should be anchored to prevent unauthorized movement. · Construct furniture for easy relocation to allow for bus route changes, street improvement projects, etc. · Avoid installing trash receptacles with design features that permit liquids to pool or remain near the receptacle and attract insects. · If possible, install trash receptacles in shaded areas a minimum of 3 feet from a bench. When installed in areas that receive direct sunlight most of the day, the heat may cause foul odors to develop. OMNITRANS relies on the private sector or local jurisdictions to provide and collect trash receptacles. Developers and local jurisdictions may design a special style of receptacle to fit into the landscape and complement the architectural style of their project or streetscape. Receptacles must be placed to maintain proper clearances for passage and wheelchair boarding areas. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 34 4.4. Lighting Where feasible, bus stops should be located so that they will be illuminated by existing street lights. At bus stops where additional light is needed, ornamental streetlights are used. In addition to street lights, stops can be lit by backlighting from advertising installed at bus shelters. If a shelter is present, both interior and area lighting are recommended. The placement and maintenance of lighting is normally the responsibility of local jurisdiction, except at advertising shelters where the interior lighting is provided and maintained along with the shelter. 4.5. Landscape Features Landscaping can enhance the level of passenger comfort and attractiveness of transit, but should be positioned and maintained so that safety and accessibility are not compromised by encroaching bushes, uneven grass surfaces, etc. Tree branches that extend into the roadway below 11' should be trimmed back at least two feet from the curb; otherwise, they become an obstacle that the bus driver may or may not be able to avoid hitting. The area between the sidewalk and the curb at bus boarding areas should not be planted for at least 5 feet parallel to the street and eight feet perpendicular to the street must be solid to provide accessibility. 4.6. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Features Installation of ITS features are likely in the future, these include: · Real-time "next-bus" arrival information · Electronic posting of schedules · Access to route information · Installation of panic buttons or call boxes In preparation for such technologies new bus stop locations and improvements to existing stops should provide for electrical and communications conduits. 4.7. Transfer Centers Transfer Centers are where multiple bus routes connect. The high volume of passengers and buses at these locations requires multiple or non-standard shelters, and provision of additional amenities. Route information needs to be provided for all routes, so area for sign holder, kiosk or other information delivery systems needs to be provided. Extra space for passenger waiting, along shelter or clear curb space, should be included in design. A standard of 8-10 square feet per peak load passenger should be used. Due to the variation in needs between the different Transfer Centers, each one should be designed specifically based on the proposed operation and locale of the center.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 35 4.8. Developer Responsibilities When a development is constructed adjacent to an existing or proposed bus stop location, the developer should be responsible for providing amenities as described in this section Jurisdictions are encouraged to require the placement of shelters that conform to local standards for passenger recognition and ease of maintenance. Local cities should submit a copy of all street improvement and re-development plans to OMNITRANS to ensure proper coordination and placement of transit amenities (turnouts, bus pad, etc.--refer to Section 1). 4.9. Bus Stop Maintenance Well maintained bus stops are crucial to the image of the transit system. Damaged street furniture and trash build-up should be tended to immediately to create a positive impression for transit patrons and the general public. OMNITRANS does not own nor maintain shelters or benches systemwide. The owners of the street furniture have the obligation to maintain their furniture, and the jurisdiction should be responsible for monitoring these items for compliance. Maintenance frequency of not less than once per week should include: · Full wash down of shelter and accessories once a month. · Removal of all dirt, graffiti, and pasted material. · Wipe down of glass surfaces. · Removal and replacement of trash bags once a week. Should be performed more than once a week if trash accumulates frequently. · Litter pick up around stop or shelter/accessories to a distance of 15 feet. · Manual or chemical removal of weeds. · Pruning of obstructing foliage. · Touch up of marred paint. · Verify shelter lighting levels and replace bad bulbs and ballasts. Repair of items that pose a safety problem should be performed as soon as possible. 4.10. Bicycle Parking Bicycle parking facilities, such as bike racks and storage lockers, may be provided at bus stops by local jurisdictions or adjacent property owners for the convenience of bicyclists using transit. Bicycle parking facilities discourage the practice of locking bicycles onto bus facilities or onto adjacent property. By confining bicycles to one area, the racks or lockers can reduce visual clutter and maintain appropriate pedestrian clearances. The guidelines for the placement of bicycle parking facilities are: · Locate bike rack or lockers away from other pedestrian or bus patron activities to improve safety and reduce congestion. · Coordinate the location of bicycle parking facilities with existing on-site or street lighting. · Ensure parked bikes are visible at all times. Do not locate bicycle parking where views are restricted by a bus shelter, landscaping, or existing site elements, such as walls. · Design and placement of bicycle parking facilities should complement other transit furniture at bus stop. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 36 · Covered or weather protected parking locations are an important bonus to bicyclists.

When selecting bicycle bike rack or lockers devices, consider the following: · Provide ability to lock bicycle frame and at least one wheel. · Support bicycle without pinching or bending the wheel. If the wheel slot is too narrow, a mountain bike tire will not fit. · Avoid scratching the paint on the frame of the bike. · Provide a place to lean the bike while locking the bike. · Locking procedure should be quick and easy to identify. · Require minimal space. · Design of bike rack or lockers device should not trap debris. · Device should be easy to install but difficult to steal.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 37

5.

DESIGN PARAMETERS

This part provides details of geometric design guidelines for Bus Stops and Bus Routes.

5.1. Bus Turnouts Guidelines for bus turnouts; · Farside turnouts should be placed at signalized intersections where the signal can create gaps in traffic allowing the bus to re-enter the street. · Twelve foot width is desirable to reduce sideswipe accidents, ten foot width is minimum. · On streets with bike lanes and where bus layovers occur, the turnout should be wide enough so that buses do not impede the bike lane. Bus turnout designs and cross-sections are illustrated in Figures 5-1 through 5-6. 5.2. Bus Shelters The following design and placement criteria will assist local jurisdictions after it has been determined a shelter will be placed at an existing bus stop: · Shelters should not be placed such that they block sight distance at intersections or driveways. This can normally be accomplished by placing the shelter more than 25 feet from the beginning or end of curb return of an intersection or driveway. · Minimum overhead canopy of 72 square feet with a minimum width of 6 feet is desired. · Minimum 7.5 feet clearance between underside of roof and sidewalk surface is desired. · Minimum two feet clearance between overhead canopy and curb face is required. · Shelter canopy should be waterproof with provisions for drainage away from waiting passengers and boarding area. · Shelter should have owner's name and 24-hour telephone number displayed for emergency purposes. · Seating for at least four people located under the shelter canopy is desired. · A minimum space of 30 inches by 48 inches of clear floor space for people in wheelchairs is required within the shelter per ADA regulations. · For passenger comfort and convenience, a lighting level of two to five footcandles is required throughout the shelter.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 44 · Accessories to be added to the transit shelter and passenger boarding area (such as telephone, water fountain, additional information panels, etc.) are a decision for the individual jurisdiction responsible for the shelter. Each item can be weighed to balance the concerns for greater passenger comfort and convenience versus concerns for security, maintenance and cost. The shelter should be located in reasonably close proximity to where the front door of the bus will open to facilitate timely passenger loading. Shelter screens should keep a minimum 6 inches vertical clearance from sidewalk to avoid collection of trash and debris. The back of the shelter should be located at least 12 inches from a building face, wall, or other broad vertical surfaces to facilitate trash removal and panel cleaning. Shelters should not be placed between a regularly used building exit and the curb so that pedestrians retain direct access to the street from the building. Whenever possible, do not place shelters in front of building windows used for commercial purposes (e.g. advertising, display, business names, etc.). Shelters should be located to avoid exposing persons to splashing water from passing vehicles and runoff from adjacent buildings and landscaping. Shelters should be located so that their orientation provides as much protection as possible from wind and rain, and with consideration of the sun's angles to allow maximum shade during peak use in the morning and afternoon.

· · · · · · ·

Figure 5-7 shows typical shelter layout, and Figure 5-8 shows shelter clearance dimensions. Placement of shelters for different sidewalk conditions is displayed in Figure 59. The design of OMNITRANS modular shelters is shown in figure 5-10.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 49

5.3. Bus Stop Signs Bus stop signs are placed to notify the general public where the bus will stop, to provide reference for coach operators, and to assist in marketing the system. To mark the location of all bus stops, OMNITRANS will provide signs as shown on Figure 5-11 to be installed by the City or Developer. Figure 5-12 illustrates a typical post anchor detail. The sign: · Identifies the location as a designated bus stop. · Provides route specific information. · Displays the transit information telephone number. There are multiple criteria involved in placing a bus stop sign. Concerns for passenger and public safety, ADA requirements, convenience, bus stop visibility and passenger amenities must all be addressed. The following are general guidelines for bus stop sign locations and clearances: · In no case should the post be located closer than 24 inches from the curb face. · Whenever possible, the bus stop sign should be located at the front of each bus zone. · Bus stop signs should be mounted on square unistrut posts. This is particularly useful for visually impaired patrons to locate the exact location where the bus will stop. · Whenever possible bus stop signs should be placed independently of all other street signs to maintain transit stop identity. · The bottom of the sign should be 7 feet above grade and no higher than 10 feet, consistent with Figure 5-11. · The top of the informational cassette should be mounted no higher than 60 inches above grade.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 52 5.4. Transit Priority Measures There are several concepts and technologies widely used today to improve bus service and reduce travel time. Collectively these measures are part of what makes a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system. Transit priority measures seek to improve bus service by reducing travel time. The components of travel time include getting to and from bus stops, time waiting for the bus to arrive, and the time spent traveling on the bus. Additional time is required if a transfer is necessary. Transit priority measures primarily seek to reduce the in-vehicle component of travel time by giving buses priority over other types of vehicles on streets. These measures include reserved bus lanes and priority treatment for buses at traffic signals. The planning and implementation of bus priority measures works best in urban areas with a high concentration of bus services, high levels of traffic flow, and good community support for transit service. To be successful, transit priority measures must be coordinated with the local jurisdictions responsible for traffic control and roadway planning and operations. Transit priority measures should effectively: · Alleviate existing bus service deficiencies · Achieve attractive and reliable bus service · Serve demonstrated existing demands for transit · Provide reserve capacity for future growth in bus trips · Attract auto drivers to transit

The following sections generally describe some of the transit priority measures available. 5.4.1. Queue Jumpers Queue jumpers provide priority treatment for buses along arterial streets by allowing buses to bypass traffic queued at congested intersections. Queue jumpers evolved from the need to solve problems not answered by bus turnouts. In the past, bus turnouts were constructed to move buses out of the traffic stream while they are stopped for passengers. Unfortunately, bus turnouts can create significant travel time penalties to bus patrons because buses are delayed while attempting to reenter the traffic stream. Queue jumpers are able to remove stopped buses from the traffic stream and getting buses through congested intersections. Queue jumpers consist of nearside right turn lane and farside bus stop and/or acceleration lane. Buses are allowed to use the right turn lane to bypass traffic congestion and proceed through the intersection. Additional enhancements to queue jumpers could include an exclusive bus only lane upstream from the traffic signal, an extension of the right turn lane to bypass traffic queued at the intersection, or an advanced green indication allowing the bus to pass through the intersection before general traffic does. A sample queue jumper is illustrated in Figure 5-13. Queue Jumper with Acceleration Lane This option includes a nearside right turn lane (bus exempt), a nearside bus stop, and an acceleration lane for buses with a taper back to the general purpose lanes. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 53 The length of the acceleration lane is based on speed and should be designed by an experienced engineer. Queue Jumper with Farside Bus Stop This option may be used when there is a heavy directional transfer to an intersecting transit route. Buses can bypass queues either using a right turn lane (bus exempt) or an exclusive bus queue-jump lane. Since the bus stop is located farside, a standard transition can be used for buses to re-enter the traffic lane. Queue Jumper with Continuous Bus Lane This option includes a nearside right turn lane or an exclusive bus queue-jump lane, a farside bus stop and a continuous bus lane extending to the next block or further, depending on bus circulation patterns. Right turns are allowable by general traffic from the bus lane. Queue jumpers at arterial street intersections should be considered when: · High-frequency bus routes have an average headway of 15 minutes or less. · Forecasted traffic volumes exceed 500 vehicles per hour in the curb lane during the peak hour and right turn volumes exceed 250 vehicles per hour during the peak hour. · Intersection operates at an unacceptable level of service (defined by local jurisdiction). · Cost and land acquisition are feasible. An exclusive nearside bus only lane in addition to the nearside right turn lane should be considered when the right turn volumes exceed 400 vehicles per hour during the peak hour. Further analysis should be conducted to determine specific warrants for the implementation of queue jumpers. The analysis should consider travel time benefits for bus passengers given varying levels of traffic congestion. The analysis should also consider the potential effect of causing delays to general traffic at the intersection blocking the transit vehicles travel between intersections.

5.4.2. Traffic Signal Priority Traffic signal priority measures are designed to eliminate delays in bus service due to waits at intersection signals. There are two general types of systems. In the first, a bus approaching a downstream traffic signal extends the green light or advances the cycle to green, either through transponders or other electronic communications means, to proceed through the intersection. The bus operator determines when signal priority is needed to maintain the bus schedule. The manual control can also be used to avoid unnecessary delays to other traffic, when the bus will be delayed at a stop, such as when a wheelchair is being loaded. In the second, a bus system equipped with an automatic vehicle location (AVL) Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 54 system and advanced radio communications gives signal priority control to the operations center, where typically a computerized system determines bus adherence to schedule and automatically triggers traffic signals when needed. 5.5. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Guidelines Conventional urban bus operations often are characterized by sluggish vehicles inching their way through congested streets, delayed not only by other vehicles and traffic signals, but also by frequent and time-consuming stops to pickup and discharge passengers. Buses travel on average at only around 60 percent of the speeds of automobiles using the same streets due to the cumulative effects of having to passenger boarding, having to reenter the traffic flow, and traveling at speeds not in accordance with coordinated traffic signal systems. Low cost investments in infrastructure, equipment, operational improvements, and technology can provide the foundation for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems that improve bus system performance. Conceived as an integrated, well-defined system, Bus Rapid Transit would provide for faster operating speeds, greater service reliability, and increased convenience, matching the quality of rail transit when implemented in appropriate settings. Improved bus service would give priority treatment to buses on urban roadways and would be expected to include some or all of the following features: · Bus lanes: a lane on an urban arterial or city street is reserved for the exclusive or near-exclusive use of buses. · Bus streets and busways: A bus street or transit mall can be created in an urban center by dedicating all lanes of a city street to the exclusive use of buses. · Bus signal preference and preemption: Preferential treatment of buses at intersections can involve the extension of green time or actuation of the green light at signalized intersections upon detection of an approaching bus. Intersection priority can be particularly helpful when implemented in conjunction with bus lanes or streets, because general-purpose traffic does not intervene between buses and traffic signals. · Traffic management improvements: Low-cost infrastructure elements that can increase the speed and reliability of bus service include bus turnouts, bus boarding islands, and curb realignments. · Faster boarding: Conventional on board collection of fares slows the boarding process, particularly when a variety of fares are collected for different destinations and/or classes of passengers. An alternative would be the collection of fares upon entering an enclosed bus station or shelter area prior to bus arrivals. This system would allow passengers to board through all doors of a stopped bus. A self-service or "proof-of-payment" system also would allow for boarding through all doors, but poses significant enforcement challenges. Prepaid "smart" cards providing for automated fare collection would speed fare transactions, but would require that boarding remain restricted to the front door of the bus. Changes in bus or platform design that could provide for level boarding through the use of low-floor buses, raised platforms, or some combination thereof. This would expedite boardings and alightings. Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 55

5.6. Bus Bulbs / Nubs Bus Bulbs, also known as nubs or curb extensions, solve the problem of locating bus patron amenities in dense urban environments with considerable pedestrian traffic. A nub is essentially a sidewalk extension through the parking lane that becomes directly adjacent to the travel lane. When used as a bus stop, a bus will stop in the traffic lane instead of weaving into the parking lane--therefore, they operate similarly to curb-side bus stops. Moreover, when space limitations prevent the inclusion of amenities, nubs create additional space at a bus stop for shelters, benches, and other transit patron improvements along sidewalks. Nubs also provide enough space for bus patrons to comfortably board and alight from the bus away from nearby general pedestrian traffic. Finally, nubs shorten the pedestrian walking distance across a street, which reduces pedestrian exposure to onstreet vehicles. Nubs should be considered at sites along crowded city sidewalks with high patron volumes, where parking along the curb is permitted. Nubs should be considered at sites with the following characteristics: · High pedestrian activity · Crowded sidewalks · A need to reduce pedestrian crossing distances · Bus stops in travel lanes Nubs have particular application along streets with lower traffic speeds and/or low traffic volumes where it would be acceptable to stop buses in the travel lane. Collector streets in neighborhoods and designated pedestrian districts are good candidates for this type of bus stop. Nubs should be designed to accommodate vehicle turning movements to and from side streets. Figures 5-14 and 5-15 shows typical nub design.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 59 5.7. Bus Pads Roadway pavements (or shoulders, if that is where the buses stop) need to be of sufficient strength to accommodate repetitive bus axle loads of up to 25,000 pounds. Exact pavement designs will depend on site-specific soil conditions. Areas where buses start, stop, and turn are of particular concern because of the increased loads associated with these activities. Using reinforced concrete pavement pads (see Figures 5-16 & 5-17) in these areas reduces pavement failure problems that are common with asphalt. The pad should be a minimum of 11 feet wide (12 feet desirable) with a pavement section designed to accept anticipated loadings. The length of the pad should be based on the anticipated length of the bus that will use the bus stop and the number of buses that will be at the stop simultaneously. 5.8. Street Design for Buses The corner curb radii used at intersections can affect bus operations when the bus makes a right turn. Some advantages of a properly designed curb radius are as follows: · Less bus/auto conflict at heavily used intersections (buses can make turns at higher speeds and with less encroachment) · Higher bus operating speeds and reduced travel time · Improved bus patron comfort · A trade-off in providing a large curb radius is that the crossing distance for pedestrians is increased This greater crossing distance increases the pedestrians' exposure to on-street vehicles and can influence how pedestrians cross an intersection, both of which are safety concerns. The additional time that a pedestrian is in the street because of larger curb radii should be considered in signal timing and median treatment decisions. The design of corner curb radii should be based on the following elements: · Design vehicle characteristics, including bus turning radius · Width and number of lanes on the intersecting street · Allowable bus encroachment into other traffic lanes · On-street parking · Angle of intersection · Operating speed and speed reductions · Pedestrians Figure 5-18 shows appropriate corner radii for transit vehicles and various combinations of lane widths. This figure can be used as a starting point; the radii values should be checked with an appropriate turning radius template before being incorporated into a final design. Figures 5-19 through 5-22 provide specific information on bus dimensions and on bus turning radii needed for design. Appendix A provides specific information on the vehicles in the current OMNITRANS fleet.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 67 5.9. Construction Impacts to Bus Operations Public Works and private development construction activities often impact bus operations and bus stops. Construction impacts caused by private development or public projects can be minimized through stipulations applied to the development. The following information attempts to reduce construction conflicts, provide information for the contractor, and guide local jurisdiction staff coordinating both design and construction work with the private development community. OMNITRANS considers construction coordination a local function, but is available to provide assistance if requested. OMNITRANS will participate in any decisions on construction that requires temporary stop closures, relocations, or route disruptions. There are two predominant mechanisms for communicating transit needs to construction contractors. The first available and commonly used mechanisms are standard plans and specifications. They usually contain language requiring contractors to maintain access and signage, etc. Notes on the construction plans provide the second and often the most followed instructions to contractors and construction inspectors. The Goal: Provide safe access to and from the bus stop for both passengers and buses. · Typical standard plans and specifications may include the following notes: · A minimum four (4) feet wide walkway shall be provided to maintain passenger access to and from bus stops during construction. · Temporary access to bus stop zones during construction shall be approved by OMNITRANS in advance of construction activities. · The contractor shall notify OMNITRANS at least 5 work days in advance for all street closures affecting transit operations regardless of the duration of the closure. This will allow OMNITRANS sufficient time to plan detours and notify the general public. · The contractor shall work with OMNITRANS to establish an approved temporary bus stop location. · OMNITRANS will provide and post the appropriate temporary bus sign signage. · The contractor shall notify OMNITRANS at least 5 days in advance of construction completion so that permanent bus stop signs can be re-installed by OMNITRANS. Recommended construction plan notes include: · Contact OMNITRANS for coordination and review requirements (See Appendix - B). · Contractor may not remove any bus stop signs without prior authorization from OMNITRANS. · All work shall conform to the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) including provisions for temporary access to and from bus stops. · Temporary access to bus stop zones during construction shall be approved by OMNITRANS at least 5 days in advance of construction activities. · The contractor is responsible for all costs incurred for loss or damage to bus stop signs and hardware and street furniture. Project acceptance will be delayed at the request of the local jurisdiction for any damaged street furniture or non-payment of costs.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 68 · · Temporary removal of street furniture to avoid damage and conflict during construction requires a 30 day advance notice to both the city and the owner of the street furniture. The contractor is responsible for construction of the passenger boarding pad on which street furniture will be placed. The pad must be designed and located in conformance with local jurisdiction standard details. Any necessary deviations from standard details require the written approval of the local jurisdiction. The contractor shall receive approval from the local jurisdiction for the location of street furniture placement prior to construction of the passenger boarding area. Prior to final acceptance or release of certificate of occupancy, the local jurisdiction must be notified to inspect and approve all bus stop related improvements. A minimum of 48 hours advance notice to local jurisdiction and OMNITRANS for final inspections is required.

· · ·

In addition, the construction plans need to show existing and proposed bus stop locations. The following special provisions may be included in the permitting process, the inspection process, pre-construction conferences, or wherever it is most appropriate: · Contractor shall provide OMNITRANS with the name and telephone number of the contractor's construction manager prior to the commencement of all construction projects involving bus stops or bus route detours. · Contractors shall make every effort to schedule their work to minimize impacts and the duration of impacts to transit operations and the general public. · The contractor is responsible for the construction of the passenger boarding area. · A representative of OMNITRANS should be invited to the project's pre-construction conference.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 69

6. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

6.1. Summary Of Requirements 6.1.1. Clear Space Along Curb Line ­ Minimum of 30 feet, prefer 40 feet, of clear space along curb area on the street side prior to bus stop pole (relative to traffic flow). Level, prefer to have paved or concrete utility strip filled in to sidewalk (if existing) at a minimum of 30 feet long. Clear space to be minimum of 4 feet back from curb line (to include sidewalk). ADA Landing Pad ­ 5 feet parallel to street, 8 feet deep. Can be in front of and part of shelter pad (if shelter installed) or freestanding - should be immediately adjacent to bus stop sign pole (prior to pole in the direction of traffic). Included in #1 above. Wheelchair accessible pathway should be included, if not existing, including access ramps is necessary. Should be tied into sidewalk, if existing. Bus Stop Information ­ Need to accommodate bus stop pole, flags and schedule information holders. Pole to be placed 18 -24 inches from curb line, and at the front of the bus stop to identify the stopping location of the bus. Trash ­ Trash and recycling containers to be placed outside of #1 clear space above and #2 ADA landing pad. Place after pole (as per traffic flow), behind pad or sidewalk, or at the end of the clear space. Seating ­ Bench to be located on a pad. If located on the ADA landing pad, minimum of 8 feet from curb; if outside ADA landing pad, minimum of 4 feet from curb. Do not block pedestrian and ADA access to/from bus stop or sidewalk. Bus Shelter Pad ­ 5 x 13 feet, 6 inches concrete (may be re-enforced with wire grid). Sub base of blue stone. Should be located minimum of 8 feet behind curb adjacent to bus stop pole, to accommodate #2 ADA landing pad. May be placed outside of ADA pad, adjacent to sidewalk, minimum of 4 feet back from curb line. Must be within #1 clear curb space. An additional 4 to 6 feet wide pad extension recommended to accommodate newspaper boxes, trash can, etc. Figures 1 and 2 provide examples of preferred designs for shelter stops. Vandalism Prevention ­ Design bus stop and surrounding area to discourage vandalism and loitering and provide for a long service life with minimum maintenance under conditions of intensive use. Vendor Boxes ­ Provide space outside of 1) clear curb space, and 2) ADA landing pad area for newspaper boxes. Must not impede pedestrian and ADA traffic flow to and from bus stop, landing pad and shelter. Prefer beside

6.1.2.

6.1.3.

6.1.4.

6.1.5.

6.1.6.

6.1.7.

6.1.8.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 70 shelter, behind front line of shelter and sidewalk, or with trashcans at end (outside of) #1 above, 40-foot clear space. 6.1.9. Electric ­ 1-inch conduit to junction box at rear corner of shelter pad (circuit breaker). Connect to building power (if possible) or nearest signal control box or electric power junction box. Electricity (120 volts/20 amp circuits) and communications to support ticket vending machines, real-time passenger information, lighting of stop, security cameras and emergency call boxes. Also for cleaning purposes and landscape maintenance. Provide outlet for maintenance equipment. The shelter shall be grounded by installation of a grounding rod or similar acceptable method, and outlets shall utilize Ground Fault Interrupter protection.

6.1.10. Landscaping ­ Trees for shade and lightning arrestors should not be placed within in #1 above, 40-foot clear curb area, and 3 to 4 feet of back of curb line. Trees may be placed immediately outside of clear curb area, or back of sidewalk. Bus nub may be installed to accommodate tree line and still give proper ADA landing pad and clear curb space. 6.1.11. Traffic Protection ­ Crash barrier to be installed in advance of stop/shelter for passenger protection, if applicable, for major road (speed limit 45 or higher) without sidewalks, or street parking, or other natural barriers to protect bus riders. Especially if narrow curb space, and passengers have to stand within 6 feet or curb line. 6.1.12. Transfer or High Volume Stops ­ Are stops where routes cross, usually at a cross street intersection. Location of stops should be as close to the intersection as possible, near a marked crosswalk to encourage proper street crossing, and within line of sight of each other. Usually requires a shelter. Route information needs to be provided for all routes, so area for sign holder, kiosk or other information delivery systems needs to be provided (#3 above). Besides all of the above, extra space for passenger waiting, along shelter or clear curb space, should be included in design. A standard of 8-10 square feet per peak load passenger should be used. Special care should be taken with placement of trashcans and vendor boxes to keep pedestrian pathways and waiting area clear. 6.1.13. Key Stops or Express Stops ­ Are stops that have been identified as major stops on routes, usually several blocks apart. In addition to all of the above, the shelter at these stops should be designed to cover a ten by twenty foot area, with seating and overhanging roof for standing under roof covering inside and outside the shelter. Visibility of bus approach route a must, trees must not block view of bus approach path. These stops should also include lighting, public information display systems, route maps, transit information, stop request and security call mechanisms, radiant heaters, ticket vending machines, and advertisements. Solar technology should be used where feasible.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 71 6.1.14. Lighting ­ Internal to shelter should be 5-10 foot candles; external to shelter, should be 2-5 foot candles. Options also include stop call or sign illumination mechanism for signaling driver which route needs to stop. 6.2. Bibliography Other Bus Stop Policies · TCRP Report 19 ­ "http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=2597" This Transit Cooperative Research Program report titles "Guidelines for the Location and Design of Bus Stops" was prepared by the Texas Transportation Institute at Texas A&M University (1996) - Note that there are five separate parts on the web site. · OCTA Policy "http://www.octa.net/temp/OCTA Bus Stop Safety and Design Guidelines.pdf" Orange County Transportation Authority (CA) - Bus Stop Safety and Design Guidelines (2004) · Palm Tran - Transit Design Manual ­ "http://www.co.palm-beach.fl.us/palmtran/library/TRANSIT DESIGN MANUAL.pdf" Palm Beach County, Florida Transit Design Manual (2004) · Arlington County - Bus Stop Standards ­ "http://www.commuterpage.com/TDM/pdf/ArlingtonCoBusStopStandards.pdf" Arlington County (VA) - Bus Stop Design Standards (2002) · AC Transit Bus Stop Policy ­ "http://www.actransit.org/aboutac/bod/policies/pdfs/Policy 508 - Bus Stop Policy.pdf" Alameda - Contra Costa Transit District (CA) Board Policy 508 - Bus Stop Policy (2005) · Grand Junction Transit Design Standards ­ "http://www.gjcity.org/CityDeptWebPages/PublicWorksAndUtilities/TransportationEngine ering/TEFilesThatLINKintoDWStoreHere/TEDS/TRANSITREGS.pdf" Grand Junction / Mesa County Metropolitan Planning Organization (CO) - Transit Design Guidelines (2003) ADA Information ­ Current Information on Web Sites · US Dept. of Justice - Transportation Requirements ­ "http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/reg3a.html#Anchor-11861" · CA Disability Access Information for Transportation ­ "http://www.disabilityaccessinfo.ca.gov/transport.htm" · Disability Access Information for Government "http://www.disabilityaccessinfo.ca.gov/goverment.htm" · Federal Transit Administration - ADA Information ­ "http://www.fta.dot.gov/transit_data_info/ada/14524_ENG_HTML.htm" · United States Access Board ­ "http://www.access-board.gov/index.htm" · ADA Accessibility Guidelines ­ "http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/html/adaag.htm"

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 72 6.3. Glossary of Terms ADAAG ­ ADA Accessibility Guidelines from the US Access Board. see: http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/html/adaag.htm Downstream - in the direction of traffic. Dwell time - the time a bus spends at a stop, measured as the interval between its stopping and starting. Farside stop - a bus stop located immediately after an intersection. Headway - the interval between the passing of the front ends of successive buses moving along the same lane in the same direction, usually expressed in minutes. Layover - time built into a schedule between arrivals and departures, used for the recovery of delays and preparation for the return trip. Midblock stop - a bus stop within the block. Nearside stop - a bus stop located immediately before an intersection. Nub - a stop where the sidewalk is extended into the parking lane, which allows the bus to pick up passengers without leaving the travel lane, also known as bus bulbs or curb extensions. Open bus bay - a bus bay designed with bay "open" to the upstream intersection. Queue jumper bus bay - a bus bay designed to provide priority treatment for buses, allowing them to use right-turn lanes to bypass queued traffic at congested intersections and access a far-side open bus bay. Queue jumper lane - right-turn lane upstream of an intersection that a bus can use to bypass queue traffic at a signal. Roadway geometry - the proportioning of the physical elements of a roadway, such as vertical and horizontal curves, lane widths, cross sections, and bus bays. Shelter - a curb-side amenity designed to provide protection and relief from the elements and a place to sit while patrons wait for the bus. Sight distance - the portion of the highway environment visible to the driver. Street-side factors - factors associated with the roadway that influences bus operations. TCRP - Transit Cooperative Research Program of the Transportation Research Board. Upstream - toward the source of traffic Waiting or accessory pad - a paved area that is provided for bus patrons and may contain a bench or shelter.

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 73

APPENDIX A

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 74

APPENDIX A - OMNITRANS Vehicle Fleet Information OMNITRANS EXISTING FIXED-ROUTE VEHICLE FLEET (FY07) Type of Vehicle New Vehicle Characteristics New Flyer Flyer (SR-585, TMC Neoplan Orion (Hybrid) 674, 709) Overall Height 9.9' 9.9' 11.2' 11.1' 11.1' Overall Length 40.0' 40.6' 40.8' 40.8' 40.8' Overall Width 8.5' 8.5' 8.5' 8.5' 8.5' Wheel Base 24.8' 24.8' 23.2' 24.4' 24.4' Edge Mirror to Mirror 10.0' 10.0' 10.0' 10.3' 10.3' First Step to Ground, Entrance 1.3' 1.3' 1.2' 1.3' 1.3' Centerline Door to Door 22.1' 22.1' 23.0' 22.1' 22.1' Location of Wheelchair lift Rear Front Front Front Front Seating Capacity 43 43 40 38 39 Total Curb Weight 39,500 40,600 40,000 37,950 37,930 Turning Radius 44' 44' 40.9' 44' 44'

A B C D E F G

New Flyer (SR813) 11.1' 39.9' 8.5' 24.4' 10.3' 1.3' 22.1' Front 39 37,930 44'

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 75

APPENDIX B

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 76 APPENDIX B: Point of Contact Information

Jurisdiction Chino Chino Hills Colton County of San Bernardino Fontana Highland Grand Terrace Loma Linda Montclair Ontario Rancho Cucamonga Redlands Rialto San Bernardino Upland Yucaipa Omnitrans Omnitrans Omnitrans Omnitrans Omnitrans Caltrans SANBAG

Staff Contact Jose Alire, Transportation Mgr Tony Wang Reggie Torres John (Patrick) McGuckian Senior Assoc. Planner Eric Lewis, City Traffic Engineer Larry Williams, Public Works Mgr Richard Shields, Director of Building and Safety/Public Works T. Jarb Thaipejr, Dir of Public Wks Mario Orioli, Public Works Superintendent Tom Danna, Traffic/Transportation Manager Akvar Rizvi, Assistant Engineer Ronald Mutter, Director of Public Works Jaime Cruz, Engineering Inspector Tony Lugo, Asst Engineer, Traffic Acquanetta Warren, Deputy Public Works Director, Operations John LaRose, Public Works Insp. Allen Wild, Stops & Stations Supervisor Department Secretary West Valley Senior Secretary East Valley Transportation Mgr West Valley Transportation Mgr East Valley

Contact Number (909) 464-8307 (909) 364-2783 (909) 514-4209 (909) 387-4122 (909) 350-6652 (909) 864-8732 ext 216 (909) 825-3825 (909) 799-4401 (909) 625-9466 (909) 395-2387 (909) 477-2740 ext 4054 (909) 798-7655 (909) 820-2532 (909) 384-5084 (909) 931-4240 (909) 797-2489 ext 243 (909) 379-7153 [email protected] (909) 379-7410 (909) 379-7210 (909) 379-7213 (909) 379-7412

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 77

APPENDIX C

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

BUS STOP DESIGN GUIDELINES October 4, 2006 Page 78 APPENDIX C: Distance Conversion Table

Feet 1 5 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 1,000 2,000 528 1,320 2,640 3,960 5,280 26,400 52,800 Feet 3.28 16.40 32.81 82.02 164.04 328.08 820.21 1,640.42 2,460.63 3,280.84 6,561.68 328 820 1,640 2,461 3,281 16,404 32,808 Miles 0.0002 0.0009 0.0019 0.0047 0.0095 0.0189 0.0473 0.0947 0.1420 0.1894 0.3788 1/10 1/4 1/2 3/4 1 5 10 Miles 0.0006 0.0031 0.0062 0.0155 0.0311 0.0621 0.1553 0.3107 0.4660 0.6214 1.2427 0.06 0.16 0.31 0.47 0.62 3.11 6.21 Meters 0.3 1.5 3.0 7.6 15.2 30.5 76.2 152.4 228.6 304.8 609.6 160.9 402.3 804.7 1,207.0 1,609.3 8,046.7 16,093.4 Meters 1 5 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 1,000 2,000 100 250 500 750 1,000 5,000 10,000 Kilometers 0.0003 0.0015 0.0030 0.0076 0.0152 0.0305 0.0762 0.1524 0.2286 0.3048 0.6096 0.16 0.40 0.80 1.21 1.61 8.05 16.09 Kilometers 0.001 0.005 0.01 0.025 0.05 0.1 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 2 1/10 1/4 1/2 3/4 1 5 10

Adopted ____________ Rev. _______________

Information

Microsoft Word - Bus Stop Guidelines 10-4-06.doc

79 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

398


Notice: fwrite(): send of 207 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531