Read Microsoft PowerPoint - Chinese Idiom final.ppt text version

Chinese Idioms

By Ben Jennings

mang ren

mo

xiang

King was riding elephant in country King saw six blind men and asked if they knew what an elephant was like They said no, because they were blind. The King asked them to describe his elephant Each, standing in a different place, felt the elephant.

mang ren

mo

xiang

Each described the elephant separately The man feeling the tusks said the elephant is long like a turnip No, said the man feeling the elephant's ear, he is like a great fan. That's wrong said the man feeling the elephant's side, he is like a great tile crock. No, said the man feeling his tail, an elephant is long and slender like a rope. Finally the King said, "you are all wrong, you only felt a part of the elephant, mistaking it for the whole."

mang

ren

mo

xiang

Moral of the story

­ "A group of blind men try to size up an elephant" is used to describe those that come up with a wrong judgment by looking at only part of something and not looking at the whole.

Comparable English Idiom

­ "You can't see the forest through the trees."

Application-Some people may look at a small part of something and think that they can judge the whole thing by it. An example of this would be in China if someone only looks at a small rural part of china they would not be able to understand China and its development.

shu

neng

sheng qiao

Famous archer Chen Yaozi 100 percent accuracy; admired and respected Gave exhibition to crowd All shots were perfect bull's eye Crowd cheered except old oil peddler Chen noticed and arrogantly asked "What do you think of my skills?"

shu

neng

sheng qiao

Old peddler,"you shoot pretty well, but nothing rare, just a matter of practice." Upset, Chen asked "what skills do you have" Old man saw how closed minded Chen was Old man placed a coin with a hole in it on top of a gourd and raised his oil ladle high into the air and poured it perfectly in the gourd without spilling a drop Crowd cheered at old man's skill Old man commented that his pouring was no special skill just something he practiced his whole life.

shu

neng

sheng qiao

Moral of the story

­ "Practice makes perfect" means that if you work hard enough and long enough at something you will become good at it.

Comparable English Idiom

­ "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."

Application-If someone wanted to master Chinese they would have to practice it over and over again until they fully understood the language.

Bibliography

"Archer." Google Images. 15 April 2006. <http://images.google.com/images?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF8&rls=RNWE,RNWE:200535,RNWE:en&q=chinese%20archer&sa=N&tab=wi> "Blind Man's Elephant." Google Images. 15 April 2006. <http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.astrologyco m.com/images/elephant.gif&imgrefurl> "Chinese Idiom Index by Pinyin." China Online. 15 April 2006. <http://chineseculture.about.com/library/extra/idiom/blidiom.htm> He, Yong. Easy Way to Learn Chinese Idioms. Translated by Scott Hillis. Beijing: New World Press, 1996. The Stories Behind 100 Chinese Idioms. Beijing: Sinolingua, 1999.

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Microsoft PowerPoint - Chinese Idiom final.ppt

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