Read The Influence magazine - vol 17 - no 2.pmd text version

THE INFLUENCE

VOL. 17 NO. 2 SPRING 2006

www.padui.org

President's Message

whether they wanted to have offenders repeat the existing curriculum twice. I will continue to update, throughout the year, any progress made by the work group and reported back to the Board. Capital improvements continue to take place at the DUI Association's building in Harrisburg to improve the functionality of the building to conduct business, cut overhead costs, and improve the overall value of the building for the membership. Renovations of the third floor were completed for storage and computer space. Improvements include drywall as well as carpeting and I would like to thank Stephen and all the staff for their hard work, as a large portion of the work was done in-house and on weekends. But nothing compares to the renovations completed under the direction of Stephen on the first floor. Walls were removed and a meeting room was built which can function as a site for Board Meetings as well as hosting Association events. Any member who has attended meetings in the past will just not believe their eyes. Once again I would like, on behalf of Board and membership, to thank Stephen and the staff for going way above and beyond. As far as special events I would like to like to remind you with summer approaching that we will be hosting the annual "DUI Victim's Run/Walk" in June and the Golf Fundraiser (with information for that event to be released in the future). As Board President, I hope that you as a member will show your support by attending one of these events. By now every member should have received their copy of the Association's Annual Report and I hope it reflects to

Board of Directors

Philip Zagozewski President Marilyn Stein Vice President Mary Ann Bowman Secretary Gary Moore Treasurer Regional Chairpersons Bob Napper, Region I vacant, Region II D. Wayne Harper, Region III Carl McKee, Region IV Regional Representatives Region I Susan Gerhart Gary Hutnick Region II Doug Kish Region III Todd Harpster Chris Smith Region IV Betty McBride Sandy Toy

I would like to begin this message by reporting how pleased I am to be able to inform the membership that the Board has been able to meet twice since our annual meeting in Harrisburg. Our first order of business was to reform board committees and also to reacquaint ourselves with unresolved business from the past year. As I mentioned in my acceptance speech, one goal of my presidency was to revisit the Multiple Offender 's educational curriculum to determine whether the information gathered by a committee a few years earlier offered a starting point or any potential for the development of an alternative curriculum for second & subsequent offenders. A work group was formed, met, and reported that after a thorough review of the materials there appeared little merit in using the materials. As much as we would like to not "reinvent the wheel" it was recommended to the board that we look in a different direction as the curriculum objectives lacked strength and varied little from the existing Safe Driving School educational curriculum. The consensus of the members of the work group was that developing a curriculum based on more of a standardized group intervention model might be the best direction to pursue. This would allow individual counties, at the least, a choice in determining

(continued on page 6)

2

THE INFLUENCE

Departments

Association News............................. 4

Case Law and Legislation .....................11 Drug & Alcohol Issues .......................... 14

THE INFLUENCE

Law Enforcement ...................................18

is a publication of the Pennsylvania Driving Under the Influence (DUI) Association 2413 N. Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17110 717-238-4354

Underage Drinking ................................ 24

Features

Drug Evaluation and Classification Program .................................................. 16 SADD Student of the Year .................... 17

"The Influence" is published by the PA DUI Association. Articles and information contained herein may be reprinted without the express permission of the Association, as long as appropriate acknowledgment is given. The opinions contained herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the PA DUI Association. Advertisements in this newsletter do not express any endorsement by the Association on behalf of the product or service.

in every issue . . . . president's message ............................. 2 regional news ......................................... 10 calendar of events .................................Back Cover

C. Stephen Erni, Editor Wendy Whitehaus Cole, Publication Coordinator

On the Cover National Town Hall Meetings Receives Great Press Attention ................................................. Story on page 4

3

Association News

TOWN HALL MEETINGS ON UNDERAGE DRINKING

Underage drinking is a serious problem in the United States. In order to address this pressing social issue, teams of government officials from around the country convened in the fall of 2005 in Washington D.C. Participants received the latest evidence-based information on the scope and consequences of underage drinking as well as strategies for addressing the issue. of Underage Drinking to host an Underage Drinking Prevention Town Hall Meeting on March 28, 2006 at the Harrisburg Area Community College. The Dauphin County Executive Commission on Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco offered a grant incentive for the school district with the highest attendance and a pair of Harrisburg Senators Baseball Tickets for every youth that brought an adult to the event.

As a result of this meeting in Washington, local communities held Dennis Owens about 1,200 townfrom the local hall meetings across ABC affiliate America the last (WHTM TV 27) week of March. served as the These events were moderator for the funded by small meeting, and the grants from the panel included federal Substance representatives Abuse and Mental from the Health Services following areas: Administration law enforcement, (SAMHSA) and drug and alcohol were held in all 50 treatment, states. A broad colleges and spectrum of Host Marty Griffin speaks with the students in the audience. universities and community leaders high school SADD Chapter members. came together during these meetings to discuss ways to prevent underage drinking by reducing demand, In the Pittsburgh area, the Pennsylvania DUI Association, availability and access to alcohol. Pennsylvanians Against Underage Drinking Coalition and the Allegheny County Adult Probation Services hosted a In Pennsylvania, 38 town hall meetings in 23 counties Town Hall Meeting on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 at were scheduled to occur on or around March 28 as part the Doubletree Pittsburgh Airport Hotel. A panel of 15 of this national campaign. The Pennsylvania DUI people with diverse backgrounds including Eugene Baird Association partnered with local agencies to conduct of the Attorney General's office, Allegheny County meetings in Allegheny and Dauphin Counties. President Judge Joseph James, two District Judges, Blaise Laratonda of Mt. Lebanon and Anthony Saveikis In Dauphin County, the Association joined together with of Oakdale, State Representative Mark Mustio and the Dauphin County Executive Commission on Drugs, member of the Pennsylvania House Liquor Control Alcohol and Tobacco, Halifax Communities that Care, Committee, Lt. Sheldon Epstein of the Pennsylvania State the YMCA, PA SADD and Pennsylvanians Against Police Troop B Pittsburgh, Chief Leo McCarthy of Moon Underage Drinking and the Federal Government's Township and Chief Robert Amann of North Regional Interagency Coordinating Committee for the Prevention Police Department, Assistant District Attorney Laura

4

Dittca, Tom McCaffery supervisor of Allegheny County Adult Probation and Bob Dulac supervisor of Allegheny County Alcohol Highway Safety Programs, Joe Bindas of Western Psychiatric Treatment, John Chamberlain of Stat MedEvac and Valerie Ketterer from Allegheny Juvenile Probation Services were available to answer any questions that the audience of more than 240 people in attendance might have raised. Special thanks also go to Pyramid Health Services for their support of the evening. Mayors, teachers, liquor control officers, parents, students and members of law enforcement agencies and faith-based organizations listened to the message from the national level, "Start Talking Before they Start Drinking." After the taped presentation, Marty Griffin radio talk show host from the KDKA morning radio show, "The Real Deal with Marty Griffin," took over as the evening's facilitator. Discussions were wide ranging: from more involvement being needed; to schools that refuse to acknowledge they have a problem and address it accordingly; and including, parents need to understand the seriousness of the situation of underage drinking and not take the attitude that it is inevitable or condone drinking in their homes under their "supervision." The information presented during these programs provided the impetus for community leaders and residents to examine their own situations and begin constructing a community task force involving parents, teachers, schools, businesses, treatment, police, faith-based organizations, district judges and community leaders. The meetings were a starting point for some, a networking opportunity for others, and information was exchanged about the positives as well as the pitfalls facing all of us motivated to protect and save our future generations from alcohol abuse.

ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP CONTINUES TO EXPAND

The PA DUI Association would like to welcome the following individuals to the Membership. Chief Michael Burdge, Annville Twp. PD Sara Eckerd Tpr. Emery Faith, PSP Tpr. Richard Gámez, PSP Ptlm. Jill Gaston, Blairsville Police Philip Aaron Gold Tpr. David Hamer, PSP Cpl. Leo Hegarty, PSP Chief Donald Hess, Blairsville PD Tpr. Chris Hessler, PSP Daniel Jones, Pocono Mountain Reg. Police Amy Kennedy Tpr. Jennifer Kosakecitch, PSP Naaman Morris, Union County Probation Officer Brian Ogg, Delaware Water Gap PD Patrolman Jonathan Roth Cpl. William Stanback, PSP Valeria Stevens, Rankin Christian Center Jason Wadsworth Bon Walsh, Livengrin Program Member Lycoming/Clinton SCA (Single County Authority) Susan DePasqua Shea Madden Cindy Newcomer Jennifer Reeder Denise Scott Laura Taylor Corporate Member Chief David Duffy, Newberry Township Police Department Michael Bosco Richard Breski Michael Briar Keith Farren Andrew Knaub Steven Lutz Thomas Myers William Myers Richard Rocco Kevin Romine Jay Smith John Snyder Gregory Starner Scott Tyson Joseph Yatsko

President Judge Joseph James 5

Officer Michael Sampere

Guard, conducted drug interdictions in the Caribbean, which often entailed high speed pursuits. Officer Sampere also served as a boarding officer, conducting recreational boarding's to thwart illegal activities such as boating under the influence. Sampere also takes great pride in having had the opportunity of being the Coxswain for the Coast Guard's elite 47' Motor Life Boat (MLB), which is one of the boats in the Navy's armada that is capable of sustaining a complete rollover. When not patrolling the streets of York, Officer Michael Sampere is a husband and a father of one daughter, and expecting another child in December. Officer Sampre spends his spare time working for a towing company, with a primary focus on repossession of vehicles. He is also an active member of the FOP Lodge 73, Carlisle Sportsman Association, PA Bow Hunters, and Pennsylvania DUI Association. Officer Michael Sampere believes that "Every law enforcement officer should reflect the job they do on and off duty. I strive to keep high morals and goals, and be a role model for my peers." With this credo, Officer Sampere serves the people of York in his attempt to make his community a safer place.

President's Message

(continued from page 2)

Officer Michael Sampere joined York Area Regional Police Department in 2001, where his commitment to keeping law and order continues to this day. Officer Sampere feels that he aides the York Area Regional Police Department most efficiently with his traffic and DUI enforcement. Sampere continually keeps high numbers in DUI arrests, as well as Misdemeanor and Felony arrests. In addition, he is currently working towards becoming a K-9 officer. Officer Michael Sampere is a veteran of the United States Coast Guard where he served from 1997 to 2001. With his unique qualifications, Officer Sampere was fortunate enough to do many things that others were unable to do. Officer Sampere was stationed on a 210' cutter for two years. During his time on this vessel, he conducted numerous law enforcement boardings of commercial fishing boats and freighters. He was also involved with the interception and apprehension of the largest combined group of illegal immigrants (420 total) since the Cuban migration. This is not Sampere's only accomplishments while serving with the United States Coast Guard. From 1997 until 2001 Sampere, along with other members of the Coast

the membership the tremendous growth we continue to experience and just what a strong organization we have become as we expand and develop programs to change community norms to save lives throughout the Commonwealth. Also, I would like to thank the members who took a moment to contact the Association staff to share their many positive comments about the new Influence. It was a first-class effort by the staff to take it to that level of professionalism. In addition, I would just like to mention that the Association's partnership with Comcast media campaign resulted in 5000 PSA's shown on television stations, and an addition 3000 PSA's disseminated via radio outlets across Pennsylvania. There are other exciting projects approved by the Board which will be discussed in the future by Stephen as they unfold. Finally, I would like to once again invite the membership and guests to stop by the "Victims Memorial Garden" when they are in Harrisburg to reflect on those individuals affected by the preventable loss of life sustained in alcohol-related crashes. Sincerely

Jake Zagozewski

Jake Zagozewski, President

Member Profile

The PA DUI Association will be profiling a member of the Association in each issue of The Influence. If you know of a DUI Association member that you would like to see recognized in this magazine, please let us know. You can e-mail Wendy at [email protected]

6

"Advancing the Ignition Interlock" through Education

For the past two years Lynda Kerr, Director of the Ignition Interlock Quality Assurance Program at the PA DUI Association, has been participating in a series of telephone interviews and meeting with the "Advancing the Ignition Interlock" student team members of the Gemstone Honors Program at the University of Maryland to discuss the benefits and drawbacks inherent in passive sensors and ignition interlocks and government ignition interlock programs. Specifically, she has provided information about Pennsylvania's drunk driving and ignition interlock laws and its relevant programs. The Gemstone Honors Program at the University of Maryland for the past ten years has invited honor students with varied interests and majors to participate in a program that integrates technological and social issues into team research projects guided by a faculty mentor. This program spans all four undergraduate years, and has had six graduating classes with program members receiving Gemstone citations. At the conclusion of their research, each team prepares a senior thesis which is presented to experts to read, discuss, and provide feedback to the teams. Each team then presents their senior thesis at the University's Annual Senior Team Thesis Conference. This year's conference was held at the University's Cambridge Community Center on March 31 and April 1 at College Park, Maryland. The "Advancing the Ignition Interlock" team was divided into two subgroups, Technology and Program. The research focused on two major subgroup goals: developing and testing a device to enhance current ignition interlock technology, and evaluating and improving the administration of Maryland's interlock program. The team consists of Katherine Butt, Rachel Clark, William Collins, Andrew Czisny, Daniel Ramsbrock, Michael Sandler, Grace Snodgrass, Dan Tasch, Samantha Tenebaum, Katherine Walsh, James White, and Pearce Wroe. The Technology subgroup experimented and tested alternatives to the ignition interlock device and assessed the feasibility of a passive alcohol sensor in motor vehicles. The Program subgroup studied interlock programs around the world centering their focus on what they considered the most progressive interlock programs in the United States: Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Mexico and California. Along with Jane Valenzia, of Maryland's Department of Motor Vehicles, Dr. Robert Voas, of the Pacific Institute of Research and Evaluation (PIRE), and Dr. Robyn Robertson, of the Traffic Institute Research Foundation, Mrs. Kerr was selected by the Gemstone Program to read the team's thesis and provide feedback to the team in preparation of their final thesis presentation.

New Technology Makes It Easier To Separate Drinking From Driving

This article is adapted from the Traffic Injury Research Foundation's Summary of the 6th Annual Interlock Symposium. Alcohol Interlock Programs: A Global Perspective By: Michael D. McConnell The most popular use of ignition interlock devices is to prevent residual drunk driving offenders from driving while impaired; however, in recent years, there has been an increase in interlock popularity in other areas. Interlock devices are now making their way into commercial transport, as more companies are realizing the added benefit of ensuring safer driving in company vehicles. In addition, a growing number of private consumers are becoming interested in interlock devices. Ignition interlock devices were first developed in the 1970s. Since then, technology has advanced and opportunities for circumvention have been reduced. The range of interlock devices has expanded, and consumers are now able to pick from a wide variety of devices and features that fit individual needs. Internationally, initiatives are being undertaken to promote greater interlock use by all citizens. There are some groups in the European Union working to make ignition interlock devices a requirement in all vehicles by 2012. Since the European perspective is focused on responsible drinking, interlocks are a means of separating drinking from driving, to ensure no person will make the mistake of driving impaired. (continued on next page)

7

Some vehicle manufacturers are now offering interlock devices by incorporating them into new vehicle designs. Both Saab and Volvo have recognized the growing interest in interlock device use and are taking steps to ensure safer roadways by offering vehicles with interlock devices that are user-friendly. By building interlock devices directly into the vehicle's keys, or other common vehicle components, consumers who are interested in these safety features will have an easier time making interlock use a common practice before driving. The Saab Alco Key is part of the Saab Real Life Safety Concept. The alco key incorporates a breathalyzer into the ignition key. According to Anne Petre of Saab, "The alco key is unique because it is significantly smaller than traditional ignition interlock devices and does not require a complicated installation process. Moreover, the simplicity of this design makes it much more affordable than traditional devices." The alco key is a simple concept. A driver provides a breath sample by blowing into a small mouthpiece at the end of the key. The breath sample then enters a small internal tube that contains a semi-conductor. If the breath sample is clear it sends an `all clear' signal to the car's electronic control unit, allowing the engine to start. Volvo, which is part of the Ford Motor Company, has developed similar technology. Volvo's Multilock concept is designed to address three priority areas in the field of traffic safety: sober driving, seat belt usage, and speed adaptation. The device requires the

driver to provide a breath sample through a mouthpiece that is incorporated into the latch plate housing of the seatbelt lock. If the breath sample passes the breath test, the indicator on the latch plate will show green; if the breath sample fails it will show red. This pass/ fail indicator will also be shown on the vehicle's dashboard. Once approved, the safety belt must be latched in order for the engine to be started. The final safety feature is incorporated into the vehicle's key. The key can be preprogrammed with a variety of different settings, including the ability to restrict the vehicle's maximum speed. All of these options allow for safer driving, and reduce the risk of unnecessary highway injuries and fatalities. These are just a few examples of how interlock device technology is being adapted to meet consumer needs. It is likely that these, as well as other advances in interlock technology (i.e., wireless interlock technology), will become more popular as the consumer base for interlock devices increases. In time, perhaps interlock devices will become a part of routine driving practices for all drivers, virtually eliminating incidents of drunk driving.

This article does not apply to the Pennsylvania Ignition Interlock Program, and is only intended to highlight the initiatives being undertaken around the world to ensure safer driving and reduce highway fatalities that are caused by impaired driving. The interlock devices mentioned in this article do not meet the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Specifications.

Ignition Interlock Presents Information at Regional Safety Task Force

The Pennsylvania DUI Association would like to thank the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) for allowing us to present information on our ongoing DUI Prevention Initiatives and the PA Ignition Interlock Quality Assurance Program during the DVRPC's Regional Safety Task Force meeting. On April 25, 2006, Lynda Kerr and Michael McConnell, from the PA DUI Association, presented information to the DVRPC's Regional Safety Task Force about the Association's multifacet approach and commitment to DUI Prevention; specifically, the PA Ignition Interlock Quality Assurance Program. The Association believes strongly in partnerships and collaboration building, and is grateful for every opportunity to share information with organizations that are working to reduce highway fatalities and improve safety on Pennsylvania roadways. The DVRPC has been serving the Greater Philadelphia Region for more than 40 years in an effort to foster regional cooperation in a nine-county, two state area. Representatives from city, county and state agencies work together to address key issues, including transportation, land use, environmental protection, information sharing and economic development. The DVRPC's Regional Safety Task Force brings together a multidisciplinary group of professionals to identify safety goals, strategies and resources, with a primary goal of reducing the number of crashes and the resultant casualties in the region. The PA DUI Association commends the DVRPC for its highway safety initiatives and their ongoing commitment to improving highway safety. We look forward to a continued relationship with this organization.

8

DUI Association Undertakes Major Renovations of Headquarters

Every year the Pennsylvania DUI Association takes steps to improve its headquarters. This year, the Association has made improvements to both the PA DUI Victims Memorial Garden and the DUI Association's office building. The Association is located at 2413 North Front St., Harrisburg, PA 17110. The Association's building faces the Susquehanna River, which provides a serene setting for the Pennsylvania DUI Victim's Memorial Garden, one of the only DUI Victim Memorial's in the Country. The Association strives hard to ensure that both the office building and Memorial Garden receives necessary upkeep on a regular basis. Pennsylvania's inclement weather conditions can make it difficult to maintain the DUI Victims Memorial Garden; a particular concern is the effect the weather has had on the park benches that surround the Memorial Garden. In an effort to restore the park benches, they were stripped down of their original finish, scrubbed clean, and a new finish was applied. The park benches now have their original look to them, and are once again a prominent feature of the Memorial Garden. In addition to the park benches, the addition of a timed irrigation system will help improve the Memorial Garden. In previous years, valuable staff time was spent watering the Garden. The new irrigation system will provide an effective means to ensuring the Memorial Garden remains a beautiful location for people to remember the Pennsylvanians who have needlessly lost their lives as a result of impaired drivers.

As the Association continues to expand its services, there has been an increased need to provide additional office space and make improvements to the current space being used. Recent office building improvements include the finishing of the third floor into additional office space and the remodeling of the conference room. The addition of a completed third floor allows for increased work space, and adds to the value of the building. The renovations made to the conference room will help make meetings more efficient, and provide a better environment for information sharing and Association meetings.

Photos

Top: Garden bench before restoration. Center: pipework and wiring for the outdoor lights made installing the irrigation system challenging. Bottom Left: Third floor renovations began by removing all old plaster, drywall and plywood flooring. New boardroom at Association headquarters

Photos Top: Garden bench restored. Center: Black's Landscaping employee working on irrigation system. Bottom Right: Third floor finished, except for the furnishings.

9

regional news DUI Association Elections In Near Future

Candidates for the 2006-2007 Executive Board are sought for the following positions: President * Vice President * Secretary * Treasurer Region I Chair * Region II Chair * Region III Chair * Region IV Chair (These are all one (1) year positions) Also being sought are candidates for Regional Representatives from: Region II * Region III (2 positions are available in Region II & 1 position in Region III) Interested individuals are required to submit a letter of intent to run for office, along with a short biography (no more than one page) to the PA DUI Association, 2413 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110 no later than July 24, 2006. In order to be considered, individuals must be members in good standing for at least one year. At a minimum, each officer should expect to attend six Board Meetings per calendar year. If you have any questions regarding the letter of intent or the election process, please contact the office or your current Board members.

Region 1

On March 17th, Region I members of the DUI Association held their first meeting of the year. The meeting was held in Philadelphia at Riverside Care South Central and included a full-day DUI & the Law training taught by Carl McKee. All who participated found this to be a very worthwhile training and left at the end of the day with more knowledge on the current DUI Law

Region 3

Thirty-eight members attended the Region III Meeting, held on March 14, 2006 at Union County. The meeting was conducted by Todd Harpster, who filled in for Chairman Wayne Harper. D. Peter "Pete" Johnson, Esquire, Union County District Attorney, was the guest speaker. C. Stephen Erni, along with Dave Andrascik of the Pennsylvania State Police, conducted a presentation of the 2005 Top Gun Award Recipients from Union County. During the Meeting, important updates were provided by the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, Pennsylvania State Police, PennDOT, and the PA DUI Association.

Region 4

Region IV members held their meeting on April 28, 2006 at the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Lawrence County. A big thank you to Pam Pratt who graciously hosted and organized the meeting for this quarter. Thirty-four people were in attendance for the meeting which was also held in conjunction with a full-day New Tricks in the Bag workshop taught by Charlotte Korba and Cathy Kumor of Fayette County Alcohol Highway Safety Program

Please send the Association any news from your region. We are looking for innovative projects, special awards or recognitions won by our members and/or their organizations to put in this space. 10

C a s e

Com. v. Carl Lippert, 887 A.2d 1277(Pa. Super. 12/1/2005) (Allegheny) Defendant was convicted under the former DUI statute 75 Pa.C.S.A. §3731(a)(4) of driving with a BAC above .10%. The court vacated his sentence, finding that the Commonwealth failed to provide sufficient evidence to sustain his conviction for DUI. Defendant was stopped at a DUI checkpoint and submitted to a BAC on the Intoxilyzer 5000, which registered a .105%. He presented expert testimony that his BAC was rising at the time he was driving and that the Intoxilyzer had a margin of error of ten percent, thus placing him well below the legal limit. The Commonwealth presented a rebuttal expert who testified that this machine's margin of error is only five percent. Significantly, the Commonwealth expert was unable to determine whether defendant's BAC was rising or falling when he was driving and therefore, the court concluded that the inference of guilt was too weak to establish proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

L a w

Com. v. Thomas A. Ciccola, 2006 PA Super. 23 (Feb. 7, 2006) (Centre) The Superior Court affirmed Defendant's conviction for §3802(a)(1) with a refusal. Defendant argued that evidence of his refusal to submit to a BAC test should have been suppressed because the government failed to provide him an attorney prior to his refusal. The court rejected Defendant's argument and concluded collection of evidence, including a blood sample for chemical testing, is not a critical stage in the trial process. Therefore, Defendant is not entitled to consult with an attorney before refusing the test.

convicted under both subsections §3802(a) and (c). Merger of the sentences eliminated any problem. The court further determined that the use of an outdated DL-26 form (informed consent), indicating that defendant was being arrested under §3731, did not invalidate his consent to a breath test. The law only requires informing a defendant of his right to refuse to submit to a chemical test, and does not require informing him of his right to consent. Relying on Com. v. Ciccola, the court stated there was no right to counsel at the time defendant was asked to submit to a chemical test as this was not a critical stage. Finally, the amended "look-back" statute was not an impermissible ex post facto law.

Com. v. William Tustin, 888 A.2d 843 (Pa. Super. 11/15/2005) (Huntingdon) The court held that a defendant who was convicted while the "look-back" period provision of the former 75 Pa.C.S.A. §3731(e) was in effect, remains subject to the new ten-year "look-back" period under 75 Pa.C.S.A. §3806(b) even if the §3731(e) period has expired. Here, defendant pled guilty to a DUI in 2004, and had a previous DUI conviction from 1996. At his sentencing, defendant's 2004 DUI conviction was treated as a second offense DUI based upon the new ten year "look-back" under Section 3806(b). The court found this section to be a recidivist provision and as such it does not violate defendant's due process rights. The court concluded that defendant was on notice of the increased "look-back" period when Section 3806(b) was enacted.

Com. v. John Brotherson, 2005 PA Super. 413, (Philadelphia Co.) (Dec. 13, 2005) The court affirmed defendant's conviction for DUI, finding sufficient evidence existed to establish that he operated his vehicle on a highway or traffic way. Defendant was asleep in his car with the engine running and was parked on a playground's basketball court. He had an alcoholic beverage inside his vehicle. Access to the playground was through a gate that was closed at the time when defendant was observed. The court found that the evidence established beyond a reasonable doubt that defendant was operating his vehicle or in actual physical control while intoxicated. The court noted that there was a strong inference that defendant was already intoxicated when he drove because of the location of his car and this inference overcame defendant's argument that he drank after his arrival on the court. The court found defendant's argument as to whether the basketball court was a highway or traffic way was waived as defendant had failed to raise that defense at trial.

Com. v. Ray D. McCoy, Jr., 2006 PA Super. 33 (Feb. 21, 2006) (Dauphin) After careful review of many issues raised, the Superior Court affirmed the defendant's convictions for Driving After Imbibing, pursuant to § 3802(a) and (c). Most importantly, the court concluded the DUI statute was not unconstitutionally vague or overbroad. Furthermore, the DUI statutory scheme does not violate the equal protection clause. The court found the arrest was valid even though the arresting officer erroneously cited the recently repealed DUI statute under §3731. The court also held there was no double jeopardy violation because the defendant was

11

Legislation

Act 15 of 2006 ­ (HB 1525) Amends Liquor Code so that hotel licensees no longer be required to maintain bedrooms for public accommodation, however, that areas required and designated as bedrooms for public accommodation prior to the effective date of this clause may not subsequently be used as licensed serving areas but may be used as licensed storage area. Approved by the Governor 2/21/06. House Bill 15 (Printer's # 3876) Amends Title 75 & 18 further providing for Substance Abuse Education and Demand Reduction Fund for DUI and penalties. PRovides for funding to local courts to implement Victim Impact Panels as part of offenders sentence. Final passage in the House on 1/31/06. Final passage in the Senate 5/2/06. Expected to be signed by the Governor by May 15, 2006. House Bill 121 (Printer's #3878) Amends Title 75 further providing for operating privileges: "For the purpose of restoring a suspended license, being current on a payment plan shall be considered as a part of a successfully completed program." Also provides for mobile installation services for ignition interlock. Approved service providers of ignition interlock systems shall be permitted to provide mobile installation of ignition interlock systems. Mobile installations shall be held to the same security and procedural standards as provided in specifications of the Department. Program participants or any unauthorized personnel shall not be permitted to witness the installation of the ignition interlock system. Regular maintenance of ignition interlocks after mobile installation shall be performed according to the specifications established by the Department." Final passage in the House on 6/28/05. Final passage in the Senate on 4/24/06. Expected to be signed by the Governor by May 15, 2006. House Bill 601 (Printer's # 3819) Amends Title 75 further providing for periods of disqualification, revocation or suspension of operating privilege and for chemical testing to determine amount of alcohol or controlled substance: "The cost of chemical testing . . . shall be paid by the individual if convicted of or placed into any pre-adjudication program or adjudicated delinquent for a violation of Section 3802; or paid by the requesting authority if the individual was found not guilty under Section 3802 or had the charges dismissed." Final passage in the House on 1/24/06. Final passage in the Senate 4/25/06. Expected to be signed by the Governor by 5/15/06. House Bill 1503 (Printer's #3733) Amends Vehicle Code further providing for the offense of fleeing or attempting to elude police officer while engaged in violation of Section 3802 shall be a misdemeanor of the first degree. Final passage in the House on 5/1/06. House Bill 1697 (Printer's #3279) Amends the Crimes Code by adding Section 6310.8 Selling or furnishing alcoholic beverages to minors resulting in injury or death. Bodily injury will result in a charge that is a misdemeanor of the second degree; serious bodily injury will result in a charge that is a misdemeanor of the first degree; and death will result in a charge that is a felony of the third degree. Final passage in the House on 12/6/05. Referred to Senate Judiciary on 1/23/06. House Bill 2368 (Printer's #3453) Amends Vehicle Code to add Section 3802.1 ­ Driving under the influence . . . with certain occupant. Any individual who violates Section 3802 where a person under 18 years of age was an occupant in the vehicle when the violation occurred, commits a misdemeanor of the first degree for violating this section, and has a prior offense as defined in 3806(b) shall be imprisoned for a minimum of 72 hours and pay a fine of not less than $1,000. Also provides for change in Section 3807 (ARD) (A) eligibility (2) stating ARD is not available for a person operating a vehicle while DUI if there are any people under 18 years of age in the vehicle. (was 14 years old) Final passage in the House on 5/1/06. House Bill 2375 (Printer's #3391) Requires institutions of higher education to implement alcohol policies; provides for PLCB enforcement and penalties. "An institution of higher education shall implement a written alcohol policy in accordance with the provisions of this act and shall distribute the policy

12

to each student at the time of enrollment and the beginning of each semester or period" and the policy shall be published on that institution's website. Final passage in House on 5/3/06. House Bill 2396 (Printer's #3424) Amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) prohibiting the sale, purchase, possession and use of alcohol vaporizing devices; and imposing penalties. A person who sells, purchases or possesses an alcohol vaprorizing device commits a misdemeanor of the third degree. A person who uses an alcohol vaporizing device commits a summary offense. Referred to Judiciary Committee on 1/26/06. House Bill 2469 (Printer's #3601) Amends Vehicle Code Section 3802(g)(1) regarding exception to the two-hour rule to clarify: (1) where the Commonwealth shows good cause explaining why the chemical test sample could not be obtained within two hours. Referred to Transportation 2/15/06. Senate Bill 727 (Printer's # 881) Establishing the Drug and Alcohol Treatment and Prevention Fund, and providing for the deposit of a portion of the liquor tax into the fund for use of fund. Referred to Public Health & Welfare on 6/9/05 Senate Bill 780 (Printer's #1549) Amends Crimes Code to provide for an exception for person seeking medical attention who shall be immune from prosecution under subsection (a) of Section 6308 if he can establish that the sole means for law enforcement to become aware of his violation is because that person called 911 "IN GOOD FAITH, BASED ON A REASONABLE BELIEF and reported that another person was in need of IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION TO PREVENT DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY; the person was the first person to make the 911 call, provided his own name to 911 and remained with the person needing medical assistance until emergency health care providers arrived." Final passage in the Senate on 3/15/06. Referred to House Liquor Control on 3/22/06. Senate Bill 968 (Printer's # 1361) Adds to Section 3803(b) of Vehicle Code: (5) An individual who violates section 3802 where a minor under 18 years old was an occupant in the vehicle when the violation occurred commits a Misdemeanor 1 (M1).

Adds to Section 3804(c): (c.1) Violation involving minor occupant ­ An individual who violates Section 3803(b)(5) (relating to grading) shall be sentenced for a first offense to a fine not less than $1,000 plus 100 hours of community service, and for a second offense to pay a fine not less than $2,500 and be imprisoned for not less than one month or more than six months; and for a third or subsequent offense to imprisonment of not less than six months nor more than two years. Referred to Judiciary 11/15/05 Senate Bill 1062 (Printer's #1514) Amends the Liquor Code;\, further defining public venue as stadium, arena, convention center, museum, amphitheater or similar structure. Also requires the PLCB's Bureau of Alcohol Education to provide biennial reports on underage drinking and high-risk college alcohol drinking. The report will include current levels and trends and programs conducted by State agencies to prevent underage alcohol drinking and high-risk college alcohol drinking and current science that better defines and suggests proven strategies for prevention of underage alcohol drinking and high-risk college alcohol drinking Final passage in Senate on 3/14/06. Referred to House Liquor Control on 3/15/06. Senate Bill 1101 (Printer's # 1569) A school district shall provide for the teaching of safe driving of motor vehicles in the secondary schools of the district in accordance with the standardized program established by the Department of Education. Referred to Education 3/16/06. Senate Bill 1140 (Printer's # 1588) This bill amends Title 42 imposing a central or regional booking fee on criminal convictions to fund the start-up, operation or maintenance of a central or regional booking center. First consideration on 5/2/06. Re-referred to Appropriations on 5/3/06. Senate Bill 1127 (Printer's #1660) Amending Title 75, further providing for homicide by vehicle while driving under the influence and for aggravated assault by vehicle while DUI; adds an "unborn child" as defined in Title 18, Section 3202, definitions. Referred to Judiciary 3/28/06.

13

Drug & Alcohol Issues

Research Institute on Addiction Self Inventory (RIASI) Developed by Thomas Nochajski, Ph.D.

When considering screening and assessment tools to determine the needs of DUI offenders, having a measure that is specific to this population is critical. The Research Institute on Addictions Self Inventory (RIASI) briefly but accurately identifies which DUI offenders are in need of further assessment. According to the NIAAA, "The RIASI represents a careful and empirical development of a screening device for use with a particular population." Screening vs. Assessment The RIASI is a screening tool. Like all screening tools it is NOT designed to provide a diagnosis for treatment. Rather, these tools are for the purpose of "raising suspicion of an AOD (alcohol or drug) problem." When screening results are positive, further assessment is warranted to determine a specific course of action. About the RIASI The RIASI is a 49-item screening instrument developed on research specific to the DUI offender. It measures both proximal factors (current drinking habits, preoccupation with drinking, alcohol expectancy and family history) and distal factors (hostility, aggression, sensation seeking, interpersonal competence, childhood risk factors). These factors are highly correlated with AOD problems and DUI offenders. The RIASI uses non-obvious indicators, as DUI offenders tend to provide the responses they believe will require minimal involvement in treatment. The RIASI has tested well for its ability to accurately identify the problem population (criterion validity). It has also shown good sensitivity and specificity which are also important measures of an effective screening tool. It correctly identified 80 percent of persons addicted to alcohol or drugs. The language of the RIASI has been kept to a 6th or 7th grade level so that it can be self administered. The test can be completed in about 15 minutes. It is available in Spanish. Scoring of the RIASI is on a point scale based on responses to the true/false questions. There are also points assigned to eight open-ended questions. The scoring is gender specific. A subscale specific to drinking driving recidivism is embedded in the screening tool as well. A total of 15 of the 49 items were identified and show a relationship to subsequent arrests and convictions for drinking driving. Studies conducted by The Research Institute on Addictions found that with DUI offenders, there is a need for screening and assessment devices that are not just focused on alcohol and drug-related problems. "The implications from these findings are that recidivism of DUI offenders may not be just a factor of alcohol-related problems, but more associated with a general deviance construct that includes heavy drinking, drug use and risk taking." (Nochajski) Isn't the CRN enough? The CRN evaluation is also an example of a screening tool. By quantifying responses to a variety of questions, including those related to quantity and frequency, it steers the DUI offender in the direction that best matches his needs. The RIASI is similar but far easier to administer. It is inexpensive and can be completed in about 30 minutes. It is a valuable method for creating awareness in the offenders mind about their AOD problem and the possible need for treatment. It also provides important "talking points" during meetings with probation officers which can help move the offender along in the stages of change. Most importantly, it identifies issues, apart from AOD use, which contribute to continued negative behaviors including rearrests. Identifying problem behaviors like sensation seeking, hostility, anxiety and interpersonal competence can be discussed during routine visits to the probation officer or in intervention groups. To receive a copy of the RIASI questionnaire, contact the DUI Association office. Training on the use of the RIASI is being planned for the fall and Dr. Thomas Nochajski will be a presenter at the 2006 PA DUI Association Annual Meeting.

By Marilyn Stein of MGS Consulting

14

Alcohol without Liquid

Alcohol Without Liquid (AWOL) is a process introduced first in Asia and Europe that allows people to take in liquor (distilled spirits) without actually consuming liquid. The machine vaporizes alcohol and mixes it with oxygen, allowing the consumer to breathe in the mixture. The machine has been dubbed AWOL, a play on the military term AWOL, Absent Without Leave. The AWOL machine produces a very fine alcoholic mist. The continual intake of this mist over a 20 minute period is the equivalent of taking one shot of distilled spirits.

Research Summary Energy Drinks Don't Prevent Intoxication

Energy drinks mask, but don't prevent, intoxication, MedPage Today reported March 27. Using energy drinks as mixers has become popular, but researchers say that while drinkers may feel fewer effects of intoxication thanks to the stimulating effect of energy drinks, they're actually just as drunk as if they had consumed other mixers. The study compared men who drank an energy drink alone, mixed an energy drink with vodka, and straight vodka. Those who drink the energy drink mixed with vodka reported feeling less drunk than those who consumed straight vodka, but objective measures found equal levels of intoxication. Researcher Maria Lucia O. Souza-Formigoni, Ph.D., of Federal University of Sao Paulo Sino in Brazil said that energy drink/vodka drinkers felt less tired, but the alcohol still impaired their motor coordination. "In other words, the person is drunk but does not feel as drunk as he really is," Souza-Formigoni and colleagues wrote. "The second important point is that many users reported using energy drinks to reduce a not-sopleasant taste of alcoholic beverages, which could dangerously increase the amount (as well as the speed of ingestion) of alcoholic beverages." The research appears in the April 2006 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

The machine was introduced to the United States in August of 2004. The possible health and safety risks of inhaling alcohol vapors are unknown and many legislators are promoting legislation to ban alcohol inhalation machines. Bills to do so have been introduced in at least 13 states so far (including Pennsylvania), and Michigan has made it illegal to possess, sell or use an AWOL machine. Support for such legislation comes from groups fighting underage drinking and drunk driving, including alcohol companies and industry groups, among others. The machine's marketers say it produces a "Euphoric High" and the effects of alcohol consumption without the high calories, carbohydrates, and hangovers associated with common consumption. In reality, distilled spirits contain no carbohydrates (nor any fat or cholesterol) that the machine could remove. Hangovers are allegedly prevented due to the fact that the alcohol is delivered with oxygen to the brain. Vaporized alcohol also enters the bloodstream faster and its effects are more immediate than its liquid counterparts. Marketers encourage purchasers to use the machine no more than twice in a 24-hour period to avoid over consumption, as this might be dangerous.

15

The Drug Evaluation & Classification Program

indicators include: disorientation, droopy eyelids, drowsiness, drunk-like behavior, slow sluggish reactions and thick slurred speech. During the performance of standardized field sobriety testing, subjects impaired will exhibit Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN). Additionally, they may exhibit multiple clues during the walk and turn and one-leg stand tests depending on the level of impairment. All prescriptions for this drug are labeled with a warning not to consume alcohol while taking the drug. When the warning is ignored, alcohol may magnify the drug's effects. Both Zolpidem and alcohol are central nervous system depressants. Most drugs-of-abuse blood tests do not include a non-barbiturate screen. Due to this fact, it is beneficial to contact your area DRE to conduct an evaluation in order to request the specific drug screen. Thorough investigations by officers can identify impairment from substances other than alcohol. The fact remains, people operate vehicles every day while under the influence of substances other than alcohol. Their chances of being involved in a crash is increased due to impairment. Officers must remain cognizant of all evidence available, and trust training and experience when determining if a subject is operating a vehicle under the influence of these substances and incapable of operating a vehicle safely. Watch for other drugs to be discussed in the DEC corner each newsletter.

By: Trooper David Andrascik, State DEC Coordinator

In November of 2004, the International Association of Chiefs of Police approved Pennsylvania as the 39th state to conduct the DEC Program. The program has evolved since California initiated the program in the late 1970s. The DEC program is an extensive program designed to identify subjects impaired by substances other than alcohol. After an intensive training and certification process, officers are certified by the IACP as Drug Recognition Experts. During each newsletter, a different drug will be discussed. These short informative columns are to assist officers in the identification of signs and symptoms of impairment resulting from the digestion of particular substances. For more information regarding the Pennsylvania DEC program and training schedule, go to www.psp.state.pa.us/dec. For information regarding the DEC program, go to www.dec.org. This column is designed to provide officers with information regarding the drug Zolpidem, brand names include Ambien® and Zaleplon. These particular drugs are prescribed to people that suffer from sleep disorders; they are, in fact, sleeping pills. The particular drug is a non-barbiturate drug that is considered a central nervous system depressant. There has been 26.5 million prescriptions filled for Ambien® in the past year. A person impaired by this drug will exhibit signs and symptoms similar to alcohol. Possible effects of the drug include: reduced inhibitions, divided attention impairment, slowed reflexes, impaired judgment and concentration, impaired vision, lack of coordination, slurred speech and emotional instability. General

16

SADD Student of the Year

SADD SELECTS LOWER MARION STUDENT TO NATIONAL STUDENT LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Students Against Destructive Decisions' Member Joins Top Teen Advisors from Across the U.S. to Guide Organization and Represent Peers

SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions), the national school-based peer-to-peer education and prevention organization, announced that Andrew Karasik of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, has been named to SADD's National Student Leadership Council for the 2006-2007 school year. Chosen from a nationwide pool of highlyqualified applicants, he joins nine other Council members who will represent the hundreds of thousands of SADD students in chapters across the country. "Andrew's leadership and his work and dedication to issues affecting teens makes him a great choice to join SADD National's Student Leadership Council," said Stephen G. Wallace, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of SADD. "We will now rely on Andrew to use his experiences on the state and local levels to help guide our organization as we work nationally to develop programs that will positively affect teens and their decision-making regarding drugs, alcohol, and other key issues facing today's youth," Wallace added. The Student Leadership Council advises the SADD National Board of Directors on policies and programs, plans and implements the SADD National Conference, and serves as a national and regional student representation network. Members of the Student Leadership Council represent SADD at local, regional, and national events and engagements. Karasik, a junior at Lower Merion High School in Ardmore, Pennsylvania, has been a dedicated SADD member for the past four years. He currently serves as President of his

(continued on page 20)

Pennsylvania SADD Student of the Year Biography

My name is Andrew Karasik, and I am ecstatic to have been appointed as Pennsylvania SADD Student of the Year for the coming term. I have been involved with SADD and similar organizations for some time now. I am very involved with my community, serving as president of the Junior Class at Lower Merion High School, in Ardmore, Montgomery County; I also serve on the Executive Board for the Pennsylvania Youth Led Anti-Tobacco Movement, called BUSTED! I am the president of the SADD chapter at my high school and the student coordinator of prevention programs for my school district. I am also one of the student coordinators for the Montgomery County Youth Advisory Panel, a subsidiary of BUSTED! I love working in prevention, and love helping my peers steer away from destructive decisions. I am often asked, "What does SADD mean to me?" Well, to me, SADD is an organization of which I am proud to be a member and local leader. It helps give meaning to a core set of values that define who I am--the values of honesty, strong leadership, and respect (both for myself and those around me). SADD has helped me find a lifestyle that not only suits me and my personality, but keeps me safe. It has taught me the necessity of a "No Use" lifestyle. SADD has also come to be a part of me, and has strengthened me emotionally. It has made me more confident about myself and my surroundings. It has led me to trust in my decisions and my own beliefs. In addition, SADD and the "No Use" lifestyle have become the basis for my morals and how I live my life. I originally joined SADD for a few reasons. One is that my mother coordinates the SADD chapter at her school in the Philadelphia School District. Another is that I felt my school was lacking in prevention programs and the other ideals that SADD embodies. I wanted to assist in creating a safer and healthier environment for myself and for all of my peers. I believe that true positive change in schools and in the lives of teens cannot come from the environment around them,

(continued on page 20)

17

Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement Seminar Offered

Law Enforcement personnel in Pennsylvania continuously attend seminars, trainings and meetings to keep their skills sharp regarding the legal environment and new technology available. They exchange information about the current trends of vehicle crashes, along with discussing statewide focus of enforcement initiatives in the effort to reduce death and injury on roads in the Commonwealth. The Pennsylvania DUI Association was pleased to partner with the Allegheny County Comprehensive Highway Safety Program, Buckle Up PA and Allegheny Adult Probation Services to offer a free, one-day law enforcement seminar to law enforcement, district judges and other highway safety stakeholders in Allegheny County on March 20, 2005 at the Radisson Hotel in Greentree. Cathy Tress, from our office, the W. PA Law Enforcement Director, worked with Phil Morrissey of the Allegheny County Health Department and Mr. Bob Zwier of Buckle Up PA to conduct the seminar which was sponsored by Safe Driving Communities Coalition. The Chairwoman of the coalition, Ms. Terri Rae Anthony also of AAA East Central, began the day with opening remarks on the importance of highway safety issues and the difference proactive police departments can make in saving lives. The day's program consisted of reviewing Allegheny County's crash data with specific information relating to impaired driving, seat belt usage, aggressive driving, pedestrian issues as well as underage and older driver crashes and fatalities. One of the most important tools for district judges and law enforcement officers from all agencies is case law. Mr. Nick Bolognese, an instructor with the Institute for Law Enforcement Education, taught a four-hour block of recent Supreme and Superior Court rulings, current DUI laws and detailed several examples of situations with emphasis on preparation and the importance of articulation of the events occurring up to and including the time of arrest, often the key in winning cases. Allegheny County's new DUI Court was presented by Assistant District Attorney Becky Zager and Allegheny County Probation officer, Frank Scherer. They usage rates is a major goal that will allow Pennsylvania to compete for additional highway safety dollars from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. If successful in raising the seat belt rates, millions of dollars could flow into PA that can be targeted for other high fatality crash causes such as DUI and aggressive driving over the next few years. Buckle Up PA's statewide law enforcement liaison coordinator Ed Boothman explained the concentrated effort for seat belt enforcement that will be taking place across Pennsylvania during the month of May 2006 with state police and local police that participate in a seat belt grant. A presentation by Ms. Janice Dean of Adult Probation and Parole Services about Ignition Interlock rounded out the afternoon. She went over the system, legal issues and how offenders in this phase of their punishment are regulated when an ignition interlock device is installed in their vehicle. She also showed the ignition interlock training 15 minute video produced by the PA DUI Association in the fall of 2005. The law enforcement video is available for download at the Association's website under law enforcement services. Nearly 100 participants attended the law enforcement educational opportunity that will be repeated next year in Allegheny County. If you would like to conduct a law enforcement one-day seminar with similar topics for your area departments and district judges, don't hesitate to contact us relating your interest.

Assistant District Attorney Becky Zager

explained how the newest court system functions and the criteria for convicted offenders' cases to be sent to this court. Ms. Zager expressed the success the new DUI Court is having and their goal to reduce recidivism rates and eliminate repeat offenders. Lou Rader, PennDOT's Transportation Planning Manager traveled to Pittsburgh and was the keynote speaker during lunch, giving everyone an update on the current highway safety status of Pennsylvania overall and the focused projects on which PennDOT is concentrating. Increasing seat belt

18

Second PA State Police Drug Recognition Expert Class Completes Training

On April 12, 2006 the second Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) class completed this arduous and demanding training regimen at the Pennsylvania State Police Academy. Seven Troopers and one municipal police officer were required to attain a 100% grade on the multi-phase final exam of about twelve hours in duration. This is the second DRE class to complete this intense drug recognition evaluation training at the PA State Police Academy in Hershey. Pennsylvania is the 39th state to enlist the Drug Recognition Expert program to help Commonwealth law enforcement officers in their efforts to remove drug impaired drivers from our roadways and waterways. Graduating PA State Troopers were: Angelo Bonesio, Emery Faith, Richard Gamez, Christophen Hessler, Jennifer Kosakevitch, and Samuel Nassan III. George Geisler, Jr., the PA DUI Association's eastern law enforcement services director, who is also a member of the Newberry Township Police Department in northern York County was the only municipal officer in this class who also successfully completed this curriculum which consisted of over 100 hours of classroom training and over 120 hours invested in traveling to White Deer Run Treatment Center, Allenwood, PA to complete clinical evaluations. The Pennsylvania DUI Association's executive director, C. Stephen Erni, arrived at the Academy at the end of the final examination to present each State Trooper with a new Intoximeter FST pre-arrest breath testing device valued at over $500 each. The Association had also donated the devices to the graduates of the first DRE class.

Director Erni told the class, "I am very proud of your hard won accomplishments in this class which will help to make our roadways safer because you will be able to recognize the drug impaired driver as well as help other Pennsylvania law enforcement officers to successfully prosecute drug impaired drivers who they have arrested." "The Association's donation of the pre-arrest breath testing instrument is just another example of your Association's support of your impaired driving enforcement efforts," said Erni. The pre-arrest breath testing instrument is an essential tool needed by the Drug Recognition Expert during his evaluation of a suspected drug impaired driver to rule out alcoholic beverage as the intoxicant. Trooper David Andrascik, Pennsylvania's first Drug Recognition Expert and state DRE coordinator, was assisted in the instruction of this class by PA State Troopers who graduated last year from the first PA State Police DRE class. Those members are: David Hamer, Cpl. Leo Hegarty, Cpl. John Quigg, Cpl. Louis Reda, Cpl. Shawn Toboz, Ronald Vetovich, and Richard Webb Jr. Other DRE certified instructors were: Sergeant Charles Smith of the Maryland State Police, the course administrator, New Jersey State Trooper Larry Wachter, Baltimore County Police Department's PFC Jonathan Strickler and Matthew Sorrenson from the Minnesota State Police.

By George Geisler, Jr., Director of Law Enforcement Services, Eastern PA

19

SADD Student of the Year

(continued from page 17)

but rather from the students among them. SADD is unique in that it is an organization that truly does good all the time. Good deeds are what humanity is based upon, and the knowledge of this is the key to the effectiveness of SADD. What we are doing in SADD will benefit not only those who are members of the organization, but everyone in our communities. This is the real basis and purpose of SADD, to be an intricate part of the community and to promote the safety of our respective communities, and the World as a whole. I would like to thank the entire state for giving me the opportunity to lead the SADD movement through the coming term. I really believe in the power and the effectiveness of SADD. I know we can be extremely effective, and we can achieve great things. Together, we are going to promote positive change in our communities. This change in return will ensure the safety and wellbeing of ourselves, our children, and our communities. And that, in my opinion, is the true magic of SADD. Thank you again!

THIS ST. PATRICK'S DAY A WARNING WAS SENT TO DRIVERS: "YOU WILL BE SEEING BLUE BESIDES GREEN"

The Pennsylvania Driving Under the Influence Association working in partnership with the Western Alliance Team DUI Task Force in Western Pennsylvania, reminded drivers beginning with the City of Pittsburgh's St. Patrick's Day Parade and continuing through the following weekend and actual holiday, that the Western Pennsylvania DUI Task Forces would be out in force patrolling and protecting the roads while looking for impaired drivers. The Western Alliance Team DUI Task Force in various counties, on various days and times, conducted roving patrols throughout western Pennsylvania. They participated with the National Checkpoint Strikeforce from the Mid-Atlantic regions including Maryland, Washington D.C., Delaware, Virginia and West Virginia. With St. Patrick's Day falling on a Friday night this year, responsible drivers were also reminded to be observant of possible intoxicated drivers on the road with them. Families were given information to be on the alert for impaired drivers having a tendency to drive slower than the normal traffic flow, turn with wide-radiuses, cross the center lines, following too closely behind the vehicle in front, stopping with a jerk at stop signs and traffic signals, remaining stopped for an unusually long period of time at a stop sign even when it's safe to proceed, sitting through several changes of a traffic signal and other behaviors that appear out of place. The Western Alliance Team DUI Task Force is made up of individual task forces from Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Blair, Butler, Indiana, Lawrence, Westmoreland counties and the Pennsylvania State Police. The Pennsylvania State Police and the Western PA Task Forces have been partnering and teaming up to cover more ground, increase public awareness and to stretch funding for DUI enforcement. There are more than 100 participating departments in Western PA. Each individual task force consists of one coordinating municipal department with as many as 14 departments participating. DUI task forces work together to enforce Pennsylvania's DUI laws in a number of ways including stationary checkpoints and roving patrols.

Student Leadership Council

(continued from page 17)

chapter and has developed new initiatives such as the annual Kick Butts Day. He's also a member of a community coalition called Community Advocates for Safe Youth (CASY) and he has been awarded multiple American Cancer Society grants to promote anti-smoking programs. "Being selected to the Student Leadership Council is a great honor, one that is well deserved, and brings great pride to our state and local organizations that have worked so hard to educate teens on responsible decision-making," said Felicity DeBacco-Erni, Pennsylvania's SADD State Coordinator. "Andrew has been an exceptional SADD member in Pennsylvania, working tirelessly to ensure that teens are aware of the perils of underage drinking and other drug use. We are confident he will thrive as an educator and as an important advocate for teens nationwide," added DeBacco-Erni. SADD is a national student-based organization with chapters in thousands of middle schools, high schools, and colleges across the country. Its mission is to provide students with prevention and intervention tools to effectively address issues such as underage drinking, drug use, impaired driving, teen violence, and suicide. More information about SADD can be found at www.sadd.org.

20

SLOW: YOU ARE ENTERING THE DUI SOBRIETY CHECKPOINT SPOTLIGHT City of Pittsburgh DUI Task Force Coordinated by the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police

The City of Pittsburgh is located in Southwestern Pennsylvania and consists of approximately 55.5 square miles. The 2000 census shows a population base of nearly 335,000 people living within the city limits. There are 88 separate and ethnically diverse communities and the city is home for the 2006 Super Bowl Champions, the Pittsburgh Steelers, as well as the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Pittsburgh Penguins. Not only is the city dominated by major national league sports teams, but it also serves as the metropolitan hub of activity for millions of people in Western Pennsylvania. There are more than ten colleges, universities and trade schools, which is the seasonal home for thousands of college students. The Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, the second largest municipal department in the state, is divided into five patrol stations located throughout the city and employs over 800 police officers at any given time. In 1994, the City of Pittsburgh recognized a serious impaired driving problem. To combat the high number of alcohol crashes and fatalities occurring within the city, they established the City of Pittsburgh DUI Task Force which pulls manpower from each station to conduct sobriety checkpoints, roving patrols and mobile awareness activities. On average, the task force conducts a minimum of eight sobriety checkpoints and 15 roving patrols annually; additionally one mobile awareness takes place per month in a calendar year. In August of 2005, the City of Pittsburgh DUI Task Force agreed to take on the responsibility as regional coordinating municipality for the NHTSA Sustained Driving Enforcement Mobility Project which ran through April 30, 2006 in Pennsylvania. Consequently, an impaired driving enforcement activity has taken place almost every weekend since August of 2005. Since 2003, 3122 DUI arrests have been made during regular traffic patrols and task force activities. Joint DUI patrols with college campus police are conducted on a frequent basis during the school year to combat underage drinking and preventive education programs are presented to students as well. The City of Pittsburgh participates regularly with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Checkpoint Strikeforce during holiday peak periods and actively promotes the risks and dangers of impaired driving through the major metropolitan media groups. The City spent more than $10,000 in 2005 on public awareness/ educational equipment with the purchase of a variable message board to continuously advertise anti-impaired driving messages and a fatal vision goggle package for the City of Pittsburgh high school students. The newly appointed Chief of Police for the Pittsburgh Bureau of Patrol is Dominic J. Costa, former DUI Project Coordinator for the task force. Costa is dedicated to reducing impaired driving deaths and injuries for the City. He supports the task force and encourages his officers to continue with aggressive enforcement of impaired driving laws. Lt. Scott Schubert began as the City's DUI Project Coordinator in November of 2004. Lt. Schubert is also the coordinator for the City's Seat Belt grant through Buckle Up PA and the supervisor for the Special Emergency Response Team, (SERT), Bomb Squad, River Rescue Team, Rapid Emergency Deployment Team and Homeland Security Team. He is also responsible for supervising and coordinating the city's special events such as the All-Star Game which will be played in Pittsburgh in July. Lt. Schubert aggressively coordinates the DUI task force and has made some innovative changes such as the addition of a marksman from the city's tactical unit that participates at every checkpoint now. The marksman is hidden from view and observes motorists traveling into the checkpoint area. Through the use of this new idea, the marksmen have radioed to the checkpoint coordinator, the observation of a motorist dumping drugs in the grass, guns tossed out the window, drivers and passengers switching positions and open alcohol containers being thrown out of moving vehicles. The task force also enforces the seat belt laws and child passenger safety laws when conducting impaired driving activities on a routine basis and at every DUI event. Under Lt. Schubert's supervision and Chief Costa's support, 27 officers have attended the NHTSA Standard Field Sobriety Basic Training Course just in the last six months with plans to conduct more types of these trainings over the next year. The City of Pittsburgh's DUI Task Force routinely partners with Pennsylvania State Police, Troop B Pittsburgh, and Lt. Scott Schubert communicates multiple activities with Lt. Sheldon Epstein, commander of the Pittsburgh barracks in an effort to reduce costs for both agencies and double their efforts with additional manpower. Through this type of team effort and effective management of the task force, the city is making huge

21

strides with public perception and the realization that if you attempt to drive impaired, you will be caught, arrested and punished. The PA DUI Association commends the aggressive efforts the City of Pittsburgh's DUI Task Force, Chief Dominic Costa and Lt. Scott Schubert are taking to make public awareness, education and enforcement of impaired drivers a priority of the department with the ultimate goal of saving lives and reducing injuries from this crime.

Automatic Sampling Fast Response Fast Cleanup Direct and Passive sampling. Designed for quick screening of a large number of subjects Designed with Operator Safety in mind Designed for use in low light conditions

There are more than 62 Sobriety Checkpoint Programs in Pennsylvania. Through their dedication in removing impaired drivers, countless lives are saved each year. The DUI Association will begin highlighting one or two sobriety checkpoint projects each publication.

For details or a demonstration contact Ken Hellendall 215-379-1671 * [email protected]

22

Limitations of Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN) for Detecting Impairment

By George Geisler, Jr., Director of Law Enforcement Services, Eastern PA

The old saying that "the eyes never lie" is certainly true. The administration of the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus evaluation of the eyes to detect impairment is certainly a worthwhile exercise in building your probable cause to arrest. However, of the seven drug categories, HGN is only symptomatic in three: CNS Depressants (barbiturates, methaqualones, tranquilizers and alcohol), Dissociative Anesthetics (PCP, "Special K", etc.), and Inhalants. If a person is impaired by CNS Stimulants (cocaine, amphetamines & methamphetamines), Hallucinogens (LSD, "shrooms", peyote, etc.), Narcotic Analgesics (heroin, oxycontin, methadone, etc.) or Cannabis (marijuana, etc.), Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus clues will NOT be present.

The point is to not rule out someone as being impaired just because their eyes do not exhibit clues of HGN. Continue your investigation by administering the Walk and Turn and One-Leg Stand field sobriety tests and augmenting the results with other observations made ­ the totality of which, along with the administration of a pre-arrest breath test, will help you to make an informed decision to make appropriate arrests and order appropriate legal breath and/ or blood tests. Each of the seven drug categories has their own signs and symptoms which will help you determine impairment. If you would like a copy of the drug symptoms matrix chart, contact the Law Enforcement Services office of your PA DUI Association.

Law Book Initiative Saves PA Law Enforcement $20,000

Earlier this year, your Pennsylvania DUI Association learned that many law enforcement officers throughout our Commonwealth did not have access to a new annual Pennsylvania Crimes Code and Vehicle Law book. Because a current law book is such an important and essential tool for law enforcement to be able to effectively do their job, your Association staff immediately began to address this problem by negotiating with the two major publishers of this material. While the cost of a new law book typically ranges from between $ 42 and $60 dollars per copy in addition to shipping/handling costs, the Association was able to reach an agreement with LexisNexis, publisher of the Goulds Pennsylvania law book, to place a bulk order of the books for $20.00 each and have them delivered to one location ­ the Association headquarters ­ for subsequent distribution to individual officers and law enforcement agencies.

to order was February 28, that deadline was extended two times for reorders due to demand. To date, your Association has distributed over 1,000 law books to law enforcement officers and departments saving our law enforcement partners in excess of $20,000! Your Pennsylvania DUI Association believes this initiative has only scratched the surface and plans on continuing this service in future years. With over 2,000 municipal police, sheriff and other law enforcement departments within our Commonwealth, comprised of more than 20,000 officers, our hope is to exponentially increase law book distribution each year until every Pennsylvania law enforcement officer and department has a new law book. Membership in your Pennsylvania DUI Association clearly has its benefits, and we hope you will continue to support the Association that supports you!

Your Team DUI staff produced and distributed a 2006 law book order announcement form to our law enforcement member database, our electronic law enforcement distribution list and to other law enforcement associations for distribution. Our target market was those officers and departments not already purchasing the law books. The Gould's law books were sold at our cost of $20.00 if picked up with an additional $ 5.00 to cover packaging and mailing costs if pick-up was not feasible. While the initial deadline

23

U n d e ra g e D r i n k i n g

Girls are Using Drugs and Alcohol at Higher Rates than Boys

Our girls are in trouble. A report this week from the Office of National Drug Control Policy confirms earlier findings from the American Medical Association: Girls are catching up to and surpassing boys in drug use. The report finds that more girls than boys started using alcohol in 2004, nearly 3 girls every minute. With the average age of a child's first drink now at 12, and with alcohol being a key factor in the three leading causes of teen deaths, the news could not be any grimmer. Worse, girls are uniquely vulnerable to the physical, emotional and social consequences of underage drinking. They are more likely to suffer depression, disruptions to their normal growth and puberty, and alcohol is almost always involved when girls are sexually assaulted. The report echoes 2004 findings from the AMA about higher rates of drinking among girls and the popularity of "alcopops"- sweet-flavored malt beverages considered "gateway" beverages for new drinkers. The alcohol industry aggressively markets these girlie drinks to teens. We can no longer afford to ignore the impact such mega-advertising has on impressionable youth. Every day, the alcohol industry bombards our kids with ads about how sexy and cool drinking is, making it hard for parents and communities to properly inform girls about alcohol's real results. These studies are a wake-up call that our girls are turning those wrong messages into dangerous behaviors. This Spring in conjunction with a national effort to bring awareness to underage drinking, communities across Pennsylvania held Town Hall meetings. The goal of these Town Hall meetings was to help communities understand the problem of underage drinking and begin the steps necessary to work together on reducing underage drinking at the local level.

Felicity DeBacco-Erni Pennsylvanians Against Underage Drinking PA SADD 2413 North Front St Harrisburg, PA 17110 717-238-4354 [email protected] www.alcoholfreeyouth.org

24

DUI Association Awarded Grant to Combat Underage Drinking

The PA DUI Association has been awarded a grant by the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency to combat underage drinking in Pennsylvania. The targets of this statewide public service announcement campaign are the caregivers of 9- to 15-year-old children. The average age when children begin drinking according to the American Medical Association is at 12 years. Pennsylvania has about 860,000 9- to 15-year-olds. Caregivers dramatically underestimate underage drinking generally and their own child's drinking in particular. The Association's program will support community efforts to reduce substance abuse by collaborating with community groups and media outlets to create, provide and/or place PSA campaigns that increase specific actions by adults meant to reduce underage drinking and decrease adult conduct that facilitates youth access to alcohol. The PSAs will be designed and aired during specific times and events, such as holidays, prom and graduation. Other components of the campaign will include technical assistance for communities, including an enewsletter, a tragedy plan, the option to create local PSA campaigns and an activity guide. Changing the way people think about underage drinking in a community is the first step to changing that community's environment. This change will save lives after the end of these PSA campaigns.

Grant Positions Available for Bid

The PA DUI Association is currently seeking bids on the three positions listed below. The positions are part of a grant awarded to the Association from the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency. This grant is funded through Substance Abuse Education and Demand Reduction (SAEDR) funds. (see adjacent article) Title: Communications Coordinator General Description: The Communications Coordinator will have primary responsibility to: Spearhead communications relationships for the new Community PSA Campaign. Including but not limited to development of Public Service Announcements in print, for television, radio, and other PSA's as needed. Executive comprehensive public relations duties for the success of this grant include: news releases, press conferences, special events and general publicity, maintaining effective relationships with news and public service media, and planning and executing all public education and media advocacy campaign materials.

Title: Technical Assistance & Training Coordinator General Description: The Technical Assistance & Training Coordinator will have primary responsibility to: spearhead a training program for communities on underage drinking that will include enhancing existing programs and developing curriculum for communities to reduce underage drinking in their communities. Program development will also be implemented simultaneously as the Community Public Service Campaign is rolled out in communities across the Commonwealth.

Title: Evaluation of Program General Description: Spearhead an evaluation component to measure the impact of the public service campaign involving the following: school surveys of 6th, 8th and 10th graders on the perception of access to alcohol in the six designated areas to be completed prior to and upon completion of the public service campaign being conducted; household surveys in the six designated areas to determine reach of exposure of message to be conducted prior to the release of messages and upon completion of message dissemination; and conduct focus groups of youth/parents in the 6th, 8th and 10th grades in the six designated areas to establish campaign messaging needs. Develop full report of evaluation including: Pre- and post-test results from the school surveys and results from the household survey.

If you are interested in bidding on any of these positions please contact Felicity DeBacco Erni at 717-238-4354.

25

Underage Drinking 2005: Girls Binging More

Nation's Biggest Youth Drug Problem Stays Big

Binge drinking among girls is growing at a faster rate than boys, according to a new status report on underage drinking in the United States by the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) at Georgetown University. Underage drinking in the United States, 2005: A Status Report summarizes the most upto-date, relevant research and data on underage drinking. Highlights from CAMY's report include:

·

Facts on Underage and Binge Drinking Nationally 10.7 million underage youth drink, 7.2 million are binge drinkers Youth who use alcohol before 15 are 5 times more likely to become alcohol dependent than adults whose first drink is at the legal age of 21. 24 percent of young drivers age 15-20 who were killed in crashes had BAC levels of .08 or higher. One-third of sixth and ninth graders obtain alcohol from their own homes. Pennsylvania In 2004, 1,366 underage drinking crashes occurred on Pennsylvania roads. In 2002, youth 12-20 years old accounted for 10.1% of all treatment admissions for alcohol abuse in the state. Pennsylvania students experiment with alcohol at a higher rate than do students across the country. Approximately 474,000 underage youth in PA drink each year.

According to all three federal surveys, girls are binge drinking more, while boys are bingeing less or increasing their bingeing at a slower rate than their female peers. Twelfth-grade female drinkers and binge drinkers are now more likely to drink distilled spirits than beer. Long-term studies now show a direct link between alcohol advertising and youth drinking. Young people who see and hear more alcohol ads are more likely to drink (and in many cases drink more heavily) than their peers. Every day, 5,400 young people under 16 take their first drink of alcohol.

· ·

·

"Underage drinking costs the United States more than $62 billion each year. At this crucial time when research shows that girls are binge drinking with alarming regularity, more must be done to reduce youth access to alcohol, and the appeal of alcohol to our youth," said David Jernigan, CAMY's executive director. Youth are more likely to drink alcohol than smoke tobacco or use other illegal drugs. In the most recent national household survey, more than 7 million underage youth reported binge drinking ­ having five or more drinks on a single occasion ­ at least once in the past 30 days. Every day three teens die from drinking and driving, and at least six more die from other alcohol-related causes, such as homicide, suicide and drowning. Heavy alcohol use in adolescence may interfere with brain development, causing loss of memory and other skills. Underage youth continue to find alcohol easily accessible, according to federal surveys. At the same time, alcohol's appeal to young people is substantial: between 2001 and 2004, for instance, the number of television alcohol ads seen by youth ages 12 to 20 increased by more than 30 percent. Research has found that the more difficult it is for youth to obtain alcohol, the less likely they are to drink. Policies that reduce youth access include beer keg registration, sales to minors compliance checks and penalties, and commercial and social host liability. Policies that counter the link between youth exposure to alcohol advertising and the greater likelihood of youth drinking include stronger self-regulation by alcohol companies, for instance tightening advertising placement standards to reduce the number of alcohol ads that youth will be more likely to see than adults. "At the end of the day we know how to reduce and prevent underage drinking," said Jernigan. "What is lacking is the will to put what we know to work on behalf of our youth."

26

Teens Steer Teens Toward A Safer Prom

Teens listen to their friends. That's the premise of the Erie Insurance Group Lookin' Out safe teen driving program. This year Lookin' Out is expanding to include an all new activity called "You Hold the Keys," designed to encourage safe driving on prom night, one of the most exciting yet potentially dangerous evenings of the academic year. With the "You Hold the Keys" program already underway in 38 schools in five states where Erie Insurance operates, the program is expected to impact an estimated 20,000 high school juniors and seniors. Lookin' Out is managed by student committees with assistance from a local Erie Insurance Agent. Like all Lookin' Out activities, students will be driving home the "You Hold the Keys" safe teen driving message with the help of local Erie Insurance Group Agents and a free prom kit. Specially-designed posters will hang throughout the schools in the weeks and days leading up to prom night, and students will be asked to sign a "You Hold the Keys" banner, pledging their commitment to safe driving. Students will also receive a "You Hold the Keys" key ring as a reminder to drive safely every time they sit behind the wheel of their cars. The "You Hold the Keys" kits are intended to enhance any activities the schools already have planned to promote responsible decisions on prom night. "The `You Hold the Keys' program is a great way for schools to reinforce the message of making safe, responsible decisions on prom night," said John Yore, principal of Sherwood High School in Sandy Spring, Maryland. "The students on our Lookin' Out committee really get creative with planning ways to encourage their peers to drive safely and this is just one more fun and exciting way they can work together to send a message that will get through to teen drivers." "We realize the importance of promoting safe teen driving, and we also know that teens listen to their friends," said Maryjane Eisnor of Eisnor Insurance Agency in Clark Mills, New York. Eisnor is working with students on the Lookin' Out committee at Westmoreland High School. "That's why we've developed a partnership with local teens. In working with students through this program, we've had the opportunity to hear their perceptions about driving. Their perceptions are the driving force for Lookin' Out." Independent agents are helping to make a difference throughout the school year with the Lookin' Out safe teen driving program. High school juniors and seniors from 42 schools in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia have been affected by the Lookin' Out program to date. "Many times traffic accidents can be avoided because they occur in a moment of carelessness," Erie Insurance Group President and Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey A. Ludrof explained. "Driving is like any other skill - it requires education, mentoring, practice and life experience to reach proficiency. We believe that by providing the Lookin' Out program and kits such as `You Hold the Keys' to schools we are elevating awareness of the risk factors associated with teen driving collisions and can help save lives and create better drivers." Erie Insurance provides schools participating in Lookin' Out with a grant to help spread the word about safe teen driving. The grants are used to fund Lookin' Out safe driving awareness programs and activities in schools. Lookin' Out has been managed successfully in high schools since 2001 and has awarded more than $130,000 in grants to educate teen drivers. Schools do not have to be participating in the Lookin' Out program to receive the "You Hold the Keys" prom kit. The Erie Insurance Group Lookin' Out program is managed from the company's home office in Erie, Pennsylvania and administered on a local, community level by ERIE Agents. The Agents participate in the program voluntarily. For more information about Erie Insurance Group, visit the company's web site at www.erieinsurance.com. To learn more about the Lookin' Out program visit the Lookin' Out web site at www.erieinsurance.com/lookinout or call (814) 870-2285.

27

Third Annual Fatal Awareness High School Conference

The Pennsylvania DUI Association and Allegheny County Adult Probation Services conducted the Third Annual Fatal Awareness Conference on Thursday, March 30, 2006, at the Robert Morris University Sewell Center in Moon Township. Over 300 high school students from Allegheny County school districts attended the conference and over 50 teachers and other adult chaperones participated as well. The conference has been designed for the past several years to get the attention of students and educate them about the risks they take when indulging in alcohol as a young person, empowering them with the knowledge regarding the risks and serious health consequences, and social problems that underage drinking and/or drinking and driving can have on their lives. These behaviors can risk their futures, end their lives or change them so drastically that their future is in danger. But the conference doesn't take the usual lecture approach. Each of the speakers is chosen carefully for their message as well as for their humor and wit. The conference is designed to be enjoyable while getting the point across. This year's conference began with a speaker from Pennsylvania's Attorney General's office, Mr. Eugene Baird, about underage alcohol use and how it can easily turn into the catalyst for other highly addictive drug use often spinning out of control. The keynote speaker was Ms. Karen Vadino, a nationally known speaker who talks to teens with humor about life's choices and how young people need to feel good about themselves without chemical stimuli. She has been in the human services field for 20 years, working in a child's psychiatric hospital, chemical dependency clinics and has also taught sociology, juvenile justice and human development at Youngstown University, Penn State University and Westminster College.

The students then broke into groups for workshops. Workshops focused on the risks and legal ramifications of drunk driving; seat belt use as the first defense against a crash; and more on making wise choices so they can grow into productive adults with bright futures. The high school conference took place the day after community leaders, teachers, parents, students, law enforcement personnel, coalition members and others heard about the new research on the health risks and consequences of the problems associated with underage alcohol abuse at the Town Hall Meeting held in Pittsburgh. The meeting discussed how to change society's acceptance, education and enforcement to combat the problems associated with underage drinking. The reality is that there is a direct link between drinking and high-risk behaviors that leads to health, safety and social problems affecting youth, including poor academic performance and school failure, assaults, car crashes, accidents, violence and suicide, as well as early and unprotected sex. Alcohol is also a gateway drug--the starting point for many teens that later move on to other drugs, raising the risk of even more devastating consequences. The conference addressed all these issues and is fast becoming one of the premiere conferences for youth to attend.

28

Warren County Celebrates 15th Annual SADD Conference

By Michael D. McConnell

PENNSYLVANIA LOCATIONS

Warren County SADD held its 15th Annual Conference on Friday, April 28, 2006 at the Holy Redeemer Center in Warren, PA. The theme of this years Conference was "Wipe Out Destructive Decisions," with over 185 students in attendance. The keynote speaker was Karen Vadino, whose motivational speech was entitled, "Leadership Through Laughter." Additional guest speakers included State Representative Kathy Rapp, President Judge William F. Morgan, and Warren County District Attorney Ross McKeirnan. During the conference, Warren County SADD Students learned valuable lessons on leadership and the importance of making safe decisions in their communities. The Pennsylvania DUI Association and PA SADD would like to congratulate Warren County SADD on their 15th Annual Conference, and wish them continued success in the future.

LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR, STATE FARM IS THERE. WE LIVE WHERE YOU LIVE.

Providing Insurance and Financial Services

www.statefarm.com State Farm Insurance Companies - Home Offices: Bloomington, IL

29

3rd Annual DUI Victims Memorial 10K Run & 1 Mile Walk

Saturday, June 17, 2006

Location -- Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania DUI Association, 2413 North Front St., on the Harrisburg Riverfront) $15.00 - Early Registration received on or before June 10th. $20.00 - Late Registration received after June 10th including day of race.

Children Under 3 Free For More Information Contact:

Mike McConnell Pennsylvania DUI Association (717)238-4354

[email protected]

Registration Forms also available online at www.padui.org

All proceeds benefit the PA DUI Victims Memorial Garden

REGISTRATION F ORM

$15.00 Early Registration $20.00 Late Registration received after June 10th including day of the race.

Name Address City Phone: Date of Birth: Email: Age (as of 6/17/2006): State Zip Code

10K Run 1 Mile Walk & Children's Run

Date

Sex: Male or Female

T-Shirt Size: S M L XL XXL

By signing this registration form, I waive all claims for myself, my heirs and assigns, the sponsor, coordinating groups, and any individual associated with the event and will hold them harmless for any and all injuries or illness which may result from my participation. I further state that I am in proper physical condition to participate in these races. I give my permission to the media to use my name and/or photo in any newspaper broadcast, telecast or any other account of this event, without limitation and without obligation of anyone to compensate me thereof.

Signature

Date

Parent or Guardian if Under 18

Date

30

The PA DUI Association is currently accepting reservations for the Safety Bug and Safety SIM for the Fall of 2006

Schools and businesses have already begun to book the Safety Bug and Safety SIM for the Fall of this year. If you have a specific date that you would like to have the Bug or SIM visit your community, please call now.

Dates such as Red Ribbon Week, Homecoming and Halloween book quickly, don't miss your chance to make a maximum impact on the health and safety of your community - call today to reserve the Safety Bug or Safety SIM.

CALL 1-800-62 PA DUI

PENNSYLVANIA DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE ASSOCIATION Application For Membership

Last Name First Name Title _______________________________

Organization_________________________________________

Address__________________________________________________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ Zip Code ___________Telephone (_____) ____________ Email __________________________

Membership Rates

INDIVIDUAL: BUSINESS: _____ New $45.00 _____ Non-Profit $100.00 _____Renewal $35.00 _____ Corporate $250.00 _____ Senior/Student $15.00 _____ Program $500.00

Please return completed application, check or money order to:

PA DUI Association 2413 N. Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17110

31

32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 3210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 32109876543210987654321210987654321098765432109876543212109876543210987654321098765432121098765432109876543210987654321 1 3 1

May 18 -19 - Sobriety Checkpoint Conference - Days Inn, State College

May 17 ­ Train-theTrainer Sobriety Checkpoint Training Days Inn, State College

May

June

June 6 ­ 9 ­ CPA pre-conference & Conference Nittany Lion Inn, State College

August

June 17, 2006 PA DUI Victim Memorial 10K Run and 1 Mile Walk

July

May 15 - Regional DUI Training Conference Quality Inn, Somerset

June 15 & 16 ­ DUI Coordinators Conference - Days Inn, State College

June 15 - York County Regional DUI Training

August 22 - Chester County Regional DUI Training

July 25 - Regional DUI Training Conference ­ Days Inn, Danville

July 14-17 - SADD National Conference, Boston MA

Contact the PA DUI Association at 717-238-4354 if you are interested in advertising in The Influence.

Calendar of Events

Multi-issue discount available, call for details.

Your Ad Here

November

December September October

November 15 ­ SADD Conference ­ Lancaster Host

October 25 ­ 27 ­ DUI Association 27th Annual Conference, Nittany Lion Inn, State College

November 14 - Regional DUI Training Conference ­ Sheraton, Allentown

November 13 ­ SADD Conference- Seven Springs Mountain Resort

December 6 - Rgl. DUI Training - Uniontown December 5 - Regional Training - New Kingsington

October 5 - Regional DUI Training Clearfield County September 26 - Regional DUI Training Conference ­ Days Inn, Meadville September 12-14 ILEE Annual Conference, Seven Springs Resort October 11 - Youth Rally on Underage Drinking Harrisburg Hilton

Information

The Influence magazine - vol 17 - no 2.pmd

32 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

653471


You might also be interested in

BETA
Annual Report 2010.qxd
YATES COUNTY
A Guide to Developing, Maintaining, and Succeeding with Your SRO Program
untitled