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NAPLAN*-style

Test Pack

FREE** Sample Writing Tests for persuasive texts

Alan Horsfield, Lisa Edwards & Lyn Baker

* This is not an officially endorsed publication of the NAPLAN program and is produced by Pascal Press independently of Australian governments.

In 2011 the Writing Test will change to a persuasive text. ** These tests are free for private personal use only.

Copyright © 2011 Pascal Press ISBN 978 1 74125 268 2 Pascal Press PO Box 250 Glebe NSW 2037 (02) 8585 4044 www.pascalpress.com.au Publisher: Vivienne Joannou Edited by Rema Gnanadickam and Rosemary Peers Cover, page design and typesetting by DiZign Pty Ltd Writing samples written by Maya Puiu Printed by Green Giant Press Reproduction and communication for educational purposes The Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act) allows 10% of the pages of this work to be reproduced and/ or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided that the educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) under the Act. For details of the CAL licence for educational institutions contact: Copyright Agency Limited Level 15, 233 Castlereagh Street Sydney NSW 2000 Telephone: (02) 9394 7600 Facsimile: (02) 9394 7601 E-mail: [email protected] Reproduction and communication for other purposes Except as permitted under the Act (for example a fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review) no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address above. NAPLAN is a trademark of Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). Disclaimer Excel Test Zone is a brand of Pascal Press. The official body that produces the NAPLAN Tests, Curriculum Corporation, in no way endorses or is connected to this product in any way. All efforts have been made by the Publisher to make these questions match the actual NAPLAN Test questions, although NAPLAN Tests are subject to change without notice. Pascal Press makes no representations about whether doing these test questions will improve your results in the actual NAPLAN Tests. All efforts have been made to gain permission for the copyright material reproduced in this book, but we have not been successful in contacting all the copyright holders. The publisher welcomes any information that will enable rectification of any reference or credit in subsequent editions.

YEAR 9 WRITING TEST: TipsCONTENTS persuasive texts YEAR 9 for writing

Check the official NAPLAN website for important updates. You are told what type of writing will be tested. From 2008 to 2010 it was a narrative text and in 2011 it will be a persuasive text. Click on the `Domains' tab on the official NAPLAN website (www.naplan.edu.au) for the latest updates on the Writing Test and to see what writing marking criteria NAPLAN markers use when assessing your writing. A sample Writing Task is also provided.

A persuasive text is sometimes known as an exposition or an argument. A persuasive text aims to argue a position and support it with evidence and reasons. When writing persuasive texts it is best to keep the following points in mind. They will help you get the best possible mark.

Language features of persuasive texts

You can use some or all of the following features: Emotive language: use words or phrases that express emotion, e.g. I find it shocking, terrible crime, terrific, heartless, desirable. Third-person narrative: avoid using I in your argument. The third person is more formal and appropriate to a persuasive text of this kind. Connectives: these words link your points together, e.g. firstly, secondly, finally, on the other hand, however, furthermore, moreover and in conclusion. Modality: use modals to express different levels of certainty. High modal verbs, including should, must, will not and ensure, are strongly persuasive. Repetition: repeat key words or phrases to have a dramatic effect on the reader by drawing emphasis to a point or idea. Rhetorical questions: these questions are designed to make the reader think, e.g. Have you ever lost a loved one? Statements of appeal: these affect the emotions of your readers and encourage action, e.g. We owe it to our children to act now on climate change.

Before you start writing

Read the question carefully. You will probably be asked to write your reaction to a particular question or statement, such as Excessive Internet usage is bad for teenagers. Most of the topics that you will be asked to comment on are very general. This means you will probably be writing about something you know and can draw upon your experience. Give yourself a few minutes before you start writing to get your thoughts in order and jot down points.

Structure of persuasive texts

A persuasive text has a specific structure: The introduction is where you clearly state your ideas about the topic. You must ensure your position is clearly outlined. It is a good idea to list your main points in your introduction--three points is perfect. The body comprises a series of paragraphs where your opinions are developed. Evidence and/or reasons are given to support your opinions about the topic. Each paragraph usually opens with a sentence that previews what the paragraph will focus on. The conclusion is a paragraph where the main points of your argument are summarised and where you restate your opinion on the topic. Your conclusion should not include any new information.

Don't forget to:

plan your argument before you start write in correctly formed sentences and take care with paragraphing choose your words carefully and pay attention to your spelling and punctuation write neatly but don't waste time make no more than three different points quickly check your argument once you have finished.

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Excel Test Zone Year 9 Test Guide

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YEAR 9 WRITING TEST 1: Persuasive text

Today you are going to write a persuasive text, often called an exposition. The purpose of writing a persuasive text is to influence or change a reader's thoughts or opinions on a particular topic or subject. Your aim is to convince a reader that your opinion is sensible and logical. Successful persuasive writing is always well planned. Persuasive texts may include advertisements, letters to newspapers, speeches and newspaper editorials, as well as arguments in debates. Hats should not be compulsory at schools. What do you think about this idea? Do you support or reject this proposal? Write to convince a reader of your opinions.

Before you start writing

Give some thought to: · whether you strongly agree or strongly disagree with this plan · reasons or evidence for your arguments · a brief but definite conclusion--list some of your main points and add a personal opinion · the structure of a persuasive text, which begins with a well-organised introduction, followed by a body of arguments or points, and finally a conclusion that restates the writer's position. Don't forget to: · plan your writing before you start--make a list of important points you wish to make · write in correctly formed sentences and take care with paragraphing · choose your words carefully, and pay attention to your spelling and punctuation · write neatly but don't waste time · quickly check your persuasive text once you have finished--your position must be clear to the reader. Remember: the stance taken in a persuasive text is not wrong, as long as the writer has evidence to support his or her opinion. How the opinion is supported is as important as the opinion itself.

Excel Test Zone Year 9 Test Guide

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Structure

Vocabulary

Year 9 Sample Writing 1: Persuasive text

Language and ideas

Audience

is · The writer's positionacts clearly stated. This

to position, engage and convince the reader.

verbs and · A variety ofare used to adjectives

Hats should not be compulsory at schools.

·

So, the school now wants us to wear a hat--well fancy that! Along with the tie, blazer, cardigan, collared shirt, skirt or pants, bulky black shoes and if you're a girl, tights, I wonder how we'll even make it out the door in the morning. I'm here today to persuade you that the introduction of the school hat is ultimately a burden. It will be added to the pile of unnecessary uniform requirements that the school already faces dif culty in enforcing.

persuade. A range of effective words and phrases enhance the tone of the speech.

Text structure

YEAR 9 WRITING TEST 1: Sample of a High to Very high level piece of writing

Excel Test Zone Year 9 Test Guide

·

The information is presented in a suitable and effective text structure. The text contains a clear introduction, main body with development of ideas, and conclusion.

Sentence structure

varied · Sentences arestructure, in length and

and include more complex clauses, which creates pace and atmosphere.

Paragraphing

of · The organisationclear information into

Ideas

65

paragraphs helps the reader follow the line of argument.

ideas · Clearcentral relatingthe to a event,

Cohesion

The school hat is unlikely to be worn by anyone--let's face it. In addition to crushing new hairstyles, the school hat will also crush our fragile adolescent egos that are just crying out for social acceptance. Don't have a boyfriend or girlfriend yet? Bit worried about this? Reckon the school hat will help you nab one? Unlikely! The proposed hat is in a nifty beret style that was last fashionable somewhere about the time some old dude called Churchill was Prime Minister of Britain.

school hat, are crafted to create the effect of a well-structured and persuasive text.

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· Referring words, word substitutions and

Punctuation

connections allow for whole text unity and for the development of textual relationships.

Secondly the aforementioned beret style has no sun-blocking capabilities and so is particularly useless. The beret will be added to the otsam and jetsam of our bedroom oors where some futuristic archaeological team will dig them up in about two thousand years. No doubt they will be confused by the abundant and yet apparently unworn quantities of berets strewn throughout our society. I urge you to take advantage of your democratic right to vote on this issue! The proposed hat serves no purpose other than adding to our already long list of uniform requirements. Please let us join together to block this ridiculous and out-dated proposal. The success of our social futures depends upon it!

· Correct and appropriate punctuation, such as

exclamation marks and rhetorical questions, enhance the effectiveness of the text.

Persuasive techniques

· The use of persuasive techniques such as

Spelling

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emotive language, repetition, inclusive pronouns and hyperbole add power to the writer's argument and in uence the audience.

· There are no spelling errors and both dif cult

(e.g. adolescent, strewn) and challenging vocabulary (e.g. archaeological, futuristic, aforementioned) is used.

Excel Test Zone © Pascal Press 2010 This writing sample has been analysed based on the marking criteria used by markers to assess the NAPLAN Writing Test.

VGood_Sample Story Yr9 NAPLAN BW.indd 1

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YEAR 9 WRITING TEST 2: Persuasive text

Today you are going to write a persuasive text, often called an exposition. The purpose of writing a persuasive text is to influence or change a reader's thoughts or opinions on a particular topic or subject. Your aim is to convince a reader that your opinion is sensible and logical. Successful persuasive writing is always well planned. Persuasive texts may include advertisements, letters to newspapers, speeches and newspaper editorials, as well as arguments in debates. Handwriting should no longer be taught in schools. What do you think about this idea? Do you support or reject this proposal? Write to convince a reader of your opinions.

Before you start writing

Give some thought to: · whether you strongly agree or strongly disagree with this plan · reasons or evidence for your arguments · a brief but definite conclusion--list some of your main points and add a personal opinion · the structure of a persuasive text, which begins with a well-organised introduction, followed by a body of arguments or points, and finally a conclusion that restates the writer's position. Don't forget to: · plan your writing before you start--make a list of important points you wish to make · write in correctly formed sentences and take care with paragraphing · choose your words carefully, and pay attention to your spelling and punctuation · write neatly but don't waste time · quickly check your persuasive text once you have finished--your position must be clear to the reader. R Remember: the stance taken in a persuasive text is not wrong, as long as the writer has evidence to su support his or her opinion. How the opinion is su supported is as important as the opinion itself.

Copyright © 2010 Pascal Press ISBN 978 1 74125 268 2

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Excel Test Zone Year 9 Sample Test 1

Log in to

A VERY GOOD PIECE OF WRITING

Structure

Vocabulary

Year 9 Sample Writing 2: Persuasive text

Language and ideas

Audience

is · The writer's positionacts clearly stated. This

to position, engage and convince the reader.

verbs and · A variety ofare used adjectives

Handwriting should no longer be taught in schools.

·

The modern age has seen improvements in technology that are rendering outdated techniques such as handwriting obsolete. It is now no longer necessary or desirable to have a strong or even legible handwriting technique, as it is possible to exist and succeed solely with the use of modern electronic equipment.

to persuade. A range of effective words and phrases enhances the tone of the speech.

Text structure

is · The informationsuitable presented in a

Sentence structure

YEAR 9 WRITING TEST 2: Sample of a very good piece of writing

varied · Sentences arestructure, in length and

www.exceltestzone.com.au

Ideas

and effective text structure. The text contains a clear introduction, main body with development of ideas, and conclusion.

and include more complex clauses, which creates pace and atmosphere.

Paragraphing

69

of · The organisationclear information into

In order to succeed both socially and educationally it is necessary to have knowledge of computers and how to use them. Social networking sites require the use of typing rather than writing and can be a young person's main source of communication with their friends. This is true also of mobile phones and text messaging, another form of technological communication that requires the use of quick and adept ngers--and not a pen in sight!

paragraphs helps the reader follow the line of argument.

ideas · Clearcentral relating to a event--

handwriting--are crafted to create the effect of a well-structured and persuasive text.

Cohesion

· Referring words, word substitutions and

Emails are quickly replacing letters, now humorously known as `snail mail'. People expect to receive communication instantly and this can't be achieved with handwriting. Computers even predict what you want to write, correct spelling mistakes as you write and even suggest more sophisticated vocabulary with the use of the thesaurus. It is evident that handwriting is now an outdated and archaic practice. There are other bene ts to writing using technology. Some handwriting is not easy to read but computer print is always decipherable. With today's environmental concerns, writing using technology saves on paper and other resources that are polluting our environment. It is obvious that teaching handwriting is no longer necessary. Time spent teaching handwriting is wasted time, as strong handwriting skills are no longer valued by society.

Punctuation

connections allow for whole text unity and for the development of textual relationships.

· Correct and appropriate punctuation, such as

exclamation marks, increase the effectiveness of the text.

Excel Test Zone Year 9 Test Guide

Persuasive techniques

Spelling

· The use of persuasive techniques such as

emotive language, repetition and hyperbole add power to the writer's argument and in uence the audience.

· There are no spelling errors. text includes the · The of both dif cult use

(e.g. technological, sophisticated) and challenging vocabulary (e.g. obsolete, archaic).

Excel Test Zone © Pascal Press 2010 This writing sample has been analysed based on the marking criteria used by markers to assess the NAPLAN Writing Test.

VGood_Sample Story Yr9 NAPLAN BW.indd 2

10/11/10 12:08 PM

YEAR 9 WRITING TEST 3: Persuasive text

Today you are going to write a persuasive text, often called an exposition. The purpose of writing a persuasive text is to influence or change a reader's thoughts or opinions on a particular topic or subject. Your aim is to convince a reader that your opinion is sensible and logical. Successful persuasive writing is always well planned. Persuasive texts may include advertisements, letters to newspapers, speeches and newspaper editorials, as well as arguments in debates. Fairy tales are not suitable stories for young children. What do you think about this opinion? Write to convince a reader of your opinions.

Before you start writing

Give some thought to: · whether you strongly agree or strongly disagree with this plan · reasons or evidence for your arguments · a brief but definite conclusion--list some of your main points and add a personal opinion · the structure of a persuasive text, which begins with a well-organised introduction, followed by a body of arguments or points, and finally a conclusion that restates the writer's position. Don't forget to: · plan your writing before you start--make a list of important points you wish to make · write in correctly formed sentences and take care with paragraphing · choose your words carefully, and pay attention to your spelling and punctuation · write neatly but don't waste time · quickly check your persuasive text once you have finished--your position must be clear to the reader. Remember: the stance taken in a persuasive text is not wrong, as long as the writer has evidence to support his or her opinion. How the opinion is supported is as important as the opinion itself.

Copyright © 2010 Pascal Press ISBN 978 1 74125 268 2

21

Excel Test Zone Year 9 Sample Test 2

Structure

A VERY GOOD PIECE OF WRITING

Year 9 Sample Writing 3: Persuasive text

Language and ideas

Vocabulary

Audience

is · The writer's positionacts clearly stated. This

to position, engage and convince the reader.

verbs and · A variety ofare used adjectives

· ·

YEAR 9 WRITING TEST 3: Sample of a very good piece of writing

Excel Test Zone Year 9 Test Guide

Text structure

is · The informationsuitable presented in a

Fairy tales are not suitable stories for young children.

There has been consistent criticism of fairy tales in recent history and they have been unfairly labelled violent and inappropriate for young children. Let us not forget that fairy tales have been present in society for hundreds of years. I believe the moral messages they carry are signi cant and that fairy tales should continue to be read to all young children.

to persuade. A range of effective words and phrases enhance the tone of the speech. Inclusive pronouns add to the persuasive power of the text.

and effective text structure. The text contains a clear introduction, main body with development of ideas, and conclusion.

Sentence structure

varied · Sentences arestructure, in length and

Paragraphing

and include more complex clauses, which creates pace and atmosphere.

73

of · The organisationclear information into

paragraphs helps the reader follow the line of argument.

It is simplistic to criticise fairy tales as unsuitable for young children as it is the values and attitudes that fairy tales communicate which transcend time and location. The goblins, witches and giants present in fairy tales are merely vehicles to show ideas about how we live our lives and to provide important instructions for young people on how to behave and treat others.

Ideas

ideas · Clearcentral relating to a event--

Log in to

Cohesion

· Referring words, word substitutions and

Take Cinderella for example. This story is known around the world for a reason. The evil step mother and cruel sisters are exaggerated to show particular ideas. As seen in this fairy tale and all others, unkind behaviour is never rewarded and people who behave negatively in fairy tales are always punished in some way. In Cinderella, the awful family are left looking foolish and socially isolated.

handwriting--are crafted to create the effect of a well-structured and persuasive text

connections allow for whole text unity and for the development of textual relationships.

Punctuation

What's more important about stories like Cinderella, however, are the rewards earned by characters who behave without greed or sel shness. Can you imagine this tale ending with the Prince marrying one of the awful step-sisters instead of Cinderella? A signi cant feature of these stories is the idea that positive and good behaviour reaps rewards. Those who criticise fairy tales and who have a modern `political correctness' should look back in history and think beyond our narrow and immediate context. Fairy tales have been around for hundreds of years and are present in a wide variety of languages and cultures for good reason!!

· Correct and appropriate punctuation increases the

effectiveness of the text.

Persuasive techniques

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· The use of persuasive techniques such as

Spelling

emotive language,, examples and rhetorical questions add power to the writer's argument and in uence the audience.

· There are no spelling errors. The text includes

the use of both dif cult (e.g. communicate, context) and challenging vocabulary (e.g. inappropriate, criticism).

Excel Test Zone © Pascal Press 2010 This writing sample has been analysed based on the marking criteria used by markers to assess the NAPLAN Writing Test.

VGood_Sample Story Yr9 NAPLAN BW.indd 3

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