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Putnam County

Fire and EMS

Standard Operating Guidelines

Putnam County Board of County Commissioners Putnam County Fire and EMS 410 S Hwy 19 Palatka, FL 32177 Phone: (386) 329-0892 Fax: (386) 326-2795

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Intent and Use of Standard Operating Guidelines for Putnam County Fire & EMS

These Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) have been developed as part of the Putnam County Department of Emergency Services/Fire & EMS (FEMS) program and are for use by FEMS personnel. An individual Fire Department that exist within the boundaries of Putnam County may or may not choose to adopt them. This decision rest with the Fire Chief and/or Board Members of that respective Department. Additionally, situations may exist that require actions not specified in these SOGs. The procedures described here should not be construed to prohibit flexibility and require emergency actions at the scene of an emergency. FEMS personnel at the scene must use their best judgment by taking appropriate actions OR make the determination that they should consult with an individual that possesses a higher level of training. If FEMS personnel on scene are not trained commensurate to duty for a respective incident, more highly trained personnel must be contacted. In all cases of questionable or unreasonable unsafe conditions, the FEMS personnel must elect not to place themselves or other personnel in harms way. FEMS personnel may initiate action following the appropriate SOG and should then confer with a more qualified Officer as soon as possible. FEMS personnel should consult with a more qualified Officer or member anytime they feel an incident has evolved beyond the scope of their practice and training. In cases that FEMS personnel are unable to make contact with qualified members, they should use their best judgment and follow the most appropriate SOG. FEMS personnel must attempt contact with a qualified FEMS Officer on any complex emergency scene or if in doubt as to whether making contact is appropriate or not. FEMS personnel should initiate the most appropriate action that falls within their scope of training and are only authorized to engage the emergency scene to the level that they are trained commensurate to duty while following the safest and best practices. Life safety of all personnel and the public we faithfully serve must dominate any and all practices at the emergency scene.

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It is NOT intended, and it is not the purpose of these Standard Operating Guidelines, to supersede County Policy, Fire & EMS policy, or the local Collective Bargaining Agreement. County Policy, Fire & EMS Policy, and the CBA are intended to exist for an entirely different purpose. In cases that concern career Fire & EMS personnel, the Putnam County Administrator and the Putnam County Board of County Commissioners are acknowledged as being the Authority Having Jurisdiction. Our agency fully acknowledges the representative elected officials of Putnam County and the County Administrator as the full and final authority in all cases in regards to career Fire & EMS. Also important to reference is a memo distributed on October 13th, 2009, at the behest of the BOCC and County Administrator. In review, the memo is very specific that career Fire & EMS personnel render full cooperation to the area Volunteer or Municipal Fire Chief and Fire Department. In conclusion, I encourage you to consider adopting the core values of the U.S. Air Force which are: Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence In All We Do. Please make your safety and the safety of others a priority. Chief Mike Patterson May 14th, 2010

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Table of Contents

Subject I-A Organization I-A Organization I-A Organization I-A Organization I-A Organization I-B Personnel I-B Personnel I-B Personnel I-C Facilities I-C Facilities I-C Facilities I-C Facilities I-C Facilities I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-D Apparatus and Equipment I-E Safety and Health I-E Safety and Health I-E Safety and Health I-E Safety and Health I-E Safety and Health I-E Safety and Health I-F Training I-F Training I-F Training Topic 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 Description Chain of Command Definitions Identification Cards Communications Intra-Department Inquiries About Incidents Attention to Duty Scheduling Procedures Mandatory Overtime Personal Vehicles Abandoned Children Safe Place Daily Duties For Career Staff Station and Unit Security Inspection of Apparatus Maintenance/Repair - Vehicles Use and Care of Property and Equipment Inspection of Apparatus Repair Tags Motorized Equipment and Tools Securing of Equipment Headlight Use Backing Apparatus Hose Testing Log Book Entries Ropes and Uses Fire Department Vehicle Use Out of Service Vehicle Medical Supplies Vehicle Accidents Protective Clothing and Equipment Risk/Management Guidelines Seat Belt Usage Receiving Bomb Threats Employee Injury Actions Training Records Post-Incident Analysis Pre-Fire Plans

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Table of Contents

Subject II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-A Notification and Response II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival II-B Arrival Topic 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Description Dispatch Notification Dispatch Assignments Receipt of Alarms Volunteer Response Route of Travel Intersections Emergency While Enroute to a Call Emergency While Available in Zone Reduced Response Response to Carbon Monoxide Detectors Response to Wildland Fires Response to Illegal Burns Disaster Preparedness and Response Apparatus Placement Positioning Apparatus In/Near Traffic Incident Management Procedures Personnel Accountability System Emergency Scene Safety Emergency Evacuation Signal Procedures Locating a Missing Firefighter Electrical Procedures Automatic Alarm and Extinguishing Systems Fire Control Explosive Devices Fire Cause Determination SCBA Fires in Places of Public Assembly Hostile Scene Operations Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Technical Rescue Emergency Response Death Scene

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Table of Contents

Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-C First Due Unit Operations II-D Water Supply II-D Water Supply II-D Water Supply II-E Helicopter Operations II-E Helicopter Operations II-E Helicopter Operations II-E Helicopter Operations III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System III-A Incident Management System

III-A Incident Management System

Topic 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1 1 2 1 2

Description Booster Lines Standpipe Operations Fire Department Connections Vehicle Fires Wildland Fires Railroad Tracks Vehicle Extrication FD Responsibility When Cutting Fences Unattended Minor Children Medical Waste on Scene Tanker Shuttle Procedures Drafting Relay Pumping Safety Landing Zone (LZ) Sector Officer Landing Communications Landing Zone (LZ) Selection and Preparation Incident Management System Introduction Command Functions and Structure Incident Commander Establishing Command Command Responsibilities Command Options Transfer of Command Sectors Administrative Officers Staging Communications Procedures Incident Safety Tactical Priorities Disaster Call In Plan Hazardous Materials Operation Plan Training Requirements Medical Protocols Fire Fighter Bill of Rights Internal Affairs Investigations

III-B Hazardous Materials Operations Plan III-C First Responder Protocols III-C First Responder Protocols III-D Fire Fighter Bill of Rights III-D Internal Affairs Investigations

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Subject Section I-A Organization

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Topic 1 Chain Of Command

EMERGENCY SERVICES DIRECTOR Vacant Chief of Fire and EMS Michael Patterson EMS Medical Director John Milanick Chief of Emergency Operations and Preparedness Quin Romay DES STAFF

Senior Staff Assistant Sheri Kenyon

Battalion Chief Steve Dennis Captain Joe Guthrie Greg Brown Lieutenant Ron Price

Battalion Chief Paul Bateman Captain Keith Fleetwood Paul Flateau Lieutenant Kymberly Dedmon Travis Broaderick

Battalion Chief Chad Hutchinson Captain Jeff Guthrie Thomas Deputy Lieutenant Thomas Burger

Billing Staff

FF/EMT Primary Fire

OPS/Part Time: Primary Fire

Paramedic/FF

Paramedic (Non-FF)

Paramedic/FF

Paramedic (Non-FF)

Paramedic/FF

Paramedic (Non-FF)

EMT/FF EMT (Non-FF)

EMT/FF EMT (Non-FF)

EMT/FF EMT (Non-FF)

OPS/ Part Time

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Subject I-A Organization Topic 2 Definitions

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I.

Throughout this document there will terms used. To avoid confusion the following terms are defined for clarity: A. Chief: refers to both Chiefs of the Department: The Chief of Fire and EMS and Chief of Emergency Preparedness and Operations. The positions are synonymous. B. Battalion Chief: the daily Shift Commander. This person is in charge of normal day to day operations for Putnam County Fire and EMS. The On Duty Battalion Chief is assigned the Central Zone under his direct supervision. C. Zone Captain: Career Officer placed in charge of either the south zone or west zone. Units in these zones will report to this officer in lieu of the Battalion Chief. D. Zone Officer: Commanding Officer for a geographic zone. Central Zone officer is the on duty Battalion Chief. South and West zones are the Zone Captain. E. Station Lieutenant: Career Officer on shift on a Rescue unit in charge of Station operations. This officer may be used for supervision in cases where a Battalion Chief or Zone Captain is unavailable. F. Senior Staff: All Chiefs, Administrative or Battalion G. Staff or Officers: All Chiefs, Administrative or Battalion, All Zone Captains, All Lieutenants. H. Person-In-Charge: on individual apparatus this is the person with the highest seniority (as defined by qualifications, experience, or length of service as determined by the responsible agency) that will direct activities in lieu of an officer being on scene. The responsible agency should predetermine these individuals.

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Subject I-A Organization Topic 2 Definitions

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I. Career Staff: Hourly or Salary paid professional staff assigned to an apparatus or function. J. Volunteer Staff: Non-Paid or volunteer incentive funded professional, assigned directly to the Department of Emergency Services for response on a call by call basis. K. Zones: Geographical response zones for Putnam County: Divided into three zones: Central, West, and South. See Chain of Command Chart for Units and Stations assigned to particular zones.

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Subject Section I-A Organization

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Topic 3 Identification Cards

I.

All members of the Putnam County Fire and EMS Department shall be issued an identification card respective to their status as being a member of the department, whether career, or volunteer. All cards will be issued from the Emergency Operations Center by the assigned support specialist designated by the Chief of DES. It is the responsibility of the individual to possess and maintain this I.D. card on their person at all times when on duty. Lost or damaged I.D. cards shall be reported immediately to the direct supervisor. If a person has not been issued an identification card upon becoming a member, he/she will notify the supervisor for issue. At such time an individual terminates membership with the department, he/she will surrender their identification card to the administration, along with all items issued to him/her.

II. III. IV. V. VI.

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Subject I-A Organization

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Topic 3 Communications Intra-Department

I.

Intra-departmental communication is vital to the smooth operation of the organization and to professional continuity and operations of all fire department personnel. Verbal communication is utilized as needed for informal operations and discussion. When a more formal communication or documentation is needed for operational purposes, communications will be reduced to writing based on the following formats: Informational Bulletins A. Informational Bulletins contain information applicable to all (or a large number of) personnel. B. Informational Bulletins are intended for posting in all stations for a specific period of time. C. Prior to distribution, informational Bulletins will be numbered by the Staff Assistant and copied on yellow paper. The original will be filed in a "day file" by the Staff Assistant. D. Informational Bulletins will be distributed to all stations for posting and to all Divisions at the Emergency Operations Center. E. The Station Commanding Officer is responsible for ensuring that all Informational Bulletins are posted in the station, and that all personnel read and understand the information. F. All personnel will initial the Informational Bulletin, indicating that they have read and understand the information. G. The Informational Bulletin shall remain posted until the "post until" date on the Informational Bulletin. H. The Station Officer shall keep the Informational Bulletin on file for six (6) months past the "post until" date.

II.

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Subject I-A Organization

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Topic 3 Communications Intra-Department

III.

Training Notices A. Training Notices contain information about upcoming training opportunities for career and participating volunteer members. B. Training Notices are intended for posting in all stations for a specific period of time. C. Training Notices will be copied on orange paper. The original will be filed in a "day file" by the Staff Assistant. D. Training Notices will be distributed to all stations for posting and to all Divisions at the Emergency Operations Center. E. The Station Commanding Officer is responsible for ensuring that all Training Notices are posted in the station. F. The Training Notice shall remain posted until the date of the training on the Training Notice.

IV.

Memorandums A. Memorandums (memos) contain information applicable to an individual or a specific group of individuals. B. Memos are intended for direct delivery to the addressee. 1. Time-sensitive memos - the individual shall be notified by the sender that a time-sensitive memo needs to be picked up or delivered, and shall make the appropriate arrangements. 2. Non-time-sensitive memos - the memo shall be placed in an envelop with the addresses name, which shall be placed in the Station Officer's mail slot or volunteer station folder. The station officer is responsible for delivering the envelop to the individual. C. Prior to distribution, a copy of the memo shall be provided to the Staff Assistant for inclusion in a "day file".

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Subject I-A Organization

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Topic 3 Communications Intra-Department

V.

Standard Operating Guidelines A. New and revised Standard Operating Guidelines shall be distributed in the same manner as Informational Bulletins. B. In addition to IV-A, the Staff Assistant shall provide each station, and division, career members, and participating volunteer officers with a copy of new or revised Standard Operating Guidelines copied on white paper, for insertion in SOG book.

VI.

Duplicates/Copies A. Members desiring duplicate Informational Bulletins, memorandums, or Standard Operating Guidelines may request these from the Staff Assistant. B. Members desiring duplicate Training Notices may request these from the Staff Assistant.

VII.

Correspondence Outside PCFEMS A. Any and all correspondence using the name of the Putnam County Fire and EMS Department, regardless of the intent as representation or affiliation, will be directed through Emergency Operations Center for review and approval prior to mailing. This is not intended to suppress anyone's rights, but is only for the purpose of insuring against inadvertent liability or possible derogatory reflection of the department.

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Subject I-A Organization

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Topic 5 Inquiries About Incidents

I.

Public Information Inquiries A. Chief Officers are authorized to acknowledge to the public the occurrence of emergency incidents for those incidents. This information should be limited to the type of incident, date, time and location. B. Requests for any other information must be directed to the Battalion Chief or higher rank through the Emergency Operations Center C. Cause and origin of fires are to be directed to the Fire Marshall. D. Operational details of the department should be directed to the Battalion Chief or to Emergency Operations Center. E. Significant incidents that may cause inquiries to be made to County, State, or Federal officials shall be reported by the Incident Commander to the on Duty Battalion Chief. The On Duty Battalion Chief will notify all officers via electronic mail. The On Duty Battalion Chief shall notify the Chief via telephone about such incidents as soon as duties permit. F. Incident notifications shall include pertinent information so that officers convey accurate information, if deemed necessary, to inquiries made by other County administration, outside agencies or the media.

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Subject I-B Personnel

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Topic 1 Attention to Duty

I.

All members of the fire department shall be cognizant of the rules, regulations, policies and operational procedures governing the organizational mission of the Department. The following rules of Attention to Duty apply. A. Members shall at all times be attentive to their duties and by their alertness and observations demonstrate their interest in their work. They shall act with dignity and maintain a bearing conducive to a good department. B. The lack of honesty, self-motivation, emotional stability, sound judgment, industry, alertness, decisiveness, power to observe, initiative, energy, ability to get along with co-workers or with the public, or unsatisfactory performance of duties may be evidence of incompetence. C. Members shall not conduct themselves in an immoral, indecent, lewd or disorderly manner. They shall not be guilty of misconduct, conduct unbecoming, or acts that tend to discredit the department, even though such conduct is not specifically set forth in these rules. D. All members shall exercise a level of composure in the performance of their duties. E. All members must be efficient in the performance of their duties. F. While on duty, all members shall be alert and remain at their assigned duty posts until properly relieved. G. Members shall keep their superior officers informed of their correct home address and telephone number. Officers will report changes to the support specialist for training and safety for update in the records management system (RMS). If a career staff member, the officer will report a change in telephone to the scheduling lieutenant for update. H. No members shall give out information concerning the internal affairs of the department without the consent of the Chief or designee. I. Members shall promptly report to their command officer, any information that they possess, observe or secure regarding fires of questionable nature.

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Subject I-B Personnel

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Topic 1 Attention to Duty

J. The accepting of money, gifts or other valuable articles from any person, as a member of the fire department is prohibited. K. Members shall be neat and clean except when duties or assignments obviously prevent. All members shall bathe promptly after engaging in rigorous and dirty activities. All members will maintain a neat and clean personal hygiene level for the comfort and protection of themselves and co-workers. L. Members knowledge of violations by subordinate members of rules, regulations, or other policies or orders governing the fire department shall be reported immediately, to the individual(s) immediate supervisor. M. Any messages received must be promptly and accurately delivered to the person concerned. N. Officers who knowingly fail to take official cognizance of violations shall receive reprimands or other disciplinary action. O. Officers shall insure that all members assigned to their responsibility are thoroughly briefed on rules procedures and policy changes and will periodically review the same to insure continued awareness. P. Each member is responsible for thorough understanding of rules, regulations, and standard operating guidelines.

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Subject I-B Personnel

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Topic 2 Scheduling Procedures

Purpose: To ensure adequate emergency response and ambulance service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year with the necessary complement of professional personnel. Policy: The work day begins at 0800 and ends at 0800 24 hours later. Time off will go through the scheduling captain. Time off includes annual leave, compensatory time, sick and swap time. Procedure: 1. Employees shall submit an appropriate request to the scheduling captain for annual leave or comp time. For periods of 48 hours or less, the request shall be submitted no later than 68 hours prior to the requested time off. For periods of more than 48 hours, the request shall be submitted no later than 14 days prior to the requested time off. For periods greater than 96 hours, the request shall be submitted no later than 30 days prior to the requested time off. 2. All leave requests are denied pending coverage initially. The scheduling captain will approve the time off requested upon finding the appropriate coverage. 3. It is not appropriate or allowed for an employee to find his/ her own coverage for leave time other than swap time unless approved by the scheduling captain. 4. Open positions due to leave time will be filled by part time employees first. This is not to include the rank of captain or above. Captain's positions can be filled with another captain or a lieutenant. When a lieutenant is not available, a senior paramedic firefighter may be moved up with battalion chief approval. When a battalion chief position is vacant it is preferred that it be filled with a Captain. 5. The main schedule will be kept in the scheduling captain's office. It is to never be altered from any other office. If a change needs to be made, it is the job of the scheduling captain. 6. It will be the responsibility of the employee to verify that the scheduling captain received a leave request and that appropriate coverage was found before it is assumed that the leave was granted.

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Subject I-B Personnel

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Topic 2 Mandatory Overtime

Purpose: To ensure adequate emergency response and ambulance service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year with the necessary complement of professional personnel. Policy: Mandatory overtime will be utilized when appropriate coverage cannot not be found due to an employee illness, bereavement leave, workers comp injuries, and for employees absent without leave. Mandatory overtime can also be utilized during hurricanes, natural disasters and MCI's. The on duty Battalion Chief or the scheduling Captain can mandatory as needed. Procedure: 1. The scheduling captain will maintain a list of full time employees eligible for overtime. 2. The list is rotated on a point system. 1 point is awarded for each mandatory overtime. The persons with the highest numbers will be at the bottom of the list. The numbers will also coincide with dates. 3. If you are scheduled off 24 hours your next shift then you will not get mandatoried under normal circumstances. 4. Mandatory overtime does not have to be position for position. The appropriate person eligible will be mandatoried. 5. When a captain calls and gives the order for mandatory, you will receive one point and your name will move on the list. You have the option of covering the mandatory yourself with an equally qualified person. In that case, you get the point and the other person will receive the compensation. 6. New employees will be added in a random order. 7. Personnel going off will be the ones to get a mandatory under normal circumstances. 8. In the event that a PRN employee is filling a full time slot for a period of longer than one month, they will be added to the list. 9. Employees already working a 48 hour shift will not be held over on mandatory under normal circumstances. 10. Leaving your assigned station prior to 0800 without the scheduling captain approval is prohibited.

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Subject I-C Facilities

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Topic 1 Personal Vehicles

I. II. III.

Personal vehicles are to be parked in the parking facilities located at each station in designated areas, clear of any access or egress doors or driveways. No personal vehicles are to be inside any fire station at any time unless specifically authorized by the station officer for extenuating circumstances. Members are not to work on or repair their personal vehicles on fire station property with the exception of a repair needed to get home after a duty shift due to a breakdown while en route to work. Personal vehicles should remain locked at all times while parked on fire department property. Members should maintain their personal vehicles so as to limit any fluid leakage from their vehicle that would create any type of hazard to the station parking area, i.e., excessive oil, fuel, transmission fluid or coolant leak that would cause soil contamination from rainwater runoff, etc. or slipping hazard. Members are responsible for valuables contained in their personal vehicles. Personal vehicles may be washed but not detailed (vacuumed, waxed, etc.) after 1700 hours and after all station equipment has been cleaned, station duties completed, and all other assigned tasks are completed.

IV. V.

VI. VII.

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Subject I-C Facilities

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Topic 2 Abandoned Children

I.

"Abandoned Baby Bill" CSHB 1901 A. Any parent may leave a newborn infant three days or younger at a fire station staffed with full time firefighters or emergency medical technicians. B. Any parent who leaves a newborn with a fire station will not be subject to prosecution for neglect of a child or contributing to the delinquency of a child as a result of leaving the child with the fire station. C. Except where there is actual or suspected child abuse or neglect, any parent has the absolute right to remain anonymous unless he/she tries to reclaim the infant. At time of drop off attempt to obtain a medical history of the child (allergies, past medical history, medications, last feeding). If you are able, attempt to gain a family history (family members with heart problems, diabetes, or other medical conditions). DO NOT FORCE QUESTIONING ON THE PARENT DROPPING OFF THE INFANT. D. Firefighters and emergency medical technicians must provide emergency medical services to the newborn infant to the extent of their training and shall arrange for the infant's immediate transportation to the nearest hospital. E. Firefighters and emergency medical technicians accepting custody of an infant and providing emergency medical services and care pursuant to this law are immune from civil and criminal liability.

II.

Procedures When An Infant Is Dropped Off At Station A. Immediately notify communications center who will dispatch a transport unit for transport to the appropriate healthcare facility for evaluation. Dispatcher will notify the Zone Officer or Battalion Chief. Zone Officer will notify the crew with further direction.

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Subject I-C Facilities Topic 3 Safe Place

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I. Procedures When a Child Enters the Program A. Get a general idea of what is wrong. Ask if the youth came in because of the Safe Place sign. B. DO NOT attempt to get details of the problem. Get child's name and age in order to provide this information to law enforcement or child services staff C. If only two personnel on-duty: 1. Notify communications center that you are out of service until the youth is picked up. 2. Render emergency medical treatment if required. 3. Notify law enforcement if indicated. D. If more than two personnel on-duty: 1. A minimum of one person shall remain with the youth until they are picked up. 2. Render emergency medical treatment if required. 3. Notify law enforcement if indicated. E. Notify the on duty Battalion Chief for further direction and intervention. F. While awaiting transport for the child: 1. DO NOT leave child unattended in the station. 2. Provide a quiet place for the child to sit while waiting. 3. Conduct your own business while keeping track of child. G. Transferring child: 1. Child service or other agency staff must provide photo identification (ID card, driver's license) documenting they are the individual sent by the accepting agency. 2. Allow staff member to visit briefly with the child in private. 3. Staff member may leave with child.

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Subject I-C Facilities Topic 3 Safe Place

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H. Documentation: 1. The following information MUST be entered into the daily log: a. Time child was dropped off or entered the station. b. Name and age of child. c. Time that child was picked up and name and type of ID presented. 2. If care was rendered, proper documentation in accordance with department policy.

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Subject I-C Facilities

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Topic 4 Daily Duties For Career Staff

I. Stations are to be maintained in a clean and orderly fashion at all times. Messiness or Clutter should be cleaned as it is found. II. Before the end of shift the following daily cleaning should occur: A. B. C. D. Floors are to be swept and mop. Carpeted floors should be vacuumed. Sinks, urinals, and toilets should be cleaned with appropriate sanitary solutions. Kitchen countertops and cooking areas should be clean. Rescue Units are to be washed. Floors of Transport units are to be swept and mopped. E. Garbage and rubbish cans are to be emptied, with new liners placed. F. Floor mats are to be cleaned and placed back in their proper position. III. Rotational Daily Duties: A. The following duties shall be completed for career crews at Rescue Stations: 1. Mondays: Yard and Bay Day: Bay is to be swept and cleaned. Cobwebs removed as needed. Trash cleaned from around the yard. 2. Tuesdays: Kitchen is to be detailed. Cabinets cleaned. Refrigerator and Freezer cleaned: ALL food is to be thrown away (unless specifically aware to keep). Rotten food found should be disposed of. Pantry cleaned of excess items. Supply order is to be completed by 2000 and sent to Rescue 84 for filling on Wednesday. 3. Wednesday: Clean supply room. Organize shelves. Assure perishable stock is rotated. Wednesday crew is to assure arrival of supplies and stocking by 2000. Crew to return bins to the supply station by the end of shift. This duty is NOT to be left for the next day crew unless cleared with a Battalion Chief. 4. Thursday: Detail the Station: clean and dust station. Clean light fixtures as needed. Move furniture and sweep behind. Clean windows and windowsills. 5. Friday: Detail the Unit Day: unit to be cleaned, cab and patient compartment. Outside compartments to be cleaned. Outside compartment equipment to be cleaned and inspected for correct functioning. Inside of patient compartment to be disinfected with appropriate solutions. 6. Saturday and Sunday: as described by the On Duty Battalion Chief.

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Subject I-C Facilities

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Topic 4 Daily Duties For Career Staff

IV. Rotational Monthly Duties: A. The following duties shall be completed for career crews at Rescue Stations: 1. 1st of the Month: All perishable supplies are to be checked for expiration dates: a. Drugs b. IV solutions c. Fast patches and pacer pads d. Any other perishable stock with dates present. 2. 15th of the Month: State inspection. An officer is to perform a state inspection (both ALS and BLS form) on every rescue, with deficiencies corrected. V. An Officer may allow duties to be extended to the crew's next shift due to call load or special situations. Crews must have permission before leaving shift for this to apply, and must be communicated to the on coming crew. VI. Career Fire Fighter stations will have a schedule of daily duties. Daily duties are to be completed per this memorandum. VII. Any time duties are not completed by the off going crew, the on-coming crew should make the off going crew aware of the discrepancies, to correct the situation. This shall not result in conflict. If conflict arises an officer shall be contacted to obtain further assistance. If an off going crew does not complete a duty, and the oncoming crew accepts the unit or station without arrangements approved with an officer, the on-coming crew has responsibility of completing the duty.

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Subject I-C Facilities

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Topic 4 Daily Duties For Career Staff

VIII. Crews receiving late calls shall not be required to stay and obtain overtime for the completion of daily duties. Daily cleaning duties other than unit washing should be completed before bedtime to ensure timely completion before end of shift. A. Crews should be courteous and helpful to their fellow crews for cases where a late call was received. The goal is that all crew members work together to return the unit to an in service, clean and maintained unit. B. Crews shall not abuse the "late call" privilege by leaving all duties until after revile at 0700 then not completing duties. C. Crews found to be abusing this privilege will be subject to progressive discipline as determined by an officer.

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Subject I-C Facilities

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Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Station and Unit Security

I. Introductions: Vehicle and Station security is quickly becoming a real concern for emergency services. We hear on a daily basis Emergency Vehicles are being stolen as well as Stations are being broken into. II. Guideline A. When the vehicle is not in use, ( not on a call ) any Fire / EMS vehicle which cannot be secured inside of an enclosed bay or fenced area shall have the keys removed. 1. The keys are to remain on the drivers person at all times when removed from the vehicle. 2. The use of provided belt clips that ensure the driver has immediate access to the keys is mandatory. B. Upon leaving any station it is the responsibility of the FIRE/EMS crew to assure the station is secured by ensuring all doors and windows are locked. This includes all sheds and adjacent buildings. C. All outside lighting around the stations and in the parking area shall be left on from dusk till dawn. 1. Any problems or malfunctions with security related items such as dysfunctioning or non-working lights or door locks etc., shall be reported to the zone officer immediately via e-mail and telephone. 2. Any problems or malfunctions with security related items such as dysfunctioning or non-working lights or door locks etc., shall be reported to the on comming shift and documented in the station log. 3. It the responsibility of the duty officer to ensure that all security items are promptly repaired and functioning on the same day they are reported if at all possible.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Inspection of Apparatus

I. Vehicle operator shall inspect the apparatus and equipment each morning when accepting responsibility from the off-going operator and after each run, making sure that all visible parts are in good working order, as well as the brakes, ignition, cooling system and radios. II. The operator shall check the fuel, oil, water, batteries and add the appropriate amount of fluid needed. The operator is responsible for cleaning the apparatus and equipment each morning, or at the time it is needed. At all times when possible, protect the apparatus from unnecessary damage from the sun, rain or any other condition which may damage the apparatus or equipment thereon. III. Operators shall report immediately to an officer or on-duty Battalion Chief all repairs needed on any vehicle or apparatus so that arrangements can be made to repair or replace as needed. IV. The person in charge of the unit shall see that the daily apparatus check list is initiated by the unit operator at 0800 hours. V. Apparatus check list shall be completed daily by the apparatus operator. All notes shall be recorded in station's daily log book. Rescue apparatus will be checked off and signed in the apparatus daily check off sheet. The Rescue daily check off sheet will be signed by the lead paramedic and partner. VI. Reserve equipment assigned to a station shall be checked daily in accordance with the above guidelines. It is the ranking officer's responsibility to see that this is done.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Maintenance/Repair ­ Vehicles

I. All requests for vehicle maintenance shall be made directly by the Station Officer or Person in Charge of the unit to the fleet manager and PCFEMS officer list via electronic mail. Replies should be made using the reply to all method to assure adequate communications on fleet maintenance issues. Electronic mails should include: A. The fleet number of the apparatus. B. The unit radio identification. C. The nature of the problem. II. All requests for emergency vehicle repair shall be made directly to the on-duty Battalion Chief. III. Vehicle maintenance schedules shall be distributed through the Battalion Chiefs to all officers. On the morning of the respective appointment, the Battalion Chief shall confirm that the scheduled vehicle will report to Fleet Maintenance as scheduled. IV. All requests for after hours tire or mechanic road service shall be directed to the onduty Battalion Chief, who will coordinate with the Fleet Manager. V. Any time a problem with steering or brakes of any PCFEMS vehicle is encountered; the vehicle should be immediately parked and placed out of service. The on-duty Battalion Chief shall be notified immediately.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Use and Care of Property and Equipment

I.

All members will take proper care of all property, supplies, equipment and tools including items of uniform clothing and protective gear.

II. In the event of damage to property, tools, equipment, protective gear or uniform issue, caused by culpable negligence or carelessness on the part of any members of the fire department, the responsible person or persons, will be subject to disciplinary action, may be responsible for payment of such damage or loss of equipment. III. All equipment or property shall be maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. This is especially important on cleaning and maintaining uniform issue and protective gear issues. Recommendations for cleaning structural firefighting protective clothing should be obtained through the manufacturer of the protective clothing. IV. All property, equipment and uniform issue items should be cleaned and maintained with cleaning materials that are non-harmful to the item's finish or material of manufacturer. V. Disciplinary action will be determined on a sliding scale based on the value of the lost/damaged item.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Inspection of Apparatus

I. Engine Oil: Should be checked each morning by oncoming operator. Lubricants designated by vehicle maintenance shall be used when needed. At no time shall oil levels drop below the add mark. II. Transmission Oil: Shall be checked each morning by oncoming operator. Oil levels shall be checked with truck on level ground, engine running at an idle speed, and transmission in neutral. III. Brakes: Notify the on-duty Battalion Chief immediately of any brake malfunction. Check air pressure warning device daily, Check by depressing and releasing brake pedal until air is depleted activating warning signal. IV. Tires and Rims: Shall be inspected daily. Maintain proper air pressure at all times. Refer to tire for proper pressures. V. Pump (as applicable): Test the priming system and check oil level in priming oil tank - lubricate all valves, discharge, suction, hose drain and multi drain. Check pump shift warning indicator lights. VI. Lights: Shall be checked each morning by oncoming operator. Replace bulbs as necessary or notify the shop. VII. Valves and Levers: Shall be checked daily. Lubricate with light oil if needed.

VIII. Undercarriage: Shall be cleaned with proper solutions as needed. Spray solution directly on parts and spray off with water. IX. General Cleaning: Shall be washed each day. X. Main Air Reservoir Holding Tank: On all apparatus, shall be drained at least once daily using the manual drain valve provided. XI. Equipment: Carried on fire department vehicles shall be permanently mounted or secured. Temporary bindings or makeshift attachment shall be removed or replaced. All equipment shall be stored in compartments if possible. - 30 -

XII.

Fuel: All vehicles shall maintain a minimum of ¾ tank of fuel at all times.

Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment Page 2 of 2 Issued 11-01-2010 Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Inspection of Apparatus

XIII.

Portable Fire Extinguishers

A. Daily Inspection 1. Daily inspections will be done during daily vehicle check off, consisting of damage to the gauge, hose, cylinder and mounting bracket. B. Monthly Inspection 1. Officers are responsible for the monthly inspection of Fire extinguishers in ALL vehicles assigned to their station on the first day of each month. Station Officers shall initial and date the inspection tags following each monthly inspection. Inspections shall include, inspecting gauge for accuracy (full or empty), hose for damage, turning bottles upside down to loosen agent. Station Officers will notify their Battalion Chief or Zone Captain three months prior to yearly inspection date. C. Career Personnel: Person in charge of the unit will be responsible for notifying the Zone Captain or Battalion Chief when an extinguisher has been discharged or damaged and needs replacing. 1. Fire Extinguishers will be brought to the Main FEMS Station and placed in a designated area by the oxygen cascade. 2. When there are fire extinguishers in the designated area to go to the extinguisher company, the on Duty Battalion Chief will contact the contracted extinguisher company and arrange pickup or delivery of the extinguishers. 3. When the extinguishers are delivered to or picked up by the extinguisher company, the extinguisher company will provide a receipt for the total number of extinguishers and what type they have taken custody of. 4. Once the extinguisher company has completed repairs, refills, or recertification then the extinguisher company will contact the on duty Battalion Chief at 386-329-1212 or the officer at 386-329-0892 to arrange for pickup or drop off. 5. When extinguishers are picked up or dropped off another receipt will be provided to document the work that has been completed. D. Volunteer Stations: The crew should notify the station Chief. - 31 -

Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Repair Tags

I. All items, gear and equipment turned in for replacement, transfer or repair shall be tagged with a repair tag, indicating the assigned location of person, date, article and a description of why the article is being turned in. II. Articles not tagged will not be accepted.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 6 Motorized Equipment and Tools

I. All tools or equipment powered by gasoline fueled engines shall be started daily and serviced as required. II. When started, engines will be allowed to operate for a sufficient time to reach normal operating temperature. III. The test with pertinent information shall be recorded in the apparatus log book IV. All engines that run on pre-mixed two-cycle fuel will have fresh fuel placed into fuel tank of the equipment every two weeks. Failure to keep the fuel fresh will result in a build-up of gum and varnish and failure of the operation of the equipment. V. All electrically operated tools and equipment shall be tested weekly for proper operation. The same log entry applies. VI. All powered equipment, whether electric or gasoline fueled, shall be thoroughly cleaned and inspected after use. VII. Personnel shall use proper protective gear when using powered equipment, especially eye and hand protection, and hearing protection when necessary

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 7 Securing of Equipment

I. All equipment carried on fire and rescue apparatus is to be permanently mounted or secured with proper brackets or carried within compartment space available. II. Temporary bindings or makeshift attachments are to be replaced with adequate and secure mounting devices as soon as possible. III. Any safety lanyard shall be made of a non-deteriorating substance such as nylon web, rope material, or safety chain. IV. Any mounted equipment shall be placed in a fashion to prevent the vehicle's finish from becoming marred or damaged. V. All mounting brackets shall be thoroughly cleaned, inspected and lubricated to provide for detection of possible failure of the bracket and smooth operation of any mechanisms holding equipment in place.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 8 Headlight Use

I. Headlights are to be utilized for emergency responses, parades, periods of limited visibility, as required by statute or as otherwise deemed necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle. II. When parked at the scene of an emergency the headlights should be turned off unless needed to illuminate the scene. Parking or marker lights are to be left on.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 9 Backing Apparatus

I. Any time a fire department vehicle is being backed, a person or persons will be positioned in such a manner as to assist the apparatus operator, to prevent striking any object which may be obscured from view, to stop traffic, if necessary, and to prevent anyone from walking behind the vehicle while it is being backed. II. Rear mount aerial unit or units with trailers (such as some tankers) require a minimum of two persons to guide the driver; one as noted above, and one to remain in front of the vehicle to observe the swing clearance of the aerial device or trailer. III. It is the responsibility of the apparatus operator to see that he/she has the proper number of personnel assisting him/her in backing up the apparatus. IV. If the apparatus operator loses sight of anyone assisting during backing, he/she will stop immediately until he/she can again see the assistant(s) or insure that the assistant is clear of the apparatus. V. In the event that a apparatus operator is unsure of the signals given by the back-up assistant, or unsure of the clearance behind or around the vehicle, the apparatus operator shall stop the vehicle and verify safe clearance of the vehicle prior to continuing movement of the vehicle. VI. In case of exceptional circumstances, if no personnel are available to assist the driver in backing the vehicle, the Apparatus operator shall walk completely around the vehicle to observe potential hazards, open compartments, loose equipment, etc. prior to backing the vehicle. In all circumstances the Apparatus operator is responsible for the safe operation of the vehicle. VII. Passenger vehicles are exempt from this rule, however, due care should always be taken while backing vehicles. VIII. If, during backing, it is found that the audible backing alarm is not working properly, the Zone Officer should be notified as soon as possible.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 10 Hose Testing

I. All fire hose in use by the Putnam County Fire and EMS shall be tested annually, anytime it has been run over by a vehicle, or whenever subjected to any situation which may damage the integrity of the fire hose. II. It is the Zone Officer's responsibility to see that these tests are carried out and to coordinate the companies within their jurisdiction. Neighboring companies should be notified to prevent two zones from having their hose off of their apparatus for testing at the same time. III. All hose information and test results shall be recorded on the ISO Hose Inventory Form. These forms are to be kept in the station file cabinet in a folder marked "Hose Inventory/Test" and filed. Once all companies in the battalion have completed their hose testing, the Zone Officer will inform the Battalion Chief via electronic mail or telephone. IV. Hose testing is to be done in accordance with NFPA 1961, NFPA 1962, and directives put out by the safety/training specialist. V. Hose Test pressures are: A. 3" or smaller: 250P.S.I. B. 4": 200P.S.I. C. 5": 150P.S.I

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 11 Log Book Entries

I. All stations shall maintain a daily log book for entries pertaining to all activities occurring in respect to the members, vehicles and operations of the fire station. II. The log book shall be maintained in a neat, concise and accurate manner. III. The following guidelines are to be used to maintain a standardized format for daily log book entries: A. Inside front cover of the log book will be listed: 1. Property of the Putnam County Fire and EMS Department 2. Fire or Rescue Station # 3. Date initiated 4. Date of last entry 5. Address and phone number of the fire station B. In the back of the log book, each shift will have listed the name and current phone number of each member of the company or companies assigned to the station. C. At the top of the page, list the day, date and shift. D. Next section, list the members' status for the day, and name of each person on duty. E. In the "Pass On" Section, list daily apparatus check completed. List any discrepancies noted and action taken. This to be initialed by the apparatus operator assigned to that particular vehicle. List any discrepancies pertaining to the station itself and action taken. F. Logging of alarms. This section should be completed upon return from an alarm with information placed in proper order. G. List the code and type of alarm, companies responding, incident address, incident number, and disposition. H. Entries are to be made in the log book by the station staff only. The station members are responsible for the accuracy and completeness for the shift.

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I. All entries are to be neat concise and legible.

Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment Page 2 of 3 Issued 11-01-2010 Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 11 Log Book Entries

J. Black ink is to be used on all entries. K. Any mistakes entered in the daily log book will be voided by putting a single line through the information and initialed by the person doing so. L. As a day progresses, log entries will be made of all activities taking place, members, apparatus, equipment changes and visitors to the station including time in/out and reason for visit. M. All training is to be logged in the log book, Enter the time training started and time training ended, including a brief description of training content. N. All injuries sustained must be logged, including description of injury and cause. O. All times listed in the daily log book are to be entered on the far left edge or column of the page. P. No page(s) are to be removed from daily log book! This book is a legal record of the activities and functions of the fire department, and is to be kept clean, neat accurate and stored in a secure location in the station. After the log book is filled up it is to be turned in to the EOC. Any pages that are discovered missing must be reported immediately to the Battalion Chief

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 3 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 11 Log Book Entries

Q. If a computerized log is used, the following is to be followed: 1. The computer log will be placed on the G drive in a folder under the name of the station. Under this folder there will be a folder titled station logs. The current used log will be placed in this folder. a. The file will be titled <<unit name>> log followed by the year and month of the log b. The example path would be G\Rescue 82\Station Logs\2009-10 i. Supervisor unit will have their files stored in the DES Private file under the G Drive for security reasons c. At the completion of each month, a new file will be created. d. The old log will be put in folder titled <<unit name>> log followed by the year. 2. All of the information placed into the written log book will also be logged into the computerized log. 3. Once completed for the day, a log entry should not be changed. Putnam County IT department makes back ups of the G drive: IT staff can verify if a file has been altered from the original. Edits can be made during shift, but no changed to the log should be made after shift completion. Personnel that alter the log are subject to progressive discipline per county policy.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 12 Ropes and Uses

I. There shall be no natural fiber rope used in this department for training or during emergency scene operations for: A. The movement of people. B. Life line/safety line operations. C. Guy ropes on "dome", "hotel", or "factory" raises of ladders. II. Only those persons that have demonstrated the necessary theoretical knowledge and practical application techniques of ropes and auxiliary equipment to the satisfaction of the Chief shall be authorized to use rope for the movement of people.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 13 Fire Department Vehicle Use

I. The following are general instructions on the use of fire department vehicles: A. Department vehicles will be used solely for official fire department business. B. If at any time the apparatus operator feels that his/her apparatus is not capable of functioning properly, he/she shall immediately notify the station or zone officer who will determine if the apparatus should be placed out of service. Any time the apparatus is placed out of service, the zone officer will immediately advise the Fleet Maintenance Manager and the Battalion Chief. C. Any time the vehicle is being operated in a non-emergency mode, all traffic laws will be strictly adhered to. D. No vehicle will use audible or visual emergency warning devices unless responding to an emergency. Air horn use will also follow this guideline. The only exception to this rule will be apparatus involved in community activities authorized by Emergency Operations Center (e.g.: parades, public demonstrations, etc.). E. If the alert tone sounds while the vehicle is in motion in a non-emergency mode, the apparatus operator will make a reasonable attempt to regulate his/her speed and road position in order to stop prior to passing through the next intersection. He/she shall then prepare to maneuver the apparatus in the direction of the emergency.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 14 Out of Service Vehicle

I. Whenever any emergency response vehicle is placed out of service during an emergency response, contact will be made with the dispatch center by radio to provide notice to other responding units of current apparatus status. II. If the vehicle is in station, notification shall also be made by telephone to the Zone Officer as to the reason for the vehicle being out of service and for what approximate time frame the vehicle will be down. III. If a reserve vehicle is needed, the on-duty Battalion Chief will provide the necessary direction or aid in acquiring the reserve vehicle. IV. If a vehicle is in need of a tow truck, the Zone Officer will coordinate the dispatch of same. V. Any vehicle that is to be towed shall have its water emptied from the booster tank, if applicable, prior to being towed. VI. The Zone Officer coordinating out of service vehicle events will send a notification via electronic mail to all officers, and the Fleet Maintenance Notification Group, about the maintenance issue.

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Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 1 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 15 Disposable Medical Supplies

II. Fire/EMS Crew Duties A. Supply orders are to be completed by the on duty crews at each station on Tuesday of each week and faxed to Rescue 84 (386)326-2714 by 0800 Wednesday morning. B. The duty crew at Rescue 84 on Wednesday shall fill the order using the provided bins or cardboard boxes as they are available. C. After all orders are filled the supply room shall be restocked as needed and cleaned accordingly including but not limited to picking up trash on the floor, cutting down cardboard boxes and discarding them in the provided trash collection receptacle located outside the front of the supply room, sweeping, dusting or de-webbing. D. After cleanup is complete the orders are to be dispersed in an appropriate fashion on the same day they are filled, call volume permitting. This can be accomplished by having duty crews stop by and pick up their supplies, a supervisor may stop by and assist or Rescue 84 crew may deliver them as needed with permission from the on duty Battalion chief. E. Crews shall be required to pick up supplies from purchasing or fleet maintenance when requested to do so. F. Any hoarding of medical supplies shall be considered theft and will be dealt with accordingly. All medical supplies shall be kept in their designated areas assigned by management. III. Lieutenant Duties A. Oversee proper dispersing of disposable medical supplies utilizing Fire/EMS employees as needed. B. Ensure that the supply room remains in a clean and orderly fashion at all times C. Create an inventory list of disposable medical supplies to be kept at each station. - 44 -

Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 2 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 15 Disposable Medical Supplies

D. Visit each station monthly and pull any and all overstock from those areas and return it to the main supply room. E. Ensure that all bins for disposable medical supplies are collected and returned to the main supply room by 0800 Wednesday for supply dispersing. F. Rotate stock on shelves in the supply room periodically to ensure that all older stock is toward the front. G. Complete a expiration sheet on all medications and other dated items in stock biannually due Jan1 and July 1 and emailed to the Captain with the AOR of disposable medical supplies. H. Report directly to the Captain with AOR of disposable medical supplies on all issues concerning that AOR. I. Maintain communication with the purchasing department and pick up supplies as they arrive to that location or when requested to do so. J. Report any items that are not in stock, backordered or if the supply inventory is inadequate to the Captain responsible. IV. Captain Duties A. Oversee Lieutenant duties for accuracy and completeness. B. Assist the Lieutenant with their duties as needed to ensure adequate disposable medical supply dispersing. C. Keep inventory of disposable medical supplies in the main supply room. D. Order disposable medical supplies as needed to ensure adequate levels are in stock for dispersing. E. Maintain communication with all medical supplies vendors dealing with Putnam County and also personal within the Putnam County Purchasing Department. - 45 -

Subject I-D Apparatus and Equipment

Page 3 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 15 Disposable Medical Supplies

F. Keep up with the latest developments within the medical supply industry and report those findings to the Battalion Chief dealing with that AOR. G. Oversee the entire bid process annually as required by the purchasing department.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Vehicle Accidents

I. When a fire department vehicle is involved in a traffic accident, the apparatus operator will immediately stop the vehicle. The person in charge of the vehicle will notify Emergency Dispatch Operations and request additional equipment as needed to mitigate the scene. II. Personnel must notify the Zone Officer immediately after the accident has occurred. Zone Officer will make contact with the Battalion Chief and the Safety Officer for PCFEMS (ES42). Personnel will be expected to maintain professionalism, and assist wherever possible. Personnel will not discuss the accident with anyone other than a Fire and EMS or law enforcement representative. III. All Putnam County Fire and EMS vehicles shall carry the following forms and/or papers in the vehicle: A. Vehicle registration B. Valid insurance ID C. Putnam County Accident Packet containing forms for completion in case of a vehicle collision. IV. Any member operating a department vehicle that is involved in an accident may be relieved of any or all duties pending the outcome of the accident investigation. V. Any member operating a department vehicle that is involved in an accident may be subject to drug and alcohol testing.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Protective Clothing and Equipment

I. All personal protective equipment (PPE) worn by Putnam County Fire and EMS (PCFEMS) personnel in the performance of their duties must have been issued by the Department. This includes: structural firefighting protective clothing (coat and trousers), wildland firefighting protective clothing jumpsuit), helmet, hood, firefighting gloves, boots, medical gloves, HEPA masks, safety glasses, SCBA (including facepiece), and personal alert safety system (PASS) devices, All personnel have been issued or have access to the appropriate personal protective equipment. All personnel must have all individually-issued PPE in their possession while on duty. II. Battalion Chiefs will verify the need for issue or replacement of personal protective clothing or equipment. Battalion Chief will coordinate with the staff assistant to procure initial issuance or replacement. III. Members are responsible for the care, cleaning and security of all items which are assigned to them, including the proper donning and use of all protective clothing and equipment. Members that fail to properly care for, use or who lose items which are assigned to their responsibility are subject to disciplinary action. This includes abuse of clothing or equipment or intentional damage beyond normal wear. IV. The cleaning of protective clothing and personal equipment shall be done in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions for same. V. Protective clothing/equipment should be inspected regularly by each member, and periodically by the Station Commanding Officer and Battalion Chief Protective clothing/equipment found at any time to be damaged or unsafe shall be removed from service immediately and replaced.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Protective Clothing and Equipment

VI. Protective Clothing/Equipment shall have approved markings only. A. Coats, pants, hoods, and boots may be marked with the member's name on the inside of the gear or where it will not be visible when worn. B. Helmets shall have the PCFEMS Shield with Station 11 on the front. One panel should have their star of life; one panel should have their Putnam County Firefighter Certification for the current year. Letters up to one inch in height spelling out the person's last name may be placed on the rear of the helmet. C. No other decals, patches, or markings are permitted without the permission of a Chief of PCFEMS.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Risk Management Guidelines

I. The following shall be used as guidelines when evaluating risk versus benefit in emergency and non-emergency situations in the course of PCFEMS operations: A. You should risk a lot only to save a lot B. You should risk only a little to save a little. C. You should risk nothing to save what is already lost.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Seat Belt Usage

I. All occupants in fire department vehicles shall wear their seat belts and shoulder restraints whenever the vehicle is in motion, in both non-emergency and emergency modes. II. All occupants in fire department vehicles shall wear their seat belts and shoulder restraints whenever the vehicle is in motion, in both non-emergency and emergency modes III. Any vehicle not having adequate seat belts, or having improperly functioning seat belts, shall be reported to the Maintenance Officer, who will make every effort to have seat belts installed or repaired as soon as possible.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Receiving Bomb Threats

I. RECEIEPT OF A BOMB THREAT A. Any employee receiving a bomb threat by any method shall make every effort to obtain as much information from the source of the threat as possible utilizing the provided bomb threat guide. Efforts should be made to identify the specific building in which the device is allegedly located. Also attempt to clarify whether the threat is intended for Putnam County, a Federal Courthouse or other governmental building. The following information should be solicited: 1. When is the bomb going to explode? 2. Where is it right now? 3. What does it look like? 4. What kind of bomb is it? 5. What will cause it to explode? 6. Did you place the bomb? 7. Why? 8. What is your address? 9. What is your name? 10. Exact wording of the threat. 11. Identifying characteristics of the voice (accent, tone, background noise, sex, etc.) II. REPORTING A THREAT A. It shall be the responsibility of each employee to immediately report any bomb threat to the Sheriffs Office, along with the employee's name, position and telephone number. B. Document and hold all information concerning the bomb threat until contacted by law enforcement officials. Insure the time of the call is noted as well as the telephone number on which the call was received.

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 6 Employee Injury Actions

I. The following flow chart shall be utilized for Employee related injuries

EMPLOYEE INJURED

TRAFFIC CRASH

MEDICAL CARE REQUIRED

NO MEDICAL CARE REQUIRED

COMPLETE TRAFFIC ACCIDENT REPORT

ADMINISTER FIRST AID AND SEEK MEDICAL

COMPLETE FIRST REPORT OF INJURY FORM

ATTENTION

MINOR /NO DAMAGE

MAJOR DAMAGE

COMPLETE FIRST REPORT OF INJURY ­FAX TO 326-7130

FOLLOW TRAFFIC CRASH FLOW IF APPLICABLE

TAKE PICTURES CONSIDER CALLING L.E.O.AND

LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT/ TAKE

FLEET MAINTENANCE FOR ASSESSMENT

COMPLETE SUPERVISOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORT

COMPLETE SUPERVISOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORT

COMPLETE SUPERVISOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORT

EMPLOYEE TAKES/ BRINGS BACK RETURN TO WORK CERTIFICATION

COMPLETE SUPERVISOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORT

EVERY VISIT EMPLOYEE NEEDS RETURN TO WORK

CERTIFICATE

OFFER EMPLOYEE LIGHT DUTY

FAX ALL PAPERWORK TO 326-7130 ASAP

NOTIFY CHIEF/SHERRI DALE / ALL OFFICERS OF EMPLOYEE WORK STATUS

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Subject I-E Safety and Health

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 6 Employee Injury Actions

II. Drug test shall be performed for any accident where there is estimated $500 or more in damages, and clearly not the fault of the employee. The On Duty Battalion Chief or Operations Chief will make the determination if drug testing shall be done in special case situations. III. All completed paperwork shall be submitted to department senior staff assistant upon completion. This process should not exceed 24 hours.

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Subject I-F Training

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Training Records

I. Training records for all personnel must be maintained to ensure that A. We receive FTE funds; B. We meet ISO requirements; and C. We meet state and federal regulations and national standards for Fire and EMS training. II. It is the responsibility of career officers to ensure that all required training records are completed correctly. A. Career Staff 1. A training schedule will be developed at before the start of each year. This schedule will include computer based training, Officer led interactive training, and practical review of equipment or procedures. Training will also provide, in this schedule, mandatory classes required by union contract. 2. In addition to these mandatory classes, training may offer special classes on a quarterly basis. This information will be published in the training schedule.

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Subject I-F Training

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Training Records

3. Zone officers are to assure training is completed as scheduled for mandatory computer based training or practical reviews. a. Zone officer is to complete a training log for each class. This log should include: i. The Start date and start time of the training. ii. The total hours of training completed. iii. Where the training was held iv. Name of the class v. Description of the training vi. The roster, with printed name and signature of both the instructor and students involved. b. Zone officer will provide a training log to the Training Officer in charge or records at the completion of each class. This log will be sent via county electronic mail containing: i. Date and time of the class ii. Name of the class iii. Roster of the class 4. The training officer in charge of records will complete online filing of training activities. The Training officer will report to the battalion chief and officers, on the 10th, 20th, and end of the month completed and not completed training (dates subject to records officer being on shift). The Battalion Chief in charge of Training will report not completed training to the Chief of the Department no later than the 10th day of the following month. 5. The training officer in charge of records will assure computer based training and training classes are submitted to the CEBroker (online State of Florida class records and audit system) for processing of department based classes only. 6. Personnel who complete training or certification from outside agencies shall submit any course certificates or other certifications to their Battalion Chief. EMS credits can be self submitted by individual staff through the CEBroker system.

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Subject I-F Training

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Post-Incident Analysis

I. A post-incident analysis shall be held on all multiple alarms, hazardous materials incidents higher than a Level One, fire death or serious injury incidents, and technician rescue incidents within three calendar days of the incident. II. The Incident Commander shall submit a written report on the post-analysis to the Chiefs of PCFEMS. III. Post-incident analysis of any alarm or incident of interest may also be submitted. IV. Notification about incidents receiving media coverage should be made to senior staff who shall alert County Administration.

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Subject I-F Training

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Pre-Fire Plans

I. Each Station Commanding Officer will be responsible for the monthly completion of a minimum number of pre-fire plans in his/her first alarm territory following these guidelines: A. Identify structures and/or locations of target hazards in your first alarm territory. Prioritize hazards based on potential for human and financial loss and environmental damage, and establish goals for completion of plans on file with the Zone Officer. B. Completed plans will be turned in to the Battalion Chief at the same time that training logs are turned in. C. Once returned to the Station Commanding Officer, the PRE-PLAN LOG will be filled out, and the plan will be put in the book. D. The PRE-PLAN LOG will be kept in the Station File in a folder marked "PREFIRE PLAN". E. EACH Structure that has a Pre-Plan will be re-checked every year. F. The PRE-PLAN will be distributed to all companies due on a response to that facility. Battalion Chiefs are responsible for copying and distributing these plans. A copy of the pre-plan should be sent the office of the Fire Marshall. G. All target hazards will have a comprehensive pre-fire plan on file in appropriate apparatus, the Battalion Chiefs vehicle and in the first due fire station. II. Upon collection, the Battalion Chief will review the plans, and then discuss with the company various tactical and strategic considerations in the event of a fire or emergency.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Dispatch Notification

I. Putnam County Fire and EMS will participate in the standard Run Card system for the dispatch of units. II. A response to a single family dwelling structure fire will include: three engine companies (with a minimum of two combat firefighters per engine), a transport capable ALS unit, and the Zone Officer. At least one tanker will be included in the first alarm assignment in all non-hydrant areas. III. A response to a commercial or multi-family dwelling fire will include a minimum of four engines (with a minimum of two combat firefighters per engine) or three engines and a ladder, a transport capable ALS unit, and the Zone Officer. The Chief and Safety Officer shall also be notified. At least one tanker will be included in the first alarm assignment in all non-hydrant areas. IV. An alarm for other than a structure fire will require a minimum of one engine company to respond. The exception to this rule would be for medical emergencies, when a rescue is to be dispatched. Fire stations may respond squad, utility or brush units to medical alarms as a first response unit in lieu of an engine response, so long as the vehicle is equipped with first responder equipment. V. Grass fires will have at least one engine and one brush unit dispatched to each. The on-duty Battalion Chief or Duty Officer, may increase this response, depending on current or predicted weather conditions, on a shift-by-shift basis. VI. Additional resources may be called for at the discretion of an Officer, or Incident Commander on-scene. Information provided by dispatch may necessitate additional resources while units are responding. VII. Dispatch will use this standardized run card system for the dispatching of units. Run card may contain more units than called for in this SOG. When discrepancies exist, the plan with the more extensive response will prevail.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Dispatch Assignments

I. State and local laws do not exempt authorized emergency vehicles from regular traffic laws when responding to an emergency. The Apparatus operator is responsible for driving with due regard for the safety of others on the road and will be held accountable for his/her actions. This requires that all fire department vehicles be operated at all times in a safe manner, taking traffic and weather conditions into consideration. II. The Company Officer, or firefighter-in-charge, is the direct supervisor of the Apparatus operator and will not permit the apparatus to move until he/she has verified that all responding personnel are seated in their designated riding positions with their seat belts or safety harnesses fastened. III. Riding on tailboards, or in any exposed position, is prohibited. IV. When an emergency vehicle is responding to an emergency, the emergency vehicle must stop for a school bus loading and unloading as would a private vehicle. If the red lights are flashing on the bus, and the students are loading or being discharged, you must come to a complete stop. In most instances, if the driver sees you coming, he/she will close the door and hold the students on the bus. Proceed with due caution only when the driver signals you to pass. V. The Apparatus operator will always maintain a speed consistent with safe operation of the vehicle under the prevailing conditions. VI. Per Florida Statutes, emergency vehicles are allowed to exceed the maximum speed limit so long as they do not endanger life or property. The maximum authorized emergency response speed, under ideal road and weather conditions, is ten miles per hour faster than the legal posted speed limit. Under less than ideal conditions, the maximum allowable speed shall be the posted speed or less, depending on prevailing conditions. When a guarded speed limit is posted, this will be the maximum permissible speed for all units. VII. Driving in the center turn lane, or in the left of center lane, into on-coming traffic is extremely dangerous and should be avoided whenever possible. VIII. Only those companies paged out and designated by dispatch will respond to an alarm. Additional companies will not respond unless specifically requested by the Incident Commander or Zone Officer and dispatched by the fire dispatcher.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Dispatch Assignments

IX. Should a closer unit, not on the assignment, be available in-zone, that unit should notify fire dispatch of its location. X. When an apparatus goes enroute to a call, the person-in-charge will inform the dispatcher of the number of combat personnel responding on the unit. XI. Tankers, air trucks, support or utility vehicles may respond with only a qualified Apparatus operator. XII. Once units have responded to an alarm of fire, no units will be canceled until a fire apparatus or fire officer has arrived on the scene and investigated, or the responsible party has called the Communications Center and canceled appropriately. The first unit or officer on scene is responsible for completing the incident report. XIII. If the calling party reports the fire out prior to arrival of the fire department, dispatch will notify the responding Zone Officer. The Zone Officer will make the decision to reduce the number of vehicles responding, downgrade the response to non-emergency, or to continue with an emergency response. In all instances, the Zone Officer will designate a minimum of one vehicle to continue to the scene to ensure the fire is out and take the report.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Receipt of Alarms

I. Upon receipt of an alarm, all personnel shall proceed directly to their assigned position on their assigned apparatus. II. Prior to boarding the apparatus for a medical response, all personnel will be in full uniform, including uniform shirt with shirt tail tucked in, or full turn-out gear. III. Prior to boarding the apparatus for all other responses, all personnel with the exception of the Apparatus operator will put on the appropriate personnel protective equipment. IV. Persons riding in cabs that are not fully enclosed will put on their helmet and hearing protection for all alarms. V. If apparatus is in service in the district when an alarm is received, personnel will respond as directed and bunker-out on arrival. Do not attempt to bunker-out while enroute to the emergency. To do this would require removing your seat belt or safety harness, and is therefore not authorized. VI. The Apparatus operator and the person-in-charge are both responsible for recording the location of the alarm. Prior to leaving quarters, they will agree on the location and the person-in-charge will then specify the route of travel. VII. If apparatus is in service in the district when the alarm is received, the Apparatus operator will slow the apparatus in order not to pass the next intersection until the alarm is received and route of response is determined. When the address is confirmed and response is initiated, the person-in-charge will notify fire dispatch of the location from which they are responding. VIII. Donning of the SCBA while enroute to an alarm is prohibited unless the SCBA unit is recessed in the seat back and can be put on while firefighter remains in the seat belt. IX. All apparatus with an assigned crew in station will respond within one minute of dispatch during the hours of 0700 and 2200, and two minutes of dispatch between the hours of 2200 and 0700.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Receipt of Alarms

X. If the above time frames are not met, dispatch will immediately encode the next due unit. The supervisor of the company which missed the time frame will submit a written report to their supervisor immediately via electronic mail. XI. The person-in-charge is not to give "responding" until all personnel are properly seated and secured and the vehicle is moving toward the alarm.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Volunteer Response

I. The following is regarding participating volunteer stations that have a formal agreement with Putnam County Fire and EMS. There will be Volunteer Fire Departments within Putnam County that do not subscribe to these guidelines, in lieu of following their departmental policies and guidelines. Please see the disclaimer regarding volunteer and following of Putnam County Fire and EMS Guidelines. II. Participating volunteers may respond only to those calls to which their respective stations have been dispatched. III. Participating volunteers responding to the fire station or to the scene of the emergency in a privately owned vehicle (POV) are governed by all applicable state and local traffic laws. All occupants of the vehicles will be seated in a proper seat with a seat belt or safety harness fastened prior to starting the response. IV. The only personnel that are authorized to ride in a POV that is responding to the station or directly to the emergency scene when paged out by the dispatcher in Putnam County are persons that are authorized to ride in PCFEMS vehicles. This specifically forbids children and family members from being in the vehicle during a response. V. Personnel are authorized to go directly to the scene of the emergency in a POV ONLY if they would have to pass the scene in order to get to the station AND if they have all of their protective clothing in the vehicle. Personnel will not pass the parallel plane of the fire station to the scene of the emergency in a POV. They will report to their assigned station. A. If the requested apparatus has already responded, additional personnel will remain at the station to provide immediate response on additional alarms. B. If all apparatus assigned to the station have already responded AND it is a known working fire, additional personnel may respond to the scene of the working fire to provide manpower. C. If responding directly to the scene of an emergency, the member will make sure their vehicle(s) are completely off the roadway in driveways, parking lots, alleys, etc., and will not park in such a manner to impede traffic, create additional hazards, or block emergency apparatus.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Volunteer Response

VI. Participating volunteer POV's are not emergency vehicles and drivers MUST obey all traffic laws. Audible warning devices, such as sirens, whistles, or bells are not permitted on private vehicles. Visual warning devices (red lights) are not authorized on POV's. VII. Any member charged and convicted of excessive speed, failure to obey traffic indicators (stop sign, red lights, etc.) or reckless driving will be suspended from all emergency response activities, via their private vehicles, in Putnam County for at least ninety (90) days. Additionally, participating volunteer companies may suspend participating volunteer personnel for periods greater than ninety (90) days or remove the offending member from the roster of that company. Any such convictions if using a red light on a personnel vehicle will result in dismissal from the fire service in Putnam County, in accordance with State law. VIII. Personnel using their private/personal vehicles for emergency response accept the liability in the event of an accident. Putnam County Fire and EMS assumes no liability. Personnel should contact their automobile insurance company for clarification and provide proof of coverage to Putnam County for any personal vehicle used to respond to emergency scenes.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Route of Travel

I. The Apparatus operator will follow the most direct safe route to the address given in the dispatch unless a specific route is indicated by the person-in-charge. The Apparatus operator and the person-in-charge will consider traffic, road and weather conditions that may affect their safe and timely response. II. Apparatus following other apparatus during an emergency response will maintain a clear and safe distance between vehicles. Apparatus operators and person-in-charge in following vehicles will be especially attentive at every intersection to ensure that cross-traffic does not proceed into the intersection after the first emergency vehicle has passed. III. Apparatus will not pass other apparatus during an emergency response until the person-in-charge in the lead vehicle has acknowledged by radio that the road is clear ahead, and it is safe for the overtaking vehicle to come around. IV. If an apparatus is approaching an intersection through which another responding apparatus may proceed, the person-in-charge will announce the approach of his/her apparatus to that intersection.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 6 Intersections

I. Apparatus operators will bring their apparatus to a complete stop at all stop signs (including four-way stops) and red traffic lights when responding to alarms. When it has been determined by the Apparatus operator and the person-in-charge that traffic has stopped in every direction, and that it is safe to continue, the Apparatus operator may proceed through the intersection. II. Apparatus may proceed through intersections that are controlled to limit the entrance of cross-traffic, and green traffic lights without stopping. However, all intersections should be approached at a speed that will allow the Apparatus operator to safely take evasive action or stop should it become necessary. III. When approaching an intersection, the Apparatus operator and the person-in-charge will be alert for other emergency vehicles that may be responding to the same alarm from another direction. If two emergency vehicles are attempting to enter the same intersection at the same time, the vehicle that is proceeding straight through the intersection has the right-of-way. If both vehicles are required to turn, the vehicle turning to the right will have precedence. IV. Apparatus operators will bring their apparatus to a complete stop at all unguarded railroad crossings during emergency and non-emergency travel. When it has been determined by the Apparatus operator and the person-in-charge that the tracks are clear of oncoming trains, the Apparatus operator may proceed across the railroad crossing. V. Apparatus shall not be driven around railroad crossing gates in the down position unless directed to do so by railroad personnel.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 7 Emergency While En-route to a Call

I. Units who encounter another emergency while responding to an emergency call shall utilize the following procedures: A. The driver/operator will stop the vehicle and the person-in-charge will assess the nature of the emergency. B. The person-in-charge will notify dispatch that response has been delayed, the location of the new emergency, action being taken, and type of assistance required. C. After giving report, the person-in-charge should determine whether the apparatus should continue original response, remain at the scene of a life-threatening emergency (fire and medical), request additional assistance (type and reason), and/or send next due company to the original alarm. D. If the unit has three or more member' on-board, the person-in-charge may choose to drop one person (along with the necessary equipment) to provide limited assistance, and continue the original response with personnel remaining on-board.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 8 Emergency While Available in Zone

I. When a situation is encountered that requires assistance while available in their zone, the Apparatus operator will stop the vehicle and the person-in-charge will assess the nature of assistance requested. II. The person-in-charge will notify dispatch of the location where the unit is committed, the nature of the problem, action being taken and the type of additional equipment required.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 9 Reduced Response

I. During periods of severe weather and/or power failures, which typically generate numerous electronic false alarms, it is not uncommon to find all apparatus in an entire district responding to reported structure fires. II. Given the above circumstances, the Battalion Chief may activate a single-engine response to all alarms in the effected area for the duration of the severe weather conditions and/or power failure. The fire dispatcher will advise the person-in-charge at the time of alarm that he/she is responding without back-up. III. If at any time during the response the dispatcher receives additional information to indicate there may in fact be a fire at the reported location, the full assignment will be dispatched at once. IV. Paramedics in Charge of a Rescue, or any officer, may reduce the response for a medical related call based on information from dispatch. The Paramedic in charge of a rescue or an officer may also reduce the response based on information from first responders on scene of a medical response. This may be done with a risk/benefit approach based upon the particulars of the call. When there is a question of reducing a medical response the unit should not downgrade unless safety issues prevail.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 10 Response to Carbon Monoxide Detectors

I. Arrival: The first arriving rescue/engine company will give a size up, establish Incident Command, and establish scene control as soon as possible. A. An interior investigation must be done to verify if the alarm is coming from a smoke detector, or carbon monoxide detector. The investigation should determine the cause of the alarm, i.e., low battery, poor location of the device, or a true alarm. B. The investigation team shall consist of two (2) firefighters wearing full protective equipment to include: bunker gear, Nomex hood, SCBA, and PASS alarm. The investigation team will be backed up by two (2) firefighters wearing the same level of protection. C. If the alarm is found to be a smoke detector, the investigation team will take the necessary steps to investigate the alarm situation, they will advise dispatch of the situation, and request any other resources that may be needed. D. If the alarm is found to be a CO detector, the investigation team will: 1. 2. 3. 4. Verify a LED reading if available; Make sure the occupancy is vacant; Exit the building and await air monitoring equipment. NOTE: Air monitoring equipment may not be available at every emergency scene. The intent of this SOG is to use air monitoring equipment if available.

E. Occupants should be interviewed to determine if they are exhibiting any signs or symptoms of CO exposure. If so, they should be given immediate medical attention necessary to the degree of exposure. f The Incident Commander may request the gas company respond to the scene if: 1. 2. 3. 4. A CO level of 35 ppm is indicated on the meter. Occupants show signs of CO poisoning. Arriving engine company or occupant shut off the gas; or The Incident Commander feels a response by the gas company is warranted.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 2 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 10 Response to Carbon Monoxide Detectors

II. Arrival of air monitoring equipment. A. Upon arrival of the air monitoring equipment, those individuals will be briefed on the action/inaction taken by the investigation team; any LED readings returned form the detector, and the medical status of the occupants. III. Air monitoring investigation A. The individual in charge of the air meter will zero the meter and verify calibration in fresh air, and comply with all other start up procedures as recommended by the manufacturer. B. The investigation team consisting of two (2) firefighters, will survey the occupancy to determine the highest levels of CO in ppm, and the possible location of the leak while staying in constant contact with the Incident Commander. C. Any investigation requiring entry into an occupancy will require the use of all personal protective equipment. D. Readings of 35 ppm or less: 1. Inform the occupant that our air monitor did not detect any elevated levels of CO, but that CO was detected in the occupancy. 2. Have the occupants check the CO detector per the manufacturer's recommendation. 3. Attempt to reset the detector. 4. Inform the occupant to be aware of CO exposure signs and symptoms, and if the detector activates again to call 9-1-1.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 3 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 10 Response to Carbon Monoxide Detectors

E. Readings above 3 5 ppm but less that 100 ppm: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Any reading exceeding ppm shall be considered an above average reading for occupancy. Occupants shall be advised that dangerous levels of CO have been detected in their occupancy. Strongly recommend that all persons leave the occupancy and begin-Positive Pressure Ventilation ASAP. Due to elevated levels of CO, the occupants of the residence should be checked medically for signs and symptoms of CO exposure. If it is determined through monitoring, that an appliance is malfunctioning and producing the elevated level of CO, it shall be shut down to eliminate any further release of CO. The gas company shall be notified in the event a gas appliance has been shut off and/or the gas main has been shut off to a residence. The gas company should secure the meter until proper repairs can be made by a qualified technician. Once proper repairs are made it will be the resident's responsibility to notify the gas company that the proper repairs were made and they need to have their gas service connected. Once the residence has been reduced to a safe level of CO, through Positive Pressure Ventilation, the residence may be occupied at the discretion of the occupant and the Incident Commander. 8. Attempts shall be make to reset the carbon monoxide detector to manufacturer's specifications. Incident Commander will inform the occupants that if it is activated again, call 9 - 1 - 1.

7. 8. 9.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 4 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 10 Response to Carbon Monoxide Detectors

F. Reading of 100 ppm or greater: 1. Any reading of 100 ppm, or greater shall be considered a potentially lethal level of CO. 2. The occupants shall be advised that potentially lethal levels of CO were found in the residence. 3. Order all occupants to stay out of the residence until they are advised it is safe to re-enter by the Incident Commander and begin Positive Pressure Ventilation ASAP. 4. Due to elevated levels of CO, the occupants of the residence should be checked medically for signs and symptoms of CO exposure. 5. If it is determined through monitoring, that an appliance is malfunctioning and producing the elevated level of CO, it shall be shut down to eliminate any further release of CO. 6. The gas company shall be notified in the event a gas appliance has been shut off and/or the gas main has been shut off to a residence. The gas company should secure the meter until proper repairs can be made by a qualified technician. Once proper repairs are made it will be the resident's responsibility to notify the gas company that the proper repairs were made and they need to have their gas service connected. 7. Once the residence has been reduced to a safe level of CO, through Positive Pressure Ventilation, the residence may be occupied at the discretion of the occupant and the Incident Commander. 8. Attempts shall be make to reset the carbon monoxide detector to manufacturer's specifications. 9. Incident Commander will inform the occupants that if it is activated again, call 9 -1 - 1.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 11 Response to Wildland Fires

I. The primary responsibility of PCFEMS at wildland fires is structural protection. To accomplish this, response of one or more engines supported by brush units, squads, and water tankers is required. Response to wildland fires shall be in the emergency mode. II. Ideally if enough personnel are available the first-due station would respond a fully staffed engine as the "first out" unit, followed by brush truck or a squad with a minimum of two personnel. III. If enough personnel are not available from the first-due station, the first out apparatus should be an engine, followed by a brush or squad response from the second-due station. The first-due station may, however, respond. A brush unit or squad as first out, if based on location and nature of the call a brush unit or squad would be indicated. Such situations could include locations where no structures are in the area or in danger, or where access problems prohibit an engine response. The first-due station shall immediately notify the communications center of this response. Communications will insure that the second-due station responds an engine in this case. IV. Additional resources shall respond as requested by the incident commander. The number of personnel authorized to respond in a brush truck, squad, or tanker is limited to the number of seat belt equipped seats within the vehicle. When responding in support of units already operating at an incident, a brush unit, squad or tanker may respond with one qualified apparatus operator with the approval of the incident commander.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 12 Response to Illegal Burns

I. Responses to illegal bums shall be non-emergency, unless information is provided by fire dispatch that the burn may be out-of-control. II. Response to illegal bums shall be in a suppression-capable unit with at least two personnel on board.

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Subject II-A Notification and Response

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 13 Disaster Preparedness and Response

I. Potential Disaster Situations A. When a situation exists that may result in an in-county disaster, such as a tropical storm or hurricane, station officers shall maintain an awareness of severe weather advisories and be prepared to take action. B. Upon issuance of a tropical storm or hurricane watch along either the Gulf Coast or the Atlantic Coast that included an area of coastline due east or west of Putnam County, actions listed in the Station Emergency Management Plan section of the Putnam County Fire and EMS Disaster Operations Plan should be implemented. II. Actual Disaster Situations A. If an emergency of potentially disaster proportions occurs in Putnam County, emergency operations listed in the Putnam County Fire and EMS Disaster Operations Plan shall be implemented. B. If Putnam County Fire and EMS resources are requested to respond to an emergency or disaster situation outside Putnam County, all related actions and operations shall be conducted in accordance with the Putnam County Fire and EMS Statewide Mutual Aid Response, the Putnam County Disaster Operations Guide, the Florida Fire Chiefs Association Statewide Mutual Aid Plan, and the Florida Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan, as appropriate.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Apparatus Placement

I. The first-in engine company will proceed directly to the scene, transmit a size-up report and establish command in accordance with NIMS standards. If arrival conditions indicate the need for a supply line, the first engine should lay a supply line. II. When arriving on scene, the first company should pull to the opposite end of the building to allow the person-in-charge to base his/her arrival report on a three-sided view of the structure. The area immediately in front of the fire building should remain clear of engine companies and staff vehicles. III. The second-in engine company should stage at an appropriate location and report to the Incident Commander "Engine 2 staged at and wait for instructions from the Incident Cornmander. IV. If the incident is at a building with an outside fire department connection, the secondin engine should stage at the fire department connection. In this instance, the Siamese connection should be inspected for obstructions and freedom of operation. V. The ladder company, if appropriate, should locate in front of the building in a position that provides maximum coverage of the face of the building and that takes into consideration overhead obstructions. VI. Vehicles, including staff cars, should not be positioned nearer than 25 feet to the rear of -the ladder truck to permit removal and movement of ground ladders. VII. Command vehicles should locate across the street from the incident, insuring they are not impeding the movement of apparatus or personnel. VIII. All apparatus should be positioned in anticipation of building collapse and high heat release. Apparatus should be backed into dead end alleys and driveways when possible in anticipation of the need for rapid withdrawal. IX. Additional units arriving should stage in their direction of travel and one block away from the immediate fire area. They should remain uncommitted until ordered into action by the Incident Commander. X. Whenever possible, an access lane for emergency movement of vehicles should be maintained.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Apparatus Placement

XI. Level 2 (formal) staging will be established as part of additional alarm assignments and run card system. XII. On Medical Responses, Transport Capable Units should be given priority placement for easy removal of patients from the scene. Responders should not park to block ingress of egress of the transporting unit (s). Vehicles that block the ingress or egress of a transport unit on a medical call should be asked to move their vehicle. XIII. POV's should be parked no closer than one (1) block away from a fire incident or medical incident. POV's may park closer than one block on a medical call but should not block transport capable units from easy access.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Positioning Apparatus In/Near Traffic

I. IT SHALL BE THE POLICY OF THE PUTNAM COUNTY FIRE AND EMS DEPARTMENT TO POSITION APPARATUS AT THE SCENE OF EMERGENCIES IN A MANNER THAT BEST PROTECTS THE WORK AREA AND PERSONNEL FROM VEHICLE TRAFFIC AND OTHER HAZARDS. II. All personnel should understand and appreciate the high risk that firefighters are exposed to when operating in and near moving vehicle traffic. We should always operate from a defensive posture. Always consider moving vehicles as a threat to your safety. Each day, emergency personnel are exposed to motorists of varying abilities, and driving at speeds from creeping to well beyond the speed limit. Some of these motorists are the vision impaired, the alcohol intoxicated and/or drug impaired. On top of everything else, motorists will often be looking at the scene and not the road. III. Nighttime operations are particularly hazardous. Visibility is reduced, and multiple emergency flashing lights tend to confuse motorists. Studies have shown that multiple headlights of emergency apparatus (coming from different angles at the scene) tend to blind civilian drivers as they approach. IV. Safety Benchmarks A. Emergency personnel are at great risk while operating in or around moving traffic environments. There are approaches that can be undertaken to protect yourself and crews: 1. Never, ever trust the traffic. 2. Engage in proper protective parking. 3. Wear garments and/or vest with reflective striping. 4. Reduce motorist vision impairment. 5. Use traffic cones and/or flares.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 2 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Positioning Apparatus In/Near Traffic

B. Listed below are benchmarks for safe performance when operating in or near moving vehicles traffic. 1. Personnel should maintain an acute awareness of the high risk of working in or around a moving traffic environment. Never, ever trust moving traffic. Always keep an eye on the traffic. 2. Apparatus should be positioned to protect the scene, patients, emergency personnel, and provide a protected work area. Where possible, angle apparatus at 45 degrees away from curbside. This will direct motorists around the scene. Apparatus positioning must always allow for adequate parking space for other emergency personnel. Allow enough distance to prevent a moving vehicle from knocking fire apparatus into the work areas. 3. At intersections, or where the incident may be near the middle of the street, two or more sides of the incident may need to be protected. Block all exposed sides. 4. For first arriving engine companies where a charged hose line may be needed, angle the engine so that the pump panel is "down stream", on the opposite side on on-coming traffic. This will protect the pump operator. 5. The initial person in charge (or command) must assess the parking needs of later-arriving fire apparatus and specifically direct the parking and placement of these vehicles as they arrive to provide protection blocking of the scene. 6. During daytime operations, leave all emergency lights on to provide warning to drivers. 7. For NIGHTTME operations, turn OFF fire apparatus headlights. This will help reduce the blinding effect to approaching vehicle traffic. Other emergency lighting should be reduced to yellow lights and emergency flashers where possible. 8. Crews should exit the curb side or non-traffic side of the vehicle whenever possible.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 3 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Positioning Apparatus In/Near Traffic

9. Always look before stepping out of apparatus, or into any traffic areas. When walking around fire apparatus parked adjacent to moving traffic, keep an eye on traffic and walk as close to fire apparatus as possible. 10. Wear garments with reflective striping any time you are operating in or near vehicle traffic. Safety vest shall be worn in any traffic scene, except for during extrication where bunker or extrication gear will be worn in lieu of the traffic vest. 11. When parking apparatus to protect the scene, be sure to protect the work area also. The area must be protected so that patients can be extricated, treated, and moved about the scene safely. 12. Once enough fire apparatus have "blocked" the scene, park pr stage unneeded vehicles off the street whenever possible. Bring in rescue units or ambulance one or two at a time and park them in safe locations at the scene. This may be "down stream" from, other parked apparatus, or the rescue maybe backed at an angle onto a protected loading area to prevent working in or near passing traffic. At residential medical emergencies, park rescue units or ambulances in driveways for safe loading where possible. 13. On an extended scene, place traffic cones at the scene to direct traffic. This should be initiated by the first company arriving on the scene and expanded, if needed, as later arriving companies arrive on the scene, Always place and retrieve cones when clear of on-coming traffic. 14. Placing flares, where safe to do so, adjacent to and in combination with traffic cones for nighttime operations greatly enhances scene safety. Place flares to direct traffic where safe and appropriate to do so. 15. Call for a law enforcement response when needed, Provide specific direction to the trooper or deputy as to exactly what your traffic control needs are. Ensure they are parking to protect themselves and the scene.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Incident Management Procedures

I. PCFEMS utilizes the NIMS. All personnel shall become familiar with its contents and procedures. II. On all fire incidents where multiple companies are dispatched, or more than four units are on-scene for a medical response, use of the PCFEMS Incident Management Procedures is mandatory. Motor Vehicle Crashes will be classified as a fire incident as it relates to NIMS implementation. All personnel, equipment and resources on the scene of an emergency incident will be managed under this guideline. III. The first-in unit person-in-charge, or higher ranking officer, shall establish command on arrival. Due to minimum manning and the need for an aggressive rescue attempt, the first-in engine person-in-charge may transfer command to the next arriving unit, or may operate in the "rescue" mode until an officer arrives and command can be transferred. IV. The person assuming command shall transmit a brief initial radio report to include: A. Company identification and arrival on the scene B. Brief Situation Report. This should give other responders a mental picture of the incident. Examples are: 1. For Structure Fire: size and type of construction 2. For Motor Vehicle Crash: how many vehicles, any HAZMAT conditions, brief damage assessment. 3. For Wildland Fire: size in square foot or acres, structures in danger, etc. C. Obvious fire or smoke conditions: nothing showing, smoke showing, fire showing, etc. D. Description of action being taken: Investigative Mode, Rescue Mode, Offensive Mode, Defensive Mode, or Exposure Protection Mode. (See Below for definitions) E. Assumption of command, including location name used to identify command and location of command post.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Incident Management Procedures

F. Instructions for incoming apparatus. V. An initial arriving company must decide on an appropriate commitment. This will usually fall into one of three general categories. A. Investigative Mode: No visible sign of fire. Further investigation required. B. Rescue Mode: The primary objective is emergency rescue activities. The company may conduct a rescue attempt with out backup (Rapid Intervention Team) being on-scene. C. Offensive Mode: The primary objective is to contain the fire to the room of origin with an interior attack with sufficient personnel on scene to effectively attack the fire. Rapid Intervention Team use is required. D. Defensive Mode: The primary objective is to attempt extinguishment or containment through an exterior opening of the building. Entry is not made. E. Exposure Protection Mode: The primary objective is to contain the building of origin through exterior operations and prevent the involvement of additional exposures. Entry is not made. Except when operating in the "rescue mode", the Incident Commander will remain at the command post in order to monitor all sectors and maintain overall control of the scene. VI. The Incident Commander will remain at the command post in order to monitor all sectors and maintain overall control of the scene except when operating in the "rescue mode". VII. Any change in mode (e.g. change from Rescue Mode to Offensive Mode, Offensive Mode to Defensive Mode, etc.) shall be clearly communicated via radio to all units on-scene or responding. VIII. The Incident Commander must quickly size-up any situation and take immediate and proper corrective action. Consider the number, location, and condition of known victims; the affect the fire is having on the victims; and the feasibility of personnel entering the entering the building to remove or protect the victims, and control of the fire with existing resources.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Personnel Accountability System

I. NOTE: This SOG regarding the Personnel Accountability System is for use ONLY when actually possible. PCFEMS fully acknowledges that when non PCFEMS personnel are in charge of a scene OR when there are Volunteer Fire Departments on scene that do not subscribe to this SOG it will not be possible to follow. PCFEMS Officers will follow this SOG only to the best of their ability keeping in mind that command and control personnel will vary. II. Every member of PCFEMS will be issued a Personnel Accountability Card (PAC) that will be printed with their name, appropriate information and be color coded by rank. A. B. C. D. E. F. G. WHITE - Battalion Chief and above RED -Lieutenants, Captains and Station Chiefs BLUE ­ Combat Qualified Firefighter/Paramedics and Firefighter/EMT's YELLOW - Combat Qualified Firefighters PURPLE ­ Non-Combat Paramedic or EMT ORANGE -Support Members GREEN - Unit Identification Tags

III. Each member shall keep his/her PAC with their bunker gear when not on duty or when not assigned to a unit. The PAC will be attached to the front of the bunker coat so that it will be easily visible. IV. Replacements are available through the Emergency Operations Center. V. Each emergency vehicle, except automobiles, shall be equipped with a PAC collector ring. A. The collector ring shall consist of a large ring with a unit identification tag attached. B. The collector ring shall be maintained in the cab of each unit in such a manner that is readily accessible and removable. VI. Zone Officers shall have in their vehicles an expanded accountability board. These boards will be used to assemble information about the incident upon their arrival at the scene. Each first due apparatus shall be equipped with two grease pencils and supply of towels. - 85 -

Subject II-B Arrival

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Personnel Accountability System

VII. The personnel accountability system shall be utilized at every working incident. Those personnel that do not have their accountability tag will not enter an emergency scene. A. Upon being dispatched to a call the firefighters will attach their PAC to the collector ring on the responding unit. Stations with only one unit may place their PACs on the ring at the start of the duty tour. B. Upon arrival at the scene, the first due unit shall announce that they are assuming command and announce the command post location in accordance with PCFEMS SOG's. If the situation warrants, the first due unit may pass command to the next in unit. C. If possible, the unit that assumes command will use their grease pencil to write unit assignments in a window of their unit. All collector rings will be brought to this unit upon being assigned a task. D. Upon arrival, the responding chief officer will proceed to the command post to review the information and take command. E. Upon transfer of command the chief officer shall retrieve all collector rings and attach them to his/her expanded accountability board. At this time the chief officer shall announce that he/she has assumed command and the new location of the command post. F. It shall be the responsibility of the Incident Commander to maintain the collector rings under the proper sector throughout the entire operation. The exception will be when a crew is sent to rehab; at this time the crew will take their tags with them and the IC shall note this in his/her records. G. It shall be the company officer's responsibility to account for all of his/her firefighters whenever finished with an assigned task and prior to leaving the scene. H. It shall be the responsibility of the individual member to ensure that his/her PAC be attached to their gear upon returning to quarters. I. It shall be the responsibility of the driver to ensure that the collector ring, as well as the grease pencil be returned to the unit upon being released from the scene. - 86 -

Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Emergency Scene Safety

I. All personnel assigned to emergency scene operations shall be equipped with the necessary personal protective equipment required by their position within the department and commensurate with their assignment at the scene. This equipment may include, but is not limited to: fire resistant jumpsuit, SCBA, P.A.S.S., coat, pants, helmet, hood, gloves, foot protection and eye/face protection. The Incident Commander shall ensure that all operating personnel properly wear all protective equipment required to safely perform the jobs they are assigned. II. The Incident Commander shall be responsible for the overall safety of all members and all activities occurring at the scene. He/she will assign sufficient supervisory personnel to control the position and function of all members operating at the scene and to ensure that safety requirements are satisfied. III. Depending upon the size of the incident, or at incidents where special hazards exist, the Incident Commander will assign a properly trained officer or firefighter to the position of Incident Safety Officer. The Incident Safety Officer will have specific responsibility to identify and evaluate hazards and to provide direction to the I.C. with respect to the safety of operations. IV. Personnel operating in hazardous areas or performing functions that would subject them to immediate danger of injury in the event of equipment failure or other sudden event shall work in teams of two or more. There shall be at least two persons in appropriate personal protective equipment specifically assigned to remain outside the hazardous area and maintain an awareness of the operations inside the hazardous area. These "outside" personnel are a rapid intervention team (RIT). Additional personnel or teams for rapid intervention shall be assigned by the Incident Commander as the need arises due to a large number of personnel operating inside the hazardous area. RIT personnel will have full personal protective equipment donned, including SCBA on their back, with mask immediately ready to don. Where possible, RIT personnel shall also assemble any special equipment needed to perform a rescue of personnel. The incident commander and pump operator may serve as RIT personnel at the onset of operations but only if wearing PPE and SCBA as described above. As soon as possible, personnel shall be assigned so as to free the commander and pump operator positions from RIT duties. Exception: When performing emergency rescue of human life, personnel may attempt to perform a rescue attempt with out backup personnel standing by. RIT will be established as soon as possible.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Emergency Scene Safety

V. It is the Incident Commander's responsibility to continually evaluate tenability of the fire building for interior operations. When the extent of fire or the structural condition of the building makes continued interior firefighting operations unsafe, all personnel must be withdrawn from the structure and be accounted for immediately. VI. Fatiguing and hazardous emergency scene conditions require frequent evaluation of operating positions, rotation of crews, the maintenance of a rehabilitation area, and a medical evaluation of affected personnel. Personnel shall not evaluate themselves. VII. The Incident Commander is responsible for implementing the PCFEMS Personnel Accountability System at working incidents.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 6 Emergency Evacuation Signal Procedures

I. Occasionally situations at emergency incidents deteriorate rapidly and create imminent hazards for personnel operating at the incident. Examples may include failure of roof supports at a structure fire, a container failure during a hazmat entry, or someone with a weapon at a medical call. II. To ensure that all personnel will be notified of such an imminent hazard and be able to immediately evacuate the hazardous area, two Emergency Evacuation Signals shall be used: A. A series of three blasts (each lasting two seconds in duration) on the air horn (done by the unit(s) as instructed by the Incident Commander or Incident Safety Officer); and B. The simulcast of a "warble tone" over all PCFEMS radio frequencies for five seconds. III. Upon hearing either of these signals, all personnel inside a hazardous area of an incident shall immediately evacuate the area. Sector officers shall account for all personnel in their sector and report this to the Incident Commander. The Incident Commander will provide a report via radio to the dispatcher, such as "All personnel are accounted for." IV. The order to sound the Emergency Evacuation Signal will usually come from the Incident Commander or Incident Safety Officer; however, anyone at the incident recognizing an imminent hazard necessitating an immediate evacuation may initiate the signal and should immediately report to the Incident Commander the circumstances requiring the evacuation.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 7 Locating a Missing Firefighter

I. When a supervisor presumes a firefighter or company may be missing or trapped, the supervisor shall initiate rescue efforts as soon as possible at the last known location. This information will be transmitted to Incident Commander and he/she shall initiate a roll call of the emergency incident to confirm the status of the missing personnel. II. Whenever possible the roll call procedure should follow this example: A. "Command to dispatch and all sectors, an unidentified MAYDAY distress call has been transmitted." B. "Command to all sectors, "Conduct a roll call of your units." C. "Command to fire sector, report"... "Fire to command, all accounted for." D. "Command to roof sector, report"... "Roof to command, all accounted for." E. "Command to side 3, report"... "Side 3 to command, all accounted for." F. F. "Command to dispatch, all accounted for." III. All roll calls at the company level should be done using face to face communications so that the radio can be kept clear. Also, while roll call is taking place all crews will be securing their assignments and preparing for possible search and rescue orders. If a search is necessary, the IC will formulate the plan with the area supervisor at the last known location. This face to face roll call will take place at any of previously mentioned benchmarks.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 8 Electrical Procedures

I. Any emergency that involves electrical equipment is the responsibility of the electric company. Fire department personnel should not enter fenced substations or electrical power generating plants until the appropriate representative of the electric company is on the scene, and then only upon his/her request and instructions. II. Fire department personnel SHALL NOT REMOVE ELECTRICAL METERS or cut electrical service wires from any structure or installation. III. It must be assumed that any fallen wire is energized. If a vehicle is in contact with any electrical equipment (wires, transformers, switches, etc.), assume it is also energized. IV. Avoid cutting or contact with grounded objects or potentially energized wires. V. Fire department vehicles are not authorized to carry, and fire department personnel are not authorized to use, rubber insulated lineman's gloves or "hot sticks". VI. Electric company (power) will be called in to perform all power disconnects. VII. If electrical hazard exists, area will be sectioned off and/or firefighters will be assigned a position to alert all personnel of danger. VIII. If damage occurs to any wiring in a structure, the power company will be called to disconnect power until structure is checked by an electrical inspector. IX. When disconnecting power to a structure, first note position of all breakers and then shut off main breaker.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 9 Automatic Alarm and Extinguishing Systems

I. An automatic fire alarm will receive a normal first alarm assignment unless otherwise specified. The first-in company will proceed to the alarm panel in a building in which the fire department has access through an open door or approved lock box, locate the zone indicating fire and investigate. If no fire is found, attempt to determine which detector activated the alarm. Notify the building manager of the problem detector and return all companies to service. II. Companies will make a complete exterior investigation of an unoccupied building in an attempt to locate the fire. If nothing is found to indicate that a fire is in progress, ask the fire dispatcher to contact the alarm company to see if there is a reset on the alarm. If the alarm has reset, and there are no indications of fire, the person-in-charge may declare a false alarm and make all companies available. III. If the fire department does not have immediate access to the building fire alarm panel, an activated alarm should be considered an indication of fire within the building. If building keys are not available, the Incident Commander should make entry from a location that will cause a minimum amount of damage to the building. IV. A deputy shall be requested any time forced entry is made. Do not leave the building unsecured; turn it over to the deputy or to the subscriber. Make note on the incident report and in the station log the name and title of the subscriber assuming responsibility for the building (identification required), or the name and badge number of the deputy. V. If a sprinkler system is activated, the fire department will insure the system is returned to service by the proper authority prior to leaving the property unattended. If the system cannot be returned to service, a fire watch must remain on the scene until such time as the system is returned to service. Returning the system to service or posting a fire watch is the responsibility of the owner/occupant. VI. On every automatic alarm where there is no fire, the first-in person-in-charge is responsible for filling out and sending a fire report to the fire marshals office for review and needed actions. Information should include nature of alarm, situation found, if the alarm was reset, and especially if it was necessary to turn off the system because the alarm would not reset.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 9 Automatic Alarm and Extinguishing Systems

VII. If the alarm is turned off, the property owner is responsible for securing a fire watch. If the owner cannot secure a fire watch the person-in-charge shall notify the on-duty Battalion Chief. A. The on-duty Battalion Chief shall inform the owner of the cost of a fire watch and the alternatives provide by Putnam County Fire and EMS. B. In no case shall Fire and EMS personnel leave a building unattended without a proper Fire watch, or working alarm system in place.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1 Topic 10 Fire Control

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. Whenever possible, the Incident Commander will conduct a well-supported aggressive attack in order to stop fire extension and control the fire in a safe and timely manner. II. The attack plan must provide enough manpower and equipment to meet all tactical objectives. III. The Incident Commander, as well as all sector officers, should consider the fire ground risk management guidelines: A. You should risk a lot to save a lot. B. You should risk only a little to save a little. C. You should risk nothing to save what is already lost. IV. When changing from an offensive to a defensive mode of operation, all personnel will be withdrawn from the building and be accounted for by their company officers. V. The Incident Commander will communicate any change in operating mode over the air to all sectors and notify the Dispatcher of the change in strategy. VI. When the forward progress of the fire has been stopped, the Incident Commander will notify fire dispatch that the "fire is under control".

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 11 Explosive Devices

I. When a common container, such as a plastic or glass bottle, is found in an unusual location, such as a mailbox, newspaper box, etc., take the following action/inaction: A. Do not approach the container once it is determined to be suspect. B. Secure the area of all civilian and emergency service personnel for at least 2500 feet. C. Request fire dispatch to respond the Putnam County Sheriffs Office Bomb Squad and the appropriate Zone Officer. The On Duty Battalion Chief shall also be notified by fire dispatch. D. Await arrival of Putnam County Sheriffs Office Bomb Technician and provide support activities as deemed appropriate by the Incident Commander. II. Companies dispatched to scenes with reported explosive devices or bomb threats shall announce that they are responding and shall stage at a location no closer than 1/2 mile from the scene until the PCSO Bomb Squad calls for assistance. Radios should not be used within 1/2 mile of the scene until all clear signal given by PCSO Bomb Squad.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 12 Fire Cause Determination

I. A Putnam County Fire Investigator will be requested to respond to all structure/vehicle fires that are working fires. If the person-in-charge can determine the cause to be accidental he/she may cancel the responding investigator. Exception: if a fire death is involved the fire scene shall be considered a crime scene until a fire investigator determines otherwise. II. The Incident Commander will insure that the building and premises are properly secured and guarded until the fire investigator arrives on the scene. He/she has the authority to bar access to any building during firefighting operations and as long afterward as deemed necessary to reasonably complete operations. This authority ends when the last firefighter leaves the premises. III. No person should be allowed to enter the premises where there is a fire of undetermined or suspicious cause without permission of the Incident Commander. If authorized to enter, each person shall be accompanied by a fire officer. The Incident Commander will maintain a log of person's names, times of entry and departure and a description of any items taken from the scene. IV. When a fire is suspicious in origin, there is evidence of possible arson, or the cause of a building fire is undetermined, the incident Commander shall request a fire investigator to respond to the incident, The Incident Commander shall leave at least one person on the premises until the fire investigator arrives. V. If a fire investigator is not available, locally or through the State Fire Marshal (352732-1743), the incident commander may leave the premises unattended IF the onduty battalion chief and senior staff has been notified and the owner or occupant completes and signs Consent to Search and Remove Evidence form. VI. Do not make statements of accusation, personal opinion or probable cause to anyone except the fire investigator. Any statement regarding fire cause should only be made by the fire investigator. For all other personnel, "The fire is under investigation" is a sufficient reply to any question concerning the cause. VII. Requests for information about the incident other than cause and origin, such as manpower, equipment, injuries, etc., will be referred to the Incident Commander or PIO. VIII. Care must be taken during extinguishment and overhaul operations to ensure that the fire is out and that the area of origin is preserved as much as possible. - 96 -

Subject II-B Arrival Topic 13 SCBA

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. No person operating with the Putnam County Fire and EMS shall be allowed to use SCBA during emergency scene operations if that person is not trained in proper use and operation of SCBA. II. Each person assigned a riding position will be responsible for checking the condition of the SCBA assigned to that position when reporting for duty, after each use, and at any other time necessary to ensure the equipment is constantly ready for use. Refer to Subject ID, Apparatus and Equipment, Topic 8. III. With the exception of the Apparatus operator of the attack pumper, all personnel arriving at the scene of an emergency that may require the use of SCBA will don their SCBA backpack prior to dismounting the apparatus, even if nothing is showing. The face piece will be put in place and connected to the regulator prior to entering any suspected hazardous atmosphere. IV. All personnel working in areas where the atmosphere is hazardous, suspected of being hazardous, or may rapidly become hazardous, shall use SCBA. They must have their face piece in place, breathing air from the SCBA only. V. All personnel working below ground level or inside any confined space shall use SCBA, unless the safety of the atmosphere can be established by testing and continuous monitoring. VI. Personnel working in proximity to areas where SCBA use is required shall have SCBA on their backs with mask immediately available for donning. VII. Personnel using SCBA shall operate in teams of two or more. Team members shall be in communication with each other through visual or voice contact at all times. They shall remain in close proximity to each other to provide assistance in case of an emergency. VIII. When personnel are involved in operations that require the use of SCBA, at least two persons shall be assigned to remain outside the area where respiratory protection is required to maintain accountability and initiate rescue, if needed. Exception: when there is need for emergency rescue of human life, properly equipped personnel may enter to perform a rescue attempt with out backup personnel standing by. Refer to Section IIB, Topic 5 for additional information on structure fires.

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Subject II-B Arrival Topic 13 SCBA

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IX. When the low-air alarm bell sounds on your SCBA, a person will be designated to exit with you. If you are operating as part of a three-person attack team, the entire team must exit; do not leave anyone operating alone in a hazardous atmosphere. X. Personnel will continue to use SCBA on the scene where hazardous atmospheres were encountered until the person-in-charge has determined it is safe to remove them. In complex situations, such as incidents involving chemicals or hazardous materials, the decision to remove breathing apparatus will be made by the Incident Commander in conjunction with the Incident Safety Officer. XI. When breathing apparatus is no longer required, it shall not be placed on the ground or left unattended in a building or other area where it will be subjected to damage. It shall be returned to the apparatus and placed in a position so as not to be a hazard or left with and under the control of the air unit operator.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 14 Fires in Places of Public Assembly

I. All fires in places of public assembly that provide food storage, processing and cooking and/or storage or issuance of medicines will be reported to Fire Dispatch by the Incident Commander. II. This notification should occur as early in the incident as possible, so the Health Department can be alerted promptly and respond, if necessary.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 15 Hostile Scene Operations

I. When dispatched to an incident that involves a shooting, stabbing, or traumatic suicide, confirm that law enforcement has been dispatched at the time of alarm. II. Secure audible and visual warning devices prior to entering the block where the address is located, traffic conditions permitting. III. Law enforcement personnel should be the first emergency responders to enter a scene where there has been reported violence. If law enforcement is not on the scene when you arrive in the area, stage your unit at least a block before the address. Notify fire dispatch of your location, and your intention to remain at that location until law enforcement arrives on the scene and declare the area safe. IV. If you are on the scene of an incident that suddenly deteriorates, and you fear for your personal safety, leave the danger zone at once. Do not return to the station, but withdraw to a safe location and notify fire dispatch of conditions at the scene. Request law enforcement to be sent to your PRESENT location, not the scene you just left. V. When law enforcement arrives at your location, fully advise them of the factual situation as you know it. Do not let them enter a hostile atmosphere without warning. VI. As soon as the scene is declared safe by law enforcement personnel, return to your on-scene responsibilities and continue operations. VII. If the person-in-charge feels that it is necessary to withdraw from a potentially hostile area in order to maintain the continued safety of his/her crew, all members of the emergency response team must withdraw. VIII. Anytime you withdraw from a scene for reasons of personal safety, it is important to obtain a report from the law enforcement agency on the scene. This requirement is equally important on an incident that results in aggressive action against any of the emergency services responders, no matter how minor the threat or how successful the intended aggressor. The police report provides critical backup documentation should the patient take legal action at a later date. The report must clearly explain why you backed away from the area, including any acts of physical and/or verbal aggression carried out against you. Note in the report that you felt uncomfortable with the situation so you backed off in self defense to wait for law enforcement assistance.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 16 Hazardous Materials Emergency Response

I. First Arriving Units A. Position the apparatus safely with special consideration for the dangerous potential of the product. Typically, the safest position is uphill and upwind. B. Establish command and give a preliminary report of the situation. C. Establish a control zone (Hot zone) beyond which entry is restricted. D. Designate a staging area for incoming apparatus, and assign a staging officer. E. Execute only immediate life-saving rescue, limiting as much as possible the endangerment of the health and safety of personnel until the material involved and hazards are identified. F. Identify the product and obtain supplementary information. Use the Emergency Response Guide (carried on all apparatus). G. Communicate with the responding Battalion Chief to coordinate the closest HAZMAT response unit(s).

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 17 Technical Rescue Emergency Response

I. First Arriving Units: A. Position apparatus no closer than 100 feet to the accident scene. B. Establish command and give a preliminary report of the situation. C. Designate staging area for other units, and assign a staging officer. D. Establish a physical barrier for crowd control with a minimum distance of 100 feet. E. Eliminate sources of vibrations/ignition sources: Unless essential, shut off all engines and stop all traffic within 500 feet. F. Locate a job foreman or a responsible eye witness and get as much pertinent information as possible: 1. Location and number of victims trapped. 2. Length of time since cave-in/collapse/entrapment occurred. 3. How victims are buried or trapped G. Execute immediate life-saving rescue; however, do not under any circumstances allow any personnel to enter: 1. An unshored trench if depth is four feet or more, or 2. A confined space with an unmonitored atmosphere. H. Communicate with the responding Battalion Chief to activate the closest technical team.

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Subject II-B Arrival

Page 1 of 1 Topic 18 Death Scene

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. Procedures for Signal 7 Calls (non-Hospice patients): A. When assessing patient's condition, do not move patient more than necessary. If patient is a confirmed Signal 7, do not move body. B. Do not let any other person, including family member, disturb the scene area. C. Stay in attendance with body until arrival of law enforcement or medical examiner. D. Do not examine personal belongings such as wallet, pocketbooks, etc. Do not look through dressers or closets or in automobiles. E. Write detailed report of everything that took place from the time of arrival. II. Procedures for fire-related deaths: A. Follow all procedures in Section I above. B. Ensure that the on-call fire investigator, State Fire Marshal, and PCFEMS Senior Staff are notified.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Booster Lines

I. The booster line (1" hose or smaller) may only be used as the initial attack line for brush fires and small outside trash fires where there is no exposure problem. The initial attack line for all other fires, including vehicle fires and dumpster fires, requires the use of municipal fire hose that is no smaller than 1- 1/2" in diameter. II. The use of booster lines is permitted for overhaul operations for ease of handling and to reduce the possibility of further water damage. III. Booster lines may be used for clean-up operations when there is no danger of fire and there is no involvement of hazardous materials. If there is a possibility of fire, or if hazardous materials are involved, the use of municipal fire hose that is no smaller than 1-1/2" in diameter is required. IV. The booster line is not authorized for use as a "ready line" during motor vehicle crashes and entrapment situations that require the presence of a charged hand line. When the situation dictates the need for a charged hand line to be immediately available, the engine company will use municipal fire hose that is no smaller than 11/2" in diameter.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Standpipe Operations

I. When operating from a standpipe, only municipal fire hose will be used. Engine company personnel will remove pre-connected house-lines, plastic adapters and pressure reducers from the standpipe and replace with fire department hose from the high rise pack, or shoulder loads, from the apparatus. II. Due to extreme heat, confined areas (such as long hallways), and lack of a means to provide early ventilation normally found during the initial stages of a fire requiring the use of a standpipe, engine company personnel should ensure that the automatic nozzle assigned to the company is carried into the building for use during standpipe operations. Only fire department nozzles will be used for standpipe operations. Industrial nozzles will remain in the hose cabinet with the industrial fire hose and will not be used by fire department personnel. III. Each engine company with the appropriate target hazards will assemble and maintain a standpipe pack that is immediately available to be taken into a building, along with a minimum of 150'x 1-3/4" municipal fire hose and an automatic nozzle, for standpipe operations. The standpipe pack will include, but is not limited to: A. One 2-1/2" National Standard Thread female x 1-1/2" National Standard Thread male reducer. B. One 2-1/2" National Standard Thread female swivel x 2 1-1/2" National Standard Thread male gated wye. C. Two spanner wrenches. D. One 12" pipe wrench in case vandals have damaged the system. E. One 10" pair of channel lock pliers, or vise grip pliers in case the valve wheel is missing and the valve system is rounded off at the top, causing the adjustable wrench not to work. F. Several wooden door wedges.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Fire Department Connections

I. The second-due engine is responsible for water supply during all fire department operations in buildings with a sprinkler or standpipe system. If the first-in engine reported "nothing showing", report to Incident Command "Engine 2 standing by the fire department connection" and wait for instructions from the Incident Commander. II. In buildings with both sprinklers and standpipes, make sure you are hooking to the proper Siamese. In most instances, the purpose of the Siamese is stamped into the casting. It will read Standpipe Siamese, or Sprinkler Siamese. III. In order to protect the pump operator and apparatus from debris possibly falling-from upper floors, the apparatus responsible for supplying the fire department connections should be placed outside the collapse zone, usually at the source of water supply. IV. The person-in-charge of the second engine should automatically order the Apparatus operator to make a reverse lay if fire or smoke is showing, a water flow alarm is sounding, or if ordered by the Incident Commander to "pump the Siamese". V. Pump discharge pressure will normally be maintained at 150 PSI if possible. Pump shall be operated in volume mode. A higher discharge pressure may be required if operating in a high-rise building, or into a deluge system. VI. Pre-planning for water requirements in sprinkler and standpipe systems are the responsibility of the first-due company.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Vehicle Fires

I. Apparatus will be positioned at least 100 feet upgrade upwind from the vehicle involved in fire, and if possible facing away from the side of the vehicle. II. A danger zone of an area within a 100 foot radius of the vehicle should be established. All people and occupied vehicles should be cleared from this area until the fire is extinguished and the area has been declared safe by the Incident Commander. III. Anticipate extra fuel tanks, exploding fuel tanks, LPG or LNG fuel cylinders, airborne bumpers, exploding drive shafts, exploding tires, exploding batteries, hazardous contents. IV. The attack team shall stay clear of the areas directly in front and to the rear of the vehicle, and the area directly facing the underside of the vehicle if on its side, during initial fire attack. V. 1-1/2" or greater attack lines shall be used for fire attack. All personnel on the attack team and operating within the danger zone will wear full protective clothing, including SCBA and Nomex hoods. VI. Be cautious when opening the hood or the trunk, as the fire may flash forward. Prop open hood with halligan tool or straight bar, as hood springs may have been weakened by the fire. VII. Under no conditions should gasoline filler cap be removed! This may permit heated gasoline vapors to escape, thus increasing the danger to personnel.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Wildland Fires

I. Pumpers and large tankers operating at woods and brush fires should not be driven off road or driveways. When fire conditions prevent control and extinguishment with hand lines and hand tools, brush truck and/or squads should be utilized. II. Units operating at wildland fires shall maintain safe escape routes at all times. Apparatus protecting structures should be backed into, driveways or otherwise positioned to provide an escape route. III. The brush truck Apparatus operator will insure that front hubs are locked in 4-wheel drive and the transfer case in is 4-wheel high when operating in high grass, palmettos or muck. A firefighter should be assigned to walk on the left front quarter of the brush truck to watch for soft ground, holes, stumps or other hazards that may impede or damage the vehicle. IV. If the brush truck becomes stuck, place the transfer case in 4-wheel low and attempt to free the vehicle. If it will not break free using 4-wheel low, do not cause further damage to the vehicle; especially the drive tine. Use tank water as necessary to protect the vehicle and crew, and call for assistance. V. Brush trucks should enter the burn (black area) from the rear of the fire whenever possible. Once inside the burned area, proceed towards the head of the fire and begin control and suppression activities. At times it will be necessary to proceed around the burnt area to gain access to spot fires or protection of structures. VI. The firefighter operating the brush truck reel-line will do so while walking on either the left or right front quarter as the vehicle slowly advances around the fire. At no time should anyone ride on the outside of the vehicle for firefighting or transportation purposes without being seated and belted. VII. If the Apparatus operator loses sight of firefighting personnel in smoke, stop the apparatus at once. Remain stopped until the smoke clears, or until personnel in question return to the vehicle.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 5 Wildland Fires

VIII. Assistance from Florida Division of Forestry or U.S. forestry should be requested when access to the fire cannot be gained by a brush truck, when more than two fire department units are needed on the scene for control, when the fuel load is beyond the capabilities of a brush truck to control, or when water alone is not an effective means of putting the fire "dead out". When forestry personnel arrive on the scene they may assume command at which point fire department personnel will then assume a support role to forestry. IX. In the event that a wildland fire damages structures or motor vehicles, the fire department will notify Florida Division of Forestry. X. When fire department units are dispatched to a previous bum that was secured by a plow line, the person-in charge will verify that the fire has in fact broken out of the secured area and is beyond his/her ability to control before requesting forestry assistance. XI. Firefighting helicopters may be requested only by a Battalion Chief of higher ranking officer, or by a Florida Division of Forestry or U.S. Forest Service official. XII. Units shall remain on scene until the fire is mopped up and completely extinguished, unless otherwise authorized by the incident commander.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 6 Railroad Tracks

I. The person in charge will instruct fire dispatch to notify the railroad that the fire department is operating in the vicinity of the railroad, or that hose lines have been run across the rails. II. Whenever Possible, supply lines should be run underneath rails close to a railroad tie. III. Fire Department vehicles will only cross railroad tracks at designated crossings. Vehicles will not drive on the cross ties, or operate from the track roadbed. This includes brush trucks. IV. Personnel should maintain awareness for trains when operating on or around railroad tracts, even if the railroad has been notified to stop all train traffic.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 7 Motor Vehicle Collisions

I. The reasons for initial fire department presence on the scene of motor vehicle collisions is to provide hazard mitigation, vehicle stabilization, medical assistance to EMS and if necessary, extrication of the occupants. II. If vehicles involved in the collision are still on the right-of-way, the Apparatus operator should position the emergency vehicle to protect persons on the collision scene from the flow of traffic. III. If collision vehicles are off the road, park fire apparatus on the shoulder of the road in a manner that will not impede traffic flow, but will protect fire department personnel. In either situation, all visible warning devices, including 4-way flashers, will be in operation. IV. Upon arrival, the person in charge shall direct the firefighters to insure that the vehicle is stabilized and the scene is safe to operate in/around. Overall scene safety for both patients and firefighters must be the primary consideration. V. If FEMS is already on the scene when fire department personnel arrive, the person in charge shall direct the firefighters to begin hazard mitigation while he/she checks with EMS to see if they need medical assistance. VI. If FEMS is not yet on the scene, the person in charge shall assign the most medically qualified personnel to triage and patient stabilization. The person in charge shall direct the firefighters to insure that the vehicle is stabilized and the scene is safe to operate in/around and simultaneously begin hazard mitigation. VII. If there is entrapment, the person in charge will notify fire dispatch of same, request the appropriate assistance, and proceed with extrication. The person-in-charge will assure the two closest zone officers are responding to the incident. The next closest station is recommended to be dispatched for scene control and manpower. VIII. When a person involved in a motor vehicle collision refuses medical attention, and your professional opinion (or gut feeling), tells you that they need to be evaluated by FEMS, advise fire dispatch of the situation and request FEMS to continue to the scene to initiate a medical refusal form.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 7 Motor Vehicle Crashes

IX. Law enforcement agencies are trained in, and responsible for, directing traffic. It is not the fire department's responsibility. Due to limited manpower for Fire and EMS operations, the person in charge should avoid assigning personnel to directing traffic whenever possible. In those instances where law enforcement has not yet arrived on scene, and it is necessary to assign personnel to traffic control in the interest of collision scene safety, be attentive to the arrival of law enforcement personnel. Insure that fire department personnel are relieved of this responsibility as soon as feasible. X. The fire department's responsibility ends when the task we were sent to perform is completed and there is no further risk to life or property. Only in an incident where a motor vehicle cannot be moved, and its position poses an obvious risk to the motoring public, should fire department personnel standby on the scene awaiting the arrival of law enforcement.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 8 Vehicle Extrication

I. "Vehicle Extrication" is defined as any vehicle accident in which force is required to gain immediate access and effect rescue/removal of the victim(s). II. Each company shall carry a full compliment of hand tools and first responder equipment. All personnel should be properly trained and proficient in the use of these tools and associated equipment. III. Normal assignment for a vehicle accident will be a rescue unit and an engine company response. For any call or radio report indicating possible victim entrapment, traffic accident with fire, multiple vehicle involvement (four or more), or other unusual situation, a second company (extrication equipped) and a Zone Officer should be requested/dispatched on the initial alarm. IV. The first-in engine company should be capable of completing the following with an appropriate degree of safety: A. Accident scene assessment (size-up) B. Hazard mitigation/scene stabilization C. Patient access D. Patient assessment and basic life support E. Minor disentanglement F. If, during size-up, the person in charge determines that their company is unable to complete all of the above tasks, they should immediately call for required assistance. V. Full protective clothing will be utilized by all department personnel participating in a vehicle extrication operation. VI. When it is determined that an extrication situation exists, a charged hand line (1-1/2" minimum) shall be deployed and manned until victim removal is completed. VII. Gaining access to the victim and disentanglement of the victim are considered two separate activities of a vehicle extrication operation. These can be performed consecutively or simultaneously, as the situation and the person-in-charge dictate. - 113 -

Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 9 FD Responsibility When Cutting Fences

I. All attempts will be made to access the fire utilizing gates or other existing openings prior to cutting a fence. If it is necessary to cut a fence, the following procedures will be utilized: A. Notify Communications Center and On-Duty Battalion Chief that fence must be cut so fire operations can be performed and the location where the fence is being cut. Note: have Communications Center notify owner if possible. B. Cut fence at post so wire can be stretched back into place. C. When fire operations are completed, fence will be stretched back into place and secured properly and marked with fire line tape. D. All brush trucks will carry proper equipment to repair fences, including nails and wire strong enough to hold barbed wire or fence wire together.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 10 Unattended Minor Children

I. When fire department personnel are operating at an incident when EMS transports the parent/guardian of an otherwise unattended child, LEA will immediately be requested, a company will remain on the scene and the person in charge of the nontransport unit will assume custody of the child until such time as LEA arrives and assumes this responsibility. II. The person in charge will assign a minimum of two personnel to be with the child at all times whenever possible. III. When LEA assumes custody of the child, record the child's name, and the deputy's name and badge number on the incident report and in the station log book.

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Subject II-C First Due Unit Operations

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 11 Medical Waste on Scene

I. It is the responsibility of all personnel to ensure that all medical waste is removed from a scene. This includes all discarded medical items left on the scene of medical calls, including (but not limited to): gloves, IV bags, dressings, bandages, etc. II. Medical waste shall be disposed of in accordance with the PCFEMS Infection Control Program. III. Persons attempting to drop off medical waste (syringes, used needles, etc.) not generated from department sources should be referred to the Putnam County Health Department for proper medical waste disposal.

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 1 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Tanker Shuttle Procedures

I. The Incident Commander will designate a water sector officer and will inform him/her of the required fire flow. II. The Water Sector Officer will determine how many gallons per minute each shuttle tanker can provide by using the following formula: V = Q /A+B+C Note: Q = GPM discharged from the shuttle tanker at 50 PSI. V = Volume of the shuttle tanker. A = Time required to off-load the shuttle tanker into the water reservoir tanker. B = Time required to fill the shuttle tanker at the shuttle tanker fill site. C = Two-way shuttle tanker travel time between points A and B. III. The Water Sector Officer will determine how many shuttle tankers will be required to maintain the maximum fire flow using the following formula: Maximum Required Fire Flow = Minimum Number of Shuttle Tankers Q Required

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 2 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Tanker Shuttle Procedures

IV. At the off-loading site: A. The Water Sector Officer will insure that a sufficient number supply lines are available to supply the reservoir tanker or folding water tank with twice the required fire flow (2Q). B. The first supply line to the reservoir tanker (or folding water tank) intake should be 50' in length, and each successive line should be increased by 50' until the total number of required intake lines are on the ground. C. All lines should be stretched in the same direction from the reservoir tanker, and on the same side of the street as the reservoir tanker, to insure that shuttle tankers will not have to cross these lines. D. Discharge pressure into the reservoir tanker will not exceed 50 PSI. V. At the shuttle tanker fill site: A. Set enough engines at draft, or hook enough engines to hydrants, to supply twice the estimated fire flow to shuttle tankers. B. A sufficient number of supply lines should be laid from the supply engine(s) to allow more than one shuttle tanker to load at the same time. C. The first supply line should be 50 ft. in length, and each successive line should be increased by 50 ft. until the total number of required supply lines are on the ground. D. All lines should be stretched in the same direction from the supply pumper(s), and on the same side of the street as the supply pumper(s), to insure that shuttle tankers will not have to cross these lines. E. Discharge pressure into shuttle tankers will not exceed 50 PSI.

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 3 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Tanker Shuttle Procedures

VI. Shuttle tanker operations: A. During shuttle tanker operations, the Incident Commander may request the Putnam County Sheriffs Department to close all roads being traveled by shuttle tankers to all traffic other than fire department vehicles. They must remain closed until permission is given by the Water Sector Officer, through the Incident Commander, to have them opened to normal traffic. B. The Water Sector Officer will coordinate the overall shuttle operation from the immediate area of the reservoir tanker/dump tank. He/she will have a portable radio to communicate with the Incident Commander and the pump operators at the tanker fill site and off-loading site. In addition, he/she will have a clipboard with pencil and paper to keep track of the unit designation of vehicles participating in the shuttle, units available in the staging area, and any other pertinent information relating to water supply. C. When an engine company arrives on the scene it may be designated as a shuttle tanker by the Incident Commander. At this time the company officer and firefighters will report to the Incident Commander with air packs and hand tools for assignment. The Apparatus operator will report to the Water Sector Officer and will shuttle water as directed. D. The Apparatus operators will verbally communicate their needs to the Water Sector Officer while they are off-loading at the reservoir site. Mobile radios will only be used in an emergency. E. Each Apparatus operator will keep a list of the number of loads of water hauled. Include times of arrival/departure to/from the fill and off-load sites. F. After off-loading water into the reservoir tanker, and after filling at the fill site, shuttle tankers will proceed past the off-load/fill site to the designated turn around area for the return trip. There will be no short turns. G. Shuttle tankers will stay in line while traveling between points A-B and B-A. Do not pass!

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 4 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Tanker Shuttle Procedures

H. In the case of extended tanker shuttle operations, an area for fuel, lube, maintenance, food, comfort and staging of additional shuttle tankers will be established in the area of the reservoir tanker. A fire department mechanic and shop truck will be assigned to this area the entire time the shuttle is in operation. I. Apparatus operators needing to use the restroom or fuel their vehicle will proceed to the designated area as needed and return to the shuttle operations as soon as service is complete. It is not necessary to notify anyone you are stopping, as this type of stop is expected. It is also expected that the service will be completed with a minimum amount of shut-down time and you will resume the water shuttle as soon as possible.

J. If a shuttle tanker is placed out of service by the mechanic, or if a Apparatus operator needs to stop for food and/or rest, the Apparatus operator will notify the Water Sector Officer that the vehicle needs to be replaced in the shuttle. This will be accomplished as soon as possible by a vehicle from the staging area in order to maintain the required fire flow. K. As fire flow requirements change, the Water Sector Officer may order shuttle tankers into or out of the staging area. It is important that Apparatus operators remain with their vehicles for immediate availability when assigned to the staging area.

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Subject II-D Water Supply Topic 2 Drafting

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. The purpose of operating a pumper from a draft is to supply water to a fire ground directly or through a relay. There are three basic factors that determine where to set up a draft. A. Amount of water needed B. Type of water available C. Accessibility of water II. The most important factor in the choice of the draft is the amount of water available. A. In order for a pumper to approach its rated capacity there must be a minimum of 24 inches of water over the strainer. If you cannot keep this amount of water above the strainer you will need to take actions to prevent a vortex or whirlpool, The use of a piece of wood or a beach ball will help prevent this from happening. You should also have 24 inches of water below the strainer to keep sand and small stones out of the pump. This in the most common type of contamination and it causes the most damage. Use of a float dock strainer will prevent materials from the bottom from being sucked into the pump. B. When operating from a draft, be sure to maintain water in the booster tank. A leaking tank valve can cause the water to be drawn out of the pump, causing loss of prime. C. Class A pumpers are rated to pump their capacity at 10 feet of lift, if the lift is greater the capacity decreases. For an effective operation the maximum lift is 20 feet and the amount of water that can be supplied is only about 60% of the rated capacity of the pump. D. Other considerations in selecting a drafting site are the stability of the ground, the convenience of connecting hose lines, and the safety of the operator. E. After positioning the pumper, immobilize it by setting the parking brake and placing wheel chocks. If the pumper is close to the road leave the warning lights operating. Before connecting the suction hose, check the gaskets to make sure no dirt or gravel has accumulated inside the couplings.

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Subject II-D Water Supply Topic 2 Drafting

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

F. If a floating strainer is available it should be used at all times. If a conventional barrel-type strainer is used, fasten a rope to it to aid in handling the hard suction hose after it is connected and in positing it properly. All connections must be made air tight. G. Engage the pump. H. After the pump has been made airtight, increase the throttle to 1,000-1,2W RPM's and operate the primer control. As the air is evacuated from the pump the compound gauge should read a vacuum. When prime is achieved the discharge gauge should read pressure. I. Increase the throttle until the desired pressure is reached. J. If the booster tank is low on water, refill the tank. K. It is very important to monitor engine operating temperatures. L. The operator must monitor the operating pressure of the pump, increased vacuum pressure usually indicates a blockage in or around the strainer or strainers. If this occurs, the only way to clear the blockage is to interrupt the water flow. M. Circulate the water in the pump between the tank and the pump when water flow is not necessary, keeping in mind to frequently discharge the water back to the water source. Failure to circulate the water in the pump may result in increased water temperature and damage to the PUMP. N. When shutting down after a drafting operation, slowly decrease the engine speed to an idle, take the pump out of gear, and allow the pump to drain. Allow the engine temperature to stabilize. After the pump is drained, operate the primer to clear any water from the lines. Unless the pump has been pumping very clean uncontaminated water, it should be flushed when a fresh supply of water is available. III. Other Devices such as the Turbo Draft Device can be used to obtain water from static water sources. Refer to the documentation provided by the manufacturer as devices vary in size, function, and water volume that can be returned to the apparatus.

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 1 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Relay Pumping

I. It is the responsibility of the first-in person in charge to anticipate the need for additional water supply. Relay pumping may be the best way to meet this need in those areas that are sparsely served by fire hydrants. II. If relay pumping is indicated, and fire ground conditions permit, the first engine should lay 1000 ft of LDH from the water source towards the fire before setting-up as the attack pumper. Due to long lays and limited availability of LDH, every effort should be made to insure that 1000 ft of 4" hose is not out of service because it is still in the hose bed of the engine committed at the "front door" of the fire building. III. The Incident Commander will advise the Water Sector Officer of his/her anticipated fire flow. The Water Sector Officer will relay this information over the appropriate media channel to all engines in the relay. Each Apparatus operator will calculate their friction loss based on the length and size of the supply line they are pumping, and the gallons per minute which must be provided to the attack pumper. IV. For the purpose of this procedure, accept that the maximum fire flow through 1000 ft. of 4" LDH is 1000 gallons per minute. If the required fire flow exceeds 1000 GPM, it will be necessary to add a parallel supply line to the entire water relay. V. The following procedures will be used for setting-up and operating a water relay: A. All roads being used for the water relay must remain closed to all traffic, other than emergency vehicles, until the Water Sector Officer authorizes their opening. B. Lay all supply fines on the same side of the street from the water source to the fire. If the water source and the fire ground are on opposite sides of the street, supply lines will cross the street at the fire ground only. It is important to keep the street open to allow the shop truck and fuel truck to patrol the line-of-relay. C. There will be a maximum of 1000 ft. of supply hose between each engine pumping in the relay. Each supply line should be made up of the same diameter hose from the source to the fire, if possible. If parallel supply lines are used in the relay, the hose in each line added may be a different diameter than the others; however, each single line should be made up of the same diameter hose from the source to the fire.

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 2 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Relay Pumping

D. To lay-down the relay, the first engine to reach the water source should lay a single supply line towards the fire. When this engine has laid 1000 ft. of hose, or when the fire is reached, the Apparatus operator will stop the lay. The first engine will continue to the fire and assume the position of the attack engine working at the scene. The supply hose remaining in the hose bed of this engine, and hose from each successive engine, may be used to extend lines on the fire ground and/or to replace burst sections of hose. E. Each successive engine arriving on the scene will begin to lay 1000 ft. of supply hose towards the fire from the point where the previous engine stopped. This succession will continue until the attack pumper is reached and the relay is complete. After laying the required amount of supply hose, each successive engine will proceed to the attack engine and transfer tank water, off-load tools, equipment, hand fines, SCBA and extra air bottles. The person-in-charge and firefighters will report to the command post for assignment. The Apparatus operator of the engine following the attack engine returns his/her engine to the water source and hook-up for relay pumping. Each successive engine will hook into the supply line 1000 ft. forward of the previous engine and prepare to relay pump. F. In some instances, based on knowledge of limited access to the area where the fire is located, the first-in engine may continue past the water source and lay a line from the entrance to the property into the immediate area of the fire building, instead of laying from water source as suggested in A above. When this happens, he second-in engine will connect to the hydrant and proceed in the same manner specified above for the first-in engine. After laying 1000 ft. of LDH, the Apparatus operator will continue to the point where the first-in engine dropped the line, hook-up and charge the line leading to the attack engine. Each successive engine will proceed as directed in the above; however, they will off-load at the location of the second-in engine and not the attack engine, prior to hooking into the supply line.

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 3 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Relay Pumping

G. As each engine is placed in the line, pumps shall be placed in volume mode (twostage pumps). When the relay is complete, the Water Sector Officer will coordinate bringing the relay to operating pressure as outlined below: 1. Each engine in the relay will connect a section of hose to a discharge gate for use as a "dump line". The purpose of the dump lines to assist the pump operator in maintaining the required operating pressures without having to adjust the pump. The pump operator can gate the dump line as necessary to discharge excess water into a gutter, sewer, field, etc. The importance of the pump operator's attention to his/her pump panel throughout the entire relay operation cannot be overemphasized! 2. The engine at the source will start moving water. When all air has been expelled between the source engine and the second engine, the pump operator of the second engine will slowly close his/her dump valve. This procedure will continue until the attack engine is flowing water from all nozzles to be used. 3. On orders of the Water Sector Officer, the source engine will be brought up to the required engine pressure. Intake pressure will be noted. Each successive engine will come up to 20 PSI intake pressure at the required discharge pressure with water continuing to flow from all in-use nozzles on the fire ground. 4. All pumpers in the water relay will set their pressure relief valves tocompensate for momentary pressure changes throughout the relay. In order to maintain a constant fire flow, dump lines will be used to prevent a dangerous pressure buildup when nozzles are closed. H. The attack pumper must maintain a constant availability of 20 pounds intake on the compound gauge. If intake pressure begins to build as a result of reduced fire flow requirements by the attack crews, notify the Water Sector Officer and dump the excess through a dump line in the same manner as the relay-engines. This will insure the previous maximum required fire flow will remain available at the attack pumper in case the water requirements of the fire ground suddenly increase.

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Subject II-D Water Supply

Page 4 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Relay Pumping

I. Pump operators will verbally notify the Water Sector Officer of their need for fuel, mechanical assistance or relief to use the restroom or for food. Pump operators will use their radios only in case of an emergency. J. As the required fire flow is reduced, the Apparatus operator pumping the attack engine will advise the Water Sector Officer of his/her new requirements. The Water Sector Officer will notify all relay engines via assigned tactical channel to reduce their pressure/flow by a specific amount. Each Apparatus operator will once again calculate their friction loss based on the length and size of the supply line they are pumping, and the gallons per minute which must be adjusted accordingly.

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations Topic 1 Safety

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. Bystanders are often curious and may approach the helicopter creating a hazardous situation. It is important to assign sufficient personnel for landing zone security when utilizing helicopter transportation. II. Protect patient and ground crew members during final approach of the aircraft, No one is to be inside the marked off landing zone until the helicopter is on the ground. III. No vehicles are permitted inside the marked off landing zone, including emergency vehicles, at any time. IV. All civilians (including patient's family), media personnel and bystanders from the emergency services operating on the scene, must be kept clear of the landing zone at all times. V. Never approach the aircraft until instructed by the pilot or flight crew. VI. Tail rotor systems are low enough to cause injury or death. High speed makes tail rotor blades difficult to see; therefore, eye contact with the pilot should be established before approaching the helicopter. VII. Always approach the aircraft from the front, in a crouched position, and in full view of the pilot or flight crew, unless given other directions by the pilot or flight crew. VIII. If the landing zone is on a slope or uneven ground, always approach the helicopter from the down hill side. Never approach the aircraft from the uphill side. IX. Before approaching the helicopter remove hats and loose objects. If wearing a helmet, hook the chin strap. X. Always lower your head when approaching the helicopter to protect your eyes from debris which may be thrown up by the rotor-wash. XI. Keep intravenous lines and other equipment below the level of your head when approaching the helicopter. XII. No smoking, flares or open flames are permitted in or near the marked boundaries of the landing zone.

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations Topic 1 Safety

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

XIII. Never open or secure helicopter compartment doors. This will only be done by the flight crew. XIV. Utilize minimal personnel to assist aircraft personnel in loading patient on-board the helicopter. Depart when directed by the flight crew; exit towards the front of the aircraft.

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 1 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Landing Zone (LZ) Sector Officer

I. Upon notification that a helicopter has been dispatched to your incident, one person is designated as the Landing Zone (LZ) Sector Officer. II. The LZ Sector officer will focus his/her efforts solely upon the establishment and safety of, an area adjacent to the incident scene that will adequately accommodate the landing of a helicopter for the pick-up and transport of a patient. III. Upon locating a site, the LZ Sector Officer will survey the area for all hazards which will be of interest to the helicopter pilot. All hazards shall be identified on all sides of the LZ, including approximate distances away from the area in which the helicopter will actually be landing. Terrain, obstructions, winds, and wires are of particular importance. When possible, a pre-determined Landing Zone will be used. PCFEMS has the following pre-determined landing zone: Putnam County Preformatted Landing Zones

Code

PUT1 PUT2 PUT3 PUT4 PUT5 PUT6 PUT7 PUT8 PUT9 Bostwick Barge Port Orange Mills E. Palatka San Mateo Satsuma Fire Station Barge Canal Interlachen Johnson

Name

Location

US 17 & Palmetto Bluff Rd US 17 North SR 207 & 207A

Lat

N 29-46.00 N 29-41.00 N 29-41.50

Long

W 81-38.00 W 81-39.00 W 81-33.70 W 81-34.00 W 81-35.00 W 81-39.40 W 81-45.00 W 81-53.00 W 81-58.00 W 81-55.00 W 81-45.00 W 81-39.00 W 81-51.00 W 81-36.00

SR 207 & US 17 N 29-39.00 US 17 & SR 100 N 29-36.00 CR 309 & ST23 N 29-32.90

SR 19 & CR 310 N 29-32.00 SR 20 & CR 315 N 29-38.00 CR 21 S & CR 20A SR 100 & CR 315N Bardin & Bannerville CR 308 & CR 309 Kennedy & Clifford US 17 & CR 308B N 29-35.00 N 29-43.00 N 29-46.00 N 29-27.00 N 29-40.00 N 29-29.00

PUT10 Grandin (N of RR Trx) PUT11 Bardin PUT12 Fruitland PUT13 Interlachen Lakes Est PUT14 Pomona Park

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PUT15 Melrose PUT16 Ocala Nat'l Forest PUT17 Crescent City Helopad PUT18 Hollister PUT19 G.P. - Hawthorne PUT20 Florahome Ballfield PUT21 Interlachen PUT22 Lake Swan Ballfield PUT23 Old Johnson School PUT24 San Mateo, Payne Rd PUT25 Hoot Owl North PUT26 Satsuma Speedway PUT27 Pine Lake/Sunray Village PUT28 Satsuma/Buffalo Bluff PUT29 Satsuma PUT30 Hoot Owl South PUT31 Welaka M.H. Park PUT32 Welaka Fish Hatchery PUT33 River Villas, Buffalo Bluff PUT34 E. Palatka V.F.D.

SR 21 N & SR 26 SR 19 @ Frontier Bar

N 29-42.00 N 29-25.00

W 82-02.00 W 81-44.00 W 81-30.86 W 81-47.43 W 81-02.50 W 81-53.00 W 81-53.09 W 81-00.00 W 81-58.00 W 81-37.02 W 81-37.87 W 81-38.36 W 81-??.?? W 81-40.44 W 81-39.12 W 81-39.12??? W 81-39.82 W 81-39.90 W 81-40.14 W 81-36.03

Behind Vital-Air N 29-26.90 State Road 20 Gordon Chapel Rd N 29-37.54 N 29-35.30 N 29-44.00 Beh RS02's Quarters N 29-37.09 N 29-43.00 N 29-36.00 US 17 & Dunns Crk US 17 & Hoot Owl Rd N 29-34.86 N 29-34.41 N 29-34.29 N 29-34.70 End of Buffalo Bluff N 29-35.34

US 17 & CR 309 N 29-33.17 US 17 & Kingston Blvd Hamilton & CR 309 N 29-32.33 N 29-31.95 N 29-28.48 Ivey St, Satsuma N 29-34.69 Louis Broer Rd N 29.39.30

Other Available Landing Zones in the County that Do Not have a PUT number assigned

Putnam Community Medical Center Helopad Bardin Grocery Store Ochwilla Elementary School Baden Powell Boy Scout Camp Reservation Mt Royal Airstrip Seminole Electric North L.Z. Seminile Electric South L.Z. Pomona Park ­ Pomona Landing Rd. G.P. Mill Rd (CR 219)

N 29-38.565 N 29.45 N 29-37.51 N 29-39.5 N 29-26.04 N 29-44.13 N 29-43.32 N 29-30.0789 N 29-40.672

W 81-41.602 W 81-45 W 82-01.80 W 82-00 W 81-39.60 W 81-38.01 W 81-37.47 W 8134.4227 W 81-40.692

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 3 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Landing Zone (LZ) Sector Officer

IV. The LZ Sector Officer shall identify from which direction the wind is coming, and will stand in the center of the upwind boundary of the LZ, with his/her back to the wind. V. The LZ Sector Officer will establish communications with the helicopter pilot as soon as possible, prior to the helicopter arriving at the LZ, if possible. (NOTE: The helicopter is using up to three radios and an intercom system during the flight, so be patient if the pilot does not acknowledge your transmission to him/her right away). VI. If the LZ is not ready for the helicopter to land shortly after arriving on scene, advise the pilot of same and have them circle the scene until the LZ is ready and safe for landing! VII. Upon the arrival of the helicopter to the scene, the LZ Sector Officer will advise the pilot of all pertinent information, including hazards and their types, location and distance from the LZ, wind direction and relative speed (light, moderate), and any other information that is pertinent to the safe approach, landing and subsequent takeoff of the aircraft. VIII. The LZ Sector Officer will focus his/her concentration on the landing zone and aircraft safety, and will not participate in any other activities at the emergency scene that would compromise this operation. IX. The LZ Sector Officer will insure that a person(s) are assigned as tail rotor guards, to prevent other emergency workers or civilians from walking into tail rotor or from doing something that would endanger the flight crew, helicopter, patient or any other safety related operation. X. SAFETY IS THE PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY OF EVERYONE INVOLVED IN A HELICOPTER EVACUATION OPERATION! This cannot be over emphasized, as helicopters are very unforgiving in the event they bump into something or someone bumps into it!!

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Landing Communications

I. The on-scene incident commander will contact the Fire Dispatch and request the use of an alternate frequency for LZ helicopter communications. The dispatcher will notify the Incident Commander and the helicopter of the frequency to be used. II. The Emergency Dispatch Center will contact the company that is on an incident scene in which a helicopter is going to be used, and advise them which helicopter is responding to the scene. This has three purposes: A. To remind the on-scene company officer that a helicopter is enroute, and the radio frequency to be used to set-up an LZ. B. To switch to and contact the helicopter for information regarding the LZ. C. To initiate a request from the on-scene company officer to respond another engine company to the scene in the event that the on-scene company is committed to assisting FEMS in patient care and cannot break away to set-up the LZ. III. Upon notification that the helicopter is coming, either from the on-scene FEMS crew or from the ED Center, the company officer will designate an LZ Sector Officer who will select and prep and LZ, and switch his/her portable radio to Air to Ground (Channel 9). IV. When giving directions to a pilot as to your location, be as specific a possible using compass directions or "clock positions". Using a "clock position", refer to your location using the nose of the helicopter as the 12 o'clock position. (i.e., "Engine I to Aero-Med, the LZ is approximately 1/2 mile at 4 o'clock to your present position." OR "Engine I to Care-flight, the LZ is approximately 1/2 mile at 4 o'clock to your present position.") This eliminates confusion, as it gives a pilot specific reference points to work with, in correlation to the position and flight direction of the aircraft. V. In the event that another engine company is called to set-up an LZ, the person in charge on the responding company will turn on his portable radio to the appropriate frequency and contact the helicopter as soon as possible. VI. If the helicopter arrives prior to an LZ being set-up, the company responsible for the LZ will advise the helicopter pilot of same, with information as to the ETA of the company's arrival and to advise the helicopter to circle the general area. This is a rare occurrence, but this is necessary to maintain open communications with flight crews and ground units. - 132 -

Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 3 Landing Communications

VII. All communications with the helicopter will be done by the LZ Sector Officer. Patient info can be relayed to helicopter from FEMS Sector through LZ Sector. No other units are to communicate on Air to Ground during LZ operations. VIII. All communications are to be brief, clear and concise. Make certain that all communications are acknowledged between the flight crew and ground units. Messages that are not acknowledged shall be considered not received by the unit to which you were transmitting. IX. If a roadway is to be cleared and used as the LZ, this information must be clearly and specifically communicated to the appropriate law enforcement agency. When a roadway is going to be used, try to minimize the time that the road is closed, and communicate to law enforcement as soon as the roadway is clear for reopening.

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 1 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Landing Zone (LZ) Selection / Preparation

I. Selecting and preparing a landing zone is one of the most important elements in maintaining the safety of personnel and of the helicopter. II. The pre determined landing zone should be located as close to the incident scene as possible, without causing problems with rotor-wash debris at the incident scene. If necessary, a LZ closer than a pre-determined landing zone can be used, at the discretion of the incident commander. If there is not an LZ available directly adjacent the incident scene, then select an adequate LZ within a reasonable of the incident location. The incident commander of chief medical officer can choose a landing zone that is closer to the helicopter in cases where the aircraft is coming from a long distance. The goal is to shorten transport time for the aircraft thus decreasing time for the patient arriving at the appropriate facility. III. The "landing area" of a landing zone, is the area where a helicopter actually touches the ground. The landing zone is the general area, including approach. IV. All landing zones shall be in an area that is free from excessive loose sand or debris. V. The landing zone will be thoroughly searched for any trash that could be blown by the rotor-wash and create a hazard for the aircraft or ground personnel. VI. Any landing zone shall be of adequate size to permit the helicopter to make an approach with an adequate final landing approach angle, along with the minimum dimensions of the actual landing area. VII. Secure the landing zone from general public and traffic. If at all possible, an engine company should be at the landing zone standing by.

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 2 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Landing Zone (LZ) Selection / Preparation

VIII.

Daytime Operations:

A. Minimum landing area shall be at least 100 ft. x 100 ft., without any adverse weather conditions. B. If adverse weather or high wind conditions are present, increase the minimum landing area to 150 ft x 150 ft. C. Landing Zone is to be flat and free of obstructions and/or debris. D. Mark landing area with strobes or florescent orange cones 24" or larger. E. Place a vehicle underneath overhead wire obstructions, Make sure emergency lights are on. F. LZ Sector Officer shall stand in the center of the upwind landing area boundary, with their back to the wind. Report wind direction and approximate speed to the pilot. G. Inform the pilot of all pertinent landing zone information and of all obstructions, including approximate height, location and distance from the landing area (power lines, trees, poles, radio towers, etc,).

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 3 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Landing Zone (LZ) Selection / Preparation

IX. Night-time Operations: A. Select a landing zone that provides a minimum landing area of at least 100 ft. x 100 ft. during daylight hours and 150 ft. x 150 ft. during non-daylight hours, keeping in mind the additional space needed for an adequate final landing approach angle. B. Landing areas should be 150 feet by 150 feet if adverse weather or high winds are present. C. Place strobe lights in each corner of the landing area. If for some reason strobe lights are not available, the following alternatives are permissible: 1. Use a florescent cone; placed on its side, with a hand light on the inside. Place the cone with the point towards center of the LZ. 2. Place one flare in each corner, securely anchored into the ground. 3. Utilize one emergency vehicle with red lights, positioned approximately 30 feet from the landing zone, preferably located on the upwind side of the LZ. D. If at all possible, place a vehicle or other lighted indicator underneath any overhead wire obstructions. E. DO NOT wave lights around to direct the aircraft! F. DO NOT shine lights directly at the aircraft! G. Keep all vehicle headlights and spot lights off around the landing zone when the aircraft is on its final landing approach (approx. 50 feet from touchdown).

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Subject II-E Helicopter Operations

Page 4 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 4 Landing Zone (LZ) Selection / Preparation

H. MAKE SURE THE LANDING ZONE IS THOROUGHLY CHECKED FOR OBSTRUCTIONS AND COMPLETE INFORMATION IS RELAYED TO THE PILOT! I. The following hand signals will be utilized when landing the aircraft

Waive off aircraft: abort landing

Land aircraft here

J. Upon the aircraft landing, at least one person will be assigned to the left hand side of the aircraft, and will maintain a safety position to prevent the accidental contact of any person with the tail rotor and to insure nobody approaches the aircraft with anything or any hands/arms in a position to come in contact with the main rotor blades (such as somebody holding up an IV bag or an IV holder sticking up from a stretcher). K. The flight crew is responsible for loading and unloading patients. Personnel shall wait for instructions from the flight crew before approaching the helicopter .

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Subject Page Issued III-A 1 of 1 11-01-2010 Incident Management System Topic 1 Incident Management: Introduction

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. It shall be the policy of this department that all personnel will use the INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (BIS) to manage personnel, equipment and other resources on the scene of an emergency incident. II. The effective functioning of fire department units and personnel at operating incidents requires clearly defined organizational guidelines for all personnel and decisive action on the part of an Incident Commander. The Standard Operating Guidelines (SOG') will be employed in establishing command management structure from arrival through successful mitigation of the incident. III. Command Procedures are designed to accomplish the following objectives: A. Establish a basic emergency incident management system and outline procedures for expanding this system to manage more complex incidents. B. Fix responsibility for command on a designated individual through a standard identification system based on arrival sequence of members, companies and officers. C. Ensure that strong, direct and visible command is established early in the operation. D. Outline the activities and responsibilities assigned to command and necessary supporting functions. E. Provide a system for the orderly transfer of command to subsequent arriving officers. The detailed procedures to be followed are listed on the following pages.

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Subject Page Issued III-A 1 of 3 11-01-2010 Incident Management System Topic 2 Command Functions and Structure

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. The following five functions are performed for any incident. Depending upon the size and complexity of the incident, different individuals may be assigned to carry out each of those functions. General responsibilities of each function are listed below. A. Command 1. 2. 3. 4. Manages the system Establishes strategic goals Approves orders for resources Includes Safety, Liaison, and Public Information

B. Operations 1. Accomplishes goals 2. Directs tactical operations 3. Controls resources in staging areas C. Planning 1. Collects and evaluates information needed for action plan 2. Forecasts probable course of events 3. Prepares alternate strategies D. Logistics: Provides services and supplies to support tactical operations E. Administrative/Finance 1. Provides fiscal documentation 2. Provides financial planning 3. Coordinates administrative documentation

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Subject Page Issued III-A 2 of 3 11-01-2010 Incident Management System Topic 2 Command Functions and Structure

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

II. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE A. It will be the responsibility of command to develop an organizational structure using standard operating procedures as soon as possible after arrival and implementation of initial tactical control measures. The size and complexity of the organization structure obviously, will be determined by the dimensions of the particular tactical situation. B. The incident command concept is based ion the following five major functions: 1. Command - Responsible for overall management of the incident which includes: a. Life Safety b. Incident Stabilization c. Property Conservation 2. Operations - Responsible for the direct control of all incident tactical activities which mean that all assigned personnel and equipment are directed toward accomplishment of the goals and objectives developed by command. 3. Planning - Responsible for collecting and evaluating information about the fire situation and assigned resources for developing an action plan for guidance of incident tactical operations. 4. Logistics - Responsible for the provision of services and supplies needed for tactical operations. 5. Finance/Administration - Fiscal documentation, financial planning including requirements limiting expenditures, coordination of administration documentation. III. COMMAND STAFF FUNCTIONS A. In addition to the five major command functions, the incident management system includes command staff functions that are responsible for key activities not handled in other areas. They are part of the incident commander's immediate staff and report directly to the incident commander.

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Subject Page Issued III-A 3 of3 11-01-2010 Incident Management System Topic 2 Command Functions and Structure

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

B. The incident commander is responsible for each unit and handles the duties until such time span of control is exceeded or the ability to deal with control of the incident is impacted. C. The functions within the command staff are: 1. Public Information Officer - Formulates and releases information about the incident to the news media and other appropriate agencies and organizations. 2. Safety officer - Monitors and assesses hazardous and unsafe situations and develops measures for assuring personnel safety. 3. Liaison officer - Point of contact for assisting and cooperating agency representatives. a. b. c. d. Law enforcement agencies Utility companies Mutual aid resources State and federal agencies

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 1 Incident Management System Topic 3 Incident Commander

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. The Incident Commander is responsible for the command function at all times. As the identity of the Incident Commander changes through transfer of command, this responsibility shifts with the title. II. The first arriving officer or senior firefighter is the Incident Commander until relieved by the arrival of a higher ranking officer. Thus, a person-in-charge shall be expected to begin building an incident management system within these guidelines. III. The Incident Commander's actions will always be governed by the following principles: A. Life safety (emergency personnel and the public) B. Incident stabilization C. Property conservation IV. The Incident Commander has the overall responsibility for the safety of all personnel operating at the incident.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 4 Establishing Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. Command procedures are designed to offer a practical framework for field operations and to effectively integrate the efforts of all members, officers and companies. The time involved in performing these functions at the beginning of a tactical operation should produce on-going time savings in the form of more effective rescue and fire control outcome. Command procedures facilitate an organized and orderly tactical operation and a more effective effort, which is particularly important in more complex situations and when command must be transferred to higher ranking officers. II. MANDATORY USE A. The use of IMS procedures is mandatory on all incidents where multiple companies or agencies are dispatched. First Alarm medical calls are excluded from this use. B. The first arriving company officer, senior firefighter or higher ranking officer at the incident scene shall assume command. He/she shall remain in command until transferring command to a second arriving person-in-charge, to a higher ranking officer or until the incident has been terminated. The first arriving person-incharge is the person who has the option of transferring command to another person-in-charge. Command should be transferred to a volunteer officer, or zone officer as they arrive if they so choose to do so. A higher ranking officer has the option to leave the current incident commander in charge based on situation evaluation. C. In the event command is transferred, the dispatcher will rebroadcast that command is being transferred.

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 4 Establishing Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

III. INITIAL REPORT A. The person assuming command shall transmit a brief initial radio report including: 1. Company identification, arrival on the scene and confirmation of assumption of command. 2. Description of situation (what I have). For example, building description, occupancy, size, construction, obvious fire conditions, injuries, etc. 3. Description of action taken (what I am doing). For example, laying lines, forcing entry, preparing to attack, ventilating, etc. Identify fast attack mode, offensive or defensive. 4. Description of needed equipment (what I need). For example, next due engine company lay an additional line, next in company set to the roof and report conditions, etc. 5. EXAMPLE, Initial Radio Report, "Engine 3 on scene with a working fire in a 2-story residence, E-3 will be assuming 2nd Street command." 6. Make a Brief Size Up and Second Radio Report, if possible. 7. EXAMPLES: a. Building description and approximate involvement, " I story wood frame, 1/3 involved " b. Exposures: Severe, moderate, light, state location of exposures. c. Company commitment: i. Type of lay ii. Hydrant used iii. Interior or exterior attack. State location of attack.

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Subject Page III-A 3 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 4 Establishing Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IV. TERMINOLOGY FOR REPORTING EMERGENCY CONDITIONS A. The first arriving company officer should transmit a brief message which outlines the extent of the reported fire. This message shall be transmitted for the benefit of all additional responding companies, higher ranking officers, dispatch, etc. B. The intent of this message is to inform all additional responding personnel of the situation prior to their arrival so that they may prepare accordingly. C. The first arriving company officer shall utilize one of the four following phrases to describe initial fire ground conditions: 1. NOTHING SHOWING - This designation shall be transmitted for situations in which no signs of smoke or fire are present, and should be additionally defined as to what area of the structure this condition is present upon arrival, i.e., north, south, east or west. 2. SMOKE SHOWING - This designation shall be transmitted when smoke is issuing from a structure and should be additionally defined as light, moderate or heavy. Companies may be expected to perform some degree of work upon arrival depending upon the conditions present. 3. FLAMES SHOWING - This designation shall be transmitted for situations in which flames are visible. The first arriving company officer shall report the extent of the fire and its location. Responding companies may be expected to perform some degree of work upon arrival depending upon the conditions present.

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Subject Page III-A 4 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 4 Establishing Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

4. WORKING FIRE - This designation shall be transmitted for situations in which smoke and flames are visible and the first arriving company officer has reason to believe that the fire will require the utilization of all responding companies upon arrival for forcible entry, search and rescue, fire attack, ventilation, support services, etc. a. Once the designation of Working Fire has been transmitted by the arriving company or higher ranking officer, dispatch shall re-transmit the message preceded by a steady Alert Tone. b. Example: "Steady Alert Tone*, attention all companies responding Putnam Hospital "Engine 3 is now reporting a working fire." c. On any working fire notification, the dispatcher will page the second alarm assignment per the Putnam County Fire and EMS Dispatch Run Card System. 5. Additionally, these designations may be updated to reflect the situation. For example, Engine 3 might report an arrival at Georgia Pacific, north side, nothing showing; but upon investigating, they encounter moderate smoke in the west wing, 2nd floor. While proceeding to the east they encounter fire extending from a large cleaning storage room. V. RADIO DESIGNATION A. The person assuming command will use the radio designation "command" in all radio communications (incidents involving more than three fire department companies) preceded by the geographic location i.e., Wooten COMMAND, 78th St. COMMAND. The designation will not change throughout the duration of the incident. B. In the event that three or more companies are on the scene, all equipment will go to a tactical frequency, after arrival. Tactical Frequency Preference should be OPS-2 for central and west zone units, and OPS-3 should be for south end incidents. These are preferences due to locations of the repeaters: Both channels can be utilized despite geographic location.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 1 Incident Management System Topic 5 Command Responsibilities

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. INITIAL A. Assumes an effective command position. Please see Command Options (Topic 6) B. Transmit a brief initial radio report. C. Rapidly evaluate the situation ("Size up"). D. Develop a "plan of attack". E. Assign companies as required. II. CONTINUING A. Assign sectors (IIIA-8 "Sectors") consistent with existing conditions. The incident commander will assign Sector Officers to supervise various areas or functions. (See diagram in Section IIIA-8 for assigning sector designations.) B. Provide continuing overall command and receive progress reports from sector officers. C. Review and evaluate attack efforts and revise "plan of attack" as needed. D. Request and assign additional companies as necessary. E. Establish and enforce a fire ground/incident safety perimeter. F. Initiate scene preservation for fire investigation purposes. G. Return companies to service and terminate "command".

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 2 Incident Management System Topic 6 Command Options

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. LEVEL OF COMMITMENT A. In cases where the initial arriving officer is an assigned chief officer, efforts should automatically be directed towards establishing command and fulfilling the listed responsibilities. B. An initial arriving person in charge must decide on an appropriate commitment for his/her company. This will usually fall into one of three general categories. 1. Nothing Showing: These situations require investigation by the first arriving company. 2. Fast Attack: Situations which require immediate action to stabilize the incident and allow for a primary search, such as interior fires in residences, apartments or small commercial occupancies, The person-in-charge must quickly decide how to deploy the company. For a critical offensive fast attack, the person in charge may choose to lead the attack while using a portable radio to continue command, or he/she may transfer command to the second arriving apparatus person in charge before entering the structure. This mode should not last more than a few minutes and will end with one of the following: a. The situation is stabilized (announced "Under Control). b. Arrival of a higher ranking officer with transfer of command. c. The situation is not stabilized and the officer must move to a normal command position on the outside. d. Note: During preceding operations, the apparatus operator will monitor communications until command is assumed.

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 2 Incident Management System Topic 6 Command Options

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

3.

Command: a. Certain situations by virtue of the size of the fire, the complexity/potential of the occupancy, or the possibility of extension, require strong, visible, overall command from the on-set. In such cases, the person-in-charge will initially assume a command position and maintain that position until relieved by a higher ranking officer. b. NOTE: A company officer who assumes command and elects not to perform company work has a choice of categories and degrees of personal involvement in the attack; but continues to be fully responsible for the identified tasks assigned to the command function. The categories identified are not strict rules, but general guidelines to assist the officer in planning initial actions.

II. PUTNAM COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN A. Certain situations by virtue of their size, nature or complexity may require the use of the Putnam County Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP). The incident commander shall be in charge and shall have the responsibility of activating the Putnam County CEMP. When used properly in conjunction with the Incident Management System, the MCPEP will extend and enhance the overall effectiveness of the fire department's operations. B. Putnam County's Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Plan implemented in large-scale disaster and potential disaster situations, is also based on the Incident Management System. In effect, the EOC Plan uses an Integrated Emergency Management System which places all county agencies involved in disaster efforts into an IMS. PCFEMS is an integral part of this system.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 3 Incident Management System Topic 7 Transfer of Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. WORKING INCIDENT: The following guidelines for transfer of command will apply to all incidents involving fire department companies: A. The first arriving company person-in-charge will automatically assume command, except as listed below. B. The first arriving assigned zone officer will automatically assume command after transfer of command procedures has been completed. The zone officer may defer this action based on his or her assessment of the situation. C. Assumption of command is discretionary for any Putnam County administrative chief. If command is assumed, transfer of command procedures will be followed. II. UNDER CONTROL: After an incident is announced "Under Control", assumption of command by arriving ranking officers is discretionary. In this circumstance the officer in command will: A. Transfer command to the higher ranking officer, if requested; B. Retain command; C. Begin to disassemble the command organization by transferring command back to a lower ranking officer, or D. Terminate the command function.

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 3 Incident Management System Topic 7 Transfer of Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

III. TRANSFER OF COMMAND PROCEDURES: Within the chain of command indicated above, the actual transfer of command will be regulated by the following procedures: A. Arriving ranking officers assuming command will communicate with the officer being relieved by radio, or preferably, face-to-face on arrival. B. The officer being relieved will brief the officer assuming command indicating the following: 1. General situation status a. threat to life b. fire location, extent, conditions, extension c. effectiveness of control efforts 2. deployment and assignments of operating companies 3. Appraisal of needs for additional resources at that time C. The officer being relieved should review the tactical worksheet with the ranking officer in complex situations. NOTE: This worksheet provides the most effective framework for command transfer as it outlines the location and status of resources, both committed and still available.

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Subject Page III-A 3 of 3 Incident Management System Topic 7 Transfer of Command

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IV. COMMAND TRANSFER NOTIFICATION A. When the above transfer of command procedures have been completed, "COMMAND" should call dispatcher and announce the transfer of command. B. Example: "Putnam - Wooten COMMAND" "Wooten COMMAND" "Transfer Wooten COMMAND to operations chief' "Acknowledge Wooten COMMAND, operations chief assuming Wooten COMMAND" C. The arrival of a higher ranking officer on the fire ground does not mean command has been transferred to that higher ranking officer. Command is transferred only when the outlined communications functions have been completed. D. The response and arrival of higher ranking officers on the fire ground strengthens the overall command function. All operations officers will exercise their command transfer prerogatives in a supportive manner that will insure a smooth transition and effective ongoing function of command. V. EXTENDED SCENES A. Any scene going longer than twelve (12) hours will require a transfer of command. This is to prevent fatigue of the staff and ensure orderly continuance of the incident B. Any incident that requires activation of the EOC, Area Command will be transferred to the Chief of Operations and Preparedness or their designee.

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Subject III-A Incident Management System Topic 8 Sectors

Page 1 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. DEFINITION AND PURPOSE: A. Sectoring is a standard system of dividing the incident scene command into smaller, more manageable and workable unit areas. Sectors are equivalent to Divisions (geographic locations) and Groups (mobile task teams) in other IMS procedures. B. Complex fire situations soon exceed the capability of one officer to effectively manage the entire operation. Sectors reduce the span of control of the overall command function to a more manageable number of companies. Sectoring allows command to communicate principally with sector officers rather than fire companies, providing an effective command structure and fire ground organization. C. When effective sectors have been established, command can concentrate on overall strategy and resource allocation. Each sector officer is responsible for the tactical deployment of the available resources and for communicating needs and progress to command. Command determines strategic objectives and assigns available resources to sectors where they are most needed. D. Sectoring reduces the overall radio traffic on the fire ground. Most routine communication conducted inside the sector handled in a face-to-face mode between the fire companies and their sector officer.

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Subject III-A Incident Management System Topic 8 Sectors

Page 2 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

II. SECTOR GUIDELINES A. Command will assign sectors and sector tasks. B. Sectors may be designated by direction (i.e., 1,2,3,4) or by area (i.e., roof sector) or by function (i.e., medical sector - see Paragraph 111A - 8, 4, Standard Sector Function) C. Use sector designation in all radio communication. D. In the early stages, during a "fast attack", a person in charge of an apparatus may be operating as both a sector officer and as command. E. Sector officers must remain mobile enough to stay with the crews that they are supervising. F. F. Routine communications within a sector should utilize non-radio modes whenever possible. G. Sector officers should report completion of tasks to command. H. Sector officers will be in control of all assigned functions within their sectors and develop tactics to accomplish strategic objectives developed by command. This requires each sector officer to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. monitor work progress re-direct activities as necessary coordinate with related activities monitor welfare of sector personnel request additional resources as needed communicate with command as necessary re-allocate resources within the sector

I. Each sector officer will keep command informed of conditions in the sector through regular progress reports. J. Command must be advised immediately of significant changes in conditions (particularity those involving ability or inability to complete missions), hazardous conditions, accidents, collapses, etc. - 154 -

Subject III-A Incident Management System Topic 8 Sectors

Page 3 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

K. The primary function of the person-in-charge working within a sector is to direct the operations of a crew in performing assigned tasks. The person-in-charge will advise their sector officer of work progress. Requests for assistance will be made to the sector officer. III. SAFETY A. The safety of fire fighting personnel represents a major reason for sectoring an incident. Sector officers are responsible for the safety of all personnel operating in their sector, and must have the capability of communicating with firefighters in the sector so control of both the position and function of working companies can be maintained. B. Command should begin to assign sectors based on the following factors: 1. When a situation develops which will eventually involve a number of companies or functions beyond an effective span of control. (In such cases, early recognition and sector assignments are critical.) 2. When command can no longer effectively cope with the number of companies involved in the operation. 3. Companies are involved in complex interior operations. 4. Companies are operating from tactical positions over which command has little or no control. 5. The situation is such that close company control is required (i.e., structural conditions, hazardous materials, heavy fire load, marginal offensive situations, etc.). C. If reconnaissance crews or sector officers observe hidden hazards while performing their tasks (i.e., live wires down, large uncovered holes, unstable objects, etc.), they should notify command immediately.

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Subject III-A Incident Management System Topic 8 Sectors

Page 4 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

D. EXAMPLE: 1. "COMMAND - West sector" 2. "West Sector - COMMAND" 3. "West sector reporting live wires down in the alley" 4. "Fire Control - COMMAND" 5. "COMMAND go ahead " 6. "Broadcast alert tone and advise all companies that there are wires down on the west side of the building in the alley"

IV. STANDARD SECTOR FUNCTIONS A. Command can assign sectors (i.e., north, south) to perform the various standard functions on the scene of an emergency incident. B. Some examples of standard sector functions are: 1. Fire fighting 2. Rehab 3. Staging (Level 2) 4. Extrication 5. Water Supply 6. Hazmat 7. Medical 8. Landing Zone 9. Salvage and Overhaul 10. Evacuation 11. Ventilation 12. Stairway Support C. In addition to these standard sector functions, command can set up special sectors to perform any other special functions as required by the situation.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 1 Incident Management System Topic 9 Administrative Officers

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. Administrative Officers (Fire Marshall, Chief of Fire and EMS, Chief of Emergency Preparedness and Operations) may be required to respond to larger incidents. Responding administrative officers will acknowledge their presence to dispatch on arrival and will report to the command post. II. Command will assign the above responding officers appropriate duties deemed necessary to manage fire ground operations. III. Ranking administrative officers will not automatically assume command of an incident based on superior rank. The automatic transfer of command based on rank as outlined in the "Transfer of command Procedures" applies to operations officers.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 3 Incident Management System Topic 10 Staging

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. DEFINITION AND PURPOSE A. The objective of staging procedures is to provide a standard system of placement for responding apparatus, personnel and equipment prior to assignment at tactical incidents. B. Effective utilization of this procedure places apparatus in an uncommitted location close to the immediate scene to facilitate more effective assignment by command and to allow command to formulate and implement a plan without undue confusion and pressure. C. COMMAND AND ADMINISTRATIVE VEHICLES W1LL NOT STAGE ON ARRIVAL AT AN INCIDENT. These vehicles will be parked in a location where they will not restrict access to the scene. D. Staging will involve two levels: Levels 1 & 2 II. LEVEL 1 STAGING A. Level I Staging will automatically be in effect at all multi-company incidents and will require all companies, except first in company, to stage in their direction of travel. If possible, second due engine companies should stage at a hydrant (if available), uncommitted, approximately one block from the scene until assigned by command. Command is then responsible for positioning units on the scene, except when S.O.G. dictate otherwise, i.e., high-rises, hospitals, etc. Staged companies, with crews intact, will report their positions by announcing their company designation and compass direction from the incident scene. B. EXAMPLE: "Engine 3, on scene, staging south at a hydrant S.E. 3rd St. and 25th Ave." C. Companies should expect to receive an immediate acknowledgment from the dispatcher. The time of arrival at "Level I Staging" will be recorded as the arrival "on the scene" time for a company.

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 3 Incident Management System Topic 10 Staging

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

D. After receiving acknowledgment of arrival from dispatch, the company officer should make sure that command is aware of the company's position and arrival. The person-in-charge will do this by waiting a reasonable time (30 -45 seconds) for command to acknowledge the company's arrival. E. If command fails to acknowledge a company's arrival during this period, the person-in-charge should call command and confirm arrival and staged position, if radio traffic and incident permit additional air traffic. III. LEVEL 2 STAGING A. Level 2 Staging will relate to large, complex situations requiring a nearby reserve of companies which involve formal staging in an area designated by command. The staging area should be away from the command post and away from the emergency scene. B. When initiating Level 2 Staging, command must designate the approximate location of the staging area by name. C. Companies arriving in Level 2 Staging will announce their arrival and receive acknowledgment of arrival from the dispatcher only. These companies should not expect to receive an acknowledgment from command. D. The person(s)-in-charge should report in person to the staging sector officer if one has been designated. If command did not assign a staging sector officer, then the first person-in-charge of the apparatus arriving at Level II Staging area will assume the responsibility of the staging sector officer, until relieved by command. E. All companies in Level 2 Staging will stand by with their crews intact and the staging sector officer will maintain an up-to-date list of apparatus and crew size in staging. F. When resources are needed from Level 2 Staging Area, command will contact "Staging" (Staging Sector Officer). Command should be very specific about the type resource needed such as type vehicle, number of personnel or specialized equipment.

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Subject Page III-A 3 of 3 Incident Management System Topic 10 Staging

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

G. When crews leave the Level 2 staging area they shall be told by staging sector where they are going, whom to report to, what equipment to bring and what they will be expected to do, depending on assignment issued by command. IV. STAGING SECTOR OFFICER A. COMMAND may designate a Staging Officer who will be responsible for communications with command and for the coordination of all activities in the staging area. B. The radio designation for the staging sector officer will be "staging". V. STAGING OFFICER GUIDELINES A. Coordinate with law enforcement to block streets, intersections and other access required for the staging area. B. Insure that all apparatus are parked in an appropriate manner to facilitate quick departure to the emergency scene. C. Maintain a log of companies available in the staging area and inventory all specialized equipment that might be required at the scene, i.e., extrication equipment, ventilation saw, portable pump, etc. NOTE: This inventory log is especially important when mutual aid companies are reporting to Level 2 staging and equipment inventories are unknown. D. Review with operations what resources must be maintained in the staging area and coordinate the request for these resources with operations. E. Assume a position that is visible and accessible to incoming and staged companies.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 5 Incident Management System Topic 11 Communication Procedures

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. COMMUNICATIONS WITH DISPATCH: Once command is established, all communications with Dispatch will be between "XXX Command" and "Fire Control" once a unit arrives on scene or at staging for the incident. II. COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN COMPANIES (SECTORS) AND COMMAND A. Radio Communications will be regulated by the following guidelines: 1. 2. 3. 4. The sender will call the receiver and give their Company (Sector) I.D. The receiver will acknowledge the caller. The sender will give the message. The receiver will give the company I.D. and acknowledge the message.

B. EXAMPLE: 1. 2. 3. 4. "COMMAND -ENGINE 1" "COMMAND - GO AHEAD ENGINE 1 " "ENGINE 1 IS RELOCATING TO THE NORTH SECTOR" "COMMAND, ACKNOWLEDGE ENGINE 1 RELOCATING TO NORTH SECTOR"

III. STAGING A. Companies arriving at Level 1 staging should announce arrival at staging and give directions. EXAMPLE: "Engine 1 on scene, staged at Church St. and SE 3rd Ave." B. Companies arriving at Level 2 Staging should announce their arrival. EXAMPLE: 1. 2. 3. 4. "Fire Control - ENGINE 3" "Fire Control: GO AHEAD ENGINE 3" "ENGINE 3 ARRIVAL AT LEVEL 2 STAGING AREA" "Fire Control :ACKNOWLEDGE"

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 5 Incident Management System Topic 11 Communication Procedures

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IV. TRANSFER OF COMMAND A. Transfer of command should be announced when completed. Command should originate this acknowledgment directing it to dispatch. B. EXAMPLE: 1. 2. 3. 4. "FIRE CONTROL - GP COMMAND" "GP COMMAND" "TRANSFER COMMAND TO ES2" "ACKNOWLEDGE COMMAND, ES 2 IS NOW GP COMMAND"

V. TACTICAL COMMUNICATIONS A. Tactical communications are meant to be direct (Company to Company) as opposed to relayed through dispatch. B. Dispatch will not repeat company to company messages unless the companies specifically request communication assistance, or unless it is obvious a message has not been received correctly. VI. WITHDRAWING FIRE FIGHTERS FROM A STRUCTURE A. Occasionally situations at emergency incidents deteriorate rapidly and create imminent hazards for personnel operating at the incident. Examples may include failure of roof supports at a structure fire, a container failure during a hazmat entry, or someone with a weapon at a medical call. B. To ensure that all personnel will be notified of such an imminent hazard and be able to immediately evacuate the hazardous area, two Emergency Evacuation Signals shall be used: 1. A series of three blasts (each lasting two seconds in duration) on the air horn (done by the unit(s) as instructed by the Incident Commander or Incident Safety Officer); and 2. The simulcast of a "warble tone" over all PCFEMS radio frequencies for five seconds.

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Subject Page III-A 3 of 5 Incident Management System Topic 11 Communication Procedures

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

C. Upon hearing either of these signals, all personnel inside a hazardous area of an incident shall immediately evacuate the area. Sector officers shall account for all personnel in their sector and report this to the Incident Commander. The Incident Commander will provide a report via radio to the dispatcher, such as "All personnel are accounted for." D. The order to sound the Emergency Evacuation Signal will usually come from the Incident Commander or Incident Safety Officer; however, anyone at the incident recognizing an imminent hazard necessitating an immediate evacuation may initiate the signal and should immediately report to the Incident Commander the circumstances requiring the evacuation. VII. CHANNEL DESIGNATIONS : Channel Transmit Frequency Receive Frequency Status .When three or more responding companies arrive on the emergency scene, the fire dispatcher shall assign all responding units to a repeated Tactical Channel if possible. Incident Commanders can assign non-repeated channels (Tac4, Tac5, Tac6,Tac7, com west, com east, red, white, blue) as needed for an incident. Below is the reference Chart of Frequencies used in Putnam County:

Description Primary Ops 2 Ops 3 Tac 4 Tac 5 Tac 6 Tac 7 Tac 8 air to ground paging com west com east red white blue Command Frequency 151.40000 153.99500 156.12000 154.35500 154.21250 154.39250 154.01000 155.61750 151.37000 154.19000 155.82750 154.45250 154.26500 154.28000 154.29500 155.16000 Tone 141.3 PL 94.8 PL 141.3 PL 94.8 PL 82.5 PL 82.5 PL 82.5 PL 82.5 PL 82.5 PL 94.8 PL 243 DPL 032 DPL CSQ CSQ CSQ 162.2 PL CH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Mode FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM FM Tag Fire Dispatch Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Fire-Tac Other Fire-Talk Fire-Talk Interop Interop Interop Interagency Command Repeater Status

Y Y Y N N N N N N Y Y Y N N N N

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Subject Page III-A 4 of 5 Incident Management System Topic 11 Communication Procedures

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

VIII.

INCIDENT TIME

A. The PCFEMS Officer in charge will request that dispatch automatically give command the incident, time every ten minutes for the first thirty (30) minutes and then every fifteen (15) minutes until the incident is announced "Under Control". COMMAND will acknowledge the incident time and transmit a brief status report. The terminology for the this procedure is known as "running a clock." B. EXAMPLE: 1. 2. 3. 4. "COMMAND - FIRE CONTROL" "COMMAND, GO AHEAD" "The incident time is 20 minutes" "COMMAND, Message received. Incident time is 20 minutes. Still heavy fire conditions in the attic (cockloft) area of the warehouse. Give the evacuation signal; we are withdrawing forces from the structure and will be setting up for defensive operations."

C. The purpose for announcing incident time is to assist the Incident Commander in judging the effectiveness of the attack plan and to help predict the possibility of structural failure.

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Subject Page III-A 5 of 5 Incident Management System Topic 11 Communication Procedures

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IX. GOOD RADIO PROCEDURES A. SHORT AND SPECIFIC: Before transmitting know what needs to be said. Choose precise terms to communicate the desired message as clearly and briefly as possible without wasting air time. Clear text should be used in place of ten codes or signals. B. TASK ORIENTED: Orders received by companies should indicate a specific task which is assigned to the company. C. INDICATE OBJECTIVE: In addition to being task and company oriented, assignments should indicate an objective to the action. The company should know exactly where to go, to whom to report, what the task will be and what the objective of the task is. Orders should tell what to do not how to do it. D. SELF CONTROL/EFFECTIVE RATE: Speak clearly at a practiced rate, not too fast or too slow. Deliberately control emotions and excitement. If the voice is not consciously controlled, it will become garbled. E. WELL TIMED/SPACED: Prioritize messages. Do not use up valuable air time with unimportant messages and insignificant details. Let critical messages go first. Maintain an awareness of the overall situation

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 6 Incident Management System Topic 12 Incident Safety

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. INTENT A. The intent of this Incident Management Procedure is to minimize confusion and congestion at the scene; and, to limit the number of personnel exposed to hazards. For a successfully controlled operation, individuals or crews shall be restricted from wandering about the incident scene or congregating in nonfunctional groups, free-lancing, etc. B. Command should be particularly alert to control the activities of off-duty personnel on the scene who may wish to assist. II. INCIDENT SAFETY OFFICER A. The Incident Commander shall utilize all available resources which would upgrade the level of safety for firefighters operating at an incident. Any company/sector officer may be assigned to assume the role of safety officer. In addition, administrative officers, training officers or prevention officers could be expected to perform this function. B. Command should designate a safety officer at all multiple alarm fires, hazardous material incidents, technical rescue incidents, or when firefighters are faced with large or complex operations. The safety officer is essentially an advisor to command and a consultant for company/sector officers. C. The safety officer has a responsibility to represent policies, procedures and safety requirements on the fire ground. Unfortunately, this often requires corrective or regulatory actions which create a "Safety Cop" image. The role of the safety officer is meant to be for the welfare of personnel operating under the stress, excitement and danger of the fire ground. This role must not be compromised by irrational attitudes. D. The safety officer should function consistently as a sector within the fire ground organization. This functional sector assignment designates full authority to move about the fire ground to represent safety concerns. While the safety officer normally functions as an advisor to command, he/she also has the overriding authority to halt any operation or plan when conditions or actions create an IMMEDIATE safety hazard.

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 6 Incident Management System Topic 12 Incident Safety

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

E. In addition, the safety officer shall keep command informed of any and all tactical revisions. III. FIRE GROUND/INCIDENT PERIMETER A. The fire ground incident perimeter is defined by fire department operations as the boundary around the incident that has been determined by safety considerations according to the foreseeable hazards of the particular incident. B. It is one of the continuing responsibilities of command to establish and enforce this safety perimeter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Subject Page III-A 3 of 6 Incident Management System Topic 12 Incident Safety

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IV. SCBA REQUIREMENTS A. Protective breathing apparatus shall be worn by all members at all alarms of fire and/or incidents where toxic or flammable vapors/gases exist; where possible oxygen deficient enclosures exist or when company officers deem SCBA is warranted. By accepted practice, breathing apparatus should be donned prior to leaving the apparatus to participate in any fire suppression activity. B. Conditions on the fire ground change rapidly and sometimes without warning. If these changes take place and the members are not prepared, it may be too late to return to the fire apparatus for SCBA (i.e., firefighters trapped or down during operations needing rapid extraction from the fire building, etc.) V. SEARCH AND RESCUE A. Search and rescue should be performed according to an efficient, well planned procedure, which has included the safety of search crew personnel. The object of the search effort is to locate possible victims, not create additional ones by neglecting the safety of the search crew. B. Before entering the search area, all search team members should be familiar with a specific search plan including the overall objective, the limits of the search area, individual assignments, etc. This may require a brief conference among crew members before entering the search area to develop and communicate the plan. C. Individual search activities should be conducted by two or more members. D. Company officers must maintain an awareness of the location and function of all members within their crew during search operations. E. A brief took around the floor below the fire may provide a good reference for the search team, as floors in multiple story occupancies usually have a similar layout. F. Whenever a search is conducted that exposes search crews to fire, they should be protected as soon as possible with a charged hose line, in order to insure a safe escape.

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Subject Page III-A 4 of 6 Incident Management System Topic 12 Incident Safety

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

VI. STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE : Structures of other than fire resistive/heavy timber construction are not designed to withstand the effects of fire, and can be expected to fail quickly if there is heavy fire involvement. If after 10-15 minutes of interior operations, arid heavy fire conditions still exist, command should begin a careful evaluation of structural conditions and Should consider withdrawing interior crews and resorting to a defensive position. VII. EVACUATION

A. It is a principal command responsibility to evaluate continually, and to determine if the fire building is tenable for interior operations. B. When a hazard which may affect the safety of fire personnel becomes apparent, the primary concern is for the welfare of those personnel. C. Interior fire fighting operations should be abandoned when the extent of the fire prohibits safe extinguishment if the structure becomes unsafe due to the possible threat of structural collapse, explosion, backfire, etc. D. To protect personnel from the adverse effects of such hazards, a structured method of area evacuation must be used. 1. Upon receipt of the evacuation order, company officers shall assemble their crews and promptly exit to a safe location where the person-in-charge of the company will again account for all crew members. Shortly after the evacuation order, sector officers shall begin the process of accounting for all evacuated crews. When all affected companies and crew members are accounted for, the evacuation process is complete. At this time a more specific determination as to the reality and extent of the hazard can be made and efforts initiated to redeploy or redirect the attack forces. 2. Building evacuation generally involves a shift from offensive to defensive as an operational strategy. In such cases, command must plan and must communicate that plan to all operating elements. This can be a difficult shift to complete as companies are committed to positions in an offensive manner. It is extremely important that everyone understands that a strategic shift has been made.

- 169 -

Subject Page III-A 5 of 6 Incident Management System Topic 12 Incident Safety

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

3. Upon determination on scene that there is imminent danger to operating personnel, i.e., building collapse or BLEVE, the incident commander shall transmit "emergency traffic" to the dispatcher. The dispatcher shall immediately transmit the WARBLE tone (high-low) on all involved working frequencies for approximately five (5) seconds, followed by a verbal notification of "All personnel evacuate XXX (location)". A series of three blasts (each lasting two seconds in duration) on the air horn (by the unit(s) as instructed by the Incident Commander or Incident Safety Officer) shall also be sounded. The incident commander shall then begin a systematic roll call of all companies to ensure that evacuation is complete. 4. All companies operating on scene will immediately report via radio to the command post that they are clear of danger. VIII. RAPID INTERVENTION CREWS:

A. During complex and active operations, it is the intent of this SOG that command should hold crews ready for immediate commitment in a resource area close to the command post. This is dependant on available personnel and not always possible. If in fact an adequate number of trained personnel are not on scene the IC should strongly consider NOT sending personnel into the IDLH. B. These rapid intervention crews should be wearing their protective clothing with SCBA on their backs and ready to react immediately, particularly to those events that involve the safety of firefighters. C. The Rapid Intervention Crews will have a minimum of two combat qualified firefighters. D. If possible more than the initial two combat qualified firefighters should be assigned to the rapid intervention crews as human resources allow.

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Subject Page III-A 6 of 6 Incident Management System Topic 12 Incident Safety

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

IX. REHABILITATION A. Command should maintain a sensible concern about the welfare of firefighting personnel during long operations. There must be a CONSTANT AWARENESS that personnel involved in rescue and fire control operations are generally fatigued having reached their adrenaline "high" well before property conservation efforts begin. Disregarding their fatigue can result in sloppy work and needless injuries. Fresh companies should be rotated in order to relieve tired fire control personnel if extensive overhaul and/or fire control efforts dictate. B. Ideally, the Rehabilitation Sector should contain an FEMS unit, and rehab unit (i.e., Gatorade, ice water, sandwiches, etc.). Firefighting companies should be cycled through this sector for medical evaluation, fluids, food and rest. Companies should be assigned intact and stay together in Rehabilitation until they are ready to be reassigned to new tactical sectors or released from the scene. The Incident Commander shall request a rehab unit to respond on all structure fires with flames showing, working fire, or any other incident where human resources may be deployed for greater than one hour. The Incident Commander should call for rehab resources as early as possible to ensure a timely response. C. In order to prevent undue or needless injuries, command should consider the "Recall" process at large complex incidents in which a significant portion of the onduty firefighters are being utilized. The "Re-call" process also provides for fresh manpower in the event of another serious incident. D. In case of emergency or conflagration, personnel off-duty and on leave may be recalled to duty by the Battalion Chief or higher ranking officer. The "Re-call" system shall be utilized as follows: 1. First "Re-call" is of the personnel scheduled to report to duty next. 2. Second "Re-call" is of personnel who last worked a tour.

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Subject Page III-A 1 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 13 Tactical Priorities

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. TACTICAL FUNCTIONS A. Tactical priorities identify the three (3) separate, major tactical functions that must be completed in order to stabilize a fire incident. Listed in priority order, they are: 1. LIFE SAFETY 2. INCIDENT STABILIZATION 3. PROPERTY CONSERVATION B. This list gives the incident commander a set of functions (what to do) priorities (when to do them), and bench marks (how to tell when each function is completed). C. TACTICAL WORKSHEETS: Tactical worksheets facilitate assumption of command. These worksheets shall be carried by all Operations Command Officers. At working incidents, Command will use a tactical worksheet to outline and record assignments to assist in transfer of Command, identification of functions and priorities, reaching of benchmarks. The Standardized I-200 forms should be used for this purpose. II. COMPANY OBJECTIVES A. The typical objectives of an attack engine company are to conduct a search for and rescue endangered occupants, locate, confine and extinguish the fire. B. The typical objectives of a back-up engine or ladder company are to gain entry (forcible or non-forcible), to accomplish ventilation (natural or forced), to search for and rescue endangered occupants, to secure utilities (gas, electric and water), conduct overhaul and property conservation and apply elevated master streams. C. Arriving engine companies will automatically perform these functions as required unless otherwise ordered by command. Companies will advise command of action they are taking. D. Persons-In-Charge of the Apparatus will determine, based upon conditions, the priority of the functions listed for their company unless otherwise ordered by command.

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Subject Page III-A 2 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 13 Tactical Priorities

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

E. This does not limit a company to only it's listed functions. Every company will be expected to perform all basic functions within the limits of their capability and it will be the on-going responsibility of command to integrate tasks and functions as required with the on-scene units. F. The assignment of these basic operations to engine companies represents a standard fire ground plan for tactical operations designed to improve the effectiveness of all units working together. This plan should in no way limit the initiative of any officer and should enhance the decision making process of all officers by establishing a standard operational framework. III. RESCUE A. It is standard operating procedure to extend a primary search in all involved and exposed occupancies that can be entered. The incident commander must structure initial fire ground operations around the completion of the primary search, Primary search means that companies have gone through all affected areas and have verified the removal or the safety of all occupants. B. Rescue efforts should be extended in the following order: 1. 2. 3. 4. The most severely threatened. The largest number (groups). The remainder of the fire area and The exposed areas.

C. During rescue operations, firefighters are attempting to locate and remove threatened occupants. It is possible that all property may be written off to accomplish this objective. This approach is life-safety oriented in a compressed and sometimes desperate time frame. Firefighters may have to fight fire to complete the primary search, but they must realize the incident is in the rescue mode until a "primary search completed" report is transmitted. D. As previously stated, each one of the tactical priorities has a bench mark of completion. The benchmark for rescue completion is "primary search completed".

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Subject Page III-A 3 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 13 Tactical Priorities

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

E. With the announcement of "primary search complete" the incident commander is only reporting the completion of primary search. The incident commander is not issuing a guarantee that everyone is out. Primary search operations are often done under hot, smoky, dark, rushed and sometimes desperate conditions. Although the primary search system is not perfect, it offers the best chance of getting the victims out of a dangerous situation. The possibilities of overlooking victims always exist; unfortunately, victims sometimes hide from the firefighters when they hide from the fire. F. As soon as the situation has been stabilized, a secondary search shall be completed. The secondary search shall consist of a systematic room-by-room search. Whenever possible, a secondary search should be conducted by using firefighters not involved with the primary search. Emphasis must be placed on completeness and accuracy. When the search has been completed, notification shall consist of "secondary search completed". IV. FIRE CONTROL A. A critical command decision (both initial and on-going) relates to the offensive/defensive mode of the situation: 1. Offensive strategy: Interior attack and related support directed toward quickly bringing the fire under control. 2. Defensive strategy: Exterior attack directed to first protecting exposures, stopping the forward progress of the fire, and then bringing the fire under control. B. Initial attack efforts must be directed toward supporting primary search. The first attack must go between the victims and the fire to protect avenues of escape. An attack from the interior, uninvolved side usually places the inside forces in a position to accomplish this objective. C. The standard radio reporting term, "Fire Under Control" is used to report the completion of fire control. Command is responsible for transmitting this report to fire control. "Fire Under Control" means that the forward progress of the fire has been stopped, and the remaining fire can be extinguished with the on-scene resources; it does not mean the fire is completely out.

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Subject Page III-A 4 of 4 Incident Management System Topic 13 Tactical Priorities

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

D. The standard radio reporting term, "Fire Extinguished" is used to report the complete extinguishment of all fire. Command is responsible for transmitting this report to dispatch. V. PROPERTY CONSERVATION A. It is standard procedure to commit whatever fire ground resources are required to keep property loss to an absolute minimum. B. When basic fire control has been achieved the command must commit and direct companies into "Stop Loss" activities. C. In cases where there is an overlapping need for both fire control and salvage to be performed simultaneously and where initial alarm companies are involved in firefighting and salvage remains undone, command should strike additional alarms and commit greater alarm companies to salvage functions. D. Effective property conservation activities require the same earlier command functions and aggressive actions as the rescue and fire control priorities. These actions produce a more positive public reaction than any other fire ground activity. E. Four objectives should be considered during property conservation operations. These are: 1. Stopping additional loss 2. Verifying that the fire is completely extinguished 3. Preserving fire scene evidence in order to determine the fire cause and point of origin, and 4. Returning the occupancy to use, when possible. F. Command should maintain a sensible concern about the welfare of any personnel during long overhaul operations; ignoring fatigue may result in sloppy and careless operations which could result in needless injuries. G. The standard radio term, "Loss Stopped", is used to report that the objectives of property conservation have been met. Command is responsible for transmitting this report to Dispatch.

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Subject III-A Incident Command System

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 14 Disaster Call In Plan

I. In cases of disaster, additional staff may be needed. The following flow sheet will be used to contact staff (through Putnam County Emergency Management City Watch system):

EVENT or DISASTER Disaster or preplan for weather

Battalion Chief's called in

ES2 or ES3 assigns a B/C to handle further staff activation

All Officers called in

A Lieutenant will be stationed at B/C's office to make field assignments

The B/C delegates call in and O/T logging to a scheduling Captain. All employees are to call in for field assignments. The call in number will be provided when City watch makes notification.

Call in last off going shift

Call in all non PRN'S who are off

A-Shift

B-Shift

C-Shift

Each employee is responsible for calling the scheduling Captain when they are demobilized for logging of O/T.

- 176 -

Subject Page Issued III-B 1 of 1 11-01-2010 Hazardous Materials Operations Plan Topic 1 Hazardous Materials Operation Plan

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

I. Hazardous materials are described as a material in a quantity or form which pose a potential risk of serious injury or harm to persons and/or the environment when released from its container. These materials may take many shapes or forms and their threat to personnel and property will vary greatly from chemical to chemical. Methods of personal protection and containment/control of these materials will range from simple to moderate to complex. Control of some of these spilled materials is within the scope of capabilities of the fire department engine or ladder company. However, numerous chemicals present severe hazards to firefighters when released and easily overwhelm the standard firefighting full protective clothing. It is these chemicals that we must be alert for, whenever they may present themselves. II. Involvement with, or potential release of, any of the following hazard classes will determine the confirmation of a hazardous materials incident: A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. Explosive Flammable - non gases Flammable - combustible liquids Flammable solids Oxidizers/organic peroxides Poisons - liquids, gases Radioactive Corrosives Miscellaneous cyrogenic / etiological / biologicaI

III. Any Potential HAZMAT incident will have a Zone Officer and Battalion Chief dispatched. In cases where the call is in the Central Zone the next closest Zone Officer will be dispatched. The first arriving officer will size up the incident, and will be responsible for requesting the closest available Hazardous Materials Team for response. This Battalion Chief will assure the Emergency Operations Center and Administrative Chiefs are notified. IV. If a HAZMAT team is called in for mutual aid, the Battalion Commander will serve as the Liaison Officer for Putnam County until the hazard is mitigated and mutual aid is completed.

- 177 -

Subject III-C First Responder Protocols

Page 1 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Training Requirements

I. PURPOSE: To ensure the basic knowledge of all participating volunteer members who respond in a first response unit to any incident. II. POLICY AND PROCEDURES In order to be an eligible crew member to respond to incidents, the following courses and/or certifications must be obtained and maintained. A. All Department Personnel, Regardless of Function (Board member, BOCC member, any employee): 1. ICS 100: Introduction to Incident Command System 2. ICS 700: NIMS: An Introduction 3. Equivalent courses must be approved by the Battalion Chief in charge of Training in writing before the course is allowed to count for this requirement B. Any Person Responding to Any Incident 1. CPR - Either AHA BLS CPR for Healthcare Providers or ASHI BLS Healthcare Provider, or equivalent. This equivalent CPR course must be approved by the Battalion Chief in charge of Training in writing before the course is allowed to count for this requirement. 2. Personnel that may be listed as a Person-In-Charge or responds as a single resource: ICS-200: Basic Incident Management System 3. Personnel that are a department officer or station officer: ICS-300: Intermediate Incident Command System 4. Successful completion of the DOT Curriculum based First Responder Course 40 hours (or an equivalent pre-hospital emergency care course meeting or exceeding the first responder 40 hour curriculum.) This equivalent course must be approved by the Battalion Chief in charge of Training in writing before the course is allowed to count for this requirement. 5. Emergency vehicle operator's course as specified by PCFEMS. 6. Should have a HBV immunization, a baseline TB test or declination forms on file with the department. 7. Forcible Entry knowledge is recommended 8. Basic Fire Extinguishers use course as specified by PCFEMS

- 178 -

Subject III-C First Responder Protocols

Page 2 of 2

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Training Requirements

C. Any IDLH (Imminent Danger to Life and Health) situation (Structure Fire, Vehicle Fire, Oxygen Deficient Atmospheres): 1. SCBA training through Putnam County Fire and EMS 2. State of Florida Fire Fighter 1 or higher certification. 3. Medically Approved by a Physician according to NFPA 1582 Standard 4. Have a Current Putnam County Approved combat capable Fire Fighter helmet sticker in place D. Brush or Wildland Fire: 1. S130 forestry course 2. S190 forestry course 3. Equivalency courses must be approved by the Battalion Chief in charge of Training in writing before the course is allowed to count for this requirement

- 179 -

Subject III-C First Responder Protocols

Page 1 of 1

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Medical Protocols

III. MEDICAL PROTOCOLS: A. Putnam County Fire and EMS uses the Florida Regional Common EMS Protocols. Within these protocols contain First Responder and BLS protocols. B. Members responding to medical emergencies are to adhere to the guidelines set forth within those Protocols. C. First Responders are encouraged to review any addendum material. This material can be found on the G Drive under EMS Policy and Procedures in the fire Current Protocols. D. Members that have more advanced training (Physicians, Off-Duty Paramedics) shall, for the purposes of this guideline, operate at the level of a BLS first responder, unless given expressed written permission by the Medical Director of Putnam County Fire and EMS to operate at a higher level of training. 1. If the Medical Director permits a first responder with more advanced training to operate at that level, the Medical Director will specify at what modes the first responder will be allowed to operate in the permission letter. 2. Equipment will be furnished to the member by Putnam County Fire and EMS when such permission is given. 3. If an FEMS unit arrives the first responder may function at their higher level of training under their scope of practice, at the discretion of the person-incharge of the apparatus.

- 180 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 1 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Fire Fighter Bill of Rights

FIREFIGHTER'S BILL OF RIGHTS, 1986 112.80 Short Title - This part may be cited as the "firefighter's Bill of Rights". 112.81 Definitions - As used in this part: 1. "Firefighter" means any person who is certified in compliance with s.633.35 and who is employed solely within the fire department or public safety department of an employing agency as a full-time firefighter whose primary responsibility is the prevention and extinguishment of fires, the protection of life and property, and the enforcement of municipal, county, and state fire prevention codes and laws pertaining to the prevention and control of fires. 2. "Employing agency" means any municipality or the state or any political subdivisions thereof, including authorities and special districts, which employs firefighters. 3. "Informal inquiry" means a meeting by supervisory or management personnel with a firefighter about whom an allegation of misconduct has come to the attention of such supervisory or management personnel, the purpose of which meeting is to mediate a complaint or discuss the facts to determine whether a formal investigation should be commenced. 4. "Formal investigation" means the process of investigation ordered by supervisory personnel, after the supervisory personnel has previously determined that the firefighter shall be reprimanded, suspended, or removed, during which the questioning of a firefighter is conducted for the purpose of gathering evidence of misconduct. 5. "Administrative proceeding" means any non-judicial hearing which may resulting the recommendation, approval, or order of disciplinary action against, or suspension or discharge of, a firefighter. 6. "Interrogation" means the questioning of a firefighter by an employing agency in connection with a formal investigation or an administrative proceeding but shall not include arbitration or civil service proceedings. Questioning pursuant to an informal inquiry shall not be deemed to be an interrogation.

- 181 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 2 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Fire Fighter Bill of Rights

112.82 Rights of Firefighters - Whenever a firefighter is subjected to an interrogation, such interrogation shall be conducted pursuant to the terms of this section. 1. The interrogation shall take place at the facility where the investigating officer is assigned, or at the facility which has jurisdiction over the place where the incident under investigation allegedly occurred, as designated by the investigating officer. 2. No firefighter shall be subjected to interrogation without first receiving written notice of sufficient detail of the investigation in order to reasonably appraise the firefighter of the nature of the investigation. The firefighter shall be informed beforehand of the names of all complainants. 3. All interrogations shall be conducted at a reasonable time of day, preferably when the firefighter is on duty, unless the importance of the interrogation or investigation is of such a nature that immediate action is required. 4. The firefighter under investigation shall be informed of the name, rank, and unit or command of the officer in charge of the investigation, the interrogators, and all persons present during any interrogation. 5. Interrogation sessions shall be of reasonable duration and the firefighter shall be permitted reasonable periods for rest and personal necessities. 6. The firefighter being interrogated shall not be subjected to offensive language or offered any incentive as inducement to answer any questions. 7. A complete record of any interrogation shall be made, and if a transcript if such interrogation is made, the firefighter under investigation shall be entitled to a copy without charge. Such record may be electronically recorded. 8. An employee or officer of an employing agency may represent the agency, and an employee organization may represent any member of a bargaining unit desiring such representation in any proceeding to which this part applies. If collective bargaining unit during investigations or interrogations, such representative shall be allowed to be present.

- 182 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 3 of 3

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 1 Fire Fighter Bill of Rights

9. No firefighter shall be discharged, discipline, demoted, denied promotion or seniority, transferred, reassigned, or otherwise disciplined or discriminated against in regard to his or her employment, or be threatened with any such treatment as retaliation for or by reason solely of his or her exercise of any of the rights granted or protected by this part. 112.83 Rights of firefighters with respect to civil suits. 1. Except as otherwise provided in subsection (2), every firefighter shall have the right to bring suit against any individual, group of persons, association, organization or corporation for damages, either monetary or otherwise, suffered during the performance of the firefighter's official duties or for abridgment of the firefighter's rights, civil or otherwise, arising out of the performance of his or her official duties. 2. Any statement taken by an employing agency in violation of SS. 112.80 112.82 shall not be used as substantive evidence against the employee whose rights have been violated, but may be used for purposes of impeachment. The provisions of this subsection shall be the sole and exclusive remedy for a violation of SS 112.80 - 112.82. 112.84 Rights of firefighters non exclusive - The rights of firefighters as set forth in this part shall not be construed to diminish the rights and privileges of firefighters that are guaranteed to all citizens by the Constitution and laws of the United States and the State of Florida or limit the granting of broader right by other law, ordinance or rule. Section 2. This act shall take effect October 1, 1986.

- 183 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 1 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Internal Affairs Investigations

I. Definitions:

A. Interview: means the formal questioning of an employee by an employing agency

representative in connection with a formal investigation or an administrative proceeding but shall not include arbitration or civil service proceedings.

B. Administrative proceeding: means any non judicial hearing which may result in

the recommendation, approval of an order for; disciplinary action, suspension or discharge of an employee.

C. Employee: for the purposes of this policy means ALL "Paramedics" and "

Emergency Medical Technician" and "Firefighters" employed either full or part time by Putnam County Department of Emergency Services and/or Emergency Medical Services.

II. Rights of Employees: Whenever an employee is subjected to an interview, such

interview shall be conducted pursuant to the terms of this section.

A. The interview shall take place at the facility where the investigating officer is

assigned, or at the facility which has jurisdiction over the place where the incident under investigation allegedly occurred, as designated by the investigating officer.

B. No employee shall be subjected to interview without first receiving written notice

of sufficient detail of the investigation in order to reasonably apprise the employee of the nature of the investigation. The employee shall be informed beforehand of the names of all complainants.

C. All interviews shall be conducted at a reasonable time of day, preferably when the

employee is on duty, unless the importance of the interview or investigation is of such a nature that immediate action is required.

D. The employee under investigation shall be informed of the name, rank, and unit or

command of the officer in charge of the investigation, the interviewers, and all persons present during any interview.

E. Interview sessions shall be of reasonable duration and the employee shall be

permitted reasonable periods for rest and personal necessities. - 184 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 2 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Internal Affairs Investigations

F. The employee being interviewed shall not be subjected to offensive language or

offered any incentive as an inducement to answer any questions.

G. A complete record of any interview shall be made, and if a transcript of such

interview is made, the employee under investigation shall be entitled to a copy without charge. Such record may be electronically recorded.

H. An employee or officer of an employing agency may represent the agency, and an

employee organization may represent any member of a bargaining unit desiring such representation in any proceeding to which this part applies. If a collective bargaining agreement provides for the presence of a representative of the collective bargaining unit during investigations or interview, such representative shall be allowed to be present.

I.

No employee shall be discharged, disciplined, demoted, denied promotion or seniority, transferred, reassigned, or otherwise disciplined or discriminated against in regard to his or her employment, or be threatened with any such treatment as retaliation for or by reason solely of his or her exercise of any of the rights granted or protected by this part.

III. Investigation Procedure.

A. ALL complaints are considered formal if they may result in disciplinary action,

suspension or discharge of an employee. All complaints shall be taken from the reporting party by an Officer or Internal Affairs Officer. When initiated Department Complainant and Report Forms should be used.

B. Internal affairs investigations shall be assigned by any Chief of PCFEMS, or

by any Battalion Chief of PCFEMS, or by any Captain of PCFEMS.

C. ANY/ALL results, reports, notes, pictures (digital or other media), electronic

audio or video recordings shall be the property of PCFEMS and retained if practical or if such investigation(s) resulted in disciplinary action against an employee.

D. ANY/ALL investigation results will be reported to the Chief(s) of PCFEMS, and

the Battalion Chief(s) of the involved employee(s). Investigation results will also be reported to the accused employee(s).

- 185 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 3 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Internal Affairs Investigations

E. Formal investigations shall require, whenever possible, the employee(s)

identification as a focus of such action.

F. The employee(s) shall be notified within 48 working hours of the time the

investigation is started. Understanding there may be a delay in which time the complaint is taken to the start of action by the investigating officer(s).

G. At no time is the 48 hour requirement applicable in cases or instances of possible

criminal acts. Criminal acts are violations of the laws of the state of Florida, or any state law, or any federal law.

1. At such time a complaint or investigation is identified as being a possible

criminal act all internal investigation(s) shall cease and the authority having jurisdiction in the matter will be contacted and involved.

2. Every attempt shall be made to interview all persons involved, or believed to

be involved.

H. Personnel interviewed by management regarding a concern, complaint,

suggestion, or conflict are expected to fully cooperate and offer information in a truthful manner. Failure to cooperate or be truthful may result in disciplinary action, suspension or discharge.

1. Investigations within PCFEMS are to be recognized as a process that affords

protection to the BOCC and it's management, PCFEMS and it's management, and all employees equally.

2. Investigations within PCFEMS are to be recognized as a process that ensures

the public trust.

3. Action(s) deemed as willfully untruthful, or misleading, or attempts to

obstruct or undermine the investigation process will handled with non progressive discipline. The result shall be discharge of employment for the first offence

- 186 -

Subject III-D Personnel Investigations

Page 4 of 4

Issued 11-01-2010

Revised NEW Authorization: Chief

Topic 2 Internal Affairs Investigations

I.

All attempts will be made to resolve problems within 30 days, in a quick and fair manner. There may be occasions in which this time frame cannot be met and is extended; in such cases the employee(s) will be notified. retribution or retaliation.

J. Personnel offering complaints, conflicts and problems in good faith will not face

- 187 -

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