Read Microsoft Word - 01-KTR-Testbank final.doc text version

Chapter 1 Multiple Choice: Factual 1. "Who gets what, when, and how" refers to a. politics. b. power. c. authority. d. a shorthand definition of the main concepts of the U.S. Constitution. e. authoritarianism. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 2. A classic definition of politics claims that it is about a. who gets what, when, and how. b. who controls the means of force. c. authority, power, and force. d. understanding the institutions of government. e. who the incumbents are at a particular time. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 3. Power is defined as a. the ability to get other people to do what you want. b. the use of force to obtain desired goals. c. the essential quality of leadership. d. the use of military, paramilitary, or police forces to control people. e. a type of totalitarianism. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 4. A system or organization for exercising authority over a body of people describes a. government. b. power. c. force. d. federalism. e. political partisanship. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 5. Power that is recognized as legitimate is known as a. authority.

b. force. c. majority rule. d. oligarchy. e. the divine right of kings. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 6. How do rules fit into the concept of "who gets what, and how?" a. Rules can be thought of as the how. b. Rules can be thought of as the who. c. Rules can be thought of as the what. d. Rules are not relevant. e. Rules define the "getting." correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 7. What are the organizations where government power is exercised and where political struggle takes place? a. Institutions b. Democracies c. Socialist countries d. Capitalist economies e. Monarchies correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 8. In capitalist economies, what controls economic decisions? a. The market b. The government c. Central planning d. The people's vote e. God's free hand, or "In God We Trust" correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 9. An economic system in which the market determines production, distribution, and price decisions, and where property is privately owned describes a. a capitalist economy. b. an ideal democracy. c. a republic. d. the system of government the framers sought to create at the Constitutional Convention.

e. economic Darwinism. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: What Is Politics? 10. In socialist economies, what controls economic decisions? a. The government b. The market c. Supply and demand forces d. Society by its purchasing power e. The people's vote correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 11. Which of the following economic systems is a hybrid combining a capitalist economy and a government that supports equality? a. Social democracy b. Market-based democracy c. Free-market democracy d. Democratic communism e. Socialism correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 14. A political system that gives ultimate power to the state rather than to the people is known as a. authoritarian government. b. a republic. c. a social monarchy. d. a theocracy. e. an Athenian-like democracy. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 12. The Soviet Union under Stalin is an example of a _______ government. a. totalitarian b. social democratic c. libertarian d. fascist e. theocratic correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship

13. Which of the following is an example of a country that still supports socialism? a. Iran b. The United States c. Russia d. Germany e. South Africa correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 15. What form of government existed in Nazi Germany and Italy under Mussolini? a. Fascism b. Monarchy c. Constitutional monarchy d. Democracy e. Popular sovereignty correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 16. A system based on "government by the few" refers to a. an oligarchy. b. a monarchy. c. anarchy. d. a democracy. e. a republic. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 17. The absence of government and laws is a characteristic of a. anarchy. b. elite democracy. c. authoritarianism. d. totalitarianism. e. theocracy. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 18. Democracy comes from the Greek word demos, which means a. people. b. government. c. economics. d. leader.

e. demands placed on government must be answered. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 19. Popular sovereignty is the basic principle of a. democracy. b. theocracy. c. oligarchy. d. monarchy. e. elite democracy. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 20. Elite democracy can be defined as the theory of democracy that limits a. the role of citizens to choosing among competing leaders. b. the right of citizens to vote for leaders. c. fundamental rights of free expression. d. the right of citizens to fully exercise their economic rights. e. the role of leaders to leading citizens. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 21. According to the theory of ________, a citizen's membership in groups is the key to political power. a. pluralist democracy b. social democracy c. participatory democracy d. elite democracy e. oligarchy correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 22. Individuals who are obliged to submit to a government authority against which they have no rights are a. subjects. b. citizens. c. Democrats. d. Republicans. e. elite Democrats. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship

23. The principle used to legitimate the authority of monarchs is a. the divine right of kings. b. social democracy. c. Athenian democratic principles. d. the French Revolution. e. constitutionalism. correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 24. A philosophical movement during the 1600s and1700s that emphasized human reason, scientific examination, and industrial progress was a. the Enlightenment. b. scientific democracy. c. reform democracy. d. Athenian democracy. e. religious fundamentalism. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: Origins of Democracy in America 25. _______ introduced the notion of a social contract. a. John Locke b. Karl Marx c. Benjamin Franklin d. Plato e. James Madison correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 26. The doctrine that society is based on an agreement between government and the governed in which people agree to give up some rights in exchange for the protection of others is called a. social contract theory. b. social democracy theory. c. pluralistic democracy. d. elite democracy. e. the state of nature. correct answer: a (VOCAB) Location: Origins of Democracy in America 27. Faith in the ability of democratic man to put the community's interests ahead of his own refers to

a. republican virtue. b. Platonic democracy. c. theocracy. d. the expansion of popular rights. e. the divine right of kings. correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America 28. The two competing views of citizenship that exist today in the United States see humans acting out of a. self-interest versus public spirit. b. public interest versus public involvement. c. self-protection versus public protection. d. public protection versus private rights. e. anarchy versus the state of nature. correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America 29. According to the text, why do some observers claim there is a crisis in American citizenship? a. Civic virtue is taking second place to self-interest as a guiding principle of citizenship. b. Too many upper-class people are participating in politics. c. Too few upper-class people are participating in politics. d. Republican virtue moves our nation too closely toward socialism. e. Madison's positive view of human nature has lost to the negative view of human nature professed by those who believe in American republican virtue. correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America 30. The two major themes of the text are a. power and citizenship. b. rights and liberties. c. government and its people. d. freedom and equality. e. democracy and the republic. correct answer: a Location: How to Use the Themes and Features in this Book Multiple Choice: Conceptual 1. In the definition of politics, government rules can be thought of as the "______" and institutions can be thought of as the "_______."

a. how; where b. what; how c. how; what d. where; how e. what; where Answer a (CONCEPTUAL) Location: A-Head: "What Is Politics?" 2. Concerning politics and economics, which of the following is an accurate statement? a. Politics is concerned with the distribution of power and resources, while economics is concerned with the production and distribution of society's wealth. b. Politics is concerned with the production and distribution of society's wealth, while economics is concerned with the distribution of power and resources. c. Politics and economics are not related. d. Politics and economics both deal with the distribution of society's wealth and the distribution of power and resources. e. Politics and economics are basically the same thing. correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 3. What defines different types of economic systems? a. The degree of government ownership of the means by which material resources are produced and the amount of government control over economic decision making b. How much the government regulates individuals' lives c. The extent to which the economy drives society d. How much government regulates individuals' finances e. The type of currency a country uses correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 4. Which of the following reflects the type of capitalism found in the United States? a. Regulated capitalism, in which business has substantial freedom from government interference, but the government does step in and regulate the economy to guarantee individual rights b. Pure laissez-faire capitalism, in which the government has no economic role at all c. Social democracy, which provides an enormous role in assuring substantive guarantees of fair outcomes for all citizens d. Pure capitalism, in which all means used to produce material resources are privately owned e. Socialism, in which economic decisions are made by the government correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics?

5. A socialist economy is most likely to a. encourage state control and ownership. b. encourage individual initiative and experimentation. c. promote class exploitation. d. ignore long-range planning. e. exist in North America rather than any other continent. correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 6. The key difference between pure capitalist economies and pure socialist economies is that a. the market controls economic decisions in capitalist economies, whereas politicians make economic decisions in socialist economies. b. politicians make economic decisions in capitalist economies, whereas the market controls economic decisions in socialist economies. c. capitalist economies are seldom democracies, whereas socialist economies frequently are democracies. d. the government plays a regulatory role only in socialist economies. e. people decide economic policies by voting in capitalist systems, but the people do not vote for economic policies in socialist systems. Answer a (Conceptual) Location: A-Head: What Is Politics? 7. Many European countries follow the theory of _________, in which economic equality promoted by socialism can be obtained peaceably and without revolution. a. social democracy b. Marxism c. social capitalism d. Jeffersonian democracy e. Italian fascism correct answer: a Location: What Is Politics? 8. What differentiates political systems? a. Political systems differ by the extent of government control over individuals' lives and the amount of control over the social order. b. Political systems differ solely by how much the government regulates the economy. c. Political systems differ by the extent to which the economy controls society. d. Except for monarchies, political systems differ on how much God or other divinities have a direct line of power in government. e. Political systems differ by the type of policies its citizens or subjects prefer.

correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 9. A political system that is most likely to be based on obligations rather than rights or privileges is a. an authoritarian government. b. a participatory democracy. c. a social democracy. d. an elite democracy. e. an obligocracy. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 10. What are the main differences between authoritarian governments and democratic governments? a. How limited government is and how much power people have b. The general level of wealth and prosperity of their publics c. How often their citizens vote in elections and call for referenda d. The size of the executive branch and the role of the judiciary e. The powers and privileges of the legislature correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen Answer: a (Conceptual) Location: A-Head: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 11. According to the elite theory of democracy, low American voter turnout would be best illustrated by which of the following statements? a. Decisions are made by leaders, so voter participation in elections doesn't matter. b. Voting laws make it difficult for ordinary people to vote. c. Elections are meaningless if you are not a supporter of the majority party. d. Politics is no longer an important activity for most Americans because they have grown too rich to care. e. Citizens control so much of society outside of electoral politics, they do not need to exercise this limited power. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 12. The pluralist theory of democracy would suggest that low voter turnout in the United States is best explained by a. the fact that citizen views are adequately represented through interest group membership. b. many Americans' belief that in such a large nation an individual's vote does not matter.

c. the complexity of voter registration laws. d. the presence of only two political parties. e. the fact that decisions are made by leaders, so voter participation in elections doesn't matter. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 13. __________ democracy is supported by those who propose that there should be more direct democracy and citizen participation. a. Pluralist b. Participatory c. Elite d. Pure e. Anarchic Answer: B (Conceptual) Location: A-Head: "Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship" 14. Which of the following statements about elite democracy, pluralist democracy, and participatory democracy is true? a. The ability and power of the individual citizen to control government increases from elite, to pluralist, to participatory democracy. b. The importance of elections decreases from elite, to pluralist, to participatory democracy. c. The ability and power of the individual citizen to control government increases from pluralist, to participatory, to elite democracy. d. Theology becomes more important from elite, to pluralist, to participatory democracy. e. The ability and power of the individual citizen to control government increases from participatory, to elite, to pluralist democracy. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 15. In which category of government would you place the United States and why? a. Advanced industrial democracy, because it provides personal freedoms within a freemarket economy. b. Authoritarian capitalism, because it provides personal freedoms within a free-market economy. c. Authoritarian capitalism, because government allows a market economy but highly regulates individual behavior. d. Advanced industrial democracy, because government allows a market economy but highly regulates individual behavior. e. Communist democracy, because the levels of freedom in the United States mean it was the first example of this type of government.

correct answer: a Location: Figure 1.3 16. What is the key difference between a citizen and a subject? a. Citizens have rights as well as obligations, but subjects have only obligations. b. Citizens have no obligations, and subjects have only rights. c. Citizens have rights and obligations, whereas subjects have only rights. d. With fewer rights to be protected, subjects have more power than do citizens. e. Both can exist within an authoritarian system, whereas only citizens exist within democratic systems. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 17. A major difference between democratic and authoritarian systems is that a. authoritarian systems see people as subjects, whereas democratic systems see people as citizens. b. authoritarian systems see people as citizens, whereas democratic systems see people as subjects. c. democratic systems don't emphasize rights as much as authoritarian systems do. d. democratic systems have an equal distribution of wealth, whereas authoritarian systems do not. e. authoritarian systems believe in preserving nature, but democratic systems do not. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 18. What is meant by the claim that democratic citizens possess both rights and responsibilities? a. The government may not infringe on certain rights, but citizens must follow laws and perform citizen duties or democratic safeguards disappear. b. The government may not infringe on certain rights, so all citizens have the right and responsibility to disengage from citizen duties if they wish. c. Citizens may feel a responsibility to the government's needs and forgo all rights. d. Government can safeguard only those rights for which citizens feel they are responsible. e. Subjects become citizens only when they forgo particular rights and all responsibilities. correct answer: a Location: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizen 19. Which of the following was a major characteristic of Athenian democracy? a. Participation was limited to citizens, with most people excluded as noncitizens. b. All people were allowed to participate. c. The political system included women in the decision-making process. d. It maximized the involvement of all people in the political process.

e. Slavery did not exist, which was similar to the early years in the United States. correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 20. Athenian democracy is much like early American democracy in that a. participation was restricted to a small number of white men. b. there was a sudden expansion of citizenship and participation as slavery ended. c. freedom of religion played a central role. d. freedom of speech for all persons was fundamental. e. no slavery existed. correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 21. American democracy differs from Athenian democracy primarily because a. the United States is a republic, whereas Athens had a more participatory democracy for its few citizens. b. unlike in the United States, Athens's constitution made it a social democracy. c. unlike in Athens, Americans do not believe in the Socratic method. d. only three-fifths of Athenian slaves could vote. e. everyone has always had voting rights in the United States, which was not the case in Athens. correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 22. What was the effect of the Protestant Reformation on European politics? a. The Catholic Church lost religious and political clout, paving the way for new political ideas about the source of legitimacy for governments. b. The Catholic Pope was no longer the King of France, Spain, and Italy. c. It led to the divine right of kings being accepted as the source of legitimacy. d. It proved that democracy could function in the United States. e. It led King George to reject the United States as a colony. correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 23. John Locke and Thomas Hobbes were known for a. discrediting the divine right of kings. b. defending the divine right of kings. c. rejecting the Enlightenment. d. presenting a doctrine of political salvation. e. pushing for a return to Athenian democracy. correct answer: a

Location: Origins of Democracy in America 24. Locke's notion of the social contract changed how European people viewed the source of government legitimacy, because people now recognized that a. a government's legitimacy could be determined by the people instead of by the divine right of kings. b. a monarch's social contract with God legitimized that monarch's rule. c. illegitimate governments like the ones they were subject to in the Middle Ages should reign supreme. d. people could pray directly to God and receive salvation by faith alone. e. the only legitimate government was a social democracy. Answer a (conceptual) Location: A-Head: "Origins of Democracy in America" 25. According to the social contract, what is the source of government's legitimacy? a. Citizen consent b. Government's authority over its subjects c. The divine right of kings d. The government's control of all property e. The Catholic Church correct answer: a Location: Origins of Democracy in America 26. One of the reasons that the founders did not give too much political influence to ordinary citizens was a. the founders had relatively low expectations of the ordinary citizen. b. citizens had too much responsibility in other areas of everyday life. c. the poor communication and transportation systems required only limited participation in the affairs of government. d. the founders knew people would gather more power as time went on due to the Fourteenth Amendment. e. the founders knew that the king's granting of too much influence to ordinary citizens had led to revolution. correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America 27. James Madison rejected notions of "pure democracy" in favor of what he called a a. republic. b. social democracy. c. Platonic democracy. d. republic. e. direct democracy.

correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America 28. James Madison thought that average citizens a. were not likely to put the community's interests above their individual interests. b. should be relegated as subjects under a monarchy. c. should participate in policymaking as much as possible. d. had performed responsibly under the Articles of Confederation and should be given more power. e. had a great "republican virtue." Answer a (Conceptual) Location: A-Head: "Citizenship in America" 29. What form of government did James Madison promote for the United States and why? a. A republic, because it was more feasible and because it would provide protection against the passions of the public b. A direct democracy, because he felt that people lacked enough power when America was just a British colony c. A direct democracy, because he felt that with only thirteen states and voting solely allowed for property owners, direct democracy was feasible in the United States d. A social democracy, because it rejected viewing property as an inalienable right e. A communist democracy, because most eighteenth-century intellectuals admired Karl Marx's vision of government. correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America 30. What are the competing views of citizenship that exist today in the United States? a. One view holds that individual participation in government should be limited because human nature is overly self-interested, while the other view places faith in the citizen's ability to act virtuously. b. One view holds that individual participation should be high in economics, while the other view holds that individual participation should be low in government. c. One view places faith in the citizen's ability to act virtuously, while the other suggests that citizens should live in a more direct democracy. d. One view holds that individual participation in government should be unlimited because human nature is virtuous, while the other view places faith only in a citizen's role in the economy. e. The competing roles differ on whether people should be viewed as citizens or whether they should be viewed as subjects. correct answer: a Location: Citizenship in America

Fill-in-the-Blank and Short-Answer Questions 1. A ____________ is a particular view of how we ought to organize and live our collective lives. It helps us arrange our collective lives so that we can live in an orderly society. ANSWER: social order LOCATION: What Is Politics? 2. ___________ can be thought of as the "how" in the definition "who gets what, and how." They are directives that determine how resources are allocated, and they determine how we try to get the things we want. ANSWER: Rules LOCATION: What Is Politics? 3. In a ___________ economy like that of the former Soviet Union, economic decisions are made not by individuals through the market but rather by politicians, based on their judgment of what society needs. ANSWER: socialist LOCATION: What Is Politics? 4. Define the term social democracy. Why is this referred to in Chapter 1 as a "hybrid" system? ANSWER: Students should define social democracy as a hybrid system combining a capitalist economy and a government that supports equality. It is a hybrid because, though capitalist, it still promotes the values of equality in socialism, and it has more government control over the economy than other capitalist systems but less than socialist systems. LOCATION: What Is Politics? 5. Define and discuss the significance of the term popular sovereignty. ANSWER: Students should first define the term. For example, "popular sovereignty refers to the concept in which the citizens are the ultimate source of political power." They should then link the concept to democracy, which is based on the principle of popular sovereignty. No democratic government would be considered legitimate unless the citizens consent to it. LOCATION: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 6. Theorists have differed over what type of democracy would best balance the interests of a country, while assuring both majority rule and minority rights. Those democratic theorists advocating ____________ democracy hold that citizens should actively and directly control all aspects of their lives.

ANSWER: participatory LOCATION: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 7. In authoritarian systems, the people are ________ of their government. They possess no rights that protect them from their government. ANSWER: subjects LOCATION: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 8. Discuss the parallels between the Ancient Greek experience and the system of government the founders devised. ANSWER: Students should highlight the fact that Athens was also a participatory democracy--one that was not a republic like the United States--but was a form of government by the people, albeit a very small percentage who were citizens. Also, participation was restricted to white men, similar to early American politics. LOCATION: Origins of Democracy in America 9. In the Middle Ages, some monarchs claimed to take their authority from God, in a principle called ________________________________. ANSWER: the divine right of kings LOCATION: Origins of Democracy in America 10. What is a republic and what, according to Madison, was its benefit over a "pure democracy," where all citizens would have direct power to control government? ANSWER: Students should note that the republican form of government is a representative democracy. In particular, Madison argued that it was feasible in a large state and that it would be safer, because public passions would be checked by the system. LOCATION: Origins of Democracy in America Essay Questions 1. Politics in America takes place in multiple places, from Washington, D.C., to a family's decision about where to go on vacation. Explain how government fits in to society. What is the relationship between government and politics? ANSWER: Students should be able to define both politics (who gets what, when, and how) and government (a system or organization for exercising authority over a body of people). Successful students will argue that a government provides the rules and institutions that determine how a society decides who gets what. Moreover, the government is given legitimate authority to decide who gets what. LOCATION: What Is Politics?

2. What are the key differences between authoritarian systems and nonauthoritarian political systems? What are the different forms of government within each of these systems? Finally, discuss the main distinction concerning the role of people in each type of government? ANSWER: Students should begin by explaining that power is ultimately held by the government in authoritarian systems, while power over one's life rests with the individual in nonauthoritarian systems. They should be able to list the forms of authoritarian systems--monarchy, theocracy, fascist government, and oligarchy--and highlight at least one key element of each. They also should be able to do the same for nonauthoritarian forms of anarchy and democracy but further differentiate theorists' ideals about how democracy operates: elite, pluralist, and participatory democracy. Finally, the key to the answer involves distinguishing between a subject in an authoritarian system, who is obliged to submit to a government authority, and a citizen in a nonauthoritarian system, who has both rights and responsibilities in a democracy. LOCATION: Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship 3. Explain how Athenian democracy, the Enlightenment, and Locke's notion of the social contract served as origins of American democracy. What did the founders learn about participatory democracy from democracy in Athens 500­300 B.C.? How did the Protestant Reformation and the Enlightenment change how people viewed government legitimacy that led to the discrediting of the divine right of kings? Finally, with whom does the social contract place the source of government legitimacy? Together, how did these eras as a whole ultimately affect the type of government chosen by the founders? ANSWER: Students should identify and define each of the main eras that are mentioned but also weave them together into a larger explanation about each of them--and how together they led the founders to choose a democracy whose legitimacy stems from its citizens. Students should especially discuss how Athenian democracy provided a participatory democracy, though the criteria for citizenship were strict. They also should point out that the questioning of the social order that began with the Protestant Reformation and that drove the Enlightenment led people to challenge more than just science and the Catholic Church. It also brought new questions as to the source of legitimacy. If people began to question the social order, they could also (and did) easily question whether the socially accepted explanation for a monarch's authority was legitimate. It wasn't, according to the social contract. The people decided whether government was legitimate; and if it did not live up to its end of the social contract, protecting particular rights of citizens, then it was not legitimate and could be overthrown. LOCATION: Origins of Democracy in America 4. Discuss the competing views of citizenship in the United States. Make sure to discuss how Madison's view of human nature differs greatly from those who argue that citizens have a strong republican virtue. What does each argument say the role of citizens in American politics should be?

ANSWER: Students should note that Madison had a negative view of human nature and argued that a republic would be the best form of government because decisions are made by elected officials rather than by citizens themselves. "Pure democracy," according to Madison, was dangerous because it could mean a majority could take away rights, liberties, and property from citizens. The opposing republican virtue position claims that citizens can and do put the public good before individual interest. Consequently the citizen had a much smaller role in Madison's eyes, compared with the positive role that those espousing republican virtue have for the citizen's ability to beneficially affect politics. LOCATION: Origins of Democracy in America

Information

Microsoft Word - 01-KTR-Testbank final.doc

19 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

453345

You might also be interested in

BETA
Microsoft Word - 01-KTR-Testbank final.doc
Microsoft Word - 13-KTR-Testbank final.doc