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6th Characteristics of Living Things- 2008

General Information

Grade Level/Course: 13603 Time Frame: 4 - 8 Weeks Description: Cells make up every living organism Every living organism needs food, water, living space and stable internal conditions Some living organisms are made up of one cell, while others are made up of many cells There are many more unicellular organisms on the Earth than multicelluar ones Living organisms have common life processes necessary for survival Without the sun, plants couldnt grow Plants and animals must have food to survive Plants and animals have common processes or functions, but have different structures that carry out those functions

Stage I: Desired Results

Standards:

Enduring Understandings: Cells make up every living organism Every living organism needs food, water, living space and stable internal conditions Some living organisms are made up of one cell, while others are made up of many cells There are many more unicellular organisms on the Earth than multicelluar ones Living organisms have common life processes necessary for survival Without the sun, plants couldnt grow Pants and animals must have food to survive Plants and animals have common processes or functions, but have different structures that carry out those functions

Essential Questions: What does it mean to be alive? What is necessary for life?

Essential Vocabulary: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. organism cell unicellular multicellular stimulus response development homeostasis classification genus species virus bacteria potists fungi tissue vascular / nonvascular plants

Resultant Knowledge and Skills: Students will know that: The sun provides the energy for all life on Earth The cell is the basic unit of life -There are unicellular (one-celled) and multicellular (many-celled) organisms Living organisms have different structures and functions Students will be able to: Measure Communicate Make models Design experiments Observe Record and interpret data Make inferences Predict Calculate Classify Use scientific equipment

Stage II: Assessment Evidence

Performance Task(s): Imagine that you are a plant specialist who has been contacted by a group of botany students. They require a seminar, a talk, on how plants and animals are similar and how they are different. It is up to you to map out two charts, one that compares plants and animals and another that contrasts plants and animals. How thorough can you be?

Other Evidence: Constructed Response: Tests, Quizzes, Observation, Homework, Student Journals, etc.: Lesson Sequence: 1. Begin the lesson by having the students set up their science notebooks with a new section. The first page should include the unit title and essential questions. The second and third pages should be the table of contents. The students should then participate in an activity called, Is It Living or Nonliving? At the end of the lesson, students should create a T table. They should list everything that they already know about living things on the left side. 2. Begin the lesson with a warm up - What does it mean to observe something? Describe what you mean. You can even draw it. At this point, have each student obtain a petri dish, a paper towel, and a white bean (seed). Students should make observations of the seed and then should wet the paper towel. Students should place the bean inside the folded paper towel and then inside the petri dish (this should be closed). Label the dish with the students name and place in a dark place for about 5-7 days. At the end of the lesson, students should using a magazine or computer/printer to select and cut out a picture of something that is a living thing. Once it is glued into his/her notebook, the student should explain how he/she knows it is alive. 3. Watch the video preview for Book A, Ch. 1 and discuss. Read p. 6-7 in Book A, Ch. 1 with the students. Then pass out photo copies of plant and animal cells to the students. Have the students draw, illustrate and label the pictures in their notebook. Then they need to describe the words and draw a sketch of: cell, unicellular, and multicellular. At the end of the lesson, assign: With a family member, observe a living thing, such as a family pet, a houseplant, or a bird outside your window. Record your observations as you study the organism. Prepare a chart that shows how the organism meets the four needs of living things discussed in this section. 4. Begin the lesson with a warm up - What is a characteristic of something? Describe what you mean. You can even draw what you mean? Read p. 8-9 in Book A, Ch. 1 with the students. Have the students create a graphic organizer from the concepts in pp. 6-9 (The Characteristics of Living Things). Model on the board. At the end of the lesson, remind students to continue to observe their living thing. 5. Begin the lesson with having the students share, in small groups, their pictures of their living thing from lesson 2. Then have them complete this warm up: Describe the one picture that you remember most form your small group and what the group member describe about that living thing. At this point, put the students into several small groups. Give each group a hot plate, a beaker, a handfull of straw. Students will set up a hay infusion demonstration. Students will need the Hay Infusion handout. (This is a good resource to reference: http://www.pocketscope.com/Support/slides/hayInfusion.php) At the end of the lesson, remind students to prepare their chart for their living thing to bring to class. 6. Begin the lesson with the activity called React!. Students will look at the differences between reactant and stimulus. Read p. 10-11 in Book A, Ch. 1 with the students. Look at the Active Art on Redi's and Pasteur's experiments (web code: cep-1011). At the end of the lesson, assign, Explain how we know that spontaneous generation does not take place. 7. Begin the lesson by reading p. 12-14 in Book A, Ch. 1 with the students. Have the students create a graphic organizer for The Needs of Living Things. Watch video clip from United Streaming on "What is a Living Thing?" At the end of the lesson, assign the Review and Reinforce worksheet for Ch. 1, section 1. 8. Begin the lesson by reviewing the Review and Reinforce worksheet for Ch. 1, section 1. Then check the petri dishes that were stored away previously in lesson 2. Have students make observations on what happened to their seed. Allow them to dissect the seed if they desire. Have students create questions on post-it notes about their observations. Share the questions with the class and classify them. At the end of the lesson, assign, the section assessment questions on p. 14 #1-3 part a. Students may answer b and c for bonus. A notebook quiz will be given during the next lesson. 9. Begin the lesson by having all students get out their notebooks and writing utensils. Students will take the notebook quiz. At the end of the quiz, assign an article on science current events. Students should read the article and then should write a short response to the article. 10. Begin the lesson by discussing the categories of different kinds of movies. Have students work in small groups to complete the Discover Activity called, "Which Organism Goes Where?" Read p. 26-29 in Book A, Ch.1. As we read, have the students create a characteristics chart like the one on p. 26. Discuss the difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. At the end of the lesson, assign the section assessment questions on p.29 #2 a-c & #3 a-c. **May need a lesson here that deals with the differences between viruses, bacteria and protists. 11. Begin the lesson with a warm up, "What are the main differences between a plant and animal cell? Are plants and animals made up of just one cell or many? Describe." Put the students into small groups or pairs. Distribute photos of different types of single-celled organisms to each group. Students should respond to the following question: What do these unicellular organisms have in common? How are they different from one another? Show the video on How to Use a Microscope from United Streaming (stop before the electron microscope images). At the end of the lesson, assign the Parts of the Microscope and Steps for Using a Microscope worksheets. Students may use pp. 202 & 203 in their textbook for review. 12. Begin the lesson by reviewing the microscope parts and steps to working it. Review safety guidelines. Demonstrate how to set up a slide with a coverslip. Have the students create slides using the hay infusion solution from lesson 5. At the end of the lesson, assign: Students need to write a paragraph describing what they saw during the lab work today and what they would do differently tomorrow in order to get better results. 13. Begin the lesson with a warm up, "Have you ever looked at pond or lake water close up? If so, what did you see? If not, what would you expect to see?" Allow the students to create slides again using the hay infusion solution and/or the pond/lake water. At the end of the lesson, assign: create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the hay infusion solution organisms to the pond/lake water organisms. 14. Begin the lesson by asking the students what autotrophs are. In what structures of the plant cell is food made? Read p. 104-105 in Book A, Ch. 4 with the students. Using web code (cep-1041), look at Plant Cell Structures with Active Art. Have the students create a graphic organizer on What is a Plant? Read p. 106-107 in Book A, Ch. 4 with the students. At the end of the lesson, assign: 1. p. 106 Math Analyzing Data, 2. Create a graphic organizer for Adaptations for Living on Land. 15. Begin the lesson by showing the video field trip from the Discovery School Video DVD. Discuss after viewing. In small groups, students should complete the following questions from the section assessment on p. 111: #1 a-c, #2 a,b. At the end of the lesson, assign the Review and Reinforce worksheet for Ch. 4, Section 1. Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:

Stage III: Learning Experiences:

Resources: Prentice Hall Science Explorer: From Bacteria to Plants http://www.phschool.com/ http://www.4teachers.org/ Howard Hughes Medical Institute Classifying Critters BBC Science - Plant Life Cycles Seed Germination Gizmo Photosynthesis Gizmo

Comments for Teachers: GLEs Strand 3.1.A.a. Describe the common life processes necessary to the survival of organisms (i.e., growth, reproduction, life span, response to stimuli, energy use, exchange of gases, use of water, elimination of waste) Strand 3.1.A.b. Recognize that most plants and animals require food and oxygen (needed to release the energy from that food)

Strand 3.1.C.a. Recognize all organisms are composed of cells, the fundamental units of life, which carry on all life processes Strand 3.1.D.a. Identify and contrast the structures of plants and animals that serve similar functions (e.g., taking in water and oxygen, support, response to stimuli, obtaining energy, circulation, digestion, excretion, reproduction) Strand 3.1.E.a. Recognize most of the organisms on Earth are unicellular (e.g., bacteria, protists) and other organisms, including humans, are multicellular Strand 3.1.E.b. Identify examples of unicellular (e.g., bacteria, some protists, fungi) and multicellular organisms (e.g., some fungi, plants, animals) Strand 3. 2.B.a Describe how plants use energy from the sun to produce food and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis

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