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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

PROSPECTUS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 2009

(Note: The final interpretation of all regulations in this Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies shall be vested in Council).

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

NOTE The Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies is valid for 2009 only. Curricula and syllabi may be amended for 2010. It is obtainable free of charge from: The Registrar Polytechnic of Namibia Private Bag 13388 Windhoek NAMIBIA Location: Telephone: Fax: Website: E-mail: 13 Storch Street, Windhoek (+264-61) 207 2008 / 2118 (+264-61) 207 2113 www.polytechnic.edu.na [email protected]

Although the information contained in this Prospectus has been compiled as accurately as possible, Council and Senate accept no responsibility for any errors and omissions, which may occur. The Polytechnic retains the right to amend regulations or conditions without prior notice. Due to the rapidly changing external environment that many programmes operate in, and the Polytechnic's desire to remain constantly relevant in its offerings, some programmes may be significantly amended after publication of this Prospectus. Please consult our website for the latest versions of our curricula, syllabi and academic regulations. The fact that particulars of a specific programme, field of study, subject, or course have been included in this Prospectus does not necessarily mean that such a programme, field of study, subject, or course will be offered in the academic year 2009. © Polytechnic of Namibia/Office of the Registrar.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

RECTOR'S FOREWORD

Foreword

Economic affluence - a function of economic value and money - is the focal point of individual and national progress. Wealth is often and solely expressed as the quantity of tangibles (the material things). But the tangibles cannot be meaningful without the intangibles (such as knowledge). Thus in this academic year, we shall have a continuous dialogue on the important topic: Wealth Creation in the New Economy. In the book "Where is the Wealth of Nations? Measuring Capital for the 21st Century", the authors postulate that the estimates of total wealth ­ including produced, natural, and human and institutional capital ­ suggest that human capital and the value of institutions ­ the intangibles, constitute the largest share of wealth in virtually all countries. Thus education is not just as an aesthetic, but the seed of intellectual stimulation, socio-economic development, competitiveness and peace. The year 2008 saw rapid fluctuations of commodity prices and an emerging global recession as the financial markets oscillated and a lot of money simply `dried up', thanks in great part to their poor regulation and oversight, and greed. Surely, those who will emerge as leaders in the new order are those with the competitive advantage ­ those better resourced with knowledge systems. Thus higher education must serve as the platform for intellectual discourse in the modern economy, address the progressive needs of society and provide the labour market with the ever-changing high-level competencies and expertise necessary for growth and prosperity. For us in academe the lesson is clear: we must be strong in every respect, for growth with poor institutions does not last: the phenomenon of rich institutions with poor human resources does not make sense; conversely, the phenomenon of rich students in poor or poorly managed academic institutions does not make sense either! Namibia is well endowed with natural resources, and we simply seem content with this fact without the right innovations and long-term investments to create more wealth. In addition, many opportunities are lost to non-nationals who are better prepared or advantaged, and this complicates the timely and effective development and empowerment of our people. As a result, our people remain relatively poor and we should be concerned! Unless we innovate to increase our fortunes, we shall deplete the natural resources and be left with useless systems. After all, the most critical resources left behind should be our well-developed human capital, institutions and systems. This year, the Polytechnic will enroll more than 10 000 students and will offer more than 100 qualifications, including several at post-graduate level. We shall strengthen our institution by means of new systems, such as the German-Namibian Centre for Logistics (GNCL), the Namibia Business Innovation Centre (NBIC) and the Graduate School of Business. In short, we are creating more apt enablers for wealth creation. The new economy will be managed by knowledge workers - those who are well educated and well skilled. Consequently, our desire is to see our nation under the leadership of visionaries and futurists ­ those who have foresight and imagination and can conceptualize the new world and construct models of success. I should think that university graduates will ensure that growth is a continuum that ensures the survival and prosperity of future generations. Let us join the learning community with the singular goal to excel. I welcome you all warmly to our campus. Sincerely, Dr. Tjama Tjivikua Founding Rector

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Historical Perspective HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

Higher education in Namibia started around 1979/80. Prior to this, all students wishing to pursue higher education had to go to South Africa or other countries abroad. The Polytechnic of Namibia has its roots in the establishment of the Academy for Tertiary Education by Act No. 13 of 1980. Classes in Teacher Training and Secretarial Courses started on 14 January 1980. Five years later, another Act, number 9 of 1985 was promulgated and the Academy consisting of a university component (the present University of Namibia), a Technikon, and College for Out-of School Training was established. The Technikon offered a total of 17 diploma and certificate courses in Agriculture and Nature Conservation, Personnel Management, Public Administration, Cost Accounting, Secretarial Training, and Communicative and Legal Training. The College for Out-of-School Training (COST) offered 13 certificate courses in Technical and Commerce/General areas. Some of the courses included pre-tertiary teacher training. Shortly after independence in 1990 it was resolved that the three components be collapsed into two independent higher education institutions, namely, a university and a polytechnic. Act No. 18 of 1992 that established the University of Namibia was promulgated and this left the Technikon and COST in some limbo, but they were placed under the auspices of the new university until the promulgation of the Polytechnic Act. Two years later, with the establishment of the Polytechnic of Namibia by Act No. 33 of 1994, Technikon Namibia and the College for Out-of School Training (COST) merged to become the Polytechnic of Namibia. The Act provides for the gradual phasing out of vocational training courses and the granting of degrees by the Polytechnic. The former City Campus (former Academy) became the Polytechnic and its first Rector, Dr. Tjama Tjivikua, was appointed on 4 August 1995, and the first meeting of Council was held on 10 August 1995. This event accelerated and completed the delinkage of the two institutions of higher education in December 1995. The Polytechnic thus became an independent and autonomous institution in January 1996. It held its first graduation ceremony at which the President of the Republic of Namibia, Dr. Sam Nujoma, delivered the keynote address on 18 April 1996. The Polytechnic's governing structure includes the Council, its supreme policy-making body, the Senate, which is responsible for the academic component of the institution, the Rector, its chief academic and administrative officer, and a Students Representative Council. Today, the Polytechnic offers 27 Certificates, 22 Diplomas, 35 Bachelor degrees, 6 Bachelor Honours degrees and 4 Masters degrees in thirty-one programmes ranging from Engineering and Information Technology to Natural Resource Management, Business Management and Journalism.

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Mission and Vision

MISSION AND VISION VISION The Polytechnic is Namibia's internationally recognised university of applied science and technology. MISSION The Polytechnic contributes to sustainable national development through excellence in technologically-oriented career education and training, applied research and service.

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CONTENTS

Contents

Page ii iii iv v vi ix x xi xii xiv xviii xix 1 5 5 5 7 7 9 11 11 12 14 15 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 25 25 29 30 31 31 32 32 33 39 39 43 44 51 58 59 60 66 67 72 72

Note Rector's Foreword Historical Perspective Mission and Vision Contents Contact Details Officers of the Polytechnic Members of Council Members of Senate Academic Calendar 2009 Academic Year 2009: Dates for Semester and Year Courses 2009 and 2010 Meetings 2009 GENERAL INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS Qualifications General Information Application for Admission Admission Criteria Registration as a Student General Regulations Issuing of Documents Academic Regulations Curriculum Regulations Recognition of Prior Learning Class Attendance Assessment Re-registration for a Qualification Maximum Study Period Promotion Regulations: Continuous and Diversified Assessment Appeal by a Candidate Graduation Application and Interpretation of the Rules FEES Enquiries and Payments Stipulations Regarding Students Fees Fees Payable Payment of Fees Rebates and/or Discounts Interest on Overdue Accounts Refunds Non-Formal Courses Financial Assistance SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT Staff Department of Accounting & Finance Bachelor of Technology: Accounting & Finance Department of Business Management Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Marketing Master of International Business Department of Human Resources Management Bachelor of Human Resources Management Department of Office Management & Technology Bachelor of Office Management & Technology Department of Economics Bachelor of Technology: Economics

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Department of Public Management Bachelor of Technology: Public Management SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION Staff Department of Communication Bachelor of Arts in English Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in English Bachelor of Arts in Communication Department of Legal Studies National Diploma: Police Science Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) Bachelor (Honours) in Criminal Justice Department of Media Technology Bachelor of Journalism & Communication Technology Bachelor (Honours) in Journalism and Communication Technology SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Staff Engineering Admission Requirements Bachelor of Technology: Engineering: Civil: Urban or Water Bachelor of Technology: Civil Engineering: Urban Bachelor of Technology: Civil Engineering: Water Bachelor of Engineering: Civil Bachelor of Engineering: Mining Bachelor of Technology: Electronic/Power Engineering Bachelor of Technology: Electronic Engineering Bachelor of Technology: Power Engineering Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics and Telecommunication Bachelor of Engineering: Electrical Power National Diploma: Engineering: Mechanical Bachelor of Technology Degree in Mechanical Engineering Department of Mathematics and Statistics Bachelor of Science: Applied Mathematics and Statistics Bachelor of Science (Honours): Applied Mathematics Bachelor of Science (Honours): Applied Statistics Department of Technical and Vocational Education and Training Department of Health Sciences Bachelor of Bio-Medical Sciences Bachelor of Environmental Health Science SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Staff National Diploma: Information Technology Bachelor of Information Technology: Business Computing Bachelor of Information Technology: Systems Administation Bachelor of Information Technology: Software Development Bachelor of Technology Master of Information Technology SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND TOURISM Staff Department of Agriculture National Diploma in Aquaculture Bachelor of Agricultural Management Department of Nature Conservation National Certificate: Nature Conservation (Techniques) Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management Namibian Environmental Education Certificate

Contents

75 75 79 82 85 86 87 89 89 90 94 95 95 103 104 108 114 117 117 118 121 125 125 128 136 139 142 145 150 150 151 151 152 156 156 158 161 164 165 168 171 173 177 178 181 181 183 190 191 192 193 194

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Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management Bachelor of Hospitality Management National Technical Certificate: Food and Beverage Operations National Technical Certificate: Rooms Division Operations Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management National Diploma: Hotel Management (Old Curriculum) National Diploma: Tourism Management (Old Curriculum) Department of Land Management National Diploma in Land Valuation and Estate Management National Diploma in Land Management and Registration National Diploma in Land Use Planning National Diploma in Land Surveying Bachelor of Technology: Land Management Bachelor of Geo-Information Technology Master of Integrated Land Management

Contents

196 196 198 200 203 208 209 211 212 213 215 216 218 219 223 224 224 237 240 241 243 244 247 251 254 258 259 260 261 261 263 266 268 270 272 280 287 287

CENTRE FOR OPEN AND LIFELONG LEARNING Staff Distance Education Information Bachelor of Technology: Public Management National Diploma: Police Science Bachelor of Technology: Accounting and Finance Department of Business Management and Department of Human Resources Mngt. National Diploma: Business Administration National Diploma: Marketing National Diploma: Human Resources Management National Diploma: Office Management and Technology Bachelor of Hospitality Management Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management Certificate: Namibian Environmental Education (NEEC) LIBRARY SERVICES COMPUTER SERVICES OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS General Information and Services Offered Students Regulations Students Disciplinary Regulations General Hostel Regulations AWARDS Rector's Medal Merit Awards

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CONTACT DETAILS

Contact Details

Central Administration and Lecturers' Offices Postal Address: Private Bag 13388, Windhoek, NAMIBIA Street Address: 13 Storch Street, Windhoek, NAMIBIA Student post to: Private Bag 13388, Windhoek, NAMIBIA Website: www.polytechnic.edu.na Email: [email protected] CENTRE FOR OPEN AND LIFELONG LEARNING Postal Address: Private Bag 13388, Windhoek, NAMIBIA Street Address: 13 Storch Street, Windhoek, NAMIBIA Tel: 207 2081/2206 Fax: 207 2208 Website: www.polytechnic.edu.na/coll E-mail: [email protected] TELEPHONE NUMBERS Office of the Rector: Rector Vice-Rector: Administration & Finance Vice-Rector: Academic Affairs & Research Office of the Registrar: Registrar Deputy Registrar Examinations Office Student Enquiries, Registrations, and Records Office of the Bursar: Bursar Office of the DOS: Dean of Students Students Councillor Cultural Department Sports Department Students Representative Council Computer Services: Manager Library Library, enquiries and loan counter Hostels: Men: Shangri-La Superintendent House Committee Call Office Ladies: Mon Resa Superintendent House Committee Call Office Ladies: Höpker Superintendent House Committee NB: The international code in all numbers is +264-61 207 2000/1-3 207 2004/5 207 2280/1 207 2008/2118 207 2379/2053 207 2067/2412 207 2056 207 2007 207 2165 207 2270 207 2070 207 9111 207 2457 207 2275 207 2022 207 2132 207 2375 229413/233130 207 2131 207 2127 229405/234193/ 233100 207 2131 207 2130

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OFFICERS OF THE POLYTECHNIC

Officers

RECTOR Tjama Tjivikua, B.A. Cum Laude (Lincoln), M.S. (Lowell), Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) VICE-RECTOR: ACADEMIC AFFAIRS AND RESEARCH Vacant VICE-RECTOR: ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE Gert Günzel, B.A., S.E.D., Cert (Senior Management Programme) (Stellenbosch), B.A. (Hons) Cum Laude (Stellenbosch), M.A. (Hons) Cum Laude (UOFS), B.Ed., D.Litt. et Phil. (Unisa) REGISTRAR Corneels Hermanus Jafta, B.Econ, H.E.D. (Western Cape), B.Ed. (UNAM), M.Ed. (Canberra) DEPUTY REGISTRAR Gerard Norman Vries, BA Social Sciences (Cape Town), Dip. African Studies (Cape Town), HDE (Namibia), B.Ed. (Namibia), MS: Educational Leadership & Policy Studies (Iowa State) BURSAR Sadia Brendell, Dip. Admin; B. Admin CHIEF LIBRARIAN Sheila Nomathemba Ndlovu, B.A. (Hons) History (Zimbabwe), Dip. Library & Info (London), MA: Library & Info Studies (London) ASSISTANT REGISTRAR: CENTRE FOR OPEN AND LIFELONG LEARNING Delvaline Möwes, B.Sc. Johannesburg (RAU), HED (PG), B.Ed, M.Ed. (UNAM), Ph.D. (Stellenbosch) DEAN OF STUDENTS Frieda Shimbuli, B.Sc. Cum Laude (Lincoln), M.Sc. (St Joseph's University), Dip. Journalism (Berlin), Cert. Audio-Visual (London) DIRECTOR: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNDRAISING F. Donovan Weimers, B.A., (B.A.Hons.) (UWC), Cert. Applied Linguistics (Bangor), H.E.D. (Post-Graduate) (UNAM) DIRECTOR: COMPUTER SERVICES Laurent Evrard, B.Tech. (Saint-Mandé), M.Sc. (EPITA, Paris)

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MEMBERS OF COUNCIL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Mr. Jacobus Oloff Munjanu - Chairperson Dr. Tjama Tjivikua - Rector Dr. Gert Gunzel - Vice-Rector: Administration and Finance Mr. Veston Malango - Vice-Chairperson Mr. Niilo Taapopi Mr. Jasper Brand Ms. Mabella F. Cupido Mr. Michael Hill Ambassador Tonata Itenge Mr. Markus von Jeney Mr. Rudolph Kamerika Mr. Van Wyk du Plessis - Senate Representative to Council Mr. Corneels Jafta - Secretary to Council Mr. Moses Haimbodi - SRC President

Council

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MEMBERS OF SENATE Dr. Tjama Tjivikua (Rector and Chairperson) Dr. Gert Günzel (Vice-Rector: Administration and Finance) Mr. Corneels Jafta (Registrar) Members of Council Mr. Jacobus Oloff Munjanu (Chairperson of Council) Mr. Veston Malango (Council Member) Deans of Schools Mr. Kofi Boamah (School of Business and Management) Dr. Sarala Krishnamurthy (School of Communication) Dr. Zacchaeus Oyedokun (School of Engineering) Dr. Ella Black (School of Information Technology) Mr. Lameck Mwewa (School of Natural Resources and Tourism) Heads of Department School of Business and Management Mr. Paul Maliti - Accounting and Finance Mr. Joseph Madhimba - Business Management Mr. Cyril Ogbokor - Economics Ms. Lydia Wambui - Human Resources Management Mr. Andrew Niikondo - Public Management Ms. Petsy Weimers - Office Management and Technology Mr. Van Wyk du Plessis - Director: Accounting & Finance School of Communication Ms. Emily Brown - Media Technology Ms. Mariette Hanekom - Legal Studies Ms. Elizabeth Wittmann - Communication

Senate

School of Engineering Mr. Samuel John - Mechanical Mr. Fredson Phiri - Power/Electronics Mr. Collert Moyo - Civil Dr. Immanuel Ajibola - Mathematics & Statistics Mr. Steve van Staden - Technical and Vocational Education & Training Mr. Andre Cronje - Health Sciences Dr. Helmut Mischo - Director: Civil School of Information Technology Mr. Alfred Mwanza - Computer Systems and Networks Dr. Heike Winschiers - Software Engineering Mr. Bill Torbitt - Business Computing Mr. Admire Kachepa - Basic Computer Studies Dr. David Cook - Director: Software Engineering School of Natural Resources and Tourism Mr. Erling Kavita - Hospitality and Tourism Dr. Thomas Christiansen - Land Management Mr. Alex Meroro - Agriculture Dr. Willem Jankowitz - Director: Nature Conservation

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Library Ms. Sheila Ndlovu - Chief Librarian Other Members Mr. Moses Haimbodi - SRC President

Senate

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2008 CORE DATES Date 5 15 19 22 23 25 26 30 Month January January January January January January January January Activity

Calendar

Institution Re-opens Administrative Staff Resume Duty Last Day for Application for Remark: November 2008 Examinations AcademicStaffResumeOfficeDuties Academic Welcome Agenda Closes: Institutional Research and Publications Committee Meeting MIB Contact Session Begins (2007/9 Cohort) Registration Begins: Senior Students and COLL COLL Vacation School Begins (pm): Windhoek ­ Information Administration Registration Ends: Senior Students Submission of Revised Action Plans for 2009 Academic Year COLL Vacation School Ends: Windhoek ­ Information Administration Registration Begins: First Year Students Registration Ends: First Year Students Meeting: Institutional Research and Publications Committee Orientation Begins: New Students Orientation Ends: New Students Lectures Begin Late Registration Begins Agendas Close: All Boards Of Studies OfficialOpeningofAcademicYear Late Registration Ends: All Programmes and COLL MIB (International Trade and Logistics) Contact Sessions Ends (2007/9 Cohort) Polytechnic Management Meeting MIB Contact Sessions Begin (2006/8 Cohort) Meeting: BOS ­ Natural Resources and Tourism Meeting: BOS ­ Communication Meeting: BOS - Engineering Meeting: BOS ­ Business Management Meeting: BOS ­ Information Technology SENEX: April Promotion and Graduation Last Day For Course/Programme Amendments/Applications For Credit/Cancellations With 100% Credit: All Courses & Programmes 33% Of Total Fees Payable: Semester Courses 12% Of Total Fees Payable: Year Courses Submission To COLL Of 1st Tutorial Letter With Assignments For 2009: Second Semester Courses Submission To COLL Of New And Revised Study Material For 2009: Second Semester Courses Submission To COLL Of All Courses To Be Revised/Developed For 2010 MIB (Financial Management) Contact Sessions Begin (2007/9 Cohort) Agenda Closes: Senate MIB Contact Sessions Begin (2008/10 Cohort) MIB Contact Sessions End (2008/10 Cohort) Meeting: Senate 66% of Total Fees Payable: Semester Courses 26% of Total Fees Payable: Year Courses Career Fair Last Day for Application for Retention of Semester Mark (3rd and 4th Opportunity Examinations)

2 6 7 9 11 13 14 20 22 23 24 25 26 27

February February February February February February February February February February February February February February

1 4 8 14 20 25 26 27

March March March March March March March March

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2 4 5 9 14 17 19 20 21 24 25 29 30 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 20 26 27 29 30 1 12 19 20 21 22 26 27 29 3 5 6 April April April April April April April April April April April April April May May May May May May May May May May May May May June June June June June June June June June July July July

Calendar

Awards Ceremony Graduation Ceremony MIB (Entrepreneurial Management) Contact Sessions Begin (2007/9 Cohort) Agenda Closes: Council Last Day for Course Cancellations with 50% Credit: Semester Courses Lectures End: All Schools Mid Semester Break Begins COLL Vacation School Begins COLL Vacation School Ends Mid Semester Break Ends Lectures Begin: All Schools Submission to Examinations of Draft Question Papers: June 2009 Examination Session Meeting: Council MIB (Entreprenuerial Management) Contact Sessions End (2007/9 Cohort) Agendas Close: All Boards of Studies Last Day for Course Cancellation with 0% Credit: Semester Courses LastDayforSubmissionofPrescribedTextbookstotheLibraryandOfficialBooksellerforthe 2nd Semester, 2009 Meeting: BOS ­ Information Technology Meeting: BOS ­ Business Management Meeting: BOS - Communication Meeting: BOS ­ Engineering Meeting: BOS ­ Natural Resources and Tourism Submission to Examinations of Final, Moderated Question Papers and Memoranda: June 2009 Examination Session HIV and AIDS Awareness Campaign Begins HIV and AIDS Awareness Campaign Ends Lectures End: First Semester ­ All Schools Submission to Examinations of Semester Marks: COLL Last Day for Course Cancellations of Any Nature Last Day for Submission of Semester Marks: Semester Courses Information Administration Practical Examinations Begins Agenda Closes: Senate 50% of Total Fees Payable: Year Courses Information Administration Practical Examinations End Examinations Begin: June 2009 Session ­ Semester Courses Meeting: Senate Agenda Closes: Council Examinations End: June 2009 Session ­ Semester Courses MIB Contact Session Begin (2008/10 Cohort) Last Day for Submission of Final CASS Marks and Result Codes Mid-Year Recess Begins Last Day for Submission of Examination Marks: June 2009 Session Polytechnic Management Meeting MIB Contact Sessions End (2007/9 Cohort) 62% of Total Fees Payable: Year Courses Last Day for Course Cancellations With 50% Credit: Year Courses SENEX: June Examination Results (am) Release of June Examination results (pm) Hostels Re-open MIB Contact Sessions End (2008/10 Cohort) Registration Begins COLL Vacation School Begins (pm): Windhoek Information Administration

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10 July

Calendar

12 13 15 24 27 29 31

July July July July July July July

Registration Ends COLL Vacation School Ends: Windhoek - Information Administration Last Day for Deans/HOD's to Submit Fees Analysis to Finance Meeting: Council Submission of Action Plans for 2010 Academic Year Mid Year Recess Ends Lectures Begin: Second Semester ­ All Schools Due Dates for Remarking and Rechecking Last Day for Submission to Finance of Budget Estimates and Motivations Polytechnic Management Meeting Academic Promotion of Students Begins Agenda Closes: Senate Academic Promotion of Students Ends 33% of Total Fees payable; Semester Courses 74% of Total Fees Payable; Year Courses Last Day for Course Amendments/Cancellations with 100% Credit: Semester Courses Agenda Closes: Institutional Research & Publication Committee Cultural Festival Begins Meeting: Senate Cultural Festival Ends Meeting: Institutional Research and Publication Committee Polytechnic Management Meeting Approval of Polytechnic Action Plan for 2010 Academic Year Agenda Closes: Council Lectures End Mid Semester Break Begins COLL Vacation School Begins: Windhoek Agendas Close: All Boards of Studies Last Day for Application for 3rd and 4th Opportunity Examinations Submission to COLL of 1st Tutorial Letter with Assignments for 2010: First Semester and Year Courses Submission to COLL of New and Revised Study Material for 2010 66% of Total Fees Payable: Semester Courses 86% of Total Fees Payable: Year Courses LastDayforSubmissionofPrescribedTextbookstotheLibraryandOfficialBooksellerforthe 1st Semester, 2010 COLL Vacation School Ends: Windhoek Mid Semester Break Ends Lectures Begin SENEX: October Promotion and Graduation Meeting: Council Last Day for all Course Cancellations with 50% Credit: Semester Courses Meeting: BOS ­ Engineering Meeting: BOS ­ Natural Resources and Tourism Meeting: BOS ­ Information Technology Meeting: BOS ­Communication Meeting: BOS ­ Business Management Agenda Closes: Senate MIB Contact Sessions Begin (2008/10 Cohort) Polytechnic Management Meeting MIB Contact Sessions End (2008/10 Cohort) Last Day for 2010 Applications 100% of Total Fees Payable: Semester and Year Courses Last Day for All Cancellations with 0% Credit: Semester 2

5 10 14 19 21

August August August August August

24 25 28

August August August

29 30 31 3 4 7 8 9 10 11 16 20 25 27 30

August August August September September September September September September September September September September September September

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1 3 5 9 12 16 23 26 28 31 2 6 9 16 21 22 24 27 30 1 3 9 11 14 23 4 15 18 22 24 25 29 31 October October October October October October October October October October November November November November November November November November November December December December December December December January January January January January January January January

Calendar

Mature Age Entry Testing Begins Mature Age Entry Testing Ends MIB Contact Sessions Begin (2007/9 Cohort) Submission to Examinations of Draft Question Papers & Memoranda: November 2009 Examination Session Meeting: Senate MIB Contact Sessions End (2007/9 Cohort) Submission to Examinations of Final, Moderated Question Papers & Memoranda: November 2009 Examination Session Last Day for Submission of Semester Marks: COLL Last Day for Course Cancellation of Any Nature Graduation Ceremony Lectures End: Second Semester ­ All Schools Polytechnic Management Meeting Agenda Closes: Council Last Day for Submission of Semester Marks Information Administration Practical Examinations Begin Information Administration Practical Examinations End Examinations Begin: November Session Meeting: Council Selection of New Students for 2010 Begins Selection of New Students for 2010 Ends Examinations End: November 2009 Session Hostels Close Last Day for Submission of Final CASS Marks and Result Codes Polytechnic Management Meeting Submissions of Contributions for Annual Report 2008 Dispatch of Letters of Admission Last Day for Submission to Examinations of all Examination Marks Academic Promotion of Students Begins Academic Promotion of Students Ends SENEX: November 2009 Examination Results (pm) End of Academic Activities Release of November Examination Results Institution Closes: 16:30 AdministrativeStaffResumeOfficeDuties Last Day for Application for Remark: November 2009 Examinations AcademicStaffResumeOfficeDuties Academic Welcome MIB Contact Sessions Begin (2008/10 Cohort) Registration Begins: Senior Students and COLL COLL Vacation School Begins (pm): Windhoek ­ Information Administration Registration Ends: Senior Students COLL Vacation School Ends: Windhoek ­ Information Administration MIB (International Trade and Logistics) Contact Sessions End (2008/10 Cohort)

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ACADEMIC YEAR 2009 Semester Dates Semester 1 Mid-semester break GOOD FRIDAY EASTER MONDAY Mid-year Recess Semester 2 Mid-semester break 02.02.2009 - 22.05.2009 14.04.2009 - 19.04.2009 10.04.2009 13.04.2009 22.06.2009 ­ 12.07.2009 13.07.2009 - 23.10.2009 27.08.2009 - 30.08.2009

Calendar

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS 2009 01 21 10 13 01 04 21 25 26 10 25 26 January March April April May May May May August December December December New Year's Day Independence Day Good Friday Easter Monday Workers' Day Cassinga Day Ascension Day Africa Day Heroes' Day International Human Rights Day Christmas Day Family Day

ACADEMIC YEAR 2010 Semester Dates Semester 1 Mid-semester break GOOD FRIDAY EASTER MONDAY Mid-year Recess Semester 2 Mid-semester break 01.02.2010 - 21.05.2010 06.04.2010 - 09.04.2010 02.04.2010 05.04.2010 21.06.2010 ­ 09.07.2010 12.07.2010 - 22.10.2010 23.08.2010 - 27.08.2010

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MEETINGS 2009 BOARDS OF STUDIES School/Month Natural Resources and Tourism Communication Engineering Business & Management Information Technology Feb 23.02 24.02 25.02 26.02 27.02 May 11.05 07.05 08.05 06.05 05.05

Meetings

September 08.09 10.09 07.09 11.09 09.09

SENATE March 20 (Friday) June 12 (Friday) August 14 (Friday) October 09 (Friday)

SENEX (EXAMINATIONS) June 26 (Friday) SENEX (PROMOTION AND GRADUATION) February 27 (Friday) September 03 (Thursday) December 11 (Friday)

COUNCIL April 24 (Friday) July 10 (Friday) September 04 (Friday) November 06 (Friday)

INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH AND PUBLICATION COMMITTEE February 06 (Friday) August 19 (Wednesday)

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QUALIFICATIONS

Qualifications

The following are the certificates, diplomas and degrees offered by the Polytechnic: Full-Time Duration 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 4 years 4 years 4 years 4 years 4 years 4 years 4 years 2 years 2 years 1 year 1 year 2 years 3 years 3 years 1 year 3 years 3 years 1 year 3 years 1.5 years 2 year 2 year 2 year 2 years 2.5 years 2.5 years 2.5 years 2 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years Code 23BACF 21CBUS 25COMT 24BPMA 23BACF 24BPMA 21DMRK 21DHUR 21DBAD 25DOMT 21BBAD 21BHUR 21BMRK 25BOMT 23BACF 23BECO 24BPMA 22MIIB 23CTAB 23CTAC 25CPOL 70HPOL 70 DPOL 25BACJ 25BHCJ 25BJCT 25BAEN 25BHEN 25BACO 35DCPM 35BPEN 35BELL 35BMEC 35DCPM 35BPEN 35BELL 35BMEC 35HPVT 35DCPM 35BPEN 35BELL 35BMEC

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT National Certificate: Accounting and Finance National Certificate: Business Studies National Certificate: Office Management & Technology National Certificate: Public Management National Diploma: Accounting and Finance National Diploma: Public Management National Diploma: Marketing National Diploma: Human Resources Management National Diploma: Business Administration National Diploma: Office Management & Technology Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Human Resource Management Bachelor of Marketing Bachelor of Office Management & Technology Bachelor of Technology: Accounting and Finance Bachelor of Technology: Economics Bachelor of Technology: Public Management Master of International Business Intermediate Accounting Honours Programme Advanced Accounting Honours Programme SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION National Certificate: Criminal Justice National Higher Certificate: Police Science National Diploma: Police Science Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Criminal Justice Bachelor of Journalism and Com. Technology Bachelor of Arts in English Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in English Bachelor of Arts in Communication SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING National Certificate: Engineering Civil and Project Management National Certificate: Power Engineering National Certificate: Electronic Engineering National Certificate: Mechanical Engineering National Higher Certificate: Engineering: Civil and Project Man National Higher Certificate: Power Engineering National Higher Certificate: Electronic Engineering National Higher Certificate: Mechanical Engineering National Higher Certificate: Vocational Instructor National Diploma: Engineering: Civil and Project Management National Diploma: Power Engineering National Diploma: Electronic Engineering National Diploma: Mechanical Engineering

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

National Diploma: Vocational Instructor Bachelor of Technology: Civil Engineering (Urban) Bachelor of Technology: Civil Engineering (Water) Bachelor of Technology: Electronics Engineering Bachelor of Technology: Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Technology: Power Engineering Bachelor of Engineering: Civil Bachelor of Engineering: Mining Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics & Telecommunications Bachelor of Engineering: Electrical Power Bachelor of Engineering: Mechanical Bachelor of Bio-Medical Sciences Bachelor of Environmental Health Sciences Bachelor of Science: Applied Mathematics & Statistics Bachelor of Science (Hons): Applied Mathematics Bachelor of Science (Hons): Applied Statistics Master of Science: Engineering: Civil: IWRM: Module: Water for People (SADC-Cooperation) SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY National Diploma: Information Technology Bachelor of Information Technology: Business Computing Bachelor of Information Technology: Systems Administration & Networks Bachelor of Information Technology: Software Development Bachelor of Technology: (Business Computing) Bachelor of Technology: (Computer Networking) Bachelor of Technology: (Software Development) Master of Information Technology SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND TOURISM Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management Certificate: Namibian Environmental Education National Technical Certificate: Food and Beverage Operations National Technical Certificate: Rooms Division Operations National Certificate: Food and Beverage Operations National Certificate: Rooms Division Operations National Certificate: Travel and Tourism Operations National Certificate: Land Valuation and Estate Management National Certificate: Land Management and Registration National Certificate: Land Use Planning National Certificate: Land Surveying National Certificate: Nature Conservation (Techniques) National Diploma: Aquaculture National Diploma: Hotel Management National Diploma: Travel and Tourism Management National Diploma: Natural Resource Management (Agriculture) National Diploma: Natural Resource Management (Nature Conservation) National Diploma: Land Use Planning National Diploma: Land Surveying National Diploma: Land Valuation & Estate Management National Diploma: Land Management & Registration

Qualifications 3 years 2 years 2 years 2 years 2 years 2 years 4.5 years 4.5 years 4.5 years 4.5 years 4.5 years 4 years 4 years 3 years 4 years 4 years 6 months 1 year 3 years 3 years 3 years 4 years 4 years 4 years 2 years 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 1 year 2.5 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 35DPVT 35BCUR 35BCWT 35BELL 35BMEC 35BPEN 35BECV 35BEMI 35BEET 35BEEP 35BEME 50BBMS 50BEHS 35BAMS 35BHAM 35BHAS 35MWRM 80NDIT 80BSBC 80BSAN 80BSSD 80BBCO 80BCNW 80BSDM 80MIFT 27CNRM 27NEEC 27CFBO 27CRDO 27CFBO 27CRDO 27CTTO 27CVEM 27CLMR 27CLUP 27CLAS 27CNAT 27DAQU 27DHMN 27DTTM 27DLAN 27DNAT 27DLUP 27DLAS 27DVEM 27DLMR

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Bachelor of Technology: Hospitality Management Bachelor of Technology: Travel and Tourism Management Bachelor of Technology: Land Management Bachelor of Agricultural Management Bachelor of Geo-Information Technology Master of Integrated Land Management

Qualifications 4 years 4 years 1 year 2.5 years 3 years 2 years 27BHMN 27BTTM 27BLMN 27BAGR 27BGIT 27MILM 27CRNM 27NEEC 23BACF 21CBUS 70CPOL 25CPMA 25COMT 70HPOL 23DACF 22DBAD 21DHRM 21DMAR 70DPOL 24DPMA 25DOMT 23BACF 27BNAT 24BPMA 27BHMN 27BTTM

CENTRE FOR OPEN AND LIFELONG LEARNING (Distance Education) Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management Certificate: Namibian Environmental Education National Certificate: Accounting and Finance National Certificate: Business Studies National Certificate: Police Science National Certificate: Public Management National Certificate: Office Management and Technology National Higher Certificate: Police Science National Diploma: Accounting and Finance National Diploma: Business Administration National Diploma: Human Resources Management National Diploma: Marketing National Diploma: Police Science National Diploma: Public Management National Diploma: Office Management & Technology Bachelor of Technology: Accounting and Finance Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation Bachelor of Technology: Public Management Bachelor of Hospitality Management Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management OUTSIDE PROGRAMMES ACCREDITED BY THE POLYTECHNIC Certificate (Sea Fisheries Observer) Certificate (Sea Fisheries Inspector) Certificate (Junior Hospitality Skills) EXTRA-CURRICULAR COURSES Hospitality Skills Courses Resort Operations Courses Computer Training Courses Language Courses CENTRE FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT CATS Short Courses

** QUALIFICATION OR PART THERE-OF OFFERED ON PART-TIME MODE ONLY ACCREDITATION OF THE POLYTECHNIC QUALIFICATIONS The Polytechnic of Namibia is established by a law of the Republic of Namibia to deliver higher education programmes leading to qualifications at all tertiary levels. As such, its qualifications are nationally and internationally recognised.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Qualifications

However, to ensure international comparability and quality of its programmes, the Polytechnic has, since 1999, been evaluated by South African higher education accreditation bodies. Currently the Higher Education Quality Committee (HEQC) of the Southern Africa Council on Higher Education is the body that evaluates and accredits its qualifications. The Master of International Business is accredited by the Foundation for International Business Administration Accreditation.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

GENERAL INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS

Note: On signing the registration form of the Polytechnic, students undertake to acquaint themselves with all relevant regulations, rules, prescriptions, and legal provisions of the Polytechnic. Ignorance of any such provision shall not be advanced as a defense on a charge of misconduct.

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations GENERAL INFORMATION

GI1

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION All prospective full-time, part-time, and distance education students must apply for admission to the Polytechnic of Namibia on the prescribed form. Application forms are available on request from the Office of the Registrar and on the website. All applications have to be accompanied by the relevant fees. The closing date for all applications is the last working day in September preceding the year in which admission is sought. Applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date whether their applications for admission have been successful or not. International students are subjected to a medical examination for admission to the Polytechnic. Mature Age Applicants are required to sit for a series of tests shortly after the closing date for applications. No late applications are accepted for mature age entry.

GI2 GI2.1

ADMISSION CRITERIA General Admission Requirements In addition to the normal admission criteria for enrolment, the Polytechnic of Namibia reserves the right to restrict the number of students being admitted to a particular programme by means of selection. Candidates may generally be admitted to the Polytechnic for instruction and training subject to such specific departmental requirements as determined by Senate for admission to a specific programme on the following conditions: Candidates must have passed at least 5 subjects (not necessarily during the same examination session), including English Language, with an E symbol or better on the NSSC Ordinary level and have obtained a total score of at least 25 points on the Evaluation Scale. Where candidates offer more than five (5) subjects the best five (5), including English Language, will be counted, OR Candidates must have obtained any other school leaving certificate from other examination authorities that can be regarded as equivalent to the prescribed qualifications and obtain a total score of at least 25 points on the Evaluation Scale based on the best five (5) subjects, including English Language. Final Selection for a Programme: Final selection for a programme will take place based on the final examination results of all qualifying candidates for that programme. All qualifying candidates will report on campus on a date as determined by the Registrar and will participate in such specific selection processes as may be determined by the Department concerned. A qualifying candidate is a candidate who has properly submitted an application for studies; who has met the general admission requirements; and who has met the specific admission requirements of a programme.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

The final selection process will generally not be applicable to students who wish to study on the distance education mode, but may be so applied in exceptional cases. Notice of such final selection process for such distance education programmes will be given separately. GI2.2 Mature Age Entry Scheme Applicants who do not meet normal admission requirements, but have at least a Junior Certificate or equivalent qualification, may, in the spirit of lifelong learning and redress of past disadvantage, apply for admission through the mature age entry scheme. Applicants under the Mature Age Entry scheme should: (a) Have reached the age of 23 years on or before 1 January of the academic year for which admission is sought. (b) Normally have completed their full-time school or college education at least three years before the academic year for which admission is sought. (c) Have at least three years work experience. Selection for Mature Age Entry will be by means of appropriate written entrance tests, three years work experience, satisfactory references, and passing of the Polytechnic language proficiency test in English at a level which enables them to commence programmes of study as approved by Senate. GI2.3 General criteria The highest qualification of a candidate will serve as a basis for evaluation for admission. Students who cannot provide substantial proof of admission qualifications, may be allowed to continue with their studies based on outstanding academic performance, subject to the approval of Senate. GI2.4 Admission to the Fourth Year (Bachelor) Level of Integrated Four-year Bachelor Programmes: Admission into the fourth year level of the programme is by way of one of the following paths: i. Current and continuing students may enrol for courses on the fourth year level before having completed all requirements for the award of the National Diploma, provided that all pre-requisites for such courses are met and that the progression rules of a particular programme are satisfied. ii. Applicants from outside the Polytechnic or those who are not current students, must be in possession of a recognised National Diploma, or its equivalent as determined by Senate, provided that Senate may require such applicants to do additional study before allowing them to enrol for the Bachelor level. iii. Students transferring from another university of technology and other recognised institutions during their study period would be dealt with as `continuing' students. Admission with Advanced Standing The Registrar may, upon recommendation of the Dean and Head of Department, grant admission with advanced standing i.e. admit applicants with credits or completed qualifications from other accredited institutions of higher learning to higher study levels within a programme.

GI2.5

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General Information and Regulations

Granting such advanced standing shall not involve an evaluation of the credits on a course-by-course basis as provided for by Rule AC2, but shall rather be considered on the volume of relevant credits presented and the attainment of core competencies (learnings) within the curriculum of the programme. Admission with advanced standing shall be considered under the following conditions: (a) In the case of credits being presented, such credits must make up at least the equivalent of one study period (one semester or one year) of the programme for which such advanced standing is applied for. If such credits do not have the sufficient volume, i.e they do not make up the equivalent of one study period, the applicant should be advised to apply for course-by-course credits under Rule AC2. (b) In the case of credits being presented, such credits must not be older than eight years and must be presented in an official original academic transcript from the institution concerned. Exceptions to the 8-year limitation may only be decided upon by Senate. (c) In the case of completed qualifications being presented, such application must be accompanied by a detailed original academic transcript issued by the certifying institution. (d) The volume of advanced standing granted shall not exceed 50% of the credit requirements for a degree, except in such cases where a National Diploma is considered appropriate for enrolment in the fourth-year level of a degree, in which case such application shall not be considered under this rule, but rather under rule GI2.4. Applicants wishing to be considered for advanced standing must apply on the prescribed form and must pay the prescribed, non-refundable fee. Applications for advanced standing must be made together with the application for admission. GI2.6 Application for Resumption of Studies Students who have gained credits towards completing their qualification, but who have interrupted their studies for a semester or longer, must apply for resumption of studies by completing the prescribed form, before they will be allowed to reregister. The provision that allows students to apply for resumption of studies will last for three years from the last date that the student was registered. Should the student fail to resume studies within this three-year period, s/he must apply for admission to the programme again. REGISTRATION AS A STUDENT Registration commences at the beginning of each semester after selection has been completed and the compilation of the course controlled. General Regulations Students shall, annually prior to the commencement of their studies, enrol as students of the Polytechnic of Namibia by completing the registration form in full, thereby binding themselves to the rules of the Polytechnic of Namibia and undertaking to pay the prescribed fees. In the event of semesterised programmes, students may be required to enrol for every semester. Students are provisionally registered until they submit the original certificates serving as requirements for admission to a particular programme. Such certificates must be submitted on or before 31 May in the year of first registration as a student, unless the Registrar allows extension of time.

GI3

GI3.1

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

Students have to provide the Registrar with a postal and residential address as well as an address for the receipt of accounts. Any change in these addresses must be submitted to the Registrar without delay but not later than 7 days after such a change. Official correspondence/financial statements sent to the address thus provided by the students will be deemed to have been received by them. Senate may annually determine the closing date for enrolment, provided that Senate may consent to late registration on payment of a late registration fee. No student shall be admitted as a candidate for more than one degree, diploma, or certificate at the same time without the special permission of Senate. Council may, after consultation with Senate, restrict the number of persons who may be permitted to register for a particular programme, in which event Senate may, from amongst the persons qualified to register for such a programme, select those who will be permitted to register. Note: Documents to be submitted on first registration On first registration the original of the qualification serving as admission qualification must be submitted together with an original identity document or birth certificate and official proof of a change of name, where applicable, plus such other documents as specified for a specific programme. GI3.2 Registration for non-credit purposes (NCP) A student who does not wish to register for a degree, diploma, or certificate, but is only interested in (a) particular course(s) may register for non-credit purposes (NCP) if he/she meets the relevant admission requirements for such course(s). Courses, half-courses, modules, or papers followed for NCP are subject to the same financial conditions and other administrative stipulations as those applicable to students following these for degree, diploma or certificate purposes. Courses, half-courses, modules or papers in which a student has passed for NCP will not necessarily be recognised as credits for a future degree or diploma. The granting of such credit may be considered only if the student has qualified for admission to study for the relevant programme on or before April 30 of the academic year in which he/she has passed the NCP courses or modules. GI3.3 Registration as a guest student Any person who does not want to follow an approved degree or diploma programme, but wants instead to attend lectures in one or more courses may be admitted as a guest student, if he/she: - completes the prescribed application form - obtains the written permission from the relevant Dean to attend the lecture(s) - registers as guest student (including payment of the prescribed fees) and - submits such proof of registration to the relevant lecturer(s) A guest student is not entitled to formal evaluation and certification, i.e., he/she will write no tests or examinations and receive no credit for attending lectures in (a) specific course(s). A guest student is not entitled to any rights/privileges to which bona fide students are entitled. All uncertainties regarding this matter must be taken up with the Registrar.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

GI3.4

General Information and Regulations

Registration dates Student registration will take place in accordance with the registration dates as contained in the Calendar. The registration programme is also announced in the media and prospective students must make sure of the dates, times and venues of registration. Students must abide by the registration programme and relevant deadlines. Late registration A late registration fee is levied on students who register during or after the period of late registration provided for in the Calendar. Student cards The Polytechnic issues a student card to each student on which the student's registration number and photo appear. Lost student cards are only replaced after submission of an official receipt for the prescribed replacement fee. Students are required to carry their student cards on their person at all times and may be asked to show such student card by any authorised staff member of the Polytechnic or its contractors. Students may be denied access to buildings, classrooms and/or services should they be unable to show a valid student card on demand.

GI3.5

GI3.6

GI3.7

Change of address A student must immediately notify the Registrar of any change of address on the prescribed form. ISSUING OF DOCUMENTS Academic records and certificates Upon graduation each candidate will be issued a free copy of an academic record and a degree or diploma certificate. Subsequent to graduation, academic records will be reprinted at a fee. A past student wishing to obtain a copy of her/his academic record shall apply for it on the prescribed form, pay the prescribed fee and produce the receipt to the Student Records Department before the document will be issued to her/him. A student currently registered at the Polytechnic wishing to obtain a copy of her/ his academic record shall also apply on the prescribed form, pay the relevant fee and produce the receipt to Student Records Department before s/he is furnished with the document. The Polytechnic shall not reprint degree or diploma certificates the originals of which have been lost by a student. A statement certifying that the student completed such a degree or diploma will be issued instead. The Polytechnic shall not re-issue qualifications upon a subsequent change of biographical data of the recipient. It is the responsibility of the holder of the qualification to provide official proof of the change in biographical data to any employer or other stakeholder.

GI4 GI4.1

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

GI4.2

General Information and Regulations

Proof of registration A student wishing to obtain a proof of registration after the standard document has been issued at registration shall pay the prescribed fee. Syllabuses A past student shall apply in writing to the Student Records Department for the issuing of a certified syllabus. The student shall pay the prescribed fee at the cashier and produce the receipt to the Student Records Department before s/he shall be furnished with the document/s. Examination results A student wishing to have her/his results reprinted, due to non-receipt of such results, which were posted to the student's registered address, shall pay the prescribed fee and produce the receipt before such results are issued to her/him by the Examinations Department. · · · After the advice of results has been sent to candidates, the Polytechnic cannot take responsibility for delivery of such results or lack thereof. Once the advice of results has been sent to a candidate's registered address, the Polytechnic presupposes that s/he have received them. Results will also be available through the Internet and via sms.

GI4.3

GI4.4

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

AC1 AC1.1

CURRICULUM REGULATIONS Timetable clashes The student is responsible for selecting his/her courses in such a way that these can be accommodated within the existing timetable. Notice of timetable clashes must be handed in at the Office of the Registrar in writing on a prescribed form within five lecturing days of commencement of lectures. Timetable clashes are clashes only when courses of the same prescribed curriculum for the same qualification and the same level appear at the same time on the timetable. Sequence of Courses and Pre-Requisites Unless otherwise determined by Senate, a student shall not be admitted to a second or subsequent level course in a subject if he/she has not fulfilled the prerequisites for that course. The Prospectus gives additional details in this regard in the Curriculum section. If a course is prescribed as a prerequisite course, students who obtain a semester mark of at least 50% shall be deemed to have satisfied the pre-requisite.

Note:

AC1.2

NOTE: AC1.3

Certain departmental rules may be different from the above. Please consult departmental rules. Course Amendment A student may only amend his/her curriculum course(s) within the period as decided by Senate and published in the Academic Calendar. In respect of each amendment: · · · the written approval of the Head of the Department the student wishes to enter and the consent of the Faculty Officer must be obtained, and the Registrar must be notified on the prescribed form within the prescribed period

AC1.4

Termination of Studies In the case of a student who wishes to terminate a course or programme, the Registrar must be notified in writing. The date on which such written notification is received will be deemed as the official date for the cancellation of the course and/or programme. (For financial obligations arising out of cancellations, refer to the Students Fees Regulations). Students may not cancel individual courses after 30 April and 30 September for the first and second semesters respectively. Tuition fees are not transferable from one academic period to the next or to a future academic period. A student who cancels (a) course(s) during the semester will be refunded the portion of tuition fees as per the refund rules contained in the Fees section of the Prospectus. If it becomes clear that a student follows a course for which he/she is not registered, the student's participation in the activities of such a course will be terminated. 11

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

AC2 RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING

General Information and Regulations

Credits obtained while a Polytechnic student was suspended due to disciplinary reasons, will not be recognised by the institution. AC2.1 Note: General Conditions and Procedures for Course Recognition Courses completed eight or more years before the date of application will not be recognised for credit purposes. Students, who wish to apply for recognition of courses successfully completed at academic institutions other than the Polytechnic of Namibia, must direct such applications to the Registrar before 31 October of the year preceding the intended year of registration. The Registrar may accept applications after this closing date for submission to Senate, but the full liability for any consequences of an unsuccessful late application for exemption rests with the student (see below). No late applications will be accepted after 28 February of the relevant year of registration. Recognition of courses at a tertiary level will not be considered on the basis of courses passed at secondary or other school level. Also a course completed on certificate/diploma level does not necessarily entitle a student to recognition of such course. An application for recognition of a course must be accompanied by documentary proof issued by the examining body concerned that the student has passed the relevant course and has obtained a minimum of 50 % of the total marks. Condoned pass marks are not accepted for recognition. Course recognition will normally be considered if the corresponding course covers 80% of the current syllabus. A student, who has not completed a qualification at the Polytechnic of Namibia and wants to enrol for another qualification at the Polytechnic of Namibia, will be entitled to recognition of all corresponding courses on condition that the original programme of study is no longer pursued. However, a student from another institution who has not completed a qualification, and who wants to enrol for a programme of study at the Polytechnic of Namibia, will only be entitled to recognition of a maximum of 50% of the courses contained in the curriculum of a corresponding programme. A student who has completed a qualification at the Polytechnic of Namibia or another institution and wants to enrol for another qualification course at the Polytechnic of Namibia is entitled to recognition of a maximum of 50% of the courses contained in the envisaged curriculum. The number of courses for recognition may be exceeded only with the approval of Senate. If any existing qualification has been revised so that the structure and the name of the qualification change, the qualification will not be interchangeable and recognition of completed courses will be restricted.

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General Information and Regulations

If a student holds a terminated qualification and wishes to obtain the new qualification, this student will receive recognition for a maximum of 50% of the number of relevant prescribed courses. Procedure: Application for course recognition On application for course recognition, an original advice of results and a certificate of conduct must accompany the application as well as syllabi of the courses for which recognition is requested. A fee per course is payable to the Polytechnic of Namibia upon application. Unsuccessful application for course recognition In the case of an unsuccessful application, the student remains fully liable as far as academic and financial consequences for the relevant courses he/she might have registered for are concerned. AC2.2 Note: Recognition of courses of other institutions Courses completed eight or more years before the date of application shall not be recognised for credit purposes. The Registrar may, upon recommendation of the Dean and Head of Department concerned, grant recognition for examinations and/or courses completed successfully at other institutions up to a maximum of 50% of the courses required for a qualification. Such recognition shall be applied for on the prescribed form and shall be granted on merit as judged against the following criteria: (a) There is at least 80% overlap between the content of the two courses concerned that is, the one presented for recognition and the one for which recognition is requested. (b) The institution at which the course was completed is recognised by the relevant authorities in the country of origin. (c) The academic standard and the standard of assessment in the course are to the satisfaction of the School/Department. (d) The syllabus of the course presented has not changed significantly since the completion of the course. AC2.3 Note: Recognition of Internal Examinations/Courses Courses completed eight or more years before the date of application will not be recognised for credit purposes. A student, who wishes to register for another programme of study before completing a qualification at the Polytechnic, is entitled to recognition of all corresponding courses on condition that the current programme of study is cancelled and that the overlap between the curricula of such courses is at least 80%. Such recognition shall also be applicable to corresponding courses completed for non-credit purposes. AC2.4 Recognition of Non-certified Prior Learning A registered student of the Polytechnic may apply for the recognition of competencies gained through experience for the purpose of gaining credit for a course or courses that form part of the curriculum of the programme he/she is registered for. 13

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

Students wishing to apply for such recognition of prior learning should do so in writing indicating clearly the course(s) that they wish to be assessed for, and should pay the prescribed fee. Such candidates should construct a portfolio of evidence of the learning and present this to the relevant Head of Department for appraisal. The Head of Department will grant access to the assessment of prior learning process based on his/her appraisal of the portfolio of evidence. Candidates granted access to assessment of prior learning would be assessed using a set of assessments, which is equivalent in standard and content to the normal assessment in the course, and would be required to pay a further fee. AC2.5 Recognition of Research Projects/Theses A research project or thesis shall be recognised for the award of only one degree, be that at the Polytechnic or another institution. Recognition of Major Courses A candidate shall not offer as a major or principal course for a degree/diploma a course which was a major or principal course of a degree/diploma already conferred upon him/her, but shall offer an alternative course approved by Senate. CLASS ATTENDANCE Attendance at Lectures/Contact Sessions Lectures/contact sessions are presented at the reasonable discretion of the relevant lecturer within the prescriptions and policy regarding tuition and training of Senate, the Boards of Studies and Departments. Full-time and Part-time students are expected to attend at least 80% of contact sessions, practicals and excursions. Students are expected to attend lectures regularly and do the required assignments, tests and examinations. Absence from lectures may be considered in the calculation of a student's semester mark. Students and/or staff may not use devices (such as cell phones or audio sets) that my cause disturbance during contact sessions. AC3.4 Carrying Out of Prescribed Work A student shall do all prescribed work which has a bearing on his tuition and shall write all tests and examinations. In all circumstances the formulation of an assignment shall be a student's independent work. Full-time/Part-time Jobs Full-time students should note that they are registered at the Polytechnic of Namibia on a full-time basis and therefore the Polytechnic may make demands on the time of such students. Absence from classes, tests or examinations due to job commitments will not be considered. The Polytechnic of Namibia reserves the right to request proof

AC2.6

AC3 AC3.1

AC3.5

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

of study leave, written permission from an employer, etc. from a student before admitting him/her to a full-time programme. In the case where programmes are offered both full-time and part-time, employed persons are expected to make use of the part-time mode. Part-time students, who commit themselves to studies at the Polytechnic of Namibia, will be expected to attend the classes, tests and examinations set down for the relevant programmes. No provision is made for students who engage in other commitments during this period which could interfere with their studies, e.g.: job-related courses (local and abroad), out-of-town work, etc. AC4 AC4.1 ASSESSMENT General Provisions Evaluation of a student's performance in a certificate/diploma/degree programme shall be based on continuous assessment and/or examinations. The weighting between continuous assessment and formal examinations shall be as determined by the special Departmental and School Regulations. In cases of courses assessed wholly by continuous assessment only, the relevant regulations shall be as determined by the Department/School concerned and approved by Senate (See AC7). Overall performance in a course shall be assessed on a percentage scale divided as follows: (a) 75 and above Distinction (b) 70-74 Merit (c) 60-69 Credit (d) 50-59 Pass (e) 0-49 Fail Note: Departmental regulations approved by Senate may be different from the above general outline and shall be applicable to programmes for which such departmental regulations were approved. Saturdays that fall in the academic period are considered academic days for the purposes of conducting tests and examinations. AC4.2 Passing a Course In order to pass a course, a student shall, unless otherwise determined by Senate, upon recommendation of a department, obtain a final pass mark of at least 50% in that course, subject to a sub-minimum of 40% in the examination mark, in the case of an examined course. Such exceptions as approved by Senate are reflected in the departmental rules. Refer to the departmental regulations for more information.

Note:

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

AC4.3 Allocation of Annual Result Codes

General Information and Regulations

The Polytechnic uses a system of annual result codes signifying the outcome of a period of study as follows: CODE P (Study Period) P8 DESCRIPTION Pass Study Period ALLOCATION RULES Student has passed 50 % or more of the courses required for a specific study period, e.g. first, second or third year. Student has obtained sufficient credits to continue studying, but will not be able to complete in normal time. Student passed less than 50 % of the required courses for the study period and/or lower study periods. Student has completed all the minimum curriculum requirements for the Certificate. Student has completed all the minimum curriculum requirements for the Higher Certificate. Student has completed all the minimum curriculum requirements for the National Diploma. Student has completed all the minimum curriculum requirements for the Bachelor or B.Tech degree. Student has completed the qualification cum laude. Student has completed all the minimum curriculum requirements for the degree of Master. Student has completed all the minimum curriculum requirements for the Bachelor Honours degree.

Pass Programme Extended Fail Obtain Certificate Obtain Higher Certificate Obtain Diploma Obtain Degree Obtain Qualification Cum Laude Obtain Masters Degree Obtain Honours Degree

F PI P7 PF PG PC MA BH

AC4.4 AC4.4.1

Promotion Regulations: Examinations General Regulations

AC4.4.1.1 Conducting of Examinations The duration and scope of the examinations for the different qualifications shall be determined by Senate, and be conducted under the supervision of Senate at such venues, dates and times as Senate may determine. On completion of a prescribed syllabus (unless determined otherwise) examinations shall be conducted in all courses. Unless Senate determines otherwise, all papers for a specific course shall be written during the same examination period. A disabled candidate (e.g. blindness, physical handicap) shall be accommodated if the necessary arrangements have been made beforehand and with the approval of Senate.

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General Information and Regulations

Practical Examinations for full- and part-time students shall be conducted in the week before the commencement of semester or end of year examinations. AC4.4.1.2 Determination of Semester Mark For all residential courses, the semester mark will be determined by way of appropriate assessments during the semester. A minimum of two assessments must be set per semester, although variations may occur per course and/or programme as approved by Senate. Students who miss one or more of these assessments will be allowed to make up one assessment by writing an appropriate supplementary assessment set on the relevant parts of the syllabus as determined by the lecturer or by doing a supplementary laboratory or practical assignment towards the end of the semester. The mark for such supplementary assessment will be used to substitute the mark for one other assessment. Students who miss more than one assessment during the semester will be allowed to substitute one assessment with the supplementary test and will be given zero for the other assessments missed. No reason needs to be provided for missed assessments. The semester mark will be calculated using assessments in a ratio as determined in the course outline of each course. A semester mark passed successfully shall give the student the right of admission to the course examination and any subsequent course demanding the respective contents as prerequisite. The following learning outcomes have been accomplished: - Students command the intellectual capacity to master the contents and complexity of the relevant course. - The share of parts with no evidence of understanding is likely to be sourced by adequate self-learning. - The lessons learnt are likely to be re-called sufficiently with adequate preparation in an examination situation. Subject to such exceptions as approved by Senate, and by the Registrar in terms of rule AC4.4.6, a semester mark shall be valid only for the examinations in the period during which it has been achieved and the immediately succeeding period. Lecturers may decide to allow not only students who have missed assessments to sit for supplementary assessments, but also those who wish to improve their marks. Lecturers who decide to allow their students this opportunity must communicate this arrangement to all students well in advance and must ensure that all students who either qualify for a supplementary assessment or who wish to make use of such supplementary assessment, are informed of the arrangements for the supplementary assessment. Students must note that this rule does not entitle all students to such supplementary assessments, but that the decision to allow or not to allow access to such supplementary assessment lies entirely with the lecturer concerned. AC4.4.1.3 Examination Admission A student who is registered for a course shall be admitted to the examination of such a course after having satisfied the assessment requirements of the course.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

Satisfactory work is determined by the various departments by means of practicals, tests and assignments embodied in a semester mark. A student shall be required to produce a student card and any other documentation that may be required from time to time on entrance to the examination venue. Students, who gain admission to examinations for which they do not meet all academic, administrative, financial or any other requirements, will have their marks for such courses nullified and will be subject to disciplinary action. Admission to the examination of a course will normally require a semester mark of at least 50%. Exceptions to this requirement are approved by Senate and contained in individual course outlines. Students who fail to gain admission to the examination must repeat the course when it is offered again. A student shall be required to produce a student card on entrance to the examination venue. AC4.4.1.5 Determination of the Final Mark The semester mark and examination mark shall be used jointly to determine the final mark in a ratio determined by the relevant department and approved by Senate. (Note: refer to the departmental regulation for more information) In the case of a course for which no semester mark is required, the examination mark shall be the final mark. The final decision regarding examination/course results shall be vested in Senate. The overall course performance results in the final mark and is proof of the following learning outcomes: - Students are able to recall lessons learnt sufficiently by adequate self-learning and for examinations preparation - Evidence given shows that sufficient content parts and relation-ships are understood and can be applied. - The share of content parts with no evidence of understanding can be sourced through adequate self-learning. - Subsequently, contents and related knowledge not covered are likely to be presented by accessing known sources. AC4.4.2 Examining

AC4.4.2.1 Examination Opportunities Examination opportunities will be offered once in all courses at the end of each semester i.e. in June and November each year. Students are encouraged to utilise the first opportunity offered immediately following the semester in which the course is taught, but may also choose to utilise only the second opportunity at the end of the following semester. No notification of absence from the examination is required. A student who has gained admission to the examination shall be free to choose whether s/he will write the first examination in the course concerned: Provided that-

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

· the decision to write the first examination or not shall be irrevocable as soon as the student has reported for the first examination; · a student who writes the first examination and who does not pass the course, shall be permitted to write the second examination also; · all papers of a course are written in the same examination session. AC4.4.2.2 Duration The duration of an examination shall be as approved by Senate for each course. AC4.4.2.3 Examiners and Moderators Senate shall, on recommendation of the Schools, appoint at least one examiner and one moderator for each examination, provided that, where more than one person is involved in teaching a course, all such persons shall be appointed examiners. Except in exceptional circumstances such as in the case of death, resignation, absence, illness or other inability of the lecturer concerned, at least one examiner shall be a lecturer who has been involved in the internal teaching of the course. External moderators shall be appointed for all courses at the third and/or fourth-year level for all programmes that have both a National Diploma and a Bachelors degree, or a National Diploma only, as exit points. External moderators shall be appointed for all courses at the fourth-year level for all programmes that have only a Bachelors degree as exit point. External moderators shall be appointed for all courses leading to a postgraduate qualification. An external person is a person who: · is not a full-time employee of the Polytechnic; · is not involved with the teaching of the course at the Polytechnic. In the absence of an internal moderator, an external moderator may be appointed. AC4.4.2.4 Supplementary Examinations Supplementary examinations will be a re-examination written together with the second opportunity examination. A student, who fails a course in the first opportunity examination, shall be entitled to sit for a supplementary examination. The supplementary examination shall be a re-examination of the same course content valid for the ordinary examination and shall comprise the same number of papers as the ordinary examination. The supplementary examination shall be subject to the general examination and promotion regulations/requirements. There shall be no restriction on the number of courses in which a student may be admitted to sit for supplementary examinations. If the student has been admitted to a supplementary examination but does not report for it, the examination mark obtained in the first opportunity examination shall be awarded. The mark obtained in the supplementary examination shall replace the ordinary examination mark.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

Supplementary examinations shall be conducted during a period determined by Senate. There will be no supplementary examinations for students who have taken second opportunity examinations. AC4.4.5 Repeating a Course A student who repeats a course after having failed such a course shall repeat the entire course as if it were being taken for the first time, subject to such exceptions approved by Senate and reflected in departmental rules. Retention of Semester Mark The Registrar may, upon notification by the Head of Department and Dean, approve the retention of semester marks for students who failed to attain a pass mark in the examination period as stipulated under AC4.4.2. Such retention of semester mark shall only be granted to students who have obtained a semester mark of at least 50% and shall only be valid for the second and third semester following the semester during which the semester mark has been achieved (thus resulting in a 3rd and 4th opportunity examination). Students shall be required to write all the examination papers in the course again. Applications for retention of semester mark and the admission to a 3rd opportunity examination must be made to the faculty officer on or before the last working day in March for examinations taking place in the June session and on or before the last working day of August for examinations taking place in the November session. Applications must be accompanied by a full motivation explaining the reasons for failure in the previous examinations and how the student intends staying informed of potential changes in the course material. It should also contain a statement committing the student to attending a set of tutorial classes that will be offered during the last week of that semester. If a student fails to obtain a pass mark, any subsequent new course linked by a chain of prerequisites cannot be taken. No retention of semester mark shall be granted for courses where the syllabi have been amended. Students will be required to repeat the new syllabi of such courses. The fee payable for this service shall be non-refundable whether or not a student wrote the examination and regardless of the outcome of such examination. Students who are registered for higher level courses on the basis of having achieved a 50% semester mark in a pre-requisite course shall be de-registered for the higher level courses as soon as they are registered for tuition for the prerequisite course again. Students who attended the relevant tutorial classes in the previous semester but failed to attain a pass mark can apply for a 4th opportunity examination. Applications must be made to the faculty officer on or before the last working day in March for the examinations taking place in the June session and on or before the last working day of August for examinations taking place in the November session. Applications must be accompanied by a full motivation explaining the reasons for failure in the previous semester. In order to gain approval a student might be required to meet with a student counsellor at a time and place set by the Registrar to reflect on his/her performance.

AC4.4.6

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

General Information and Regulations

If a pass mark in the four opportunity examinations has not been attained or if no third or fourth opportunity was available, the semester mark is nullified, the course is failed and has to be repeated. Students will remain registered for the third and fourth opportunity examinations in the offering type (mode) in which they have gained the admission mark for the course concerned. Students will be required to pay a fee for this service as determined by Council. AC4.4.7 Assessment of Students with Special Learning Needs The Registrar may, upon recommendation of the Dean and/or Head of Department, grant additional time based on the category of disability to students with physical disabilities to complete tests and examinations. Students wishing to make use of such additional time should submit a written request to the Student Information Officer and should provide proof of the disability. AC4.5 Misconduct at Examinations Any candidate found to be dishonest or attempting to be dishonest during an examination may be disqualified not only in that examination and course, but in the whole examination and/or further disciplinary action may be taken by the Polytechnic against such a candidate. Contagious/Communicable Diseases Students suffering from contagious/communicable diseases, particularly in times of known epidemics, will be required to write examinations in seclusion, or may be required to write a special examination at a date and time as decided by Senate. RE-REGISTRATION FOR A QUALIFICATION Students who have failed to pass any courses in the first semester/year of their study must re-apply for admission. The Registrar may, upon recommendation of the Dean and Head of Department concerned, approve re-registration for a student who has failed to pass any course(s) in an academic period. MAXIMUM STUDY PERIOD A student shall not be permitted to re-register for the same qualification after double the minimum period of study from first registration. The maximum period per offering type is: 1 year Certificates 2 year Higher Certificates 3 year Diplomas 4 year Degrees FT 2 4 6 8 PT 3 6 8 10 DE 3 6 8 10

AC4.6

AC5

AC6

Students may appeal to Senate for extension of this period.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

AC7

General Information and Regulations

PROMOTION REGULATIONS: CONTINUOUS AND DIVERSIFIED ASSESSMENT Courses that are assessed by continuous assessment only (no final examination), will have a minimum of six (6) assessments in a semester that will be utilised to calculate the final mark in a ratio as determined in the course outline for each course. Exceptions to the minimum number of assessments or the general application of this rule must be approved by Senate. Students, who miss one or more of these assessments during a semester, will be allowed to make up one such assessment by writing a supplementary assessment set on the whole syllabus of the course or another appropriate supplementary assessment as determined by the course lecturer. Such supplementary assessment will take place during the examination period. The mark for such supplementary assessment will be used to substitute the mark for one other assessment provided that in courses where separate assessments are used for theory and practical, students may be allowed to do one supplementary for theory and one supplementary for practical. Students, who miss more than one or two assessments in the case of courses with theory and practical during the semester, will be allowed to substitute one or two assessments with the supplementary assessment(s) and will be given zero for the other assessments missed. No reason needs to be provided for missed assessments.

AC8 AC8.1

APPEAL BY A CANDIDATE Remark (Applicable only to Examined Courses) A student who has failed a course may upon written application to the Registrar and payment of the prescribed non-refundable fee on or before 15 January for the November Examinations, and on or before 15 July for the June Examinations request remarking of his/her scripts for such course(s). For a script to be remarked, a student shall have obtained an examination mark of at least 35% and a final mark of at least 45%. The remarking will be done by the moderator, hereinafter referred to as the arbiter. The student is required to complete the remark application form. The marks allocated by the arbiter shall constitute the results of the remark, after approval by Senex/Senate. Such result shall supersede the result of the original examination and may cause a lowering of the mark or symbol originally awarded. Remarking shall not be permitted for scripts already moderated, practical examinations or for a course of which all papers are marked entirely by computer. A student who applies for the remarking of a course shall not forfeit any right which he/she may already have to a supplementary examination. If the remarking results in the student passing the course, this shall supersede the original and/or supplementary examination result.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

AC8.2

General Information and Regulations

Recheck of Examination Marks (Applicable only to Examined Courses) A student, who has strong reasons to believe that an examination mark may be incorrect, can apply that such mark be re-checked, regardless of the mark obtained. The student shall apply for such a recheck on the prescribed form and pay the non-refundable fee. Such re-check shall not necessarily lead to a re-mark of the script, unless so determined by the officer conducting the re-check.

AC8.3

Objection to Final Mark (Applicable to both Examined and Continuous Assessment Courses) Any objection to a final mark obtained in a course must be raised with the Examinations Department within six (6) months of the publication and or notification date thereof, failing which the final mark shall thereafter be deemed as the correct final mark obtained by the student. GRADUATION Requirements for Graduation: Qualifications of the Polytechnic will only be awarded to students who have met all curriculum requirements for the specific programme as determined by Senate. Students who have outstanding financial or other obligations to the Polytechnic will not be allowed to graduate. Students who are unable to provide original proof of their admission qualification will not be allowed to graduate. Notice of Expectation to Graduate: Students who are in the final semester of study towards the National Diploma or Bachelor degree must complete and submit the form Notice of Expectation to graduate to the Faculty Officer before or during Week 8 of that semester. Failure to do so may lead to such student not being allowed to graduate at the ceremony following that semester. Students completing such forms will be held accountable for information they provide on such forms.

AC9 AC9.1

AC9.2

AC9.3

Obtaining a National Diploma or Bachelor cum laude: A student shall pass a National Diploma or Bachelor degree cum laude if s/he has achieved an overall average of 75% for all courses in the curriculum of the diploma or degree, provided that each course was passed with at least a credit. None of the courses prescribed in the programme must have been failed and the programme must have been completed in the minimum prescribed time. Cum laude awards will only be made at the highest qualification in a programme. APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION OF THE RULES The interpretation of the rules shall be a matter of the exercise of academic judgment by the relevant authorities. Should a disagreement arise between the recommending and approving authorities in the application of these rules, the case under consideration shall be forwarded to Senate or SENEX for a final decision.

AC10

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

F: F.1 F.1.1 STUDENT FEES ENQUIRIES AND PAYMENTS METHODS OF PAYMENTS 1) PERSONALLY The Cashier Administration Building 13 Storch Street Windhoek BY MAIL All payments by mail must be directed to: The Bursar Polytechnic of Namibia Private Bag 13388 Windhoek

Fees

2)

3)

BY DIRECT DEPOSIT The Polytechnic of Namibia's bank details are as follows: First National Bank Branch: Ausspannplatz Branch Number: 28 18 72 Account Number: 555 001 26319

Submit a copy of the deposit slip or fax to (061) 207-2273 for the attention of the Assistant Bursar: Finance. Kindly ensure that the correct student number is clearly stated as reference number. F.1.2 OFFICE HOURS: Enquiries and Payments 1) For Enquiries Mondays to Thursdays 10:00 - 13:00 14:00 - 16:00 No enquiries on Fridays 2) For Payments Mondays to Thursdays 09:00 - 13:00 14:00 - 16:00 Fridays 09:00 - 13:00 F.1.3 (a) (b) (c) (d) PAYMENT REQUIREMENTS Cheques and Postal orders must be crossed and made out to the Polytechnic of Namibia. No post dated cheques are accepted. Never send cash by post. Students will be de-registered immediately for dishonoured or unpaid (R/D) cheques and an amount of N$310.00 will be charged to the account. 24

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

(e) (f) (g) F.2 F.2.1

Fees

Payment must be made only to the Cashier and not to any other staff member. An official receipt should be obtained upon payment. No receipt will be issued for direct deposits. The bank's stamp on the deposit slip serves as a proof of payment. The Polytechnic and its staff cannot be held responsible for possible losses that may occur when the payment requirements are not adhered to. STIPULATIONS REGARDING STUDENT FEES GENERAL

F.2.1.1 Council reserves the right to amend, without prior notice, all fees payable to the Polytechnic. F.2.1.2 Tuition fees shall differ from course to course depending on course requirements. F.2.1.3 Should Council temporarily or permanently suspend any student's rights or privileges, or permanently refuse admission to any student, the student concerned shall forfeit all claims to refunds, reduction or remission of fees paid or payable to the Polytechnic of Namibia. F.2.1.4 Fees are payable on a monthly basis, whether a student received an account or not. Failure to adhere to stipulated due dates will result in de-registration, withheld of results, refusal of access to meals, accommodation and examinations. F.3 F.3.1 FEES PAYABLE TUITION FEES

Tuition fees (denoted in the Namibian dollar, N$) are charged per course regardless of whether the course is taken on full-time, part-time or distance education mode. General tuition fees per course are charged as follows: SCHOOL School of Business and Management (SBM) All disciplines (incl. Service Courses) School of Communication (SC) Media Office Management & Technology All other disciplines (incl. Service Courses) School of Engineering All disciplines - Diploma All disciplines - Bachelor Waternet - Master Health Science Technical & Vocational Education & Training Full Credit Half Credit DIPLOMA N$ 830 BACHELOR MASTER N$ N$ 1,110 75,000 (full programme)

2,490 910 830 1,770 1,320 830 600

2,200

3,120

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Information Technology All disciplines - Diploma All disciplines - Bachelor IT - Master School of Natural Resources and Tourism (SNRT) Nat. Con. & Agric. ­ Diploma Nat. Con. & Agric. ­ Bachelor Land Mgt., Hosp. & Tourism ­ Diploma Land Management - Bachelor Land Management ­ M.Tech 1,400 1,160 1,610

Fees

2,200

2,640

1,700 1,450

2,500

N.B. Other course fees may vary as per qualification. Please consult the Fees Booklet of 2008 for specific course fees. F.3.1.1 EXCEPTIONS TO NORMAL TUITION FEES FEE - N$ PER 1,010 1,950 1,630 3,100 1,950 1,950 2,300 1,450 260 1,860 1,450

COURSE SEMESTER School of Business and Management (SBM) Computerised Accounting School of Natural Resources and Tourism (SNRT) Basic Hotel Information Systems Community Based Land Management Food and Beverage Operations & Management 1 1,800 Food Production Theory and Practice Tour Guiding 2 Tourism Destination Management 1 & 3 Travel Theory & Practice 3 (Galileo) Research Project (PRO101N) Practical 1 - 4 (BTN) In Service Training (All disciplines in SNRT) School of Communication (SC) Information Administration (all courses) F.3.2 FEES FOR OTHER SERVICES SERVICES

FEE - N$ NON-REFUNDABLE Undergraduate Application 80 Postgraduate Application 120 Late Application 230 Registration (inclusive of Technology, Assessment & Student Activity Fee) 655 Late Registration Fee (in addition to Registration fee) 210 Re-registration 500 Fines for Unpaid Cheque or Refer to Drawer (R/D) 310 Application for Credit Transfer from Other Institutions 80 Application for Advanced Standing (in addition to application fee) 80

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Credit Transfer from Other Institutions (per course) Academic Record Statement to Replace Certificate/Diploma Remark (per course) Re-check of Marks (per course) Replacement of Student/Meal Card Application fee for Recognition of Prior Learning Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Assessment Fee (per course) Retention of Semester Mark ­ payable on application (per course) Application for resumption of studies Receiving of Qualification in Absentia Reprinting of Examination Results Copies of Official Documents (Proof of Registration, etc.) Medical Services ­ Fees per visit Duplicate Study Guide (Distance Students) Duplicate Tutorial Letter Library Fees Membership for non-Polytechnic users One book at a time Two books at a time Three books at a time Fines Overdue fines on normal loans Overdue fines on short loans Damage to library materials Irreparable damage to library materials Loss of Library materials Illegal removal of library materials Cellular Phone (talking on/ringing) Eating/Drinking in the library Making noise Library Deposit ­ UNAM (staff/students) Other Parking Parking violation Internet Café charges to Students Making noise Parking (Staff) Parking Violation Internet Café charges to Students RESIDENCE FEES

Fees 395 45 230 300 80 100 80 440 440 80 110 65 65 15 210 30

190 330 460 1,20 1,20 120 1,200 120 120 120 550 60 120 10/hour 110 60 120 10/hour

OTHER

F.3.3 (a) (b) (c) (d)

Registration in residence will be done per semester. Any student who leaves the residence during a semester will be charged for the whole semester. All resident students will be levied 50% of the meal fees (N$ 3,705.00) per semester, which is payable whether meals are taken or not. Any student who wishes to be given more credit for meals has to pay in advance.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Residence Breakage deposit (Refundable) N$ 450.00 (per semester) (per semester) (per semester) (per semester)

Fees

Residence Fees: NAMIBIAN & SADC Citizens Single Room N$5,790 Double Room N$4,530 Residence Fees: INTERNATIONAL Single Room N$8,760 Double Room N$7,650 Meal Fees (including VAT)

N$7,410 (per semester) N$14,820 (per year)

Cost per meal inclusive of VAT for full-time boarders: Breakfast - N$7.49 Lunch - N$25.00 Supper - N$19.70 Cost per meal for non-residential students, staff and occasional customers: Meals: Breakfast Lunch Supper N$19.14 N$34.87 N$27.94

Accommodation for occasional occupants (per day): N$130.00 F.3.3.1 RESIDENCE BREAKAGE DEPOSIT (a) (b) (c) A deposit of N$450.00 must accompany a confirmed admission to the residence. Such deposit does not form part of the residential fees and is refundable on completion of the student's studies or when the student leaves the residence permanently. The deposit must be paid in cash, cheque or postal order. Please note that the deposit fee does not form part of the bursary.

In the following circumstances the deposit shall be forfeited in full or in part: (a) (b) (c) If a student cancels the application after a place in the residence has been allocated to him/her, 10% of the breakage deposit shall be forfeited. A student who fails to pay the full residence fees before the due date must again pay a full residence deposit before readmission is granted. If a student has an outstanding account or has caused losses/damages to the Polytechnic's property when he/she leaves the residence, the relevant amount will be deducted from the deposit. EXAMINATION FEES

F.3.4

An assessment fee of N$155 is payable at date of registration and is included in the registration fee.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

F.4 F.4.1 PAYMENT OF FEES The various fees are payable as follows:

Fees

Application Fee: Late Application Fee: Registration Fee: Technology Fee: Assessment Fee: Late Registration Fee: Residence Breakage Deposit:

Payable on application until 30 September Payable on application after 30 September Payable on registration date Payable on registration date Payable on registration date Payable after registration date Payable on/or before admittance

Deposit Fees Payable at Registration for the 1st semester of 2009: N$1,500 for all disciplines Deposit payable during the 2nd semester of 2009 will be decided by Management later during the academic year and published. Notes: 1. 2. 3. The amounts above are inclusive of Registration, Technology, Assessment and Student Activities fees. If the total fee account is below the minimum amount specified above, then the whole fee account is payable at Registration. Students will pay the Registration, Technology and Assessment Fees only once per year on registration for that year.

Balances on fee accounts are payable on the due dates as specified in F.4.2 below. Residence Fees Per Semester F.4.2 DUE DATES 30 June 31 July 62% 74% Deposit At Registration N$2,000 On Due Dates Balance

Installments are payable on/or before: Year courses: 29 February 12% 31 March 26% 30 April 38% 31 August 31 May 30 September Semester 1: 29 February 31 March 30 April 31 July 31 August 30 September 86% 50% 100% 33% 66% 100% 33% 66% 100%

Semester 2:

NB: Where students fail to pay their fees on the due dates, Council reserves the right to refuse such students meals, accommodation, examination admission, or any other steps Council may take from time to time. 29

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

F.4.3 BURSARY STUDENTS

Fees

On registration, bursary holders must produce original written proof of bursaries awarded. Should sponsorship be subsequently withdrawn, the student should pay the required fees. NB: No withdrawal of the award will be accepted after 28 February for first semester and 31 July for second semester. Residence breakage deposit of N$450.00 must be paid in cash, cheque or postal order, as this does not form part of the bursary unless otherwise stipulated. F.5 F.5.1 REBATES AND/OR DISCOUNTS Rebates to Personnel Members and their Dependants

Personnel members and their dependants in the permanent employ of the Polytechnic and UNAM shall pay a registration fee only at date of registration. They may register at the beginning of the academic year for any academic course, except for extra-curricular courses, as the latter courses must be self-supporting. No rebate will be allowed if the relevant person has a bursary and/or when subjects are repeated. To qualify, students must submit an original letter from Human Resources Department to the Student Debtors Officers ON REGISTRATION DATE. Rebates not applied for in this manner will be forfeited. F.5.2 Rebate to Council Members

Officially appointed Council members and their dependants shall pay a registration fee only at date of registration. They may register at the beginning of the academic year for any academic course, except for extra-curricular courses, as the latter courses must be self-supporting. No rebate will be allowed if the relevant person has a bursary and/or when subjects are repeated. F.5.3 Rebate to Members of Housing Committee

A rebate equal to 30% of residence fees will be granted to the Housing Committee Chairperson and 20% of residence fees to Housing Committee members for the period served in that capacity. Rebates will only be refunded if all accounts are settled in full. F.5.4 Rebate to Students Representative Council

A rebate of 50% to SRC Chairperson and 40% to SRC members will be granted on the following conditions: (a) The rebate will be calculated for the period served as SRC member or chairperson. (b) Rebates will be calculated on tuition fees only, excluding residence fees or any other charges. (c) Rebates will be refunded at the end of each semester. (d) Rebates will only be refunded, if the fee account is settled in full. F.5.5 DISCOUNTS

F.5.5.1 Discount of 20% for students from the same family (excluding the first student) based on the following conditions: (a) (b) Students are self-funding, i.e. they do not get a bursary or scholarship. Students must apply for the discount in writing to the Bursar. 30

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

(c) (d) (e) (f)

Fees

Applicants must produce a full birth certificate to prove that at least one parent is the same or a documentary proof that they are legally adopted. No discount will be considered for courses being repeated. Students must be studying concurrently; i.e. at the same time. Part-time and/or married students do not qualify for the rebates.

F.5.5.2 Discount for Full Payment A 10% discount on tuition fees will be granted if tuition fees are paid full. The following conditions apply: (a) On or before 29 February each year for year and first semester accounts. (b) On or before 31 July each year for second semester accounts. (c) Students who are de-registered for whatever reason will forfeit the discount and will then be liable for the full account. (d) Students who cancel their courses or subjects will not be entitled to a refund of the discount after the discount has been allowed. F.5.5.3 Discount for Excellent Academic Performance All students who obtain at least 85% in the final mark of a course shall receive a discount on tuition fees for that course as follows: 5% for a first year course; 10% for a second year course; 15% for a third, fourth or fifth year course. No discount shall be given for excellent academic performance in courses that the student repeats. F.6 INTEREST ON OVERDUE ACCOUNTS

A 15% annual interest will be charged on all residence and tuition accounts overdue by 30th September. F.7 F.7.1 REFUNDS Refund Upon Discontinuation of Studies

F.7.1.1 Year/Semester Written applications for refunds of class fees should be submitted to the Student Debtors Officers. F.7.1.2 Year Courses (a) (b) (c) Cancellation of course(s) on or before 29 February - 100 % credit Cancellation of course(s) on or before 30 June - 50 % credit Cancellation of course(s) on or after 01 July - no credit

F.7.1.3 First Semester Courses (a) (b) (c) Cancellation of course(s) on or before 29 February - 100 % credit Cancellation of course(s) on or before 07 April - 50 % credit Cancellation of course(s) on or after 08 April - no credit

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

F.7.1.4 Second Semester Courses (a) (b) (c)

Fees

Cancellation of course(s) on or before 31 July - 100 % credit Cancellation of course(s) on or before 08 September - 50 % credit Cancellation of course(s) on or after 09 September - no credit

F.7.1.6 Students who fail to cancel courses and residence in writing remain responsible for the full fees for the particular academic year. F.7.1.7 Extra-Curricular Courses No refund unless courses are cancelled by the Institution. F.7.1.8 Refunds - General Students who wish to request 100 % refund due to cancellation as a result of factors beyond their control may appeal to the Registrar in this regard. Such appeal must be submitted to the relevant Faculty Officer. No refunds can be guaranteed. Claims for refunds will be processed twice a month, i.e. on the 15th and 30th day. An official claim form should be completed and handed in at the Enquiry Counter, Ground Floor, Administration Building. F.7.1.9 Credit balances will be forfeited if it is not claimed within one year. F.8 NON-FORMAL COURSES

Non-Formal courses are offered on an extra-curricular basis and are subject to a minimum of 10 registered students per course. These courses are run on a self-financing basis. Fees For Foreign & National Languages (Total Hours 75) - N$1,660 (Inclusive of Registration Fee) F.9 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Please note that the Polytechnic does not offer any financial assistance in the form of loans and/or bursaries. For additional information contact the Student Financial Aid Officer at telephone number (061) 207-2187. NB: Not withstanding the fact that all the information contained herein has been compiled as accurately as possible, Council, Senate and the Boards of Studies of the Polytechnic accept no responsibility for any errors that may occur.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF THE DEAN Dean Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Faculty Officers : : : : : : : Telephone Numbers E-mail Addresses : : :

School of Business and Management

Kofi Boamah, Cert. Ed, DEM, B Comm (Hons), M.Com (Delhi) Margaret Munkanda, ND Exec. Secr. (PoN) 061-207-2220 061-207-2445 [email protected] Derlien Katunohange, ND Public Admin. (PoN), B.Tech Public Mngt. (TSA) Winson Nepembe, ND Public Admin. (PoN), B.Tech Public Mngt. (UNISA) Petsy Neiss, ND Nursing Science (UNAM) 061-207-2320 / 2263 / 2160 [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE Head of Department : Paul Maliti, BA, FCCA, FZICA Secretary : Margaret Munkanda Telephone Number : 061-207-2220 Fax Number : 061-207-2445 E-mail Address : [email protected] Faculty Officer : Winson Nepembe, ND Public Admin. (PoN), B.Tech Public Mngt. (UNISA) Telephone Number : 061-207-2263 E-mail Address : [email protected] Academic Staff : John Chekani, M.Sc (Finance), ADCA, FMC, CMA : Van Wyk du Plessis, MBA, BA, HBA, LSTD, FA(SA). : Zelda Maritz, Hons B. Compt (UNISA) IACSA, CTA (UNISA) : Paul Maliti, BA, FCCA, FZICA : Gordian Bowa, B.Acc (UNZA), M.Acc(Glasgow), ACMA (UK), FZICA : Pierre Barayagwiza, M.Sc Accounting & Economic Analysis : Pieter Koortzen, NTDC, FIAC, CFA, FA (SA), M.Com : Gerhardt Sheehama, BTech Cost & Management Accounting (Pen. Tech.) : Isaac O. Randa, M.Com (Acct & Stat.) (Sukhadia), AIII (India), Ph.D (Sukhadia) : Samuel M Mutonga, BTech Acc Fin (PoN) : Dickens C Sichinga, B.Com (Accoutancy) (UNIMA), MSc. Acc & Fin (Stirling, UK), ACCA (Affiliate).

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Head of Department :

School of Business and Management

Faculty Officer Telephone Number E-mail Address Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Academic Staff

: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :

:

Joseph Madhimba, B.A. (Marketing), MBA (Wolverhampton Univ. UK), MABE UK, Diploma Management (London), Diploma Journalism (Paris), Diplôme d'Études en Langue Française Derlien Katunohange, ND Public Admin. (PON), B. Tech Public Mngt. (TSA) 061-207-2320 [email protected] Amanda Schroeder, B-Tech Business Administration (PoN) 061 - 207 2398 061 - 207 2087 [email protected] OR [email protected] Victor Somosu, BSc. (Bus. Admin.) (Ogun State Univ.), MSc. (Marketing), MBA (Univ. of Lagos), Dip.(Comp.Op & Prog.) (ESCC) Steven Denk, ND Marketing (PON), B.Tech Marketing (UNISA) Vetira Hijamita, BA (Env. Scie.) (Univ. of Botswana), B.Sc. (Business Admin. & Marketing) (Commonwealth Univ., Virginia - U.S.A) Alfred Ndjavera, MSc Financial Decision Management. (University of Luton), B-Com Economics & Management (UNAM) Adele Mapanga, MBA (United States Internat. Univ.) Sulaiman Mbaziira, B.Comm, LLM(Econ. Law) Lutz Neuhaus, B.Comm (Hons)(Pretoria), MBA (Stellenbosch) Comfort Oyedokun, Ph.D (Sc. Ed.) Ahamadu Bello University (Nigeria), M.EDCardiff (U.K), BSc Ahamadu Bello University (Nigeria) Efeginia Semente, ND Marketing (PON), B.Tech Marketing (UNISA) Sibolile Sinvula, M. Admin (Unam), Post Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) (Unam), B. Admin (Unam) Pachalo Msiska, MIB Int. Inv. & Int. Fin. Mgt. (London) Ottilie Kangandjo, ND Commerce (PoN) B-Tech Business Administration (PoN) Simon Akpo, NCE, B.Sc (Ed) Hons, M.Ed Uapirama John Kavari, Master of Science in Financial Economics, Master of Business Administration, BCom Honours in Business Management, Advanced Diploma in Business Administration, Diploma in Management , Certificate in Business Administration Chris van Zyl, MBA (Stell); Hons. B Business Mgt & Administration (Stell); NHD (Immunology); ND (Histopathology); Cert (Med. Tech) Cert. Estate Agent (SA)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Head of Department Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Faculty Officer Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Academic Staff : : : : : : : : : : : : :

School of Business and Management

Lydiah Wambui, BA (Psych.), MSc. (MOD) (United States Internat. Univ.) Amanda Schroeder, B-Tech Business Administration (PoN) 061 - 207 2398 061 - 207 2087 [email protected] OR [email protected] Petsy Neiss, ND Nursing Science (UNAM) 061-207-2160 061-207-2401 [email protected] Olukemi Asemota, M.Sc Industrial/Organisational Psychology, B. Sc Psychology, Prof. Dip. Personnel Management (Nigeria) Andrew Beukes, BA (Hons) Industrial Psychology (UWC), MSc Industrial / Organisational Psychology (Emporia State University, USA) Elaine January, B. Admin (Hons) Industrial Psychology (UWC) Ngondi Kaura-Ndjavera, MA Human Resource Management

DEPARTMENT OF OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY Head of Department : Petra Weimers, BA, HED (UWC) Secretary : Magreth Munkanda, ND Exec. Secr. (PoN) Telephone Number : 061 - 207 2220 Fax Number : 061 - 207 2445 E-mail Address : [email protected] Faculty Officer : Derlien Katunohange, ND Public Admin. (PON), B. Tech Public Mngt. (TSA) Telephone Number : 061-207-2320 E-mail Address : [email protected] Academic Staff : Marlene de Wet, ND: Priv. Secr., NHD (PSE) (Tech. RSA) : Estie Syfert, ND: Bus Comp., NHD Office Man. (Cape Tech.), N.H.D. (P.S.E.) (TSA) : Sandra du Plessis, B.A. (Stellenbosch), Sec. Certificate (Stellenbosch) : Ilse Täschner, Nat. Higher Sec. Cert. (Pretoria), BA, HED (UNISA), Sworn Translator of the High Court of Namibia (English/Afrikaans/German)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS Head of Department : Cyril Ogbokor, B.Sc Econ., M.Sc Econ. (Nigeria) Faculty Officer : Petsy Neiss, ND Nursing Science (UNAM) Telephone Number : 061-207-2160 Fax Number : 061-207-2401 E-mail Address : [email protected] Secretary : Amanda Schroeder, B.Tech Bus. Admin. (PoN) Telephone Number : 061-207-2398 Fax Number : 061-207-2087 E-mail Address : [email protected] OR [email protected] Academic Staff : Vincent Babikanyisa, Post Grad. Dip OR (UWIST), B.A. (Hons) (Makerere), M.A. (Washington) : Magda Gerber, H.E.D. (UNAM), B. Comm (UNISA) : Cyril Ogbokor, B.Sc Econ., M.Sc Econ. : Esau Kaakunga, Ph.D (Natal), M Phil (Ghana), B Comm (UNAM) : Bridget Dundee, B.Econ Hons (UWC), PGDE (UNAM)

36

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT Head of Department : Andrew Niikondo, ND Public Administration (UNAM), B.Tech Public Management (TSA), MA Public Administration (UWC) Faculty Officer : Winson Nepembe, ND Public Admin. (PoN), B.Tech Public Mngt. (UNISA) Telephone Number : 061-207-2263 Fax Number : 061-207-2401 E-mail Address : [email protected] Secretary : Amanda Schroeder, B.Tech. Bus. Admin (PoN) Telephone Number : 061-207-2398 Fax Number : 061-207-2087 E-mail Address : [email protected] OR [email protected] Academic Staff : Charles A. Keyter, Cert. Distance Education (Penn. State), Cert. Online Instructor (Walden), B Admin (Hons), M. Admin, Ph.D Public & Development Management (Stellenbosch) : Marie Opali, Teachers Cert. (Uganda), Cert. Adult Studies, B.A. (Hons), Cert. Project Planning and Management (Makerere) PA (Botswana) : Ulrich Freyer, ND Public Administration (PoN), B.Tech Public Management (TSA), M. Admin (UWC) : Johan Coetzee, BA (Hons) Cum Laude, MA Hons Business and Administration, MBA (Stellenbosch) : Ben Namabanda, B.Econ (UNAM), M.Admin (UNAM) NAMIBIA GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING (NGSA) Project Manager : James F van Rooi, B.Econ., HED (UWC), MBA (Maastricht) Faculty Officer : Winson Nepembe, ND Public Admin. (PoN), B.Tech Public Mngt. (UNISA) Telephone Number : 061-207-2263 Fax Number : 061-207-2401 E-mail Address : [email protected] Secretary : Eva-Liisa Mauritius Telephone Number : 061-207-2286 Fax Number : 061-207-2717 E-mail Address : [email protected]

37

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

GENERAL NOTE ON THE COURSE PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1A AND 1B · · · · With effect from 2006, PIS 1A & 1B are subdivided into modules where modules 1 to 3 will be covered in PIS1A and modules 4 to 7 will be covered in PIS1B. A student will be registered per module and not for PIS1A or PIS1B - but to obtain a pass in PIS1A and PIS1B s/he must pass all modules respectively. All modules will be assessed throughout the specific semester and a student has two opportunities per semester to pass a module. Before a student can register for Module 4, 5, 6 and 7 in PIS1B s/he must pass module 1 in PIS1A. If not passed the student must register for module 1 in the following semester before attempting module 4, 5, 6 and 7.

The following table indicates the different course and module codes for PIS1A & PIS1B: Principles of Information Systems 1A (PIS121S) Module 1(PIS001M) Module 2 (PIS002M) Module 3 (PIS003M) Principles of Information Systems 1B (PIS122S) Module 4 (PIS004M) Module 5 (PIS005M) Module 6 (PIS006M) Module 7 (PIS007M)

38

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

School of Business and Management

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: ACCOUNTING & FINANCE

23BACF

Additional Admission Requirements: The prospective student must have passed Mathematics OR Accounting at Grade 12 or an equivalent level. First Year - National Certificate Accounting and Finance (Offered Full-time, Part-time and Distance Education) Semester 1 Course Title Financial Accounting 1A Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Commercial Law 1A Language in Practice B Semester 2 Financial Accounting 1B Quantitative Methods 1 Course Code FAC111S ITM111S PEC111S PIS121S CML111S LPB0320 FAC112S QTM112S Prerequisite Grade 12 Accounting or Mathematics None None None None English Proficiency Test Financial Accounting 1A Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) None Principles of Information Systems 1A Commercial Law 1A Language in Practice B

Principles of Economics 1B PEC112S Principles of Information Systems 1B PIS122S Commercial Law 1B Communication Skills CML112S CSK0420

NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year (Offered Full-time, Part-time and Distance Education) Semester 3 Financial Accounting 2A FAC211S Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Quantitative Methods 2A QTM211S Quantitative Methods 1 Cost & Management Accounting 2A CMA211S Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Company Law 1A CLW111S Commercial Law 1A & 1B Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Semester 4 Financial Accounting 2B Quantitative Methods 2B Cost & Management Accounting 2B Company Law 1B Business Ethics and Leadership FAC212S QTM212S CMA212S CLW112S BEL112S Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Quantitative Methods 1 Cost & Management Accounting 2A Company Law 1A None

Third Year - National Diploma Accounting and Finance Semester 5 Financial Accounting 3A FAC311S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Cost & Management Accounting 3A CMA311S Cost & Management Accounting 2A & 2B 39

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Taxation 3A Auditing 3A Computerised Accounting 1 Semester 6 Financial Accounting 3B Cost & Management Accounting 3B Taxation 3B Auditing 3B TAX311S AUD311S CAC111S FAC312S CMA312S TAX312S AUD312S

School of Business and Management Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Cost & Management Accounting 2A & 2B Taxation 3A Auditing 3A

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology: Accounting and Finance (Offered Full-time, Part-time and Distance Education) Additional Admission Requirements: Diploma in Accounting or equivalent (Offered Fulltime over 1 academic year and Part-time over 2 academic years) Semester 7 Financial Accounting 4 Managerial Finance 4A Accounting Information Systems 4 Management Accounting & Control 4A Research Methodology Semester 8 Managerial Finance 4B FAC411S MAF411S AIS411S MAC411S RMA411S MAF412S Financial Accounting 3A & 3B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B plus Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B Cost & Management Accounting 3A & 3B None Financial Accounting 2A & 2B plus Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B Cost & Management Accounting 3A & 3B Research Methodology

Management Accounting & Control 4B MAC412S Research Project RPB412S

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

Transition rules for Bachelor of Technology in Accounting and Finance Candidates who hold other qualifications and the `old' Diploma in Accounting or Cost Accounting must take note of the following transition rules:

Programme Core-Courses Non-Core-Courses Required to graduate Not required to graduate National Diploma Commerce Company Law 1A &1B First year minor courses Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B or Example Statistical Methods Introduction to Mathematics Computerised Accounting 1 English Communication Module 4 Taxation 3A & 3B Auditing 3A & 3B Cost and Management Accounting 2A & 2B Cost and Management Accounting 3A & 3B Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Financial Accounting 3A & 3B Financial Accounting is applicable to students who have not completed it under Commerce. National Diploma Accounting Company Law 1A & 1B First year minor courses (Old Curriculum) Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B or Example Statistical Methods Introduction to Mathematics Computerised Accounting 1 English Communication Module 4 Taxation 3A & 3B Auditing 3A & 3B B.Tech Business Company Law 1A & 1B First year minor courses Administration Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B or Example Statistical Methods Introduction to Mathematics Computerised Accounting 1 English Communication Module 4 Taxation 3A & 3B Auditing 3A & 3B Cost and Management Accounting 2A & 2B Cost and Management Accounting 3A & 3B Financial Accounting 1A &1B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Financial Accounting 3A & 3B Other qualifications: Other qualifications will be considered individually and credits granted on a case-by-case basis.

Important notices: 1. Computerised Accounting - CAC111S Due to limited computer laboratory space, students must note that the department expects those registering for Computerised Accounting to book space by registering their names in a specifically designed departmental registration form. This registration form is available on the day of registration. Registration is strictly on the first come first registered basis. Students who previously registered for Computerised Accounting and failed it, must note that priority will be given to those who register for the course for the first time. Opportunity to repeat the course in the subsequent semester is subject to the availability of laboratory space, which cannot be guaranteed in all cases. 41

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

2. Research Project - RPB412S

School of Business and Management

Research Projects require that every student be allocated a supervisor who is normally a member of staff at the Polytechnic. In order to facilitate this process, all students may be required, in addition to the normal course registration, to register with the Head of Department of Accounting and Finance. Such registration will be in the form of student name, student number and the topic on which the Research Project will be based. Students are encouraged to find a member of staff to act as supervisor for his/her project wherever possible. The department retains the right to veto the choice of supervisor based on the academic requirements of a supervisor. Research Project topics must be in the field of Accounting and Finance. NAMIBIA GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING (NGSA) HONOURS ACCOUNTING (CTA) Admission Requirements As per University of Kwazulu-Natal criteria for: CTA Intermediate (2 years) - 23CTAB CTA Advance (1 year) - 23CTAC Students must register and pass all four (4) modules as indicated below at the same examination sitting to progress from the Intermediate (2 years) to the Hons/CTA (1 year) and from the Hons/CTA (1 year) to sit for the Part One Qualifying examination of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Namibia (ICAN). Courses Financial Accounting: Intermediate / Advanced Auditing: Intermediate / Advanced Management Accounting: Intermediate / Advanced Taxation: Intermediate / Advanced

42

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

School of Business and Management

INTRODUCTION OF NEW PROGRAMMES 2007 The department introduced new Bachelor qualifications for all its programmes in 2007. Old programmes were phased out with effect from 2007. The first year of old programmes were no longer offered in 2007 and the second year of old programmes were no longer offered in 2008. The third year will no longer be offerred in 2009. Students are required to transition to the new programmes as per the transition rules. Special Academic Regulations Progression Rule 1: There was a complete switch to the new curriculum as from 2007 for only the new intake [first year students], and from there onward the rest of the new Bachelor curricula would be systematically phased in while the old B-Tech programme is systematically phased out; with the year 2012 being the final date for the award of the B-Tech degree. Progression Rule 2: A student might not be allowed to take a higher level course above his/her current level of study even if the course in question has no prerequisite, and if such courses cannot be offered to the student on genuine academic grounds. Rules for the Award of the National Cerificate in Business Studies The new National Certificate in Business Studies shall be awarded to students only after successful completion and credit-passes for all common Business Management courses in the first year plus Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B and Principles of Economics 1A & 1B on the second year level. General Transition Rules The general transition rules for all programmes are as follows: 1. 2. 3. All new enrolments as from 2007 start with the new curricula. All third year students in 2008 who failed (i.e. less than 50% of credits obtained) must switch to the new curricula in 2009. All third year students in 2008 who have passed may continue with the old curricula, but if such students should fail any of the courses in the old curricula, such failed courses in the old curricula will only be offered with new syllabi and students must complete the new courses. The last date for completion of the old curricula is 2012, after which the students in the old curricula must automatically switch to the new curricula and make up all outstanding courses from the new curricula. Students who do not progress every year must switch to the new curricula and make up all outstanding courses from the new curricula. Third and Fourth Year students in 2009 have the choice to switch to the new curricula and must be advised accordingly as to which courses to make-up from the new curricula. There is no retention of semester mark for courses of which the syllabi have changed.

4.

5. 6. 7.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management 21BBAD

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Phased in 2007) Course(s) Failed Programme Transition Rules Equivalent (New)

The transition rule was applicable as from 2007 for the courses listed below: Business Management 1A & 1B Introduction to Business Management Human Resources Management 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Human Resources Management 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Marketing 1A Intro. to Marketing & its Environment Marketing 1B Marketing Principles The transition rule is only applicable as from 2008 for the courses listed below: Business Management 2A Business Operations Business Management 2B Business Finance The transition rule is only applicable as from 2009 for the courses listed below: Business Management 3A Purchasing and Supply Management Business Management 3B Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Intro. Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship Small Business Management Small & Medium Enterprises Management The transition rule is only applicable as from 2010 for the courses listed below: Business Management 4A Strategic Business Management: Planning & Control Business Management 4B Strategic Business Management: Analysis & Decision International Business Management 4A International Business Management: Planning International Business Management 4B International Business Management: Analysis CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Title Business Accounting 1A Communication Skills Introduction to Business Management Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Intro. to Marketing & its Environment Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B Business Ethics & Leadership Professional Writing

Course Code BAC1100 CSK0420 BMA121S ITM111S MAR121S IPH111S

Prerequisite None English Proficiency Test None None None None

BAC1200 BEL112S PRW0520

None None Communication Skills

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Introduction to Human Resources Management Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) (if not yet taken) Marketing Principles HRM122S ITM111S MAR122S None None None

School of Business and Management

NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics (or equivalent) Second Year (Phased in 2008) (National Certificate in Business Studies) (Replaced National Certificate Business Administration that was phased out at the end of 2006) Semester 3 Business Accounting 2A Basic Business Statistics 1A Business Operations Professional Communication Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M) Semester 4 Business Accounting 2B Basic Business Statistics 1B Business Finance Principles of Economics 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M) BAC211S BBS111S BSO221S PFC0620 PEC111S PIS121S Business Accounting 1A & 1B Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) None Professional Writing None None

BAC212S BBS112S BFS222S PEC112S PIS122S

Business Accounting 1A & 1B Basic Business Statistics 1A None None Principles of Information Systems 1A

Third Year - National Diploma Business Administration (Phased in 2009) Semester 5 Commercial Law 1A CML111S None Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: COB321S Introduction to Marketing & its Introduction Environment & Marketing Principles Entrepreneurship ENT321S None Intermediate Microeconomics IME211S Principles of Economics 1A Purchasing and Supply Management PSM321S Business Operations Semester 6 Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management Commercial Law 1B Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Intermediate Macroeconomics Small & Medium Enterprises Management BLM322S CML112S COB322S IME212S SME322S Business Operations Commercial Law 1A Introduction to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles Principles of Economics 1B None

45

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Business Administration (Phasing in 2010) (Full-time and Part-time mode only) Additional Admission Requirements: Diploma in Business Administration or equivalent OR Students with the Old National Diploma in Business Administration, and those with equivalent and non-equivalent National Diplomas enrolling for the final stage of the Bachelor degree in the Business Administration programme, must also register and pass all core courses as indicated below. However, the student can apply for recognition of prior learning (RPL), where applicable. National Diploma: Commerce: majored in Business Management up to 3rd year level and either Economics, Communication Science or Financial Accounting: are required to register and pass Small & Medium Enterprises Management 2nd Semester and Commercial Law 1A & 1B. National Diploma: Commerce: not majoring in Business Management up to 3rd year level: are required to register and pass Introduction to Business Management , Business Ethics & Leadership, Business Operations, Business Finance, Purchasing and Supply Management, Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management , Small & Medium Enterprises Management and Commercial Law 1A & 1B. National Diploma: Information Administration/Office Management and Technology: are required to register and pass Introduction to Business Management , Business Ethics & Leadership, Business Operations, Business Finance, Purchasing and Supply Management, Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Commercial Law 1A & 1B, Entrepreneurship, Small & Medium Enterprises Management, Intro. to Marketing & its Environment, Marketing Principles, Business Accounting 1A & 1B, Introduction to Mathematics and Basic Business Statistics 1A & 1B, Principles of Economics 1A & 1B; Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Introduction, Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Analysis. National Diploma: Human Resource Management and Personnel Management Diploma: are required to register and pass Small & Medium Enterprises Management 2nd semester and Commercial Law 1A & 1B. All other diplomas shall be treated on a case by case basis by the Head of Department. CURRICULUM Semester 7 International Business Management Planning Research Methodology Retail Business Management Strategic Business Management: Planning & Control IBM421S RMA411S RBM421S SBM421S Purchasing and Supply Management & Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management None Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles Purchasing and Supply Management & Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management

46

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 8 International Business Management Analysis Project Management Research Project Strategic Business Management: Analysis & Decision IBM422S PRM422S RPB412S SBM422S

School of Business and Management Purchasing and Supply Management & Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management None Research Methodology Purchasing and Supply Management & Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management

47

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - OLD CURRICULUM (PHASED OUT IN 2006) 22BBAD NATIONAL CERTIFICATE BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION First Year (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Business Accounting 1A Business Management 1A English Communication Module 4 Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B Business Management 1B English Communication Module 4 (if not yet taken) Introduction to Mathematics (Business and Management) (if not yet taken) Principles of Economics 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B

Course Code BAC1100 BMA111S ECM0400 ITM111S PEC111S PIS121S BAC1200 BMA112S ECM0400 ITM111S PEC112S PIS122S

Prerequisite None None English Proficiency Test None None None None None English Proficiency Test None None Principles of Information Systems 1A

Second Year (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 Basic Business Statistics1A BBS111S Business Management 2A English Communication Module 5 Marketing 1A And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 2A Human Resources Management 1A Intermediate Micro Economics Semester 4 Basic Business Statistics 1B Business Management 2B English Communication Module 6 Marketing 1B And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 2B Human Resources Management 1B Intermediate Macro Economics BMA211S ECM0500 MAR111S BAC211S HRM111S IME211S BBS112S BMA212S ECM0600 MAR112S BAC212S HRM112S IME212S

Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Business Management 1A & 1B English Communication Module 4 None Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Principles of Economics 1A Basic Business Statistics 1A Business Management 1A & 1B English Communication Module 5 None Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Principles of Economics 1B

48

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

NATIONAL DIPLOMA BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

School of Business and Management

Third Year (Not available in 2009) (Full-time, Part-time and Distance mode) Semester 5 Business Management 3A BMA311S Business Management 2A & 2B Commercial Law 1A CML111S None Entrepreneurship ENT111S None And any TWO of the following: Applied Economic Policy Analysis AEP311S Intermediate Micro & Macroeconomics Business Accounting 2A BAC211S Business Accounting 1A & 1B (if not yet taken) Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A CBB111S Marketing 1A & 1B Financial Management 1A NFM111S Business Accounting 2A & 2B Human Resources Management 1A HRM111S None (if not yet taken) Intermediate Microeconomics IME211S Principles of Economics 1A (if not yet taken) Semester 6 Business Management 3B Commercial Law 1B Small Business Management And any TWO of the following: Business Accounting 2B (if not yet taken) Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Financial Management 1B Human Resources Management 1B (if not yet taken) Intermediate Macroeconomics International Trade BMA 312S CML112S SBM112S BAC212S CBB112S NFM112S HRM112S IME212S ITT312S Business Management 2A & 2B Commercial Law 1A Entrepreneurship Business Accounting 1A & 1B Marketing 1A & 1B Business Accounting 2A & 2B None Principles of Economics1B Principles of Economics 1A

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology Business Administration (Phasing out at the end of 2009) (Full-time and Part-time mode only) Additional Admission Requirements: Diploma in Business Administration or equivalent OR Students who have completed the National Diploma's listed below can enrol for the B.Tech Business Administration provided that they register and pass the additional courses listed below: National Diploma: Commerce majored in Business Management up to 3rd year level and either Economics, Communication Science or Financial Accounting:- Small Business Management 2nd Semester and Commercial Law 1A & 1B National Diploma: Commerce not majoring in Business Management up to 3rd year level. Business Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B;3A & 3B; Small Business Management and Commercial Law 1A & 1B National Diploma: Information Administration: Business Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B; 3A & 3B, Commercial Law 1A & 1B, Entrepreneurship, Small Business Management, Marketing 1A & 1B, Business Accounting 1A & 1B, International Trade, Applied Economic Policy Analysis, Introduction to Mathematics and Basic Business Statistics 1A & 1B

49

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

National Diploma: Human Resources Management and Personnel Management Diploma: Small Business Management 2nd semester and Commercial Law 1A & 1B CURRICULUM Semester 7 Advanced Organisational Development Business Management 4A Financial Planning and Control 1A International Business Management 1A Retail Business Management Research Methodology Semester 8 Advanced Organisational Management Business Management 4B Financial Planning and Control 1B International Business Management 1B Project Management Research Project AOD111S BMA411S FPC111S IBM111S RBM111S RMA411S AOM112S BMA412S FPC112S IBM112S PRM112S RPB412S None Business Management 3A & 3B None Business Management 3A & 3B Marketing 1A & 1B or Marketing Management or Business Management 3A & 3B None None Business Management 3A & 3B None Business Management 3A & 3B None Research Methodology

Important Notice: Research Project - RPB412S Research Projects require that every student be allocated a supervisor who is normally a member of staff at the Polytechnic. In order to facilitate this process, all students may be required, in addition to the normal course registration, to register with the Department. Such registration may be in the form of student name, student number and the topic on which the Research Project will be based. The department retains the right to veto the choice of supervisor based on the academic requirements of a supervisor. Research Project topics must be in the student's field of specialisation. No retention of semester mark for continuous assessment courses, namely Research Methodology, Research Project and Research Methodology, Dissertation and Project and Entreprenuership.

50

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

BACHELOR OF MARKETING (PHASED IN 2007)

School of Business and Management 21BMRK

Programme Transition Rules Course(s) Failed Equivalent (New) The transition rule was applicable as from 2007 for the courses listed below: Business Management 1A & 1B Introduction to Business Management Human Resources Management 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Human Resources Management 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Marketing 1A Introduction to Marketing and its Environment Marketing 1B Marketing Principles The transition rule is only applicable as from 2008 for the courses listed below Practice of Selling 1A & 1B Principles of Selling Practice of Sales Management Sales Operations & Management 1A & 1B *Marketing 3A & 3B *Services Marketing *For current first and second year students only The transition rule is only applicable as from 2009 for the courses listed below: Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Intro. Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Electronic Marketing E- Marketing & Web Management Marketing 2A & 2B Marketing & Product Management Marketing Communication Strategy 1A & 1B Marketing Communication Strategy Marketing Research Practice 1A & 1B Marketing 3A & 3B Marketing Research & Market Intelligence Services Marketing

The transition rule is only applicable as from 2010 for the courses listed below: Customer Care Management Customer Care & Customer Management Distribution Channel Management 1A & 1B Supply and Distribution Management International Marketing Management International Marketing and Management 1A & 1B Marketing 4A & 4B Strategic Marketing Management: Planning and Decision Making Marketing of Financial Services 1A & 1B Marketing of Financial Services First Year - National Certificate in Business Studies (Phased in 2007) (Replaced National Certificate Marketing and Sales that was phased out at the end of 2006) Semester 1 Course Title Business Accounting 1A Communication Skills Introduction to Business Management Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Intro. to Marketing & its Environment Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources Course Code BAC1100 CSK0420 BMA121S ITM111S MAR121S IPH111S Prerequisite None English Proficiency Test None None None None

51

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B Business Ethics & Leadership Professional Writing Introduction to Human Resources Management Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) (if not yet taken) Marketing Principles BAC1200 BEL112S PRW0520 HRM122S ITM111S MAR122S

School of Business and Management None None Communication Skills None None None

NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics (or equivalent). Second Year (Phased in 2008) National Certificate in Business Studies (Phased in 2007) (Replaced National Certificate Marketing and Sales that was phased out at the end of 2006) Semester 3 Basic Business Statistics 1A Professional Communication Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Selling Services Marketing Principles of Info. System 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M) Semester 4 Basic Business Statistics 1B Business Finance Professional Communication (If not yet taken) Principles of Economics 1B Sales Operations & Management Principles of Info. System 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M) BBS111S PFC0620 PEC111S POS221S SSM221S PIS121S Introduction to Mathematics Professional Writing None None Intro. to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles None

BBS112S BFS222S PFC0620 PEC112S SOM222S PIS122S

Basic Business Statistics 1A None Professional Writing None Marketing Principles Principles of Info. System 1A

Third Year - National Diploma Marketing (Phased in 2009) Semester 5 Commercial Law 1A CML111S None Consumer and Organisation Behaviour: COB321S Introduction to Marketing & its Introduction Environment & Marketing Principles E-Marketing & Web Management EWM321S Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles Entrepreneurship ENT321S None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Marketing Research & Market Intelligence MRI321S One Optional Basic German 1A or Basic French 1A or Basic Portuguese 1A or Basic Spanish 1A Semester 6 Commercial Law 1B Consumer and Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Marketing Communication Strategy Marketing & Product Management Small & Medium Enterprises Management One Optional Basic German 1B or Basic French 1B or Basic Portuguese 1B or Basic Spanish 1B

School of Business and Management Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles None None None None Commercial Law 1A Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles None

GER110S BAF111S BAP111S BAS111S CML112S COB322S MCS322S MAR322S SME322S

GER120S BAF112S BAP112S BAS112S

Basic German 1A Basic French 1A Basic Portuguese 1A Basic Spanish 1A

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Marketing (Phasing in 2010) Additional Entry Requirements for the fourth level: Fourth Year Bachelor of Marketing Holders of the Diplomas listed below may be admitted to the fourth level provided that they have completed the courses listed for each Diploma. National Diploma: Marketing [Old Curriculum] : Marketing Research & Market Intelligence E-Marketing & Web Management or equivalent National Diploma: Business Administration: Services Marketing or equivalent Principles of Selling or equivalent, Sales Operations & Management or equivalent, Consumer & Organisational Behaviour: Intro, Consumer & Organisational Behaviour: Analysis, Marketing Communication Strategy or equivalent, Marketing Research & Market Intelligence, E-Marketing & Web Management or equivalent, Marketing and Product Management or equivalent National Diploma: Human Resources Management: Small Medium Enterprises Management or equivalent Marketing and Product Management, Sales Operations & Management or equivalent, Commercial Law 1A & 1B, Marketing Research & Market Intelligence, E-Marketing & Web Management, Services Marketing or equivalent, Consumer & Organisational Behaviour: Introduction, Consumer & Organisational Behaviour: Analysis, Marketing Communication Strategy or equivalent Other National Diplomas: in the School of Business Management [e.g. Old Commerce Diploma]: Small Medium Enterprises Management or equivalent, Marketing and Product Management, Sales Operations & Management or equivalent, Commercial Law 1A & 1B,

53

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

Marketing Research & Market Intelligence, E-Marketing & Web Management, Services Marketing or equivalent, Consumer & Organisational Behaviour: Introduction, Consumer & Organisational Behaviour: Analysis, Marketing Communication Strategy or equivalent CURRICULUM Semester 7 International Marketing and Management IMM421S Research Methodology [Individual] OR Research Methodology Dissertation & Project [Group] (Year Course) Strategic Marketing Management: Planning and Decision Making And any ONE of the following: Marketing of Financial Services Marketing For Tourism Retail Business Management *Project Management (Offered only in the eighth semester) Semester 8 Customer Care Management Research Project [Individual] Supply and Distribution Management RMA411S RDP400Y SMM421S MFS421S MFT411S RBM412S *PRM422S Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles None None Marketing & Product Management Services Marketing Services Marketing Intro. to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles None

CCM422S RPB412S SDM422S

Introduction to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles Research Methodology Intro. to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles 21BMAR

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: MARKETING (OLD CURRICULUM) (Phased out in 2006) NATIONAL CERTIFICATE: MARKETING AND SALES First Year (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Business Accounting 1A English Communication Module 4 Marketing 1A Practice of Selling 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M)

Course Code Prerequisite ITM111S None BAC1100 ECM0400 MAR111S POS111S PIS121S None English Proficiency Test None None None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B English Communication Module 4 (If not yet taken) Marketing 1B Practice of Selling 1B Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) (if not yet taken) Principles of Information Systems 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M) BAC1200 ECM0400 MAR112S POS112S ITM111S PIS122S

School of Business and Management None None None None None Principles of Information Systems 1A

NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics (or equivalent). Second Year - National Higher Certificate Sales Management (Follows on first year Certificate) (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 Basic Business Statistics 1A English Comunication Module 5 Marketing 2A Practice of Sales Management 1A And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Principles of Economics 1A Semester 4 Basic Business Statistics 1B English Communication Module 6 Marketing 2B Practice of Sales Management 1B And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Principles of Economics 1B BBS111S ECM0500 MAR211S PSM111S BMA111S PEC111S BBS112S ECM0600 MAR212S PSM112S BMA112S PEC112S Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) English Communication Module 4 Marketing 1A & 1B Practice of Selling 1A & 1B None None Basic Business Statistics 1A English Communication Module 5 Marketing 1A & 1B Practice of Selling 1A & 1B None None

Third Year - National Diploma Marketing (Follows on second year Higher Certificate) (Not available in 2009) Semester 5 Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A Commercial Law 1A Entrepreneurship Marketing 3A Marketing Communication Strategy 1A Semester 6 Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Commercial Law 1B CBB111S CML111S ENT111S MAR311S MCS111S CBB112S CML112S Marketing 1A & 1B None None Marketing 2A & 2B Marketing 1A & 1B Marketing 1A & 1B Commercial Law 1A

55

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Marketing 3B Marketing Communication Strategy 1B Small Business Management MAR312S MCS112S SBM112S

School of Business and Management Marketing 2A & 2B Marketing 1A & 1B Entrepreneurship

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology Marketing (Phasing out at the end of 2009) (Offered on Full-time and Part-time mode only) Additional Admission Requirements: Diploma in Marketing or equivalent NOTE: Students with old National Marketing diplomas, those with equivalent or non-equivalent national diplomas enrolling for the final stage of the old Bachelor of Technology Marketing programme must also register for and pass these core courses as indicated below. However, the student can claim for recognition of prior learning (RPL) where applicable. National Diploma: Business Administration: Marketing 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B and 3A & 3B, Practice of Selling 1A & 1B, Practice of Sales Management 1A & 1B, Consumer Buyer Behaviour 1A & 1B, Marketing Communication Strategies 1A & 1B. National Diploma: Human Resources Management: Entrepreneurship, Marketing 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B; 3A & 3B, Practice of Sales Management 1A & 1B, Practice of Selling 1A & 1B, Commercial Law 1A & 1B, Consumer Buyer Behaviour 1A & 1B, Marketing Communication Strategies 1A & 1B, Small Business Management and Introduction to Mathematics, Basic Business Statistics 1A & 1B. Semester 7 Customer Care and Customer Management Distribution Channel Management 1A International Marketing Management 1A Marketing 4A CCC111S DCM111S IMM111S MAR411S None None Marketing 3A & 3B Marketing 3A & 3B and Promotional Strategy or Marketing Communication Strategy 1A & 1B or Advertising & Sales Promotion Marketing 3A & 3B and Consumer & Buyer Behaviour 1A None None

Marketing Research Practice 1A Research Methodology, Dissertation and Project (Offered Part-time mode Only) or Research Methodology (Offered Full-time mode Only) Optional Electives Basic German or Basic French or Basic Portuguese or Basic Spanish Financial Planning and Control 1A Marketing of Financial Services 1A Semester 8 Distribution Channel Management 1B Electronic Marketing

MRP111S RDP400Y RMA411S

BAG111S BAF111S BAP111S BAS111S FPC111S MFS111S DCM112S ELM112S

None None None None None Marketing 1A & 1B None None

56

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

International Marketing Management 1B IMM112S Marketing 4B MAR412S

School of Business and Management Marketing 3A & 3B Marketing 3A & 3B and Promotional Strategy or Marketing Communication Strategy 1A &1B or Advertising & Sales Promotion Marketing 3A & 3B and Consumer & Buyer Behaviour 1A Research Methodology None None None None None Marketing 1A and 1B

Marketing Research Practice 1B

MRP112S

Research Project (Offered Full time only) RPB412S Optional Electives Basic German or Basic French or Basic Portuguese or Basic Spanish Financial Planning and Control 1B Marketing of Financial Services 1B BAG111S BAF111S BAP111S BAS111S FPC112S MFS112S

*Note 1: (Choice courses will be taken as 1A and 1B of the same course over the two semesters). *Note 2: (When the B-Tech is extended to full-time mode in the near future, the minimum study period for the B-Tech will be one year, consisting of the indicated 6 semester courses in the first half of the year and the 6 semester courses in the second half of the year). Important Notice: Research Project - RPB412S Research Projects require that every student be allocated a supervisor who is normally a member of staff at the Polytechnic. In order to facilitate this process, all students may be required, in addition to the normal course registration, to register with the Department. Such registration may be in the form of student name, student number and the topic on which the Research Project will be based. The department retains the right to veto the choice of supervisor based on the academic requirements of a supervisor. Research Project topics must be in the student's field of specialisation. No retention of semester mark for continuous assessment courses, namely Research Methodology, Research Project and Research Methodology, Dissertation and Project and Entrepreneurship.

57

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

School of Business and Management

Admission Requirements The requirements for admission to the Master of International Business programme are as follows: · · · · · A recognised 4-year Bachelor degree or its equivalent qualification or a recognised graduate degree with a research component; At least two years of relevant full-time work experience; Computer Literacy and a proven proficiency in English language; Be employed or self-employed during the programme; and Exceptions may be based on the recognition of prior learning and candidates must demonstrate that they possess the necessary learning abilities to succeed in the program.

Apart from the admission requirements listed above, all the students admitted will be required to work through the text book "Business Explained" prior to their first lectures. Mastering of the contents will be tested and the Polytechnic reserves the right in case of poor performance in the test to cancel or defer the admission. Programme Duration The modular Master's of International Business programme will be covered over a minimum period of two (2) years if the thesis is done concurrently with the specialisation modules in the fourth phase. Programme Structure The programme is divided into four phases: theory and practice, value creation, networking across cultures and managing for results. All the modules in phases I to III are considered core management areas and are therefore compulsory for all the prospective candidates except for exchange students who are assumed to have covered the equivalent in their countries. The modules in phase IV are optional and at least one area must be taken in addition to the core modules. (For further details on the Master of International Business, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009.)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT INTRODUCTION OF NEW PROGRAMME 2007

School of Business and Management

The department introduced a new Bachelor qualification for its programme in 2007. The old programme was phased out with effect from 2007 which means that the first year of the old programme was no longer offered as from 2007, while the second year is no longer offered from 2008. Special Academic Regulations Progression Rule 1: There was a complete switch to the new curriculum as from 2007 for only the new intake [first year students], and from there onward the rest of the new Bachelor curriculum would be systematically phased in while the old B-Tech programme is systematically phased out; with the year 2012 being the final date for the award of the B-Tech degree. Progression Rule 2: A student might not be allowed to take a higher level course above his/her current level of study even if the course in question has no prerequisite, and if such courses cannot be offered to the student on genuine academic grounds. Rules for the Award of the National Cerificate in Business Studies The new National Certificate in Business Studies shall be awarded to students only after successful completion and credit-passes for all common Business Management courses in the first year plus Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B and Principles of Economics 1A & 1B on the second year level. General Transition Rules The general transition rules for the programme is as follows: 1. 2. 3. All new enrolments as from 2007 start with the new curriculum. All 2nd year students in 2007 who failed (i.e. less than 50% of credits obtained) must switch to the new curriculum in 2008. All 2nd year students in 2007 who have passed may continue with the old curriculum, but if such students should fail any of the courses in the old curriculum, such failed courses in the old curriculum will only be offered with new syllabi and students must complete the new courses. The last date for completion of the old curriculum is 2012, after which the students in the old curriculum must automatically switch to the new curriculum and make up all outstanding courses from the new curriculum. Students who do not progress every year must switch to the new curriculum and make up all outstanding courses from the new curriculum. Third and Fourth Year students in 2008 have the choice to switch to the new curriculum and must be advised accordingly as to courses to make up on the new curriculum. There is no retention of semester mark for courses of which the syllabi had changed.

4.

5. 6. 7.

59

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management 21BHUR

BACHELOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (NEW) (Phased in 2007) Programme Transition Rules

Course(s) Failed Equivalent (New) The transition rule was applicable as from 2007 for the courses listed below: Business Management 1A & 1B (Any) Introduction to Business Management Human Resources Management 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Human Resources Management 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Marketing 1A Intro. to Marketing & its Environment Marketing 1B Marketing Principles The transition rule is only applicable as from 2008 for the courses listed below: Human Resources Management 2A Organisational Behaviour Human Resources Management 2B Organisational Management Business Management 2A Business Operations Business Management 2B Business Finance The transition rule is only applicable as from 2009 for the courses listed below: Human Resources Management 3A Human Resource Staffing Human Resources Management 3B Employee Health and Safety Industrial Relations 1A & 1B (Any) Industrial Relations Small Business Management Small & Medium Enterprises Management Management of Training 1A Introduction to Education Training and Development Management of Training 1B Principles of Education, Training and Development Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship The transition rule is only applicable as from 2010 for the courses listed below: Advanced Industrial Relations 2A & 2B (Any) Advanced Industrial Relations Advanced Management of Training 4A & 4B (Any) Advanced Management of Training Human Resources Management 4A & 4B (Any) Strategic Human Resources Management CURRICULUM First Year ­ National Certificate in Business Studies (Phased in 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisite Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Communication Skills CSK0420 English Proficiency Test Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (Business & Management) Intro. to Marketing & its Environment MAR121S None Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources IPH121S None Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B Business Ethics & Leadership Professional Writing BAC1200 BEL112S PRW0520 60 None None Communication Skills

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Introduction to Human Resources Management Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) (if not yet taken) Marketing Principles HRM122S ITM111S MAR122S

School of Business and Management None None None

NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics (or equivalent). Second Year (Phased in 2008) Semester 3 Organisational Behaviour Basic Business Statistics 1A Professional Comunication Labour Law 1A Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Information System 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M) Semester 4 Organisational Management Basic Business Statistics 1B Professional Communication (if not yet taken) Labour Law 1B Principles of Economics 1B Principles of Information System 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M)

ORB221S BBS111S PFC0620 LAL111S PEC111S PIS121S

Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources & Introduction to Human Resources Management Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) Professional Writing None None None

ORM222S BBS112S PFC0620 LAL112S PEC112S PIS122S

Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources & Introduction to Human Resources Management Basic Business Statistics 1A Professional Writing Labour Law 1A None Principles of Information System 1A

Third Year - National Diploma: Human Resources Management (Phasing in 2009) Semester 5 Entrepreneurship ENT321S None Business Operations BSO221S None Human Resource Staffing HRS311S Organisational Behaviour & Organisational Management Introduction to Education Training ETD321S None and Development Organisational Development and ODC311S Organisational Behaviour & Change Organisational Management Semester 6 Business Finance Employee Health and Safety BFS222S EHS312S None Organisational Behaviour & Organisational Management

61

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Industrial Relations Principles of Education, Training and Development Small and Medium Enterprises Management IRL322S PTD322S SME322S

School of Business and Management Labour Law 1A & 1B None None

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Human Resources Management (Phasing in 2010) Additional Admission Requirements Students with the old National Diploma in HRM, Personnel Management and those with equivalent and non-equivalent National Diplomas enrolling for the final stage of the Bachelor degree in the Human Resources Management programme, must also register and pass all core courses as indicated below. However, the student can claim for recognition of prior learning (RPL) where applicable. Students who have completed the National Diploma's listed below can enrol for the Bachelor Human Resources Management provided that they register and pass the additional courses listed below, unless the course(s) were already passed or credit obtained for them: National Diploma in Human Resources Management/National Diploma: Personnel Management: Human Resource Staffing, Employee Health and Safety, Organisational Development and Change, Industrial Relations, Introduction to Education Training and Development, Principles of Education Training and Development, Labour Law. National Diploma: Business Administration: Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources, Introduction to Human Resources Management, Organisational Behaviour, Organisational Management, Human Resource Staffing, Employee Health and Safety, Industrial Relations, Labour Law 1A & 1B, Introduction to Education Training and Development, Principles of Education, Training and Development. National Diploma: Commerce: Introduction to Business Management , Business Ethics & Leadership, Business Operations, Business Finance, Purchasing and Supply Management Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management , Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources, Introduction to Human Resources Management, Organisational Behaviour, Organisational Management, Human Resource Staffing, Employee Health and Safety, Industrial Relations, Labour Law 1A & 1B and Introduction to Education Training and Development, Principles of Education, Training and Development. National Diploma: Public Administration or Public Management: Introduction to Business Management , Business Ethics & Leadership, Business Operations, Business Finance, Purchasing and Supply Management , Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management , Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources, Introduction to Human Resources Management, Organisational Behaviour, Organisational Management, Human Resource Staffing, Employee Health and Safety, Industrial Relations, Labour Law 1A & 1B and Introduction to Education Training and Development, Principles of Education, Training and Development. Semester 7 Advanced Industrial Relations Advanced Management of Training Research Methodology Strategic Human Resources Management AIR421S AMT421S RMA411S SHR421S Industrial Relations Introduction to Education Training and Development & Principles of Education, Training & Development None Human Resource Staffing & Employee Health and Safety

62

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 8 Advanced Organisational Development and Change Compensation Management Research Project [HR] ADC412 CMA412S RPB412S

School of Business and Management Organisational Development and Change Human Resource Staffing RMA411S 21BHRM

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (OLD CURRICULUM) (Phased out from 2006) First Year (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Business Accounting 1A Business Management 1A English Communication Module 4 Introductionto Mathematics (Business & Management) Human Resources Management 1A Principles of Economics 1A Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B Business Management 1B English Communication Module 4 (If not yet taken) Introduction to Mathematics (Bus & Management) (If not yet taken) Human Resources Management 1B Principles of Economics 1B

Course Code Prerequisite BAC1100 None BMA111S None ECM0400 English Proficiency Test ITM111S None HRM111S PEC111S BAC1200 BMA112S ECM0400 ITM111S HRM112S PEC112S None None None None English Proficiency Test None None None

Second Year (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 Human Resources Management 2A HRM211S Business Management 2A Labour Law 1A Management of Training 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Semester 4 Human Resources Management 2B Business Management 2B Labour Law 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B Management of Training 1B BMA211S LAL111S MOT111S PIS121S HRM212S BMA212S LAL112S PIS122S MOT112S

Human Resources Management 1A & 1B Business Management 1A & 1B None None None Human Resources Management 1A & 1B Business Management 1A & 1B Labour Law 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A None

63

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

Third Year - National Diploma: Human Resources Management (Not available in 2009) Semester 5 Human Resources Management 3A HRM311S Human Resources Management 2A & 2B Business Management 3A BMA311S Business Management 2A & 2B Industrial Relations 1A IRL111S None English Communication Module 5 ECM0500 English Communication Module 4 Semester 6 Human Resources Management 3B Business Management 3B Industrial Relations 1B English Communication Module 6 HRM312S BMA312S IRL112S ECM0600 Human Resources Management 2A & 2B Business Management 2A & 2B None English Communication Module 5

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology: Human Resources Management (Phasing out at the end of 2009) (Offered on Full-time and Part-time only) Additional Admission Requirements: National Diploma in Human Resources Management. Students who have completed the National Diploma's listed below can enrol for the old B.Tech Human Resources Management provided that they register and pass the additional courses listed below: National Diploma: Business Administration: Human Resources Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B and 3A & 3B, Industrial Relations 1A & 1B, Labour Law 1A & 1B and Management of Training 1A & 1B. National Diploma: Commerce: Business Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B; 3A & 3B; Human Resources Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B; 3A & 3B, Industrial Relations 1A & 1B, Labour Law 1A & 1B and Management of Training 1A & 1B. National Diploma: Personnel Management: Industrial Relations 1A & 1B and Management of Training 1A & 1B. National Diploma: Public Administration or Public Management: Business Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B; 3A & 3B; Human Resources Management 1A & 1B; 2A & 2B; 3A & 3B, Labour Law 1A & 1B, Industrial Relations 1A & 1B, Management of Training 1A & 1B Semester 7 Advanced Industrial Relations 2A Advanced Management of Training 2A Advanced Organisational Development Business Management 4A Human Resources Management 4A Research Methodology Semester 8 Advanced Industrial Relations 2B Advanced Management of Training 2B Advanced Organisational Management Business Management 4B AIR211S AMT211S AOD111S BMA411S HRM411S RMA411S AIR212S AMT212S AOM112S BMA412S Industrial Relations 1A & 1B Management of Training 1A & 1B None Business Management 3A & 3B Human Resources Management 3A & 3B None Industrial Relations 1A & 1B Management of Training 1A & 1B None Business Management 3A & 3B

64

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Human Resources Management 4B Research Project HRM412S RPB412S

School of Business and Management Human Resources Management 3A & 3B Research Methodology

Important Notice: Research Project - RPB412S Research Projects require that every student be allocated a supervisor who is normally a member of staff at the Polytechnic. In order to facilitate this process, all students may be required, in addition to the normal course registration, to register with the Department. Such registration may be in the form of student name, student number and the topic on which the Research Project will be based. The department retains the right to veto the choice of supervisor based on the academic requirements of a supervisor. Research Project topics must be in the student's field of specialisation. No retention of semester mark for continuous assessment courses, namely Research Methodology, Research Project and Research Methodology, Dissertation and Project.

65

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

DEPARTMENT OF OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY The department offers all courses on a part-time as well as a full-time basis. The courses Administrative Office Management 1, 2 and 3, Information Administration 1, 2 and 3 and Speech and Deportment are also offered on the distance education mode. Information Administration consists of practical and theoretical parts. A minimum of ten students should be registered for any specific course. Practicals Practicals are required for Information Administration. Attendance Full-time students for Information Administration are required to attend 8 hours of lectures per week. Part-time students for Information Administration are required to attend 6 hours of lectures per week. For the other courses, Administrative Office Management and Speech and Deportment full-time students are required to attend 4 hours of lectures per week and part-time students 3 hours per week respectively. Students registered on the distance education mode for any of the courses in Information Administration are required to attend compulsory vacation schools during January, April, July and August of each year. Admission Requirements In addition to the general admission requirements of the Polytechnic of Namibia the following shall apply: Students who wish to register for Information Administration 1A on the part-time or distance education modes should be able to type 20 words per minute. A pass in Language in Practice A of the English Proficiency Test, which is a prerequisite for Language in Practice B, taught to first year students is also a requirement. Students who only gain entry into Language in Practice A could also be admitted, but will be required to advance to Language in Practice B before their third year of study. Students with a C symbol in English at Ordinary level may be admitted prior to receiving the outcome of their English Proficiency Test, but they will also be required to advance to Language in Practice B before their third year of study. Mature age students with at least a Grade 10 certificate, or equivalent, or candidates with foreign qualifications, may be admitted in terms of the Polytechnic's Mature Age Entry Scheme. Selection for mature age entry will be by means of appropriate written entrance tests, three years work experience, satisfactory references and passing of the Polytechnic English Proficiency test. Keyboarding This course is aimed at individuals who would like to become keyboard literate (touch type) and acquire basic computer skills. The keyboarding course is a semester course which will be offered on a full-time and a parttime basis and can be taken during either semester one or semester two. On successful completion of this course students will receive an attendance certificate which will also indicate the speed they have attained. Those students who complete this course with a speed of at

66

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management

least 20 w.p.m. will meet the prerequisite for Information Administration 1A on the part-time and distance modes. BACHELOR OF OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY (Phased in 2007) 25BOMT

Admission for Graduates with Equivalent Qualifications: Graduates of the phased-out National Diploma Executive Secretary, who wish to register for the degree, must have passed Information Administration 3A and 3B as well as Office Administration 3A and 3B before commencing with the degree. Students enrolling for the degree will also be required to register for Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management as these courses are pre-requisites for Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management which are compulsory courses for the degree. Students with any equivalent diploma who want to register for the fourth level of the Bachelor of Office Management and Technology will be evaluated on an individual basis, in consultation with the Registrar, in order to obtain admission to the fourth level of the degree. Exit Levels The National Certificate: Office Management and Technology after successful completion of at least one year of study. The National Diploma: Office Management and Technology after successful completion of three years of study. The Bachelor Degree: Office Management and Technology after successful completion of four years of study. Transition Rules The transition from the existing to the new diploma will involve that, if not yet taken, students should register for Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management. Business Accounting 1A & 1B and Business Accounting 2A & 2B which are pre-requisites for an elective at the Bachelor level. While completing these courses, students can register for some of the other courses offered in Semesters 7 and 8 for which they qualify. All students who comply with the pre-requisites will be able to register for the Bachelor of Office Management and Technology as from 2007. Special Progression Rules for Information Administration Progression from one Information Administration course to the next is allowed only in the event of a student having satisfied the pass requirement in a formal examination for these courses. All practical and theoretical papers of a course should be written in the same examination session. Pass Requirements Information Administration 1, 2, 3 and 4. A student passes the examination if s/he obtains an average final mark of 50 % or more, subject to the sub-minimum of 35 % per examination paper. The final mark consists of: 50 % of the semester mark and 50 % of the examination mark.

67

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

CURRICULUM

School of Business and Management

First Year - National Certificate Office Management and Technology Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisite Information Administration 1A IAD111S None Administrative Office Management 1A AOM121S None Speech and Deportment 1A SDP111S None Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Communication Skills CSK0420 Language in Practice B Semester 2 Information Administration 1B Administrative Office Management 1B Speech and Deportment 1B Business Ethics and Leadership Second Year Semester 3 Information Administration 2A Administrative Office Management 2A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Professional Writing And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Business Operations Semester 4: Information Administration 2B Administrative Office Management 2B Introduction to Human Resources Management Professional Communication And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Business Finance IAD112S AOM122S SDP112S BEL112S Information Administration 1A None None None

IAD211S AOM221S IPH111S PFW0520 LPT111S BAC1100 PEC111S BSO221S IAD212S AOM222S HRM122S PFC0620 LPT112S BAC1200 PEC112S BFS222S

Information Administration 1A & 1B Administrative Office Management 1A & 1B None Communication Skills None None None None Information Administration 2A Administrative Office Management 1A & 1B None Professional Writing Legal Practice 1A None None None

Third Year - National Diploma Office Management and Technology Semester 5: Administrative Office Management 3A AOM321S Administrative Office Management 2A & 2B Information Administration 3A IAD311S Information Administration 2A & 2B Public Relations 1A PRL311S None And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1A LPT111S None 68

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Commercial Law 1A Principles of Economics 1A Intermediate Microeconomics Business Accounting 1A Business Accounting 2A Business Operations Semester 6: Information Administration 3B Administrative Office Management 3B Public Relations 1B And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1B Commercial Law 1B Principles of Economics 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics Business Accounting 1B Business Accounting 2B Business Finance CML111S PEC111S IME211S BAC1100 BAC211S BSO221S IAD312S AOM322S PRL312S LPT112S CML112S PEC112S IME212S BAC1200 BAC212S BFS222S

School of Business and Management None None Principles of Economics 1A None Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Information Administration 3A Administrative Office Management 3A Public Relations 1A Legal Practice 1A Commercial Law 1A None Principles of Economics 1B None Business Accounting 1A & 1B None

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Office Management and Technology Semester 7: Information Administration 4A IAD411S Information Administration 3A & 3B Administrative Office Management 4A AOM411S Administrative Office Management 3A & 3B Organisational Behaviour ORB221S Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management Research Methodology RMA411S None And any ONE of the following: Entrepreneurship ENT321S None Financial Management 1A NFM111S Business Accounting 2A & 2B Labour Law 1A LAL111S None Semester 8: Information Administration 4B Administrative Office Management 4B Organisational Management IAD412S AOM412S ORM222S Information Administration 4A Administrative Office Management 4A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management Research Methodology None Business Accounting 2A & 2B Labour Law 1A

Research Project And any ONE of the following: Small & Medium Enterprises Management Financial Management 1B Labour Law 1B

RPB412S SBM322S NFM112S LAL112S

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION (Old curriculum phased out end of 2006) First Year Semester 1 Course Title Information Administration 1A Office Administration 1A Speech and Deportment 1A English Communication Module 4 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Legal Practice 1A Semester 2 Information Administration 1B Office Administration 1B Speech and Deportment 1B And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Legal Practice 1B Second Year Semester 3 Information Administration 2A Office Administration 2A English Communication Module 5 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Intermediate Microeconomics Legal Practice 1A Business Management 2A Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A Semester 4 Information Administration 2B Office Administration 2B English Communication Module 6

School of Business and Management 25DIAD

Course Code IAD111S OAD111S SDP111S ECM0400 BMA111S BAC1100 PEC111S LPT111S IAD112S OAD112S SDP112S BMA112S BAC1200 PEC112S LPT112S

Prerequisite None None None English Communication Module 3 None None None None Information Admin 1A None None None None None Legal Practice 1A

IAD211S OAD211S ECM0500

Information Administration 1A &1B Office Administration 1A & 1B English Communication Module 4 None None None Principles of Economics 1A None Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Information Administratin 2A Office Administration 2A English Communication Module 5

BMA111S BAC1100 PEC111S IME211S LPT111S BMA211S BAC211S CML111S IAD212S OAD212S ECM0600

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics Legal Practice 1B Business Management 2B Business Accounting 2B Commercial Law 1B Third Year Semester 5 Information Administration 3A Office Administration 3A Secretarial Public Relations 1A And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Legal Practice 1A Business Management 2A Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A Intermediate Microeconomics Applied Economic Policy Analysis Business Management 3A Semester 6: Information Administration 3B Office Administration 3B Secretarial Public Relations 1B And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Legal Practice 1B Business Management 2B Business Accounting 2B Commercial Law 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics International Trade Business Management 3B BMA112S BAC1200 PEC112S IME212S LPT112S BMA212S BAC212S CML112S

School of Business and Management None None None Priciples of Economics 1B Legal Practice 1A Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A

IAD311S OAD311S SPR311S BMA111S BAC1100 PEC111S LPT111S BMA211S BAC211S CML111S IME211S AEP311S BMA311S

Information Administration 2B Office Administration 2A & 2B None None None None None Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Principles of Economics 1A Intermediate Micro & Macroeconomics Business Management 2A & 2B Information Administration 3A Office Admininistration 3A Secretarial Public Relations 1A None None None Legal Practice 1A Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A Principles of Economics 1B Intermediate Micro & Macroeconomics Business Management 2A & 2B

IAD312S OAD312S SPR312S BMA112S BAC1200 PEC112S LPT112S BMA212S BAC212S CML112S IME212S ITT312S BMA312S

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: ECONOMICS

School of Business and Management

23BECO

Regulations Admission requirements Applicants holding diploma qualifications of this or of any other recognised tertiary institution and who wish to enroll into the programme will be admitted on merit and on a case by case basis, depending on the assessment of the applicant's suitability as well as availability of facilities and resources. Prospective students wishing to enroll for the programme but without all the required courses shall be asked to do those courses that they are missing as arrears. Prospective secondary school students must have passed Mathematics with a D or better symbol at the Ordinary level. Applicants who score a B or better in Mathematics will not be required to do and pass Introduction to Mathematics, ITM 111S, first. Transition Rules Although there are no perceived transition problems, it is possible that some students who, for one reason or another, repeat courses, may find themselves adversely affected during the course of implementing this programme. Such students should consult the Head of Department who will advise them as best as he can in terms of transition rules. First Year - Bachelor of Technology: Economics (Offered Full Time and Part Time) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Mathematics for Social Sciences 1A MSS111S Introduction to Mathematics or a B or better symbol in Mathematics at the Ordinary level Principles of Information Systems 1A PIS121S None Basic Business Statistics 1A BBS111S Introduction to Mathematics or a B or better symbol in Mathematics at Ordinary level Communication Skills CSK0420 Language in Practice B And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Semester 2 Principles of Economics 1B Mathematics for Social Sciences 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B Basic Business Statistics 1B Professional Writing And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 1B Business Ethics and Leadership PEC112S MSS112S PIS122S BBS112S PRW0520 BAC1200 BEL112S None Mathematics for Social Science 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Basic Business Statistics 1A Communication Skills None None

Second Year (Offered Full-time and Part-time) Semester 3 Intermediate Microeconomics IME211S Mathematics for Economists MEC211S

Principles of Economics 1A Mathematics for Social Sciences 1A & 1B

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Money and Banking Professional Communication And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 2A Business Operations Semester 4 Intermediate Macroeconomics Mathematical Economics Financial Intermediation and Institutional Investment Economics of Agriculture & Rural Development And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 2B Business Finance MAB211S PFC0620 BAC211S BSO221S IME212S MEC212S FII212S EAR212S BAC212S BSF222S

School of Business and Management Principles of Economics1 B Professional Writing Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Principles of Economics 1B Mathematics for Social Sciences 1A & 1B None None Business Accounting 1A & 1B None

Third Year (Offered Full Time and Part Time) Semester 5 Applied Economic Policy Analysis AEP311S Applied Mathematical Economics Statistics for Economists Managerial Economics And any ONE of the following: Business Management 3A Economics of Growth & Development Semester 6 Public Finance & Taxation International Trade International Finance Econometrics And any ONE of the following: Business Management 3B Industrial Economics AME311S SEC311S MEN311S BMA311S EGD311S PFT312S ITT312S IFN312S ECM312S BMA312S IEC312S

Intermediate Microeconomics & Macroeconomics Mathematics for Economists & Mathematical Economics Basic Business Statistics 1A & 1B Intermediate Microeconomics Business Management 2A & 2B Intermediate Macroeconomics Principles of Economics 1A & 1B Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Economics 1A Statistics for Economists Business Management 2A & 2B Intermediate Microeconomics

Fourth Year (Offered on Full-time and Part-time) Semester 7 Research Methodology RMA411S None Economics of Namibia & SACU Countries 4A ECN411S None And any THREE of the following: (These courses will be offered if and when resources permit and if there is a minimum required number of students enrolled for the course in question.) Project Planning & Management Transport Economics Mortgage Finance and Real Estate Investment History of Economic Thought PPM411S TEC411S MFI411S HET411S None None None None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Corporate Finance Analytical Economic History Planning Techniques Labour Economics Semester 8 Research Project Economics of Namibia & SACU Countries 4B CFN411S AEH411S PLT411S LEC411S RPB412S ECN412S

School of Business and Management None None None None Research Methodology & Econometrics None

74

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC MANAGEMENT Transition Rules Course Failed: Public Administration 1 Economics 1 Human Resources Management 1 Financial Accounting 1 Public Administration 2 Commercial Law Human Resources Management 2 Economics 2 Financial Accounting 2 Public Administration 3 Human Resources Management 3 Economics 3 Financial Accounting 3 Law (Public Administration) Auditing 1

School of Business and Management

24BPMA

Course to Repeat: Introduction to Public Management and Public Management in Namibia Principles of Economics 1A and Principles of Economics 1B Introduction to Psycology of Human Resources Introduction to Human Resources Management Financial Accounting 1A and Financial Accounting 1B Public Human Resources Management and Public Financial Management Commercial Law 1A and Commercial Law 1B Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management Intermediate Microeconomics and Intermediate Macroeconomics Financial Accounting 2A and Financial Accounting 2B Public Policy Organisational Theories Human Resources Management 3A and Human Resources Management 3B Applied Economic Policy Analysis and International Trade Financial Accounting 3A and Financial Accounting 3B Law for Public Managers 1A and Law for Public Managers 1B Auditing 3A and Auditing 3B 24BPMA

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC MANAGEMENT

First Year - Certificate in Public Management Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Introduction to Public Management IPM111S None Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Basic Mathematics BMS1100 None Basic Business Statistics 1A BBS111S Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) / Basic Mathematics or Grade 12 symbol B or better Introduction to Sociology ISO0100 None Language in Practice B LPB0320 English Proficiency Test

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Semester 2 Public Management in Namibia Communication Skills Basic Business Statistics 1B Principles of Economics 1B Basic Mathematics (if not yet taken) Introduction to Political Science And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management BAC1100 IPH111S PMN112S CSK0420 BBS112S PEC112S BMS1100 IPS0100 BAC1200 HRM122S

School of Business and Management None None Introduction to Public Management Language in Practice B Basic Business Statistics 1A None None None None None

NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Basic Mathematics if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics (or equivalent). Second Year Semester 3 Principles of Information Systems 1A Professional Writing Public Human Resources Management Regional & Local Government And any ONE of the following: Intermediate Microeconomics Business Accounting 2A Organisational Behaviour

PIS121S PFW0520 PHR211S RLG211S IME211S BAC211S ORB221S

None Communication Skills Introduction to Public Management Introduction to Public Management Principles of Economics 1A Business Accounting 1A & 1B Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources & Introduction to Human Resources Management Principles of Information Systems 1A Public Management in Namibia Regional and Local Government Professional Writing Principles of Economics 1B Business Accounting 1A & 1B Intro to Psychology of Human Resources & Introduction to Human Resources Management

Semester 4 Principles of Information Systems 1B Public Financial Management Regional & Local Government in Namibia Professional Communication And any ONE of the following: Intermediate Macroeconomics Business Accounting 2B Organisational Management

PIS122S PFM212S RLG212S PFC0620 IME212S BAC212S ORM222S

Third Year - National Diploma in Public Management Semester 5 Public Policy PBP311S Law for Public Managers 1A LPM111S Development Management DMA111S International Relations & Organisations IRO311S

Public Management in Namibia None Introduction to Public Management None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

And any ONE of the following: Applied Economic Policy Analysis Financial Management 1A Human Resource Staffing Semester 6 Organisational Theories Law for Public Managers 1B Comparative Local Government And any ONE of the following: International Trade Financial Management 1B Employee Health and Safety AEP311S NFM111S HRS311S

School of Business and Management Intermediate Microeconomics & Macroeconomics Business Accounting 2A & 2B Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management Introduction to Public Management None Regional and Local Government Principles of Economics 1A Business Accounting 2A & 2B Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management 24BPMA

OTP112S LPM112S CLG112S ITT312S NFM112S EHS321S

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC MANAGEMENT Public Management with Development Management Specialisation Fourth Year Semester 7 Research Methodology Comparative Public Management Project Planning & Management And any TWO of the following: Economics of Nam. & SACU Countries 4A Regional Development Planning Management of Public Enterprises Governance and Politics in Africa Human Resources Management 4A Semester 8 Research Project Ethics & Accountability And any THREE of the following: Economics of Namibia and SACU Countries 4B Advanced Development Management Community Development Management Industrial & Labour Relations Human Resources Management 4B Public Private Partnership Management

RMA411S CPM411S PPM411S ECN411S RDP411S MPE411S GPA411S HRM411S RPB412S ETA412S ECN412S ADM412S CDM422S ILR412S HRM412S PPM412S

None Public Management in Namibia None None Regional & Local Government Public Management in Namibia Introduction to Political Science Human Resources Management 3A & 3B Research Methodology None None Development Management Regional and Local Government None Human Resources Management 3A & 3B Public Management in Namibia

Note: Students who wish to enrol for Advanced Development Management must take note that the prerequisite for the course is Development Management. However, students can enrol concurrently for Development Management and the B-Tech courses during the first semester.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Business and Management 24BPMA

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC MANAGEMENT Public Management with Regional and Local Government Specialisation Fourth Year Semester 7 Research Methodology Comparative Public Management Project Planning & Management And any TWO of the following: Regional and Local Government Finance Regional Development Planning Governance & Politics in Africa Semester 8 Ethics & Accountability Research Project And any THREE of the following: Regional & Local Government Personnel Community Development Management Environmental Management Advanced Development Management Industrial & Labour Relations Public Private Partnership Management

RMA411S CPM411S PPM411S LGP411S RDP411S GPA411S ETA412S RPB412S LGP412S CDM422S EMA412S ADM412S ILR412S PPM412S

None Public Management in Namibia None Regional & Local Government Regional & Local Government Introduction to Political Science None Research Methodology Regional & Local Government Regional and Local Government None Development Management None Public Management in Namibia

Additional Requirement Students who have completed the National Diploma Public Administration at the Polytechnic of Namibia and other tertiary institutions, can enrol for the B.Tech Public Management provided they have completed the following 4 (four) non-diploma courses: 1 Principles of Information Systems 1A PIS121S None 2 Principles of Information Systems 1B PIS122S Principles of Information Systems 1A 1 Basic Mathematics BMS1100 None 1 Basic Business Statistics 1A BBS111S Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management)/ Basic Mathematics or Grade 12 symbol B or better 2 Basic Business Statistics 1B BBS112S Basic Business Statistics 1A 1 & 2 Professional Communication PFC0620 Professional Writing 1 Regional and Local Government RLG211S Introduction to Public Management (Public Administration 1) Students can enrol concurrently for both the B.Tech Public Management courses and the non-diploma courses. The non-diploma courses are offered on the full, part time and distance education mode.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION OFFICE OF THE DEAN Dean Faculty Officer Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address

School of Communication

: Sarala Krishnamurthy, Post Grad. Diploma in the Teaching of English, B.Sc., M.A. English, Ph.D. in Styllistics & African Lit. (Bangalore) : Petsy Neiss, ND Nursing Science (UNAM) : 061-207-2160 : 061-207-2401 : [email protected] : Celeste Zaahl, ND Exec. Secr. (PoN) : 061-207-2325 : 061-207-2212 : [email protected]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION Head of Department : Elisabeth Wittmann, Cert. OET (London); B.A., B.Ed., M. Phil (Stellenbosch), U.E.D., B.A. (Hons) (UNISA) Secretary : Beverley Tjejamba, Certificate in Secretarial and Computer Studies: MicroWorld Namibia, Secretarial Diploma: Namibia College of Excellence Telephone Number : 061 - 207 2443 Fax Number : 061 - 207 2310 E-mail Address : [email protected] Administrative Assistant : Monica Mundjindi, Dip. Office Administration E-mail Address : [email protected] Deputy Head of Department : Fred Opali, Teachers Cert. (Uganda); B.A. (Hons); Dip. Ed.; M.A.; Cert (Designing and Writing DE Courses) (Makerere); LCIBM (SA); Cert. OET (London) Academic Staff : Sarala Krishnamurthy, Post Graduate Diploma in Teaching of English; B.Sc.; M.A. in English; Ph.D. in Stylistics and African Literature (Bangalore) : Fred Opali, Teachers Cert. (Uganda); B.A. (Hons); Dip. Ed.; M.A.; Cert (Designing and Writing DE Courses) (Makerere); LCIBM (SA); Cert. OET (London) : Jairos Kangira, Cert. Ed (UZ); Dip. Journalism & Professional Writing (UK); B.A. (Unisa); B.A.(Hons) (UZ); M. Phil (UZ); Ph.D. (UCT) : Obododimma Oha, B.A.(Hons) (Calabar), M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan) : Alexander Brewis, Cert. OET (London); B.A.; H.E.D. (Stellenbosch); B.A.(Hons) (Unisa); M.Phil (Stellenbosch) : Juliet Eiseb, B.A.; H.E.D. (UWC); B.Ed (Hons) (UPE); M.Phil (Stellenbosch) : Tracy Grellmann, B.A.; H.E.D (UNAM); M.Phil (Stellenbosch) : Jeanne Hunter, B.A.; H.E.D. (Stellenbosch); Dip. Transl. (Unisa); B.Ed. (UNAM); Dipl. Linguistics (Surrey); Cert. OET (London)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication : Elina Ithindi, B.A. (Wittenberg); M.A. (Warwick); Cert. OET (London) : Rewai Makamani, B.A .(Hons); M.A.F.L.; MLSP.,GRAD.CE.,Cert. n Hum. Project Management (UZ); Cert. OET (London) : Juliet Pasi, B.A., B.A.(Hons), Grad Cert Ed., M.A. (UZ) : Alexandra Tjiramanga, M. A. ELT (Karl Franzens); Cert. OET (London) : Elisabeth Wittmann, B.A.; B.Ed.; M. Phil (Stellebosch); U.E.D.; B.A. (Hons) (Unisa); Cert. OET (London) : Jemima N. Hipondoka, B.Ed. (UNAM), M.Ed. (Monash) : Bronwen Beukes, H.E.D.; B.Ed (UNAM); Cert. OET (London) : Joanne Brandt, B.A.(UCT), H.E.D. (Unisa) : Caleb Gwasira, B.A. (UZ); Grad. C.E. (UZ);B.Ed (UNAM) : Marceline Naobes, B.Ed. (UNAM) : Emelda Ucham, B.A. (UNAM); B.A. ( Hons) (Unisa) : Antoinette Wentworth, Teachers Diploma (Khomasdal); H.E.D.; B.Ed (UNAM) (On Official Study Leave)

DEPARTMENT OF LEGAL STUDIES Head of Department: : Mariette Hanekom, B.A., Hons (Journalism), LL.B. (Stellenbosch), Legal Practitioner to the High Court of Namibia and Supreme Court of South Africa (Cape of Good Hope Provincial Division), Conveyancer and Notary, Sworn Translator of the High Court of Namibia (English/Afrikaans) Deputy Head of Department : Adv. Magda Saayman, B.Iuris. (UOFS), LL.B (UNISA) Academic Staff : Retha van Zyl, B.Sc. (Stellenbosch), Dip.Ed. (UNAM), B.Proc., LL.M (UNISA), Legal Practitioner to the High Court of Namibia : Hiltrud von Alten, B.A., LL.B. (UCT), Legal Practitioner to the High Court of Namibia : Stephan Schulz, 1st State Ex. Law (Saarbruecken), 2nd State Ex. Law (Zweibrucken), Doctor Iuris (Freiburg im Breisgau) : Emmy Musima Wabomba, B.Iuris LL.B (UNAM), Legal Practitioner to the High Court of Namibia : Stephnie de Villiers, B.A., LL.B (Stellenbosch), Legal Practitioner to the High Court of Namibia, Conveyancer : Tuhafeni Helao, Cert. Basic Police Training (Luiperd Valley Police College); Cert. Supervision and Management (IPI Police College); NCPA, NHCPA, NDPA (PoN); B.Admin (UNAM); MPA (UWC)

80

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication

DEPARTMENT OF MEDIA TECHNOLOGY Head of Department : Emily Brown, B.A. (Hons) (Communication) (UNISA), M.Sc. (Journalism/Mass Comm) (Iowa State) Lab/Studio Technician : François Andreas, Apple Certified Help Desk (Apple Online Course) Assistant, A+ Certified (Comptia Online Course) Project Officer : Cornelius Jacobus Bekker, Dip. In Journalism (Varsity College, RSA) Deputy Head of Department : Bertha Amakali, ND Journ. (Natal Technikon); MA Journ. Studies (Univ. of Wales, Cardiff) (UK) Academic Staff : Emily Brown, B.A. (Hons) (Communication) (UNISA); M.Sc. (Journalism/Mass Comm) (Iowa State) : Elva A. Gómez De Sibandze, ESL Cert. (Brigham Young University, USA), B.A. & M.A. Lang. & Literature (University of Utah, USA), Postgraduate Cert. in Translation, Culture and Communication (University of KwaZulu-Natal, RSA), PhD Candidate in Culture, Communication and Media Studies (University of KwaZulu-Natal, RSA) : Bertha Amakali, ND Journ. (Natal Technikon); MA Journ. Studies (Univ. of Wales, Cardiff) (UK) : Unomengi Kauapirura, BA (Mass Comm); College of Notre Dame, Maryland USA

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION Special Departmental Regulations A : GENERAL 1.

School of Communication

Provided there is adequate registration of students in a course, all courses shall be offered every semester. Only a limited number of students shall be registered every semester, subject to the availability of staff. Unless exempted from particular English Communication courses, on provisional admission to the Polytechnic, all incoming students shall be tested for placement in an appropriate English course. The applicable courses are Principles of Language Use (PLU0120), Language in Practice A (LPA0220), Language in Practice B (LPB0320), and Communication Skills (CSK0420). Except for Principles of Language Use which shall not require any prerequisite, all courses in English Communication shall have prerequisites or shall require placement and/or relevant exemptions. Students shall register for an English course within a year of writing the placement test. Students who do not do so shall be required to write the placement test again before registering for a course(s) in English Communication. Students who have English qualifications from other institutions and those with qualifications from institutions where English was the language of instruction may be required to write a placement test before registering for a course(s) in English Communication. The minimum credit-bearing requirement for English Communication is a pass in Module 4 or Communication Skills. The following courses are compulsory but not credit-bearing, subject to the provisions for placement testing and exemptions: Principles of Language Use Language in Practice A Language in Practice B

2.

3.

4.

5.

6. 7.

8.

From 2009, French, Portuguese, and Spanish shall, in addition to German, become credit-bearing courses and shall be offered as required by various programmes.

B : EXEMPTIONS 1. Students with a grade 1, 2, or 3 pass in English as a Second Language at HIGCSE (Higher International General Certificate of Secondary Education) or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Higher level or an equivalent school-leaving certificate examination shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students with a grade 1, 2, 3, or 4 pass in First Language English at HIGCSE or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Higher level or an equivalent school-leaving certificate examination shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B.

2.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

3.

School of Communication

Students with a grade A or a grade B pass in English as a Second Language at IGCSE or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary level or an equivalent schoolleaving certificate examination shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students with a grade A, B, or C pass in First Language English at IGCSE or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary level or an equivalent school-leaving certificate examination shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students who completed English Communication courses or their equivalents eight or more years previously shall not be exempted from any English Communication course.

4.

5.

C : EXIT LEVEL COURSES 1. Exit level courses shall be: Communication Skills (CSK0420), Professional Writing (PFW0520), Professional Communication (PFC0620), or Principles of Critical Thinking (PCT121S), subject to the requirements of individual programmes. Professional Writing, Professional Communication, and Principles of Critical Thinking may be taken in any order or simultaneously depending on the student's load and major programme or orientation.

2.

D : TRANSITION RULES 1. From the 2009 academic year, all full-time, part-time, and distance education students shall register for courses in English Communication according to the following table of correspondence:

Corresponding New Courses Principles of Language Use (PLU0120) Language in Practice A (LPA0220) Language in Practice B (LPB0320) Communication Skills (CSK0420) Communication Skills (CSK0420) Professional Writing (PFW0520) Professional Communication (PFC0620) Principles of Critical Thinking (PCT121S)

Old Courses English Communication Module 1 (ECM0100) English Communication Module 2 (ECM0200) English Communication Module 3 (ECM0300) English Communication Module 4 (ECM0400) Communication Skills (COM1100) English Communication Module 5 (ECM0500) English Communication Module 6 (ECM0600) Communication and Critical Thinking (CCT111S)

2.

Distance education students who shall be required to repeat courses in the old curriculum in 2009 shall register for the corresponding new courses.

E : PROGRESSION RULES 1. Students must pass Module 3 or Language in Practice B before they are allowed to register for Communication Skills.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

2.

School of Communication

Students must pass Communication Skills or Module 4 or be exempted from it before being allowed to register for Professional Writing or Professional Communication or Principles of Critical Thinking. A student shall not be allowed to register for a higher course unless s/he has taken and passed a lower course or has been exempted from it.

3.

F : RETENTION OF SEMESTER MARK 1. Retention of semester mark shall be allowed for Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A and Language in Practice B, Communication Skills, Professional Writing, Professional Communication, or Principles of Critical Thinking, in accordance with Rule AC4.3.6 in the Prospectus. For Modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, there shall be no retention of semester mark after the second opportunity examinations have been written or have lapsed.

2.

G : ATTENDANCE Attendance at lectures shall be compulsory. Each week, full-time and part-time students shall be required to attend lectures and laboratory hours as stipulated in the course outline of each course. As proof of attendance, students shall be required to sign an attendance list. H : ASSESSMENT (a) Full-time and Part-time students Continuous Assessment/Evaluation: 60% of the Final Mark Final Examination: 40% of the Final Mark A candidate will gain admission to the examination by obtaining a continuous assessment mark of at least 50%. In order to pass the subject, a student needs a final mark of at least 50%. A student needs to obtain a minimum of 40% for the examination paper. (b) Distance Education Students Continuous Assessment/Evaluation: 30% of the Final Mark Final Examination: 70% of the Final Mark A candidate will gain admission to the examination by obtaining a continuous assessment mark of at least 50%. In order to pass the subject, a student needs a final mark of at least 50%. A student needs to obtain a minimum of 40% for the examination paper. I : NATIONAL AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES 1. In addition to the English Communication courses offered for formal qualifications, nonformal language proficiency courses in English, Afrikaans, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese and Oshikwanyama shall be offered on a regular basis. Other languages shall be accommodated subject to certain limitations. Tailor-made courses in Language and Communication in any of the languages taught by the school may be negotiated for closed groups. The languages shall be offered at different levels, depending on the students' knowledge and/or proficiency in the language. 84

2.

3.

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

4. 5. The duration of each level shall be 75 hours.

School of Communication

Classes are normally presented after hours in two two-hour sessions per week, provided there are at least ten registered students per course.

6. At the end of each 75-hour course (4 months), students sit for oral and written examinations. 7. Certificates are issued to students who: (a) Attend regularly, and, (b) Achieve a minimum mark of 50%. Registration fees are included in the course fees. For details, contact the Administrator, National and Foreign Languages, Department of Communication. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 25BAEN

Description The BA degree in English is a 3-year contextualised programme (Full-time/Part-time) that blends Language (English) and Literature in English. The degree programme lays special emphasis on work integrated learning or practice. Admission Requirements In addition to the General Admission Requirements (Regulation G12.1) and Mature Age Entry Scheme (Regulation G12.2) as contained in the Prospectus of the Polytechnic of Namibia (2008:4-5) students shall have symbol D or better in English. They shall also write a special English test (not a placement test) which they should pass with at least 50% to be admitted into the programme. Admission under the Mature Age Entry Scheme shall also consider Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH DEGREE REGULATIONS The programme shall be governed by the following regulations: The BA in English shall be awarded to candidates who have obtained 399 NQF credits as per the required curriculum. a. b. c. d. The BA in English degree shall begin in year 1 and shall consist of 24 courses from year 1 to year 3. In order to complete the BA English degree, a student shall pass 23 taught courses plus Work Integrated Learning (which shall extend over one semester). In addition, in order to complete the BA in English degree, a student shall also be required to study and pass a Namibian national language. The BA in English degree shall consist of core courses in Linguistics/ English Language and Literature, and, in addition to Work Integrated Learning, basic studies and electives in Mathematics, Information Technology, Communication, and the Social Sciences.

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CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Title Introduction to Linguistics Introduction to Literature Introduction to Sociology Computer User Skills Intercultural Communication Semester 2 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology The Study of Prose Basic Mathematics Introduction to Political Science Second Year Semester 3 English Morphology Theory and Practice of Poetry Namibian Literature in English Rhetorical Theory and Criticism Semester 4 English Syntax Theory and Practice of Drama Literary Criticism Public Speaking and Argumentation International Relations & Organisations Third Year Semester 5 Work Integrated Learning Semester 6 Psycholinguistics Semantics English as a Second Language African Literature Management Communication BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS) IN ENGLISH

School of Communication

Course Code ILS111S ILT111S ISO0100 CUS0100 ICC111S IPP112S TSP112S BMS1100 IPS0100

Prerequisite None None None None None None None None None

EMP211S TPP211S NLE211S RTC211S ESY212S TPD212S LCR212S PSA212S IRO311S

None None None None None None None None None

WIL311S PCL312S SMT312S ESL312S AFL312S MCO312S

None None None None None None 25BHEN

Description The BA Honours degree in English is a 1-year postgraduate programme that blends Language (English) and Literature in English. The degree programme lays special emphasis on research. (For further details on the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in English, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009).

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION

School of Communication 25BACO

Description The Bachelor of Arts in Communication is a three-year degree programme (Full-time/Parttime) that is aimed at equipping students with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills in communication management and administration. Holders of this degree will have communication skills that will enable them to effectively design, manage and evaluate communication processes that involve individuals, groups, organisations and the public. The degree programme's Work Integrated Learning component will provide students with the necessary experiential learning at the workplace. Admission Requirements In addition to the General Admission Requirements (Regulation G12.1) and Mature Age Entry Scheme (Regulation G12.2) as contained in the Prospectus of the Polytechnic of Namibia (2008:4-5), students shall have symbol D or better in English. They shall also write a special English test (not a placement test) which they should pass with at least 50% to be admitted into the programme. Admission under the Mature Age Entry Scheme shall also consider Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). Regulations The Department of Communication will offer a 3-year BA in Communication. The programme shall be governed by the following regulations: The BA in Commmunication shall be awarded to candidates who have obtained at least 384 or 385 (depending on choice) NQF credits as per the curriculum requirements. a. b. c. d. The BA in Communication degree shall begin in year 1 and shall consist of 24 courses from year 1 to year 3. In order to complete the BA in Communication degree, a student shall pass 23 taught courses plus Work Integrated Learning (which shall extend over one semester). In addition, in order to complete the BA in Communication degree, a student shall also be required to study and pass a Namibian national language. This shall be a non-credit bearing course. The BA in Communication degree shall consist of core courses in Communication, and, in addition to Work Integrated Learning (Internship), other courses which include Basic Mathematics, Information and Communication Technology, and electives from the Social Sciences.

Assessment a. Courses will be examined at the end of the semester in which they are taught. b. Written papers will count for 40% and continuous assessment (CASS) 60% in each course. c. Continuous assessment (CASS) for each course may include a relevant small-scale project. CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Title Introduction to Communication 1A Intercultural Communication Basic Mathematics Computer User Skills Principles of Economics 87

Course Code ICO111S ICC111S BMS1100 CUS0100 PEC111S

Prerequisite None None None None None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 2 Introduction to Communication 1B Non Verbal Communication Organisational Communication Introduction to Marketing and its Environment Plus ONE of the following Electives: Introduction to Public Management Introduction to Sociology Second Year Semester 3 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism Group Dynamics and Communication Gender Communication Web Communication Semester 4 Specialised Writing Public Speaking and Argumentation Public Relations: Theory and Practice Introduction to Political Science Third Year Semester 5 Work Integrated Learning Semester 6 Legal and Ethical Issues in Communication Management Communication Persuasion and Propaganda Plus any TWO of the following Electives: Mediation Communication Rhetoric and Constitutional Discourse International Relations and Organisations

School of Communication

ICO112S NVC112S OCO212S MAR121S IPM111S ISO0100

None None None None None None

RTC211S GDC211S GCO211S WCO211S SPW212S PSA212S PRT310S IPS0100

None None None None None None None None

WIL311S LEC312S MCO312S PAP312S MCM312S RCD312S IRO311S

None None None None None None None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF LEGAL STUDIES

School of Communication

The Department offers the following qualifications: · National Diploma Police Science ­ offered only on distance mode of study; · Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) ­ commencing in academic year 2009 and offered on part-time mode and, in due course, also as a hybrid programme, combining shorter periods (up to two weeks twice a semester) of face-to-face tuition with elements of distance tuition. Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Criminal Justice ­ commencing in academic year 2009 and offered only on part-time mode of study.

·

In addition, the Department also offers a string of legal courses, i.e. service courses, to other departments across schools. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: POLICE SCIENCE 70DPOL

The current National Diploma Police Science will be phased out commencing as from 2009. No new students will be admitted to register for the National Diploma Police Science. Students who are currently registered for National Diploma Police Science must complete their qualification by the end of the academic year 2012. CURRICULUM First Year - National Certificate Police Science (Phased out in 2008) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Police Studies 1A PLS 111S None Investigation of Crime 1A IVC 111S None Criminal Law 1A CRL 111S None Criminal Procedure Law 1A CPL 111S None Communication Skills CSK0420 Language Practice B/M3 or Placement Public Law 1A PBL 111S None Semester 2 Police Studies 1B Investigation of Crime 1B Criminal Law 1B Criminal Procedure Law 1B PLS 112S IVC 112S CRL 112S CPL 112S Police Studies 1A Investigation of Crime 1A Criminal Law 1A Criminal Procedure Law 1A

Second Year - National Higher Certificate Police Science (Phasing out from 2009) Semester 3 Police Studies 2A PLS 211S Police Studies 1B Investigation of Crime 2A IVC 211S Investigation of Crime 1B Criminal Law 2A CRL 211S Criminal Law 1B Law of Evidence 1A LOE 211S None Semester 4 Police Studies 2B Investigation of Crime 2B Criminal Law 2B Public Law 1B PLS 212S IVC 212S CRL 211S PBL112S Police Studies 2A Investigation of Crime 2A Criminal Law 2A None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication

Third Year - National Diploma Police Science (Phasing out in 2010) Semester 5 Police Studies 3A PLS 311S Police Studies 2B Investigation of Crime 3A IVC 311S Investigation of Crime 2B Criminal Law 3A CRL 311S Criminal Law 2B Professional Writing PFW0520 Communication Skills Semester 6 Police Studies 3B Investigation of Crime 3B Criminal Law 3B Professional Communication PLS 312S IVC 312S CRL 312S PFC0620 Police Studies 3A Investigation of Crime 3A Criminal Law 3A Professional Writing

Mode of Study The National Diploma Police Science is wholly offered on distance mode of study. Assessments (National Diploma Police Science) Students are required to complete and submit two assignments for each course and obtain at least 50% in order to gain admission to the end of semester examination. Final examination marks are calculated on the basis of 50% continuous assessment marks plus 50% examination marks, which together constitute the final marks. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (POLICING) 25BACJ

As from 2009 the Department will offer a three year Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing). This qualification is offered at level 7 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). Aims of the programme The Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) curriculum is designed to cover a wide range of the national occupational standards for Policing. It intends to provide and equip students with essential theoretical knowledge as well as analytical and practical skills of police administration and management in the criminal justice system with an emphasis on the Namibian context. Through participation in the programme students will have the opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the role of policing as a sub-system of the Criminal Justice System in a modern society, as well as that of other law enforcement agencies such as Prisons and Corrections, the Municipal Police, Immigration Services, Namibian Defence Force, Security Institutions and the Bank / Insurance Industries (Forensic Investigators). As a developing country, and against the backdrop of increasing crime rates, Namibia needs to produce highly qualified Criminal Justice professionals, who can not only manage offenders through the system but also advise Government on policy issues. Imbalanced or inadequately planned development contributes to criminality and thereby constitutes a threat to quality of life, security, democracy, good governance, the rule of law and the free exercise of human rights. The programme intends to provide a diverse range of skills and competencies which are both discipline specific and job related, as well as to facilitate the development of highly generic cognitive and intellectual skills, enabling a graduate to adapt in a continuously changing professional environment throughout the Criminal Justice System. The programme also fosters an understanding of how learned academic knowledge and skills interact and inform the development of professional policing and law enforcement practice across communities and criminal justice sectors, taking into consideration international best practices and standards.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication

The programme is fully commensurate with the African Common Position presented at the 11th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice in Bangkok (2005). Qualification Outcomes After successful completion of the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) students are expected to be able to: · Explain and discuss the Criminal Justice System, including its sub-systems Police, Prosecution, Courts, Corrections (Prisons) and Youth in theory and practice; · Outline and discuss the Namibian Criminal Justice System in both regional and global contexts; · Display a deep and broad understanding of the operational interfaces of the various subsystems of the Namibian Criminal Justice system; · Evaluate Criminal Justice policies and advance viable solutions to problems in their practical applications; · Identify and analyse Criminal Justice problems and critically put forward workable solutions; · Demonstrate a thorough understanding of Human Rights and Juvenile Justice in terms of the administration of Criminal Justice; · Demonstrate a wide range of scholastic and technical skills in policing; · Make and justify autonomous decisions on crime prevention and crime investigation; · Plan, formulate and implement community policing strategies against the objective of maintaining relationships of trust between members of society and the police; · Analyse and direct police crime prevention and investigation activities; · Plan operations and independently manage the affairs of a police unit, station or Police regional and national headquarters. The programme learning outcomes are detailed at subject level in form of specific learning outcomes. These subject related learning outcomes reflect the following categories: · · · · Development of knowledge and understanding (subject specific); Cognitive/intellectual skills (generic); Key transferable (generic); Practical skills (subject specific).

Mode of Study The Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) programme is offered on part-time mode and, in due course, also as a hybrid programme, combining shorter periods (up to two weeks twice a semester) of face-to-face tuition with elements of distance tuition. Admission Requirements · Students wishing to enrol for a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice must write an English proficiency test and test into Communication Skills (CSK0420). In addition, they must write an aptitude test in which they should demonstrate their interest in, and motivation to acquire knowledge and skills of the operations of the criminal justice system in Namibia and that of the SADC region at a professional level. · Students who have obtained the ND: Police Science from the Polytechnic of Namibia during the past 4 years (i.e. since 2005) with an average of at least 55% may apply for "admission with advanced standing". These students will qualify for the conferment of the degree Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) after successful completion of the following courses: · Criminal Justice Studies 1A & 1B · Policing 3A & 3B · Research Methodology

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

· · Research Project Alternative Dispute Resolution

School of Communication

Progression Rules A student will not be allowed to register for any second year course(s) under this programme unless he/she has passed Communication Skills (CSK04020). CURRICULUM First Year - (Phased in 2009) Certificate in Criminal Justice (Policing) (NQF level 5) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Criminal Justice Studies 1A CJS111S None Principles of Information Systems 1A PIS121S None Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Management IPH111S None Introduction to Sociology ISO0100 None Communication Skills CSK0420 English Placement Test Semester 2 Policing 1 Human Rights for Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Studies 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Principles of Information Systems 1B Second Year (NQF level 6) Semester 3 Criminal Law 2A Policing 2A (Operations) Crime Investigation 2A Professional Writing Statistics (Information Technology) 1A (optional) Semester 4 Law for Public Administrators Policing 2B (Operations) Crime Investigation 2B Criminal Law 2B Law of Evidence & Criminal Procedure Statistics (Information Technology) 1B (optional) POL112S HCJ112S CJS112S HRM122S PIS122S None None Criminal Justice studies 1A None Principles of Information Systems 1A

CRL221S POL211S CIV211S PFW0520 SIT111S

Criminal Justice Studies 1B Policing 1 None Communication Skills None

LPA212S POL212 CIV212 CLW222S LEC212S SIT112S

None Policing 2A (Operations) Crime Investigation 2A Criminal Law 2A Criminal Justice Studies 1B Statistics (Information Technology) 1A

Third Year - Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) (NQF level 7) Semester 5 Research Methodology RMA411S None Policing 3A (Administration) POL311S Policing 2B (operations) Crime Investigation 3A (Crimes of Violence) CIV311S Crime Investigation 2B Professional Communication PFC0620 Professional Writing

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 6 Policing 3B (Administration) Research Project Crime Investigation 3B (Crimes of Violence) Alternative Dispute Resolution POL312S RPB412S CIV312S ADR312S

School of Communication Policing 3A (Administration) Research Methodology Crime Investigation 3A (Crimes of violence) Professional Communication

Table of credits Current students registered for the National Diploma Police Science who choose to migrate to the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing) will be granted credit for courses completed as set out below, but will be required to complete all outstanding courses to fulfil the requirements of the programme. Course completed (ND. Police Science) First Year - Semesters 1 & 2 Police Studies 1A and B Investigation of Crime 1A and B Criminal Law 1A and B Criminal Procedure Law 1A and B (and Law of Evidence 1A) Public Law 1A Year Two - Semesters 3 & 4 Police Studies 2A and B Investigation of Crime 2A Criminal Law 2A and B Law of Evidence 1A (and Criminal Procedure Law 1A and B) Investigation of Crime 2B Public Law 1B Year Three - Semesters 5 & 6 Investigation of Crime 3A Investigation of Crime 3B Course credited (BA. Criminal Justice) Policing 1 Crime Investigation 2A Criminal Law 2A Law of Evidence and Criminal Procedure Law for Public Administrators Policing 2A and B (Operations) Crime Investigation 2A Criminal Law 2B Law of Evidence & Criminal Procedure Crime Investigation 2B Human Rights for Criminal Justice Crime Investigation 3A (Crimes of Violence) Crime Investigation 3B (Crimes of Violence)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

BACHELOR (HONOURS) IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

School of Communication 25BHCJ

As from 2009 the Department will offer a one year Bachelor (Honours) in Criminal Justice. This qualification is offered at level 8 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). With the Bachelor (Honours) degree in Criminal Justice Polytechnic of Namibia introduces a new postgraduate programme with the aim of eventually covering the training and research needs of various sub-systems of the Namibian Criminal Justice System. Although initially focusing on general Criminal Justice research needs, the programme will, in due course, offer specialisations like "Policing", "Prisons and Corrections" or "Juvenile Justice". The study programme will allow students who have completed their Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (Policing), or any other relevant Bachelor of Arts, to pursue postgraduate studies in this related field of studies at Polytechnic of Namibia. The programme caters not only of the wider Namibian Criminal Justice System but also for Criminal Justice Systems of other SADC member states. (For further details on the Bachelor (Honours) in Criminal Justice, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009.)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT MEDIA TECHNOLOGY

School of Communication

Candidates wishing to study Journalism and Communication Technology must write an English Proficiency Test and test into Communication Skills. In addition, they must write an admission test in which they must demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the history of Namibia and the region, current affairs and topical issues. Candidates must also pass an interview. BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY 25BJCT

Description The Bachelor of Journalism and Communication Technology rests on a strong core educational structure with a balance between the practical and the academic instruction. Apart from the education of students in the practice of journalism, this curriculum also includes course-work in Communication Technology, which allows students to specialise in one of the areas of specialisation provided: Journalism, Public Relations and Corporate Communication, and Multi-Media Design and Production. Admission Requirements (Rule G12 of the Prospectus of the Polytechnic of Namibia, applies.) · Applicants shall be required to write an English placement test, and a score of at least 40% should be obtained to be considered for admission. · Applicants shall be required to write a General Knowledge Journalism Test, and a score of at least 40% should be obtained to be considered for admission. · Applicants who are successful in the two admission tests referred to above, shall be called for an interview, which would be the final requirement for admission to the Bachelor's Degree Programme. · Holders of a National Diploma in Journalism and Communication Technology conferred by accredited institutions shall be admitted to the Degree Programme upon assessment of courses contained in the Diploma. · Mature-age applicants shall be limited to 5% of the total admission. Such applicants should have reached the age of 23 years on or before January 01 of the year of registration. These applicants ought to have at least three years' relevant work experience. Qualification Outcomes Holders of this qualification are able to: a. Practice the professional roles b. Critique and publish an analysis of the various media's responsiveness to society and people c. Display a professional attitude and adaptability d. Display a level of expertise beyond that achieved in the Diploma e. Demonstrate effective time management in order to meet deadlines f. Demonstrate a mastery of the project production process g. Create relevant and effective solutions to problems h. Display effective leadership (to include confidence, role modelling and the ability to motivate) i. Exhibit creativity (through innovation, use of unique ideas and an ability to have a vision in the identification of problems, solutions and opportunities) j. Apply innovative approaches to management k. Demonstrate an understanding of the media's organisational role l. Discover and develop knowledge through a variety of research methodologies m. Apply knowledge and research findings to an issue or problem n. Demonstrate the impact and value of prior learning o. Develop insight through project work, analysis and presentations

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

p. q.

School of Communication

Demonstrate expertise in writing, speaking and mediated communication Illustrate an ability to work co-operatively and independently.

Summary of Qualification Requirements This qualification will be awarded to people credited with a minimum of 395 NQF credits, and who have met the requirements of the compulsory and elective sections of the curriculum. Academic Standards a. Pre-determined semester hours b. Prescribed experiential learning hours (1 semester - 16 weeks x 40 hours = 640 hrs Detailed Qualification Requirements General Education (GED) Requirements a. Language for the Media 1, 2 and 3 b. Keyboard and Basic Computer Skills (KCS110S) c. Information Gathering and Writing for the Media (IGW110S) Rules of combination a. Journalism b. Public Relations and Corporate Communication c. Multi-Media Design and Production Electives: Note: This curriculum provides core and specialisation courses. Specialisations: Students will specialise in one of the following areas of study: a. b. c. Journalism Public Relations and Corporate Communication Multi-Media Design and Production

Credit recognition and transfer arrangements · Applicants who have pursued another qualification at the Polytechnic of Namibia may apply for exemption of courses successfully completed. Such exemption would be granted upon condition of an overlap of at least 80% of the course content. Proof of such overlap would have to be provided by the student through course outlines and syllabi and transcripts of grades. In the case of an application based on the recognition of prior learning, the candidate should be tested and a portfolio of evidence should be submitted as proof of experience. · Students currently registered for the Diploma will be able to register for the Honours Degree upon successful completion of the Diploma. · New students, who register as of 2009, will register for the Bachelor's Degree since the National Diploma will no longer be available. · Students from other institutions who are holders of a Diploma in Journalism, from recognised institutions, would be required to write the General Knowledge Journalism Test, as well as the English Placement Test. Should these tests be completed successfully they would be admitted into the Honours Programme. Assessment Arrangements Continuous Assessment: Experiential Learning Portfolio: Examination: 40% 20% 40%

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication 25BJCT

BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Title Language for the Media 1 Keyboard and Basic Computer Skills Introduction to Communication Technologies Information Gathering and Writing for the Media Semester 2 Communication Theory Communication and Society Introduction to Broadcast Journalism

Course Code LME110S KCS110S ICT110S IGW110S COT110S CMS110S IBJ110S

Prerequisites None None None None None Intro. to Comm. Tech Intro. to Comm. Tech and Information Gathering and Writing for the Media or equivalent Intro. to Comm. Tech

Introduction to Photography Second Year Semester 3 Introduction to Multi-media Design and Production Print Design, Editing and Production Video Production Language for the Media 2 Communication and the Law Semester 4 Communication Ethics Language for the Media 3

IPG110S

IMM210S

DEP210S VIP210S LME210S CLW210

Intro. to Comm. Tech and Information Gathering and Writing for the Media or equivalent skills None Intro. to Photography and/or Introduction to Broadcast Journalism Language for the Media 1 Communication Theory and Communication and Society Communication and the Law; Communication and Society Language for the Media 2

CME310S LME310S

PLUS ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIALISATION ELECTIVES: SPECIALISATION COURSES FOR JOURNALISM: Specialisation Elective 1: Public Relations Theory and Practice PRT310S Advanced News Reporting and Writing WITH NRW310S

Communication Theory; Language for the Media 2 Information Gathering and Writing for the Media

97

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Digital Art and Design OR DAD310S WITH NRW310S

School of Communication Introduction to Multi-media Design and Production; Video Production Information Gathering and Writing for the Media

Advanced News Reporting and Writing

SPECIALISATION COURSES FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS AND CORPORATE COMMUNICATION: Specialisation Elective 2: Public Relations Theory and Practice PRT310S Communication Theory; Language for the Media 2 WITH Advanced News Reporting and Writing NRW310S Information Gathering and Writing for the Media Public Relations Theory and Practice Digital Art and Design OR PRT310S WITH DAD310S Communication Theory; Language for the Media 2 Introduction to Multi-media Design and Production; Video Production

SPECIALISATION COURSES FOR MULTIMEDIA DESIGN AND PRODUCTION: Specialisation Elective 3: Digital Art and Design DAD310S Introduction to Multi-media Design and Production; Video Production WITH Public Relations Theory and Practice PRT310S Communication Theory; Language for the Media 2 Digital Art and Design OR DAD310S WITH NRW310S Introduction to Multi-media Design and Production; Video Production Information Gathering and Writing for the Media

Advanced News Reporting and Writing Year Three Semester 5 Experiential Learning

MEL210S

The successful completion of courses for the first four semesters.

Students have to complete a credit-bearing experiential learning component in order to ensure that they would meet the demands of industry. Such an internship requires of the student to compile and submit a portfolio based on tasks undertaken during the experiential Learning. The submission of a professional portfolio is one of the main requirements for the successful completion of this semester-long credit-bearing Experiential Learning course.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication

Objectives The period allowed for experiential learning would serve to afford the Journalism and Communication Technology student the opportunity of acquiring hands-on knowledge of skills, practices and approaches necessary for this field. Through mentoring and actual projects, the student will gain insight into what the profession entails. While a great deal of what this environment has to offer would be new to the student, it would also facilitate an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses. Through careful monitoring and assessment, the student will be given every opportunity of gaining as much experience as possible during this period, so that the Specialisation Electives - which follow the experiential learning period - would be much more meaningful and beneficial. When selecting a host institution for the purpose of Experiential Learning, the Journalism and Communication Technology student ought to ensure that the host institution is industry- or specialisation-related. This means that the student should consider a media institution (e.g. print, or audio/television broadcasting; a wire service e.g. NAMPA); an advertising agency or multi-media/web development company/department or a Public Relations/Communication Department or even the Film Commission. Procedure During the six-month period, staff responsible for experiential learning will pay two visits to the organisation/company hosting the students for this purpose. This will give staff the opportunity of meeting with both the students and their supervisors to assess progress, and identify areas of concern or opportunity. In addition, it will afford staff the opportunity to maintain regular contact with industry and keep abreast of trends in the field. Logbooks, which would also contain guidelines for experiential learning, would be kept during this time, to indicate the nature of tasks undertaken by the student, and the extent of work done. Debriefing of students - upon return to class - will be carried out by staff in the Department, and the information obtained at this time would serve to inform the course content of the Specialisation Electives and the other courses to be offered in the third year. Semester 6 Entrepreneurship EPS310S Media & Comm. Research Methodologies MRM311S None Successful Completion of InService Training

PLUS ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIALISATION ELECTIVES: SPECIALISATION COURSES FOR JOURNALISM: Specialisation Elective 1: Audio Production AUP310S

Television Production

TVP310S

Intro. Communication Technologies; Intro. to Broadcast Journalism; Intro. to Multi-media Design and Production Intro. Communication Theory; Intro. to Broadcast Journalism; Intro. to Multi-media Design and Production

OR

99

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication

SPECIALISATION COURSES FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS AND CORPORATE COMMUNICATION: Specialisation Elective 2: Public Relations Campaigns and Special Events RCS310S Public Relations Theory and Practice; Language for the Media WITH Media Advertising Strategies MAS310S Language for the Media 2; Introduction to Multi-media Design OR SPECIALISATION COURSES FOR MULTIMEDIA DESIGN AND PRODUCTION: Specialisation Elective 3: Writing for Multi-Media WMM310S Intro. to Multi-media Design and Production or equivalent skills; Video Production or equivalent skills WITH Advanced Web Design AWD310S Experiential Learning NB: A minimum of five (5) students must register for specialisation electives to be offered. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (Phasing out 2010) CURRICULUM 25DJCT

First Year (Not available in 2009) Semester 1 Course Title Language for the Media 1 Keyboard and Basic Computer Skills Introduction to Communication Technologies Information Gathering and Writing for the Media Semester 2 Communication Theory Communication and Society Introduction to Broadcast Journalism

Course Code LME110S KCS110S ICT110S IGW110S COT110S CMS110S IBJ110S

Prerequisites None None None None None Intro. to Comm. Technologies Intro. to Comm. Tech.; Information-Gathering and Writing for the Media or equivalent skills Intro. to Comm. Technologies

Introduction to Photography Second Year (Phasing out 2009) Semester 3 Introduction to Multi-media Design

IPG110S

IMM210S

Intro. to Comm. Tech. and Information Gathering and Writing for the Media or equivalent skills

100

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Print Design, Editing and Production Video Production Language for the Media 2 Communication and the Law

School of Communication DEP210S VIP210S LME210S CLW210S None Intro. to Photography and/ or Introduction to Broadcast Journalism Language for the Media 1 Communication Theory and Communication and Society Communication and the Law; Communication and Society Language for the Media 2

Semester 4 Communication Ethics Language for the Media 3

CME310S LME310S

PLUS TWO OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIALISATION ELECTIVES: Prerequisite for Specialisation Electives: Successful completion of the experiential learning, including courses required up to the second year, semester 2. Specialisation Elective 1: Public Relations Theory and Practice OR Specialisation Elective 2: Advanced News Reporting and Writing OR Specialisation Elective 3: Digital Art and Design PRT310S Communication Theory; Language for the Media 2 Experiential Learning Introduction to Multi-media Design; Video Production

NRW310S DAD310S

Objectives The period allowed for experiential learning would serve to afford the Journalism and Communication Technology student the opportunity of acquiring hands-on knowledge of skills, practices and approaches necessary for this field. Through mentoring and actual projects, the student will gain insight into what the profession entails. While a great deal of what this environment has to offer would be new to the student, it would also facilitate an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses. Through careful monitoring and assessment, the student will be given every opportunity of gaining as much experience as possible during this period, so that the Specialisation Electives - which follow the experiential learning period - would be much more meaningful and beneficial. Procedure During the six-month period, staff responsible for experiential learning will pay two visits to the organisation/company hosting the students for this purpose. This will give staff the opportunity of meeting with both the students and their supervisors to assess progress, and identify areas of concern or opportunity. In addition, it will afford staff the opportunity to maintain regular contact with industry and keep abreast of trends in the field. Logbooks, which would also contain guidelines for experiential learning, would be kept during this time, to indicate the nature of tasks undertaken by the student, and the extent of work done. Debriefing of students - upon return to class - will be carried out by staff in the Department, and the information obtained at this time would serve to inform the course content of the Specialisation Electives and the other courses to be offered in the third year. 101

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Third Year (Phasing out 2010) Semester 5 Experiential Learning

School of Communication

MEL210S

The successful completion of courses for the first three semesters. None

Semester 6 Entrepreneurship

EPS310S

PLUS TWO OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIALISATION ELECTIVES: Specialisation Elective 1: Public Relations Campaigns and Special Events RCS310S Public Relations Theory and Practice; Language for the Media 2 Media Advertising Strategies MAS310S Language for the Media 2; Introduction to Multi-media Design OR Specialisation Elective 2: Audio Production AUP310S Intro. Communication Theory; Intro. to Broadcast Journalism; Intro. to MultiMedia Designed Production Television Production TVP310S Intro. Communication Theory; Intro. to Broadcast Journalism; Intro. to MultiMedia Design and Production OR Specialisation Elective 3: Writing for Multi-Media WMM310S Intro. to Multi-media Design and Production or equivalent skills; Video Production or equivalent Skills Advanced Web Design AWD310S Experiential Learning

102

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Communication

BACHELOR (HONOURS) IN JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY 25HJCT The Bachelor (Honours) in Journalism and Communication is an initial postgraduate specialisation that builds on a Bachelor Degree in the same cognate areas. Students who enrol for this degree may practice in the fields of Journalism or Communication Technology. This Degree prepares students for the study of how people and organisations interact with the Media as well as research-based postgraduate study. The courses require an advanced level of conceptual ability and intellectual autonomy, as well as, specialised knowledge in Journalism and Communication. One of the main requirements for graduation is a mini thesis. This requirement serves to consolidate the students' expertise in the fields of Journalism and Communication Technology. Students will be required to apply the different research methodologies, assess theoretical material and demonstrate independent and critical analytical skills. The mini thesis will be supervised by an academic staff member and it will represent a 30% of the total credits. (For further details on the Bachelor (Honours) in Journalism and Communication Technology, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009.)

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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING OFFICE OF THE DEAN Dean Faculty Officer Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address PC Support Officer

School of Engineering

: Zacchaeus Olusegun Oyedokun, Ph.D. (UWIST. Cardiff), M.Sc. (Electronics & Telecoms), B.Eng. Hons. (Electrical), (ABU Zaria) : Ferrand van Wyk, BA (UNAM), PGDE (UNAM), CLEF (University of the Franche-Comte), DELF (University of the Franche-Comte) : 061-207-2106 : 061-207-2401 : [email protected] : Tjitjai Katjiuongua : 061-207-2024 : 061-207-2142 : [email protected] : Mario P. Tripodi, (ND: Electronic Eng.)

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING Head of Department : Collert Moyo, M.Sc. (Civil Eng.) FT-Academic Staff : Dr. Helmut Mischo, (D.Ing) : David Katale, M.Sc (Civil Eng.) : Candidus Tomeka, M.Sc. (Civil Eng.) Laboratory Technicians : Gabriel Neliwa, N.Dip (Civil Eng) : Manuel Pedro, N.Dip (Civil Eng) : Liberty Moyo DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Head of Department : Fredson Phiri, M.Eng Sc (Mobile Data Networks (Malaysia), B.Sc (Electrical Eng)(Malawi) Academic Staff (Power) : Edward Chikuni, Ph.D. (University of Wales, Swansea) M.Sc.Electrical Power Engineering, (UMIST, Manchester) B.Eng (Electrical Engineering) (University of Sierra Leone) : V.F. Shooya ND, BTech (PoN) : Kalaluka Kanyimba, M.Eng (Power & Automation) B.Eng (Machines and Power) : Gideon Gope, M.Sc. (Elect), BSc (Elect) Academic Staff (Electronics) : Smita Francis, M.Sc. (Electronics), B.Sc. (Physics Electronics) (Nagpur University) : Lutz Steinbrück, NHD Elec. Eng. (L/C), (Cape Technicon) : S. Dipura, MSc (Electronic Engineering) ItES Co-ordinator : J Pieter Wasserfall, NHD Elec. Eng. (L/C), (Technikon Witwatersrand) Academic Staff (S0) : Ilana Malan, B.Sc. Hons. (Physics), (University of Free State), B.Sc. Hons. (Biomedical Engineering), (University of Cape Town) Lab Manager : Anthony Apata, ND (Mech Eng) (Idah), B.Sc Engr (Electrical) (Ibadan) Laboratory Technicians : Epafras P. Shilongo, ND. (Electrical Eng.) (PoN) Stores Officer : Theophelus Mabengano

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Head of Department : Samuel John, Pr Eng (COREN), M.Sc (Mech Eng), (ABU, Nigeria), B.Eng., (Mech), (ABU, Nigeria) Academic Staff : Bernard Siepker, Pr. Eng (ECN), M Eng (Mech) (UStel, RSA), B Eng (Mech) (UStel, RSA) : Andrew Zulu, M.Sc. (Mech Eng) (UCT RSA), B Eng (Mech) (UNZA, Zam) : Rajaram Swaminathan, FIE (IEI), P.hD (Mech Eng) (UMadr, Ind), M.Sc (Mech Eng) (UMadr, Ind), B.Eng (Mech Eng) (UMadr, Ind) : Frikkie Henn, N4 Industrial Diploma : Sebastan Kapeng NTD, N6, Vocation Dip : Nikowa Namate, BSc (Hon) Mining Lab Manager : Grant Kloppers, B.Tech (Mech.Eng.) (Pen Tech), ND (Mech Eng) (Pen Tech), N4 (Fit & Mach) (Ath TC, RSA) Laboratory Technicians : Isabel Bishi, ND Mech. (Gwe Pol, Zim), ND (Technical & Vocational Education) (Gwe Pol, Zim) : Conrad January, ND Mech. Eng. (PE Technikon) : Wisdom Nyagormey, HND Mech. Eng. (Plant), (Accra, Ghana); Dip. (Auto), (City & Guilds, London) DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Head of Department : Immanuel Ajibola, Ph.D Maths (ABU, Nigeria) PGDC.Sc (Unilag, Nigeria), B.Sc (Hons) Physics/ Maths. (Unilag), M.Sc. Maths (Ife) Academic Staff : Benson Obabueki, M.Sc. (Maths) (JOS) B.Sc. (Maths) (Benin, Nigeria), : Selma K. Heelu, B.Sc (Maths) (Virginia), M.Phil (Curriculum) (UWC) : Lawal I. Funtua, B.Sc (Hons) Maths. (Bayero), HED (Maths) Nortwest University, National Diploma (IT) PON : Elizabeth Hugo, B.Com., H.E.D. (Stellenbosch) : Innocent Kamwi, B.Sc Maths/Stat. (UNAM), PGDE (UNAM) : Andrew Roux, ND (Ec Geol.), B.Tech. (Geol.) (Technikon Wits), Dipl. (Datametrics) (UNISA) Pr.Sci.Nat : Alphonse Bere, B.Sc Applied Mathematics (NUST) (Zimbabwe); M.Sc (Statistics) (Zimbabwe) : Werner Tjipueja, B.Sc (Maths & Stats) (UNAM), M.Sc (Applied Stats) (Limburg) : Vijayakumar R. Kandaswamy, M.Sc (Maths) PGDCS, National College (Bharathi Dasan University) (Tamilnadu) : Johannes K. Mutesi, B.Sc (Maths & Stats) (UNAM) : Johson Fatokun, Ph.D (Applied Maths), MSc, BSc

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING Head of Department : Steve van Staden, M.Ed (Free State University) B.Ed (UNAM), N.T.D. N.E.D (National Education) RSA, Industrial Dip. - Mechanical Secretary : Marie Adank Telephone Number : 061-207-2020 Fax Number : 061-207-2051 E-mail Address : [email protected] Academic Staff : Haruana A Obida, Med Voc/Tech ED, Bsc Fla A & M Uni (Tall), AA Degree VWCC Ron USA. : John M. Rossouw, N.H.C.T. - N.N.D. (Mech); N.T.D. - Industrial Dip. : Ivan Coerecius, T3 National Diploma (Electrical Eng) (Pen.Tech.) Higher Diploma Education (Technical Secondary) (UCT), B.Ed (UNAM) : Lance Hauuanga, Higher Diploma Education (Windhoek College of Education), B.Ed Hons PGDE (Free State University), M.Ed (Free State University) : Annie Grobbelaar BA Hons (UNAM) BA HED (Pretoria), B.Ed Hons (UNAM) : Lukas J. Bock BA & PGDE (UNAM), BTech (Pretoria), M.Ed (Rhodes) : Grantley Sinclair, M.Ed (IT) (Charles Sturt Univ., Australia), M.Ed (Adult Education) (North West Univ., RSA), B.Ed (Technology Education) (Univ. of New Brunswrich, Canada), Dipl. (Mechanical Eng Technician) (Seneca College, Canada), Dipl. (Industrial Eduation) (Univ. of Tech., Jamaica) DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SCIENCES Head of Department : Andre Cronje, B-Tech (Biomedical) PE Technikon, National Higher Diploma, PE Technikon, BSc. (Hon) Epidemiology (US), B.Econ (Hon) (US), National Higher Diploma (Post School Education) Cape Technikon, National Diploma (Haemathology) Cape Technikon, National Diploma (Clinical Pathology) Cape Technikon Secretary : Muriel Mouton Telephone Number : 061-207-2870 E-mail Address : [email protected] Academic Staff : Elsabe van der Colf, M.Sc. (Medical Science) Univ. Stellenbosch, B.Tech (Biomedical Technology) Peninsula Technikon, B.Med.Sc. (UFS), B.Med.Sc. (Hon) Univ. Free State : Vincent Nowaseb, BSc. (Biochemistry) UP, National Diploma (Biomedical Technology) CPUT : Chris Izaaks, B-Tech (Biomedical) CPUT : Charmaine Jansen, Master in Public Health, Cardiff University, B-Tech Environmental Health (Cape Technikon), National Diploma Environmental Health (Cape Technikon)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

ENGINEERING QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Certificate: Engineering: Civil and Project Management National Certificate: Engineering: Power National Certificate: Engineering: Electronic National Certificate: Engineering: Mechanical National Higher Certificate: Engineering: Civil and Project Management National Higher Certificate: Engineering: Power National Higher Certificate: Engineering: Electronic National Higher Certificate: Engineering: Mechanical National Diploma: Engineering: Civil and Project Management National Diploma: Engineering: Power National Diploma: Engineering: Electronic National Diploma: Engineering: Mechanical Bachelor of Engineering: Civil Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics and Telecommunication Bachelor of Engineering: Electrical Power Bachelor of Engineering: Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Engineering: Mining Bachelor of Technology: Engineering: Mechanical Bachelor of Technology: Engineering: Civil (Urban) Bachelor of Technology: Engineering: Civil (Water) Bachelor of Technology: Engineering: (Power) Bachelor of Technology: Engineering: (Electronic) Master of Science Degree: Engineering: Civil: IWRM: Module: Water for People (SADCcooperation) Engineering Course Presentation Schedule Electronic and Power Engineering programme S0.1, S1, S3 are full time theoretical semester courses and will only be presented in the first semester of each year. P1 and P2 are full time applied studies, each with a minimum duration of 19 continuous weeks. These studies will be conducted in the industry under the supervision of a mentor in collaboration with the Polytechnic of Namibia co-ordinator. These two courses will be presented in each semester of the year. S0.2, S2, S4 are full time theoretical semester courses and will only be presented in the second semester of each year. S5 (Semester 7) is a part time theoretical semester course and will be presented in the first semester of every second year. S5 (Semester 8) is a part time theoretical semester course and will be presented in the second semester of every second year. S6 (Semester 9) is a part time theoretical semester course and will be presented in the first semester of of every second year. S6 (Semester 10) is a part time theoretical semester course and will be presented in the second semester of every second year. NOTE: Students are solely responsible for their placement in industry for P1, P2 applied studies. 107

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

Civil Engineering programme Semester 1, Semester 3, Semester 5 and Bachelors of Technology Degree Semester 7 are semester courses and will only be presented in the first semester of the year. Semester 2, Semester 4, Semester 6 and Bachelors of Technology Degree Semester 8 are semester courses and will only be presented in the second semester of the year. All semesters but Semester 4 consist of theoretical training and imply studies at the Polytechnic of Namibia. Semester 4 is applied studies with a minimum duration of 16 continuous weeks. These studies will be conducted in the industry under the supervision of a mentor in collaboration with a Polytechnic of Namibia, co-ordinator. NOTE: Students are solely responsible for their placement in industry for Semester 4. Late Registration for Engineering Students No late registration will be allowed. Engineering Admission Requirements a. Admission Requirements The minimum admission requirements to the Introduction to Engineering Studies (ItES) programme are as follows: 1. A grade 12 certificate with at least 5 subjects graded 4 on the NSSC Higher level or an E on the NSSC Ordinary level. A minimum C symbol must have been obtained for Mathematics and Physical Science, as well as gaining entry into Language in Practice A through an English placement test. The candidate must also score 25 points on the Engineering Evaluation Scale counting up to five subjects that must include Mathematics, Physical Science and English. If a candidate did not do Physical Science, but a "Physics equivalent" subject, the Registrar may, upon recommendation of the HOD and Dean, approve registration of the candidate. OR 2. Pass at least 4 N3 subjects, with at least 50% in each, including Mathematics and a Physics equivalent subject, as well as gain entry into Language in Practice A through a placement test. OR 3. Pass at least 4 N4 subjects, with at least 40% in each, including Mathematics and a Physics equivalent subject, as well as gain entry into Language in Practice A through a placement tests. OR 4. VTC graduates with a grade 12 certificate or equivalent who obtains at least 50 % in Mathematics and a Physical Science proficiency test, based on the grade 11/12 NSSC Ordinary syllabi, as well as gain entry into Language in Practice A through an English placement test. OR 5. Mature age students with a grade 12 certificate who obtain at least 50% in a Mathematics and a Physical Science proficiency test, based on the grade 11/12 NSSC Ordinary syllabi, as well as gain entry into Language in Practice A through an English placement test. OR 6. Candidates with a foreign qualification, evaluated by the Namibian Qualifications Authority (NQA) as equivalent to a grade 12 certificate, who obtain at least 50% in a Mathematics and a Physical Science proficiency test, based on the grade 11/12 NSSC Ordinary syllabi, as well as gain entry into Language in Practice A through an English placement test. Admission to the programme will be strictly on merit. 108

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

b. Exemption Requirements for Introduction to Engineering Studies The minimum exemption requirements for the Introduction to Engineering Studies programme are as follows (Candidate may enroll directly into S1): 1. Candidates with a grade 12 certificate with at least 5 subjects graded 4 on the NSSC Higher level or an E on the NSSC Ordinary level. A minimum NSSC Higher level 3 or NSSC Ordinary level A symbol must have been obtained for Mathematics and Physical Science, as well as gaining entry into Communication Skills through a placement test. The candidate must also score 37 points on the Engineering Evaluation Scale counting up to five subjects that must include Mathematics, Physical Science and English. If a candidate did not do Physical Science, but a "Physics equivalent" subject, the Registrar may, upon recommendation of the HOD and Dean, approve registration of the candidate. OR Pass at least 4 N5/N6 subjects, with at least 40% in each, including Mathematics and a Physics equivalent subject, as well as gain entry into Communication Skills through an English placement test. OR Candidates from other tertiary institutions, that gain entry into Communication Skills through an English placement test, will be assessed on an individual basis. Candidates that want to enrol into the Mechanical Engineering programme MUST obtain a credit/ exemption for Engineering Graphics.

2.

3. 4.

NOTE: These candidates must take Principles of Information Systems 1A instead of Principles of Information Systems 1B in S1 and add Principles of Information Systems 1B to their S2 curriculum. c. Credits Requirements. The following credits will be granted, upon application, to candidates that gain entry into the Introduction to Engineering Studies programme (minimum symbols are indicated): Introduction to Engineering Physics Introduction to Engineering Chemistry Introduction to Mathematics module 1/2 Principles of Information Systems 1A Engineering Graphics Physics: NSSC (O) A, NSSC (H) 3 or Science proficiency test 70% Physics: NSSC (O) A, NSSC (H) 3 or Science proficiency test 70% Mathematics: NSSC (O) A, NSSC (H) 3 or Mathematics proficiency test 70% Pass ICDL module 1 to 3 tests Drawing related subject: NSSC (O) D

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY (FOURTH YEAR) ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Civil Engineering (Urban & Water): The minimum admission requirements to the fourth year of either Bachelor of Technology degrees in Civil Engineering is as follows: The student must have passed all courses of the National Diploma in Civil Engineering and Project Management from the Polytechnic of Namibia with an overall pass mark of 50% or greater. Course sequences are guided through "recommended sequence", the prerequisites are spelled out for every course separately. Students desiring to register outside the recommended sequence must give positive proof of lower level course mastery prior to registration, the central programme mapping of the department's courses refers.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

To be admitted to the Bachelor-Urban Engineering Programme, candidates from outside Polytechnic of Namibia must have normally obtained a good pass in a National Diploma in Civil Engineering or Project Management or Quantity Surveying or equivalent with a minimum overall pass mark of 50% or higher. Prospective students may be required to sit for a set of qualifying examinations (proficiency testing). Admission will be granted if `course for course' credit can be obtained. To be admitted to the Bachelor-Water Engineering Programme, candidates from outside Polytechnic of Namibia must have normally obtained a good pass in a National Diploma in Civil Engineering or Water Engineering or equivalent with a minimum overall pass mark of 50% or higher. Prospective students may be required to sit for a set of qualifying examinations (proficiency testing). Admission will be granted if `course for course' credit can be obtained. Mechanical Engineering Alternative 1 For current local students: National Diploma in Mechanical Engineering (M+3) qualification and registration as a Mechanical Engineering Technician with the Engineering Council of Namibia or the equivalent regulatory body in the SADC region or internationally recognised. OR Alternative 2: For mature age students: A (M+3) qualification and registration as a Mechanical Engineering Technician with the Engineering Council of Namibia or the equivalent regulatory body within SADC region or internationally recognised. OR Alternative 3: For all other students not in the above categories: A recognised (M+3) qualification in Mechanical Engineering and a Polytechnic of Namibia evaluation on merit. Such applicant should have at least 2 years of relevant industrial experience. In addition, applicants are subjected to a selection process for this programme. Electronic and Power Engineering Alternative1 A National Diploma in Electrical Engineering (M+3) from the Polytechnic of Namibia OR Alternative 2 An equivalent Electrical Engineering qualification recognised by the Polytechnic of Namibia. These candidates must also be able to register as a Technician-in-Training with the Engineering Council of Namibia or an equivalent international body. A candidate must have entry to Communication Skills 1 before he/she will be allowed to continue with any of the S1 or higher-level courses. Proficiency Tests Proficiency tests in Mathematics, Physical Science, Computer Skills and a placement test in English Communication will be written at the Polytechnic of Namibia at a predetermined date. The Mathematics and Science tests will cover the NSSC (Extended) syllabus.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

ENGINEERING EVALUATION SCALE

POINTS NSSC (H) NSSC (O) OR HIGCSE OR IGCSE HG SG N3 (%) SO (%)

School of Engineering

PROFICIENCY TEST: MATH & SCIENCE %

PROFICIENCY TEST: ENGLISH ENTRY MODULE

(symbol) (symbol)

(symbol) (symbol)

10 9 8 7

1 2 3 4 A* A

A B C D A B

80+ 70+ 80+ 60+ 70+ 50+ 80+ 70+ Module 4 or Communication Skills

6 5 4 3 2

B C D E F

E F

C D E F

60+ 50+ 40+

60+ 50+ 3

Total points will be calculated using grades obtained in Mathematics, Physics equivalent subject, English and the three other best subjects. Engineering Assessment Criteria Two types of assessments are used in Engineering. · Final Examination · Diversified Continuous Evaluation Final Examination: Students build a semester mark through tests and assignments and write a final examination covering the whole course content at the end of such a course. Admission will be granted to candidates to sit for a first or a second end of semester examination in a course if they have accumulated a minimum semester mark of 50% in that course. The decision to write the first examination or not, shall be irrevocable as soon as the student has reported for the first examination. The final course mark will consist of 50% of the end of semester examination course mark and 50% of its semester mark. To pass a course, a candidate must have a final mark of 50% in that course. There is a sub minimum of 40% in the end of semester examination course mark. Diversified Continuous Evaluation: Students build a final mark through projects, examinations and assignments during the semester. These aspects are set out in the course outlines of the particular courses. General Engineering Progression Requirements Subject to the provisions of the progression rules that follow for each programme, a candidate who completes 50% or less of the courses required in a year in a programme must re-apply

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

for entry to the programme. A candidate can complete a course either by receiving credit for the course or by passing the course. Certificate, Diploma and Degree Minimum Requirements Electronic, Mechanical and Power Engineering A Certificate will only be issued to a candidate after the successful completion of all the courses stated in the S1, S2, P1 and P2 part of the curricula. A Higher Certificate will only be issued to a candidate after the successful completion of all the courses stated in the S1, S2, P1, P2, and S3 part of the curricula. A Diploma will only be issued to a candidate after the successful completion of all the courses stated in the S1, S2, P1, P2, S3 and S4 part of the curricula. A Bachelor of Technology Degree will only be issued to a candidate after successful completion of a Diploma, or equivalent, and the successful completion of all courses stated in the respective Bachelor of Technology Degree curriculum. Civil Engineering A Certificate will only be issued to a candidate after the successful completion of all the courses stated in the Semester 1, Semester 2, and Semester 3 part of the curriculum. A Higher Certificate will only be issued to a candidate after the successful completion of all the courses stated in the Semester 1, Semester 2, Semester 3 and Semester 4 part of the curriculum. A Diploma will only be issued to a candidate after the successful completion of all the courses stated in the Semester 1, Semester 2, Semester 3, Semester 4, Semester 5 and Semester 6 part of the curriculum. A Bachelor of Technology Degree will only be issued to a candidate after successful completion of the Diploma in Civil Engineering and Project Management, or equivalent, and the successful completion of all courses stated in the respective final year Bachelor of Technology Degree curriculum. Exception and Progression Rules Exception Rule: (For all subsequent progression rules) The Registrar may, after student counseling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success. Progression Rule No 1A: Applicable to students enrolled in ItES first semester. The student must have passed Language in Practice A, Introduction to Mathematics Module 1, Engineering Skills Module 1 and any 3 other courses to proceed to ItES second semester. Progression Rule No 1B.Applicable to students enrolled in ItES second semester. The student must have passed all the courses in the ItES programme to progress to the higherlevel Engineering studies. Students who fail to meet the requirements of Progression Rules 1A and/or 1B must re-apply for admission to the ItES programme. Major Courses (Pass mark 50%): Engineering Graphics Engineering Skills Module 1 112

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Engineering Skills Module 2 Language in Practice A Language in Practice B Introduction to Physics Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Principles of Information Systems 1A Minor Courses (Pass mark 40%): Introduction to Ecology* Introduction to Chemistry** Introduction to Engineering Geography History for Engineers Introduction to MicroEconomics

School of Engineering

** Introduction to Chemistry must be passed with 50% for a student to proceed to Mechanical Engineering S1. ** Introduction to Ecology and Introduction to Chemistry must be passed with 50% for a student to proceed to Civil Engineering S1. Progression Rule No 2: The student must have passed all first year Engineering courses to proceed to relevant Engineering Practice. The student may not enroll for any full time courses whilst doing Engineering Practice. In case the student was granted exception, according to the conditions of the exception rule, he/she may only enroll for a maximum of one full time course per semester, subject to the written approval of employer or bursary donor. NOTE: Engineering Practice could be done at any time after successful completion of first year Engineering courses. Progression Rule No 3: The student must have passed all S1/S2 core courses to proceed to S3. Progression Rule No 4: The student must have successfully completed all courses from S3/ S4 (ND) to proceed to B-Tech. in Mechanical Engineering. CIVIL ENGINEERING (new set of curricula) Exception Rule: [For all subsequent (CIV)-progression rules] The Registrar may, after student counselling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success. Important Note for all Civil Engineering students still following the old curriculum: For a maximum period of 5 years (envelope grace period) the old curriculum will follow the exception rule and progression rules numbers 2 to 4 below. Progression Rule No 5 (MECH-ENG) The student may register for a maximum of two prescribed B-tech courses in addition to Mechanical Engineering Project 4A (MEP410S) or Mechanical Engineering Project 4B (MEP420S) during Semester 8, provided that the course/s registered for are actually presented by the Department of Mechanical Engineering during the respective semester.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: ENGINEERING: CIVIL: URBAN OR WATER 35BCUR & 35BCWT Description (B-Tech Urban Engineering) Studies are concentrated in technologies related to Engineering Mathematics, Engineering Physics & Chemistry, Basic Surveying practices, Soil Mechanics and Material Science, overviews in Water Engineering, Structural Design and Construction of roads, buildings, bridges and dams, and key elements of Project Management, Onsite Logistics and Quantity Surveying, Solid and Liquid Waste Management, Urban Planning and Design and Systems Reticulation and Design. The total notional hours for this programme amount to 5870 up to the end of the B-Tech in Urban Engineering. All courses have pre-determined competence profiles clearly indicating the competence & skills training through modular lecturing, excursions, self-study, assignments, practicals and projects. Students will also be required to demonstrate their competences through a number of presentations throughout all 8 semesters. Description (B-Tech Water Engineering) Studies are concentrated in technologies related to Engineering Mathematics, Engineering Physics & Chemistry, Basic Surveying practices, Soil Mechanics and Material Science, overviews in Water Engineering, Systems Reticulation and Design, Water Purification and Wastewater Treatment, Water Supply and Sanitation concepts, Water Utility and Integrated Water Resources Management, Solid and Liquid Waste Management, key elements of Project Management and Water legislation. The total notional hours for this programme amount to 5870 up to the end of the B-Tech in Water Engineering. All courses have pre-determined competence profiles clearly indicating the competence and skills training through modular lecturing, excursions, self-study, assignments, practicals and projects. Students will also be required to demonstrate their competences through a number of presentations throughout all 8 semesters. Exit Points: Certificate for level 1 after successful completion of semesters 1-3, Higher Certificate for level 2 after successful completion of semester 4, National Diploma for level 3 after successful completion of semesters 5 and 6. Important Transition Note: The new set of curricula will be implemented over the years 2005-07 to follow the natural cycle from semester to semester. However, the department strives to have all courses developed by the end of 2005. For this reason both, the new and parts of the old curricula, will be presented here. Their latest `phasing in /out' times are clearly indicated. The department reserves the right to implement readily developed courses on National Diploma Level to replace old courses even before 2007. The grace period for completion of a National Diploma in Civil Engineering will be 5 years with regards to the old curriculum. I.e. a student having started studying for a National Diploma in Civil Engineering in the old curriculum will attend the new courses but will receive his/her qualification (NDCertificate) under the old qualification for a maximum period of 5 years with effect from 2005. The last date of award of the old National Diploma shall be 2010. Thereafter such student will have no further right to be certified under the old qualification and will have to complete the new qualification. Courses on the new curriculum will during these 5 years count on the old qualification. Exception Rule: (For all subsequent progression rules) The Registrar may, after student counseling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

S0.1 Code LPA0220 ITD012S ITM011S ITS012S TLS011S IEG010S IHE010S SDS010S S0.2 LPB0320 CSK0420 TLS021S ITM021S ITS022S IEE010S IME010S PIS121S Course Title Language in Practice A Engineering Graphics Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 Introduction to Chemistry Engineering Skills Module 1 Introduction to Engineering Geography History for Engineers Self Development and Study Skills Language in Practice B or Communication Skills Engineering Skills Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Physics Introduction to Ecology Introduction to Micro-economics Principles of Information Systems 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M)

School of Engineering Prerequisite

Language in Practice A Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 None None

Semester 1, Notional Hours: 820h COM1100 Communication Skills Language in Practice B SUR110S Surveying 1 See admission requirements APC110S Applied Physics and Chemistry See admission requirements EDG110S Engineering Descriptive Geometry See admission requirements CMT110S Construction Material Technologies 1 See admission requirements MAT111S Mathematics 1 See admission requirements SLM110S Study Skills and Learning Methods See admission requirements PIS122S Principles of Information Systems 1B See admission requirements Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M) *Communication Skills is available on Distance Education Mode, but if this option is taken than the Vacation Schools are compulsory. Semester 2 , Notional Hours: 750h CDR110S Civil Engineering Drawing-AutoCAD CON110S Construction Methods MPC110S Introduction to Management Practices in the Civil Engineering Industry TST110S Theory of Structures SOM110S MAT120S RMA411S Strength of Materials Mathematics 2 Research Methodology Engineering Descriptive Geometry Construction Material Technologies 1 Principles of Information Systems 1B Applied Physics and Chemistry Mathematics 1 Applied Physics and Chemistry Mathematics 1 Mathematics 1 Mathematics 1

Progression Rule No 2: The student must have passed all first year Engineering courses to proceed to relevant Engineering Practice. The student may not enroll for any full time courses whilst doing Engineering Practice. In case the student was granted exception, according to the conditions of the exception rule, he/she may only enroll for a maximum of one full time course per semester, subject to the written approval from employer or bursary donor. 115

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 3, Notional Hours: 700h PFC0620 Professional Communication WAE110S Water Engineering 1 BCS110S BSE110S BCP110S QSV110S LAL111S Semester 4 CPR210S Building Construction Scheduling Building Site Equipment Building Costing and Pricing 1 Quantity Surveying Labour Law 1A Civil Engineering Practical Training

School of Engineering

Communication Skills Mathematics 2 Applied Physics and Chemistry Introduction to Management Practices in the Civil Engineering Industry Introduction to Management Practices in the Civil Engineering Industry Introduction to Management Practices In the Civil Engineering Industry Introduction to Management Practices in the Civil Engineering Industry None See Progression Rule No 2 Prerequisite Theory of Structures Strenght of Materials Theory of Structures Strenght of Materials Water Engineering 1 Engineering Descriptive Geometry None None Building Costing & Pricing 1 Structural Design 3A Structural Analysis 3A Structural Analysis 3A Water Engineering 2 Geo-technical Engineering 3A See Progression Rule No 2(CIV) See Progression Rule No 2(CIV)

Semester 5, Notional Hours: 700h Code Course Title SDE311S Structural Design 3A SAN310S WAE310S GDE310S GET310S BSO221S BCP310S Structural Analysis 3A Water Engineering 2 Geometric Design 1 Geo-technical Engineering 3A Business Operations Building Costing and Pricing 2

Semester 6 SDE321S Structural Design 3B SAN320S Structural Analysis 3B CAS310S Computer Applications in Structural Analysis WAE320S Water Engineering 3 GET320S Geo-technical Engineering 3B BFS222S Business Finance DOC310S Documentation

NOTE: For the current and revised B-Tech courses in Urban Engineering there is no change with regards to addition of courses. I.e. students will attend to the new curriculum from 2005 as per central course mapping available in the department. This final year programme is currently offered part time only and will be put on full time mode with a minimum of 8 students attending. Students registering from 2005, will be registered into the revised curriculum for B- Tech Urban Engineering or the new curriculum for B-Tech in Water Engineering only but have the exit options as sketched out above. The B-Tech in Urban Engineering was fully accredited (CTP) in 2003 and has experienced rather strategic changes than content changes to accommodate a B-Tech in Water Engineering (refer to curriculum below).

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering 35BCUR

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: CIVIL ENGINEERING: URBAN ENGINEERING Semester 7 Code PTN411S RDM411S GDE411S UPD411S SWM411S RCD411S CMT411S PJM411S

B-Tech 1 (Advanced Engineering Level) Notional Hours: 800h Course Title Pre-requisite Pavement Technology 1 None Reticulation Design & Management 1 Water Engineering 3 Geometric Design 2 Geometric Design 1 Urban Planning & Design 1 None Solid Waste Management 1 None Reinforced Concrete Design 1 Structural Design 3B Construction Material Technology 2 Construction Material Technology 1 Project Management 1 Building Construction Scheduling

Progression Rule No 2(CIV): The student must have successfully completed minimum four courses from Bachelor 1 advanced engineering level in Semester 7 (the recommended course sequence refers) to proceed to either Bachelor design project: UDP420S or WDP420S depending on the programme chosen. Semester 8 Code UDP410S UPD421S WM421S PTN421S RDM421S RCD421S PJM421S TEN411S B-Tech 2 (advanced engineering level) Notional Hours: 800h Course Title Prerequisite Urban Engineering Design Project See progression rule No 2(CIV) Urban Planning & Design 2 Urban Planning & Design 1 Solid Waste Management 2 Solid Waste Management 1 Pavement Technology 2 Pavement Technology 2 Reticulation Design & Management 2 Reticulation Design & Management 1 Reinforced Concrete Design 2 Reinforced Concrete Design 1 Project Management 2 Project Management 2 Traffic Engineering None 35BCWT

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: CIVIL ENGINEERING: WATER ENGINEERING Semester 7 Code RDM411S SWM411S PJM411S CMT411S WWT411S WTT411S WSS411S IWL410S B-Tech 1 (Advanced Engineering Level) Course Title Reticulation Design & Management 1 Solid Waste Management 1 Project Management 1 Construction Material Technology 2 Wastewater Treatment 1 Water Treatment Technology 1 Water Supply and Sanitation 1 Introduction to Water Law

Pre-requisite Water Engineering 3 None Building Construction Scheduling Construction Material Technology None None None None

Progression Rule No 2(CIV): The student must have successfully completed minimum four courses from Bachelor 1 Advanced Engineering Level in Semester 7 (the recommended course sequence refers) to proceed to either Bachelor design project: UDP420S or WDP420S depending on the programme chosen. Semester 8 B-Tech 2 (Advanced Engineering Level) Code Course Title RDM421S Reticulation Design & Management 2 SWM421S Solid Waste Management 2 117 Prerequisite Reticulation Design & Management 1 Solid Waste Management 1

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

PJM421S WUM410S IWM410S WWT421S WTT421S WDP410S Project Management 2 Water Utility Management 1 Integrated Water Management Wastewater Treatment 2 Water Treatment Technology 2 Water Engineering Design Project

School of Engineering Project Management 1 None None Wastewater Treatment 1 Water Treatment Technology 1 See progression rule No 2(CIV) 35BECV

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING: CIVIL (Phased in 2008)

Description The Bachelor of Engineering: Civil is a professional degree worth 590 credits at NQF Level 8. The degree will incorporate project-based assessments, a research component and six months of practical work-based learning. Admission requirements The admission requirements into Semester 1 are derived from the professional roles, the course learning outcomes, the competence and skills required and are as follows: Grade 12 with a minimum NSSC (H) `3' symbol in Mathematics, Physical Science and English. Two additional subjects must have been passed with a minimum NSSC (O) `A' and `B' symbols respectively. OR Passed the Introduction to Engineering Studies (ItES) programme with NSSC (H) equivalent qualifications as indicated on the Engineering Evaluation Scale. Special Rules Exception Rule: [For all subsequent (CIV)-progression rules] The Registrar may, after student counselling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success. Progression Rule No 1 (CIV): The student must have passed all courses from the Year 1Year 2 to proceed to Year 3 semester 5. Progression Rule No 2 (CIV): The student must have passed all Year 3 semester 5 courses to proceed to Year 3 semester 6 (Specialisation). Progression Rule No 3 (CIV): The student must have passed all Year 4 semester 7 courses to proceed to the Engineering Project. Progression Rule No 4 (CIV): The student who has one year relevant working experience supported by an employer will be credited with Year 5 semester 9 after submiting a report on his working experience. Transition Rule 1 (CIV) A student with the Diploma and Bachelor of Technology degree qualifications will be assessed and placed at the appropriate level. The grace period for completion of the Bachelor of Technology qualification is 6 years from the implementation of the Professional Bachelor degree. The last date for the award of the B.Tech degree shall be 2014. Thereafter such student will have no further right to be certified under the old qualification and will have to complete the new qualification.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

CURRICULA First Year Semester 1 Course Code CSK0420 CUS0100 END111S MTM110S AMC110S APH120S Semester 2 CAD120S EEG120S ACH110S MTM120S MLS120S MOM120S WPR120S Second Year Semester 3 MTM310S EGY120S FMC610S BMA121S PFW0520 TST210S Semester 4 CON220S ICM210S GMS210S PFC0620 PMG220S SVY210S

School of Engineering

Course Title Communication Skills Computer User Skills Engineering Drawing 115 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Computer Aided Drawing 125 Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Chemistry 125 Engineering Mathematics 125 Material Science 125 Mechanics of Materials 125 Workshop Practise 125

Prerequisite(s) See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements None See admission requirements See admission requirements Mathematics 115 See admission requirements Engineering Mechanics 115 None

Engineering Mathematics 216 Engineering Geology 161 Fluid Mechanics 214 Intro to Business Management Professional Writing Theory of Structures 161

Engineering Mathematics 125 See admission requirements Engineering Mechanics 115 None Communication Skills Mechanics of Materials 125

Construction Materials Engineering 161 Introduction to Construction Management None Geomechanics 161 None Professional Communication Communication Skills Project Management 161 Survey 161 Engineering Mathematics 115

Progression Rule 1 (CIV) The student should have passed all Year 1 and 2 courses to proceed to Year 3. Third Year Semester 5 GEG310S PGD310S STA310S STD310S SSS220S WRE310S

Geotechnical Engineering 171 Geometric Design of Roads 171 Structural Analysis 171 Structural Design (Concrete & Masonry) Statistics 171 Water Engineering 171

Geomechanics Engineering Drawing 115 Theory of Structures Theory of Structures None Fluid Mechanics 214 Introduction to Construction Management None

Electives (Choose one of the following) CLT220S Contract Law and Tendering 171 EDS310S Electric Drive Systems 171 119

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

STD311S UTE310S WWT310S Structural Design (Steel, Timber) 171 Urban Traffic Engineering 171 Water & Wastewater Treatment 171

School of Engineering Theory of Structures None Engineering Chemistry 125

Progression Rule 2 (CIV) The student should have passed all Year 3 semester 5 courses to proceed to semester 6. Third Year Semester 6 Core Courses MCD310S Mechanical Design 171 SBM421S Strategic Business Management Planning & Control

None Progression Rule 2 (CIV)

Pick one specialisation related to the elective done in semester 5 Specialisation 1 (Water Engineering) SRD320S Sewer Water Reticulation Design and Management 171 Water & Wastewater Treatment SWM320S Solid Waste Management 171 None SWD320S Storm Water Reticulation Design and Management 171 Water & Wastewater Treatment WDM320S Water Resources Development & Management 171 None WRD320S Water Reticulation Design & Management Progression Rule 2 (Civ) Specialisation 2 (Structural Engineering) ASD320S Advanced Structural Steel Design 171 CAS310S Computer Applications in Structural Engineering 171 RCD320S Reinforced Concrete Design 171 STA320S Structural Analysis 271 Structural Design (Steel, Timber) Structural Analysis 1 Structural Design (Concrete & Masonry) Structural Analysis 1 Geometric Design of Roads Structural Design (Concrete & Masonry) Geometric Design of Roads None Contract Law and Tendering Introduction to Construction Management Structural Design (Concrete & Masonry)

Specialisation 3 (Transport Engineering) GDE320S Geometric Design 271 PTN320S Pavement Technology 171 TES320S TSS320S Traffic Economics 171 Transport Systems and Structures 171

Specialisation 4 (Construction Management) CON320S Construction Organisation 171 CEN320S Construction Process Engineering 171 CCC320S Construction Cost Calculation 171 RCD320S Reinforced Concrete Design 171

Specialisation 5 (Geotechnical Engineering) ERM320S Earth & Rock Moving in Civil Engineering Progression Rule 2 (Civ) GME320S Geotechnical Methods & Equipment 171 Mechanical Design (Civil) & Electric Drive Systems GET321S Geotechnical Engineering 271 Geotechnical Engineering 1

120

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

GTE320S Geotechnical Technical Equipment and Machinery 171

School of Engineering Progression Rule 2 (CIV)

Progression Rule 3 (CIV) The student should have passed all Year 4 semester 7 courses to proceed to the Engineering project course. Fourth Year Semester 7 EVE410S Environmental Enineering 181 None ERM810S Engineering Research Methodology 181 None SSS410S Statistics 281 Statistics 1 (Civil) Electives (Pick the related field to semester 6 specialisation) Specialisation 1 (Water Engineering) HSS410S Hydraulic Structures 181 EID410S Irrigation and Drainage Engineering 181 SWM330S Solid Waste Management 281 Specialisation 2 (Structural Engineering) CMF410S Continuum Mechanics & Finite Elements Methods 181 RRC410S Rehabilitation & Repairs of Concrete Structures 181 ACM410S Advanced Concrete Materials 181 Specialisation 3 (Traffic/Transport Engineering) TFT410S Traffic Flow Theory 181 TEN412S Traffic Engineering 281 UPG410S Urban Planning 181 Specialisation 4 (Construction Engineering) CEM410S Civil Engineering Measurement 181 CTE410S Concrete Materials Technology 181 RRC410S Rehabilitation & Repair of Concrete Structures 181 Specialisation 5 (Geotechnical Engineering) GVC410S Geotechnical Engineering - Vertical Underground Construction 181 GSU410S Geotechnical Engineering - Specialised Underground Construction 181 SWM410S Solid WasteManagement 281 Semester 8 - Compulsory Courses CET420S Engineering Project 181 CPN420S Cleaner Production 181 MTT420S Materials Handling Technology & Storage Techniques 181 SBM421S Strategic Business Management: Planning & Control Specialisation 1 in S6 Specialisation 1 in S6 Progression Rule 2 (Civ)

Specialisation 2 in S6 Specialisation 2 in S6 Specialisation 2 in S6 Specialisation 3 in S6 Specialisation 3 in S6 Specialisation 3 in S6 Specialisation 4 in S6 Specialisation 5 in S6 Specialisation 5 in S6

Specialisation 5 in S6 Specialisation 5 in S6 Specialisation 5 in S6

None

Progression Rule 2 (Civ)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 9 CET890S Civil Engineering Practice 181

School of Engineering Progression Rule 3 (Civ) 35BEMI

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING: MINING (Phasing in 2009)

Description The Bachelor of Engineering: Mining degree features two specialisations of Mining Production and Mineral Processing. The degree is worth 624 credits (Minining Production) and 627 credits (Mineral Processing) respectively at NQF level 8. It consist of eight semesters of instruction and a ninth devoted to experiential learning in industry and to applying the obtained knowledge in a bachelor's thesis. Admission Requirements 1. Grade 12 with a minimum of NSSC (H) grade 3 or equivalent in Mathematics, Physical Science and English. 2. In addition two subjects with a minimum NSSC (O) `A' and `B' symbols respectively or equivalent must be passed; OR 3. Passed the Polytechnic Bridging Programme (ITES) with NSSC (H) or equivalent qualifications as indicated on the Engineering Evaluation Scale. The Bachelor of Engineering: Mining programme will be offered on full-time mode only. CURRICULA First Year Semester 1 Course Code CSK0420 CUS0100 END111S MTM110S AMC110S APH120S EGY120S MIN110S Semester 2 CAD120S EEG120S ACH110S MTM210S MLS120S MOM120S EGY220S MIN120S Second Year Semester 3 MTM310S GMS210S MOM210S FMC610S

Course Title Communication Skills Computer User Skills Engineering Drawing 115 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Geology Mining Practice 141 Computer Aided Drawing 125 Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Chemistry 125 Engineering Mathematics 125 Material Science 125 Mechanics of Materials 125 Engineering Geology 261 Mining Practice 241

Prerequisite(s) See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements See admission requirements None See admission requirements See admission requirements Engineering Mathematics 115 See admission requirements Engineering Mechanics 115

Engineering Mathematics 361 Geomechanics - Soil Mechanics 161 Mechanics of Materials 261 Fluid Mechanics 161

Engineering Mathematics 115 None Mechanics of Materials 125 Engineering Mechanics 115 Engineering Mathematics 125

122

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

EMC510S SVY210S Electrical Machines 161 Surveying 161

School of Engineering Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Mathematics 361 Engineering Mathematics 115 Fluid Mechanics 161 Engineering Drawing 115 Engineering Mathematics 115 Surveying 161 Geomechanics - Soil Mechanics

Semester 4 NMS220S Numerical Methods & Statistics 161 TDN620S Thermodynamics 161 POD220S MSV210S GMS220S IMG220S MIN220S Principles of Design 161 Mine Surveying 171 Geomechanics - Rock Mechanics 161 Introduction to Mining 161 Mining Practice III 341

Third Year Semester 5 Compulsory MAD310S Machine Design 171 Principles of Design 161 EEG310S Environmental Engineering in Mining 171 Introduction to Mining 161 EEM720S Engineering Managment 171 Electives: Specialisation 1: Mining Production MLL310S Mining Law and Licenses 171 MID310S GPS310S Mineral Deposits 171 Geophysical Systems 171

Introduction to Mining 161 Engineering Geology 261 Introduction to Mining 161 Engineering Geology 261 Introduction to Mining 161 Engineering Geology 261 Numerical Methods & Statistics 161 Engineering Mechanics 115 Thermodynamics 161 Engineering Mathematics 125

Specialisation 2: Mineral Processing NMS310S Numerical Methods and Statistics 271 SYM310S Systems Modeling 171 EXM310S Experimental Methods 171

Semester 6 Compulsory MPM320S Mineral Project Management 171 PFW0520 MIP320S MPL320S Professional Writing Mineral Processing 171 Mine Planning 171

Electives: Specialisation 1: Mining Production MUM320S Mining Methods Underground Mining 181 Introduction to Mining 161 Mineral Deposits 171 MSM320S Mining Methods Surface Mining 181 Introduction to Mining 161 Mineral Deposits 171

Introduction to Mining 161 Engineering Managment 171 Communication Skills Introduction to Mining 161 Mineral Deposits 171 Introduction to Mining 161 Mineral Deposits 171

123

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Specialisation 2: Mineral Processing ETR620S Electronics 161 CNS320S Control Systems 171 Fourth Year Semester 7 Compulsory ERM810S Engineering Research Methodology 181 CHT410S Conveying & Hauling Technology 181 MIP410S Mineral Processing 281 Electives: Specialisation 1: Mining Production MPL410S Mine Planning 281 MPU410S ESM410S EUM410S Mining Engineering Project Underground 181 Mining Equipment Surface Mining 181 Mining Equipment - Underground Mining 181

School of Engineering Electrical Engineering 124 Systems Modeling 171

Introduction to Mining 161

Introduction to Mining 161 Mineral Deposits 171 Mine Planning 171 Mineral Deposits 171 Mining Methods Surface Mining Mineral Deposits 171 Mining Methods Underground Mining 181 Mineral Deposits 171 Mineral Processing 171 Mineral Deposits 171 Mineral Processing 171 Mineral Deposits 171 Mineral Processing 171

Specialisation 2: Mineral Processing PPD410S Processing Plant Design 181 CAG410S PMY410S Crushing and Grinding 181 Process Mineralogy 171

Semester 8 Compulsory PME420S Mining Engineering Project 281 MEV420S HSP420S

Engineering Research Methodology 181 Mine Economics & Mine Valuation 181 S6 & S7 compulsory courses Health & Safety Protection in Mining 181 S6 & S7 compulsory courses

Electives: Specialisation 1: Mining Production VCC420S Mine Ventilation & Climate Conditioning 181 Mine Planning 281 SDF420S Shaft Sinking & Deep Foundations 181 Mining Methods Underground Mining 181 DTE420S Large Underground Excavation, Mining Methods Drifting & Tunneling 181 Underground Mining 181 CHT420S Conveying & Hauling Technology 281 Conveying & Hauling Technology 181 MMM420S Mining Methods, Marine Mining 181 Introduction to Mining 161 Mineral Deposits 171 Specialisation 2: Mineral Processing PPD420S Processing Plant Design 281 Processing Plant Design181 Process Mineralogy 171 124

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

FLO420S MWM420S HMY420S CPN420S Flotation 181 Waste Management in Mining 281 Hydrometallurgy 181 Cleaner Production 181

School of Engineering Mineral Deposits 171 Mineral Processing 171 Processing Plant Design181 Mineral Deposits 171 Mineral Processing 171 Environmental Engineering in Mining 171

Fifth Year Semester 9 BEP510S Experiential Training with Bachelor Thesis 181

Completion of all courses up to S8

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: ELECTRONIC/POWER ENGINEERING 35BELL & 35BPEN NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ENGINEERING: ELECTRONIC Description Electronics is the buzzword of modern technology but has a history dating back to the first telephone and a little later the wireless. The discovery of semi-conductor technology opened up a vast area of new applications for increasingly smaller and more powerful devices. Qualified Technicians in this field of study are involved in telecommunications and radio/TV broadcasting, automation in which programmable controllers are used to operate systems, and the maintenance and repair of electronic equipment and systems which is a filed of specialisation. Exception Rule: (For all subsequent progression rules) The Registrar may, after student counselling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success. S0.1 Code LPA0220 ITD012S ITM011S ITS012S TLS011S IEG010S IHE010S SDS010S S0.2 Code LPB0320 CSK0420 TLS021S ITM021S ITS022S IEE010S IME010S Course Title Language in Practice A Engineering Graphics Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 Introduction to Chemistry Engineering Skills Module 1 Introduction to Engineering Geography History for Engineers Self Development and Study Skills Course Title Language in Practice B or Communication Skills Engineering Skills Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Physics Introduction to Ecology Introduction to Micro-economics Prerequisite

Prerequisite Language in Practice A Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 None

125

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

PIS121S

School of Engineering

Principles of Information Systems 1A None Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M) *Communication Skills is available on Distance Education Mode, but if this option is taken then the Vacation Schools are compulsory. Progression Rule No 1A: (Applicable to students enrolled in ItES). The student must have completed all S0.1/S0.2 courses to proceed to S1. Progression Rule No 1B.1: (Applicable to students in the Electronic and Power programmes that qualify to enroll directly into S1). The student must have been granted credits for courses Introduction to Chemistry (ITS012S), Introduction to Physics (ITS022S), Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 (ITM011S), Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 (ITM021S), Language in Practice B, Engineering Graphics (ITD012S), Engineering Skills Module 1 (TLS011S), and Engineering Skills Module 2 (TLS021S) before being allowed to enroll for S1. S1 (Semester 1) Code Course Title CSK0420 Communication Skills DEL1100 Digital Electronics 1** ELE111S ELC1100 ITD012S MAT111S PIS122S Electrical Engineering 1 ** Electronics 1 ** Engineering Graphics* Mathematics 1 ** Principles of Information Systems 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M) Prerequisite Language in Practice B Introduction to Science Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Science Module 2 Language in Practice B Introduction to Science Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B None Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B Principles of Information Systems 1A

* Only applicable for candidates entering S1 direct after school ***Communication Skills is available on Distance Education Mode, but if this option is taken then the Vacation Schools are compulsory. S2 (Semester 2) APR110S Applied Programming 1 DEL1200 Digital Electronics 2 ** Principles of Information Systems 1B Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Digital Electronics 1 Electronics 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Electrical Engineering 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Electronics 1 Electrical Engineering 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills 126

ELE120S ELC1200

Electrical Engineering 2 ** Electronics 2 **

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

MAT120S PRJ110S Mathematics 2 ** Projects 1

School of Engineering Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Principles of Information Systems 1B Engineering Graphics Electronics 1 Electrical Engineering 1 Communication Skills 1

** Core S1/S2 Courses Progression Rule No 2: The student must have passed all core S1/S2 courses** to proceed to relevant Engineering Practice 1. The student may not enrol for any full time courses whilst doing Engineering Practice 1 or Engineering Practice 2. In case the student was granted exception, according to the conditions of the exception rule, he/she may only enrol for a maximum of one full time course during P1 and P2 subject to the written approval of employer/ bursary giver. NOTE: Student must submit proof of employment offer to the coordinator before he/ she can register for either Practice 1 or Practice 2. P1 (Semester 3) Code Course LPR2100 Electronic Engineering Practice 1 P2 (Semester 4) LPR2200 Electronic Engineering Practice 2 Prerequisite See Progression Rule 2 Electrical Engineering Practice 1

Progression Rule No 3: The student must have passed all S1/S2 core courses to proceed to S3. S3 (Semester 5) CEL1300 Communication Electronics 2 CTS210S Control Systems 2 Electrical Engineering 2 Mathematics 2 Electronics 2 Mathematics 2 Electronics 2 Electrical Engineering2 Co requisite: Mathematics 3 Projects 1 Electronics 2 Mathematics 2 Mathematics 2 Digital Electronics 2 Applied Programming 1 Projects 1 Electronics 2 15 Electrical Engineering Credits (P1/P2 excluded) Design Projects 3A Projects 2 3 Electronic Engineering S3 credits

DPJ310S ECD310S MAT311S MIC310S PRJ210S

Design Projects 3A Electronic Design 3A Mathematics 3 Micro Controller Applications 3A Projects 2

S4 (Semester 6) DPJ320S Design Projects 3 B

ENT3400

Entrepreneurship & Management 2

127

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

And any FOUR of the following electives: AUT3300 Automation 3 CTS310S EMA3400 EPR3400 ECD320S HFE1300 MIC320S PEL3300 Control Systems 3 Electrical Machines 3 Electrical Protection 3 Electronic Design 3B High Frequency Engineering 3 Micro Controller Application 3B Power Electronics 3

School of Engineering Electronics 2 Applied Programming 1A Control Systems 2 Mathematics 3 Electrical Engineering 2 Electrical Machines 2 Mathematics 2 Power Engineering 3 Electrical Distribution 3 Mathematics 3 Electronic Design 3A Communication Electronics 2 Mathematics 3 Micro Controller Application 3 A Electrical Machines 2 Electronics 2 Mathematics 3

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ENGINEERING: POWER Description Graduates with this Diploma are typically involved in the area of power distribution, from domestic installations to large commercial complexes and from small remote electrical installations to large high voltage demand points. Their knowledge also allows them to become involved in High Voltage power distribution at national grid level, in cities and in towns. Although electronics are becoming dominant there is still an area in which automation is needed. Exception Rule: (For all subsequent progression rules) The Registrar may, after student counselling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success. S0.1 Code LPA0220 ITD012S ITM011S ITS012S TLS011S IHE010S IEG010S SDS010S S0.2 LPB0320 CSK0420 TLS021S ITM021S ITS022S IEE010S IME010S PIS121S Course Title Language in Practice A Engineering Graphics Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 Introduction to Chemistry Engineering Skills Module 1 History for Engineers Introduction to Engineering Geography Self Development and Study Skills Language in Practice B or Communication Skills Engineering Skills Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Physics Introduction to Ecology Introduction to Micro-economics Principles of Information Systems 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M) 128 Prerequisite

Language in Practice A Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 None None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

*Communication Skills is available on Distance Education Mode, but if this option is taken then the Vacation Schools are compulsory. Progression Rule No 1A: (Applicable to students enrolled in ItES). The student must have completed all S0.1/S0.2 courses to proceed to S1. Progression Rule No 1B.1: (Applicable to students in the Electronic and Power programmes that qualify to enroll directly into S1). The student must have been granted credits for courses Introduction to Chemistry (ITS012S), Introduction to Physics (ITS022S), Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 (ITM011S), Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 (ITM021S), Language in Practice B, Engineering Graphics (ITD012S), Engineering Skills Module 1 (TLS011S), and Engineering Skills Module 2 (TLS021S) before being allowed to enroll for S1. S1 (Semester 1) Code Course Title CSK0420 Communication Skills DEL1100 Digital Electronics 1 ** ELE111S ELC1100 ITD012S MAT111S PIS122S Electrical Engineering 1 ** Electronics 1 ** Engineering Graphics* Mathematics 1 ** Principles of Information Systems 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M) Prerequisite Language in Practice B Introduction to Science Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Science Module 2 Language in Practice B Introduction to Science Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B None Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B Principles of Information Systems 1A

* Only applicable for candidates entering S1 directly after school S2 (Semester 2) Code Course Title APR110S Applied Programming 1 ELE120S EMA120S ELC1200 Electrical Engineering 2 ** Electrical Machines 2 ** Electronics 2 ** Prerequisite Principles of Information Systems 1B Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Electrical Engineering 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Electrical Engineering 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Electronics 1 Electrical Engineering 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Mathematics 1 Communication Skills

MAT120S

Mathematics 2 **

129

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

PRJ110S Projects 1

School of Engineering Principles of Information Systems 1B Engineering Graphics Electronics 1 Electrical Engineering 1 Communication Skills

** Core S1/S2 Courses Progression Rule No 2: The student must have passed all core S1/S2 courses** to proceed to relevant Engineering Practice 1. The student may not enrol for any full time courses whilst doing Engineering Practice 1 or Engineering Practice 2. In case the student was granted exception, according to the conditions of the exception rule, he/she may only enrol for a maximum of one full time course during Practice 1 and Practice 2, subject to the written approval of employer / bursary giver. NOTE: Student must submit proof of employment offer to the coordinator before he/ she can register for either Practice 1 or Practice 2. P1 (Semester 3) Code Course Title EPR2100 Electrical Engineering Practice 1 P2 (Semester 4) EPR2200 Electrical Engineering Practice 2 Prerequisite See Progression Rule 2 Electrical Engineering Practice 1

Progression Rule No 3: The student must have passed all S1/S2 core courses to proceed to S3. S3 (Semester 5) EMS1100 Engineering Mechanics (Statics) CTS210S Control Systems 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Physics Language in Practice B Engineering Skills Module 2 Mathematics 2 Electronics 2 Electrical Engineering 2 Co-requisite: Mathematics 3 Projects 1 Electrical Engineering 2 Electrical Machines 2 Mathematics 2 Electrical Engineering 2 Mathematics 2 Projects 1 Electronics 2 Mathematics 2 15 Electrical Engineering Credits (P1/P2 excluded) Design Projects 3A Projects 2 3 Electrical Engineering S3 credits

DPJ310S ELD3300 PEN310S PRJ210S MAT311S

Design Projects 3A Electrical Distribution 3 Power Engineering 3 Projects 2 Mathematics 3

S4 (Semester 6) DPJ320S Design Projects 3B

ENT3400

Entrepreneurship &Management 2

130

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

And any FOUR of the following electives: AUT3300 Automation 3 CEL1300 CTS310S EMA3400 EPR3400 ECD320S HFE1300 MIC320S PEL3300 Communication Electronics 2 Control Systems 3 Electrical Machines 3 Electrical Protection 3 Electronic Design 3B High Frequency Engineering 3 Micro controller Applications 3B Power Electronics 3

School of Engineering Electronics 2 Applied Programming 1A Electrical Engineering 2 Mathematics 2 Electronics 2 Control Systems 2 Mathematics 3 Electrical Engineering 2 Electrical Machines 2 Mathematics 2 Electrical Distribution 3 Power Engineering 3 Mathematics 3 Electronic Design 3A Communication Electronics 2 Mathematics 3 Micro controller Applications 3A Electrical Machines 2 Electronics 2 Mathematics 3

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY in ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (B. Tech. Electronic) 35BELL and BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY in POWER ENGINEERING (B. Tech. Power) 35BPEN In addition to the institution's admission requirements for degrees, the following admission requirements to the Bachelor of Technology Degree Programme in Electronic Engineering and Bachelor of Technology Degree Programme in Power Engineering will apply: National Diploma M. Dip T4 qualification T3 qualification Course registration will be based on attained pre-requisites Appropriate credits will be transferred Appropriate exemptions will be considered Applicants will need to undertake studies in the relevant courses to satisfy the pre-requisites of the B. Tech. courses.

The Bachelor of Technology Degree in Electronic Engineering and Bachelor of Technology Degree in Power Engineering have four components each, comprising 10 credits per Programme. The first component is the Bachelor of Technology Degree Foundation. The second component is the Bachelor of Technology Degree Core to provide a technical overview of either Electronic or Power areas respectively. The third component is the Bachelor of Technology Degree Sequence. This is a two course in-depth sequence in a particular technical area. The student must select at least one sequence to develop technical expertise. The fourth and final component is the Bachelor of Technology Degree Electives, which enables students to take three elective courses. Students are allowed to broaden their Programme by selecting courses from the sequenced courses as well as from the individual specialty courses to add depth and breadth to their Programme. To summarize, students will take: Foundation Course · Industrial Project 4A · Industrial Project 4B (2 credits) 131

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

· Mathematics 4 One of the 2 Core courses · Power Systems 4 · Electronic System Design 4 One of the following 4 Sequences · Electrical Protection Sequence (Power only) Electrical Protection 4A Electrical Protection 4B · Micro controllers Sequence (Electronics only) Field Programmable Logic Device Applications 4 Micro controller System Applications 4 · Communications Sequence (Electronics only) Electronic Communications 4 Digital Communications 4 · Controls Sequence (Power and Electronics) Control Systems 4 Digital Control Systems 4 · Three additional courses from the list of Electives including individual electives and sequence courses not selected above. Institutional resources will determine the number of courses that can be offered and presentation of any one course is dependent on the amount of students enrolling for such a course. The decision to present or not to present a course lies with the management of the Polytechnic of Namibia. BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY DEGREE in ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 35BELL

Description Graduates of this programme will acquire a sound knowledge in the area of Electronic Engineering. The programme will produce specialists in any one or more of the three options: Communication Systems, Control Systems and Micro Controller systems. A Graduate of this programme will be able to assume responsibilities and work effectively in the modern workplace. Graduates will acquire practical skills that will enable them to supervise implementation of solutions to practical problems. Currently this programme is offered only part time and are divided into 4 semesters. Note: Not all courses indicated in the respective semesters will be offered. The courses offered will depend on student enrolment and department recourses. S5 (Semester 7) Code Course Title ESD410S Electronic System Design 4 IPJ410S MAT410S Industrial Project 4A Mathematics 4 Prerequisite Electronic Design 3B High Frequency Engineering 3 Micro controller Applications 3B Design Project 3B or Design Projects 3 Mathematics 3 Prerequisite Design Project 3B or Design Projects 3

S5 (Semester 8) Code Course Title IPJ410S* Industrial Project 4A

132

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Any ONE of the following (Sequence choice): CTS410S Control Systems 4 ECC410S Electronic Communications 4 MSA410S

School of Engineering

Control Systems 3 Control Systems 2 Electronic Design 3B High Frequency Electronics 3 Micro controller Systems Applications 4 Micro controller Applications 3B

Any ONE of the following but not the same as a previous choice (Elective choice): CTS410S Control Systems 4 Control Systems 3 EMG410S Energy Management 4 None EGM410S Engineering Management 4 Entrepreneurship and Management 2 ECC410S Electronic Communications 4 Control Systems 2 Electronic Design 3B High Frequency Electronics 3 MAE410S Maintenance Engineering 4 None MSA410S Micro Controller Systems Applications 4 Micro Controller Applications 3B REN410S Renewable Energy 4 None REL410S Radio Engineering 4 Electronic Communications 4 S6 (Semester 9) Any ONE of the following (Sequence choice): DCS410S Digital Control Systems 4

Control Systems 3 Mathematics 4 DCM410S Digital Communications 4 Electronic Communications 4 Micro Controller Applications 3B FLD410S Field Programmable Logic Micro Controller Applications 3B Device Applications 4 Any ONE of the following but not the same as a previous choice (Elective choice): DCS410S Digital Control Systems 4 Control Systems 3 Mathematics 4 DCM410S Digital Communications 4 Electronic Communications 4 Micro Controller Applications 3B EMG410S Energy Management 4 None EGM410S Engineering Management 4 Entrepreneurship and Management 2 FLD410S Field Programmable Logic Device Applications 4 Micro Controller Applications 3B MAE410S Maintenance Engineering 4 None REN410S Renewable Energy 4 None REL410S Radio Engineering 4 Electronic Communications 4 S6 (Semester 10) IPJ420S Industrial Project 4B Industrial Project 4A Any ONE of the following but not the same as a previous choice (Elective choice): DCS410S Digital Control Systems 4 Control Systems 3 Mathematics 4 DCM410S Digital Communications 4 Electronic Communications 4 Micro Controller Applications 3B EMG410S Energy Management 4 None EGM410S Engineering Management 4 Entrepreneurship and Management 2 FLD410S Field Programmable Logic Device Applications 4 Micro Controller Applications 3B MAE410S Maintenance Engineering 4 None

133

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

REN410S REL410S Renewable Energy 4 Radio Engineering 4

School of Engineering None Electronic Communications 4

* No registration for this course for it was registered in Semester 7. BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY DEGREE in POWER ENGINEERING 35BPEN

Description Graduates of this programme will acquire a sound knowledge in the area of Power Engineering, which involves generation, transmission, and distribution of electrical energy. The Protection option will produce experts in power system administration. A Graduate of this programme will be able to assume responsibilities and work effectively in the modern workplace. Graduates will acquire practical skills that will enable them to supervise implementation of solutions to practical problems. Currently this programme is offered only part time and is divided into 4 semesters. NOTE: Not all courses indicated in the respective semesters will be offered. The course offered will depend on student enrolment and departmental resources. S5 (Semester 7) Code Course Title IPJ410S Industrial Project 4A MAT410S POS410S Mathematics 4 Power Systems 4 Prerequisite Design Project 3B or Design Projects 3 Mathematics 3 Electrical Distribution 3 Electrical Engineering 3 Electrical Machines 3 Electrical Protection 3 Mathematics 3 Design Project 3B or Design Projects 3

S5 (Semester 8) IPJ410S* Industrial Project 4A Any ONE of the following (Sequence choice): CTS410S Control Systems 4 EPR410SE Electrical Protection 4A

Control Systems 3 Electrical Distribution 3 Electrical Protection 3 Mathematics 3 Any ONE of the following but not the same as a previous choice (Elective choice): CTS410S Control Systems 4 Control Systems 3 EMA410S Electrical Machines 4 Electrical Machines 3 Power Systems 4 EPR410SE Electrical Protection 4A Electrical Distribution 3 Electrical Protection 3 Mathematics 3 EMG410S Energy Management 4 None EGM410S Engineering Management 4 Entrepreneurship and Management 2 HVE410S High Voltage Engineering 4 Power Engineering 3 Electrical Protection 3 IPE410S Industrial Power Engineering 4 Electrical Distribution 3 Electrical Protection 3 Power Engineering 3

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PEL410S MAE410S REN410S Power Electronics 4 Maintenance Engineering 4 Renewable Energy 4

School of Engineering Power Electronics 3 Electrical Machines 4 Control Systems 3 None None

S6 (Semester 9) Any ONE of the following (Sequence choice): DCS410S Digital Control Systems 4

Control Systems 3 Mathematics 4 EPR420S Electrical Protection 4B Electrical Protection 4A Any ONE of the following but not the same as a previous choice (Elective choice): DCS410S Digital Control Systems 4 Control Systems 3 Mathematics 4 EMA410S Electrical Machines 4 Electrical Machines 3 Power Systems 4 EPR420S Electrical Protection 4B Electrical Protection 4A EMG410S Energy Management 4 None EGM410S Engineering Management 4 Entrepreneurship and Management 2 HVE410S High Voltage Engineering 4 Power Engineering 3 Electrical Protection 3 IPE410S Industrial Power Engineering 4 Electrical Distribution 3 Electrical Protection 3 Power Engineering 3 PEL410S Power Electronics 4 Power Electronics 3 Electrical Machines 4 Control Systems 3 MAE410S Maintenance Engineering 4 None REN410S Renewable Energy 4 None S6 (Semester 10) IPJ420S Industrial Project 4B Industrial Project 4A Any ONE of the following but not the same as a previous choice (Elective choice): DCS410S Digital Control Systems 4 Control Systems 3 Mathematics 4 EMA410S Electrical Machines 4 Electrical Machines 3 Power Systems 4 EPR420S Electrical Protection 4B Electrical Protection 4A EMG410S Energy Management 4 None EGM410S Engineering Management 4 Entrepreneurship and Management 2 HVE410S High Voltage Engineering 4 Power Engineering 3 Electrical Protection 3 IPE410S Industrial Power Engineering 4 Electrical Distribution 3 Electrical Protection 3 Power Engineering 3 PEL410S Power Electronics 4 Power Electronics 3 Electrical Machines 4 Control Systems 3 MAE410S Maintenance Engineering 4 None REN410S Renewable Energy 4 None * No registration for this course for it was registered in Semester 7.

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School of Engineering 35BEET

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING: ELECTRONICS & TELECOMMUNICATION

Introduction The Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics and Telecommunication programme is a 4½ year programme with 620 credits accumulated from 51 courses. Successful completion of the programme will lead to the the award of a NQF level 8 (on the Namibian Qualifications Framework) Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics and Telecommunication degree. Admission Requirements Candidates must have NSSC(H) or equivalent qualification with a minimum of 2 obtained in Mathematics and and a minimum of 2 in Physical Science plus a minimum of NSSC(O) E obtained in English as well as gaining entry into English Communication Skills 1 through the Polytechnic of Namibia's English Placement Test. The candidate must also score 37 points on the Engineering Evaluation Scale counting up to five subjects that must include Mathematics, Physical Science and English. If a candidate did not do Physical Science, but a "Physics equivalent" subject, the Registrar may, upon recommendation of the HOD and Dean, approve registration of the candidate. OR Candidates must have successfully completed the Introduction to Engineering studies offered at Polytechnic of Namibia with at least 65 percent in Mathematics Module 2, 65 % in Introduction to Physics and 65% in Introduction to Chemistry. Exceptions Holders of National Diploma in either Electronic or Power Engineering from the Polytechnic of Namibia will be required to have obtained an average of 70 % for all prescribed final year courses and a minimum of 75 % in both Mathematics 2 and Mathematics 3. Students who satisfy these criteria will be admitted into the second year of the B.Eng program. The students will also be exempted from the following second year courses: 1. Digital Electronics 253 2. Analogue Electronics 263 3. Control System 263 However the students will be required to take the following extra first year courses in the first year of registration: 1. Material Science 152 2. Professional Writing 3. Engineering Physics 162 4. Engineering Chemistry 153 5. Introduction to Algorithm Design 155 6. Engineering Drawing ­ AutoCad Admission for applicants with other qualifications Candidates with other qualifications that gain entry into Communication Skills or are exempted from Communication Skills will be assessed on an individual basis. Admission to the programme will be strictly on merit.

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School of Engineering

Qualification Outcomes On successful completion of the programme graduates should have the competencies listed below: · Application of Fundamental and Engineering Knowledge · Engineering Problem Solving · Engineering Design and Synthesis · Engineering Computer Skills · Research Skills : Investigations, Experiments and Data Analysis · Professional Ethics and Practice · Professional and General Communication · Team and Multidisciplinary Working · Impact of Engineering Activity on Society and the Environment · Independent and Lifelong learning · Entrepreneurship and Leadership Programme Structure/Curriculum The Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics and Telecommunication is a 4½ year programme with 620 credits accumulated from 47 core courses and 14 electives. Additionally all students shall be required to produce to the satisfaction of the Head of Department, a certificate showing evidence of completion of suitable work in the basic workshop processes during a period of at least 8 weeks in an approved electronics/telecommunication environment, either before registration or within the first two years from the date of first registration for the programme. Semester 1 MTM110S APH120S END111S AMC110S CSK0420 CUS0100 Semester 2 MTM210S MOM120S EEG120S MLS120S CAD120S ACH110S WPR120S Semester 3 DEL510S PFW0520 MTM310S ANE510S EWP510S EMC510S Semester 4 MAI620S Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Drawings 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Communication Skills Computer User Skills Engineering Mathematics 125 Mechanics of Materials 125 Electrical Engineering 125 Material Science 125 Computer Aided Drawing 125 Engineering Chemistry 125 Workshop Practice 125 Digital Electronics 215 Professional Writing Engineering Mathematics 216 Analogue Electronics 216 Electrical Workshop Practice 215 Electrical Machines 216 Measurements and Instrumentation 226 Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Engineering Physics Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Drawings None None Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Mathematics 125 None Engineering Mathematics 115 Electrical Engineering 125

Electrical Engineering 125 Analogue Electronics 216 137

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEL620S SAS620S ADI111S MTM720S ANE620S Digital Electronics 226 Signals and Systems 226 Intro to Algorithm Design Engineering Mathematics 227 Analogue Electronics 226

School of Engineering Digital Electronics 215 Analogue Electronics 216 Engineering Mathematics 216 Electrical Engineering 125 None Engineering Mathematics 216 Engineering Mathematics 216 Analogue Electronics 216 Electrical Engineering 125 Intro to Algorithm Design Digital Electronics 226 Computer User Skills Signals and Systems Engineering Mathematics 227 Engineering Mathematics 227 Analogue Electronics 226

Semester 5 IPG120S CAR710S ICN210S TCE610S CNS610S FAC1100 Semester 6 CNS720S TCE720S MCA720S ENT111S EEM720S PAS620S Semester 7 REG810S ERM810S EMT810S DIC810S IRS220S ACP710S Semester 8 ESD820S DSP820S OPC820S RNE820S

Introduction to Programming Computer Architecture 317 Introduction to Computer Networking Telecommunication Engineering 316 Control Systems 316 Financial Accounting 1A

Control Systems 327 Control Systems 316 Telecommunication Engineering 327 Telecommunication Engineering 316 Microcontroller Applications 327 Computer Architecture Entrepreneurship Engineering Electromagnetics 327 Engineering Mathematics 216 Electrical Engineering 125 Probability and Statistics 326 Engineering Mathematics 125 Radio Engineering 418 Engineering Research Methods 418 Eng Electromagnetics Professional Writing Probability and Statistics Engineering Mangement 418 Financial Accounting 1A Professional Writing Digital Communication 418 Telecommunication Engineering 3B Probability and Statistics Introduction to Switching and Routing Intro to Computer Networking Applied Computer Programming 417 Intro to Programming Electronic Systems Design 428 Digital Signal Processing 428 Optical Communication 428 Renewable Energy 427 Microcontroller Applications (B.Eng) Signals and Systems Telecommunication Engineering 327 Telecommunication Engineering 327 Electrical Engineering Engineering Mathematics 227 Electrical Machines 216

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Plus any TWO: TSN820S Telecommunication Switching & Network Systems 428 INR820S Intelligent Robotics 428 MCS820S DCS820S Semester 9 ETP830S

School of Engineering

Digital Communication Microcontroller Applications (B.Eng) Intro to Programming Mobile Communication Systems 528 Digital Communication Digital Control Systems 528 Control Systems 327 Electronics and Telecomunications Project 518

Engineering Research Methods 35BEEP

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING: ELECTRICAL POWER

Introduction The Bachelor of Engineering: Electrical Power programme is a 4½ year programme with 620 credits accumulated from 51courses. Successful completion of the programme will lead to the the award of a NQF level 8 Bachelor of Engineering: Electrical Power degree. Admission Requirements Candidates must have NSSC(H) or equivalent qualification with a minimum of 2 obtained in Mathematics and and a minimum of 2 in Physical Science plus a minimum of NSSC(O) E obtained in English as well as gaining entry into English Communication Skills 1 through the Polytechnic of Namibia's English Placement Test. The candidate must also score 37 points on the Engineering Evaluation Scale counting up to five subjects that must include Mathematics, Physical Science and English. If a candidate did not do Physical Science, but a "Physics equivalent" subject, the Registrar may, upon recommendation of the HOD and Dean, approve registration of the candidate. OR Candidates must have successfully completed the Introduction to Engineering studies offered at Polytechnic of Namibia with at least 65 percent in Mathematics Module 2, 65 % in Introduction to Physics and 65% in Introduction to Chemistry. However a score 65 % in the said courses will not automatically guarantee entry into the programme as selection will be based on merit. Exceptions Holders of National Diploma in either Electronic or Power Engineering from the Polytechnic of Namibia will be required to have obtained an average of 70 % for all prescribed final year courses and a minimum of 75 % in Mathematics 2 and a minimum of 75 % in Mathematics 3. Students who satisfy these criteria will be admitted into the second year of the B.Eng program. The students will also be exempted from the following second year courses: 1. Digital Electronics 253 2. Analogue Electronics 263 3. Control System 263 However the students will be required to take the following extra first year courses in the first year of registration: 1. Material Science 152 2. Professional Writing 3. Engineering Physics 162

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

4. 5. 6. Engineering Chemistry 153 Introduction to Algorithm Design 155 Engineering Drawing

School of Engineering

Entry for Applicants with Other Qualifications Candidates with other qualifications (including Bachelor of Technology) that gain entry into Communication Skills or are exempted from Communication Skills will be assessed on an individual basis. Admission to the programme will be strictly on merit. Qualification Outcomes On successful completion of the programme graduates should have the competencies listed below: · Application of Fundamental and Engineering Knowledge · Engineering Problem Solving · Engineering Design and Synthesis · Engineering Computer Skills · Research Skills : Investigations, Experiments and Data Analysis · Professional Ethics and Practice · Professional and General Communication · Team and Multidisciplinary Working · Impact of Engineering Activity on Society and the Environment · Independent and Lifelong learning · Entrepreneurship and Leadership CURRICULUM Semester 1 MTM110S APH120S END111S AMC110S CSK0420 CUS0100 Semester 2 MTM210S MOM120S EEG120S MLS120S CAD120S ACH110S WPR120S Semester 3 DEL510S PFC0620 MTM310S ANE510S Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Drawings 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Communication Skills Computer User Skills Engineering Mathematics 125 Mechanics of Materials 125 Electrical Engineering 125 Material Science 125 Computer Aided Drawing 125 Engineering Chemistry 125 Workshop Practice 125 Digital Electronics 215 Professional Writing Engineering Mathematics 216 Analogue Electronics 215 Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Drawings 115

Engineering Mathematics 125 Electrical Engineering 125 Communication Skills Engineering Mathematics 125 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Physics 115

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

EWP510S EMC510S Semester 4 MAI620S DEL620S TDN620S ADI111S MTM720S ANE620S Electrical Workshop Practice 215 Electrical Machines 216

School of Engineering Electrical Engineering 125

Measurements and Instrumentation 226 Electrical Engineering 125 Analogue Electronics 215 Digital Electronics 226 Analogue Electronics 215 Digital Electronics 215 Thermodynamics Mathematics 115 Intro to Algorithm Design Engineering Mathematics 227 Engineering Mathematics 216 Analogue Electronics 226 Engineering Mathematics 216 Analogue Electronics 215 Electrical Engineering 125 Introduction to Programming Computer Architecture 316 Power Systems Engineering 316 Power Electronics 316 Control Systems 316 Financial Accounting 1A Control Systems 327 Electrical Machines 327 Automation 327 Power Systems Engineering 327 Engineering Electromagnetics 327 Probability & Statistics 327 Power Systems Engineering 418 Engineering Research Methods 418 Intro to Algorithm Design Digital Electronics 226 Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Mathematics 227 Engineering Mathematics 227

Semester 5 IPG120S CAR710S PSE610S PEL610S CNS610S FAC1100 Semester 6 CNS720S EMC720S AMA720S PSE720S EEM720S PAS620S Semester 7 PSE810S ERM810S EMT810S ICN210S ENT111S ACP710S Semester 8 DES820S RNE820S ETD820S ETP820S

Control Systems 316 Electrical Machines 216 Engineering Mathematics 227 Measurements and Instrumentation 226 Power Systems Engineering 316 Engineering Mathematics 227 Engineering Mathematics 227 Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Mathematics 125

Power Systems Engineering 327 Professional Writing Probability & Statistics 327 Engineering Management 418 Professional Writing Financial Accounting 1A Introduction to Computer Networking Computer User Skills Entrepreneurship Applied Computer Programming Electrical Systems Design 428 Renewable Energy 428 Electric Drives 428 Electrical Protection 428 Power Systems Engineering 418 Electrical Machines 216 Electrical Engineering 125 Power Systems Engineering 418

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Plus any TWO of the following: AMA820S Automation 418 TDN820S Transmission & Distribution Networks 418 Electrical Machine Design 428 High Voltage Engineering 428 Power System Operation & Control 428 Electrical Power Project (Final Year)

School of Engineering Control Systems 327 Engineering Mathematics 227 Power Systems Engineering 418 Engineering Mathematics 227 Electrical Machines 327 Power Systems Engineering 418

EMD820S HVE820S PSC820S Semester 9 EPP830S

Engineering Research 528 Methods 418

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: ENGINEERING: MECHANICAL Description Mechanical Engineering covers a vast range of activities from simple hand tools to spacecraft. The programme at the PON focuses on areas of technology in line with Namibian industry. Areas of study cover mechanisms, the use of heat to deliver work and the reverse process, the factors influencing the strength of components of machines and structures, manufacturing processes and design of components. Graduates of the programme are equipped with a range of knowledge that will enable employment in a broad range of industries, from consulting engineering to mining and from industry to transport. Exception Rule: (For all subsequent progression rules) The Registrar may, after student counselling and upon recommendation of the Course Lecturer and the HOD and the Dean, approve registration for courses if this directly supports the student's success. S0.1 Code LPA0220 ITD012S ITM011S ITS012S TLS011S IEG010S IEE010S SDS010S S0.2 LPB0320 CSK0420 TLS021S ITM021S ITS022S IHE010S IME010S PIS121S Course Title Language in Practice A Engineering Graphics Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 Introduction to Chemistry Engineering Skills Module 1 Introduction to Engineering Geography Introduction to Ecology Self Development and Study Skills Language in Practice B or Communication Skills Engineering Skills Module 2 Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Physics History for Engineers Introduction to Micro-economics Principles of Information Systems 1A Register for Modules 1 (PIS001M), 2 (PIS002M) and 3 (PIS003M) Prerequisite

Language in Practice A Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 None None

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School of Engineering

*Communication Skills is available on Distance Education Mode, but if this option is taken then the Vacation Schools are compulsory. Progression Rule No 1A: (Applicable to students enrolled in S0). The student must have completed all S0.1/S0.2 courses to proceed to S1. Progression Rule No 1B.2: (Applicable to students in the Civil, and Mechanical programmes that qualify to enroll directly into S1). The student must have been granted credits for courses Introduction to Chemistry (ITS012S), Introduction to Physics (ITS022S), Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 (ITM011S), Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 (ITM021S), Language in Practice B, Engineering Graphics (ITD012S), Engineering Skills Module 1 (TLS011S), and Engineering Skills Module 2 (TLS021S) before being allowed to enroll for S1. Semester 1 (S1) EMS1100 Engineering Mechanics (Statics) 1** Introduction to Physics Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Language in Practice B Engineering Skills Module 2 Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Introduction to Physics Language in Practice B Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 Engineering Skills Module 2 Language in Practice B Engineering Graphics Language in Practice B Engineering Skills Module 2 Language in Practice B Principles of Information Systems 1A

CSK0420 ELE111S MAT111S CAD1100 WPR1100 PIS122S

Communication Skills 1 Electrical Engineering 1 Mathematics 1** Computer Aided Draughting** Workshop Practice Principles of Information Systems 1B Register for Modules 4 (PIS004M), 5 (PIS005M), 6 (PIS006M) and 7 (PIS007M)

***Communication Skills is available on Distance Education Mode, but if this option is taken than the Vacation Schools are compulsory. Semester 2 (S2) FMC1200 Fluid Mechanics 2** EMP1200 Engineering Mechanics (Particle Dynamics) 2** Mathematics 2** Design and Manufacture 2** Engineering Mechanics 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Engineering Mechanics 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Computer Aided Draughting Engineering Mechanics 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills

MAT120S DEM1200

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

MOM1200 TDY1200 Mechanics of Materials 2** Thermodynamics 2**

School of Engineering Engineering Mechanics 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills Engineering Mechanics 1 Mathematics 1 Communication Skills

** Core S1/S2 Courses

Progression Rule No 2: The student must have passed all first year Engineering courses to proceed to relevant Engineering Practice. The student may not enrol for any full time courses whilst doing Engineering Practice. In case the student was granted exception, according to the conditions of the exception rule, he/she may only enroll for a maximum of one full time course per semester, subject to the written approval of employer /bursary giver. Note: Engineering Practice could be done at any time after successful completion of first year Engineering courses. Semester 3 (P1) MPR2100 Mechanical Engineering Practice 1 Semester 4 (P2) MPR2200 Mechanical Engineering Practice 2 Semester 5 (S3) FMC310S Fluid Mechanics 3 EMR310S MAT131S DEM310S MOM310S TDY310S Engineering Mechanics 3A (Rigid Body Dynamics) Mathematics 3 Design and Manufacture 3A Mechanics of Materials 3A Thermodynamics 3A See progression rule no 2 Mechanical Engineering Practice 1 Fluid Mechanics 2 Mathematics 2 Engineering Mechanics (Particle Dynamics) 2 Mathematics 2 Mathematics 2 Design and Manufacture 2 Mathematics 2 Mechanics of Materials 3A Mathematics 2 Thermodynamics 2 Mathematics 2 None Fluid Mechanics 3A Design and Manufacture 3A Engineering Mechanics (Rigid Body Dynamics) 3A Mechanics of Materials 3A Thermodynamics 3A

Semester 6 (S4) ENT3400 Entrepreneurship and Management FMC320S Fluid Mechanics 3B MEP320S Mechanical Engineering Design Project TOM320S Theory of Machines MOM320S ICE320S Mechanics of Materials 3B Internal Combustion Engines

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering 35BMEC

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Description At this level, the programme cover mainly the development of machines and systems basically for diverse application in the modern technologically advancement. Mechanical Engineering is one of the broadest of all Engineering disciplines, which ultimately provides opportunities for employment in the Industries, Research and Development, Education/Training and Government. Areas of study covers planning, analyzing, evaluating, design and improvement of components and improvement of components and systems. Semester 7 (S5) Progression Rule No 4: The student must have successfully completed all courses from S3/S4-Level (ND) to proceed to B-Tech in Mechanical Engineering. Code Course Title Core courses (compulsory) MVN410S Mechanical Vibration and Noise 4 MOM410S Mechanics of Materials 4 HTF410S Heat Transfer** MEP410S Mechanical Engineering Project 4A COS410S Control Systems Semester 8 (S6) Core Courses (compulsory) FMC420S Fluid Mechanics 4** MEP420S Mechanical Engineering Project 4B Electives: ESA410S RAC410S MAT410S Experimental Stress Analysis* Refrigeration and Air Conditioning* Mathematics 4 Fluid Mechanics 3B Mechanical Engineering Project 4A Mechanics of Materials 4 Thermodynamics 3A Mathematics 3 Prerequisite Theory of Machines Mechanics of Materials 3B Internal Combustion Engines None Theory of Machines

* If presented. BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING: MECHANICAL 35BEME

Description The Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering programme is a 585 credit Namibia Qualifications Authority (NQA) level 8 professional scientific bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. It has a normal duration of eight semesters of instruction and a ninth semester devoted to experiential learning in industry. The programme consists of forty four core - and six elective courses of which students are required to offer two from one of three fields of specialization, being mechatronics, energy and manufacturing. The field of specialization is selected at the end of the third year of studies. The curriculum for the first year of the proposed programme is identical to that of the B Eng programmes proposed by the Departments of Civil - and Electrical Engineering. A student who successfully completes the proposed programme and who consequently receives the B Eng (Mech) qualification is eligible for registration as a Professional Engineer in Training with ECN.

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School of Engineering

Admission Requirements The minimum requirements for entry into the first year of the proposed programme are : · a 3 symbol obtained in NSSCH Mathematics and NSSCH Physical Science and · a 2 symbol in NSSCH English or gaining entry into English Communication Skills 1 through the English placement test of PON and · a minimum of 37 points on the engineering evaluation scale of PON counting up to five NSSC subjects including Mathematics, Physical Science and English OR Successful completion of the ItES programme of PON with a mark of 60 % obtained in each of Introduction to Mathematics Module 2 and Introduction to Physics and Language in Practice B. ItES route entrants who collected a credit for Communication Skills 113 during ItES will offer five courses in the first semester instead of the six of students entering via the NSSCH route, whereas those who did not will offer the normal six courses in the first semester. Articulation Holders of a National Diploma (ND) and/or B Tech degree in Mechanical Engineering obtained from PON are eligible for admission. Depending on the results of an evaluation of equivalence of their qualifications, PON will consider holders of similar qualifications obtained elsewhere to be admitted. Holders of a ND (Mech Eng) will be admitted to the second year of the B Eng (Mech) programme provided that such students may be exempted from certain second year courses and that certain first year courses be offered. The first year courses to be offered are : Engineering Physics 114 Engineering Chemistry 123 Material Science 124 The second year courses for which exemption may be given and the minimum requirements for such exemptions are : Engineering Mathematics 215 Engineering Mechanics 213 Mechanics of Materials 214 Fluid Mechanics 214 Engineering Mechanics 224 Mechanics of Materials 223 Thermodynamics 225 Principles of Design 224 55 % for Mathematics 3 or equivalent 55 % for Engineering Mechanics (Particle Dynamics) or equivalent 55 % for Mechanics of Materials 3A or equivalent 55 % for Fluid Mechanics 3B or equivalent 55 % for Engineering Mechanics (Rigid Body Dynamics) or equiv. 55 % for Mechanics of Materials 3B or equivalent 55 % for Thermodynamics 3A or equivalent 55 % for Design and Manufacture 3 or equivalent

In addition, holders of a ND (Mech Eng) from PON who have successfully completed a one year probation period with an employer in a relevant industry are also exempted from the course Experiential Training 510. Holders of ND (Mech Eng) who join the B Eng (Mech) programme and who are exempted from all the indicated courses will offer a total of six courses in S3 and S4 provided such students offer three S5 courses in S3 and two S6 courses in S4.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

Articulation between the ND (Mech Eng) qualification and the B Eng (Mech) programme is scheduled to commence one year after the date of implementation of the programme. Holders of a B Tech (Mech Eng), as well as current - or former B Tech students of PON who have completed all prescribed B Tech courses except Mechanical Engineering Project 4A or 4B, will be admitted to the third year of the B Eng (Mech) programme provided that such students may be exempted from certain third year courses and that certain first - and second year courses be offered. The first - and second year courses to be offered are : Engineering Physics 114 Engineering Chemistry 123 Material Science 124 Electrical Machines 214 Introduction to Algorithm Design 214 Numerical Methods 224 Electronics 224 The third year courses for which exemption may be given and the minimum requirements for such exemptions are: Statistics 314 55 % for Mathematics 4 or equivalent Systems Modeling 313 55 % for Control Systems 4 or equivalent Thermofluids 314 55 % for Fluid Mechanics 4 or equivalent Heat Transfer 325 55 % for Heat Transfer 4 or equivalent Vibration and Noise 325 55 % for Mechanical Vibration and Noise 4 or equivalent Holders of B Tech (Mech Eng) who join the B Eng (Mech) programme and who are exempted from all the indicated courses will offer six courses S5 and seven courses in S6. Articulation between the B Tech (Mech Eng) qualification and the B Eng (Mech) programme is scheduled to commence two years after the date of the implementation of the programme. Students who qualify to articulate with the B Eng (Mech) course who do not meet the minimum requirement for exemption of any particular B Eng (Mech) course will not attend contact sessions in that course. Such students will instead be afforded two examination opportunities to obtain a pass mark in the course for which exemption is sought. Such examinations will take place before lectures commence in the beginning of the academic year and will cover the syllabus of the B Eng (Mech) course for which exemption is sought. CURRICULUM Semester 1 MTM110S APH120s END111S AMC110S CSK0420 CUS0100 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Drawings 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Communication Skills Computer User Skills Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 2 MTM120S Engineering Mathematics 125 MOM120S Mechanics of Materials 125 EEG120S Electrical Engineering 125 MLS120S CAD120S ACH110S WPR120S Material Science 125 Computer Aided Drawing 125 Engineering Chemistry 125 Workshop Practice 125

School of Engineering

Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Mathematics 115 None Engineering Drawings 115 Admission Requirements Engineering Mathematics 125 Engineering Mathematics 115 Engineering Physics 115 Engineering Mechanics 115 Engineering Mathematics 125 Electrical Engineering 125

Semester 3 MTM310S Engineering Mathematics 216 EMC610S Engineering Mechanics 213 FMC610S EMC510S MOM610S ADI111S Fluid Mechanics 214 Electrical Machines 216 Mechanics of Materials 214 Introduction to Algorithm Design

Semester 4 NMS620S Numerical Methods 224 EMC620S MOM620S TDN620S ETR620S POD620S Engineering Mechanics 224 Mechanics of Materials 223 Thermodynamics 225 Electronics 224 Principles of Design 224

Engineering Mathematics 125 Intro to Algorithm Design Engineering Mathematics 125 Engineering Mechanics 213 Mechanics of Materials 125 Engineering Mathematics 115 Fluid Mechanics 214 Electrical Engineering 125 Engineering Drawings 115 Workshop Practice 125

Semester 5 SSS710S Intro to Statistics SYM710S Systems Modelling 313

EXM710S TFL710S MPS710S MAD710S

Experimental Methods 315 Thermofluids 314 Manufacturing Processes 313 Machine Design 315

Electrical Machines 216 Engineering Mechanics 213 Fluid Mechanics 214 or Thermodynamics 225 Engineering Mathematics 225 Electronics 224 Fluid Mechanics 214 Electrical Machines 216 Thermodynamics 225 Workshop Practice 125 Principles of Design 224 Systems Modelling 313 Engineering Mechanics 224 Experimental Methods 315

Semester 6 CNS720S Control Systems 325 VAN720S Vibration and Noise 324

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

HTF720S MAD720S EEM720S PFW0520 Heat Transfer 324 Machine Design 324 Engineering Management 324 Professional Writing

School of Engineering Numerical Methods 224 Thermodynamics 225 Engineering Mechanics 224 Machine Design 315 Machine Design 315 Manufacturing Processes 313

Semester 7 ERM810S Engineering Research Methodology DSP810S Design Project (B.Eng) EVE810S Environmental Engineering Elective ­ choose one sector only Energy Sector ESR810S Renewable Energy Systems

All courses up to and Semester 6 Thermofluids 314 Vibration and Noise Thermofluids Heat Transfer 324 Control Systems 325 Environmental Engineering Manufacturing Processes Electronics 224 Control Systems 325 Experimental Methods Engineering Research Methodology Environmental Engineering Thermofluids 314 Heat Transfer 325 Control Systems 325 Material Science 125 Mechatronics Completion of all prescribed courses up to and including 4th year, except Mechanical Project.

Manufacturing Sector CAM810S Computer Aided Manufacturing Mechatronics Sector MTS810S Mechatronics Semester 8 MCP820S Mechanical Project ENT111S Entrepreneurship CPN820S Cleaner Production Elective - choose one sector only Energy Sector PPT820S Power Plant Technology Manufacturing Sector NTI820S Introduction to Nanotechnology Mechatronics Sector MPA820S Microprocessor Applications Semester 9 MET830S Mechanical Experiential Training

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

School of Engineering

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

35BAMS

Admission Requirements In addition to the general admission requirements at the Polytechnic, a candidate should have obtained a minimum of grade B symbol in NSSC Mathematics or its equivalent. Candidates that obtained a C symbol in Mathematics will be required to sit for an entrance test in Mathematics. Candidates who left formal school eight (8) or more years earlier will be considered for admission under Rule G12.3. Modes of Study The programme will run in the full-time and part-time modes. CURRICULUM Semester 1 Course Title Algebra and Trigonometry Introduction to Mathematical Structures Introduction to Statistics Computer User Skills Communication Skills Any one of the following (electives): Financial Accounting 101 Principles of Economics 1A Semester 2 Official Statistics Calculus Linear Algebra 1 Financial Mathematics 1 Applied Programming Professional Writing Any ONE of the following (electives): Financial Accounting 102 Principles of Economics 1B Semester 3 Probability Theory Differential Equations Linear Algebra 2 Mathematical & Statistical Computing Introduction to Business Management Professional Communication Any ONE of the following (electives): Cost and Management Accounting 201 Intermediate Microeconomics 2A Course Code ALT110S IMS110S INS110S CUS0100 CSK0420 FAC111S PEC111S OST120S CLS120S LIA120S FIM120S APR110S PFW0520 FAC112S PEC112S PBT210S DEQ210S LIA210S SMC210S BMA121S PFC0620 CMA211S IME211S Prerequisite(s) None None None None Language in Practice B None None None Algebra & Trig Algebra & Trig None Computer User skills or PIS1B Communication Skills Financial Accounting 1A None Calculus Calculus Linear Algebra 1 Computer User Skills None Professional Writing Financial Accounting 1B PEC1A

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 4 Statistical Inference Mathematical Programming 1 Financial Mathematics 2 Mathematical Modelling 1 Business Ethics and Leadership Any ONE of the following (electives): Cost and Management Accounting 202 Intermediate Microeconomics 2B Semester 5 Real Analysis Numerical Analysis 1 Mathematical Programming 2 Complex Analysis 1 Mathematical Modelling 2 Business Operations Semester 6 Regression Analysis & ANOVA Demography Survey Methodology Numerical Analysis 2 Business Finance Mechanics SIN220S MHP220S FIM220S MMO220S BEL112S CMA212S IME212S RAN310S NAN310S MHP310S CAN310S MMO310S BSO221S RAA320S DMG320S SST320S NAN320S BUF320S MCH320S

School of Engineering Probability Theory Linear Algebra 1 Financial Mathematics 1 Calculus None CMA2A PEC1B Calculus Differential Equations Math Prog. 1 Co-requisite Real Analysis Mathematical Modelling 1 None Statistical Inference 1 and Linear Algebra 1 None Introduction to Statistics Numerical Analysis 1 None Differential Equations 35BHAM

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS): APPLIED MATHEMATICS

(For further details on the Bachelor of Science (Honours): Applied Mathematics, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009.) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS): APPLIED STATISTICS 35BHAS

(For further details on the Bachelor of Science (Honours): Applied Statistics, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009.)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING Qualifications offered National Certificate Vocational Instructor National Higher Certificate Vocational Instructor National Diploma Vocational Instructor Admission requirements LEVEL 1.0 - National Certificate MINIMUM ENTRY CRITERIA for both the PRE-SERVICE and IN-SERVICE COURSES under the Instructor Training Programmes: 1.1 Industrial Training 1.1.1 Recognised training qualification for the trade sector to ARTISAN/CRAFTSPERSON level, i.e. apprenticeship, etc.; PLUS 1.1.2 A minimum of two years relevant industrial experience after completion of the final trade test following the training period; PLUS 1.2 Academic Qualifications 1.2.1 National Technical Certificate Part Three, OR equivalent qualification (a Data Base of `equivalent qualifications' acceptable for entry will be generated for reference to facilitate RPL) PLUS 1.2.2 Proficiency in English, e.g., PON grading to a minimum of level TWO. NOTE: Experienced artisans without formal academic or training qualifications may take appropriate theory tests and/or trade tests approved by the Selection Panel for the Instructor Training Programme, in order to qualify for entry to the FIRST LEVEL of the Instructor Training Programme. LEVEL 2.0 - National Higher Certificate MINIMUM ENTRY CRITERIA for both the PRE-SERVICE and IN-SERVICE COURSES under the Instructor Training Programme: SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION of the Level 1.0 - National Certificate Course in Vocational Instructing, OR an equivalent pedagogical training programme, PLUS 2.1 Industrial Training 2.1.1 Recognised training qualification for the trade sector to ARTISAN/CRAFTSPERSON level, i.e. apprenticeship, etc; PLUS 2.1.2 A minimum of three years relevant industrial experience after completion of the final trade test following the training period; PLUS 2.1.3 A minimum of four years relevant instructing/teaching experience, PLUS 2.2 Academic Qualifications 2.2.1 National Technical Certificate Part Three, OR equivalent qualification (a Data Base of `equivalent qualifications' acceptable for entry will be generated for reference to facilitate RPL) - PLUS 2.2.2 Proficiency in English, e.g. PoN grading to a minimum of level TWO. 35CPVT 35HPVT 35DPVT

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering

LEVEL 3.0 - National Diploma MINIMUM ENTRY CRITERIA SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION of the Level 2.0 - National Higher Certificate Course in Vocational Instructing, OR an equivalent pedagogical training programme, PLUS Industrial Training/Experience Four years relevant industrial and/or management experience; PLUS Academic Qualifications National Technical Certificate Part Three, OR equivalent qualification (a Data Base of `equivalent qualifications' acceptable for entry will be generated for reference to facilitate RPL); PLUS 3.2.1 Proficiency in English, e.g. Polytechnic of Namibia grading to a minimum of level TWO. 3.1 3.1.1 3.2 3.2.1 NATIONAL CERTIFICATE: VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTOR 35CPVT

Description The PON entered into a joint agreement with the Government and European Union to upgrade the skills of Instructors already in service at Vocational Training Centres and Technical Schools around the country as well as Technical graduates who wish to become Instructors/Teachers in the Technical field. No new intake in 2009. Phasing out over 3 year period beginning 2009 and ending 2011. CURRICULUM Semester 1 (Phasing out 2009) Course Code Course Title PDV110S Professional Development 1A ICS110S COS110S ILS110S DLM110S APA110S PDT110S Prerequisites Industrial Training to `artisan' level & minimum of 3 years related Industrial experience Instructors Communication Skills 1 None Computing Skills 1A None Instructional & Learning Strategies 1A None Design of Learning Materials 1A None Assessment of Learner Progress and Achievement 1A None Plan and Deliver Training Programmes 1A None Professional Development 1A None Computer Skills 1A Instruction and Learning Strategies 1A Design of Learning Materials 1A Assessment of Learner Progress and Achievement 1A Plan and Deliver Training Programme 1A

Semester 2 (Phasing out 2009) PDV120S Professional Development 1B CGA110S Career Guidance & Assessment of Preparation for Further Training 1 COS120S Computing Skills 1B ILS120S Instructional & Learning Strategies 1B DLM120S Design of Learning Materials 1B APA120S Assessment of Learner Progress and Achievement 1B PDT120S Plan and Deliver Training Programme 1B

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Engineering 35HPVT

NATIONAL HIGHER CERTIFICATE: VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTOR Semester 3 PDV210S Professional Development 2A COS210S Computer Skills 2A ESB110S Entrepreneurial Skills & Small Scale Business Development 1A MOE110S Management of the Environment 1A TEA110S Training Programme Evaluation, Including Staff Appraisal 1A QTE110S Quality Assurance Mechanisms for Training Evaluation 1A CGN110S Counselling & Guidance for both Academic and Personal Needs of Trainees 1A Semester 4 PDV220S Professional Development 2B COS220S Computer Skills 2B ESB120S Entrepreneurial Skills & Small Scale Business Development 1B MOE120S Management of the Environment 1B TEA120S Training Programme Evaluation, Including Staff Appraisal 1B QTE120S Quality Assurance Mechanisms for Training Evaluation 1B for CGN120S Counselling & Guidance for both Academic and Personal Needs Trainees 1B NATIONAL DIPLOMA: VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTOR

Professional Development 1A & 1B Computer Skills Module 1B None None None None None Professional Development 2A Computer Skills 2A Entrepreneurial Skills & Small Business Development 1A Management of the Environment 1A Training Programme Evaluation, Including Staff Appraisal 1A Quality Assurance Mechanisms Training Evaluation 1A Counselling & Guidance for both Academic and Personal Needs of of Trainees 1A 35DPVT

Semester 5 PDV310S Professional Development 3A Professional Development 2A & 2B IFC110S Information & Communication Technology Skills 1A Instructors Communication Skills 1 TMS110S Training Management Skills 1A None TNA110S Training Needs Analysis Surveys 1A None TEA210S Training Programme Evaluation including Staff Appraisal 2A None IVE110S Innovations and Initiatives in Vocational Education & Training 1A None MTP110S Marketing Training Programmes 1A None Semester 6 PDV320S Professional Development 3B IFC120S Information & Communication Technology Skills 1B TMS120S Training Management Skills 1B TNA120S Training Needs Analysis Surveys 1B IVE120S Innovations and Initiatives in Vocational Education & Training 1B Professional Development 3A Information & Communication Technology Skills 1A Training Management Skills 1A Training Needs Analysis Surveys 1A Innovations and Initiatives in Vocational Education and Training 1A

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

MTP120S TEA220S Marketing Training Programmes 1B Training Programme Evaluation Including Staff Appraisal 2B

School of Engineering Marketing Training Programmes 1A TEA210S

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SCIENCES BACHELOR OF BIO-MEDICAL SCIENCES

School of Engineering

50BMES

Description The Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences is a professional degree . The degree incorporates a research component and 1 year of practical work-based learning. Admission requirements Grade 12 with minimum of 25 points as per the Polytechnic general admission requirements. In addition, applicants must meet the following specific admission requirements: · · · · Mathematics English ­ B on NSSC (O) or 4 on NSSC (H) or equivalent ­ E on NSSC (O) or 4 on NSSC (H) or equivalent (English Placement Test into Language in Practice A) Biology or Physiology ­ B on NSSC (O) or 4 on NSSC (H) or equivalent Physical Science ­ B on NSSC (O) or 4 on NSSC (H) or equivalent

Students not meeting these requirements may be admitted but will be required to enrol for a bridging programme and/or selected bridging courses. Students are informed that they will necessarily then be on an extended programme. Qualification Outcomes Graduates of this programme are able to: · Select, perform, interpret and integrate routine and specialised diagnostic techniques (including molecular biology techniques) in a specific field and in accordance with the statutory requirements in place of study, workplace or both. · Critically evaluate trends in technology and evaluate and implement new techniques, equipment and methods according to accreditation requirements and based on sound scientific principles. · Operate effectively within resource constraints to solve problems in both familiar and unfamiliar contexts. · Manage and supervise laboratory operations and apply GLP and accreditation requirements. · Participate in research in Bio-Medical Sciences in compliance with ethical research principles. · Manage resources efficiently and effectively. · Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct. · Describe and apply laboratory safety procedures. · Describe and apply emergency procedures to be followed in the event of a laboratory accident(s). · Communicate effectively with patients, laboratory personnel, within the profession, with other health care professionals and with the public. · Communicate effectively with stakeholders especially in relations to outputs. · Train other students of Biomedical Sciences and related fields.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Human Anatomy & Physiology IA Medical Chemistry I Biostatistics & Calculations Medical Physics Laboratory Principles I A Computer User Skills Communication Skills Semester 2 Human Anatomy & Physiology IB Molecular Biology Immunology Biochemistry Applied Laboratory Principles 1B Second Year Semester 3 Medical Microbiology 1 Haematology 1 Anatomical Pathology 1 Clinical Chemistry 1 Biology of Diseases Semester 4 Medical Microbiology 2 Haematology 2 Anatomical Pathology 2 Clinical Chemistry 2 Third Year Semester 5 Medical Microbiology 3 Haematology 3 Clinical Chemistry 3 Research Methodology A Medical Laboratory Management A Semester 6 In-Service Training (Practice 1)

School of Engineering

Course Code Prerequisite(s) HPY110S Biology or Physiology (B in Ordinary or 4 in Higher) CEM110S Physical Science (B in Ordinary or 4 in Higher) BCL110S Physical Science & Mathematics (B in Ordinary or 4 in Higher) MPH110S Physical Science & Mathematics (B in Ordinary or 4 in Higher) LAP110S (B in Ordinary or 4 in Higher) CUS0100 CSK0420 English Placement test into Language in Practice A (Module 2) HPY120S BMB120S IMY120S BCH120S ALP120S Human Anatomy & Physiology IA Medical Chemistry I Human Anatomy & Physiology 1A Medical Chemistry I Laboratory Principles IA

MMB210S HAM210S CEP210S CLC210S BOD210S MMB220S HAM220S CEP220S CLC220S

Human Anatomy & Physiology IA & IB Immunology Human Anatomy & Physiology IA & IB Biochemistry Human Anatomy & Physiology IA & IB Medical Microbiology 1 Haematology 1 Cellular Pathology 1 Clinical Chemistry 1

MMB310S HAM310S CLC310S RES310S LAM320S BMT320S

Medical Microbiology 2 Haematology 2 Clinical Chemistry 2 BioStatistics & Calculations Applied Laboratory Principles 1B All courses up to semester 5

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Fourth Year Semester 7 In-Service Training (Practice 2) Semester 8 Integrated Clinical Pathology Research Methodology B Medical Laboratory Management B

School of Engineering

BMT410S ICP420S RES420S LAM420S

All courses up to semester 6 Practice 1 & 2 Practice 1 & 2 Practice 1 & 2 50BEHS

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

Description The four (4) year Professional Bachelor of Environmental Health Sciences with an exit level outcome of one (1) year for the National Certificate in Environmental Health Science and three (3) years for the National Diploma in Environmental Health Science. Admission Requirements Grade 12 with a minimum of 25 points as per Polytechnic's general requirements. In addition, applicants must meet the following specific admission requirements: Physical Science Mathematics Biology English - C on Ordinary level or equivalent - C on Ordinary level or equivalent - C on Ordinary level or equivalent - E on Ordinary level or equivalent

Students not meeting these requirements may be admitted, but will be requied to enroll for a bridging programme or selected bridging courses. Special Academic Rules and Regulatons All candidates admitted for the Bachelor of Environmental Health Sciences are required to register with the Professional Body for Environmental Health during training. Ethical and Professional rules and regulations set by the ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS COUNCIL OF NAMIBIA shall be upheld by all candidates enrolled for this programme at all times. Rules related to laboratory practical set by the department shall be upheld by all candidates enrolled for this qualification. Progression Rule All candidates admitted for the Degree are only allowed to proceed to the next level of study on the following conditions: (i) that their compulsory Practical Attachments for the preceding level are successfully completed; (ii) that a minimum of 60% of the subjects enrolled for have been completed successfully. Candidates admitted to the Degree are bound by compliance to all the pre-requisite courses stated for the respective higher level courses.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Health Physics Health Biology 1A Social Studies 1A Computer User Skills Building Construction 1A Environmental Pollution Control 1A Communication Skills Semester 2 Health Chemistry Health Biology 1B Social Studies 1B Building Construction 1B Environmental Pollution Control 1B Health Statistics Second Year Semester 3 Environmental Pollution Control 2A Occupational Health and Safety 2A Epidemiology 2A Food and Meat Hygiene 2A Environmental Management Practice 2A Semester 4 Environmental Pollution Control 2B Occupational Health and Safety 2B Epidemiology 2B Food and Meat Hygiene 2B Environmental Management Practice 2B Third Year Semester 5 Environmental Pollution Control 3 Occupational Health and Safety 3 Epidemiology 3 Food and Meat Hygiene 3 Environmental Management Practice 3 Semester 6 In-Service Training (Practice 1) Fourth Year Semester 7 In-Service Training (Practice 2)

School of Engineering

Course Code HPC110S EHB110S SOS110S CUS0100 BCN110S EPC110S CSK0420 HCH120S EHB120S SOS120S BCN120S EPC120S HES120S

Prerequisite Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Language in Practice B Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements Admission Requirements

EPC210S OHS210S EDY210S HFM210S MNP210S EPC220S OHS220S EDY220S HFM220S MNP220S

Environmental Pollution Control 1A & 1B Building Construction 1A & 1B Health Statistics Health Biology 1A/B

Environmental Pollution Control 2A Occupational Health and Safety 2A Epidemiology 2A Food and Meat Hygiene 2A Environmental Management Practice 2A

EPC310S OHS310S EDY310S HFM310S MNP310S

Environmental Pollution Control 2B Occupational Health and Safety 2B Epidemiology 2B Food and Meat Hygiene 2B Environmental Management Practice 2B All courses up to semester 5

EHT320S

EHT410S

All courses up to semester 6

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 8 Environmental Management Practice 4 Epidemiology 4 Occupational Health and Safety 4 Environmental Pollution Control 4 Food and Meat Hygiene 4

School of Engineering

MNP420S EDY420S OHS420S EPC420S HFM420S

In-Service Training (Practice 1 & 2) In-Service Training (Practice 1 & 2) In-Service Training (Practice 1 & 2) In-Service Training (Practice 1 & 2) In-Service Training (Practice 1 & 2)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OFFICE OF THE DEAN Dean

School of Information Technology

Faculty Officer Telephone Number Fax Number Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail address PC Support Officer

: Dr. Ella Black, M.A. Instructional Design & Technology (Ohio State), Ph.D. Social and Cultural Foundations in Education with specialisation in Instuctional Media & Technology (Ohio State) : Ferrand van Wyk, BA (UNAM), PGDE (UNAM), CLEF, DELF (University of the Franche-Comte) : 061-207-2016 : 061-207-2401 : Maximillian Gertze : 061-207-2052 : 061-207-2051 : [email protected] : Message Nyambe

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS Head of Department : Alfred Mwanza, B.Sc. Mathematics, Computer Science (University of Zambia), M.Sc. Computer Science (Bulawayo) Academic Staff : Dr. Bernd Kiekebusch, Dr. rer. nat. (University of Würzburg, Germany) : Peter Gallert, M.A. Logic, Media Science, (Leipzig), CCAI (Cisco Certified Academy Instructor), CCNA (Cisco Certified Networking Associate) : Alfred Mwanza, B.Sc. Mathematics, Computer Science (University of Zambia), M.Sc. Computer Science (Bulawayo) : Logan Fransman, National Diploma PC Engineering (Damelin), National Diploma Business Computing (Polytechnic of Namibia) : Isaak Nhamu, MSC, BSc (Computer Science), National Diploma (Technical and Vocational Education) : Katongo Lukwesa, B.Sc. Mathematics, Computer Science (University of Zambia) DEPARTMENT OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Head of Department : Dr. Heike Winschiers, Diploma Inform (Hamburg), Dr. rer. nat. (Hamburg) Academic Staff : Dr. Heike Winschiers, Diploma Inform (Hamburg), Dr. rer. nat. : Jens Fendler, Dipl.-Inform. (FH) (Wolfenbüttel), : Gereon Kapuire, B.Tech (Bus. Comp.), ND (Bus. Comp.) (PoN) : Anicia Peters, B-Tech (Business Computing) (PoN) : Edward Gatonye, Bachelor Information Technology (PoN) : Shilumbe Chivuno-Kuria, B.Sc. Computer Science, Psychology (UNAM) : John Dlamini, MSc. Computer Engineering (Politechnika, Poland) 161

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Information Technology

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS COMPUTING Head of Department : William Torbitt, B.Sc., Mathematics, Physics, (Johannesburg), B.Sc. Hon., Experimental Physics (Witwatersrand), M.Sc. Radio Astronomy, (Manchester), M.Sc. Computer Science, (London) Academic Staff : William Torbitt, B.Sc., Mathematics, Physics, (Johannesburg), B.Sc. Hon., Experimental Physics (Witwatersrand), M.Sc. Radio Astronomy, (Manchester), M.Sc. Computer Science, (London) : Dorothea Westhofen-Kunz, Diplom-Informatikerin (1997 University of aarland, Germany) : Robert Gatonye, B.Sc. Computer Science, Mathematics (UNAM), CISA (Certified Information Systems Auditor, MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer), CPA II : Josephat Mukabi, M.Sc (IT) (Univ. of Sunderland, UK) : Meke Shivute, BTech IT (CPUT), ND: IT (PoN), NC: IT (PoN) DEPARTMENT OF BASIC COMPUTER STUDIES Head of Department : Admire Kachepa, M.Sc. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science (People's Friendship University of Russia), B.Sc. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science (People's friendship University of Russia) Academic Staff : Bernd Schulz, Dipl.-Ing. (Brunswick) : Admire Kachepa, M.Sc. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science (People's Friendship University of Russia), B.Sc. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science (People's friendship University of Russia) : Julius Silaa, B.Tech. Informatics and Computer Science (Moscow Power Engineering Institute) : Ndakolute S. Abraham, BETD (WCE), : Simon Muchinenyika, B.Sc. (Hon) Computer Science, Midlands State University. : Jeremiah Lumbasi, M.Sc. (IT) Unam, BSc (Hon) Moi University, Kenya : Colin Nyandoro, B.Sc. (Hon) Computer Science, Midlands State University, National Diploma (Education), University of Zimbabwe

162

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Information Technology CODES 80NDIT 80BSBC 80BSSD 80BSAN 80BBCO 80BCNW 80BSDM 80MIFT

QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Diploma: Information Technology Bachelor of Information Technology (Business Computing) Bachelor of Information Technology (Software Development) Bachelor of Information Technology (Systems Administration & Networks) Bachelor of Technology: Business Computing Bachelor of Technology: Computer Networking Bachelor of Technology: Software Development Master of Information Technology

Description Information Technology refers to the skills and knowledge needed to operate computer equipment and applications. Information Technology studies at the Polytechnic of Namibia offer different areas of specialisations as well as different exit levels. The National Diploma is being awarded to students who successfully passed all subjects required for the first year of studies and who have mastered the basic skills needed to understand and use the computing environment for business purposes. Beside computer user skills and an introduction to programming, courses also include more general proficiencies, such as English language, Mathematics, Business Management, and Presentation of Projects to an audience. The National Diploma is the foundation, upon which the student is able to choose a specialisation for the Bachelor of Information Technology. Bachelor of Information Technology: for those who successfully completed all requirements for the three year degree. The Bachelor of Technology is obtainable after the fourth year of study, in the appropriate programme. It contains a number of courses designed to offer deeper insight into advanced skills in various areas of Information Technology. A requirement is an approved independent project. The fourth year of study permits the student to either work in advanced positions in industry or to apply for Master-level studies. It is expected that students whose knowledge and work experience do not include newer trends, as represented in the latest syllabi for the Bachelor of Information Technology, must acquire such skills on their own prior to attempting courses at the fourth year level. It is strongly recommended that prospective students seek advice and counsel from the Heads of Departments before registering for a particular subject and specialisation, respectively. Special School Assessment Regulations There are situations where assessment of an individual module provided by other schools will supersede assessment regulations. This is reflected in the module / course documentation. Course Evaluation for all courses offered by the School utilising in-course assessment and a Theory Paper and a Practical Paper · An in-course mark is determined by continuous evaluation made up of tests and practicals during the semester. · Students must have satisfactorily completed to the minimum standard (50% overall) all practicals and tests during the year to be admitted to the final examination. E.g. a class mark of 50 %.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Information Technology

Final Examination consists of two papers: Theory and Practical · A sub-minimum of 40% must be obtained in each paper. The combined examination mark must be at least 50% overall. · In-course mark and examination mark shall be used jointly to determine the final mark in the ratio of 50% (semester mark) to 50% (examination mark). Course Evaluation for all courses offered by the School utilising in-course assessment and a Theory Paper · An in-course mark is determined by continuous evaluation made up of tests and assignments during the semester. · Students must have satisfactorily completed to the minimum standard (50% overall) all assignments and tests during the year to be admitted to the final examination. Final examination consists of one Theory paper · A sub-minimum of 40% must be obtained in the examination. · In-course mark and examination mark shall be used jointly to determine the final mark in the ratio of 50% semester mark to 50% examination mark. Course Evaluation for all courses offered by the School using Continuous Evaluation only · The semester mark is determined by continuous evaluation made up of tests and assignments during the year. · The course mark is the final mark · Students must obtain a 50% mark to pass the course. · Supplementary tests and extensions will be defined within the individual course outline. NB: For all assessments the departmental plagiarism policy applies. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (Replacing Old National Certificate in 2008) 80NDIT Admission Requirements Applicants must satisfy the general admission requirements of the Polytechnic. In addition, the following conditions must be met: 1. The applicant must have passed English at the NSSC Ordinary or equivalent level with symbol E or better 2. The applicant must have passed Mathematics at the NSSC Ordinary or equivalent level with symbol D or better 3. The applicant must participate in an English placement test at the Polytechnic and qualify for Language in Practice A or higher level 4. The applicant must participate in an apptituide test at the Polytechnic and achieve a ranking within the number of available places for students in Information Technology Transitional Arrangements from Old National Certificate to the New National Diploma) Since 2008, only the new courses are offered. If a student has not completed National Certificate (old) at the end of 2009 he/she must recommence study in the Bachelor at the level commensurate with the credits carried forward.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Old National Certificate Basic Computing Studies Old courses no longer offered Information Technology Project Introduction to Digital Electronics Programming 1A Equivalent

School of Information Technology

Replacement courses ITP0200S Professional Communication IDE111S Operating Systems and Networks ONS110S PRG1A Introduction to Programming IPG120S

Students changing to the new National diploma can obtain the following credits: National Diploma Current courses Course Operating Systems & Networks Intro to Software Engineering Credit obtainable Old diploma Course

Code

Code ISA110S ISN0200

ONS120S Intro to Systems Administration ISW120S Intro to Systems Analysis CURRICULUM

Semester 1 Course Title Computer User Skills Computer Organisation & Hardware Introduction to Algorithm Design Introduction to Business Management Mathematics for IT 1A Communication Skills Semester 2 Operating Systems and Networks Introduction to Programming Introduction to Software Engineering Introduction to Logic Business Ethics & Leadership Professional Communication Mathematics for IT 1B

Course Code Prerequisite CUS0100 None COH110S None ADI111S None BMA121S None MIT112S None CSK0420 Language in Practice B ONS120S IPG120S ISW120S ILO120S BEL112S PFC0620 MIT122S Computer User Skills Introduction to Algorithm Design Computer Organisation None Communication Skills Mathematics for IT 1A 80BSBC

BACHELOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: BUSINESS COMPUTING

Description Business Computing is a branch of Information Technology that primarily deals with the question of how to use computers and computer programs most effectively for business and general purposes. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the field of business management and accounting is equally important to an excellent ability to use computers efficiently and to the limits of their capabilities. Successful candidates in Business Computing are able to select, implement and manage computer systems cost-efficiently and suitable for the intended use in business. Often, this requires research or knowledge in a wide variety of hardware and software systems (offered by commercial vendors or as "open source"), and the ability to match that knowledge to the business needs in innovative ways. Admission Requirements Applicants must have passed at least 50% (rounded down) of the courses of the National Diploma: Information Technology, and must have passed Communication skills. Applicants must complete the Diploma before they can be awarded the Bachelors degree. The HOD may approve exceptions to the entry requirements.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Information Technology

Transitional Arrangements from Old to the New Programme Since 2008, only the new courses are offered. Provision will be made to credit the new courses against the replaced or revised old courses for the students to obtain the old diploma until 2009. Students have the opportunity to change registration to the new qualification, namely the Bachelor and will obtain credit on a course-by-course basis. See table:

National Diploma Business Computing Old courses Business Accounting 1A BAC 1100 Business Management 2A BMA 211S Introduction to Databases 1A IDB 110S Programming 1B Statistics 1A Computer Hardware Applied Software Engineering Introduction to Databases 1B Business Accounting 1B Business Management 2B Object Oriented Technology Statistics 1B Introduction to Web Design IInternet Server Programming Visual Application Development Business Accounting 2A Business Management 3A Project Management Management Information Systems Introduction to SAP Business Computing Project in Industry PRG120S SIT111S CHW110S ASE110S IDB120S BAC 1200 BMA 212S OOT110S SIT121S IWD110S ISP110S VAD110S BAC211S BMC 311S PJM110S MNS110S SAP110S CPI110S Equivalent Current courses Business Accounting 1A BAC 1100 Business Operations BSO 221S Introduction to Databases 1A IDB210S Procedural Programming PPR210S Statistics 1A SIT11S Computer Hardware CHW121S Software analysis and SED210S design and SQT110S SQT220S Introduction to Databases 1B IDB220S Business Accounting 1B BAC 1200 Should be offered until 2009 Object Oriented Programming OOP210S Statistics 1B SIT121S Web Developmet Fundamentals WDF220S Internet Technology and INT220S Internet Programming INP310S User Interface Design UID220S Should be offered until 2009 Should be offered until 2009 Project Management PTM210S Management Information Systems MNS210S Enterprise Systems Applications ESA310S Business Computing CPI320S Project in Industry (6 weeks)

Same Revised Same Revised Same Same Restructured Revised Same Phasing Out Revised Same

New Phasing Out Phasing Out Revised Revised New Duration revised

Students wanting to complete the old National Diploma have until 2009 with the above mentioned arrangements. Students changing to the new Bachelor degree can obtain the following credits from the old National Diploma. Bachelor Business Computing New courses Course Object Oriented Programming Software analysis and design Introduction to Databases 1A Introduction to Databases 1B Management Information Systems Business Accounting 1A Statistics 1A Web Development Fundamentals Credit obtainable Old diploma Course Code Object Oriented Technology OOT110S Applied Software Engineering ASE110S and Software Engineering 1 SEN110S Introduction to Databases 1A IDB110S Introduction to Databases 1B IDB120S Management Information Systems MNS110S Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 Statistics 1A SIT110S Introduction to Web Design IWD110S

Code OOP210S SED210S IDB210S IDB220S MNS210S BAC1100 SIT110S WDF220S

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Electronic Commerce Statistics 1B Business Accounting 1B Business Operations Enterprise Web Application Development Enterprise Systems Applications Process Management Introduction to Marketing & its Environment Project Management Experiential Training Enterprise Systems Technology Commercial Law (IT) Entrepreneurial Skills

School of Information Technology ELC220S Electronic Commerce SIT121S Statistics 1B BAC1200 Business Accounting 1B BSO221S Business Management 2A EWD310S Internet Server Programming, Advanced Internet Technologies ESA310S Introduction to SAP PMT310S None MAR121S PTM210S CPI320S EST320S CML320S ENT321S None Project Management Experiential Training None None None ELC410S SIT121S BAC 1200 BMA211S ISP110S AIT410S SAP 110S

PJM110S CPI 110S

CURRICULUM Second Year Semester 3 Course Title Object Oriented Programming Software Analysis and Design Management Information Systems Business Accounting 1A Statistics for IT 1A Introduction to Databases 1A Semester 4 Introduction to Databases 1B Electronic Commerce Web Development Fundamentals Business Accounting 1B Business Operations Statistics for IT 1B Third Year Semester 5 Enterprise Web Application Development Enterprise Systems Applications Process Management Project Management Introduction to Marketing & its Environment

Course Code Prerequisite(s) OOP210S None SED210S Introduction to Software Engineering MNS210S None BAC1100 None SIT111S None IDB210S Computer User Skills IDB220S ELC220S WDF220S BAC1200 BSO221S SIT121S Computer User Skills None Computer User Skills Business Accounting 1A None Statistics for IT 1A

EWD310S ESA310S PMT310S PTM210S MAR121S

Web Development Fundamentals and Object Oriented Programming Management Information Systems Software Analysis and Design None None

Semester 6 Business Computing Project in Industry CPI320S ND: IT Enterprise Systems Technology EST320S Enterprise Systems Applications Commercial Law (IT) CLI320S None Entrepreneurship ENT111S None NB: The student has to pass all listed courses up to semester 6 and a project in industry has to be passed between semester 3 and 6. 167

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Information Technology

BACHELOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION AND NETWORKS Description Systems Administration and Networks is a branch of Information Technology that concerns itself with the task of establishing and maintaining the technical environment for computer systems with optimal functionality, reliability and security. Information system administrators design, and create computer networks, install and maintain software systems, implement rules and procedures to insure high performance, reliability and "round-the-clock" availability of service, take responsibility for security both against equipment failure, and against unauthorised intrusion by viruses and hackers, and trouble-shoot arising problems. Successful candidates often rise into middle and upper-level technical management, charged with the responsibility for all computing requirements of an organisation. Admission Requirements Applicants must have passed at least 50% (rounded down) of the courses of the National Diploma: Information Technology, and must have passed Communication Skills. Applicants must complete the Diploma before they can be awarded the Bachelor's degree. The HOD may approve exceptions to the entry requirements. Transitional Arrangements from Old to the New Programme Since 2008, only the new courses are offered. Provision will be made to credit the new courses against the replaced or revised old courses for the students to obtain the old diploma until 2009. Students have the opportunity to change registration to the new qualification namely the Bachelor of Systems Administration and Networks and will obtain credit on a course-by-course basis as described in the table below. The table also shows the course equivalence where old course have been revised and/or new ones introduced. Electives A total of six(6) electives are required as follows: three (3) courses from one track and other three (3) from another track. The student should choose 2 tracks from 3 tracks namely: Programming Track, Business track or Databases Track. Students are not allowed to choose more than three (3) courses from any one track.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

National Diploma Information Systems Administration Old courses Operating Systems 1A OPS110S CCNA 1 CCN110S Equivalent

School of Information Technology

Current courses Operating Systems and Networks OSN110S Introduction To Computer Networking ICN210S Introduction to Databases 1A IDB110S Introduction to Databases 1A IDB210S Programming 1B PRG120S Procedural Programming PPR210S Project Management(IT) PJM110S Project Management(IT) PTM210S Computer Hardware CHW110S Computer Hardware CHW121S Applied Software Engineering ASE110S Software analysis and design SED210S and SQT110S SQT220S Operating Systems 1B OPS120S Systems Administration SAD110S Systems Administration SAD221S CCNA 2, CCNA3 taken together CCN120S/ Introduction to Routing and CCN130S Switching IRS220S Object Oriented Technology OOT110S Object Oriented Programming OOP210S Introduction to Databases 1B IDB120S Introduction to Databases 1B IDB220S Introduction To Web Design IWD110S Web Development Fundamentals WDF220S CCNA 4 CCN140S Internetworking and WAN Technologies IWT310S Management Information Management Information Systems MNS110S Systems MNS210S Database Programming DBP110S Database Programming DBP220S Internet Server Programming ISP110S Internet Technology and INT220S Internet Programming INP310S Introduction to SAP SAP110S Enterprise Systems Applications ESA310S Systems Administration Project Systems Administration Project in in Industry IAP110S Industry 15 weeks IAP320S

New Revised Revised Revised Revised Same Restructured Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised New Revised

Students currently on the old Diploma in Information Systems Administration can change registration to the new Bachelor. In this regard the student would obtain the following credits from the old National Diploma.

Bachelor of Information Technology Systems Administration and Networking Current courses Course Code Introduction To Systems Administration ISA210S Introduction to Computer Networking ICN210S Operating Systems OPS210S Web Development Fundamentals WDF220S Management Information System MNS210S Introduction To Databases 1A IDB210S Introduction to Routing and Switching IRS220S Systems Administration Project Management(IT) Object Oriented Programming Introduction To databases 1B Internetworking and WAN Technologies Internet and Intranet Systems Administration Internet Programming Electronic Commerce Database Administration Systems Administration project in Industry (Experiential Learning) SAD221S PTM210S OOP210S IDB220S IWT310S Credit obtainable Old diploma Course Introduction To Systems Administration CCNA 1 Operating Systems 1Aand 1B Introduction to Web Design Management Information Systems Introduction to Databases 1A CCNA 2 and CCNA 3 Systems Administration Project Management(IT) Object Oriented Technology Introduction To Databases 1B CCNA 4 Code ISA110S CCN110S OPS110S IWD110S MNS110S IDB110S CCN120S & CCN130S SAD110S PJM110S OOT110S IDB120S CCN140S ISP110S ELC110S DSA410S IAP110S

IIS310S INP310S Internet Server Programming ELC220S Electronic Commerce DSA320S Database Administration Systems Administration project in IAP320S Industry(Experiential Learning)

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CURRICULUM

School of Information Technology

Second Year Semester 3 Course Title Course Code Prerequisite(s) Introduction to Systems Administration ISA210S Operating Systems and Networks Introduction to Computer Networking ICN210S Operating Systems and Networks Project Management PTM210S None Electives (Choose 2 tracks) (see notes on electives) Programming Track Object Oriented Programming OOP210S Introduction to Programming Databases Track Introduction to Databases 1A IDB210S Computer User Skills Business Track Management Information Systems MNS210S None Semester 4 Operating Systems OPS210S Introduction to Routing and Switching IRS220S Systems Administration SAD221S Electives (Choose 2 tracks) (see notes on electives) Programming Track Internet Technology INT220S Databases Track Introduction to Databases 1B IDB220S Business Track Web Development Fundamentals WDF220S Electronic Commerce ELC220S Semester 5 Internetworking and WAN Technologies IWT310S Operating Systems and Networks Introduction to Computer Systems Introduction to Systems Administration Object Oriented Programming Computer User Skills Computer User Skills None Introduction to Routing and Switching Systems Administration

Internet and Intranet Systems IIS310S Administration Computer Forensics CFR311S Operating Systems Electives (Choose 2 tracks) (see notes on electives) Programming Track Internet Programming INP310S Internet Technology Business Track Entrepreneurship ENT111S Business Ethics Enterprise Systems Applications ESA310S Management Information System Semester 6 Systems Administration Project in IAP320S ND (IT) Industry (Experiential Learning) Electives (Choose 2 tracks) (see notes on electives) Databases Track Database Administration DSA320S Introduction to Databases 1B NB: The student has to complete and pass at least 15 courses comprising of at least 9 core subjects and 6 electives. The project in industry has to be passed between semester 3 and 6.

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School of Information Technology 80BSDM

BACHELOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

Description Software Development is a branch of Information Technology that is oriented towards the creation of computer programs for a wide variety of purposes. It is about developing the programs that make computers useful and interesting. The successful software engineer is able to analyse requirement, translate into design suitable for a computing solution, create or program it as a system of software modules, verify its functionality, and implement it for the end-user. The software engineer uses a variety of tools from traditional programming languages to most sophisticated specialised software workbenches and testing tools. In addition to the ability to learn quickly the essential features of an application in any area of client needs, excellent communications and writing skills are equally essential. Successful software engineers also possess a good command of time and project management skills with special regard to managing complex software development efforts. Admission Requirements Applicants must have passed at least 50% (rounded down) of the courses of the National Diploma: Information Technology, and must have passed Communication skills. The HOD may approve exceptions. Candidates must complete the requirements for the National Diploma before the Bachelor will be awarded. Transitional Arrangements from Old to the New Programme Since 2008 only the new courses are offered. Provision will be made to credit the new courses against the replaced or revised old courses for the students to obtain the old Diploma until 2009. Students have the opportunity to change registration to the new Bachelor and will obtain credit on a course-by-course basis. See tables below:

National Diploma Software Engineering Old courses Introduction to Databases 1A IDB110S Programming 1B PRG120S Operating Systems 1A OPS110S Statistics 1A SIT111S Computer Hardware CHW110S Project Management PJM110S Applied Software Engineering ASE110S Introduction to Databases 1B Object Oriented Technology Software Engineering 1 Operating System 1B Statistics 1B Introduction to Web Design Internet Server Programming Visual Application Development Software Engineering 2 Database Programming Management Information Systems Introduction to SAP Software Engineering Project in Industry IDB120S OOT110S SEN110S OPS120S SIT121S IWD110S ISP110S VAD110S SEN210S DBP110S MNS110S SAP110S SEP110S Equivalence Current courses Introduction to Databases 1A Procedural Programming Operating Systems and Networks Statistics 1 A Computer Hardware Project Management Software Analysis and Design and SQT110S Introduction to Databases 1B Object Oriented Programming Software quality and testing and SED110S Operating Systems Statistics 1B Web Development Fundamentals Internet Technology and Internet Programming User Interface Design Software Engineering 2 Database programming Management Information Systems Enterprise Systems Applications Software Engineering Project in Industry 14 weeks

IDB210S Revised PPR210S Revised ONS110S SIT11S Same CHW121S Same PTM210S Revised SED210S SQT220S Restructured IDB220S Revised OOP210S Revised SQT220S SED210S Restructured OPS210S New SIT121S Same WDF220S INT220S INP310S UID220S New SEN311S Same DBP220S Revised MNS210S Revised ESA310S New Temporary SEP320S arrangement

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Student wanting to finish of the old National Diploma have 2008 and 2009 with the above mentioned arrangements. Students changing to the new Bachelor can obtain the following credits from the old National Diploma. (The courses marked with an asterisk (*) have no prior equivalence and will have to be done by the student)

Bachelor of Information Technology Software Engineering New courses Course Code Procedural Programming* PPR210S Object Oriented Programming OOP210S Software analysis and design SED210S Introduction to Databases 1A Introduction to Databases 1B Project Management Internet Technology* User Interface Design Software quality and testing Database Programming Statistics 1B Internet Programming Software Engineering 2 Database Application Development Process Management* Introduction to Systems Administration Experiential Training Database Administration (Elective) Component Based Development (Elective)* Credit obtainable Old diploma Course Code OOT110S ASE110S SEN110S IDB110S IDB120S PJM110S

Object Oriented Technology Applied Software Engineering and Software Engineering 1 IDB210S Introduction to Databases 1A IDB220S Introduction to Databases 1B PTM210S Project Management INT220S UID220S VAD110S and HID410S SQT220S ASE and SEN110S DBP220S Database Programming SIT121S Statistics 1B INP310S Internet Server Programming, Advanced Internet Technologies SEN311S Software Engineering 2 DBD320S

DBP120S SIT121S ISP110S, AIT410S SEN210S

ISA110S Introduction to Systems Administration ISA110S SEP320S Experiential Training SEP120S DSA220S Database Administration DSA410S CBD320S

CURRICULUM Second Year Semester 3 Course Title Procedural Programming Object Oriented Programming Software Analysis and Design Introduction Databases 1A Project Management Semester 4 Introduction to Databases 1B Internet Technology User Interface Design Software quality and Testing Database Programming Statistics 1B

Course Code Prerequisite PPR210S Introduction to Programming OOP210S Introduction to Programming SED210S Introduction to Software Engineering IDB210S Computer User Skills PTM210S None IDB220S INT220S UID220S SQT220S DBP220S SIT121S Computer User Skills Object Oriented Programming None Introduction to Software Engineering Introduction to Databases 1B None

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Third Year Semester 5 Internet Programming Software Engineering 2

School of Information Technology

INP310S SEN311S

Database Application Development DBD310S Process Management PMT310S Introduction to Systems Administration ISA210S Semester 6 Software Development Project in Industry (Experiential Learning) SEP320S Electives (choose any two) Database Administration DSA320S Component Based Development CBD320S Any other course from another study programme as approved by HOD: SD

Internet Technology Software Analysis and Design Software Quality and Testing Project Management Database Programming Computer Organisation & Computer Hardware

ND (IT) Introduction to Databases 1B Object Oriented Programming

NB: The student has to pass all listed courses up to semester 5 and a project in industry has to be passed between semester 3 and 6 as well as 2 electives of choice. BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY (No new intake 2009) B.Tech. offered in three areas of specialisation, of which the student have to choose either: · Business Computing 80BBCO · Computing Networking 80BCNW · Software Development 80BSDM The Bachelor of Technology is a degree awarded after completing the requirements for the national Diploma, plus a fourth year of study. The three specialisations of the degree correspond broadly to the three Bachelor Information Technology, in business computing, systems administration and software engineering, and it is expected that students completing the 3 year degrees will continue with the relevant degree programme. Admission Requirements General: Admission requirement is any National Diploma in IT / Computing or any three-year academic degree in IT from an accredited institution as approved by Senate. Additional for Business Computing: Business Management, Accounting, and Statistics are required to the extent as provided in the National Diploma curricula of the Polytechnic. Additional for Computer Networking: Equipment configuration skills and networking theory knowledge at the level of a Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA). This knowledge is usually documented by either of the following: · Holding a valid CCNA certification; · Passing the course CCNA4 (code CCN140S) at Polytechnic of Namibia or at any other accredited Cisco Academy; · Having extensive and recent network configuration skills and knowledge as a result of work experience. This must be certified by the employer of the prospective student. 173

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Additional for Software Development: Solid knowledge and practice of common programming techniques (Databases, Internet, and Object Oriented) as well as Software Engineering methods, techniques and tools comparable to the PON Diploma courses (OOT110S, DBP 110S, ISP110S, SEN210S). Programme structure and content: The programme contains a Bachelor thesis and eight courses allocated as follows (list of courses see below): Core courses: 2 courses plus Research Project Specialisation area courses: 4 courses Other courses on B.Tech level: 2 courses Core courses are compulsory: In the area of specialisation 4 courses are to be chosen from the list of available courses in that area as specified below. For the other courses the student can take additional courses from the area of specialisation. Alternatively, the student can take courses from one or more of the other areas as outlined in the list below. Certain Non-IT courses might also be accepted, provided they are on B.Tech. level, reasonably related to the application of IT, and account for at least 4 credit hours. If these courses are offered by other schools, students must seek approval for these courses by the HOD of their respective Department within the School of IT. Core course list: Semester Course Title 7 or 8 7 or 8 8 Theory of Computation Research Methodology Bachelors Research Project Code TOC410S RIT410S BRP410S Prerequisites

Research Methodology

COURSE LISTS: Business Computing - Course list Semester Course Title 7 or 8 7 or 8 7 or 8 7 or 8 7 or 8 Advanced Management Information Systems Practical Management Information Systems Intro. to Information Systems Audit Enterprise Business Systems Logistics Management Systems Code AMI410S PMS411S ISA410S EBS410S LSM410S Prerequisites Management Information Systems see notes below

Computer Networking - Course list Semester Course Title 7 7 7 or 8 Cisco CCNP 1 Cisco CCNP 2 Network Security Code CCP410S CCP420S NIS410S Prerequisites Cisco CCNA 4 Cisco CCNA 4

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7 or 8 8 8 Practical Network Security Cisco CCNP 3 Cisco CCNP 4 PNS410S CCP430S CCP440S

School of Information Technology Cisco CCNA 4 Cisco CCNA 4

Software Development - Course list Semester Course Title Code 7 or 8 Architecture and Implementation AIF410S of Database M S 7 or 8 Advanced Internet Technologies AIT411S 7 or 8 8 7 or 8 7 or 8 Application Server Technology AST410S Database Systems Administration II DSA420S Human Computer Interaction Multimedia Management HCI410S MMT410S Prerequisites Internet Technolgy Internet Programming Internet Server Programming Database Systems Administration I User Interface Design Understanding of Programming Techniques

Course list - Approved IT related: 7 or 8 Advanced Management Skills 7 or 8 Numerical Methods

AMS410S NMH410S

NOTES: 1. No course will be offered unless at least four students have registered for it. Students are advised to consider alternative courses if their first choice course cannot be offered. 2. Subject to available space, courses may also be attended by students who are not pursuing a B.Tech degree. However, such prospective students must be approved by the lecturer, to whom they should demonstrate that they have the necessary foundation or experience for the subject. 3. See syllabus for details about required prior learning and/or any other pre-requisites. If pre-requisites are stated in terms of courses of the current curriculum for the National Diploma at the Polytechnic of Namibia, equivalent knowledge acquired outside the Polytechnic may be substituted. The Bachelor Research Project The Bachelor Research Project (BRP410S) is an integral part of the programme. In order for a student to register for BRP410S, all of the following criteria must be met prior to registration: 1. 2. 3. 4. The student must have passed RIT410S. The student must have no more than two B-Tech. courses outstanding. The student must present a research proposal which meets all quality criteria as defined within the prerequisite course RIT410S. The research project must be in the area of specialisation of the student's programme registered for as approved by the corresponding HOD. Exceptions from this rule may be granted to the student by the HoD of the programme as registered by the student.

Mathematics (IT) 1B, Programming 1B

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5.

School of Information Technology

A supervisor must have approved the proposal within at most six months prior to the intended start date of the research. An approved supervisor must have further given his/ her consent to supervise the research project. The lecturer of the course RIT410S must have approved the proposal within at most six months prior to the intended start date of the research.

6.

During the BRP410S project the student will attend a weekly session, in which the progress will be monitored, guidance given by the lecturer and work presented by the student.

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MASTER OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

School of Information Technology 80MIFT

Description The Master of Information Technology is a postgraduate program focused on research-informed professional practice. Besides research proficiency and specialised knowledge in the field of Information Technology, the graduate will be equipped with project management and instruction skills, as well as logical reasoning. Those four competencies have been identified as essential for the graduate to successfully perform in the workplace, e.g. in the industry, government, educational institutions and parastatals. Those competencies will provide the graduate with a basis or opportunity for originality in developing and applying ideas within a research and/ or professional context. The program further intends to facilitate international exposure and support applied research relevant to the local industry. (For further details of the Master of Information Technology, refer to the Prospectus of Postgraduate Studies 2009.)

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SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND TOURISM OFFICE OF THE DEAN Dean Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Faculty Officer Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address Tutor/Computer Lab Assistant Tutor/Lab Assistant

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

: Lameck Mwewa, LEAD Fellow, MSc. Geoinformatics, (ITC, Netherlands), B.Eng. Land Surveying (UNZA) : Sonja Samuels, National Diploma: Natural Resource Management: Nature Conservation (PoN) : +264 61 2072146 : +264 61 2072196 : [email protected] : Antonia Goliath, Cert. in Principles of Public Relations (PRISA, Namibia), ND Executive Secretary (PoN) : +264 61 2072114 : +264 61 2072401/2113 : [email protected] : David Louw, ND Business Computing (PoN) : Clifford Akashambatwa, ND: Natural Resource Management (Agriculture) (PoN), Post Diploma Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management (PoN)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Head of Department : Alexander Meroro, M.Sc (Agric. Dev.)(London) Secretary : Illony De Voss, Dip. Executive Secretary (PoN) Telephone Number : +264 61 207 2141 Fax Number : +264 61 207 2143 E-mail Address : [email protected] [email protected] Academic Staff : Richard Terence Kamukuenjandje, B.Sc. Tropical Agriculture, MSc. in Ecological Agriculture (Kassel) : Lucia Kafidi, B.Sc. (AgEd & Anim. Sc.) and M.Sc. (AgEd) (Oklahoma State) : Ibo Zimmermann, M.Sc. (Pretoria) : Hilma Amwele, ND Natural Resource Management (Agriculture) (PoN), B-Tech Agricultural Management (Port Elizabeth), M-Tech (Agric) (Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University) : Salomo Mbai, National Diploma Agric. (Neudamm), B.Tech Agric. (Pretoria), B.Agric Hons (UFS), M.Agric (UFS) : Mogos Teweldemedhin, B.A in Business and Economics-Accounting, B.Agric Hons (UFS), M.Agric (UFS)

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DEPARTMENT OF NATURE CONSERVATION Head of Department : Willem Jankowitz, H.E.D., Ph.D (UOFS) Secretary : Illony de Voss, Diploma Executive Secretary (PON) Telephone Number : +264 61 207 2141 Fax Number : +264 61 207 2143 E-mail Address : [email protected] [email protected] Academic Staff : Louise Theron, B.Sc. (Hons) (Potchefstroom), H.E.D. (UNISA) : Marietjie de Klerk, B.Sc., H.E.D. (UP), B.Ed. (UNISA), M.Sc. (Surrey) : Barbara Curtis, M.Sc (Zoology) (UCT) : Shirley Bethune, M.Sc. (Limnology)(Rhodes) : Meed Mbidzo, Masters Degree (Resource Conservation Biology) (University of Witwatersrand) : Willem Adank, Dip. Agric. (Neudamm), ND Nature Conservation (TSA), B.Tech Nature Conservation (PoN) : Dave Joubert, M.Sc. (Conservation Biology), H.E.D. (UCT) DEPARTMENT OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT Head of Department : Erling Kavita, B.Phil Tourism, Cum Laude (Birmingham), MA Tourism (Birmingham) Telephone nNumber : +264 61 207 2093 Fax Number : +264 61 207 2356 E-mail Address : [email protected] Academic Staff : Ms Wanjiru Muhoho, Galileo Trainers Certificate (Galileo), IATA/UFTAA Fares and Ticketing Dip, BA Vocational Studies Tourism (Delhi), MA Mass Communication (Leicester) : Elias Nyakunu, Post Graduate Dip. Tourism Planning (Munich), BA (Makerere), MA (Victor Babes Boylai) : Hendriena Shiyandja, Diploma in Hotel Management (Higher Hotel Institute, Cyprus), B.Tech. Food and Beverage Service Management (Cape Technicon) : Rudolf Imhof, Certificate, Apprenticeship for Chefs (Switzerland) : Surita Schoeman, Dip. Food and Clothing Technology (Pretoria Technicon) : Gerald Cloete, Dip Hotel Management (Utalii College) : Alida Siebert, Bachelor of Arts in Hotel and Restaurant Administration (Washington), Higher Diploma Hotel Management (University Centre Ritz Switzerland), ND: Hotel Management (Johannesburg Hotel School) : Joram Ndlovu, MSc Tourism and Hospitality Management, B.Ed (Hons) Educational Management, Advanced Diploma in Culinary Arts, Diploma in Technical and Vocational Education, City and Guilds of London Institute 7061/2, Class 1 Chef

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DEPARTMENT OF LAND MANAGEMENT Head of Department : Thomas Christiansen, (CIM expert), Ph.D rer.nat. M.Sc. Geography Telephone Number : 061-207 2215 Fax Number : 061-207 2196 E-mail Address : [email protected] Academic Staff : Frikkie Louw, M.Env. Dev. LIM (UKZN), National Diploma Surveying (Cape Tech, RSA) : Joe Lewis, M.Sc. Geoinformatics, PM GIS (ITC), B.Sc. Survey (UCT), B.Eng. Industrial-Mechanical (Stellenbosch) : Amin Issa, M.Sc. GIS for Cadastre (ITC), Post Grd. Dip. GIS Cadastre (ITC), Adv. Dip. LMV (UCLAS) : Lameck Mwewa, LEAD Fellow, M.Sc. Geoinformatics, (ITC), B.Eng. Land Surveying (UNZA) : Samuel Hayford, M.Sc. Geo-information Management (ITC), B.Sc. Land Economy (UST) : Charl-Thom Bayer, MSc. Geoinformatics, (ITC), B.Sc Surveying (UCT) : Vera de Cauwer, M.Sc. Bioscience Engineering (UG), M.Sc Tropical Forestry (ENGREF), Ed Degree (UG) : Alex Mudabeti, M. Geoinformatics, (ITC), The Netherlands, B.Tech., Dipl. Land Management (LIS), Cert. Land Measuring (PoN) : Sebastian Mukumbira, B.Sc. Applied Physics (Hons) (NUST), CCNA : Nalumino Akakandelwa, Adv. Dip. Financial Services: Property Finance - Institute of Bankers (South Africa), MPhil: Land Economy (Cambridge), BSc. Land Economy (CBU) : John Kangwa, BSc. (Hons) Surveying (East London) MSc Geography (UNZA) : Gibson Marwa, B.Sc. (Hons) Surveying (UZ) : Taruwona Makaza, B.Sc. (Hons) Surveying Engineering (Canada) : Emma Nangolo, PhD GIS and Database Management (Finland), MSc GID (Durham), BSc Zoology & Botany (UNAM) : Brand van Zyl, Masters Urban & Regional Planning, M. Environmental Mngt., BA Urban : Nadine Korrubel. Masters Town and Regional Planning (UOVS), BA (Stellenbosch) : David Varges, National Diploma Land Surveying (PoN) : Paulus Nashidengo, National Diploma Land Surveying (PoN) : Brain Mhango, M.Sc. (Aberdeen), M.Sc. (Wageningen-Enschede), PG Dipl.(ITC-Enschede), Dipl. Eng. (UNZA).

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Diploma: Aquaculture - Full Time National Diploma: Natural Resource Management (Agriculture) - Full Time Bachelor of Technology: Agricultural Management - Distance with Intensive Workshops Bachelor of Agricultural Management - Part Time blocks with Intensive Workshops NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN AQUACULTURE (Full-time only) 27DAQU

Description The need for a National Diploma in Aquaculture stems from the emergence of Aquaculture in Namibia and the current lack of training opportunities. The Department of Agriculture at the Polytechnic is uniquely poised to meet this need because it currently offers parallels in Agriculture, thus many of the courses in the National Diploma already exist. Eight aquaculturespecific courses are included in the National Diploma in Aquaculture. Graduates are prepared as technicians and entrepreneurs in the culture of aquatic organisms. Graduates may also enter the Bachelor of Agricultural Management programme. Mode of Delivery The programme is offered through full time study and will generally be taken over four semesters at the Polytechnic of Namibia and one semester of In-Service Training through a work attachment. Students admitted to the programme and who meet the high admission standards may complete the programme in a total of 4 semesters. Programme Structure The programme consists of 17 semester courses, all of which are compulsory. The courses total 216 credits. The In-Service Training component is run in partnership with establishments where the students gain work experience. Special Regulations Admission Only a limited number of students will be accepted for this programme. Candidates may be admitted into this programme if they have received a Grade 12 certificate at NSSC (O) level (or equivalent) with at least 25 aggregate points, and comply with the following additional requirements: · A pass with at least a B-symbol in English at NSSC (O) level or NSSC (H) level 2 or equivalent. · A pass with at least a C-symbol in Mathematics at NSSC (O) or NSSC (H) level 4 or equivalent, OR completion of bridging course (Introduction to Mathematics (SBM) · Demonstrated competence in Basic Computer Use. · Passes with at least a E-symbol in Biology or Science related subjects at NSSC (O) level or NSSC (H) level 4 or equivalent. · A pass with a C-symbol in Physical Science at NSSC (O). · Mature age students could be considered. Examination Requirements In line with the general requirements of Senate, the assessment of the student's academic performance will be on the basis of a semester mark and examination mark. For determining the combined final mark of diploma courses, the ratio of semester mark to examination mark

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shall be 70:30 for the courses of the programme offered in the Department of Agriculture. The semester mark is determined by continuous assessment of a student's achievement by means of tests, assignments, tutorials, seminars, practicals, and projects. A written examination for a course consists of 1 paper of 3 hours. A candidate will gain admission to the examination of a course if s/he attains a semester mark of at least 50%. Promotion Policy As in the general regulations, in order to pass, a student shall obtain an overall final mark of at least 50% and a sub-minimum of 40% for the examination. Practicals Apart from weekly practical sessions for many of the diploma courses, there are also excursions. The student must complete one semester of compulsory In-Service Training. CURRICULUM NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN AQUACULTURE BRIDGING (may be taken concurrently with 1st year courses) Course Code Course Title Briding Year: Semester 1 BCU110S Basic Computer Use LPA0220 Language in Practice A Bridging Year: Semester 2 ITM011S Introduction to Mathematics M1 LPB0320 Language in Practice B First Year Semester 1 IBI510S Introduction to Biology ITS012S Introduction to Chemistry IAQ510S Introduction to Aquaculture Semester 2 PAO520S Physiology of Aquatic Organisms AEC520S AEC2100 BAC1100 Aquatic Ecology Agricultural Economics Business Accounting 1A Prerequisite None Principles of Language Use None Language in Practice A 27DAQU

None None None Introduction to Aquaculture, Introduction to Biology & Introduction to Chemistry Introduction to Biology & Introduction to Chemistry None None

Second Year Semester 3 FNA610S Feeding and Nutrition of Aquaculture Species AEN610S Aquaculture Engineering RAS610S Reproduction of Aquaculture Species ABM322S Agribusiness Management

Physiology of Aquatic Organisms Introduction to Mathematics Physiology of Aquatic Organisms Agricultural Economics & Business Accounting 1A

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ACS220S RME410S Agricultural Statistics Research Methodology

School of Natural Resources and Tourism Introduction to Mathematics M1 None Physiology of Aquatic Organisms Aquatic Ecology Language in Practice B Language in Practice B

Semester 4 HDA620S Health and Diseases of Aquaculture Species ACO620S Aquatic Conservation LBT4001 Agricultural Extension CSK0420 Communication Skills Third Year Semester 5 ISA710S In-Service Training (Aquaculture Project) BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT (Phasing in 2009)

Physiology of Aquatic Organisms, Aquatic Ecology & Research Methodology 27BAGR

Definition Agriculture is aimed at producing food, fuel, fibre and other products, through management of living organisms and the non-living resources that influence them. The most common form of agriculture in Namibia is livestock farming, to produce domestic animals, while arable agriculture produces crops, fruits and vegetables, and is limited to areas with better rainfall or where extra water is available for irrigation. Major challenges include the need to improve the efficiency of production, to exploit Namibia's comparative advantages, to meet the growing demands for food and to counter increasing urbanization. One option is to produce a diversity of both animals and plants at a high rate in integrated biosystems, whereby they support each other and optimize use of scarce resources such as water. Other options include the integration of valuable living organisms into existing farming systems. In order to be sustainable, agriculture needs to be socially acceptable, it needs to produce in a way that supports ecological processes that it depends upon, it needs to earn more money than is spent on it and it should not be too risky. All these issues and many more are included in the agriculture program at the Polytechnic of Namibia. Functions The diploma section of the programme prepares students to venture into farming or agribusiness, or to become agricultural research or extension technicians to facilitate sustainable development. The degree section of the program not only provides opportunities for continued career education, but also focuses on the attributes that equip high potential entry-level employees with relevant managerial skills. In particular, it concentrates on improved productivity and effective management of agricultural and human resources, and finances. Modes of Delivery The first 5 semesters of the programme are taken through full time study, four semesters of which are at the Polytechnic of Namibia while one semester is spent on in-service training through a work attachment. Thereafter the program shifts to a block-learning mode with intensive workshops, which takes two years, or possibly one year if the student is not employed. Programme Structure The first 5 semesters of the programme consists of 23 semester courses and a semester of inservice training, for the Diploma. The in-service training is run in partnership with establishments where the students gain work experience. The Department of English Communication presents

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four of the courses. A proficiency test at registration determines which of these modules a student slots in to. The Degree section of the programme comprises semester courses. There are seven compulsory courses in the sixth semester, with an elective course out of Sustainable Animal Production or Plant Production IV or Community-Based Natural Resource Management. The seventh semester has five compulsory courses, with an elective course out of Principles of Critical Thinkink or Professional Communication. There is at least one contact sessions per semester. In addition, those students who have not passed a computer course will need to take Computer User Skills (CUS0100) in order to fulfil the curriculum requirements for the programme. Special Regulations Admission Candidates may be admitted into this qualification if they meet the general Polytechnic of Namibia admission requirements of a Grade 12 certificate at NSSC (O) level with at least 25 aggregate points and comply with the following additional requirements: · A pass with at least an E-symbol in English at NSSC (O) level or NSSC (H) level 4 or equivalent, OR placement into an English bridging course through the placement test · A pass with at least an E-symbol in Mathematics at NSSC (O) or NSSC (H) level 4 or equivalent · Passes with at least an E-symbol in Agriculture, Biology or Science related subjects. · Mature students with a grade 10 certificate or equivalent, or candidates with foreign qualifications, with a pass in Numerical and English Proficiency Tests could be considered · Must be medically and physically fit for field work, which forms an integral part of the programme · Candidates will be expected to demonstrate proficiency with computers (word processing, spreadsheets, internet use) OR complete a bridging course in basic computer use. Candidates for the Bachelor of Agriculture may be admitted into this qualification if they have received a National Diploma in Natural Resource Management (Agriculture) from the Polytechnic of Namibia or an equivalent qualification of at least 200 credits, with a pass of at least 60% in all courses. Examination Requirements In line with the general requirements of Senate, the assessment of the student's academic performance will be on the basis of a semester mark and examination mark, for Diploma courses, and for the Bachelor of Agriculture it is 100% continuous assessment. For determining the combined final mark of Diploma courses, the ratio of semester mark to examination mark shall be 70:30 for the agricultural courses of the Diploma program. The semester mark is determined by continuous assessment of a student's achievement by means of tests and/or assignments/tutorials/seminars/practicals/projects. A written examination for a course consists of 1 paper of 3 hours. A candidate will gain admission to the examination of a course if s/he attains a semester mark of at least 50%. The exception amongst the agricultural courses is Basic Computer Use, which has a practical test in place of a written examination. For information about the four English courses presented by the Department of Communication, please see the relevant section of the Prospectus under the School of Communication, Legal & Secretarial Studies.

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The combined final mark of Degree courses is determined by continuous assessment of a student's achievement by means of tests and/or assignments/oral presentations/practicals/ projects. Promotion Policy There are two exit levels, one at the Diploma, after 5 semesters of full time study, and the other at the Bachelor of Agricultural Management. As in the general regulations, in order to pass, a student shall obtain an overall final mark of at least 50% per course, with a sub minimum of 40% for the examination. Students may not progress to any Bachelor of Technology or Bachelor of Agriculture courses until they have passed at the Diploma level. Practicals Apart from weekly practical sessions for most of the Diploma courses, there are also excursions for some of the courses. To qualify for In-service Training, a student must pass all courses from the first to the fourth semester except that a student will be allowed to go for In-service Training if s/he has failed only one course. S/he should however have been admitted to the examination in that course. Exemptions from this rule are subject to the approval of the Board of Studies, but may only be granted under exceptional circumstances. Departmental Rule Students who have passed all the Diploma courses of the previous semesters may not register for a course that is scheduled for a higher year than their current year, so as to avoid conflicts with current courses when on excursions. Students who have to repeat one or more courses may consider registering for a course that is scheduled for a higher year, if it appears likely that the student will be able to cope with all the courses for which that student registers. Transitional Arrangements from Old to New New Courses Introduction to Mathematics Module 1 Introduction to Biology Introduction to Biology Introduction to Chemistry Old Courses Agricultural Calculations Basic Plant Production, Basic Animal Production Agricultural Science Agricultural Land Management Non-Ruminant Husbandry Agroecology -

Research Methodology (SNRT) Business Accounting 1A

NB: From 2009, only the new courses will be offered for the new diploma programme. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The 2009 Third year students in the current programme who wish to complete the old curriculum can do so until 2010. When a student fails a phased out course s/he will be required to take up the new course as per schedule provided above. No retention of semester mark is allowed for phased out courses. For the students that are on the old programme the cut-off date will be the end of 2010 academic year. Current graduates of the National Diploma in Natural Resource Management (Agriculture) will be admitted to the Bachelor of Agriculture programme, and will join the programme in the sixth or seventh semester, however they are highly recommended to take Business Accounting 1A as a prerequisite for Financial Management (Agriculture) IV. Three courses (Non-ruminant animal husbandry, Agricultural land management and Agro-ecology) have been removed from the Diploma and are elevated to the Bachelors of 185

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7. 8. 9.

Agriculture qualification while two courses Research Methodology (SNRT) and Business Accounting 1A have been added to the Diploma level. It is strongly recommended that prospective students seek advice and counsel from lecturers before registering for a particular subject and specialisation, respectively. Provision will be made to credit the new courses against the replaced or revised old courses for the students to obtain the old diploma until 2010. Students have the opportunity to change registration to the new diploma and will obtain credit on a course-by-course basis. 27BAGR

BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT (New intake 2009) First Year Course Code Course Title Semester 1 IBI510S Introduction to Biology ITS012S Introduction to Chemistry BCU110S Basic Computer Use LBT4003 Agricultural Mechanization PLU0120 Principles of Language Use (depending on proficiency test) Semester 2 ITM011S Introduction to Mathematics M1 SSA120S Soil Science (Agriculture) RSC112S BAC1100 LPA0220 Rangeland Science Business Accounting 1A Language in Practice A Prerequisite None None None None None

None Introduction to Chemistry (Co-requisite: Introduction to Mathematics M1) Introduction to Biology None Principles of Language Use

Second Year Semester 3 SRH2100 Small Ruminant Husbandry RMN211S Rangeland Management AAG2100 Agronomy AEC2100 ACS220S ABM322S RME410S LPP0320 Agricultural Economics Agricultural Statistics Agribusiness Management Research Methodology (SNRT) Language in Practice B

Introduction to Biology Rangeland Science Introduction to Biology & Soil Science Introduction to Mathematics M1 Recommended) Introduction to Mathematics M1 Co-requisite: Agricultural Economics None Language in Practice A Introduction to Biology Language in Practice B Introduction to Biology & Soil Science Language in Practice B

Semester 4 LRH2200 Large Ruminant Husbandry LBT4001 Agricultural Extension HCT3200 Horticulture SK0420 Communication Skills

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Third Year Semester 5 IAG710S In-Service Training (Agriculture) Semester 6 NRH3200 Non-Ruminant Husbandry AAC3200 Agroecology ALM2200 SAM410Y ACM720S PFW0520 Agricultural Land Management Strategic Agribusiness Management Agricultural Marketing Professional Writing

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Research Methdology (SNRT) Introduction to Biology Rangeland Management & Co-requisite: Agricultural Land Management Soil Science (Agriculture) None None Communication Skills None None None None

Plus either ONE of the following: SAP410Y Sustainable Animal Production OR PTP411A Plant Production IV OR CBR410Y Community-Based Natural Resource Management PTN004P Practical 4 Fourth Year Semester 7 FMA411A RSO610S IFT610S MRI321S

Financial Management (Agriculture) IV Rural Sociology Introduction to Food Technology Marketing Research and Market Intelligence

Business Accounting 1A None None Agricultural Economics & Agribusiness Management Communication Skills Communication Skills

Plus either ONE of the following: PCT121S Principles of Critical Thinking OR PFC0620 Professional Communication

OLD PROGRAMME (Phasing out at the end of 2010 and there will be no new enrollments in 2009) CURRICULUM BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY (AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT) First Year (Not available from 2009) Course Code Semester 1 ACA110S Agricultural Calculations BCU110S Basic Computer Use BPP110S Basic Plant Production LBT4003 Agricultural Mechanisation LBT1002 Agricultural Science ECM0100 Principles of Language Use Course Title 70BLAN Prerequisite

None None None None None None (depending on proficiency test)

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Semester 2 SSA120S Soil Science (Agriculture) BAP120S RSC112S ECM0200 Basic Animal Production Rangeland Science Language in Practice A

School of Natural Resources and Tourism Agricultural Science (Agricultural Calculations recommended) None Basic Plant Production Principles of Language Use

Second Year (Not available from 2009) Semester 3 SRH2100 Small Ruminant Husbandry RMN211S Rangeland Management AAG2100 Agronomy AEC2100 Agricultural Economics ACS220S ECM0300 Semester 4 LRH2200 LBT4001 ALM2200 ECM0400 Agricultural Statistics Language in Practice B Large Ruminant Husbandry Agricultural Extension Agricultural Land Management Communication Skills

Basic Animal Production Rangeland Science Basic Plant Production & Soil Science None (Agric. Calc. recommended) Agricultural Calculations Language in Practice A Basic Animal Production Language in Practice B Soil Science Language in Practice B

Third Year (Phasing out at the end of 2010) Semester 5 OPT4101 In-Service Training

All courses of the first four semesters, unless only one course has been failed, for which the student obtained admission to the examination. Agricultural Economics Basic Plant Production and Soil Science (Agriculture) Basic Animal Production Rangeland Management and Agricultural Land Management

Semester 6 ABM322S Agribusiness Management HCT3200 Horticulture NRH3200 AAC3200 Non-Ruminant Husbandry Agroecology

Fourth Year Course Code Course Title Prerequisite Compulsory courses: FMA411A Financial Management (Agriculture) IV None SAM410Y Strategic Agribusiness Management None RME410Y Research Methodology (SNRT) None Plus either ONE of the following: SAP410Y Sustainable Animal Production None OR PTP411A Plant Production IV None OR CBR410Y Community-Based Natural None Resource Management PTN004P Practical 4 None

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Fifth Year Compulsory courses: AAM410Y Advanced Agribusiness Management RPA101Y Research Project (Agriculture) Research Methodology (SNRT) Related to SAP410Y OR RPA101Y Research Project (Agriculture) Research Methodology (SNRT) Related to PTP411A OR RPA101Y Research Project (Agriculture) Research Methodology (SNRT) Related to CBR410Y PLUS continuation of the following, if not yet taken: RPA101Y Research Project (Agriculture) None

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DEPARTMENT OF NATURE CONSERVATION

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Certificate: Nature Conservation (Techniques) - Full-time National Diploma: Natural Resource Management (Nature Conservation) - Full-time Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation - Distance Education Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management - Distance Education Certificate: Namibian Environmental Education - Distance Education Definition The National Certificate: Nature Conservation (Techniques) provides knowledge and skills to pursue a career as Ranger in the field of Nature Conservation. The National Diploma: Natural Resource Management (Nature Conservation) provides knowledge and skills which will allow students, after the successful completion of this programme, to pursue a career as Nature Conservationist, Tour Operator, Information Officer, Resource Manager, Environment Interpretation Officer, Environment Education Officer. The Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation focuses on the attributes that will equip high potential entry-level employees with relevant managerial and research skills. In particular, the programme concentrates on improved productivity and effective management of natural and human resources including finances. Special Regulations Admission Requirements A person may be admitted to the National Diploma for instruction and training if s/he meets the general requirements as decided upon by the Polytechnic of Namibia Senate and complies with the following additional requirements: 1. 2. 3. 4. S/he passed Biology or a biological related subject for his/her final school certificate; S/he passed English with a D symbol or equivalent at Grade 12 level. S/he is prepared to undergo a selection programme at his/her own risk. S/he is medically fit. Field and physical work form an integral part of this study programme.

Admission to the B.Tech level of the programme is aimed at individuals who have completed the National Diploma Natural Resources Management in Nature Conservation or related field, with at least one year practical experience and identified high potential for advancement. Examination Requirements In addition to the general requirements of Senate, the assessment of the student's academic performance will be on the basis of a semester/year mark and examination mark. Evaluation will be according to the syllabus description for the different courses/practicals. A semester/ year mark of 50% is required for admission to examinations, where applicable. All courses require a final mark of at least 50% to pass. For the courses presented for the certificate and diploma by the Department of Nature Conservation, continuous evaluation, both theoretical and practical, contributes 70% to the final mark. A written examination of three hours (one paper) contributes 30% to the final mark. The proportion of overall marks allocated to theory and to practical will correlate with the proportion of time allocated to each. · The courses: Language in Practice B and Communication Skills presented by the Department of Communication will be evaluated according to the evaluation criteria of that department.)

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Promotion Policy In addition to the general regulations of Senate, in order to pass, a student shall obtain an overall final mark of at least 50% per course with a sub-minimum of 40% for the examination where applicable. Practicals The student must undergo compulsory in-service training in the third and sixth semesters of the programme. A student will not be allowed to do both in-service training sessions in the same year, or consecutively. B.Tech students (year four and five) must pass the practical evaluation at the end of such practical session with a minimum of 50%. Students are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs. In view of the prerequisite for practical sessions, students must register for Plant Studies IV (Module A), Resource Management (Module A), Conservation Management 1 and Research Methodology in the same year. Prerequisites The prerequisites for in-service training can be found in course codes and prerequisites below. Any exceptions to this rule are subject to the approval of Senate. Students should have at least a code 8 driver's license before going on the second in-service training. CURRICULUM NATIONAL CERTIFICATE: NATURE CONSERVATION (TECHNIQUES) First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title LPB0320 Language in Practice B PID110S Plant Identification NAT5001 Nature Conservation Administration NCT110S Nature Conservation Techniques (Module A) Semester 2 NCT120S Nature Conservation Techniques (Module B) NCT130S Nature Conservation Techniques (Module C) NAT5002 Law Enforcement RGB111N Computer Usage NCA110S Nature Conservation Calculations CSK0420 Communication Skills 27CNAT

Prerequisite Language in Practice A None None None

None None None None None Language in Practice B

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CURRICULUM

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: NATURE CONSERVATION First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title NAT0100 Animal Studies 1 NAT5100 Plant Studies 1 RGB111N Computer Usage NCA110S Nature Conservation Calculations LPB0320 Language in Practice B NAT1100 Nature Conservation Ecology 1 Semester 2 NAT0200 NAT5200 NAT5002 NAT1200 NAT4100 CSK0420 Animal Studies 2 Plant Studies 2 Law Enforcement Nature Conservation Ecology 2 Nature Conservation Techniques 1 Communication Skills

27BNAT

Prerequisite None None None None Language in Practice A None Animal Studies 1 None None Nature Conservation Ecology 1 None Language in Practice B

Second Year Semester 3 OPT4001 In-Service Training

Nature Conservation Techniques 1 PLUS Any 5 of the following: Animal Studies 1 Animal Studies 2 Plant Studies 1 Plant Studies 2 Nature Conservation Ecology 1 Nature Conservation Ecology 2 Animal Studies 2 Nature Conservation Ecology 2 Language in Practice B Nature Conservation Ecology 2 Nature Conservation Techniques 1

Semester 4 NAT0300 Animal Studies 3 NAT2100 Environmental Conservation Development MEE221S Methodology of Environmental Education NAT1300 Nature Conservation Ecology 3 NAT4200 Nature Conservation Techniques 2 Third Year Semester 5 NAT5300 NAT4300 NAT6003 NRM210S NAT5001

Plant Studies 3 Nature Conservation Techniques 3 Aquatic Ecosystem Management Natural Resource Management Nature Conservation Administration

Plant Studies 2 Nature Conservation Techniques 2 None Animal Studies 3 & Nature Conservation Ecology 3 None

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Semester 6 OPT4002 In-Service Training

School of Natural Resources and Tourism All courses of the first five semesters must have been passed, or admission obtained. Exceptions may be approved by the Departmental Board. None None None None None

Fourth Year* Co-requisite courses RGB111N Computer Usage Compulsory courses PSO411Z Plant Studies IV (Module A) RMM451U Resource Management IV (Module A) REM531Z Research Methodology CVM112Y Conservation Management 1 Practical Component SEM171N Seminar PRO101N Research Project BTN001P Practical 1 BTN002P Practical 2 Fifth Year* PSO421Y FMN451Z POM191R

Plant Studies IV*** (Module B) Plant Studies IV (Module A) Financial Management I (Nature Cons) None Management Principles I None (Nature Cons) And any ONE of the following: RMM461T Resource Management IV** Resource Management IV (Module A) (Module B) CBR410Y Community-Based Natural Resource None Management Practical Component BTM003P Practical 3 None BTN004P Practical 4 (Optional) None * Tuition for the fourth and the fifth year will be offered through the distance education mode only and will extend over two academic years. ** Oral Examination Curriculum for year four and year five: There will be six compulsory courses, one co-requisite course (for students who have no previous training in Computer Usage), three compulsory practicals, a compulsory seminar and research project. CERTIFICATE: COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 27CNRM

Definition This certificate focuses on the attributes that will equip high potential entry-level practitioners of community-based natural resource management with relevant managerial and research skills. The study programme concentrates on improved productivity and effective management of natural and human resources. Admission Requirements Any person may be admitted to this study programme if s/he is in possession of a diploma/ degree in the field of Natural Resources Management (Nature Conservation, Agriculture, Land Management and/or any other related field). 193

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

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Examination Requirements A year mark of 50% is required for admission to examinations where applicable. All courses require a final mark of at least 50% to pass. Curriculum Tuition will be offered through the distance education mode and will extend over one academic year. The CBNRM course offered in the Bachelor of Technology (Nature Conservation and Agricultural Management) programmes is the same as for this certificate and the course will run concurrently as one course. Practical Students must pass the practical evaluation at the end of the practical session with a minimum of 50%. The practical session will be for more or less one week (face-to-face). Students are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs. A fee is payable for meals, if provided by the institution. CURRICULUM CERTIFICATE: COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Course Code Course Title CBR410Y Community Based-Natural Resource Management BTN004P Practical 4 PRO101N Project Prerequisite None None None 27NEEC 27CNRM

NAMIBIAN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATE

Definition This certificate is an introductory Environmental Education (EE) study programme for adults who wish to know more about applying environmental education in their community or work. The NEEC is most valuable to people who are involved with EE and those who intend to become involved in EE. The NEEC is a competence-based study programme and therefore aims to help students develop practical, foundational and reflexive competencies. Admission Requirements There are no minimum qualifications needed to join the study programme, however participants must be proficient in spoken and written English. In addition, a pre-course assignment is a requirement along with the application. Preference for selection will be given to those people who have firm links with environmental education, either in a community or work context. Assessment Requirements Assessment will be continuous and outcomes-based. Students need to continually reflect on their participation and professional development. Assessment is done through a review of: · Draft and final versions of written assignments; · Group work and presentations; and · A portfolio of work. Evidence of learning will be obtained from students' assignments, participation in group settings and critical self-reflection.

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Tuition and Delivery Mode Tuition will be offered through the distance education mode and will extend over one academic year. Students need to attend four compulsory face-to-face contact sessions/vacation schools. Students are further encouraged to form study groups with fellow participants in the same region. Within study groups, students will do group activities and support each other's learning. CURRICULUM NAMIBIAN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATE Course Code Course Title OEM101Y Our Environment: Issues, risks and responses DIE101Y Developing, implementing and evaluating environmental education curriculum, programmes and resources EEA101Y Environmental education approaches: theory and practice Prerequisite None None None 27NEEC

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DEPARTMENT OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Technical Certificate: Food and Beverage Operations National Technical Certificate: Rooms Division Operations National Certificate: Food and Beverage Operations National Certificate: Rooms Division Operations National Diploma: Hospitality Management Bachelor of Hospitality Management National Certificate: Travel and Tourism Operations National Diploma: Travel and Tourism Management Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management BACHELOR OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 27BHMN

Admission Requirements Applicants must be able to express a special interest in hospitality management. No specific skills other than those at grade 12 are required, but a D pass in English at NSSC Ordinary level is recommended. Knowledge of subjects such as Accounting and Mathematics; as well as some experience in hospitality would help in the programme. Candidates may also be admitted to this programme if they meet the General Admission Requirements of the Polytechnic of Namibia. (Please refer to the General Admission Requirements in the Prospectus.) Assessment Strategies The methods of assessment selected are a combination of individual and group assessment modes and are aimed at both continuous and terminal assessment. They are structured to facilitate individual inquiry, group dynamics and team-building, analytical discussion and applied knowledge. To these ends the programme uses several types of assessment. These include: Formative assessment: Measures e.g. presentation, project work, case-studies; practical exercises and laboratory work which provide information that will indicate to the individual student his/her progress to date. Summative assessment: Measures students' performance or level of achievement at the end of a sequence of study. Most commonly, this will take the form of the end of term and terminal examinations. Increasingly, both formative and summative assessments are being administered in an integrated format. This allows for the strengthening of linkages between courses, as well as minimising unnecessary duplication of workload for the individual student. The semester mark is determined by continuous evaluation of a student's achievement by means of tests and/or assignments/seminars/practical/tutorials. Each course is evaluated on its own at the end of the course as stipulated in the syllabus. The evaluation will be either theoretical or practical or a combination thereof. In order for students to qualify for In-Service Training (industrial attachment) all courses of the first semester (for National technical certificate) and five semesters of (the diploma level) must be passed, except that a student will be allowed to register for In-service training if s/he has failed only one course. For courses with a practical component, practical tests account 60% while theory accounts for 40% of semester mark. Courses that have an examination

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component, a sub-minimum of 50 per cent semester mark should be obtained to gain exam entrance. Practical and in-service training count for 60 per cent of the final mark and theory counts for 40 per cent of the final mark. In-service Training and Applied Projects are assessed through continuous evaluation. The In-service training 1 and 3 are executed in industry (off campus), following the Polytechnic In-service training regulations. All Applied Projects and the Hospitality research project are executed both on and off campus, under the supervision of the Hospitality and Tourism Department staff and mainly focuses on observation, data collection, processing, analysis, interpretation and write up. NOTIFICATION A prescribed uniform is compulsory for all Hospitality students and must be worn for the duration of their studies (all 3 years). A detailed description of the uniform requirements can be obtained from the Department of Hospitality and Tourism. The internship requirements of Hospitality students should be noted as 25 hours per week subject to business volume. Transition arrangement from old to the new programme NEW COURSES Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Computer Usage Hospitality & Tourism Law Food Production Theory and Practice Food and Beverage Service Supervisory Management Skills Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Accounting OLD COURSES Foundations of Hotel Management Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B Hotel Law 1& 2 Food Production 1 & 2 Food and Beverage Operations Management 1 & 2 Supervisory Management Skills 1&2 Business Accounting 1A & B Accommodation Operations Financial Control 2 Human Recourses Management 2 (Hotel & Tourism) Marketing 2 (Hotel & Tourism)

NB: The new programme was implemented in 2007 for the first and seventh semesters. 1. The 2008 Third year students in the current programme will follow the old curriculum. 2. When a student fails a phased out course s/he will be required to take up the new course as per schedule provided above. 3. No retention of semester mark is allowed for phased out courses. 4. For the students that are on the old programme the period of study may not exceed four years (as from the date of SENATE approval of the new programme) and/or the cut-off date will be the 2010 academic year. 5. Current graduates of the National Diploma in Hotel Management will be admitted to the Bachelor programme, and will join the programme in the seventh semester, however they will have to complete Professional Writing and Professional Communication before completion of the Bachelor programme.

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NATIONAL TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE: FOOD AND BEVERAGE OPERATIONS 27CFBO Definition The one-year National Technical Certificates provide knowledge and skills that enable students to gain employment at entry level in the hotel and catering industry. They are designed for students who seek immediate employment in the industry. National Technical Certificate in Food and Beverage Operations: The programme covers a spectrum of courses. The emphasis is on technical skills and quality delivery of customer service. This is supported by practical knowledge of food production and food and beverage service. Practical training is strongly supported by a well equipped training kitchen as well as a commercial kitchen at the Polytechnic Hotel School. In addition, the students are expected to complete 42 credit hours of internship in a hospitality enterprise. This provides them with `'hands on training" in a real life situation and thus prepares them adequately for employment as junior cooks, bar tenders, or food and beverage servers. CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title IHT110S Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Industry FPT110S Food Production Theory and Practice SSF1100 Safety, Security and First Aid FBS110S Food and Beverage Service CSH110S Customer Service in hospitality Industry Semester 2 HFB120S Hotel Practice (Industry Attachment) (Food and Beverage Operations)

Prerequisites None None None None None

Food Production 27CRDO

NATIONAL TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE: ROOMS DIVISION OPERATIONS

Definition National Technical Certificate in Rooms Division Operations: The programme covers a spectrum of courses. The emphasis is on technical skills and quality delivery of customer service. This is supported by practical knowledge of House Keeping and Laundry Service, Front Office Operations and Hotel Information Systems. Practical training is strongly supported by the Polytechnic Hotel school with accommodation facilities, a front office equipped with modern reservation systems, a laundry and conference facilities. The Hotel School is also equipped with a computer laboratory offering students hotel reservations training programs. In addition, the students are expected to complete 42 credit hours of internship in a commercial hospitality enterprise. This provides them with `'hands on training" in a real life situation and thus prepares them adequately for employment as front office, house keeping and customer service personnel.

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CURRICULUM First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title IHT110S Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Industry HKL110S House Keeping and Laundry SSF1100 Safety, Security and First Aid FOO220S Front Office Operations BIS311S Basic Hotel Information Systems CSH110S Customer Service in the Hospitality Industry Semester 2 HRD120S Hotel Practice (Industry Attachment) (Rooms Division Operations) BACHELOR OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Prerequisite None None None None None None Food Production 27BHMN

Definition The programme comprises of a series of courses leading to specific competencies and has multiple exit points that include: National Certificate in either Food and Beverage Operations or Rooms Division Operations National Diploma in Hospitality Management Bachelor of Hospitality Management. The programme includes all courses covered in the first semester of the National Technical Certificates depending on the option a student may select. At this level apart from emphasis on technical skills and quality delivery of customer service, there is also an emphasis on written and verbal communication skills, basic computer and accounting skills. The students are therefore expected to take additional courses in English language, a foreign language, business accounting, and computer skills. In addition, the student must complete 11.2 credit hours of hotel practice at the commercial sector of Hotel School. The hotel practice exposes students to real life situations and thus prepares them for employment should they wish to exit at this level. The major outcomes of the National Certificates are the same as those of the national technical certificates. The students are however expected to demonstrate adequate communication skills in handling everyday on the job situations when interacting with visitors; have a fair accounting ability, and show capacity to multi task. The National Diploma qualification builds on the National Certificate in Food and Beverage Operations and National Certificate in Rooms Division. In the second year of their study, in the third semester the students are expected to complete all major courses within the two options; i.e. if a student has achieved a National Certificate in Food and Beverage Operations s/he must complete the major courses in Rooms Division Operations. At the Bachelor's level, the students are exposed to higher analytical skills and knowledge within the management domain. Focus is on service organisation. Courses such as Strategic Management, Hospitality Operations Management, Human Resources Management, Strategic Marketing, Developing and Managing Small Properties, Financial Management and Research provide students in their final year with an opportunity to examine and be challenged by

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theories and practices impacting on middle to high-level managers. The programme is aimed at equipping students with the necessary advanced knowledge, expertise and strategic skills necessary for upper-level managerial jobs, such as hotel general managers and divisional managers. The students may also opt to develop and run their own hospitality businesses. CURRICULUM BACHELOR OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT First Year (FOOD AND BEVERAGE OPERATIONS) Semester 1 Course Code Course Title Prerequisite IHT110S Introduction to Hospitality and None Tourism Industry FPT110S Food Production Theory and Practice None FBS110S Food and Beverage Service None CSH110S Customer Service in Hospitality None Industry LPB0320 Language in Practice B Language in Practice A Plus any ONE of the following languages: GER110S Basic German 1A BAF111S Basic French 1A BAP111S Basic Portuguese 1A BAS111S Basic Spanish 1A Semester 2 HFB120S Hotel Practice (PON) (Food and Beverage Operations) Course Work: CSK0420 Communication Skills HTA110S Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Accounting RGB111N Computer Usage Plus any ONE of the following languages: GER120S Basic German 1B BAF112S Basic French 1B BAP112S Basic Portuguese 1B BAS112S Basic Spanish 1B First Year (ROOMS DIVISION OPERATIONS) Semester 1 Course Code Course Title IHT110S Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Industry HKL110S House Keeping and Laundry FOO220S Front Office Operations BIS311S Basic Hotel Information Systems CSH110S Customer Service in the Hospitality Industry LPB0320 Language in Practice B None None None None Food Production 27BHMN

Language in Practice B None None Basic German 1A Basic French 1A Basic Portuguese 1A Basic Spanish 1A

Prerequisite None None None None None Language in Practice A

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Plus any ONE of the following languages: GER110S Basic German 1A BAF111S Basic French 1A BAP111S Basic Portuguese 1A BAS111S Basic Spanish 1A Semester 2 HRD120S Hotel Practice (PON) (Rooms Division Operations) CSK0420 Communication Skills HTA110S Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Accounting RGB111N Computer Usage Plus any ONE of the following languages: GER120S Basic German 1B BAF112S Basic French 1B BAP112S Basic Portuguese 1B BAS112S Basic Spanish 1B

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

None None None None Food Production Language in Practice B None None Basic German 1A Basic French 1A Basic Portuguese 1A Basic Spanish 1A

Second Year Semester 3: For those with National Certificate in Food and Beverage Operations HKL110S House Keeping and Laundry None FOO220S Front Office Operations None BIS311S Basic Hotel Information Systems None MAR110S Marketing 1 (Hotel and Tourism) None EMN201S Events Management None PFW0520 Professional Writing Communication Skills Semester 3: FPT110S FBS110S MAR110S EMN201S PFW0520 For those with National Certificate in Rooms Division Operations Food Production Theory and Practice None Food and Beverage Service None Marketing 1 (Hotel and Tourism) None Events Management None Professional Writing Communication Skills

Semester 4: Common Core Courses ONE of the following: HFB120S Hotel Practice (PON) (Food and Beverage Operations) OR HRD120S Hotel Practice (PON) (Rooms Division Operations)

Pass in all major courses (exceptions may be allowed if students have failed one course only) Pass in all major courses (exceptions may be allowed if students have failed one course only) None Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Accounting

Course Work HRM110S Human Resource Management 1 (Hotel & Tourism) FCT2400 Financial Control 1

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Third Year Semester 5 Course Code Course RDM2400 Rooms Division Management FBM3500 Food and Beverage Management HTL310S Hospitality and Tourism Law SMS310S Supervisory and Management Skills PFC0620 Professional Communication SSF1100 Safety, Security and First Aid Semester 6 HMP320S Hotel Management Practice (Industrial Attachment)

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Prerequisite None None None None Communication Skills None Pass in all major courses (exceptions may be allowed if students have failed one course only)

Fourth Year (Tuition for the fourth year will be offered through the distance education mode only.) Semester 7 Course Code Course RME410S Research Methodology HOM410S Hospitality Operations Management SMH410S MHR410S Strategic Management in Hospitality and Tourism Managing Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism Organisations Prerequisite None Rooms Division Management & Food & Beverage Management None Human Resource Management 1 (Hospitality and Tourism)

Semester 8 FMH420S Financial Management for Hospitality Financial Control 1 and Tourism DMH420S Developing and Managing Small Rooms Division Management & Hospitality Property Food and Beverage Management & Strategic Mgt. In Hospitality and Tourism & Mgt. Human Resources in Hospitality and Tourism SHT420S Strategic Marketing for Hospitality Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism) and Tourism HRP420S Hospitality Research Project Research Methodology

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School of Natural Resources and Tourism 27BTTM

BACHELOR OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT

Definition The Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management programme is designed to prepare graduates for self-employment or professional careers in public and private sector organisations concerned with tourism. The core courses provide the knowledge and basic skills required in the broad business environment, while the management stream extends and reinforces these foundations as they apply in the operation of small and medium sized establishments. The tourism stream provides a more industry-specific focus for the understandings provided in the business subjects, and uses an interdisciplinary approach, which views tourism as a form of human behaviour as well as a business interest. The programme is intended to provide students with a holistic understanding of the elements of travel and tourism within the social, economic and cultural fabric of society, appreciation of the relationships among the various elements of the industry, as well as the ability to apply appropriate evaluative and management strategies to situations involving travel and tourism. Students on both the Diploma and Degree programmes follow the same course of study in the first three years. Admission Prospective students must be able to express a special interest in tourism development. The Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management Degree is a four-year academic programme, with the following exit points: National Certificate in Travel and Tourism Operation National Diploma in Travel and Tourism Management Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management No specific skills other than those at grade 12 are required, but a D in English at Ordinary level is recommended. Knowledge of subjects such as History, Geography, Accounting and Mathematics would help in the programme. Candidates may also be admitted to this programme if they meet the General Admission Requirements (Please refer to the General Admission Requirements in the Prospectus). Holders of the current National Diploma in Travel and Tourism will be admitted to the Bachelor Degree Programme. However, such students are required to do Professional Communication if they have not done so before completion of the Bachelor programme. Assessment Strategies The methods of assessment selected are a combination of individual and group assessment modes and are aimed at both continuous and terminal assessment. They are structured to facilitate individual inquiry, group dynamics and team-building, analytical discussion and applied knowledge To these ends, this Programme uses several types of assessment. These include: Formative assessment: Measures e.g. project work, presentation, case-studies, practical exercises and laboratory work which provide information that will indicate to the individual student his/her progress to date. Summative assessment: Measures students' performance or level of achievement at the end of a sequence of study. Most commonly, this will take the form of the end of term and terminal examinations.

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School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Increasingly, both formative and summative assessments are being administered in an integrated format. This allows for the strengthening of linkages between courses, as well as minimising unnecessary duplication of workload for the individual student. The semester mark is determined by continuous evaluation of a student's achievement by means of tests and/or assignments/seminars/practical/tutorials. Each course is evaluated on its own at the end of the course as stipulated in the syllabus. The evaluation will be either theoretical or practical or a combination thereof. In order for students to qualify for In-Service Training (Tourism Practice) all courses of the five semesters must be passed, except that a student will be allowed to register for In-service training if s/he has failed only one course. For courses that have an examination component, a sub-minimum of 50 per cent semester mark should be obtained to gain exam entrance. During the third year (final year of the Diploma Programme) practical and in-service training count for 60 per cent of the final mark and theory counts for 40 per cent of the final mark. In-service Training (5 months): The programme includes a mandatory period of industry-based work experience, which contributes to the continuous process of the personal development of the student and represents a key aim of the course. In-service Training periods will be formally structured and evaluated on a continuous assessment basis and will contribute towards qualifications and the award of the Diploma in Travel and Tourism Management. In-service Training and Applied Projects are assessed through continuous evaluation. The In-service training is executed in industry (off campus), following the Polytechnic In-service training regulations. All Applied Projects and the Tourism Project are executed both on and off campus, under the supervision of the Hospitality and Tourism Department staff and mainly focusing on observation, data collection, processing, analysis, interpretation and write up (Guidelines in reference to the DACUM recommendations). Transition Arrangements from the Old to the New Programme New Courses Tourism Operations Computer Usage Hospitality & Tourism Law Hospitality & Tourism Law Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Phased out Phased out Phased out Phased out Phased out Supervisory Management Skills Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Accounting Professional Communication Old Courses Tourism Destination Management 1 Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B Tourism Law 1 & 2 Hotel Law 1 & 2 Tourism 1 & 2 Business Accounting 1A Tour Operations Financial Control 2 Human Recourses Management 2 Marketing 2 (Hotel & Tourism) Supervisory Management Skills 1 & 2 -

The first year students in 2007 followed the first semester of the new curriculum while the current third year students will continue with the old curriculum until completion. When a

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student fails a phased-out course s/he will be required to do the new course as long as s/he meets the requirement to do so (such as the pre-requisites, etc). Diploma holders that meet the necessary requirements can register for the seventh semester of the new programme. However, Professional Communication should be done in order to fulfill the curriculum requirements for the prgramme. For the students that are on the old programme the period of study may not exceed four years (as from the date of SENATE approval of the new programme) and/ or the cutt-off date will be 2010 academic year. No retention of semester mark is allowed for phased-out courses. CURRICULUM BACHELOR OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title TOG111S Tour Guiding 1 IHT110S Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Industry SSF1100 Safety, Security & First Aid LPB0320 Language in Practice B Plus any ONE of the following languages: GER110S Basic German 1A BAF111S Basic French 1A BAP111S Basic Portuguese 1A BAS111S Basic Spanish 1A Semester 2 RGB111N Computer Usage TOG211S Tour Guiding 2 EDT120S Economic Development of the Tourism Industry HTA110S Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Accounting CSK0420 Communication Skills Plus any ONE of the following languages: GER120S Basic German 1B BAF112S Basic French 1B BAP112S Basic Portuguese 1B BAS112S Basic Spanish 1B Second Year Semester 3 MAR110S Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism) EMN201S Event Management ENT201S Entrepreneurship PRT201S Public Relations for Tourism PFW0520 Professional Writing And any ONE of the following: TOO210S Tourism Operations TTP111S Travel Theory & Practice 1 205 27BTTM

Pre-requisite None None None Language in Practice A None None None None None Tour Guiding 1 None None Language in Practice B Basic German 1A Basic French 1A Basic Portuguese 1A Basic Spanish 1A

None None None Communication Skills Communication Skills None None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 4 FCT2400 Financial Control 1 HRM110S UTO220S PFC0620 Human Resources Management 1 (Hospitality & Tourism) Urban Tourism Professional Communication

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Accounting None None Communication Skills Tourism Operations Travel Theory & Practice 1

And any ONE of the following: TDM202S Tourism Destination Management 2 TTP211S Travel Theory & Practice 2 Third Year Semester 5 SMS310S Supervisory Management Skills TLE310S Tourism & Local Economic Development HTL310S Hospitality & Tourism Law SSF1100 Safety, Security and First Aid And any ONE of the following: TDM310S Tourism Destination Management 3 TTP311S Travel Theory & Practice 3 Semester 6 TIS311S In-Service Training

None None None None Tourism Destination Management 2 Travel Theory & Practice 2 Pass in all major courses (exceptions may be allowed if students have failed one course only)

Fourth Year (Tuition for the fourth year will be offered through the distance education mode only.) Semester 7 RME410S Research Methodology SMH410S Strategic Management in Hospitality & Tourism TPP410S Tourism Policy & Planning MHR410S Managing Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism Organisations Semester 8 EPM420S Ecotourism Planning & Management FMH420S Financial Management in Hospitality & Tourism SHT420S Strategic Marketing in Hospitality & Tourism TRP420S Tourism Research Project None None None Human Resources Management 1 (Hospitality & Tourism) None Financial Control 1 Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism) Research Methodology

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OLD PROGRAMME (Phasing out from 2007 until end of 2010) QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Certificate: Hotel Operations National Higher Certificate: Hotel Operations National Diploma: Hotel Management National Certificate: Tourism Management National Diploma: Tourism Management Definition The National Certificate qualifications in both hospitality and tourism management provide knowledge and skills that enable students to gain employment at entry level in the respective fields of hospitality and tourism. National Diploma qualifications, on the other hand, provide knowledge and skills, which will allow students, after the successful completion of these programmes, to pursue careers in hospitality and tourism as well as related industries. Training prepares them for the supervisory level in kitchens, at the front office in hotels, tour operations, as tourism information officers, tour and travel consultants, event organisers, etc. In addition, these programmes offer sufficient "hands-on" training in a real life environment to prepare students adequately for the workplace. Special Regulations Examination Pass Requirements In order to be able to sit/enrol for the final examination in any course, a minimum 50% semester mark has to be obtained. This mark is determined by continuous evaluation of a student's achievement by means of tests and/or assignments/seminars/practicals/tutorials. Each course is evaluated on its own at the end of the course as stipulated in the syllabus. The evaluation will be either theoretical or practical or a combination thereof. In order to pass a course, a student shall obtain a final mark of at least 50% subject to a subminimum of 40% in the examination mark. For Travel Theory 3 (Galileo Reservation System) students must attain an 80% pass mark to be considered successful. For Basic Hotel Information Systems (Inn-keeper) students must obtain a 60% pass mark to be considered successful. In order for students to proceed to the following academic year, 50% of first year courses including core hotel operation/tourism courses must have been passed. Practicals and In-service Training · Practical examinations count for 60% of the final mark and theory counts for 40% of the final mark. · In-service training periods will be formally structured and evaluated on a continuous assessment basis and will contribute towards qualifications.

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· ·

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

In order for students to qualify for In-Service Training 1 (Hotel Practice), all core courses must be passed. In order for students to qualify for In-Service Training 2 (Hotel Practice) and In-Service Training (Tourism Practice) all courses must be passed. 27DHMN

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: HOTEL MANAGEMENT (OLD CURRICULUM) CURRICULUM First Year (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Code Course Title All courses are compulsory FHM110S Foundations of Hotel Management FPR110S Food Production 1 PIS121S Principles of Information Systems 1A SSF1100 Safety, Security, First Aid BAC1100 Business Accounting 1A GER110S Basic German 1A FBM110S Food & Beverage Operations & Mgt 1 ECM0300 English Communication Module 3 Semester 2 FPR210S FBM210S GER120S PIS122S BAC1200 ECM0400 Food Production 2 Food & Beverage Operations & Mgt 2 Basic German 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B Business Accounting 1B English Communication Module 4

Prerequisite None None None None None None None English Communication Module 2 Food Production 1 Food & Beverage Operations Mgt 1 Basic German 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A None English Communication Module 3

Second Year (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 HIS211S In-Service Training (Hotel Practice 1) 50% of first year hotel operation courses. Practical release period of 5 months to industry Semester 4 SMS1400 Supervisory and Management Skills 1 FCT2400 Financial Control 1 HRM110S Human Resources Management 1 (Hotel & Tourism) MAR110S Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism) FOO220S Front Office Operations ACO210S Accommodation Operations HLW210S Hotel Law 1 Third Year (Phased out at the end of 2008) Semester 5 SMS3500 Supervisory and Management Skills 2 FCT3500 Financial Control 2 HRM210S Human Resource Mgt. 2 (Hotel & Tourism) MAR210S Marketing 2 (Hotel & Tourism) None Business Accounting 1A None None None None None

Supervisory and Management Skills 1 Financial Control 1 & Bus. Acc 1A & 1B Human Resource Mgt. 1 (Hotel & Tourism) Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism)

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

BIS311S RDM2400 HLW310S Basic Hotel Information Systems (Inn-Keeper) Rooms Division Management Hotel Law 2

School of Natural Resources and Tourism None None Hotel Law 1

Semester 6 HIS311S In-Service Training (Hotel Practice 2) Passed all courses Practical release period of 5 months to industry NATIONAL DIPLOMA: TOURISM MANAGEMENT (OLD CURRICULUM) CURRICULUM First Year (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Code Course Title All courses are compulsory TTP111S Travel Theory & Practice 1 TOU111S Tourism 1 PIS121S Principles of Information Systems 1A SSF1100 Safety, Security, First Aid BAC1100 Business Accounting 1 A ECM0300 English Communication Module 3 GER110S Basic German 1A Semester 2 TOU112S TDM102S TOG111S PIS122S BAC1200 ECM0400 GER120S Tourism 2 Tourism Destination Management 1 Tour Guiding 1 Principles of Information Systems 1B Business Accounting 1B English Communication Module 4 Basic German 1B 27DTTM

Prerequisite None None None None None English Proficiency Test None Tourism 1 None None Computer Usage None English Communication Module 3 Basic German 1A

Second Year (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 TTP211S Travel Theory & Practice 2 PRT201S Public Relations for Tourism TOO210S Tour Operations TOG211S Tour Guiding 2 EMN201S Events Management ENT201S Entrepreneurship ECM0500 English Communication Module 5 Semester 4 SMS1400 Supervisory and Management Skills 1 FCT2400 Financial Control 1 HRM110S Human Resource Mgt. 1 (Hotel & Tourism) MAR110S Marketing 1 (Hotel and Tourism) TDM202S Tourism Destination Management 2 TLW2400 Tourism Law 1

Travel Theory & Practice 1 English Communication Module 4 Tourism 2 Tour Guiding 1 Tourism 2 None English Communication Module 4 None Business Accounting 1A None None Tourism Destination Management 1 None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Third Year (Phased out at the end of 2008) Semester 5 SMS3500 Supervisory and Management Skills 2 FCT3500 Financial Control 2 HRM210S Human Resource Mgt. 2 (Hotel & Tourism) MAR210S Marketing 2 (Hotel & Tourism) TTP311S Travel Theory and Practice 3 (Galileo) TDM310S Tourism Destination Management 3 TLW3500 Tourism Law 2 Semester 6 TIS311S In-Service Training

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Supervisory and Management Skills 1 Financial Control 1 & Bus. Acc 1A & 1B Human Res. Mgt. 1 (Hotel & Tourism) Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism) Travel Theory and Practice 2 Tourism Destination Management 2 Tourism Law 1 Passed all courses Practical release period of 5 months to industry

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

DEPARTMENT OF LAND MANAGEMENT

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

QUALIFICATIONS OFFERED National Certificate: Land Surveying National Certificate: Land Use Planning National Certificate: Land Valuation and Estate Management National Certificate: Land Management and Registration National Certificate: Geo-Information Technology National Diploma: Land Surveying National Diploma: Land Use Planning National Diploma: Land Valuation and Estate Management National Diploma: Land Management and Registration National Diploma: Geo-Information Technology Bachelor of Geo-Information Technology Bachelor of Technology: Land Management Master of Integrated Land Management Special Admission Regulations Candidates may be admitted to the Land Management programmes if they meet the general Polytechnic admission requirements of at least 25 aggregate points, and comply with the following conditions: · Must hold at least a Grade 12 certificate at NSSC (Ordinary) level with good passes in English and Mathematics (with minimum D symbols). Physics and Geography are highly recommended. · Placement in Language in Practice B according to the English Proficiency Test. Students who only gain entry into Language in Practice A may also be admitted, but will be required to advance to Language in Practice B before their third year of study. · Mature age students with a grade 10 certificate or equivalent, or candidates with foreign qualifications, a pass in Numeracy and English Proficiency Test. · Must be medically and physically fit for fieldwork, which forms an integral part of the programme. · Must be able and prepared to attend classes on full-time basis. Assessment Except for In-service Trainings, Diploma Projects, Engineering Surveying, Advanced Surveying 1 & 2, Sectional Title Surveying, Digital Cartography and Visualisation, Large Scale Mapping, Layout Drafting, Land Information Systems 2 and Surveying Project, all courses are assessed on the basis of a semester mark and examination mark. For Engineering Surveying, Advanced Surveying 1 & 2, Sectional Title Surveying, Digital Cartography and Visualisation, Large Scale Mapping, Land Information Systems 2, Layout Drafting and Surveying Project, students will build up a final mark through projects, assignments or tests following the standard (minimum six) continuous assessments according to the assessment policy. The aspects of continuous assessment of In-Service Training and Diploma Projects will be as set out in the course outlines of these courses.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Natural Resources and Tourism 27DVEM

NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND VALUATION AND ESTATE MANAGEMENT

Definition Land Valuation In the legal context, the term land valuation is used to denote the attachment of value on bare land and improvements to and on the land. Land valuation is, therefore, the art or science of estimating in monetary terms, the worthiness of an interest in property at a given point in time for a specific purpose of valuation, taking into account the interplay of legal, economic, institutional and other factors affecting land and landed property. Graduates are employed as assistant valuers in central and local government property offices and a variety of private businesses. Estate Management Estate Management is a field that covers a broad range of activity. Essentially it deals with every aspect of the relationship between society at large and individuals who occupy or own landed property. In a more elaborate way, estate management touches upon tenants (i.e. occupiers), landlords (owners) or investors in landed property. Estate Management primarily deals with physical assets (real property) and human resource. Hence for an estate manager to be effective both specialised asset management skills and human resource management skills are important. Practically an estate manager acts as an agent, taking responsibility on behalf of the owner/investor in landed property on one side while also taking care of the interests in property of the user or occupier. So estate management has the duty to create respect and mutual trust between landlord and tenant. Generally the process demands ensuring the well being of, property (physical assets), and interests of tenants, employee's owners, and society at large are taken care of. CURRICULUM NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND VALUATION AND ESTATE MANAGEMENT First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title RGB111N Computer Usage MMS110S Mathematics and Statistics LMM110S Land Management 1 LTS110S Land Tenure Systems 1 PEC111S Principles of Economics 1A LRP120S Law Relating to Real Property LPB0320 Language in Practice B Semester 2 GIS110S Geoinformatics 1 LEC120S PDM120S LIS120S BCS120S VAL120S 27DVEM

Prerequisite None None None None None None Language in Practice A

Mathematics and Statistics & Computer Usage Land Economics Principles of Economics 1A & Land Management 1 Property Development and Marketing 1 None Land Information Systems 1 Computer Usage Building Construction and Services None Valuation 1 Land Management 1 & Principles of Economics 1A

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Second Year Semester 3 LMM210S Land Management 2 EMM210S Estate Management 1 LUP120S Land Use Planning 1 VAL210S Valuation 2 LIS211S Land Information Systems 2 PDM220S Property Development & Marketing 2 Semester 4 EMM220S LRR120S PEC112S ISS120S PFN120S LTX220S Third Year Semester 5 OMP310S ENT111S VAL310S PFN310S DPV310S Estate Management 2 Land Reform and Resettlement Principles of Economics 1B Infrastructure and Services Property Finance 1 Land Taxation

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Land Management 1 Building Construction and Services None Valuation 1 Land Information Systems 1 Property Development and Marketing 1 Estate Management 1 None Principles of Economics 1A None None None

Organisational Management & Practice Entrepreneurship Valuation 3 Property Finance 2 Diploma Project (VEM)

None None Valuation 2 Property Finance 1 All courses of the first four semesters, unless only one course has been failed for which the student obtained admission to the examination Diploma Project (VEM) Language in Practice B 27DLMR

Semester 6 IVE320S In-Service Training (VEM) CSK0420 Communication Skills (Distance mode only)

NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND MANAGEMENT AND REGISTRATION

Definition Land management may be defined as the art and science of making decisions in support of objectives with respect to the inventory, allocation, use and conservation of land and its resources. Land management encompasses policies, plans, decisions and actions by public and private individuals and groups. There are three key attributes of land that every country must manage- its tenure, value and use. The first relates to land registration, the second to land valuation and the third to land use or spatial planning (Dale and McLaughlin 1999). The three are inextricably linked. Land management as a broad area of academic and professional activity provides the necessary foundation and framework for the study of these attributes. In order to manage land efficiently and effectively, there is a need of some form of land registration, which provide a safe and certain foundation for the acquisition, enjoyment and disposal of rights in land. Land Registration provides the means for recognising formalised land/property rights, and for regulating the character and transfer of these rights.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

At an operational level Land Registration comprises a series of processes concerned with the determination or adjudication of land rights, allocation of land, delimitation and description of parcels, exchange of land rights and dispute resolution. Conceptually Land Registration is interested in the evolution, creation, maintenance, exchange and socio-economic consequences of different types of land rights, together with the necessary institutional arrangements. CURRICULUM NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND MANAGEMENT AND REGISTRATION First Year Semester 1 Course Code Course Title RGB111N Computer Usage MMS110S Mathematics and Statistics for LM LMM110S Land Management 1 LTS110S Land Tenure Systems 1 LLM110S Law for Land Managers 1A LUP120S Land Use Planning 1 LPB0320 Language in Practice B Semester 2 GIS110S Geoinformatics 1 LRT110S DRL120S LIS120S LLM120S GRF110S 27DLMR

Prerequisite None None None None None None Language in Practice A

Mathematics and Statistics & Computer Usage Land Registration and Tenure Systems None Deeds Registration Law 1 None Land Information Systems 1 Computer Usage Law for Land Managers 1B Law for Land Managers 1A Generic Registration for Flexible None Land Tenure

Second Year Semester 3 LTM210S Land Tenure Management 2A DRL210S Deeds Registration Law 2A LIS211S Land Information Systems 2 LMV210S Land Markets and Valuation LLM210S Law for Land Managers 2 UPD120S Urban Planning and Development Semester 4 ADR210S LTM220S LIS220S LRR120S LTX220S DRL220S

Land Management 1 Deeds Registration 1 Land Information Systems 1 None None Land Management 1 & Land Tenure Systems 1 None Land Management 1 Land Information Systems 2 None None Deeds Registration Law 2A & Law for Land Management 2

Adjudication and Dispute Resolution Land Tenure Management 2B Land Information Systems 3 Land Reform and Resettlement Land Taxation Deeds Registration Law 2B

Third Year Semester 5 LTM310S Land Tenure Management 3 OMP310S Organisational Mgt. and Practice 214

Land Tenure Management 2A & 2B None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

ENT111S DPL310S Entrepreneurship Diploma Project (LMR)

School of Natural Resources and Tourism None All courses of the first four semesters, unless only one course has been failed for which the student obtained admission to the examination Language in Practice B Diploma Project (LMR) 27DLUP

CSK0420

Communication Skills

Semester 6 IMR320S In-Service Training (LMR) NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND USE PLANNING

Definition Land use planning is the statutory activity of directing and controlling all land use changes in an administrative area (Municipality, District, Region, Province) by segmenting the area into zones and designating a planning instrument to each zone. Land Use Zoning (LUZ) is the American variety of Land Use Planning (LUP). Town & Country Planning is the British equivalent also used in several southern African countries. Regional Planning, Town & Regional Planning and Physical Planning are sub sets of LUP in other countries By definition Land Use Planning is the art and science of ordering and assigning different parcels of land to different and competing uses, so that equity, compatibility, economy and aesthetics are achieved. Planning however is one thing and implementation is another. The broader concept of creating a plan as well as ensuring that the plan is implemented is referred to as Land Use Management. CURRICULUM NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND USE PLANNING First Year Semester 1 - Core Modules Course Code Course Title RGB111N Computer Usage MMS110S Mathematics and Statistics LMM110S Land Management 1 LTS110S Land Tenure Systems 1 BEC110S Basic Ecology LUP120S Land Use Planning 1 LPB0320 Language in Practice B Semester 2 GIS110S Geoinformatics 1 TTS110S NRT120S CBL120S LRR120S ISS120S 27DLUP

Prerequisite None None None None None None Language in Practice A

Mathematics and Statistics & Computer Usage Tools and Techniques Mathematics and Statistics Natural Resources Management 1 Basic Ecology Community Based Land Management 1 None Land Reform and Resettlement None Infrastructure and Services None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Second Year Semester 3 LMM210S Land Management 2 LUP210S Land Use Planning 2 LDR210S Layout Drafting PTH210S Planning Theory 1 NRT210S Natural Resource Management 2 UPD120S Semester 4 PTH220S NRT220S LUP220S GIS220S LIF220S LEE210S Urban Planning and Development

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Land Management 1 Land Use Planning 1 Geoinformatics 1 Co-requisite: Land Use Planning 2 Natural Resource Management 1 & Mathematics & Statistics Land Management 1 & Land Tenure Systems 1 Planning Theory 1 Natural Resource Management 2 Land Use Planning 2 Geoinformatics 1 None Land Management 1 & Land Tenure Systems 1

Planning Theory 2 Natural Resource Management 3 Land Use Planning 3 Geoinformatics 2 Legal and Institutional Framework Local Livelihoods & Economic Development

Third Year Semester 5 ENT111S Entrepreneurship CSK0420 Communication Skills DPL320S Diploma Project (LUP)

Semester 6 ILU310S In-Service Training (LUP) NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND SURVEYING

None Language in Practice B All courses of the first four semesters, unless only one course has been failed for which the student obtained admission to the examination Diploma Project (LUP) 27DLAS

Definition The primary aim of the National Diploma in Land Surveying is to prepare students for a career as Land Surveying Technician. The Land Surveying programme aims at improving on traditional surveying qualifications, with respect to land surveying and land registration. Non-cadastral surveying subjects have been replaced by subjects on land information systems, cadastral surveying, land registration, and (flexible) land tenure systems. The programme also aims at developing capacity to fulfil the surveying and registration needs for implementation of the proposed Flexible Land Tenure Act. The programme will enable graduates to survey informal settlements (under the supervision of professional land surveyors), and to develop, use and maintain local registration systems for the management and upgrading of land tenure rights. Graduates will be able to register with the Namibian Council for Professional Land Surveyors, Technical Surveyors and Survey Technicians (SURCON) as Survey Technicians. Admission requirements for the National Diploma in Land Surveying are: · · · A National Certificate in Land Measuring/Surveying from the Polytechnic of Namibia, or A National Certificate in Land Registration from the Polytechnic of Namibia, plus the additional Semester courses Basic Surveying, Cadastral Surveying 1, Large Scale Mapping, and Surveying Project, from the National Certificate in Land Measuring, or Students who do not comply with the above, can register for the National Diploma in Land Surveying, subject to the evaluation by the Department of the individual diploma qualifications. 216

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

CURRICULUM NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN LAND SURVEYING First Year Semester 1 (Core Courses) Course Code Course Title RGB111N Computer Usage MMS110S Mathematics and Statistics LMM110S Land Management 1 LTS110S Land Tenure Systems 1 BEC110S Basic Ecology LUP120S Land Use Planning 1 LPB0320 Language in Practice B Semester 2 GIS110S Geoinformatics 1 LIS120S BSV121S LSM120S CAS120S SUP120S Land Information Systems 1 Basic Surveying Large Scale Mapping Cadastral Surveying 1 Surveying Project

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

27DLAS

Prerequisite None None None None None None Language in Practice A Mathematics and Statistics & Computer Usage Computer Usage Mathematics and Statistics, Computer Usage Mathematics and Statistics Co-requisites: Basic Surveying, Cadastral Surveying 1, Large Scale Mapping

Second Year Semester 3 ENS210S Engineering Surveying ADO210S LIS211S CAS210S LMM210S AVS210S Semester 4 CLF220S GIS220S LIS220S LTS210S STS220S DCV220S Adjustment of Observations Land Information Systems 2 Cadastral Surveying 2 Land Management 2 Advanced Surveying 1 Cadastral Legislative Framework Geoinformatics 2 Land Information Systems 3 Land Tenure Systems 2 Sectional Title Surveying Digital Cartography and Visualisation

Basic Surveying & Large Scale Mapping Basic Surveying Land Information Systems 1 & Geoinformatics 1 Basic Surveying & Cadastral Surveying 1 Land Management 1 Basic Surveying & Surveying Project None Geoinformatics 1 Land Information Systems 2 Land Tenure Systems 1 Large Scale Mapping & Basic Surveying Land Information Systems 2 & Large Scale Mapping

Third Year Semester 5 ENT111S Entrepreneurship CSK0420 Communication Skills

None Language in Practice B

217

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

AVS310S Advanced Surveying 2

School of Natural Resources and Tourism Engineering Surveying & Advanced Surveying 1, Adjustment of Observations & Cadastral Surveying 2

Third Year Semester 6 ICS320S In-Service Training (Land Surveying)

Advanced Surveying 2 27BLMN

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: LAND MANAGEMENT

Definition For decades the central social and political issue in Southern Africa has been access to land. The recent democratisation in Namibia and RSA and in other Southern African countries has resulted in new constitutional provisions, new laws and new policies on land. Consequently land managing institutions face an immense task to implement land reform. At the same time the new democracies in Southern Africa lack a good cadre in all segments of society and in particular in Land Management. The Bachelor of Technology in Land Management programme responds to the particular demand to educate and train staff to: · Supervise operations in Land Management organisations · Lead (multidisciplinary) Land Management projects · Advise land officials and (small) local authorities in the regions on Land Management matters · Integrate the different Land Management disciplines in a Land Management system The Bachelor of Technology in Land Management also aims at preparing graduates for further education at professional/academic level. Admission requirements for the Bachelor of Technology in Land Management: · A National Diploma in Land Surveying, or a National Diploma in Land Use Planning; or · Other relevant National Diplomas (3 years) with additional bridging requirements to demonstrate competency in specific courses. One year of relevant working experience is recommended. Relevant National Diplomas considered for admission to the Bachelor of Technology in Land Management. For these diplomas specific bridging courses will be required to meet the competency requirements for the Bachelor of Technology: · ND in Land Management · ND in Natural Resource Management (Agriculture or Nature Conservation) · ND in Land Surveying · ND in Urban/Rural Planning · ND in Land Use Planning NOTE: Decision on the relevance of the ND and the bridging courses that will be required, is at the discretion of the Land Management Department in consultation with the Registrar's Office. Specific competency requirements: · Knowledge/skills at National Diploma Land Use Planning level/equivalent to Semesters 3 + 4 of the second year of the National Diploma in Land Use Planning. OR

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·

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Knowledge/skills at National Diploma Land Surveying level/equivalent to Semesters 3 + 4 of the second year of the National Diploma in Land Surveying. CURRICULUM

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: LAND MANAGEMENT Fourth Year Semester 7 Course Code Course Title Compulsory courses LPI410S Land Policies and Institutions ESI410S LAD410S RME410S Economic and Social Land Issues Land Administration Research Methodology

27BLMN

Prerequisite Land Management 2 & Land Tenure Systems 1 Land Management 2 Land Tenure Systems 1 None Geoinformatics 2 & Land Information Systems 3 Geoinformatics 2 & Land Information Systems 3 Land Use Planning 3 & Natural Resources Management 3 Land Use Planning 3 & Natural Resources Management 3 Land Policies and Institutions & Land Administration None Research Methodology 27BGIT

And any ONE of the following combinations: GIS410S Geoinformatics 4 LIS411S OR LUR410S LUU410S Land Information Systems 4 Land Use Planning 4 (Rural) Land Use Planning 4 (Urban)

Semester 8 OIL420S Optimisation of the Integrated Land Management Process OOM420S Organisation and Operation Management LMR420S Land Management Research Project

BACHELOR OF GEO-INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (Offered Full-time only)

Definition A Geographic Information System (GIS) can be defined as a computerised system that facilitates the phases of spatial data entry, storage, maintenance, analysis and dissemination. It can be viewed also in general terms as an information technology that is used to acquire, manage, interpret, integrate, display, analyse, or otherwise use spatial data to produce spatial products such as maps [both digital and analogue]. Where as GIS is defined as above, Geoinformatics is viewed as the scientific field that attempts to understand and integrate different disciplines studying the methods and techniques of handling spatial information. The discipline that provides the background for the production of necessary tools required for spatial data handling is called Spatial Information Theory. Geoinformatics (or Geomatics as the Canadians like to call it) has evolved from just a concept to a recognised study and professional field.

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The overall aim of the programme is to provide the academic training of skilful and competent labour force for the growing GIS industry in Namibia. The programme aims at providing participants with the practical and theoretical skills necessary to successfully design, implement and apply geo-information technologies that can be use as decision supporting tools for spatial problems. The focus of the programme will be the development of essential practical skills along side training in fundamental spatial concepts and theory. Duration The Bachelor of Geo-information Technology is a 3 years educational programme with the following exit levels: · Year 1: National Certificate in Geographic Information Systems · Year 2: National Diploma in Geo-information Technology · Year 3: Bachelor Degree in Geo-information Technology. Admission Requirements Candidates may be admitted directly into the first year of the GIT programme if they meet the general Polytechnic admission requirements of a Grade 12 certificate at NSSC (O) level with at least 25 aggregate points, and comply with the following additional requirements: · · · A pass with at least a C symbol in Mathematics at NSSC (O) level or (NSSC (H) 4). A pass with at least a C symbol in English at NSSC (O) level, and placement into the new Communication Skills according to the English Placement Test. Students who only gain entry into Module 2 or 3 (or its equivalence) may also be admitted, but will be required to advance to the Communication Skills (or its equivalence) by the end of their 2nd year of study, if they wish to complete the National Diploma or Bachelor Degree in GIT. A pass with at least a D symbol in Geography OR Physics at NSSC (O) level. Proof of competency in basic computer usage. Students who meet the general admission requirements but not the above specific requirements could enter the bridging programme [year zero] to make up the additional requirements. The following courses need to be passed. Mathematics: Students who passed Mathematics at NSSC (O) level with less than a C symbol need to pass the bridging courses Introduction to Mathematics Modules 1 & 2. Geography or Physics: Students who did not pass Geography or Physics at NSSC (O) level with at least a D symbol, need to pass the bridging course Introduction to Geospatial Data. (Note: All students have to pass this course, either in Year 0 (for bridging students) or Year 1 (students who gain entry directly into the first year of the programme). Without proof of competency in basic computer usage, the course Computer Usage must be passed. Mature age will not be considered for admission to this programme.

· · · · ·

· ·

Progression Rule for the Bachelor in Geo-information Technology A student has to pass all the courses for the National Diploma in GIT, plus the additional Bachelor courses of Year 2, before he/she will proceed to the Bachelor GIT. Students who want to progress from certificate to diploma must be able to pass all the courses at certificate level plus the additional diploma courses of year 1. Course Assessment Strategies This programme will have different assessment strategies in line with the learning outcomes of a particular course. Except for In-service Training, Diploma Project, the Final Research project and those other courses specifically prescribed in the curriculum to be assessed in continuous evaluation, all the other courses will be assessed on the basis of a semester mark and examination mark.

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The semester mark is achieved through continuous assessments cumulatively contributing 40% of the final mark. The examination mark is achieved through regular end of semester examination, which accounts for the remaining 60% of the final mark. To gain admission to the semester examination, a candidate must have attained at least 50% as semester mark in a given course. In-Service Training, the Diploma Project, final assignment and other courses (see syllabi) will be assessed according to the Polytechnic's continuous assessment policy. The assessments are designed to make sure that the learning outcomes of a particular course are attainable. As for In-Service-Training, performance of the student will be continuously evaluated by the internal supervisor or lecturer during the entire period in consultation with the industrial supervisor. The oral presentation and the written reports will be evaluated by a panel that will include the program coordinator, the internal supervisor and an appointed moderator. The student will be required to submit to the internal supervisor a monthly portfolio of evidence of all tasks that s/he would have been involved in during the entire period. CURRICULUM BACHELOR OF GEO-INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Bridging Year: Semester 1 Course Code Course Title IGD110S Introduction to Geospatial Data ITM011S Introduction to Mathematics (M1) LPA0220 Language in Practice A RGB111N Computer Usage Bridging Year: Semester 2 ITS0220S Introduction to Physics ITM021S Introduction to Mathematics (M2) LPB0320 Language in Practice B First Year Semester 1 BWC120S IGD110S GES110S RES110S ISW120S Semester 2 DCV221S GES120S IDB220S SED210S ISM110S Prerequisite None None Principles of Language Use None None Introduction to Mathematics (M1) Language in Practice A 27BGIT

Basic Web Cartography Introduction to Geospatial Data Geographic Information Systems 1 Remote Sensing 1 Introduction to Software Engineering

Computer Usage None Computer Usage Co-requisite: Intro to Geospatial Data Computer Usage

Digital Cartography Geographic Information Systems 1 Geographic Information Systems 2 Geographic Information Systems 1 & Computer Usage Introduction to Databases 1B Computer Usage Software Analysis and Design Introduction to Software Engineering Introduction to Survey and Mapping Introduction to Mathematics (M2)

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Second Year Semester 3 WDF210S GES610S LIS610S RES610S APR110S Semester 4 GDG620S GIM620S ISA110S DSA410S GSA720S CSK0420 Third Year Semester 5 IGI310S

School of Natural Resources and Tourism

Web Development Fundamentals Computer Usage Geographic Information Systems 3 Geographic Information Systems 2 Land Information Systems Geographic Information Systems 2 & Introduction to Databases 1B Remote Sensing 2 Remote Sensing 1& Geographic Information Systems 1 Applied Programming 1 Software Analysis and Design (Engineering) Geodemographics Geoinformation Management 1 Geographic Information Systems 3 Geographic Information Systems 3 & Remote Sensing 1 Computer Usage

Introduction to Systems Administration Database System Administration 1 Introduction to Databases 1B Geo-Statistical Analysis Geographic Information Systems 2 & Remote Sensing 2 Communication Skills Language in Practice B

In-Service Training (BGIT)

Remote Sensing 2, Land Information Systems & Geographic Information Systems 3

Following courses are followed by Bachelor of Geo-Information Technology students: GIP710S GIM710S AGD710S GIS Programming Geoinformation Management 2 Advanced Geodatabases Land Information Systems, Geographic Information Systems 3 & Database System Administration 1 Geoinformation Management 1 Geographic Information Systems 3, Land Information Systems & Introduction to Databases 1B Geographic Information Systems 2, Basic Web Cartography & Web Development Fundamentals Communication Skills All courses included up to semester 5

Semester 6 AWG720S PCT121S PGI720S

Advanced Web GIS Principles of Critical Thinking Project (BGIT)

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MASTER OF INTEGRATED LAND MANAGEMENT

School of Natural Resources and Tourism 27MILM

The Master of Integrated Land Management programme aims at providing professionals working in the natural resources field, the core competencies necessary to become managers leading teams across all land management sectors. Graduates are equipped with skills that will allow them to formulate and implement policies relating to integrated land management in Southern Africa. (For further details on the Master of Integrated Land Management, refer to the Prospectus on Postgraduate Studies 2009.)

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CENTRE FOR OPEN AND LIFELONG LEARNING Assistant Registrar Coordinator: Courseware Development Coordinator: Student Support Coordinator: Administrative Support Student Support Officers : : : : :

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

Delvaline Möwes, B.Sc. (RAU-Johannesburg), HED (PG), B.Ed, M.Ed. (UNAM), Ph.D. (Stellenbosch) Georgina Fröhlich, B.Sc., Dip. Ed. (New England), M.Ed. (UNISA) Rochelle van Wyk, B.A. (UNISA) Certificate for Distance Education Practitioners (UNISA) Judith Britz, B.A. HED (PG) (UNAM) Yvonne Tjizumaue, ND: Commerce (PoN) Johnson Mutirua, Certificate: Education for Development (NAMCOL) Michelle Saunderson Brenda Kaumbangere Elvis Dausab Usiel Tjiho, Diploma: Stores Management & Stock Control (Cambridge Tutorial College) Susie van der Merwe, NC: Secr., Diploma: Management Development 061-207 2081 061-207 2208 [email protected] [email protected] www.polytechnic.edu.na/centres/coll/coll.htm

Store and Dispatch Clerk Secretary Telephone Number Fax Number E-mail Address (enquiries) E-mail Address (assignments) Website

: : : : : : :

VISION STATEMENT Through pedagogic innovation, the Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning (COLL) seeks to be internationally recognised and distinguished for the design and delivery of supported open and distance learning. DISTANCE EDUCATION: QUALIFICATIONS The following qualifications are offered on the distance education mode of study: National Certificate: Public Management National Diploma: Public Management Bachelor of Technology: Public Management National Certificate: Police Science National Higher Certificate: Police Science National Diploma: Police Science National Certificate: Accounting and Finance National Diploma: Accounting and Finance Bachelor of Technology: Accounting and Finance National Certificate: Business Studies National Diploma: Business Administration National Diploma: Marketing National Diploma: Human Resources Management National Diploma: Office Management and Technology

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Bachelor of Hospitality Management Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation Certificate: Community-Based Natural Resource Management Certificate: Namibian Environmental Education In order to provide an effective and efficient student support service, the Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning (COLL) employs full-time academic staff, drawn from the academic schools and departments at the Polytechnic, on a part-time basis to offer tutorials and develop quality assured instructional materials (print-based and other media). The COLL also provide a range of administrative and academic support services to distance education students across the country. DE1 DE2 (a) ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Refer to Rule GI2, the general admission regulations and requirements. CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE CENTRE FOR OPEN AND LIFELONG LEARNING All written enquiries in connection with your studies at the COLL should be addressed to: Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Polytechnic of Namibia Private Bag 13388 Windhoek NAMIBIA Always provide the following particulars in all correspondence: · Student number (if registered already) · Identity number · Date of birth · Initials and surname · Study Programme (b) (c) No responsibility is accepted for correspondence that is not directed to the abovementioned address. Enquiries/Letters concerning academic matters, such as problems with the use of textbooks, tutorial letters and study guides must be directed to the Coordinator: Student Support, Ms. Rochelle van Wyk, Tel: (061) 207 2203, e-mail: [email protected] edu.na. Appointments in this regard can also be made directly. Administrative enquiries with regard to registration, assignments and study material may be directed to the Coordinator: Administrative Support, Ms. Judith Britz, the Student Support Officers or the Stores and Dispatch Clerk, who may be contacted through telephone: (061) 207 2259/2071/2561/2558/2235/2801/2802 or email: [email protected] while assignments may be submitted electronically to [email protected] (Refer to DE12 (j)). Correspondence in connection with the library must be directed to the Chief Librarian: 207 2092 Correspondence in connection with finances must be directed to 207 2266 Correspondence in connection with examinations must be directed to 207 2027/2106 REGIONAL CENTRES Students living in the vicinity of Regional Centres are advised to consult the Regional Coordinator in charge, should there be any administrative enquiries, e.g. application, registration, course amendments, fees, study material, submission of assignments, examination, face-to-face tutorials, etc. 225

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(b) DE4 (a)

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The physical location of Regional Centres and contact details of Regional Coordinators will be communicated to students upon registration. OFFICE HOURS COLL Office Hours COLL offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 07:30 to 13:00 and from 14:00 to 16:30. Office hours of the Regional Centres are as follows: 07:30 - 13:00 14:00 - 16:30 APPLICATION AND REGISTRATION PROCEDURES Refer to Rule GI2 of the Polytechnic Prospectus for Admission Criteria. Special admission requirements for certain programmes are spelt out in Departmental regulations. Such special requirements will be in addition to the normal admission requirements. All prospective students must apply for admission to the Polytechnic of Namibia on the prescribed application form. Application forms are available on request from the Office of the Registrar and from regional centres. Application forms are also available on the Polytechnic website: http://www.polytechnic.edu.na. All applications must be accompanied by the relevant fees. The closing date for all applications is the last working day in September preceding the year in which admission is sought. Applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date whether their application for admission have been successful or not. Registration dates are published in the Polytechnic Prospectus, appear on the Polytechnic website: http://www.polytechnic.edu.na and are advertised in the media. These dates are applicable to all categories of students.

(b)

DE5

(a)

By signing the registration form, the student inter alia declares that s/he is familiar with the contents of this Prospectus and the regulations for his/her degree/diploma/certificate, and that s/he undertakes to strictly obey all rules and regulations of the Polytechnic. Students who register in person: Students who live in or in the vicinity of Windhoek, or one of the Regional Centres may personally hand in their applications for registration at the respective offices. If a student registers IN PERSON, s/he will receive all available study material upon payment of the initial installment of fees. Students who register by mail: Students who register by mail must ensure that their applications for registration are in order (see closing date for registration). THE COMPLETED REGISTRATION FORM TOGETHER WITH THE INITIAL PRESCRIBED INSTALLMENT MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE THE CLOSING DATE (see "Fees"), as well as documents required for admission to the particular qualification (see "Documents to be produced"). The above should be sent to: The Faculty Officer Polytechnic of Namibia Private Bag 13388 Windhoek, NAMIBIA

(b)

(c) (i)

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(ii)

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In the case of previously registered students, the student retains the existing student number allocated to him/her the first time s/he registered. THIS NUMBER MUST BE INDICATED ON HIS/HER REGISTRATION FORM. A new number will not be issued. Students must indicate the proposed qualification on the registration form. If this qualification is not indicated, the registration form will be regarded as incomplete, leading to possible disqualification of registration. Study material will be posted via regional centres where applicable. If study material is not received within two weeks of application for registration and if no further communication is received from the COLL, the local post office and regional centres must be contacted before the COLL is contacted. Upon issuing/receiving of study material, students are responsible to verify and ensure that they received the correct study material for the courses they registered for. Assignments based on wrong study material and tutorial letters will not be accepted for marking. Duplicate study material will be issued to distance education students at the following costs: Study guide - N$210.00 First tutorial letter with assignments - N$30.00 The above-mentioned amounts are subject to change. REGISTRATION AND RE-REGISTRATION Any person who wishes to be registered as a student at the Polytechnic for a particular academic year must complete the official registration form and sign it (by which s/he subjects him/herself to the regulations of the Polytechnic), must pay the prescribed fees and, except if already produced, must produce documentary proof that all admission requirements have been met for the study of the qualification for which a student wishes to register. In exceptional cases, the Polytechnic may grant permission that documentary proof may be handed in not later than 31 May each year, failing which a student's registration will immediately be cancelled, and s/he will forfeit his/her tuition fees in accordance with the stipulations of the paragraph under "Fees" in the Prospectus. The relevant sections under "General Information" are applicable for further information, including the closing dates and the basic requirements for registration. The Polytechnic may set a final registration date for a specific academic year after which a student may no longer register, and may refuse any application for registration if the student's completed registration form, the prescribed fees and/or the required documentary proof in support of his/her application do not reach the Polytechnic before the fixed closing date. A student who was previously registered at another tertiary institution and did not obtain a degree, diploma or a certificate at the end of his/her last year of registration, must (if a decision can be made based on the information on his application forms) submit a satisfactory certificate of conduct and an original report of his/her complete academic record, issued by the Registrar of the previous institution, during his/her first year of registration not later than 31 May each year, failing which his/her registration will be cancelled immediately. Re-registration may be refused in the case of a student whose academic progress does not satisfy Senate/the relevant Board of Studies. In cases where permission for re-registration is granted, it will be done only on conditions as determined by the Polytechnic. 227

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DE6 (a)

(b)

(c)

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(e)

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Students who find themselves unable to continue with their studies are required to cancel such courses. If courses are not cancelled, it will be viewed as a failure on the side of the student to make satisfactory academic progress. A cancellation form for course/study programme is attached to the Information Manual for Distance Education Students. Cancellation forms are also available from the COLL and the Regional Centres. The closing date for all cancellations is the last working day in April for 1st semester courses and the last working day in September for 2nd semester courses. The relevant sections under "Termination of Studies", Rule AC1.4 and "REFUNDS" Rules F.7.1.1 ­ F.7.1.9 are applicable for further information, including the closing dates and the basic requirements for cancellation of courses/termination of studies. DOCUMENTS TO BE PRODUCED When students register for the first time, the following original documents must be handed in together with the student's application for registration: (a) original certificate of the relevant admission qualification; (b) original Namibian identity document; (c) original marriage certificate in case of married women. If the student was previously registered at any other tertiary institution, and s/he has suspended his/her studies before the completion of the degree or diploma for which s/he was registered, s/he must produce the following documents together with his/her application for registration: (a) original certificate of conduct; (b) original report of full academic record. The above documentation must be issued by the institution where the qualification was obtained. All qualifications must be certified before submission to the Polytechnic.

DE7

DE8 (a)

CHANGING REGISTRATION Students who wish to cancel their studies at the Polytechnic must complete the prescribed form (Refer to DE6 (e)). Students are referred to the section on fees in connection with the repayment of money. Note that the closing date for course amendments is the last day in February (1st semester and year courses) and the last day in July (2nd semester courses) each year. This date also applies to applications for course exemptions. Cancellations can, however, still be done after this date (Refer to DE6 (e)). Course amendments and change of mode of study, i.e. change from full-time/part-time to the distance education mode of study is subject to the availability of study material and the time available to submit assignments as indicated on the approved assignment schedule. In the case of a change of address and/or examination centre, students are requested to communicate the change of address and/or Examination Centre to COLL in writing as soon as the relevant change happens. Forms for Notification of Change of Address and/ or Examination Centre are attached to the Information Manual for Distance Education Students. These forms are also available from COLL and the Regional Centres. METHOD OF INSTRUCTION Distance education is a unique method of instruction and study. It is unique in the sense that instruction and learning take place with the instructor/tutor and the students in different places for most of the time. In the COLL the main medium of instruction is 228

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the printed word, which enable students to study at home. It is therefore possible for students to study when and where they wish and they can link their academic studies with their practical work. The study material for each course will be supplied to students when they pay their tuition fees upon registration. The main form of material is the printed study guide, consisting of a number of units with activities for the students to complete to assess their own understanding of the course. Usually prescribed or supplementary reading is recommended. The supplementary reading material may be a reader, which will be supplied with the printed study guide, or a prescribed textbook, which should be bought. Each course also includes assignments which must be completed on time and send to the COLL for tutor-marking. The marks gained for an assignment form part of the final assessment for the course. Each assignment also receives tutorial comments which is sent back to students to assist them in their studies. The COLL is aware of the difficult circumstances in which many of its students have to study, and therefore provides assistance to enable students to derive full benefit from their studies. Tutors are assigned for each course to help students with academic problems they may have. Students may consult the tutor by letter, by phone at certain specified times, email or by a pre-arranged visit. DE10 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES The COLL provides the following support services: (a) Marker-tutoring Assignments coming from students are used as a teaching tool and marker-tutors therefore do not just mark in a conventional sense, but also give the necessary advice and encouragement on how students may improve and make progress toward being successful at the end of a semester. Telephone/email-tutoring Marker-tutors are available for tutoring and academic advice through telephone- and email correspondence. Students will be provided with a list of their tutors' telephone numbers and email addresses upon registration. Students are advised to please make use of this service. Face-to-face tutorials/Saturday tutorials These tutorials are organised in Windhoek and at the various Regional Centres on Saturdays. Notice of such tutorials will be provided to students by the: Coordinator: Student Support (COLL); and the Regional Coordinator. Students should make every effort to attend these tutorials. Vacation Schools Vacation schools are offered two times a year, during April and August in Windhoek. Notice of such vacation schools will be sent to students from time to time. Although attendance at vacation schools is usually optional, students are strongly advised to make use of this service. It is a valuable opportunity for students to benefit, not only for academic purposes, but also to make use of library facilities and to meet their tutors and fellow students. Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for the NEEC, B.Tech: Nature Conservation, Bachelor: Hospitality Management, Travel and Tourism Management, Research Methodology, Research Project, Information

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

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Administration, Speech and Deportment, Computerised Accounting, Basic German and Basic Portuguese. Please refer to the first tutorial letter on these courses for more detail. Students registered for these courses may not cancel their registration after 28 February and 28 July of each year. (f) Radio tutorials Radio tutorials are broadcast on National Radio, to supplement print-based instructional material and face-to-face sessions with 10 minute radio programmes. Schedules for radio tutorials are available on COLL's website: www.polytechnic.edu.na/centres/coll/ coll/htm. Library services The Polytechnic's library services are available free of charge to all registered students. Membership of the library is subject to the Library Regulations. The library will lend recommended books and other supplementary reading matter to students. Prescribed textbooks must, however, be bought by the student, and will NOT be provided by the library. A student who does not return library material on the due date will not be allowed admission to the examinations, to re-register, and will not receive his/her examination results before the outstanding library material has been returned to the Polytechnic. Limited stocks of library books are available from Regional Centres. The student must also consult his/her nearest Regional Centre in this regard. The Polytechnic Library has a number of very useful resources and services which are accessible through the website: http://www.polytechnic.edu.na/library/library.php A Resource Guide on all the various library services available to distance education students will be issued upon registration. Online examination papers: Past examination papers are available from the Library's web page, but only on campus. They are also accessible via CD-ROM from the Distance Education Regional Centres and via email from the Subject Librarians [email protected] polytechnic.edu.na. Subject Librarians will only send past papers to distance education students who have supplied their student numbers. If there is anything students do not understand, or which they need to have explained, they should not hesitate to consult their Tutor, Coordinator: Administrative Support, Coordinator Student Support, Regional Coordinator, or the Assistant Registrar of COLL; either by telephone, fax, email, a letter, or by a personal visit arranged beforehand. DE11 PRESCRIBED TEXTBOOKS AND STUDY MATERIAL Particulars concerning the prescribed textbook(s), which the student must buy, will be made available upon registration by means of a first tutorial letter, which is part of the study material of a particular course. Prescribed textbooks are available at the Regional Centres for reference purposes. Some of these textbooks are also available at the following Namibian Open Learning Network Trust (NOLNeT) Centres (Regional Centres that serve NAMCOL, NIED, Polytechnic and UNAM students): Walvisbay Main Municipal Library; Mariental Teachers' Resource Centre; Eenhana Multi Media Centre and Community Library; Outapi Community Library at Multi-Purpose Youth Resource Centre; the Ongwediva Computer Laboratory and Library at the Teachers' Resource Centre and the Oranjemund NAMDEB Technical College.

(g)

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Full particulars concerning the prescribed textbooks are contained in the first tutorial letter. Students are strongly advised to order their books from the bookshop in good time, as this will prevent many unnecessary delays and disappointments. COLL does not sell prescribed textbooks and cannot order these for the students. Books are prescribed for most courses and can be ordered directly from the distributors or via the regional centres. All books can be purchased from the book supplier, Book Den at Wernhill, in Windhoek, Telephone: (061) 239976. DE12 ASSIGNMENTS Students are required to qualify for examination admission on the basis of satisfactory answers to assignments. Particulars of the assignments, contribution of the assignment mark towards the final mark of a particular course and the minimum requirements for examination admission appear in the first tutorial letter. The due dates for submitting assignments must be strictly adhered to and are stipulated in the Information Manual for Distance Education Students. If students receive the study material too late for submitting a particular assignment on time, they must immediately discuss the matter with the Regional Centre or the Coordinator: Administrative Support in Windhoek. Rules for students on submission of assignments (a) Keep to the due dates. Assignments that are submitted after the due date will be returned unmarked. It remains your responsibility to see to it that your assignment reaches COLL in time. (b) Medical and humanitarian reasons are the only reasons accepted for the late submission of assignments. Late submission of assignments will only be approved till 7 days (including weekends) after the due date of an assignment. Valid documentary proof must be attached before any late assignment will be considered. Late submission of assignments without valid documentary proof will be returned unmarked and may not be resubmitted for marking. Travelling and attendance of workshops, job related activities and conferences may not be used as an excuse for the late submission of assignments. (c) Assignments already submitted but not passed/returned unmarked may not be resubmitted. (d) The formal requirements for essays as set out in tutorial letters must be strictly adhered to. If your assignment does not comply with these requirements, you might lose marks. (e) Assignments based on wrong study material and tutorial letters will not be accepted for marking. (f) Remember to give the assignment the same number as the one appearing in the tutorial letter. For example, if you do assignment 02, you should number "02" and not "01". DO NOT enclose more than one assignment in the same assignment book. (g) Indicate your student number, course name and course code, e.g. Introduction to Mathematics, ITM111S, and the assignment number on the assignment cover page before submission of an assignment. (h) Ensure that all information as requested on the assignment cover is completed and correct. Incorrect or incomplete information will prevent it from being accepted for marking. (i) Students' tutor-marked assignments will be returned to them in window envelopes and therefore their names, addresses and postal codes must be completed clearly and correctly on the assignment cover. If this information is missing, tutor-marked assignments will not be returned to students. (j) Students may send assignments via e-mail. Students should download the Electronic Assignment Book available in MsWord format from http://www.polytechnic.edu.na/ centres/docs/coll_assbook.doc to complete assignments. Ensure that all information 231

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(k) (l)

(m) (n) (o)

(p) (q)

as requested on the assignment cover is completed and correct. Incorrect or incomplete information will prevent it from being accepted for marking. After completion of the assignment, email the Electronic Assignment Book as an attachment to: [email protected] Completed assignments must never be emailed/mailed to the relevant Tutor, Student Support Officer or the Store and Dispatch Clerk. Always supply sufficient stamps when posting your assignments. Students who use express post for mailing their assignments must pay the costs attached to this service themselves. The Polytechnic of Namibia will not pay penalties for assignments with insufficient postage. Such assignments will be returned unmarked to the students. Posted/couriered assignments received after the due date of the assignment will be returned unmarked. Warning: Any loose pages increase the possibility for loosing assignment marks. Students living in the vicinity of Windhoek and who prefer to submit their assignments personally, must hand them in at the COLL assignment box. Students living in the vicinity of Regional Centres, should preferably submit their assignments at these centres. Students are encouraged to form study groups to discuss their studies, but identical assignments by different members of a study group are not acceptable. Copying assignments constitutes a transgression of the Students Regulations of the Polytechnic of Namibia. Students found guilty of copying assignments will be awarded 0% for such an assignment. Upon submission of assignments, students have to acknowledge by means of complete referencing, all sources used and/or quoted. Students found guilty of plagiarism will be penalised and may be awarded 0%. A student, who has strong reasons to believe that an assignment mark may be incorrect, may apply that such mark be re-checked, regardless of the mark obtained. An application for a re-check must be directed to the Assistant Registrar: COLL on or before the last working day of May for the examinations taking place in the June session and on or before the last working day of October for the examinations taking place in the November session. Applications must be accompanied by a full motivation explaining why a re-check is sought. Such a re-check shall not necessarily lead to a re-mark of the assignment, unless so determined by the tutor conducting the re-check. Applications for re-check based on requests to be condoned for admission to the examination will not be considered.

DE13 EXAMINATIONS A student is responsible for the arrangements and cost of his journey to the examination centre, as well as his accommodation at that centre. 1. In order to be admitted to the examination of a course, a student must obtain a semester/ year mark of at least 50%. 2. In order to pass a course, a student has to comply with the following criteria: (a) an examination mark with a sub-minimum of 40% must be achieved in cases where the examination comprises only one paper, and 35% each in cases where the examination consists of two or more papers, provided that the combined paper sub-minimum is 40%; (b) a final mark (calculated from semester/year mark and examination mark with the prescribed weighting ratio) of 50% has to be obtained in the course; (c) The semester/year mark and examination mark shall be used jointly to determine the final mark in the ratio of 30% (semester/year-mark) to 70% (examination mark), unless explicitly otherwise determined by Senate.

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3.

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

The final examination timetable, in the form of an admission letter will be mailed to every student in May and October each year. It will, inter alia, contain the following information: (a) a list of courses in which the student obtained examination admission, with a corresponding list of final examination dates; (b) a list of courses in which the student has not obtained examination admission; (c) particulars regarding the examination centre and session; and (d) further general examination instructions will be mailed to students at the same time. Refer to AC4.3.6, Retention Rule of semester mark. NOTE: (a) Candidates who have not received their examination admission letter before each examination must immediately contact the Examination Department at telephone (061) 207-2027 / 2106. (b) Students will not be permitted to write examination unless they have the following documentation in their possession at each session: - Proof of identity - Student card or proof of registration - Examination admission letter (c) Students are responsible for ensuring that they attend the correct examination session and receive the correct examination question paper.

4. 5.

DE14 EXAMINATION CENTRES (a) It is essential that the number of examination centres be limited as far as possible and therefore there must be at least five registered students before a centre will be established in an area. The Polytechnic reserves the right to approve or reject any application for the establishment of a special examination centre at any one place. Polytechnic regional students may sit for their examinations at the Polytechnic Regional Centres, Mariental Teachers' Resource Centre, Luderitz Community Library, Oranjemund NAMDEB Technical College, and the Karasburg Teachers' Resource Centre. (b) The Polytechnic takes no responsibility for the delay in mail delivery of examination timetables or receipt of any other information owing to a change in address or the inaccessibility of an address of any student. It is always the responsibility of the student to notify the Polytechnic of Namibia of any change in his/her postal address and to verify if such changes are effected correctly (See "Changing Registration").

DE15 EXAMINATION NUMBERS AND SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS (a) The candidate uses his/her student number as his/her examination number. (b) A candidate may be requested to furnish proof of identity at all times. For this purpose candidates must show both their student card and an identity document on which a photograph of him/herself appears. (c) The duration of every paper will be indicated on the timetable. (d) Candidates and invigilators will be notified of any special arrangements in advance. (e) Cellular phones and smoking are not allowed in the examination rooms. DE16 EXAMINATION ADMISSION In a course offered, no student will be admitted to the examination unless s/he has met the following requirements for the particular academic year:

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(a) S/he must have been registered for instruction or additional examination opportunities in that course offered or, with the permission of Council, by another institution recognised by Council for this purpose; (b) S/he must have satisfactorily completed a minimum of a semester's/year's work such as prescribed by Senate before a set date. The minimum requirements, which a student must meet for admission to the examination in a particular course, appear in the study material for the particular course and are spelt out in Departmental regulations. DE17 EXAMINATION RESULTS (a) The results of the June/July examinations are expected to be announced in mid July, while the results of the October/November examinations are expected to be announced by mid December each year. Every candidate will be furnished with his/her examination results as soon as possible thereafter. (b) No results will be announced by telephone or telegram. (c) No results will be mailed to a student before s/he has returned all books that s/he has borrowed from the library. (d) No results will be sent to students who have not settled their accounts in full. (e) A student who has, in his/her opinion, met all the requirements for a certificate/diploma/ degree and has not received confirmation thereof by mid February or mid August each year, should contact the Examinations Department. (f) The student must provide the Examinations Department with the required documents for certification as soon as possible after the final examination. (g) The institution reserves the right to rectify erroneous final marks issued as and when it became known. DE18 FAILURE TO PAY In the event of fees not being paid as per schedule, a student will not: (a) receive examination results; (b) be allowed access into examinations unless special arrangements have been made; (d) be permitted to re-register; (e) be allowed to graduate. DE19 STUDY PROGRAMMES OFFERED ON THE DISTANCE EDUCATION MODE: ADMISSION Refer to the General Rules and Regulations. A compulsory English Proficiency test must be written before a student can enroll for a English Coure. English Proficiency tests can be written at the Regional Centres or at the main campus in Windhoek. DE20 IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1A & 1B (a) Students must sign a letter of declaration that they have access to a computer before they can enroll for Principles of Information Systems on the distance education mode. The letter is attached to the Information Manual for Distance Education Students. (b) With effect from 2006, PIS 1A & 1B were subdivided into modules where modules 1 to 3 will be covered in PIS1A and modules 4 to 7 will be covered in PIS1B. (c) A student will be registered per module and not for PIS1A or PIS1B ­ but to obtain a pass in PIS1A & PIS1B s/he must pass all modules respectively. (d) All modules will be assessed throughout the specific semester and a student has only two opportunities per semester to pass a module. (e) All papers (theory and practical) should be written in the same semester.

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(f) (g)

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

Before a student may register for modules 4, 5, 6 and 7 in PIS1B s/he must pass module 1 in PIS1A. If not passed, the student must register for Module 1 in the following semester before attempting Module 4, 5, 6 and 7. The following table indicate the different course and module codes for PIS1A & PIS1B: Principles of Information Systems 1B (PIS122D) Module 4 (PIS004D) Module 5 (PIS005D) Module 6 (PIS006D) Module 7 (PIS007D)

Principles of Information Systems 1A (PIS121D) Module 1(PIS001D) Module 2 (PIS002D) Module 3 (PIS003D)

DE21 IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR ENGLISH COURSES GENERAL (a) Unless exempted from particular English Courses, on provisional admission to the Polytechnic, all incoming students shall be tested for placement in an appropriate English course. The applicable courses are Principles of Language Use (PLU0120), Language in Practice A (LPA0220), Language in Practice B (LPB0320), and Communication Skills (CSK0420). (b) Except for Principles of Language Use which shall not require any prerequisite, all courses in English shall have prerequisites or shall require placement and/or relevant exemptions. (c) Students shall register for an English course within a year of writing the placement test. Students who do not do so shall be required to write the placement test again before registering for a course(s) in English. (d) Students who have English qualifications from other institutions and those with qualifications from institutions where English was the language of instruction may be required to write a placement test before registering for a course(s) in English. (e) The minimum credit-bearing requirement for English is a pass in Module 4 or Communication Skills. (f) The following courses are compulsory but not credit-bearing, subject to the provisions for placement testing and exemptions: Principles of Language Use Language in Practice A Language in Practice B (g) EXEMPTIONS Students with a grade 1, 2, or 3 pass in English as a Second Language at HIGCSE (Higher International General Certificate of Secondary Education) or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Higher level or an equivalent school-leaving certificate examinations shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students with a grade 1, 2, 3, or 4 pass in First Language English at HIGCSE or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Higher level or an equivalent schoolleaving certificate examinations shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students with a grade A or a grade B pass in English as a Second Language at IGCSE or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary level or an equivalent schoolleaving certificate examinations shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students with a grade A, B, or C pass in First Language English at IGCSE or Namibia Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) Ordinary level or an equivalent school-leaving

(h)

(i)

(j)

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(k)

certificate examinations shall be exempted from Principles of Language Use, Language in Practice A, and Language in Practice B. Students who completed English Communication courses or their equivalents eight or more years previously shall not be exempted from any English course. EXIT LEVEL COURSES Exit level courses shall be: Communication Skills (CSK0420), Professional Writing (PFW0520), Professional Communication (PFC0620), or Principles of Critical Thinking (PCT121S), subject to the requirements of individual programmes. Professional Writing, Professional Communication, and Principles of Critical Thinking may be taken in any order or simultaneously depending on the student's load and major programme or orientation. TRANSITION RULES From the 2009 academic year, all full-time, part-time, and distance education students shall register for courses in English Communication according to the following table of correspondence: Corresponding New Courses Principles of Language Use (PLU0120) Language in Practice A (LPA0220) Language in Practice B (LPB0320) Communication Skills (CSK0420) Communication Skills (CSK0420) Professional Writing (PFW0520) Professional Communication (PFC0620) Principles of Critical Thinking (PCT121S)

(l) (m)

1.

Old Courses English Communication Module 1(ECM0100) English Communication Module 2 (ECM0200) English Communication Module 3 (ECM0300) English Communication Module 4 (ECM0400) Communication Skills (COM1100) English Communication Module 5 (ECM0500) English Communication Module 6 (ECM0600) Communication and Critical Thinking (CCT111S) 2.

Distance education students who shall be required to repeat courses in the old curriculum in 2009 shall register for the corresponding new courses. PROGRESSION RULES Students must pass Module 3 or Language in Practice B before they are allowed to register for Communication Skills. Students must pass Communication Skills or Module 4 or be exempted from it before being allowed to register for Professional Writing OR students must pass Communication Skills or Module 4 or be exempted from it or pass Module 5 before being allowed to register for Professional Communication OR students must pass Communication Skills or Module 4 or be exempted from it before being allowed to register for Principles of Critical Thinking. A student shall not be allowed to register for a higher course unless s/he has taken and passed a lower course or has been exempted from it. RETENTION OF SEMESTER MARK Retention of semester mark shall only be allowed for Module 4, Module 6, Communication Skills, Professional Writing, Professional Communication, or Principles of Critical Thinking, whichever is the exit module/course required for the programme that the student is enrolled in, in accordance with Rule AC4.3.6 in the Prospectus. There shall be no retention of semester mark after the Second Opportunity Examinations have been written or have lapsed. 236

1. 2.

3.

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3.

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

There shall be no retention of semester mark for phased-out courses. ASSESSMENT Semester Mark: 30% of the Final Mark Final Examination: 70% of the Final Mark A candidate will gain admission to the examination by obtaining a semester mark of at least 50%. In order to pass an English Course, a student needs a final mark of at least 50%. CURRICULA

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC MANAGEMENT

24BPMA

First Year - Certificate in Public Management Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Introduction to Public Management IPM111S None Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Basic Mathematics BMS1100 None Basic Business Statistics 1A BBS111S Introduction to Mathematics (Busines & Management) / Basic Mathematics or Grade 12 symbol B or better Introduction to Sociology ISO0100 None Language in Practice B LPB0320 English Proficiency Test And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources IPH121S None NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Basic Mathematics if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Semester 2 Public Management in Namibia PMN112S Introduction to Public Management Principles of Economics 1B PEC112S None Basic Mathematics BMS1100 None (if not yet taken) Basic Business Statistics 1B BBS112S Basic Business Statistics 1A Introduction to Political Science IPS0100 None Communication Skills CSK0420 Language in Practice B And any ONE of the following: Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Introduction to Human Resources Management HRM122S None NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Basic Mathematics if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year Semester 3 Principles of Information Systems 1A Public Human Resources Management Regional & Local Government

PIS121D PHR211S RLG211S

None Introduction to Public Management Introduction to Public Management

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Professional Writing And any ONE of the following: Intermediate Microeconomics Business Accounting 2A Organisational Behaviour PFW0520 IME211S BAC211S ORB 211S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Communication Skills Principles of Economics 1A Business Accounting 1A & 1B Intro to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management Principles of Information Systems 1A Public Management in Namibia Regional & Local Government Professional Writing Principles of Economics 1B Business Accounting 1A&1B Intro to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management

Semester 4 Principles of Information Systems 1B Public Financial Management Regional & Local Government in Namibia Professional Communication And any ONE of the following: Intermediate Macroeconomics Business Accounting 2B Organisational Management

PIS122D PFM212S RLG212S PFC0620 IME212S BAC212S ORM212S

Third Year - National Diploma in Public Management Semester 5 Public Policy PBP311S Public Management in Namibia Law for Public Managers 1A LPM111S None Development Management DMA111S Introduction to Public Management International Relations & Organisations And any ONE of the following: Applied Economic Policy Analysis Financial Management 1A Human Resources Staffing Semester 6 Organisational Theories Law for Public Managers 1B Comparative Local Government And any ONE of the following: International Trade Financial Management 1B Employee Health & Safety IRO311S AEP311S NFM111S HRS311S OTP112S LPM112S CLG112S ITT312S NFM112S EHS312S None Intermediate Microeconomics & Macroeconomics Business Accounting 2A & 2B Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management Introduction to Public Management None Regional & Local Government Principles of Economics 1A Business Accounting 2A & 2B Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology (with Development Management Specialisation) Semester 7 Comparative Public Management CPM411S Public Management in Namibia Project Planning and Management PPM411S None Research Methodology RMA411S None Research Project RPB412S Research Methodology (if not yet taken) And any TWO of the following: Economics of Namibia and SACU Countries 4A ECN411S None 238

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Regional Development Planning Management of Public Enterprises Governance and Politics in Africa RDP411S MPE411S GPA411S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Regional and Local Government Public Management in Namibia Introduction to Political Science

Semester 8 Ethics and Accountability ETA412S None Research Methodology RMA411S None (if not yet taken) Research Project RPB412S Research Methodology And any THREE of the following: Economics of Namibia and SACU Countries 4B ECN412S None Advanced Development Management ADM412S Development Management Community Development Management CDM422S Regional and Local Government Public Private Partnership Management PPM412S Public Management in Namibia NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Research Methodology/Research Project NOTE: Students who wish to register for Advanced Development Management must take note that the prerequisite for the course is Development Management. However, students may register concurrently for Development Management and the B.Tech level courses. Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology (with Regional and Local Government Specialisation) Semester 7 Comparative Public Management CPM411S Public Management in Namibia Project Planning and Management PPM411S None Research Methodology RMA411S None Research Project RPB412S Research Methodology (if not yet taken) And any TWO of the following: Regional and Local Government Finance LGP411S Regional and Local Government Regional Development Planning RDP411S Regional and Local Government Governance & Politics in Africa GPA411S Introduction to Political Science NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Research Methodology/Research Project Semester 8 Ethics and Accountability ETA412S None Research Methodology RMA411S None (if not yet taken) Research Project RPB412S Research Methodology And any THREE of the following: Regional and Local Government Personnel LGP412S Regional and Local Government Community Development Management CDM422S Regional and Local Government Environmental Management EMA412S None Advanced Development Management ADM412S Development Management Public Private Partnership Management PPM412S Public Management in Namibia NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Research Methodology/Research Project

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Additional Admission Requirements Students who have completed the National Diploma: Public Administration at the Polytechnic of Namibia or other recognised tertiary institution may register for the B.Tech: Public Management provided they also register for the following non-diploma courses. Students may register concurrently for both the B.Tech: Public Management courses and these non-diploma courses. Semester 7 (non-diploma courses) Regional and Local Government Principles of Information Systems 1A Professional Communication Basic Business Statistics 1A RLG211S PIS121D PFC0620 BBS111S Introduction to Public Management

Professional Writing Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) / Basic Mathematics or Grade 12 symbol B or better Basic Mathematics BMS1100 None NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Basic Mathematics if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Semester 8 (non-diploma courses) Principles of Information Systems 1B PIS122D Principles of Information Systems 1A Professional Communication PFC0620 Professional Writing (if not yet taken) Basic Business Statistics 1B BBS112S Basic Business Statistics 1A Basic Mathematics (if not yet taken) BMS1100 None NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Basic Mathematics if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: POLICE SCIENCE 70DPOL 1. The current National Diploma Police Science will be phased out commencing as from 2009; 2. No new students will be admitted to register for the National Diploma Police Science as from 2009; 3. First year courses will be offered for the last time in 2009, but only for students registered before 2009 who need to register or repeat such courses; 4. No retention of semester marks (third and fourth opportunity examinations) will be available to students registered for first year courses in 2009; 5. The second and third years of the National Diploma Police Science will be similarly phased out; 6. Students who are currently registered for the National Diploma Police Science must complete their qualification by the end of the academic year 2012. First Year - National Certificate: Police Science (Phased out end of 2009 ­ only available to students registered before 2009) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisite Police Studies 1A PLS111S None Investigation of Crime 1A IVC111S None Criminal Law 1A CRL111S None Criminal Procedure Law 1A CPL111S None Public Law 1A PBL111S None Communication Skills CSK0420 Language in Practice B

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Semester 2 Police Studies 1B Investigation of Crime 1B Criminal Law 1B Criminal Procedure Law 1B Communication Skills (if not yet taken) PLS112S IVC112S CRL112S CPL112S CSK0420

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Police Studies 1A Investigation of Crime 1A Criminal Law 1A Criminal Procedure Law 1A Language in Practice B

Second Year - National Higher Certificate: Police Science (Phased out end of 2010 - Not available from 2011) Semester 3 Police Studies 2A PLS211S Police Studies 1B Investigation of Crime 2A IVC211S Investigation of Crime 1B Criminal Law 2A CRL211S Criminal Law 1B Law of Evidence 1A LOE211S None Professional Writing PFW0520 Communication Skills Semester 4 Police Studies 2B Investigation of Crime 2B Criminal Law 2B Public Law 1B Professional Writing (If not yet taken) PLS212S IVC212S CRL212S PBL112S PFW0520 Police Studies 2A Investigation of Crime 2A Criminal Law 2A None Communication Skills

Third Year - National Diploma: Police Science (Phased out end of 2011 - Not available from 2012) Semester 5 Police Studies 3A PLS311S Police Studies 2B Investigation of Crime 3A IVC311S Investigation of Crime 2B Criminal Law 3A CRL311S Criminal Law 2B Professional Communication PFC0620 Professional Writing Semester 6 Police Studies 3B Investigation of Crime 3B Criminal Law 3B Professional Communication (if not yet taken) PLS312S IVC312S CRL312S PFC0620 Police Studies 3A Investigation of Crime 3A Criminal Law 3A Professional Writing 23BACF

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

Additional Admission Requirements: The prospective student must have passed Mathematics OR Accounting at Grade 12 or an equivalent level. First Year - National Certificate: Accounting and Finance Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None Financial Accounting 1A FAC111S Grade12 Accounting/ Mathematics Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Principles of Information Systems 1A PIS121D None Commercial Law 1A CML111S None Communication Skills CSK0420 English Proficiency Test 241

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NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Semester 2 Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Quantitative Methods 1 QTM112S Introduction to Mathematics Financial Accounting 1B FAC112S Financial Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1B PEC112S None Principles of Information Systems 1B PIS122D Principles of Information Systems 1A Commercial Law 1B CML112S Commercial Law 1A Communication Skills CSK0420 English Proficiency Test (if not yet taken) NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year Semester 3 Financial Accounting 2A Quantitative Methods 2A Cost and Management Accounting 2A Company Law 1A Introduction to Business Management Semester 4 Financial Accounting 2B Quantitative Methods 2B Cost and Management Accounting 2B Company Law 1B Business Ethics & Leadership

FAC 211S QTM 211S CMA211S CLW111S BMA121S FAC 212S QTM212S CMA212S CLW112S BEL112S

Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Quantitative Methods 1 Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Commercial Law 1A & 1B None Financial Accounting 1A & 1B Quantitative Methods 1 Cost and Management Accounting 2A Company Law 1A None

Third Year - National Diploma Accounting and Finance Semester 5 Financial Accounting 3A FAC311S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Cost and Management Accounting 3A CMA311S Cost & Management Accounting 2A & 2B Taxation 3A TAX311S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Auditing 3A AUD311S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Computerised Accounting 1 CAC111S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Computerised Accounting 1. Computerised Accounting 1 is offered as a year course on the distance education mode and is studied over two semesters. Semester 6 Financial Accounting 3B Cost and Management Accounting 3B Taxation 3B Auditing 3B FAC312S CMA312S TAX312S AUD312S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Cost & Management Accounting 2A & 2B Taxation 3A Auditing 3A

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Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

Fourth Year - Bachelor of Technology Additional Admission Requirements: Diploma in Accounting or equivalent Semester 7 Financial Accounting 4 FAC411S Financial Accounting 3A & 3B Accounting Information Systems 4 AIS411S Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B Management Accounting & Control 4A MAC411S Cost and Management Accounting 3A & 3B Managerial Finance 4A MAF411S Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B Research Methodology RMA411S None Research Project RPB412S Research Methodology (if not yet taken) NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Research Methodology/Research Project Semester 8 Management Accounting & Control 4B Managerial Finance 4B MAC412S MAF412S Cost and Management Accounting 3A & 3B Financial Accounting 2A & 2B Quantitative Methods 2A & 2B Research Methodology None

Research Project RPB412S Research Methodology RMA411S (if not yet taken) Financial Accounting 4 FAC411S Financial Accounting 3A & 3B (if not yet taken) Accounting Information Systems 4 AIS411S Principles of Information Systems (if not yet taken) 1A & 1B NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Research Methodology/Research Project DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Introduction of New Programmes 2007 The departments introduced new Bachelor qualifications for all its programmes in 2007. Old programmes were phased out with effect from 2007 which means that the first year of old programmes were no longer offered in 2007, while the second year were no longer offered in 2008, and the third year are no longer offered in 2009. Special Academic Regulations Progression Rule 1: A complete switch to the new curricula was implemented in 2007 for only the new intakes [first year students], and from there onward the rest of the new Bachelor curricula are systematically phased in while the old B. Tech programmes are systematically phased out, with year 2012 being the final date for the award of the B.Tech degree. Progression Rule 2: A student might not be allowed to take a higher level course(s) above his/her current level of study even if the course(s) in question have no prerequisite, and if such course(s) cannot be offered to the student on genuine academic grounds. Rules for the Award of the National Certificate in Business Studies The New National Certificate in Business Studies shall be awarded to all Business Administration students only after successful completion and credit-passes for all common

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Business Management courses in the first year plus Principles of Information Systems 1A & 1B and Principles of Economics 1A & 1B on the second year level. General Transition Rules The general transition rules for all three programmes are as follows: 1. All new enrolments/first year students as from 2007 started with the new curricula. 2. Second year students in 2007 who failed (i.e. less than 50% of credits obtained) had to switch to the new curricula in 2008. 3. Third year students in 2008 who failed (i.e. less than 50% of credits obtained) must switch to the new curricula in 2009. 4. Second year students in 2007 who have passed, continued with the old curricula, but if such students failed any of the subjects/courses in the old curricula, such failed subjects/ courses in the old curricula were only offered on new syllabi and students had to complete the new courses. 5. Third year students in 2008 who have passed, may continue with the old curricula in 2009, but if such students failed any of the subjects/courses in the old curricula, such failed subjects/courses in the old curricula will only be offered on new syllabi and students have to complete the new courses. 6. The last date for completion of the old curricula is 2012, after which the students in the old curricula must automatically switch to the new curricula and make up all outstanding courses/subjects from the new curricula. 7. Students who do not progress every year must switch to the new curricula and make up all outstanding courses/subjects from the new curricula. 8. There is no retention of semester marks for subjects/courses of which the syllabi have changed. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: (New Curriculum phased in 2007) Programme Transition Rules Course(s) Failed Equivalent (New) 21DBAD

The transition rule was applicable as from 2007 for the courses listed below: Business Management 1A & 1B (Any) Introduction to Business Management Human Resources Management 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Human Resources Management 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Marketing 1A Introduction to Marketing and its Environment Marketing 1B Marketing Principles The transition rule was applicable as from 2008 for the courses listed below : Business Management 2A Business Operations Business Management 2B Business Finance The transition rule is only applicable as from 2009 for the courses listed below: Business Management 3A Purchasing and Supply Management Business Management 3B Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A Consumer & Organisation Behaviour:Intro. Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship Small Business Management Small & Medium Enterprises Management

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CURRICULUM

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

First Year - National Certificate Business Studies (Phased in 2007) (Replaced National Certificate Business Administration that was phased out at the end of 2006) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Intro. to Marketing & its Environment MAR121S None Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources IPH121S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (Business & Management) Communication Skills CSK0420 English Proficiency Test NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Business Ethics & Leadership BEL112S None Marketing Principles MAR122S None Introduction to Human Resources Management HRM122S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Professional Writing PFW0520 Communication Skills NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year (Phased in 2008) Semester 3 Business Accounting 2A Business Operations Principles of Economics 1A Basic Business Statistics 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Professional Communication Semester 4 Business Accounting 2B Business Finance Principles of Economics 1B Basic Business Statistics 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B

BAC 211S BSO221S PEC 111S BBS111S PIS121D PFC0620 BAC212S BSF222S PEC112S BBS112S PIS122D

Business Accounting 1A & 1B None None Introduction to Mathematics None Professional Writing Business Accounting 1A & 1B None None Basic Business Statistics 1A Principles of Inform. Systems 1A

Third Year - National Diploma Business Administration (Phased in 2009) Semester 5 Consumer and Organisation Behaviour: Introduction COB321S Intro. to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles 245

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Entrepreneurship Purchasing and Supply Management Intermediate Microeconomics Commercial Law 1A Semester 6 Consumer and Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Small & Medium Enterprises Management Business Logistics and Supply Chain Management Intermediate Macroeconomics Commercial Law 1B ENT321S PSM321S IME211S CML111S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning None Business Operations Principles of Economics 1A None

COB322S

Intro. to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles None Business Operations Principles of Economics 1B Commercial Law 1A

SME322S BLM322S IME212S CML112S

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Old Curriculum phased out 2007 ­ 2009) First Year - National Certificate Business Administration (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None Business Management 1A BMA111S None Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Principles of Information Systems 1A PIS121D None English Communication Module 4 ECM0400 English Proficiency Test Semester 2: Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Business Management 1B BMA112S None Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Principles of Economics 1B PEC112S None Principles of Information Systems 1B PIS122D Principles of Information Systems 1A English Communication Module 4 ECM0400 English Proficiency Test (if not yet taken) NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 Business Management 2A Basic Business Statistics 1A Marketing 1A English Communication Module 5 And any ONE of the following: Intermediate Microeconomics Business Accounting 2A Human Resources Management 1A

BMA211S BBS111S MAR111S ECM0500 IME211S BAC211S HRM111S

Business Management 1A & 1B Introduction to Mathematics None English Communication Module 4 Principles of Economics 1A Business Accounting 1A & 1B None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 4 Business Management 2B Basic Business Statistics 1B Marketing 1B English Communication Module 6 And any ONE of the following: Intermediate Macroeconomics Business Accounting 2B Human Resources Management 1B BMA212S BBS112S MAR112S ECM0600 IME212S BAC212S HRM112S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Business Management 1A &1B Basic Business Stats. 1A None Eng Communication Module 5 Principles of Economics 1B Business Accounting 1A & 1B None

Third Year - National Diploma Business Administration (Not available in 2009) Semester 5 Business Management 3A BMA311S Business Management 2A & 2B Entrepreneurship ENT111S None Commercial Law 1A CML111S None And any TWO of the following: Applied Economic Policy Analysis AEP311S Intermediate Microeconomics & Macroeconomics Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A CBB111S Marketing 1A & 1B Financial Management 1A NFM111S Business Accounting 2A & 2B Intermediate Microeconomics IME211S Principles of Economics 1A (if not yet taken) Human Resources Management 1A HRM111S None (if not yet taken) Business Accounting 2A BAC211S Business Accounting 1A & 1B (if not yet taken) Semester 6 Business Management 3B Small Business Management Commercial Law 1B And any TWO of the following: International Trade Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Financial Management 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics (if not yet taken) Human Resources Management 1B (if not yet taken) Business Accounting 2B (if not yet taken) BMA312S SBM112S CML112S ITT312S CBB112S NFM112S IME212S HRM112S BAC212S Business Management 2A & 2B Entrepreneurship Commercial Law 1A Principles of Economics 1A Marketing 1A & 1B Business Accounting 2A & 2B Principles of Economics 1B None Business Accounting 1A & 1B 21 DMRK

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: MARKETING (New Curriculum, phased in 2007)

Programme Transition Rules: Course(s) Failed Equivalent (New) The transition rule was applicable as from 2007 for the courses listed below Business Management 1A & 1B (Any) Introduction to Business Management Human Resources Management 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Human Resources Management 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Marketing 1A Introduction to Marketing and its Environment Marketing 1B Marketing Principles

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

The transition rule was applicable as from 2008 for the courses listed below (for first and second year students only) Practice of Selling 1A & 1B (Any) Principles of Selling Practice of Sales Management 1A & 1B Sales Operations & Management (Any) Marketing 3A & 3B Services Marketing The transition rule is only applicable as from 2009 for the courses listed below Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1A Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Intro. Consumer and Buyer Behaviour 1B Consumer & Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Electronic Marketing E- Marketing & Web Management Marketing 2A & 2B Marketing & Product Management Marketing Communication Strategy 1A & 1B (Any) Marketing Communication Strategy Marketing Research Practice 1A & 1B (Any) Marketing Research & Market Intelligence First Year - National Certificate Business Studies (Phased in 2007) (Replaced National Certificate Marketing and Sales that was phased out at the end of 2006) Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Semester 1 Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Intro. to Marketing & its Environment MAR121S None Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources IPH121S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (Business & Management) Communication Skills CSK0420 English Proficiency Test NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Business Ethics & Leadership BEL112S None Marketing Principles MAR122S None Introduction to Human Resources Management HRM122S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Professional Writing PFW0520 Communication Skills NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year (Phased in 2008) Semester 3 Principles of Selling Services Marketing Principles of Economics 1A

POS221S SSM221S PEC111S 248

None Intro. to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Basic Business Statistics 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Professional Communication Semester 4 Business Finance Sales Operations & Management Principles of Economics 1B Basic Business Statistics 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B Professional Communication (If not yet taken) BBS111S PIS121D PFC0620 BSF222S SOM222S PEC112S BBS112S PIS122D PFC0620

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Introduction to Mathematics None Professional Writing None Marketing Principles None Basic Business Statistics 1A Principles of Inform. Systems 1A Professional Writing

Third Year - National Diploma Marketing (Phased in 2009) Semester 5 Consumer and Organisation Behaviour: Introduction COB321S Intro. to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles E-Marketing & Web Management EWM321S Intro. to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles Entrepreneurship ENT321S None Marketing Research & Market MRI321S Intro. to Marketing & its Intelligence Environment and Marketing Principles Commercial Law 1A CML111S None And any one of the following: Basic German 1A or GER110S None Basic Portuguese 1A BAP111S None NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Basic German 1A and Basic Portuguese 1A. Semester 6 Consumer and Organisation Behaviour: Analysis Marketing Communication Strategy Marketing & Product Management COB322S MCS322S MAR322S Intro. to Marketing and its Environment and Marketing Principles Intro. to Marketing & its Environment and Marketing Principles Intro. to Marketing & its Environment & Marketing Principles

Small & Medium Enterprises Management SME322S None Commercial Law 1B CML112S Commercial Law 1A And any one of the following: Basic German 1B or GER120S None Basic Portuguese 1B or BAP112S None NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for Basic German 1B and Basic Portuguese 1B.

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NATIONAL DIPLOMA: MARKETING (Old Curriculum phased out 2007 - 2009) First Year - National Certificate Marketing and Sales (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None Marketing 1A MAR 111S None Practice of Selling 1A POS111S None Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Principles of Information Systems 1A PIS 121D None English Communication Module 4 ECM0400 English Proficiency Test NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Semester 2 Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Marketing 1B MAR112S None Practice of Selling 1B POS112S None Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Principles of Information Systems 1B PIS122D Principles of Information Systems 1A English Communication Module 4 ECM0400 English Proficiency Test (if not yet taken) NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year - National Higher Certificate Sales Management (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 Marketing 2A MAR211S Marketing 1A &1B Practice of Sales Management 1A PSM111S Practice of Selling 1A & 1B Basic Business Statistics 1A BBS111S Introduction to Mathematics English Communication Module 5 ECM 0500 English Communication Module 4 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A BMA111S None Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Semester 4 Marketing 2B Practice of Sales Management 1B Basic Business Statistics 1B English Communication Module 6 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Principles of Economics 1B MAR212S PSM112S BBS112S ECM0600 BMA112S PEC112S Marketing 1A & 1B Practice of Selling 1A &1B Basic Business Statistics 1A English Communication Module 5 None None

Third Year - National Diploma Marketing (Not available in 2009) Semester 5 Marketing 3A MAR311S Marketing 2A & 2B Entrepreneurship ENT111S None Marketing Communication Strategy 1A MCS111S Marketing 1A & 1B

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Consumer & Buyer Behaviour 1A Commercial Law 1A Semester 6 Marketing 3B Small Business Management Marketing Communication Strategy 1B Consumer & Buyer Behaviour 1B Commercial Law 1B CBB111S CML111S MAR312S SBM112S MCS112S CBB112S CML112S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Marketing 1A & 1B None Marketing 2A & 2B Entrepreneurship Marketing 1A & 1B Marketing 1A & 1B Commercial Law 1A

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (New Curriculum phased in 2007) 21DHUR Programme Transition Rules Course(s) Failed Equivalent (New)

The transition rule was applicable as from 2007 for the courses listed below Business Management 1A & 1B (Any) Introduction to Business Management Human Resources Management 1A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Human Resources Management 1B Introduction to Human Resources Management Marketing 1A Intro. to Marketing & its Environment Marketing 1B Marketing Principles The transition rule was applicable as from 2008 for the courses listed below Human Resources Management 2A Organisational Behaviour Human Resources Management 2B Organisational Management Business Management 2A Business Operations Business Management 2B Business Finance The transition rule is only applicable as from 2009 for the courses listed below Human Resources Management 3A Human Resource Staffing Human Resources Management 3B Employee Health and Safety Industrial Relations 1A & 1B (Any) Industrial Relations Management of Training 1A Introduction to Education Training and Development Management of Training 1B Principles of Education, Training and Development Small Business Management Small & Medium Enterprises Management First Year - National Certificate Business Studies (Phased in 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Intro. to Marketing & its Environment MAR121S None Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources IPH121S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (Business & Management) Communication Skills CSK0420 English Proficiency Test NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent.

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Semester 2 Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Business Ethics & Leadership BEL112S None Marketing Principles MAR122S None Introduction to Human Resources Management HRM122S None Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Professional Writing PFW0520 Communication Skills NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol on Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year - (Phased in 2008) Semester 3 Organisational Behaviour Basic Business Statistics 1A Professional Communication Labour Law 1A Principles of Economics 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Semester 4 Organisational Management Basic Business Statistics 1B Professional Communication (if not yet taken) Labour Law 1B Principles of Economics 1B Principles of Information Systems 1B

ORB211S BBS111S PFC0620 LAL111S PEC111S PIS121D ORM212S BBS112S PFC0620 LAL112S PEC112S PIS122D

Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management Introduction to Mathematics Professional Writing None None None Intro. to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management Basic Business Statistics 1A Professional Writing Labour Law 1A None Principles of Inform. Systems 1A

Third Year - National Diploma Human Resources Management (Phased in 2009) Semester 5 Entrepreneurship ETN321S None Business Operations BSO221S None Human Resource Staffing HRS311S Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management Introduction to Education Training & Development ETD321S None Organisational Development and Change ODC311S Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management Semester 6 Business Finance Employee Health and Safety Industrial Relations BSF222S EHS312S IRL322S None Organisational Behaviour and Organisational Management Labour Law 1A & 1B

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Principles of Education, Training & Development Small and Medium Enterprises Management PTD322S SME322S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning None None

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (Old curriculum phased out 2007 - 2009) First Year (Not available from 2007) Semester 1 Course Title Introduction to Mathematics Human Resources Management 1A Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A English Communication Module 4

Course Code Prerequisites ITM111S None HRM111S None BMA111S None BAC1100 None PEC111S None ECM0400 English Proficiency Test

Semester 2 Introduction to Mathematics ITM111S None (if not yet taken) Human Resources Management 1B HRM112S None Business Management 1B BMA112S None Business Accounting 1B BAC1200 None Principles of Economics 1B PEC112S None English Communication Module 4 ECM0400 English Proficiency Test (if not yet taken) NOTE: Candidates may apply for exemption from Introduction to Mathematics (Business & Management) if they have obtained at least a B symbol in Ordinary level Mathematics or equivalent. Second Year (Not available from 2008) Semester 3 Human Resources Management 2A Business Management 2A Management of Training 1A Labour Law 1A Principles of Information Systems 1A Semester 4 Human Resources Management 2B Business Management 2B Management of Training 1B Labour Law 1 B Principles of Information Systems 1B

HRM211S BMA211S MOT111S LAL111S PIS121D HRM212S BMA212S MOT112S LAL112S PIS122D

Human Resources Man. 1A & 1B Business Management 1A & 1B None None None Human Resources Man. 1A & 1B Business Management 1A & 1B None Labour Law 1A Principles of Inform. Systems 1A

Third Year - National Diploma Human Resources Management (Not available in 2009) Semester 5 Human Resources Management 3A HRM311S Human Resources Man. 2A & 2B Business Management 3A BMA311S Business Management 2A & 2B Industrial Relations 1A IRL111S None English Communication Module 5 ECM0500 English Comm. Module 4

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 6 Human Resources Management 3B Business Management 3B Industrial Relations 1B English Communication Module 6 HRM312S BMA312S IRL112S ECM0600

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Human Resources Man. 2A & 2B Business Management 2A & 2B None English Comm. Module 5 25DOMT

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

The Department: Office Management and Technology offers all courses on the full-time, parttime and distance education modes. Information Administration consists of practical and theoretical parts. A minimum of ten students should be registered for any specific course. Practicals Practicals are required for Information Administration. Attendance Students registered on the distance education mode for any of the courses in Information Administration are required to attend compulsory vacation schools during January, April, July and August of each year. Students registered for Speech and Deportment are required to attend compulsory vacation schools in April and August. Admission Requirements In addition to the Polytechnic's general admission requirements the following shall apply: Students who wish to register for Information Administration 1A on the distance education mode, should be able to type a minimum of 20 words per minute. A pass in Language in Practice A (LPA0220) of the English Proficiency Test, which is a prerequisite for Language in Practice B (LPB0320), taught to first year students, is also a requirement. Students who only gain entry into LPA0220 could also be admitted, but will be required to advance to LPB0320 before their third year of study. Students with a C symbol in English at Ordinary level may be admitted prior to receiving the outcome of their English Proficiency Test, but they will also be required to advance to LPB0320 before their third year of study. Mature age students with at least a Grade 10 certificate, or equivalent, or candidates with foreign qualifications, may be admitted in terms of the Polytechnic's Mature Age Entry Scheme. Selection for mature age entry will be by means of appropriate written entrance tests, three years work experience, satisfactory references and passing of the Polytechnic English Proficiency test. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY (Phased in 2007) Exit Levels The National Certificate: Office Management and Technology after successful completion of at least one year of study. The National Diploma: Office Management and Technology after successful completion of three years of study.

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

Transition Rules The transition from the existing to the new diploma will involve that, if not yet taken, students should register for Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources and Introduction to Human Resources Management. Business Accounting 1A & 1B and Business Accounting 2A & 2B , which are pre-requisites for an elective at the Bachelors level. Special Progression Rules for Information Administration Progression from one Information Administration course to the next is allowed only in the event of a student having satisfied the pass requirement in a formal examination for these courses. All practical and theoretical papers of a course should be written in the same examination session. Pass Requirements Information Administration 1, 2 and 3 A student passes the examination if s/he obtains an average final mark of 50% or more, subject to the sub-minimum of 35% per examination paper. The final mark consists of 50% of the semester mark and 50% of the examination mark. NATIONAL DIPLOMA: OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY First Year - National Certificate Office Management and Technology Semester 1 Course Title Course Code Prerequisites Information Administration 1A IAD111S None Administrative Office Management 1A AOM121S None Speech and Deportment 1A SDP111S None Introduction to Business Management BMA121S None Communication Skills CSK0420 Language in Practice B Semester 2 Information Administration 1B Administrative Office Management 1B Speech and Deportment 1B Business Ethics and Leadership Second Year Semester 3 Information Administration 2A Administrative Office Management 2A Introduction to Psychology of Human Resources Professional Writing And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Business Operations Semester 4 Information Administration 2B Administrative Office Management 2B Introduction to Human Resources Management IAD112S AOM122S SDP112S BEL112S Information Administration 1A None None None

IAD211S AOM221S IPH121S PFW0520 LPT111S BAC1100 PEC111S BSO221S IAD212S AOM222S HRM122S 255

Information Administration 1A & B Administrative Office Management 1A & B None Communication Skills None None None None Information Administration 2A Administrative Office Management 2A None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Professional Communication And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Business Finance PFC0620 LPT112S BAC1200 PEC112S BSF222S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Professional Writing Legal Practice 1A None None None

Third Year - National Diploma: Office Management and Technology Semester 5 Information Administration 3A IAD311S Information Administration 2A & B Administrative Office Management 3A AOM321S Administrative Office Management 2A & B Public Relations 1A PRL311S None And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1A LPT111S None Commercial Law 1A CML111S None Principles of Economics 1A PEC111S None Intermediate Microeconomics IME211S Principles of Economics 1A Business Accounting 1A BAC1100 None Business Accounting 2A BAC211S Business Accounting 1A & B Business Operations BSO221S None Semester 6 Information Administration 3B Administrative Office Management 3B Public Relations 1B And any ONE of the following: Legal Practice 1B Commercial Law 1B Principles of Economics 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics Business Accounting 1B Business Accounting 2B Business Finance IAD312S AOM322S PRL312S LPT112S CML112S PEC112S IME212S BAC1200 BAC212S BSF222S Information Administration 3A Administrative Office Management 3A Public Relations 1A Legal Practice 1A Commercial Law 1A None Principles of Economics 1B None Business Accounting 1A & 1B None 25DIAD

National Diploma: Information Administration (Old curriculum phased out end of 2006) First Year Semester 1 Course Title Information Administration 1A Office Administration 1A Speech and Deportment 1A English Communication Module 4 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Legal Practice 1A Semester 2 Information Administration 1B Office Administration 1B

Course Code Prerequisites IAD111S None OAD111S None SDP111S None ECM0400 English Communication Module 3 BMA111S BAC1100 PEC111S LPT111S IAD112S OAD112S 256 None None None None Information Administration 1A None

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Speech and Deportment 1B And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Legal Practice 1B Second Year Semester 3 Information Administration 2A Office Administration 2A English Communication Module 5 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Intermediate Microeconomics Legal Practice 1A Business Management 2A Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A Semester 4 Information Administration 2B Office Administration 2B English Communication Module 6 And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics Legal Practice 1B Business Management 2B Business Accounting 2B Commercial Law 1B Third Year Semester 5 Information Administration 3A Office Administration 3A Secretarial Public Relations 1A And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1A Business Accounting 1A Principles of Economics 1A Legal Practice 1A Business Management 2A Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A Intermediate Microeconomics Applied Economic Policy Analysis Business Management 3A SDP112S BMA112S BAC1200 PEC112S LPT112S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning None None None None Legal Practice 1A

IAD211S OAD211S ECM0500 BMA111S BAC1100 PEC111S IME211S LPT111S BMA211S BAC211S CML111S IAD212S OAD212S ECM0600 BMA112S BAC1200 PEC112S IME212S LPT112S BMA212S BAC212S CML112S

Information Administration 1A & 1B Office Administration 1A & 1B English Communication Module 4 None None None Principles of Economics 1A None Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Information Administration 2A Office Administration 2A English Communication Module 5 None None None Principles of Economics 1B Legal Practice 1A Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A

IAD311S OAD311S SPR311S BMA111S BAC1100 PEC111S LPT111S BMA211S BAC211S CML111S IME211S AEP311S BMA311S

Information Administration 2B Office Administration 2A & 2B None None None None None Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 1A & 1B None Principles of Economics 1A Intermediate Micro & Macroeconomics Business Management 2A & 2B

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Semester 6 Information Administration 3B Office Administration 3B Secretarial Public Relations 1B And any ONE of the following: Business Management 1B Business Accounting 1B Principles of Economics 1B Legal Practice 1B Business Management 2B Business Accounting 2B Commercial Law 1B Intermediate Macroeconomics International Trade Business Management 3B IAD312S OAD312S SPR312S BMA112S BAC1200 PEC112S LPT112S BMA212S BAC212S CML112S IME212S ITT312S BMA312S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Information Administration 3A Office Administration 3A Secretarial Public Relations 1A None None None Legal Practice 1A Business Management 1A & 1B Business Accounting 2A Commercial Law 1A Principles of Economics 1B Intermediate Micro & Macroeconomics Business Management 2A & 2B 27BHMN

BACHELOR OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

Description The Bachelor of Hospitality Management is aimed at equipping students with necessary advanced knowledge, expertise and strategic skills necessary for upper-level managerial jobs, such as hotel general managers and divisional managers,. The students may also opt to develop and run their own hospitality businesses. Admission The programme is aimed at individuals who have completed a National Diploma in Hospitality Management. BACHELOR OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Fourth Year Semester 7 Course Title Research Methodology Hospitality Research Project (if not yet taken) Hospitality Operations Management Strategic Management in Hospitality & Tourism Managing Human Resources in Hospitality and Tourism Organisations Semester 8 Financial Management in Hospitality & Tourism Developing and Managing 27BHMN

Course Code Prerequisites RME410S None HRP420S Research Methodology HOM410S SMH410S MHR410S Rooms Division Management/ Food & Beverage Management None Human Resource Management 1 (Hospitality and Tourism)

FMH420S

Financial Control I

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Small Hospitality Property DMH420S

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning Rooms Division Management & Food and Beverage Management & Strategic Management in Hospitality & Tourism & Management. Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism

Strategic Marketing in Hospitality & Tourism SHT420S Marketing 1 (Hotel and Tourism) Research Methodology RME410S None (if not yet taken) Hospitality Research Project HRP420S Research Methodology NOTE: Vacation Schools are compulsory for students enrolled for all of the above courses. BACHELOR OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 27BTTM

The Bachelor of Travel and Tourism Management is aimed at providing students with a holistic understanding of the elements of travel and tourism within the social, economic and cultural fabric of society, appreciation of the relationships among the various elements of the industry, as well as the ability to apply appropriate evaluative and management strategies to situations involving travel and tourism. Admission The programme is aimed at individuals who have completed the National Diploma in Travel and Tourism Management. BACHELOR OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT Fourth Year Semester 7 Course Title Research Methodology Tourism Research Project (if not yet taken) Strategic Management in Hospitality & Tourism Tourism Policy & Planning Managing Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism Organisations Semester 8 Ecotourism Planning & Management Financial Management in Hospitality & Tourism Strategic Marketing in Hospitality and Tourism Research Methodology (if not yet taken) Tourism Research Project 27BTTM

Course Code Prerequisites RME410S None TRP420S Research Methodology SMH410S TPP410S MHR410S None None Human Resource Man 1 (Hospitality and Tourism)

EPM420S FMH420S SHT420S RME410S TRP420S

None Financial Control 1 Marketing 1 (Hotel & Tourism) None Research Methodology

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning 27BNAT

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: NATURE CONSERVATION

The Bachelor of Technology: Nature Conservation study programme focuses on the attributes that will help equip high potential entry-level employees with relevant managerial and research skills. In particular, the programme concentrates on improved productivity and effective management of natural and human resources including finances. Admission The programme is aimed at individuals who have completed the National Diploma Natural Resources Management in Nature Conservation or related field, with at least one year practical experience. Curriculum Tuition will be offered through the distance education mode and will extend over two academic years. There will be four compulsory courses, one co-requisite course (for students who have no previous training in this course), and three compulsory practicals. Practicals In view of the pre-requisite for practical sessions, students must register for Plant Studies IV (Module A), Resource Management IV (Module A), Conservation Management I and Research Methodology in the same year. Students must pass the practical evaluation at the end of such practical session with a minimum of 50%. Students are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs. BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY: NATURE CONSERVATION Fourth Year Course Title Co-requisite Courses: Computer Usage (Nature Conservation) Compulsory Courses: Plant Studies IV (Module A) Resource Management IV (Module A) Conservation Management I Research Methodology Practical Component: Seminar Research Project Practical 1 Practical 2 Fifth Year Plant Studies IV*** (Module B) Financial Management I (Nature Conservation) Management Principles I** (Nature Conservation) Plus any ONE of the following: Resource Management IV*** (Module B) Community-Based Natural Resource Management Course Code Prerequisites RGB111N PSO411Z RMM451U CVM112Y REM531Z SEM171N PRO101N BTN001P BTN002P PSO421Y FMN451Z POM191R RMM461T CBR410Y Plant Studies IV (Module A) None None Resource Management IV (Module A) None None None None None None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Practical Component: Practical 3 Practical 4 (Optional) * BTM003P BTN004P

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning None None

Tuition for the fourth and the fifth year will be offered through the distance education mode only and will extend over two academic years. ** Students will receive lecture notes for Management I and will be credited with Management Principles I (Nature Conservation). ** * Oral Examination CERTIFICATE: COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CBNRM

This certificate focuses on the attributes that will equip high potential entry-level practitioners of community-based natural resource management with relevant managerial and research skills. The study programme concentrates on improved productivity and effective management of natural and human resources. Admission Requirements Any person may be admitted to this study programme if s/he is in possession of a diploma/ degree in the field of Natural Resources Management (Nature Conservation, Agriculture, Land Management and/or any other related field). Examination Requirements A year mark of 50% is required for admission to examinations where applicable. All courses require a final mark of at least 50% to pass. Curriculum Tuition will be offered through the distance education mode and will extend over one academic year. The CBNRM course offered in the Bachelor of Technology (Nature Conservation) programme is the same as for this certificate and the course will run concurrently as one course. Practical Students must pass the practical evaluation at the end of the practical session with a minimum of 50%. The practical session will be for more or less one week (face-to-face). Students are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs. A fee is payable for meals, if provided by the institution. CURRICULUM CERTIFICATE: COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Course Title Community Based-Natural Resource Management Practical 4 Research Project Course Code Prerequisites CBR410Y BTN004P PRO101N None None None 27CNRM

CERTIFICATE: NAMIBIAN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION (NEEC) This certificate is an introductory Environmental Education (EE) study programme for adults who wish to know more about applying environmental education in their community or work. The NEEC is most valuable to people who are involved with EE and those who intend to become involved in EE. The NEEC is a competence-based study programme and therefore aims to help students develop practical, foundational and reflexive competencies. 261

Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

Centre for Open and Lifelong Learning

Admission Requirements There are no minimum qualifications needed to join the study programme, however participants must be proficient in spoken and written English. In addition, a pre-course assignment is a requirement along with the application. Preference for selection will be given to those people who have firm links with environmental education, either in a community or work context. Assessment Requirements Assessment will be continuous and outcomes-based. Students need to continually reflect on their participation and professional development. Assessment is done through a review of: · Draft and final versions of written assignments; · Group work and presentations; and · A portfolio of work. Evidence of learning will be obtained from students' assignments, participation in group settings and critical self-reflection. Tuition and Delivery Mode Tuition will be offered through the distance education mode and will extend over one academic year. Students need to attend four compulsory face-to-face contact sessions/vacation schools. Students are further encouraged to form study groups with fellow participants in the same region. Within study groups, students will do group activities and support each other's learning. CURRICULUM NAMIBIAN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATE Course Title Our Environment: Issues, risks and responses Developing, implementing and evaluating environmental education curriculum, programmes and resources Environmental education approaches: theory and practice Course Code OEM101Y DIE101Y EEA101Y 27NEEC Prerequisites None None None

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Prospectus for Undergraduate Studies 2009

LIBRARY SERVICES L1

Library Services

General The Library is a social and emotionally engaging centre for learning and experience. Our vision is to provide resources that support learning, teaching, research and creative expression by providing timely and effective access to information and services to the broad Polytechnic Community, resulting in the improvement of institutional outcomes. Library hours Days Monday - Friday Saturday Sunday Public Holidays External Study Area Monday - Sunday 05:00 - 00:00 NB: Hours of opening vary during different times of the year. Notices communicating this information are usually displayed at the Library entrance and on the website (http://www.polytechnic.edu.na/library/library.htm). Semester 08:00 - 22:00 08:00 - 13:00 14:00 - 20:00 Closed Vacation 08:00 - 17:00 Closed Closed Closed

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L3

Services The Library provides the following facilities and services: · General Collection: Academic books, reference books, audio-visuals, periodicals and newspapers. · Study Collection: Prescribed texts that can only be used for 2 hours in the Library. It is located on Level 4. · Group Study Areas: Can be booked for 3 hours/day. Booking can be done at the Reference Desk on Level 4. · Study Carrels: Can be booked for a day by graduate and postgraduate students, as well as lecturers, for a day. Booking can be done at the Reference Desk on Level 4. · Multimedia Lab: Facilities to view CD-ROMs, DVDs and videos · Student Lab: Where students can do their assignments. Located on Level 4. · Photocopy facilities: On Levels 2, 3 & 4. · Inter-library Loans: Enables access to resources in other libraries, which is not available in your own library. Contact the ILL Officer for more information in this regard at Tel. 2072092. · Namibiana Collection: Publications about Namibia or published by Namibians. · Internet Café: Only for Polytechnic students. · Online databases: Full-text journals and books. · Library Tours: Can be booked at the User Services Librarian, Level 3. · User Education: Learn how to search for information and how to use the online databases by booking a Library Information Skills class with the Subject Librarians on Level 3 and 4

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L4 Library regulations

Library Services

L4.1 Membership All registered students and staff of the Polytechnic are automatically members of the Library. All Polytechnic students will be requested to fill in a form with their biographical details before they can take out books. Registered students and staff of UNAM can also become members of the Library by producing their staff/student cards and by completing a Library registration form. UNAM students will have to pay a deposit with registration. This money will be refunded in part or in full depending on whether the student has outstanding fines or books with the Library. Persons not included in any of the above categories may become members of the Library, subject to the approval of the User Services Librarian. They are required to complete the Library registration form and upon acceptance pay the following applicable non-refundable annual fee: Library usage with no loan privilege = N$70.00 One book per visit = N$190.00 Two books per visit = N$330.00 Three books per visit = N$460.00 L4.2 Borrowing privileges · Own student/staff cards and outside user cards must be produced whenever Library materials are borrowed. No items will be issued on another person's card. · The following number of items may be borrowed simultaneously: Polytechnic Students 6 14 days Polytechnic Staff 10 30 days UNAM Students 3 14 days UNAM Staff 3 30 days Outside Users 1/2/3 14 days · The loan period may be extended in person, telephonically (Tel. 2072022/2621) or via e-mail ([email protected]), provided another user does not require the book. · Issued library materials must either be returned or renewed before the end of each loan period. · All items must be returned at the desk where it was issued from, i.e. Circulation, Multi Media or Study Collection. · Newspapers are to be read in the Periodical Section and are not to be taken out. · No borrower may lend library materials to or on behalf of any other person. Borrowers assume full responsibility for the use and return of library materials and have to pay the Polytechnic for any loss or damage. · A fine, as determined from time to time, is payable in respect of items renewed or handed in late. · The library reserves the right to recall library materials at any time. L5 Library Rules · All borrowers are responsible for any materials checked out on their user cards. · Students should report a lost student card as soon as possible so that their Library account can be blocked. · Using another patron's user/membership card is prohibited and a serious offence. · All Library materials should be returned / renewed before the end of the loan period, otherwise a fine is applicable and no further loans are permitted.

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· · · · · · · · · L6

Library Services

Study Collection items are to be used inside the Library for a two hour period and are NOT to be taken out. An hourly fine (or part thereof) is applicable for late returns. Replacement valued, as determined by the Librarian, should be paid for any lost or damaged items. Make sure all Library items in your possession are issued before you leave the Library. Unauthorized removal of Library items shall result in strict disciplinary action and a large fine. Students found in possession of unauthorized or stolen Library material will be blocked from taking out Library material until a disciplinary hearing has taken place. NO person shall make noise or cause a disturbance in the Library and hold public meetings or demonstrations inside the Library. NO smoking, eating (including chewing gum) or drinking are permitted in the Library. ALL cellular phones MUST be switched OFF when entering the Library and shall not be used at any time inside the Library. Any person not adhering to the abovementioned rules shall be fined.

Library Security Library items are protected against unauthorized removal by an electronic book detection system. When a Library item is removed illegally an alarm will sound, upon which the item must be returned to the security desk. Please note, leaving the Library building with unauthorized library materials (not issued) is regarded as a serious offence and will lead to a large spot fine and a disciplinary hearing. Further information Brochures are available in the Library for newcomers or any other persons wishing to acquaint themselves with Library services and procedures. Librarians are to be consulted whenever help is needed.

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COMPUTER SERVICES

Computer Services

Mission · As a unit, Computer Services provides a broad Information Technology service to the Polytechnic community. Some of the duties include: · The operation of a central computer system providing information processing for the following departments: Students records, academic administration, finance, personnel, space management, asset control, library and the transport section. · Personal computers, peripherals, Network operation and software support/acquisition. · Technical validation of purchases for information technology related equipment. · Implementation of the latest information technology products. STAFF Director: Executive Secretary: Manager (Network): Manager (ITS systems): Manager (Data Centre): Manager (PC Support): Webmaster: Systems Administrators: Mr. Laurent Evrard, M.Sc. (EPITA, Paris) Ms. Loise Kafita Mr. Calvin Mouton Ms. Marsha Cawood Mr. Gabriel Rukoro Mr. Breyten Mouton Mr. Romeo Sinkala Ms. Foibe Kalipi Ms. Victoria Hasheela Statistician: Mr. Reino Ihemba Systems developer: Mr. Oretu Kavari ITS Support Officer: Ms. Juanita Frans PC Support Officer (main campus) Mr. Franco Bandlow, Mr. Philander Muyunda, Mr. Derick Fredericks Junior PC Support (main campus) Mr. Ivan Isaacks Trainee PC Support (Main campus) Ms. Nelsia Zakapi PC Support Officer (Library) Mr. Paulo de Almeida, Mrs. Magreth Tjingaete, Junior PC Support (Library) Ms. Pelinawa Sakues, Mr. Waldo Gertze PC Support Officer (Engineering) Mr. Mario Tripodi Junior PC Support (Engineering) Mr. Allastair Ellitson PC Support Officer (Science & Tech) Mr. John Archer Information technology situation at the Polytechnic The Polytechnic has always acquired the most reliable technology on the market. The central administrative system, called the ITS system, allows students and staff to register, to consult marks, financial statements, examination timetables among others, via any computer connected to the Internet. Namibia's first gigabit Ethernet network was implemented in 1998 at the Polytechnic. To date, more than 2000 devices are connected to the network. Africa's only full Tucows mirror at this time (including all the available modules) started its operations in 2000. It can be reached via the following URL: http://www.tucows.com. The Bureau of Computer Services is also hosting two of Africa's largest public ftp servers, which can be reached at ftp://ftp.polytechnic.edu.na and at ftp://ftp2.polytechnic.edu.na. They both contain very useful and popular Free / Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) packages. In August 2007, the these two servers contained more than 2,5 Tb of programs.

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Computer Services

Other sites of interest hosted at the Polytechnic: A mirror of the Massachussets Institute of Technology's OpenCourseWare program, located at http://ocw.polytechnic.edu.na A mirror of the Gutenberg project, with free books offered for e-consulation, located at ftp:// ftp2.polytechnic.edu.na/pub/gutenberg A free GIS software, GRASS, located at http://grass.polytechnic.edu.na A complete repository of Ubuntu Linux, located at: ftp://ftp.polytechnic.edu.na/pub/ubuntu Lots of other operating system, installation, patches and other programs, such as Fedora, RedHat, Suse, OpenSUSE, FreeBSD, Gentoo, Mozilla, OpenOffice, Apache, and many more. Many computer laboratories are reserved for IT classes. Each lab boosts, in average, about 25 PCs and all of them (1104 of them as at 10 August 2007) are linked to the campus network. The library is also well equipped and contains free access labs and an internet section. A centralised printing solution for all students should be in place on campus early 2008. Internet/E-mail is present through two internet links of 1 Mbits / second each, thus giving redundancy. Internet access is open to students from the computer labs. Apple and Open Source based computers are available in the Library for student use. Two very helpful IT services are available free of charge to all registered students: Free web-based e-mail and student web. The web-based e-mail service is not only very similar to other web-based services, it also scans all mails against viruses, and it also filters most spam. The student web allows each student to access its student records, financial statement, examination timetable and other very useful information. For instructions on how to access these two services, log on to the site: http://students.polytechnic.edu.na from any computer connected to the Internet. Please take note that forgotten passwords shall be replaced subject to the payment of a fee. Wireless services were in their final testing phase in September 2007. Student cards are provided by the card system's office on the lower ground of the Office Building. Please take note that previously registered students have to return their student cards during first semester registration before being issued with a new one. Failure to return the previously issued student card shall lead to the payment of the prescribed replacement fee.

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OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS GENERAL INFORMATION AND STUDENT SERVICES

Ofice of the Dean of Students

The Office of the Dean of Students provides quality students services and programmes to the diverse Polytechnic student population. The quality of services and programmes are studentcentered which provide a healthy environment to learning. These services include Health Services, Social Services, Counseling and HIV/AIDS Coordination, Job placement Services, Accommodation, Sport and Culture, and Hostel and Kitchen Services. Furthermore, the Office of the Dean of Students provides leadership and supervisory support to both the Academic and Residential Sections of the Polytechnic. The aim is to promote services and programmes relevant to students' development throughout their academic studies, and, above all, to facilitate and encourage student extra-curricular activities, appreciation of cultural differences, and academic excellence. STUDENTS SERVICES 1. Polytechnic Health Services: The Polytechnic Health Services provide primary health care and ensures a good quality of life for students. It focuses on the prevention of illness, promotion of a healthy life style and general hygiene. It provides the following health development workshops: (1) Family planning (2) Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI's). It also provides the following health development programme: (a) First Aid Training. The Polytechnic Health Services is adjacent to Shangri-la student hostel. It opens from 7:30 a.m. to 16:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. The nurse is on stand-by over the weekends for emergencies. The Health Services unit has a full-time nurse. 2. Social Welfare Services: The Social Welfare Services focuses on social problems and promotes good mental health for students. It provides the following social welfare development workshops: (1) Violence against women and children (2) Alcohol and substance abuse (3) Relationships and date rape (4) Stress management and (5) Self-esteem. It also provides the social welfare programme: (a) New student orientation. 3. Student Counseling and HIV/AIDS Coordination Services: The Student Counseling and the HIV/AIDS Coordination Services provides academic and HIV/AIDS counseling. It incorporates counseling as a helping relationship and as a means of psychological interventions. It provides both individual and group counseling. It provides the following academic development workshops: (1) Study skills and (2) Student leadership. It also provides the following academic development programmes: (a) HIV/AIDS Awareness Campaign (b) HIV/AIDS peer counseling training. Counseling is therefore provided to facilitate positive growth and development amongst students. 4. Job Placement Services: This section provides students with career guidance. It incorporates counseling as helping relationship and counseling as the means of psychological intervention. Job placement service provides the following career guidance development workshop: (1) CV Writing. It also provides the following career guidance programmes: (a) Career fair (b) Mock interviews

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5. Accommodation, Sport and Culture

Ofice of the Dean of Students

Hostel accommodation provides quality living quarters. There are three (3) hostels with a capacity of 390 beds. There are two (2) female hostels and one (1) male hostel. The three (3) Hostel Superintendents are assisted by ten (10) Housing Committee (HC) members. Sport activities provide students with a well balance and stimulating extra-curricular environment. It provides a platform for students to participate in a variety of sports. Students are encouraged to explore their sport talents. The trophy award ceremony recognizes both sport and cultural achievements. Cultural activities provide students with a platform to express their cultural heritage. Extra-curricular activities are vital to each student's education. The cultural festival is a week long event of fun an entertainment, which culminates in the crowning of Miss and Mr. Polytechnic. 6. Hostel and Kitchen Service This section provides students with a wide range of nutritional meals served at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Menus are planned in conjunction with the menu committee. This section also ensures a clean living environment, maintenance of hostel and kitchen facilities. Each residential hall is supervised by a superintendent. The HC members are elected by students each year to assist the superintendents with the overall operation of the residential services and the general well-being of students. The Polytechnic has three residential halls. The ladies' residences are Monresa and Höpker and, the men's hostel is Shangri-La. Total accommodation of about 391 is provided. 7. Meals Residential students eat in the same dining hall which is supervised, managed and maintained by the Hostel Manager. The latter is also responsible for the overall food services and kitchen operation. The dining hall is well furnished. The kitchen is well equipped with competent kitchen staff who prepare food on a daily basis. Student Representative Council (SRC) The SRC is the highest student's representative body elected annually by students in accordance with the SRC Constitution. The aim of the SRC is to represent all sections of the student community, including fulltime, part-time, and distance education students. Representation is one of the most important functions of the SRC. Students are represented on a number of Committees, such as Polytechnic Council, Senate, and the Boards of Studies. Since the SRC is entrusted with issues and activities to represent students, their programme reflects a healthy balance of recreational and academic activities.

8.

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SR: STUDENT REGULATIONS

Ofice of the Dean of Students

NOTE: The final interpretation of these Regulations shall be vested in the Council. SR1. RULES AND CONDUCT

SR1.1 Subordination to the rules On signing the registration form, a student binds himself/herself to obey all the legal provisions and rules of the Polytechnic, and it is the student's duty to become acquainted with such legal provisions and rules. Ignorance of such legal provisions shall not establish a defense. In this regard, The Polytechnic Act, the Statutes, all the Calendars and Prospectuses, the rules and prescriptions of Council, Senate, Boards of Studies, Departments, the Rector's pronouncements or those of any other authorized official or body are important. SR1.2 Conduct Students shall: 1.2.1 pursue the mission of the Polytechnic; 1.2.2 be primarily dedicated to their studies; 1.2.3 refrain from acts of misconduct, as defined in the Student Disciplinary Regulations; 1.2.4 refrain from any conduct or action which results or may result in the inconvenience of any other students in their studies or being prejudiced in any other way; 1.2.5 refrain from undisciplined or improper behaviour towards personnel members; 1.2.6 immediately notify the Registrar in writing of any change of address (any letter, communication, parcel, etc. directed to students at their latest recorded addresses shall be deemed to have been received by the students); 1.2.7 comply with the rules regarding dress code; 1.2.8 be subject to the traffic and parking rules of the Polytechnic; 1.2.9 refrain from smoking, eating and drinking during lectures, practical classes, examinations, tests or in any place where smoking is prohibited. SR2 STUDENT ACTIVITIES

SR2.1 Orientation Programme 2.1.1 An orientation programme, specifically aimed at new students takes place at the beginning of the academic year. 2.1.2 All students registered at the Polytechnic for the first time, are required to participate in this programme. SR2.2 Sports and Culture 2.2.1 In order to promote the total development of students, the Polytechnic facilitates sports and cultural facilities. 2.2.2 The Dean of Students is responsible for exercising control over and co-ordinating and promoting sports and culture at the Polytechnic as determined in the relevant Regulations. SR2.3 Religious or party-political associations 2.3.1 The Students Representative Council or any association or club at the Polytechnic shall give no official or financial support - directly or indirectly - to any political party or external religious organisation. Student association or club shall be an association or club as constituted in terms of section 4(2) of the Students Representative Council constitution.

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2.3.2 2.3.3

Ofice of the Dean of Students

No offices of political parties or external religious organisations shall be permitted on campus. Subject to the provisions of paragraph SR 2.4, no political-party meetings shall be held on campus; a political-party meeting in terms of this provision shall be deemed to be any public meeting under the auspices of a political party.

SR2.4 Outside persons as speakers on campus 2.4.1 Any recognised students association or club wishing to invite external persons to speak on campus, shall notify the Students Representative Council thereof at least one week prior to the invitation. The SRC shall thereupon, in due time prior to the speaker's address, notify the Dean of Students. 2.4.2 The provision in SR2.4.1 shall apply mutatis mutandis in the event that the Students Representative Council wishes to invite external persons to speak on campus. 2.4.3 The Dean of Students or the Rector or any person or body appointed by the Rector has the right to interdict the function in the event that it would unduly interfere with the normal functioning of the Polytechnic. SR2.5 The use of notice boards, conducting of meetings and functions and distribution of publications 2.5.1 Individual students or student associations and clubs may use notice boards and conduct meetings or gatherings on the premises of the Polytechnic only with the approval of the Student Representative Council, the Dean of Students, the Officer for Accommodation, Sport, and Culture. 2.5.2 After the necessary permission has been obtained in terms of the above paragraph a student may affix such document, poster or publication only on designated notice boards and may not write, scratch or paint in any way on walls, pillars or any other parts of the campus buildings or structures. 2.5.3 No students, club or association may, without the SRC's permission, publish, affix, display or distribute any document, poster or publication of any official nature whatsoever on the premises of the Polytechnic, or, using the name of the Polytechnic, publish, affix, display or distribute it elsewhere, or contribute towards doing so. 2.5.4 No room or other terrain of the Polytechnic may be used for meetings or functions without prior permission from the responsible person or institution. SR2.6 Journeys, educational tours, and camps Journeys, educational tours, and camps for which arrangements are made in the name of the Polytechnic, may only be organised with the permission of the Dean of Students or respective Dean of School and for this purpose the procedures contained in the Tour Regulations must be complied with. SR2.7 Students Representative Council 2.7.1 The Students Representative Council is elected annually by the students of the Polytechnic as determined by the SRC Constitution. 2.7.2 The SRC, within the framework of its powers, and in collaboration with the Dean of Students, is entrusted with matters concerning students. 2.7.3 In the absence of a constituted SRC, or when the SRC, in the opinion of the Rector, does not act in the interest of students, the SRC's functions may be carried out by the Rector or any person or body appointed by the Rector.

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SR3 PERSONAL

Ofice of the Dean of Students

SR3.1 Dress Students shall be dressed appropriately and neatly at lectures, and official gatherings on and off campus. SR3.2 Personal care A student is responsible for the maintenance of a high standard of personal hygiene and care. SR3.3 Pregnancy and parenthood 3.3.1 No pregnant student is allowed to stay in the Polytechnic hostel from the 13th week of pregnancy. 3.3.2 The Polytechnic will not be held liable for any pregnant student. Note: Any complication and risk during the pregnancy. Due to insufficient facilities the Polytechnic cannot accommodate child birth and premature labour. Pregnant students must provide a medical certificate regarding their pregnancy status. 3.3.3 No children of students may reside in a Polytechnic hostel. SR4 MISCELLANEOUS

SR4.1 Contagious diseases If a student has suffered from a contagious disease or has been in contact with such a disease, a medical certificate, stating that the student may be at the Polytechnic without any danger of contaminating others, must be submitted to the Registrar. SDR. SDR1 1.1 STUDENTS DISCIPLINARY REGULATIONS GENERAL PROVISIONS On signing the registration form of the Polytechnic, students undertake to acquaint themselves with all relevant regulations, rules, prescriptions and legal provisions of the Polytechnic. Ignorance of any such provision shall not be advanced as a defense on a charge of misconduct. Words indicating the singular may also implicate the plural. A student shall not formally be charged with misconduct before a written and signed statement containing a charge, complaint or allegation against the student has been handed to the accused. The initiator who laid a charge may institute or have instituted a preliminary investigation into a charge, complaint or allegation which has been presented to such a person or into a student's conduct which has been such that it could possibly amount to misconduct. In the preliminary investigation, consultations may be held, or information obtained, from any person, including the student against whom the charge, accusation or allegation has been instituted. The Rector or his/her appointee may, if in the best interest of the Polytechnic, suspend a student against whom a charge, accusation or allegation has been instituted for a determined period by, i.e. prohibit the student from: Entering any premises or hostel of the Polytechnic, or any part thereof; Exercising any rights or privileges a registered student enjoys. The Rector, or his/her appointee, may at any time cancel a suspension; provided that notwithstanding such cancellation, the hearing of the charge of misconduct may be continued.

1.2 1.3 1.4

1.5 1.5.1 1.5.2 1.6

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1.7

Ofice of the Dean of Students

1.8

When the chairperson of a disciplinary committee, (before that disciplinary committee has reached a ruling on the charge against a student), is of the opinion that the relevant charge should rather be heard by a committee on another level, the hearing may be suspended and referred to the Rector for a ruling. The Rector may rule that the disciplinary committee shall continue with the hearing or that it shall be referred to another disciplinary committee. This other disciplinary committee will conduct a complete hearing. If a disciplinary committee, Council, the Rector or a person appointed by the Rector, temporarily or permanently deprives a student of any rights or privileges which students enjoy, or suspends the student temporarily or expels the student, such a student shall forfeit all rights to repayment, reduction or remission of fees paid by or payable to the Polytechnic. DEFINITION OF MISCONDUCT A student is guilty of misconduct when such conduct is prejudicial or could be prejudicial to the good name of the Polytechnic, or the maintenance of order and discipline at the Polytechnic or the proper execution of work at the Polytechnic, inter alia, if such a student: Infringes any act, regulation, rule, or prescription of the Polytechnic, or makes an attempt to do so; Refuses to comply with any rightful instruction or request by any lecturer or official of the Polytechnic or acts in contradiction to such instructions or requests; Wrongfully and in a blameworthy manner usurps, uses, damages, destroys or alienates any property of the Polytechnic, a personnel member or a fellow student or applies or handles it in such a way that it is prejudicial or could be prejudicial to the Polytechnic, a personnel member or fellow student; Is on any Polytechnic premises whilst under the influence of liquor or drugs (dependence-producing drugs), or without written permission from the Rector or authorized representative: Brings alcoholic beverages or drugs onto the premises of the Polytechnic, consumes them or has them in their possession; or serves or consumes alcoholic beverages or drugs on campus during a gathering of a student association or student body of the Polytechnic or during Polytechnic journeys, educational tours, camps, and assignments. Note: Proof of being "under the influence of alcohol" will be determined by the use of an appropriate breath analyser, (maximum limit is 0,08 ml of alcohol per 100 ml blood). Proof of "under the influence of drugs" will be determined by utilizing an appropriate blood test. Refusal to undergo such a breath analyser test or blood sampling as well as refusing to be searched properly by the appropriate authorities are serious offences.

SDR2

2.1 2.2 2.3

2.4

2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8

Intimidates whether by word or deed fellow students and staff on or off the campus. Behaves in a violent, riotous, obscene or improper manner on or in any premises of the Polytechnic or elsewhere during a gathering by or of the student body of the Polytechnic or a portion/group thereof. Behaves in an insulting, obscene or improper manner towards a fellow student or personnel member of the Polytechnic, a management body or office of the Polytechnic or a member of such a body or office-holder of such office; Knowingly makes false or incorrect statements to any personnel member of the Polytechnic; or purposefully spreads false information about the Polytechnic to any person; 273

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2.9 (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 SDR3 3.1 3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 3.1.4

Ofice of the Dean of Students

Is guilty of misconduct which is the cause of or can reasonably be the cause of any one of the following instances, either where such cause was foreseen or could have been foreseen as a reasonable possibility at the time of the poor conduct: Implicating the good name of the Polytechnic to the disadvantage of the Polytechnic Prejudicing or endangering the maintenance of order, discipline and safety at the Polytechnic Prejudicing or endangering the smooth course of tuition, research, administration or general activities at the Polytechnic Divulging confidential Polytechnic information. Dishonoring the National Symbols of the country. Organising or participating in student action, which interferes with or could interfere with the academic work of fellow students, or with the functioning of the Polytechnic; Bringing, possessing or handling a fire-arm or any other dangerous weapons, explosives or fuel which is not reasonably required for the operation of a machine, on campus; Assisting or encouraging other students to commit an offence; Injuring the dignity of or physically assaulting, or mentally wronging or humiliating any personnel member or fellow student; Failing to comply with any hostel rule; Let any person sleep over in their hostel rooms after 10.00 pm during weekdays or after midnight during weekends. Is dishonest or attempts to be dishonest in any test, assignment or examination. Gives flat/room keys to any other person. Removes furniture without the permission of his/her superintendent. Commits plagiarism. CLASSIFICATION OF MISCONDUCT Depending on the seriousness or degree of misconduct, misconduct by students is divided into the following categories: Academic related misconduct: the Student's Disciplinary Committee: Academic, hears misconduct of an academic nature, having a bearing on the studies of a student. Non-academic related misconduct (serious cases): the Student Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic, hears cases of serious misconduct.. Non-academic related misconduct (less serious cases): the Hostel Disciplinary - or the SRC Disciplinary Committee shall hear cases of misconduct of less serious nature. Non-Academic related misconduct (specific to club/house/society/cultural): the Disciplinary committee of the club, houses and culture societies or association concerned shall be competent to hear less serious charges related to their specific situation. NOTIFICATION A student charged with any form of misconduct shall be notified of such complaints in writing at least seven days before the hearing by the relevant disciplinary committee; provided that any such student may waive this period. Any such notice shall contain the charge in full as well as stipulating the particular disciplinary committee which will hear the charge, and the time and place of the hearing. Written notice of a charge shall be regarded as being properly served if it was posted or delivered by hand to the student concerned to the address provided on the registration form. In case of serious charges or where the student is a minor, a copy of the charge shall be sent to the parents of the student concerned per registered post at the address provided by the student on the registration form. 274

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4.5 4.6

Ofice of the Dean of Students

Any notice sent or delivered in the manner prescribed in these Regulations shall be considered as having been received by the person to whom it was addressed. Preference will be given to hand delivering such notices. When students neglect or refuse to attend a hearing they can be heard in absentia and the proceedings shall not be invalid as a result of the absence of the accused person. DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEES AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Students Disciplinary Committee: Academic The chairperson of the committee may apply one or more of the following disciplinary measures against a student who has been found guilty of serious misconduct: (a) The revocation of a qualification obtained by improper methods (b) The suspension as a student for a period determined by the chairperson (c) The cancellation of examination results (d) The refusal of registration for examination for a specified period (e) A warning (f) Any other measures which the chairperson deems appropriate; Provided that no such disciplinary measures shall be put into operation against a student or if such a student is a minor, the parents or guardian have been notified in writing of the alleged contravention and the student has been afforded a proper opportunity to make a written statement and to appear personally before the Students Disciplinary Committee: Academic. Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic When the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non - Academic finds a student guilty of misconduct, one or more of the following penalties may be imposed by the chairperson: (a) Suspension from the Polytechnic or a hostel for a period not exceeding the present academic period and one further academic year (b) Imposition of a fine, the student will pay or the amount of nights the person stayed over (c) Demanding of any such financial amount as may be necessary to compensate for any damage, loss or expense caused by the action of the accused (d) Cancellation of privileges of the student as a member of the Polytechnic for not more than one year (e) Imposition of a specific task (f) Warning and/or reprimand (g) Recommendation to the Rector that the student be suspended from the Polytechnic or a hostel for a period exceeding the period stated in paragraphs (a) and (d) (h) Any other penalty, which the Student Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic thinks fit in the specific circumstances. The accused will be informed before any hearing regarding the procedure of the Students Disciplinary Committee: Academic and the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic, as well as appeal procedures. Division of functions Except where the context otherwise indicates, the Registrar shall deal with matters of the Students' Disciplinary Committee: Academic and the Dean of Students shall deal with matters of the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic.

SDR5 5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

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5.5 5.5.1

Ofice of the Dean of Students

5.5.2

5.5.3 5.5.4

Procedure of disciplinary hearings The parties involved will be: The accused The representative of the accused The chairperson (who will make the judgment) Advisors to the chairperson The initiator (who will investigate and present the charge) Witnesses If the Registrar/Dean of Students is of the opinion that there are reasonable grounds for a charge of misconduct against a student and that the conduct of the student concerned is apparently of a serious nature, a written charge shall be formulated and a hearing shall be convened by the Students Disciplinary Committee: Academic, when the charge has a bearing on the studies of the student, or when the charge does not have a bearing on the student's studies, a hearing by the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic. The disciplinary committee concerned shall hear a student to whom proper notice has been given of the charge in accordance with section SDR4 of these Regulations at the time and place as mentioned in the notification. At the commencement of the hearing the charge shall be put to the student who shall have the opportunity to plead to the charge, provided that such a student shall also have the right to hand in a written statement in explanation of this plea. Representation The accused may appoint a representative to assist him/her during the proceedings, providing the representative is a registered student and this representative should preferably be a SRC member. The Registrar/Dean of Students may not institute the case against the student, but a personnel member must be appointed to do so on behalf of the Polytechnic. The Rector must identify an alternative chairperson if the Registrar/Dean of Students is involved in the case or institutes the case. Procedure during hearing The procedure to be followed during a specific hearing shall be in accordance with general disciplinary hearing principles providing the provisions of these Regulations, and although the formal rules of the Law of Evidence are not applicable to the hearing, the accused shall inter alia have the right to: (a) Give evidence (b) Call witnesses or have witnesses called (also by the representative) (c) Cross-examine the witnesses who have testified against the student or have them cross-examined (d) Cross-examine own witnesses or have them cross-examined (e) After all evidence has been given, argue the case or have it argued by the representative (f) After conviction presents evidence in mitigation of punishment; If an accused student admits guilt in respect of the charge, the chairperson of the disciplinary committee may decide whether or not evidence regarding the charge is required. The person (initiator) who cites the case against the accused inter alia may: (a) Examine the person or persons who testify against the accused (b) Cross-examine the accused that has testified, as well as any person or persons who have testified for the accused (c) Argue the case after all evidence has been given but before the accused or the representative was afforded the opportunity to argue the case.

5.6 5.6.1 5.6.2

5.7 5.7.1

5.7.2

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5.7.5

The chairperson of a disciplinary committee will be the only one making the final judgment, although he/she may be assisted with advice by the other committee members, as provided for in this document. The Registrar/Dean of Students shall appoint a staff member to keep a record of the proceedings at the hearing and of all evidence given there by means of a tape recording and/or in writing. Such person shall not be a member of the disciplinary committee. The minutes of the proceedings shall be kept safely for at least two years. Unless the Chairperson of the relevant disciplinary committee determines otherwise, the hearing shall take place in camera and the proceedings of that disciplinary committee shall not be published. Appeal The Students Appeal Committee: Non-Academic, compiled as stipulated in the statutes of the Polytechnic, shall hear the appeal cases of the students against findings of the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic and conclude the case on behalf of Council whilst appeal cases of academic nature will be referred to the Council Appeal Committee. A student may appeal against the conviction and/or penalty. A student shall give the chairperson written notice of appeal not later than five (5) calendar days after being notified in writing of the decision of the disciplinary committee against which committee's decision appeal is made. In the notice of appeal, the grounds for the appeal shall be fully stated. The student may appoint a representative to assist him/her in the formulation of grounds for appeal. (See SDR5.6.1) On receiving the notice of appeal, the chairperson shall forward it immediately to the Rector who shall submit it to the Students Appeal Committee: Non-Academic or Council Appeal Committee. On considering the appeal, the Students Appeal Committee: Non-Academic or Council Appeal Committee may decide which procedure it thinks most fit in the circumstances. The Students Appeal Committee: Non-Academic or any other council Appeal Committee may in part or in whole accept, or reject or amend the conviction of the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic or the Students Disciplinary Committee: Academic and/or the sentence and may impose any of the prescribed sentences which it thinks fit. GENERAL HOSTEL AND SRC DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE The General Hostels Disciplinary Committee Complaints Complaints about less serious misconduct (which may include repeated minor misconduct) on the hostel premises or transgression of a hostel regulation shall be taken up with or made by the Superintendent of the relevant hostel. Compilation of the General Hostels Disciplinary Committee The General Hostels Disciplinary Committee shall consist of a superintendent of a hostel of the Polytechnic, in which the accused does not reside and the two chairpersons or nominees of house committees or nominees from the housing committee members, as advisors. The superintendent shall serve as chairperson for the disciplinary committee and be responsible for the final decision. Disciplinary measures The General Hostels Disciplinary Committee may impose one or more of the following disciplinary measures:

5.8 5.8.1

5.8.2 5.8.3

5.8.4 5.8.5 5.8.6 5.8.7

SDR6 6.1 6.1.1

6.1.2

6.1.3

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(a) Suspension of the student from the hostel of residence for a period not exceeding the remainder of the calendar year with or without a recommenda tion that the student be denied re-admission to a Polytechnic hostel for the following calendar year (b) Imposition of a fine not exceeding N$100.00 (c) Demand any such financial amount as may be necessary to compensate for any damage, loss or expense caused by the action of the student (d) Cancellation of privileges of the student to participate in any student activity for a period not exceeding the remainder of the calendar year (e) Warning and/or reprimand (f) Imposition of a task (g) Cancellation of any privileges of the student or the position held in the student community 6.2 6.2.1 The SRC Disciplinary Committee Complaints Complaints about students' transgressions of the SRC rules shall be taken up with or made by a member of the SRC appointed by the SRC President. This initiator shall institute the charge against the student, on behalf of the SRC. Compilation of the SRC Disciplinary Committee The SRC Disciplinary Committee shall consist of the SRC President (as the chairperson of the hearing) and two other SRC members nominated by the SRC members as advisors. Disciplinary measures The SRC Disciplinary Committee may impose one or more of the following disciplinary measures: (a) Imposition of a fine not exceeding N$100.00 (b) Cancellation of privileges of the student to participate in any student activity for a period not exceeding the remainder of the calendar year (c) Warning and/or reprimand (d) Imposition of a task (e) Cancellation of a leadership position held by the student in the student community Procedure of mentioned Disciplinary Committees examining misconduct The prescriptions of sections SDR5.7 shall mutatis mutandis be applicable to a hearing by any mentioned disciplinary committee examining misconduct. Disciplinary measures shall take effect immediately after imposition thereof. The accused shall have the right to appeal against a ruling of a disciplinary committee on a charge of less serious misconduct. The appeal shall be lodged in accordance with section SDR5.8.3 and the chairperson shall forward the appeal to the Dean of Students who will initiate the Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic to serve as appeal committee. The Hostels Disciplinary Committee or SRC Disciplinary Committee shall compile and submit a report on the proceedings, the ruling of the disciplinary committee and the disciplinary measures which were imposed to the Dean of Students in any case. The Students Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic, as the appeal hearing body, has power of review inter alia that he/she: (a) May further investigate a case (b) May re-investigate and/or reconsider the penalty imposed

6.2.2

6.2.3

6.3 6.3.1 6.3.2 6.3.3

6.3.4 6.3.5

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6.3.6 SDR7 7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4

(c) May confirm, amend or set aside any ruling and/or penalty of such a disciplinary committee and may take any steps which he/she deems fit (d) May, where necessary, determine the procedure to be followed at the review of a hearing or penalty (e) May determine that the penalty shall not take effect prior to the review of the case. The decision of this committee will be final. DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF HOUSES, CLUBS AND CULTURAL SOCIETIES Functioning of the Disciplinary Committees of Houses, Clubs and Cultural Societies Procedure Complaints shall be taken up with or made by a member of the appropriate committee of a house committee or management of a hostel, house, club or cultural society. The chairperson of the appropriate house, club or cultural society shall arrange a hearing by the disciplinary committee of the relevant students group. The chairperson shall also appoint a registered hostel student when applicable or a member of the specific body to institute the charge against a student (this will be the initiator). The prescriptions of paragraphs SDR6.3.1 to SDR6.3.5 shall mutatis mutandis be applicable to such hearing. If a student is dissatisfied with the ruling of such a disciplinary committee, he/she may, not later than five (5) days after the announcement of the findings, appeal to the Student Disciplinary Committee: Non-Academic, which shall conclude the case in accordance with section SDR6.3.3 up to SDR6.3.6. The student will forward the appeal form to the Dean of Students. Compilation The disciplinary committee of a house, club or cultural association shall consist of the chairperson (also as chairperson for the hearing) and at least two management members (as advisors). Disciplinary measures The disciplinary committee referred to in this paragraph, may impose one or more of the following disciplinary measures: (a) A fine not exceeding N$50.00 (b) Warning and/or reprimand (c) Cancellation of privileges of the student to participate in any student activity of the house, club or association for a period not exceeding the remainder of the calendar year (d) Imposition of a task. ADMISSION OF GUILT Summary action in the case of an admission of guilt When a person with whom a charge of less serious or minor misconduct has been instituted against a student, is of the opinion that the student should be given an opportunity to make an admission of guilt prior to a hearing of a disciplinary committee of the charge against such a student a report on the alleged misconduct shall be submitted to the initiator of such a case. The initiator may decide not to afford the student such an opportunity, in which case the report shall be returned with a corresponding note to the person who instituted the charge, so that a disciplinary committee may continue with the hearing. If the initiator decides to afford the student the opportunity to make an admission of guilt, a written notice shall be sent to the student, containing the following particulars: 279

7.1.5 7.1.6

7.1.7

7.1.8

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8.1.3.1 The time, place and nature of the alleged misconduct; 8.1.3.2 That an admission of guilt may be lodged within seven days from the date of the notice and that such admission of guilt will not be weighed against the student; 8.1.3.3 That the student is under no circumstances compelled to make such admission of guilt; 8.1.3.4 Possible measures to be imposed should an admission of guilt be made; 8.1.3.5 That a failure to make an admission of guilt will not be held against the student during a possible later hearing; 8.1.3.6 The chairperson of the disciplinary committee will decide on a penalty. 8.1.4 The disciplinary committee will meet and decide to accept the admission of guilt and the committee has the power to impose any measures as described in appropriate sections of these regulations regarding the penalties allowed for that specific disciplinary committee. GHR GENERAL HOSTEL REGULATIONS These Regulations shall be applicable to all hostels of the Polytechnic.

GHR1 CONTROL OF HOSTELS 1.1 Subject to the authority of the Rector, the control of hostels shall be exercised by the Dean of Students, the relevant Superintendent of the hostel and the House Committee. 1.2 The powers of the House Committee and the way in which it is elected are defined in the constitution of each hostel. The Dean of Students shall approve the constitution of the hostel. 1.3 The responsibility for meals and linen shall be vested in the Hostel Manager. The House Committee shall bring complaints in this regard to the attention of the Senior Matron. 1.4 The Dean of Students, the Superintendent, and the House Committee shall deal with matters concerning students conduct and discipline within the prescriptions of these regulations. GHR2 ORGANISATION 2.1 The organisation of the hostels is divided into supervisory and management functions. 2.2 The Dean of Students, the Superintendents and the House Committees shall be responsible for supervision. 2.3 The management of the hostels shall be done by the Hostel Manager: Hostel and Catering Services. 2.4 The duties of the Hostel Superintendent shall inter alia include: 2.4.1 to act as advisor for individual students regarding their welfare 2.4.2 to promote a high academic and moral standard in the hostel 2.4.3 to maintain the image of the Polytechnic and to protect the interest of the Polytechnic 2.4.4 to ensure that the rules and regulations of the hostel and the Polytechnic are complied with 2.4.5 to ensure the smooth running of the hostel in general and to report on the same to the Dean of Students 2.4.6 to issue such hostel rules as are deemed necessary from time to time and to which all resident students or visitors are subject. 2.5 Through their conduct students shall maintain and extend the good reputation of the hostel. 2.6 Students and other residents shall be compelled to carry out and/or comply with all decisions, commissions and rules taken, issued or put into operation by Council or its delegate(s) from time to time regarding the hostels in general or a hostel in particular.

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GHR3 FUNCTIONS 3.1 As far as hostels are concerned, the rendering of hostel services to resident students during the course of the year, excluding vacations. This includes the following: provision of meals provision of furniture and equipment rendering of cleaning and laundry services 3.2 An additional function of the hostels is accommodation for delegates to congresses and vacation schools. GHR4 ADMISSION TO HOSTELS 4.1 Applications for admission to hostels must be made on the prescribed form, obtainable from the Registrar. 4.2 The Superintendent first screens the applications before the House Committee assists the Superintendent in the allocation of rooms to students. 4.3 Application for admission to hostels for the following year closes on 30 September of each year. 4.4 Late applications will be considered if accommodation is available. 4.5 After the Polytechnic has accepted applications for hostel accommodation, the applicants subject themselves to the relevant rules of the Polytechnic. 4.6 Students who have failed an academic year, forfeit their place in the hostel, but may apply to be placed on a waiting list for re admission should accommodation become available. 4.7 No part-time students will be accommodated in the Polytechnic Hostels. Note: Student on experiential training who are registered full-time are allowed to stay in the hostel. 4.8 The Polytechnic reserves the right to, at its discretion, refuse application for admission to a hostel, including present hostel residents' applications, or to terminate hostel accommodation of a student on the following grounds: 4.8.1 misconduct on any premises of the Polytechnic, of which a student has been found guilty; 4.8.2 poor academic performance; 4.8.3 adaptation problems in the hostel; 4.8.4 continuous infringement of rules; 4.8.5 insubordination; 4.8.6 willful damage to property; 4.8.7 improper or obscene behavior; 4.8.8 any other grounds in the opinion of the Dean of Students or the Rector. GHR5 PLACEMENT IN HOSTELS 5.1 Choice of room-mates will be respected as far as possible. 5.2 All requests regarding room-switching after students have been placed must be directed in writing to the House Committee for consideration. GHR6 FEES 6.1 Hostel fees All hostel fees are payable to the Polytechnic. The fees are determined by Council from time to time. 6.2 6.2.1 6.2.2 Hostel deposit Hostel deposit and breakage fees shall be paid during registration. The deposit and breakage feel will be refunded on a pro rata basis.

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6.3 6.3.1 6.3.2 6.3.3

Ofice of the Dean of Students

Liability for fees on leaving the hostel Hostel fees are calculated per study period and a student must direct a written notice to the Bursar before the end of a term if he/she does not intend to use hostel accommodation for the next term. A student remaining at the Polytechnic, who leaves the hostel at any date after commencement of the academic year and before the last day of a term, must pay the fees for the full term. In cases of termination due to death or serious illness, fees will be levied pro rata in respect of the actual period of hostel accommodation.

GHR6.4 BREAKAGE 6.4.1 Before students move into a room, they must be satisfied that the room and its contents are in good order and, if necessary, report any defects to the Superintendent. This is also applicable to students switching rooms during the course of the year. 6.4.2 Reporting Breakage and damage to buildings and furniture must be reported immediately to the House Committee which will report it to the Superintendent. The Superintendent records full particulars of such cases in a book kept for this purpose. Assessment of damage The Superintendent requests the Hostel Manager to assess the damage and to have it repaired, and the Hostel Manager submits an account in settlement of the costs to the Hostel Management Committee. This committee submits the account to the Bursar, who will levy the relevant damage. Liability for damage Resident students are individually and jointly liable for damage done in a hostel. The person responsible for the damage must pay for the damage done. Where the Superintendent cannot identify the person responsible for the damage, the entire room, floor, flat, block or hostel, as the case may be, may be held responsible for the damage, unless proof can be furnished that circumstances (e.g. the elements) or specific persons from outside are responsible for the damage. Recovery of damage On application by the Hostel Management Committee, the Bursar makes arrangements that an account is sent to the student(s) for the repair costs. If an account for breakage is not settled within two months, the relevant person will be debited and the examination results will be retained until the account has been settled in full. Security Every student receives a key to her/his flat. It is the responsibility of every student to lock the flat/room door whenever she/he enters or leaves the flat.

6.4.3

6.4.4

6.4.5

6.4.6

GHR7 GATE 4 (SMALL GATE TO THE LADIES HOSTEL) 7.1 The smaller gate to the ladies hostel must always be manned by a security guard. 7.2 This gate must be opened at 07:00 and again locked at 22:00 during weekdays and until 24:00 on Saturdays and Sundays. 7.3 Residents of the ladies hostels are free to come in and leave the gate at all times. 7.4 Visitors are allowed between the opening time and closing time (07:00 until 22:00). 7.5 All visitors, including male hostel students, must leave by 22:00 during weekdays and 24:00 on Saturday and Sundays. 7.6 Students must show their student cards when visiting the ladies' residence.

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Visitors' names must be recorded in the register. The room number to be visited must also be included.

GHR8 CLOSING AND RE-OPENING OF HOSTELS 8.1 The hostels close for the vacation after breakfast of the day following the closing of the Polytechnic and reopen with dinner on the day prior to the reopening of the Polytechnic. 8.2 A student suspending his studies or who does not attend lectures anymore, must leave the hostel within a day after having attended the final lecture. 8.3 A student who does not sit for any examination must leave the hostel within one day after the closure of lectures. 8.4. A student writing examinations must leave the hostel within one day after the final paper. 8.5 All students must vacate Polytechnic hostel during June and December recess. GHR9 SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS REGARDING ACCOMMODATION 9.1 No provision is made for the accommodation of semester and year students during the June and December vacations, unless otherwise approved by the Dean of Students. 9.2 At the beginning of the year, House Committee members may reside in the hostel from such dates as may be determined by the Superintendent or the Dean of Students in consultation with the Manager: Hostel and Catering Services. 9.3 During vacations, accommodation may be offered to students groups, pupils and delegates to conferences and workshops. The fees for accommodation during vacations are determined by the Bursar. Applications for accommodation are approved by the Hostel Management Committee. A day tariff, as determined by the Bursar, will be paid to hostel personnel who do approved additional official duty during vacations. The direct expenditure (including additional salaries) will be calculated against the income received. Only registered students of a hostel may stay in a hostel overnight. A student with a complaint should report this to a member of the House Committee, who will refer it to the Chairperson of the House Committee if necessary. The chairperson will, if unable to deal with it, refer the complaint to the Superintendent. The Superintendent or an authorised person may inspect any room in a hostel at any reasonable time.

9.4 9.5 9.6

GHR10 VACATING HOSTELS 10.1 Any student wishing to vacate a hostel permanently must complete the necessary cancellation form which also serves as a claim form for the refund of the hostel deposit and submit it to the Bursar. As soon as a resident student moves into a room, any defects must immediately be reported to the Superintendent. 10.2 If a resident student vacates the hostel permanently at the end of a term, that student, together with the Superintendent, must inspect the condition of the room and equipment. On failure to do so, such a student will be liable for damage which may be discovered at a later stage. GHR11 DRESS 11.1 Hostel students must always be dressed appropriately and neatly and in accordance with the internal hostel rules. 11.2 Property of hostel students, especially clothes, must be properly marked.

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GHR12 QUIET AND STUDY TIMES 12.1 A student must behave in such a way as to facilitate the studying of fellow-students at all times. Quiet and study times must be adhered to as defined in the internal rules. It is the duty of the House Committee to ensure that all students are always able to study in the hostel. 12.2 During weekends, students are expected to conduct themselves in such way as not to offend fellow students and immediate neighbors. GHR13 PARKING OF VEHICLES No hostel student may keep any vehicle on the hostel premises without the written consent of the Dean of Students. Parking of Vehicles is often at owner's risk. GHR14 WEAPONS No student may possess any explosives, petrol or dangerous weapons in the hostel or during Polytechnic journeys, educational tours, camps, and assignments. GHR15 CASES OF ILLNESS 15.1 All cases of illness and casualties must be reported to the House Committee and the Superintendent or Matron. 15.2 No doctor may be sent for without the knowledge of the Superintendent, House Committee or Matron. 15.3 The Superintendent or Matron must report cases of contagious diseases to the Dean of Students without delay. GHR16 MEETINGS 16.1 Meetings held on campus should be conducted in consultation with the Dean of Students. 16.2 No political meetings are permitted on the hostel premises. 16.3 No person who is not a resident student may address students on the hostel premises without the consent of the Rector or the Dean of Students. GHR17 CONDUCT TOWARDS PERSONNEL 17.1 Hostel students may in no way interfere with the activities of the hostel personnel or direct requests to them or give them orders. 17.2 Any complaints concerning the personnel and general complaints regarding laundry and food must be handed in at the House Committee. The House Committee must report these to the Superintendent. 17.3 Where necessary, the Dean of Students may also be contacted. GHR18 MAINTENANCE AND USE OF BUILDINGS, PREMISES AND FURNITURE 18.1 It is the responsibility of all resident students to keep the hostel premises and buildings clean and tidy. 18.2 No posters, notices or any defacement may be fixed to the walls of the buildings. No objects may be nailed to walls. Notices must appear only on notice boards and be signed by a House Committee member. 18.3 Students may not make any alterations to electric wiring. 18.4 The illicit use of fire-hoses and other fire fighting apparatus in the hostel is prohibited. 18.5 No bicycle or other vehicles or parts thereof may be kept in the rooms. 18.6 Bulbs are kept in stock by the Superintendent and on the handing in of a fused bulb, this will be replaced. 18.7 Flat keys can be obtained from the Superintendent at a fixed tariff. 18.8 No Polytechnic equipment may be removed from rooms, recreation halls, dining rooms or lounges.

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18.9 18.10 18.11

On occasions such as house functions and house meetings the House Committee may make appropriate arrangements as it thinks fit and on its own responsibility. No food may be prepared in hostel rooms. A student may not keep any pets or other animals in or at the hostel. In addition to any disciplinary measures which may be taken, a student will forfeit the privilege of keeping a radio or similar device should its usage cause any offence.

GHR19 DINING ROOMS 19.1 Superintendents and House Committees are responsible for the maintenance of good order in the dining rooms. 19.2 Smoking is prohibited in dining rooms at all times. 19.3 Meals are served at the times determined by the Hostel Management Committee. 19.4 Furniture, food, or equipment may not be removed from the dining rooms. 19.5 Damaged to or loss of common facility/property shall be the responsibility of all the occupants of flat members where the guilty party is not traceable. GHR20 MISCONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE 20.1 Students and other persons residing in hostels or visiting there shall be subject to the rules of that hostel as well as to the disciplinary measures which Council or its delegate(s) may promulgate for students and/or hostels in general, or any hostel in particular, from time to time. GHR21 LOSS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 21.1 The Polytechnic shall not accept responsibility for loss of or damage to personal property of hostel residents. GHR22 JOURNEYS, TOURS AND CAMPS 22.1 Journeys, tours, and camps held in the name of the hostel, may only be organized with the consent of the Dean of Students. 22.2 The Polytechnic will not make any contributions towards costs in respect of excursions or weekend camps undertaken by resident students. GHR23 VISITORS 23.1 Visitors and spouses are not allowed in any part of the hostel rooms after 10.00 pm (squatting) during week days and after midnight during weekends. 23.2 A resident student who permits a visitor and/or spouse to spend the night in his/her room is guilty of a transgression. GHR24 INITIATION CEREMONIES AND RAIDS 24.1 Initiation ceremonies and raids are strictly prohibited. GHR25 CLEANING SERVICES 25.1 Daily cleaning services Corridors, bathrooms and student recreation halls are cleaned daily by service workers. 25.2 Cleaning of rooms Students are personally responsible for the cleaning and neatness of their rooms during the semester. 25.3 Cleaning during vacations During vacations cleaning services which are not possible during term-time are carried out. For this reason students must remove all personal possessions and hand in their keys to the Superintendent.

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GHR26 LAUNDRY 26.1 Laundry is done in accordance with internal laundry procedures. GHR27 APPLICATION FOR ACCOMMODATION 27.1 The Polytechnic of Namibia reserves the right to approve or reject an application of accommodation without furnishing any reasons for its decision. GHR28 HANGING CLOTHES ON THE BALCONIES 28.1.1 Hanging clothes on the balconies are forbidden and constitute an offence. The Polytechnic made provision for clothing lines since its inception GHR29 SMOKING 29.1 No smoking is allowed in any of the Polytechnic buildings including Polytechnic Hostels.

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AWARDS AW 1 RECTOR'S MEDAL

Awards

To qualify for the Rector's Medal AW 1.1 AW 1.2 AW 1.3 AW 1.4 A candidate should have completed his/her programme within the prescribed period of study. He/she must have passed all courses with at least 70%. The overall average mark achieved by the candidate may not be less than 75%. Should he/she be exempted from a course(s), course mark(s) for such a course(s) shall be ignored in calculating his/her overall average mark. Courses completed in addition to the minimum requirements for a qualification shall be ignored in calculating the overall average mark. He/she must have maintained a clean academic record throughout his/her studies at the Polytechnic: no repeating candidate will be eligible for selection. Apart from receiving the Rector's medal and a Certificate of Congratulations, he/ she shall also receive a cash award as determined by the Rector from time to time. The Rector's medal shall only be awarded for the highest qualification in a programme. MERIT AWARDS To receive a merit award, a student must obtain a minimum overall mark of 70%. Normally students who have repeated any course(s) at any level shall not be eligible for merit awards. The best final year student per qualification and the best student of the Polytechnic awards shall be granted. Students who qualify as the best first year and the best non-final year students shall be given certificates of congratulations only. All students who obtain distinctions shall receive a discount on tuition fees for every distinction obtained in a full course.

AW 1.5 AW 1.6 Note: AW 2 AW 2.1 AW 2.2 AW 2.3 AW 2.4 AW 2.5

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