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CONTENTS

Alternative Assessment Options for Individual Selections

UNIT 1: SPINE TINGLERS "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe ...................................... 1

"The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell ................................... 2

"Casey at the Bat" by Ernest Lawrence Thayer ...................................... 3

"The Birds" by Daphne du Maurier .................................................. 4

"The Red-headed League" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle ............................... 5

"The Listeners" by Walter de la Mare

"Beware: Do Not Read This Poem" by Ishmael Reed

"Echo" by Henriqueta Lisboa ........................................................ 6

"Caucasian Mummies Mystify Chinese" by Keay Davidson ......................... 7

UNIT 2: CHALLENGES AND CHOICES from A Lincoln Preface by Carl Sandburg ........................................... 8

"I Have a Dream" by Martin Luther King, Jr.

from Rosa Parks: My Story by Rosa Parks with Jim Haskins

"There Is a Longing . . . by Chief Dan George

"I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman ......................................... 9

ft

"The Golden Kite, the Silver Wind" by Ray Bradbury ............................. 10

"The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost

"New Directions" by Maya Angelou

"To Be of Use" by Marge Piercy ..................................................... 11

"Old Man of the Temple" by R. K. Narayan ........................................ 12

"Perseus" by Edith Hamilton ........................................................ 13

"Slam, Dunk, &: Hook" by Yusef Komunyakaa

"The Spearthrower" by Lillian Morrison

"Shoulders" by Naomi Shihab Nye .................................................. 14

UNIT 3: MOMENTS OF DISCOVERY "Children in the Woods" by Barry Lopez ........................................... 15

"Rules of the Game" by Amy Tan .................................................. 16

"Checkouts" by Cynthia Rylant

"Fifteen" by William Stafford ....................................................... 17

"Sympathy" by Paul Laurence Dunbar

"Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou

"We never know how high we are" by Emily Dickinson

from In My Place by Charlayne Hunter-Gault ...................................... 18

\....... "The Interlopers" by Saki (H. H. Munro) ........................................... 19

"The Rug Merchant" by James A. Michener ........................................ 20

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Contents

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UNIT 7: NONFICTION

"Single Room, Earth View" by Sally Ride .......................................... 40

"The Washwoman" by Isaac Bashevis Singer

"On Summer" by Lorraine Hansberry

"A Celebration of Grandfathers" by Rudolfo A. Anaya ............................. 41

from A White House Diary by Lady Bird Johnson

"Arthur Ashe Remembered" by John McPhee

"Georgia o 'Keeffe" by Joan Didion ................................................ . 42

"Understanding Comics" by Scott McCloud ........................................ 43

"Earhart Redux" by Alex Chadwick

"In These Girls, Hope Is a Muscle" by Madeleine Blais, a book review by

Steve Gietschier

"In These Girls, Hope Is a Muscle" by Madeleine Blais, book jacket ............... 44

UNIT 8: DRAMA The Dancers by Horton Foote ....................................................... 45

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Acts I & II, by William Shakespeare .......... 46

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Acts III & IV, by William Shakespeare ........ 47

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Act V, by William Shakespeare ............... 48

UNIT 9: POETRY "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" by William Wordsworth ........................... 49

"The Eagle" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

"'Hope' is the thing with feathers-" by Emily Dickinson

"Dream Deferred" and "Dreams" by Langston Hughes ............................. 50

"Blackberry Eating" by Galway Kinnell

"Memory" by Margaret Walker

"Woman's Work" by Julia Alvarez

"Meciendo" by Gabriela Mistral

"Eulogy for a Hermit Crab" by Pattiann Rogers .................................... 51

"Uphill" by Christina Rossetti

"Summer" by Walter Dean Myers

Ecclesiastes 3: 1-8, The King James Bible

"The Bells" by Edgar Allan Poe ..................................................... 52

"The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe

"The Seven Ages of Man" by William Shakespeare ................................. 53

"On the Grasshopper and the Cricket" by John Keats Sonnet 30 by William Shakespeare Three Haiku by Basho and Chiyojo "Hokku Poems" by Richard Wright ................................................. 54

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Contents

iii

"The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe (text page 5)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Nonverbal Communication As readers. we are suspicious of Montresor's actions. Is he re ally going to show Fortunato a cask of wine? Fortunato. on the other hand, is completely taken in by mention of the wine. If he had observed Montresor's body language. he might have guessed what was coming. Reread the story and make note of Montresor's actions. Make a list of the clues Fortunato could have gotten from Montresor's nonverbal communi cation. Next to each clue, tell what message is expressed. 2. Diary Entries Fortunato could speak "from the grave" if he had had a diary when he was sealed into the catabombs. Write three entries in Fortunato's diary that would reveal Mon tresor's guilt. More Advanced Students 3. Refiection Montresor appears to have some mixed emotions as he walls up the entrance to the crypt. He hesitates and trembles when Fortunato screams. He grows impatient when Fortunato does not answer his call. Finally, Montresor tells us that his "heart grew sick." Given Montresor's plan and determination. why does he have mixed emotions? Examine this character's thoughts and feelings in this difficult situation. What causes his mixed emo tions? How does he deal with them? Write your answers to these questions in an essay. 4. Model and Demonstration As Fortunato and Montresor proceed to the Amontillado, they go through a series of arched doorways and vaults. These underground passages are made of stone. Consider why architects used arches instead of square or rectangular doorways. What are the advantages of arches and vaulted ceilings? Use wooden building blocks or a similar material to illustrate how an arch is constructed. Use your model to demonstrate the advantages of arch and vault construction. Explain the physics behind those advantages.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic 5. Sequel Consider what might happen next in the story. How will Montresor live with himself after what he did to Fortunato? Will he ever return to the vaults? Does he feel remorse? Write a sequel to ''The Cask of Amontillado." Show the strength and determination of Mon tresor. just as Poe did. Keep in mind Montresor's statement about punishing "with im punity." In your sequel. will that statement be true. or will you prove Montresor wrong? Interpersonal and Musical/Rhythmic 6. Mardi Gras Work in a group to learn more about Mardi Gras, the carnival setting of the story. Have one group member investigate each of the following sets of questions: (1) What does Mardi Gras mean? Why is it called that? Why do people celebrate? (2) What kind of music is played during Mardi Gras? (3) Why are masked balls held? What kinds of masks do people wear? Collaborate on a report of your findings. Explain how the information about Mardi Gras helps your understanding of the background of Poe's story. You might accom pany your report with a recording of some music that might be played at a Mardi Gras ball.

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The Cask of Amontillado

1

"Casey at the Bat" by Ernest Lawrence Thayer (text page 36)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. World Records Report In "Casey at the Bat," the "mighty" Casey does not live up to the crowd's expectations and knock the ball out of the park. We are led to believe, however, that he's capable of breaking home-run records. What is the all-time home-run record? How many other world records can you find? Use an encyclopedia or a book of records to re search world records in a variety of areas. You can include "serious" topics such as sporting events, the world's tallest building, the longest-ruling monarch, or topics that are not so se rious, such as the longest domino line or biggest bubblegum bubble. Present your findings in a brief report. 2. Dialogue Imagine that Babe Ruth, who held the home-run record in the major leagues for 38 years. was on hand to witness Casey's failure at the plate. What might Ruth, the "Sultan of Swat," have said to Casey? Improvise a dialogue in which the Babe extends advice to the "mighty" Casey.

More Advanced Students 3. Poem Reworking Write a revised version of "Casey at the Bat." How might the poem have ended if the mighty Casey hadn't struck out? Keep the same rhyme scheme and rhythm as the original poem, but be creative in writing an alternative ending.

For Learning Modalities

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Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal 4. Movie Score Imagine that you have been hired to work on an animated cartoon version of "Casey at the Bat." Your job is to select the background music for the movie. What kind of music do you think best accompanies Casey's walk to the plate? The first pitch? What best accompanies the climax? Choose two or three different pieces of music. Play the pieces and have other students guess for which parts of the story the particular pieces are meant. Linguistic/Interpersonal 5. Altemative Endings Working with a partner. invent a story that has a definite turning pOint. Brainstorm two versions of how the story ends: one with a true climax, and one that turns anticlimactic. Collaborate on writing two versions of the story: one in which events tum out as expected, and one in which events take an unexpected tum. Verbal/Linguistic 6. Summary Think of a recent event that you participated in or witnessed. Possibilities include a sporting match, a concert, a club meeting. or a family outing. Prepare an oral report in which you summarize what happened. Remember: A summary includes only the most im portant details.

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Casey at the Bat 3

"The Red-headed League" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (text page 82)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Character Comparison Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are great friends and compan

ions, but their personalities and attributes are quite different. Make a comparison of the two by writing simple statements that detail the two men's childhood tastes and interests, such as favorite foods, activities in school. and earliest hobbies. Develop your statements with reasoning based on evidence from the selection. 2. Trial Preparation As a prosecuting attorney, begin to prepare the case against John Clay. First, make a list of the pieces of evidence that you will introduce during the trial. Second, write questions that you will ask Sherlock Holmes on the witness stand. Your questions should elicit a complete rundown of how the detective built his case against the criminal.

More Advanced Students 3. School Mystery Write a Sherlock Holmes mystery of your own, using 'The Red-headed

League" as inspiration. Set your mystery at your school. including yourself as a replacement for Dr. Watson, who was not able to make the trip with Mr. Holmes. While your mystery should take place in the setting of your school, make sure that Holmes stays in character. 4. Character Description Create a fictional detective who is as skilled as Sherlock Holmes. Write a character description of your creation, including the detective's name, where he or she lives, and what special attributes he or she has. Include a brief description of your de tective's most difficult case.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic 5. Author Interview Imagine that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is appearing on an interview pro gram. As host, what questions would you ask about his work? How do you think the author would respond? Work with a partner to role-play an interview with the author. Linguistic and Visual/Spatial 6. City Guide What did you learn about London from reading ''The Red-headed League"? Use a variety of reference sources to do further research on the city during the era of Sherlock Holmes. Write a brief guide to the city, including any maps, photographs, and sketches you can find or produce. Bodily/Kinesthetic 7. Theatrical Production Throughout the years, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories have been a favorite subject for adaptation to the stage and screen. Working with a group, choose a scene from 'The Red-headed League" and act it out as a theatrical perfor mance. Do a careful second reading of the selection to be sure your movements on stage are true to the story.

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The Red-headed League

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"Caucasian Mummies Mystify Chinese" by Keay Davidson (text page 114)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. News Article Think of an item in use today-a skateboard, cleats, or a curling iron, for ex ample-that might puzzle an archaeologist in the distant future. Then, imagining yourself as a journalist in that future time, write a news article reporting on the discovery of this "an cient artifact." Include in your report the archaeologist's speculations about the use of the item and its importance in the ancient society. 2. Presentation on Archaeological Tools What tools do archaeologists use? Using an ency clopedia or other reference sources, prepare a presentation on the tools and methods ar chaeologists use in their work. Explain how archaeological tools and methods have changed over the years. What technological advances have been made in recent decades? More Advanced Students 3. Dialogue "Caucasian Mummies Mystify Chinese" provides information on how some Chi nese might find the discovery of the mummies troubling. Working with a partner, prepare a dialogue between a Chinese scholar and a Western scholar in which the possibility of a Cau casian role in ancient Chinese history is explored. Make sure that the Chinese point of view is well represented. Also, discuss what positive effects might have resulted from an interplay between Western and Chinese civilizations. 4. Report on Burial Practices Cultures throughout human history have developed elaborate burial practices. Choose an ancient culture, such as Egyptian or Aztec, and use an encyclo pedia to prepare a report on that culture's burial practices. You might wish to compare the culture's burial practices with burial practices in our present society.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial 5. Model A number of archaeological discoveries continue to mystify scientists. It is still a

mystery, for example, how ancient peoples of Great Britain managed to form, move, and set up the massive stone slabs that make up the site known as Stonehenge. The eerie stone fig ures on Easter Island, to cite another example, have also mystified archaeologists. In an en cyclopedia or magazine article, find a photograph of a site such as Stonehenge or Easter Island and construct a model using plaster, papier-mache, or other appropriate materials.

Linguistic 6. Follow-Up Questions As "Caucasian Mummies Mystify Chinese" indicates, the discovery of the mummies has led to a number of interesting and thought-provoking questions. Imagine that you are writing a follow-up article on the Caucasian mummies. Prepare a list of ques tions that you would ask the archaeologists.

Verbal/Linguistic 7. Oral Presentation Learn more about a well-known archaeologist, such as Mary Leakey. Use

an encyclopedia or biography to help you prepare an oral presentation on the archaeologist. Include in your presentation illustrations or photographs detailing one of the archaeologist's major findings and a map showing the location of the discovery.

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Caucasian Mummies Mystify Chinese

7

"I Rave a Dream" by Martin Luther King, Jr. (text page 140)

from Rosa Parks: My Story by Rosa Parks with Jim Haskins (text page 143)

"There Is a Longing . . ." by Chief Dan George (text page 145)

"I Rear America Singing" by Walt Whitman (text page 146)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Newspaper Account Suppose you are a newspaper reporter who happened to be on the bus with Rosa Parks on the day she refused to give up her seat. Write an unbiased eyewitness account of the events that occurred on December 1, 1955. Use details of the event as they appear ~n the excerpt from Parks's autobiography. 2. Occupation List In "I Hear America Singing," Walt Whitman celebrates individuals whose occupations he feels are vital to America. List ten occupations that you feel are vital to America today. Give reasons for including each occupation on your list.

More Advanced Students 3. Compare-and-Contrast Essay Examine Martin Luther King's speech "I Have a Dream."

Then examine Chief Dan George's poem ''There Is a Longing. . .... Both are examples of per suasive writing. In a one-page essay. compare and contrast the two works. What is the main point of each selection? How do the authors appeal to their audiences? How do they per suade their audiences?

For Learning Modalities

Interpersonal and Verbal/Ungui5tic 4. Poem Chief Dan George writes about the longing that his people have for freedom and equal-. ity. Write your own poem titled ''There Is a Longing ...... Write from the point of view of a particular group of people. such as young people. elderly people. people in your school or neighborhood. people in a certain occupation, or people of a certain ethnic or cultural back ground. Describe what the group longs for and how they might obtain it. VerballUngu;stic and Intrapersonal 5. Speech and Response Reread Martin Luther King, Jr.·s speech several times. Then practice giving the speech in front of a mirror. If possible, tape record yourself. and listen critically to the recording. Then deliver the speech to an audience. What effect did delivering the speech have on your understanding of it? How did saying Dr. King's words in front of an audience affect your own emotional response to the speech? Write your thoughts in a briefjournal response. Visual/Spatial 6. Mind Map The selections in this grouping-"I Have a Dream," the excerpt from Rosa Parks: My Story. "I Hear America Singing." and "There Is a Longing ..."-have a common theme. Use the following mind-mapping technique to determine that theme and discover your own feelings about it. Write one selection title in each corner of a piece of paper. Around each title. write words and phrases that express the main points of the selection and your reac tions. For example. you may agree or disagree with parts of the selection. You may be very moved or inspired, or you may feel disturbed. After completing your notes for each selection. write in the center of the page any ideas that appear in the corners more than twice. Use these ideas to develop your own statement of the common theme of these selections.

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Dream/Rosa/America/Longing

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"The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost (text page 166) "New Directions" by Maya Angelou (text page 168) "To Be of Use" by Marge Piercy (text page 171)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Observation and Description The themes of Robert Frost's ''The Road Not Taken" and Marge Piercy's ''To Be of Use" are enhanced by vivid images of nature. In order to use images like these effectively in a poem or story, a writer must become a keen observer. Look out the window. or, if possible, go outside and observe your surroundings. Record in a notebook some of the sights that catch your eye. Write a descriptive paragraph based on your notes. More Advanced Students 2. Analyzing Character Marge Piercy's poem "To Be of Use" describes people and a particular work ethic that the speaker of the poem loves. The speaker states. "I love people who har ness themselves,/an ox to a heavy cart,/who pull like water buffalo. with massive pa tience,/who strain in the mud and the muck to move things forward./who do what has to be done. again and again." In what way might Annie Johnson in "New Directions" be one of those people loved by the speaker of ''To Be of Use"? Answer this question in an essay. 3. Continuation In "New Directions." Annie Johnson takes control of her life by establishing her own business. At the end of the biographical sketch. the reader learns that her tiny busi ness selling meat pies continued to grow until eventually she ran her own store. Imagine what her store looked like and the different ways in which it might have continued to grow and change. In what ways might Annie herself and her two sons have grown and changed? Write an imaginative piece about Annie's life beyond the events related by Angelou.

For Learning Modalities

Interpersonal and Verbal/Linguistic

4. Interview and Essay "The Road Not Taken" is about decisions and the different paths a person may choose to take in life. Make plans to interview an adult about his or her choices. You might choose a relative, neighbor, teacher, or any other member of your community. Ask the person about his or her goals, the most important decisions he or she has had to make. and of what he or she is most proud. Take thorough notes or record your conversa tion on aUdiotape. Then, based on your notes, write an essay that describes what this per son taught you about setting goals and making decisions.

Visual/Spatial and Interpersonal

5. Advertisement Suppose you and a partner have been asked by Annie Johnson to create an advertising campaign for her unique. homemade meat pies or for her general store. Brain storm to identify some of the most interesting. entiCing details of the pies or the store. What details might grab the attention of potential customers? Make a careful plan for your adver tising campaign, and then create one or more of the advertisements.

Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical

6. Humorous Poem You know the kinds of people loved by the speaker in ''To Be of Use." Which kinds would the speaker dislike? Brainstorm to list your ideas. Then write a short, humorous poem focusing on the kinds of people the speaker in ''To Be of Use" might not find particularly useful. Share your finished poem with your classmates.

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Road/Directions/Use

11

"Perseus" by Edith Hamilton (text page 186)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Intrapersonal Reflection Perseus must have had many emotions during his adventures. What might he have felt when he discovered he could fly or when King Polydectes and his warriors suddenly turned to stone? List four or five events that happen in the story. Con sider what you would feel if you were in Perseus' place in each of these events. Describe what you imagine Perseus must have felt during these extraordinary happenings. 2. Myth RetelHng Much of the impact of a story depends upon the point of view from which it is told. Medusa, for example. might have a very different interpretation of the events in "Perseus" than Hamilton gives in her account. Imagine that Danae, not Perseus. is the cen tral character of a myth. Reconstruct and retell the story as if it were the story of Danae's life. How did she come to marry Acrisius? What is happening to her while Perseus is absent? What happens to her after her rescue? Present an oral version of "The Myth of Danae." More Advanced Students 3. Motive and Conflict Chart The plot of most stories revolves around conflicts between peo ple who act from different motives. Certainly different characters in the tale of Perseus want or believe different things. Working as a group, make a chart of characters in the Perseus myth. showing what you think motivates the actions of each, and what conflicts result. You may discover that not everyone in your group thinks the same thing. Resolve those conflicts, and present your chart to the class. 4. Critical Analysis As action-packed and eXCiting as Perseus' adventures are, we should not forget that our account of them is given to us by a narrator-Edith Hamilton. On occasion, she makes observations about characters or situations that reveal opinions about the events and the culture in which they take place. What does she seem to think about the story she's telling? Write an essay that assesses the narrator's attitude toward her subject and charac ters. Use specific examples of Hamilton's language from the text to support your ideas.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial and Logical/Mathematical

5. Map Locations The map of the known world has changed much since the time of the myth of Perseus. Edith Hamilton says little about the Hyperboreans except that they were "always banqueting and feasting." The word hyperborean still exists today, however. It comes directly from Greek and its meaning may surprise you. Use a dictionary to discover the source and meaning of hyperborean. Then use a modern map to compile a list of countries or regions that you consider to be hyperborean. Describe each country or region in terms of its longi tude and latitude, so that given the data, others can locate your choices. Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal 6. Lyre Report Long before Edith Hamilton's account of Perseus, the stories of Greek mythol ogy were passed orally from generation to generation, often in poems accompanied by the music of a lyre. Working in a group, compile a report on this ancient instrument. Include the types of lyres that might have been played in ancient Greece and their construction, similar ancient instruments made elsewhere, and related modern instruments or those that have descended from the anCient lyre.

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Perseus

13

"Children in the Woods" by Barry Lopez (text page 215)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Job Profile Are you headed for a conservation job? Find out about one in detail, and pre pare ajob profile. You might begin by looking in a source such as The Enhanced GuideJor Occupational Exploration. What does the work involve. what education and skills are re quired. and who are likely employers? What are the advantages and disadvantages of work ing in that particular conservation job? Present your job profile to the class. 2. Nature Recording Record some sounds of nature. Your recording might include wind in the trees. rain. water running in a stream. waves crashing on a beach, thunder. birds. crickets, or other natural sounds in your surroundings. Play the tape during a quiet time when you are alone. What effect do these sounds of nature have on you? Write a journal entry in which you explain the effect of the sounds on you. You might also play the tape for a few friends to see if it has a similar or different effect on them. More Advanced Students 3. Persuasive Speech Choose one endangered species. Write a persuasive speech in which you convince your audience of the importance of preserving that species. You will need to re search the habitat of the species and the impact of the species' disappearance on other species in the habitat. Use a quotation from "Children in the Woods" to make a point in your speech.

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For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic 4. Learning Environments How would you establish an environment in which students your own age can learn about nature? Choose a general subject area, such as wetlands. wood lands, urban park, and so on. Explain what you would do to encourage students to learn about the area. Write your explanation in the form of a proposal for your science teacher or principal. If possible, set up your learning environment and see how it works. Interpersonal 5. Teamwork Organize a group of workers to carry out some act of conservation. With permis sion, you might clean up a park or roadside, help a neighbor plant a tree, or mount a cam paign against something that's happening in your community that you feel is harmful to the environment. Keep a journal of your group's efforts. Include in your journal your thoughts about how effectively your group is working as a team. Visual/Spatial 6. Nature Study The author of "Children in the Woods" was fascinated with a pattern of sun light. He noticed a tiny detail of nature and stopped to look closely. Observe some small as pect of nature. It might be a seed, a plant growing in a sidewalk crack, or a few drops of rain on a rock. You might even use a magnifying glass to study your subject. Notice how the de tails of your very small object change when you make a much larger picture of them. Make a detailed, close-up sketch of what you see-large enough to fill an entire 8-by-11-inch piece of paper.

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Children in the Woods

15

"Checkouts" by Cynthia Rylant (text page 236) "Fifteen" by William Stafford (text page 241)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. WustratioD To the speaker in "Fifteen," the discovered motorcycle was a vision, a wonder. He describes what it looked like to his amazed eyes. What do you think it really looked like? Using reference books as sources, create an illustration of a motorcycle. Label its parts care fully so that someone who is unfamiliar with motorcycles can learn from your illustration. More Advanced Students 2. Human Nature In "Checkouts" the author writes, "This is often the way of children, when they truly want a thing, to pretend that they don't. And then they grow angry when no one tried harder to give them this thing they so casually rejected .... " What is your opinion on the subject? Is what the author has written true? Use evidence from the story as well as from your own life to support your opinion in a brief essay. 3. Debate The motorcyclist in "Fifteen" was perhaps lucky to be alive, given that he had "flipped over the rail." The poem makes no mention of whether he wore a helmet or not. Many states now have laws that require motorcyclists to wear helmets at all times. Some states do not. Motorcycling groups have recently lobbied to have some states' helmet laws repealed, stating that helmets restrict their personal freedoms. Statistics show that helmets prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries. Should motorcyclists be required to wear hel mets at all times? Only for highway driving? Or should motorcyclists be allowed to choose? Form teams and hold a formal debate on this issue.

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For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic 4. Career Profile Interview a grocery story manager. Find out what kinds of career opportuni ties exist in the retail food industry. What kind of training and experience do these jobs re quire? What are some of the skills and daily tasks involved in these jobs? What types of peo ple are best suited to these kinds of jobs? Create a career profile based on what you learn in the interview.

Body/Kinesthetic 5. Role Play Role-play one or more of the scenes in "Checkouts," with or without dialogue. In particular, act out the first, second, and third meetings between the girl and the bag boy. Pay special attention to body language, such as the lack of eye contact between the two.

Verbal/Linguistic and Visual/Spatial 6. Pamphlet Create a pamphlet for teenagers new to your community. Provide an overview of important information, such as how to get around on a bike or public transportation, what they'll need for school, and where to get the best pizza. Include any other information that is vital to a teenager's well-being in your community. Also, include a simple map. If it is avail able, use desktop publishing software to design and produce your pamphlet.

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Checkouts/Fifteen

17

"The Interlopers" by Saki (H. H. Munro) (text page 262)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Final Journal Entries Imagine that you are Ulrich von Gradwitz or Georg Znaeym trapped beneath the fallen beech tree, fearing that you might not survive. Reflect on your situation by writing a final journal entry. Describe how you feel as you lie injured and stranded in the cold, dark forest. Then describe your changing feelings toward your long-time enemy who is stranded with you. More Advanced Students 2. Creating Suspense In the opening paragraphs of 'The Interlopers," Saki uses images of nature to reflect the dark, bitter feelings of his characters and create suspense. Review the opening of the story and make a list of some of these dark, suspenseful images. Then write a descriptive paragraph in which you use images of nature to create a frightening, dangerous setting. 3. Defense A defense is a type of writing or speech that attempts to support or excuse some one or something. Write a defense in support of the somber ending to ''The Interlopers" or in support of a happier ending. Take a strong position and provide solid arguments to reinforce your position.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic

4. Celebration Speech When Georg and Ulrich discuss the end of their family feud and the possible beginning of friendship, Georg mentions that someday he hopes to "come and feast on some high day at your (Ulrich's) castle." Imagine that the men are rescued and that Georg and members of his family are actually invited to Ulrich's castle. With a partner, plan the speech that each man would make to the assembled families. After practicing your speeches. present them to the class.

Interpersonal and Verbal/Linguistic

5. Conflict Report Make plans to interview a variety of people-relatives, friends. neighbors. or teachers-about ways in which they have ended misunderstandings or resolved conflicts. Invite people to share advice based on their experiences. When you have completed your in terviews, prepare a report describing some of the most interesting stories and outlining the advice you received. Make generalizations about the ways in which most people deal with conflict in their lives.

Body/Kinesthetic and Verbal/Linguistic 6. Improvisation With a partner, create two characters who, like Georg and Ulrich, are in con flict over a possession or an issue. Your characters may be completely fictional. or they may be based on people you know.in your life or public figures you have seen or read about in the news. Role-play an argument or heated discussion between your characters. Then allow the conflict to reach some kind of a resolution. After you have practiced, present your role play to your classmates.

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The Interlopers

19

"Combing" by Gladys Cardiff (text page 282)

"Women" by Alice Walker (text page 283)

"maggie and milly and molly and may" by E. E. Cummings (text page 284)

"Astonishment" by Wist"awa Szymborska (text page 285)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Oral History The poems "Combing" and "Women" both give an account of the relation be tween generations. Tell the story of your parents' or grandparents' generation in an oral his tory. Find out details about where they lived, what they did, how they met, where they moved, where they worked, and what their interests and ideas were. Present your family's oral history to a classmate. 2. Sequel In "maggie and milly and molly and may," E. E. Cummings pOints out in the poem's final lines that "it's always ourselves we find in the sea." Maggie found a shell, Milly a starfish, Molly a crab, and Maya stone. How would each have responded had they found something else? Switch one of the girls' discoveries around and write a paragraph sequel in which you explain how she might have responded to a different discovery. More Advanced Students 3. News Report In "Women," the poet refers to her mother's struggle for better schools for her children. In 1957, the school system in Little Rock, Arkansas, was desegregated. This event sent shock waves through the nation, and focused attention on civil rights issues as never before. Using reference materials from the library, research what happened, and write a news report as if you were reporting to the nation the dramatic events in Little Rock in 1957.

For Learning Modalities

Logical/Mathematical and Interpersonal 4. A Genealogy of Women A genealogy is an account or history of ancestors and their descen dents. Frequently, such genealogies trace the male side of a family, going back through time from father, to grandfather, to great grandfather. Interview your family to find out informa tion about the women in your family. Prepare a chart going as far back as you can, showing names and dates. For reference, find information about genealogy and genealogical charts in a library or online. Visual/Spatial 5. Drawing In "Astonishment," the poet expresses amazement that she exists here and now, and as herself, and not something else, in another time. Draw an illustration for the poem, showing the poet with all the things she's astonished she wasn't. Visual/Spatial and Verbal/Linguistic 6. Report: Quilting The painting The Quiltmakers illustrates a traditional method both of functional folk art and social interaction. Quilts are now considered historical artifacts as well as artwork, and their patterns often tell a story. Even today, quilting is a method of so cial expression. Research the history and symbolism of quilts in America, using resources from libraries, craft museums, or other folklore reference sources. Write a report of your findings. Sketch some examples of types of quilts and their characteristics to accompany your report.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Combing/Women/maggie/Astonishment

21

"The Inspector-General" by Anton Chekhov (text page 310)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Personal Irony Imagine or recall a real-life personal event, such as a birthday celebration or family picnic, that occurred in a way different from what you expected. What had you ex pected to happen? What actually did happen? Write a paragraph explaining the ironic event, contrasting the expected outcome and the actual outcome. 2. Neighborhood Improvement Take a walk around your block and inspect the neighborhood in which you live. What improvements would benefit all the people who live there? Choose one improvement. Then write a brief report explaining what steps need to be taken to make the improvement a reality. More Advanced Students 3. Help Wanted Advertisement Imagine that the Czar asks you to write a help wanted adver tisement to fill the pOSition of inspector-general. The ad must be brief but persuasive to at tract the most suitable candidates. Write the ad using information from the story and your own imagination. 4. Double Negative Dialogue Write a dialogue from the driver's point of view, that uses double negatives. In your dialogue. have the driver explain to the buffet owner what happened to the inspector-general. Use humor to help convey the irony of the situation. Mter rehearsing, perform your dialogue for the rest of the class.

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For Learning Modalities

Body/Kinesthetic and Verbal/Linguistic 5. Skit Working in a small group, create a skit that illustrates at least one of the types of liter ary irony: verbal irony. dramatic irony. or irony of situation. In your skit, put a contempo rary spin on one of the themes or situations described in Chekhov's "The Inspect .:>r General." Mter rehearsing. perform your skit for the rest of the class. Verbal/Linguistic 6. Interview and Essay Interview a professional in a local government or civic organization. such as the Board of Education, and find out about the services provided by the organiza tion. Prepare a list of interview questions. keeping in mind the key question prompts who, what. when. where, why, and how. During the interview, make detailed notes. If you wish to tape-record the interview, ask the person's permission. Mer the interview, write a brief essay explaining the organization's services. Logical/Mathematical 7. Pie Chart Think of at least six basic services provided to your community, such as police protection and public schools. Think about how much tax money is needed to maintain the service. How many employees must be paid? How expensive is the equipment? Then create a pie chart that illustrates which services should receive what percentage of every 100 local tax dollars. Remember that the total parts of a pie chart will always equal 100 percent. If possi ble, contact your municipal tax office to compare your estimates with the actual allocations.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

The Inspector-General

23

"An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A" by Patricia Yolk (text page 332)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Description "An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A" presents a narrator's changing opinion of insects and an entomologist's observations about insects. Write a descriptive paragraph from the point of view of an insect in apartment 4A or from the point of view of an insect who lives in the entomology department at the American Museum of Natural History. 2. Two Perspectives The narrator in "An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A" takes a diffi cult problem and makes it into something positive. In ajouITIal entry, describe a time in which you had to make the best of a difficult situation. What did you do to change your atti tude toward the situation? Why was changing your own attitude, rather than trying to change the situation, a good way to handle the problem?

More Advanced Students 3. Personal Essay As a child, the narrator in "An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A"

eagerly collected bugs in glass cigar tubes. Why do you think she wants to rid her apartment of the insects she enjoyed so much as a child? Do you think that most people become more practical and less fascinated with the world as they grow older? Which people, places, things, and activities did you enjoy more when you were a very young child than you enjoy today? Write your answers to these questions in an essay. 4. Feature Article "An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A" is a feature article about an in teresting personal experience. Imagine that you are a writer for a local newspaper or maga zine, and you have been told to write a feature article about some aspect of life in your school. When you have settled on a subject, write your article using interesting, concrete details that will help a reader to understand your ideas and your experience.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 5. Pesticide Report The narrator of "An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A" enlists the help of an entomologist and tells her "pest control operator" to stop spraying pesticides in her apartment. Using chemical pesticides to control insects, particularly insects that destroy farmers' crops, is often the subject of debate. Working in a group, investigate the issue of chemical pesticides. Use library sources to answer such questions as, What are the dangers of certain chemical pesticides? What is organiC farming? Prepare a report of your findings. Visual/Spatial and Verbal/Linguistic 6. Children'S Zoology Fair Entomology is a branch of zoology, which is the part of the science that deals with animals. Working with a group, create a plan for a children's zoological fair. Research the different branches of zoology and decide how information about each branch should be presented to children. Create a plan for colorful displays, pamphlets, and interac tive exhibits. Musical/Rhythmic 7. Jingle Work with a partner to write a humorous jingle about insects. Either write your own original tune, or set your lyrics to the tune of a popular song or commercial jingle. Share your jingles with your classmates.

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© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

An Entomological Study of Apartment 4A

25

"Talk" by Harold Courlander and George Herzog (text page 358)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Interpersonal Reflection In ''Talk," animals and objects alike object to the farmer's treat

ment of them. Do you agree or disagree with their objections? Reread the beginning of ''Talk," and consider how you would feel in the same situation. Describe your feelings in a brief paragraph. 2. Story Summary Write a paragraph summarizing the main action in ''Talk.'' Name the major characters, the setting, and the conflict of the stoty.

More Advanced Students 3. Character Analysis What values do the actions of the human characters in ''Talk'' reflect? What motivates the characters? How do they relate to one another and to their environ ment? Analyze the characters and draw conclusions about the values revealed by their be havior. 4. Bibliography Create a bibliography, or list of related titles. of West Mrican folk tales. Choose a major theme, such as humorous folk tales or those featuring the same main char acter. Use resources in your school or community libra:ry to compile a bibliography of at least ten different folk tales.

For Learning Modalities

Logical/Mathematical and Visual/Spatial 5. Logic Rating System Create a system to rate the logic. or illogic, of each talking situation in the stoty. For example, you might devise a scale that ranges from 1 to 10, with adjectives to define the increasing degrees of illogic. Show your logic rating system in a bar graph, line graph, or other type of graphic organizer. Verbal/Linguistic and Musical/Rhythmic 6. Limerick A limerick is a five-line poem that has a lighthearted subject. It typically begins with a line such as ''There was an old man from " The first, second, and fifth lines have three beats, and the third and fourth lines have two beats. It follows a rhyme scheme of aabba. Write a limerick to describe the experience of one of the men in ''Talk.'' Focus on the humor and absurdity of the situation. Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 7. Cultural Study Gather clues about Ashanti culture from the details in ''Talk.'' Pay special attention to the setting and the characters. Write a brief description of your impression of daily Ashanti life, based on your analysis of these details.

©

Prentice~Hall,

Inc.

Talk

27

from The Road Ahead by Bill Gates (text page 385)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Advice Column Video phones and video teleconferencing are in fairly wide use today, es

pecially in the business community. These technologies. which enable people to see each other as they talk, provide more interpersonal contact than conventional telephones. De velop some rules or gUidelines for effective interpersonal communication via video phone or video teleconference. What should people be sure to do, or not do, during such a conversa tion? Are there courtesies that video phone communicators need to observe? Write your ideas in the form of an advice column, with a letter asking advice and an answer of three to five paragraphs. 2. Job Description Review Bill Gates's description of some of the technologies of the future. Consider what other developments video-on-demand might lead to and what new technol ogy-oriented career might exist when you begin job hunting. Write a description of such a job or draw a picture of yourself performing the job tasks.

More Advanced Students 3. Newspaper Editorial Do you agree with Bill Gates's opinion that technology provides con

venience, or do you feel that there are times when technology is inconvenient? Are you in favor of unlimited development, or do you advocate a slower, more careful approach to intro ducing new technologies? Write your opinions in a persuasive editorial for your school news paper. 4. Software Instruction The success of the computer indusUy depends upon the develop ment of computers that are easy to use, or "user-friendly." Imagine you are a software repre sentative reqUired to teach potential customers how to use your software. Prepare a lesson for performing several operations within a word-processing or desktop publishing program with which you are familiar. Teach your lesson to one or two classmates at a classroom computer or in the computer lab. Then write an analysis of the effectiveness of your lesson.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 5. Rebuttal Bill Gates views unlimited choice and an increased flow of information as a conve

nience. Take the opposite position. Write a rebuttal to Gates's essay in which you explain how a flood of choices and variables will lead to inefficiency and confusion. Support your opinions with examples and evidence from your own observation and experience, if applicable.

Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 6. Debate As more and more information is transmitted over the Internet, the debate widens

over such questions as these: Who should provide the information? Who should control ac cess to the information? Should certain information be kept off the Internet? Working in teams of three or four students, examine the issue of the control and access of information on the Internet. Have each team take a position and research the subject in news and com puter magazines. Prepare arguments for presentation, and debate the issue.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

from The Road Ahead

29

"Fire and Ice" by Robert Frost (text page 412) "All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace" by Richard Brautigan (text page 413) "There Will Come Soft Rains" by Sara Teasdale (text page 414) "The Horses" by Edwin Muir (text page 415)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Journal Entry In "Fire and Ice" Robert Frost associates fire with feelings of desire and ice with feelings of hate. With what emotions do you associate fire and ice? If the world were to end, should it end in fire or in ice, or in a completely different way? Explain your reasoning in a journal entIy. 2. Descriptive Paragraphs Imagine you are one of only a sparse human population left in the world described by Sara Teasdale in "There Will Come Soft Rains." A devastating war has virtually destroyed the modern world; you and the other survivors are left to begin new lives for yourselves, closer to nature. Write at least three descriptive paragraphs about your new surroundings and your thoughts about your situation. More Advanced Students 3. Alliterative Poem Write a short poem or jingle using alliteration-the repetition of sounds at the beginning of words. Your poem should be about some aspect of your life, such as school, family, friends, a hobby, food, or place. Use alliteration to create a certain mood serious, humorous, or even silly. Read your poem aloud to your classmates. 4. Personal Essay Every day, computer technology becomes more advanced and finds its way into many different fields. In an essay, consider the impact of computerization on our lives. Do you feel that computers will eventually replace humans in most ordinary tasks? In what ways do computers seem to be more efficient than humans? In what ways are computers limited? Support your opinion with examples from your own experience.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic and Visual/Spatial 5. Cybemetic Town In "All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace," Richard Brautigan describes a future world in which computers watch over people and free them from ordinary tasks. Create a map and a drawing depicting a cybernetic town. Then write a description of the town explaining what people spend their time doing, how they react to being "watched over by machines of loving grace," what they enjoy most about their new lives, and what they resent. Compare your town to those of your classmates. Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 6. Technology Poll Working as a class, conduct a poll of attitudes toward technology. First, create a survey in which you ask questions such as these: Which aspects of modern technol ogy do you welcome into your life? Which aspects do you resent or fear? Do you feel that peo ple should return to simpler ways of life, or do you feel that continued technological progress can help society? Make copies of your questionnaire, and pass it out in your school and com munity. When you have gathered your data, present your findings in a finished report.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Fire/Grace/Rains/Horses

31

"Gifts" by Shu Ting (text page 442) "Glory and Hope" by Nelson Mandela (text page 443)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

less Advanced Students

1. Letter Put yourself in the place of a South African teenager listening to Nelson Mandela deliver "Glory and Hope." What part of the speech is most moving or promising? What will you always remember? Write a letter to a South African friend in which you share your re sponse to the speech. 2. Oral Interpretation Choose a partner and together read "Gifts" aloud, taking turns read ing each stanza. Listen for the similarities and differences in the ways in which you and your partner emphasize certain words and phrases. Then read the poem aloud again, com bining your interpretations to make the most effective reading. More Advanced Students

3. Report South Africa and China are not the only countries guilty of repressing freedoms. Use library resources to find out about another society, past or present, that has oppressed its citizens. In a factual report, discuss the reasons for the oppression, how the citizens re spond (or did respond). and how the oppression might be stopped (or how it was stopped). Support any opinions you offer with facts and examples. Provide a bibliography. 4. Dialogue What would Nelson Mandela and Shu Ting say to each other about the struggles their countries and their people have been through? Would they admire each other's efforts. or are their differences too great? What would they say about human rights? Write a two page dialogue, consisting of a conversation the two might have on a television talk show.

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Interpersonal and Verbal/linguistic

5. Oral Cause-and-Effect Report China's democratic movement gained ground in the early 1980's but, at the end of the decade, it suffered a fatal setback. Choose a partner and to gether use library resources to discover what happened in 1989 that virtually ended the democracy movement in China. Learn about what forces opposed democracy. and how the opposition responded when the democratic movement tried to make progress. Present your report orally, with one of you delivering information about the democratic movement, and the other discussing the opposition's responses.

Visual/Spatial

6. Artistic Interpretation Create an artistic interpretation of one image or a combination of images from "Gifts." Use markers, watercolors, pastels, or some other "soft" medium to help convey the warmth and familiarity of Shu Ting's images. Display your artwork next to a copy of the poem.

Verbal/linguistic

7. Letter to the Editor Imagine that your local newspaper has printed an editorial condemn ing the expression of personal feelings in published works. such as Shu Ting's "Gifts." Write a letter to the editor supporting Shu Ting's right to free expression. Use logic rather than emotion; support your opinions with examples, facts, and well-reasoned arguments.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Gifts/Glory

33

"Sonata for Harp and Bicycle" by Joan Aiken (text page 470)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Security Memo Few businesses today would communicate by loudspeaker. Today, compa nies use memos or broadcast E-mail. Imagine yourself the head of security at Moreton Wold. Compose a memo or E-mail message to all personnel regarding the policy of emptying the building by five o'clock sharp. 2. Dialogue What do you think Heron and Miss Bell said to each other when they were finally reunited? Write a dialogue in which you portray their first words after such a long separa tion. More Advanced Students 3. Bomb Damage Oral Report As Jason decides what to do, evening falls on London, with "cold layers of dew sinking among the withered evening primroses in the bombed areas." During World War II, the sky over London reverberated with the sounds of bombers, sirens, anti-aircraft guns, and falling bombs during the Battle of Britain. Learn more about this ter rifying period, its effect on London's people, and its significance to the course of the war. Present your report to the class. 4. Instruments Report The two most common instruments for a sonata are the piano and the violin. Research the history of one of these instruments. Then prepare a report about the old and new forms of the instrument. If possible, include illustrations.

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For Learning Modalities

Logical/Mathematical and Visual/Spatial 5. Model Aiken describes the Grimes Buildings as old and crumbling, but each little office "owned one tiny crumb of light-such was the proud boast of the architect." We later learn that the structure is triangular. How were these two things accomplished? Construct a sim ple model of the Grimes Buildings. Research the architecture of a real-life triangular office building, such as the Flatiron Building in New York City. Share your model with the class. Be prepared to explain the design of the building. Verbal/Linguistic and Body/Kinesthetic 6. Interview With a partner, write and play the roles of Mr. Manaby and Jason Ashgrove in Jason's original job interview. What is Mr. Manaby looking for in an advertising copywriter? What does Jason wish to know about his job, his office, his co-workers, and his company? How wIll Mr. Manaby respond? Musical/Rhythmic and Verbal/Linguistic 7. Strange Music It may seem odd that Miss Bell and Mr. Heron playa sonata with harp and bicycle bell, but there are other forms of weird instruments. Find out about unconventional musical instruments and their uses, either current or historical, instruments designed for music, or instruments adapted from other devices. Begin your research with an encyclope dia, or consult a librarian or online sources. Obtain pictures of unusual instruments, and acquire recordings if you can. Present your report to the class.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Sonata for Harp and Bicycle

35

"Blues Ain't No Mockin Bird" by Toni Cade Bambara (text page 498) "Uncle Marcos" by Isabel Allende (text page 504)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Newspaper Tribute Imagine that you are a friend of the del Valle family in "Uncle Marcos" and often visited during Marcos's extended visits. Write a newspaper article in which you pay tribute to Marcos upon his death. Note the contributions Marcos made to the family and the community. 2. Story Performance Review the story "Blues Ain't No Mockin Bird" until you can tell it in your own words. Practice telling the story with expression and dramatic pauses. Then per form the story for the class, or make a videotape or audio recording. More Advanced Students 3. Revision Would Granny have talked to the reporters if they had approached her in some other way? Write a revised edition of the story. Don't change anyone's character traits, but do change the reporters' behavior. 4. Dramatization Flesh out one scene from "Uncle Marcos" and dramatize it. You may show Marcos amazing the children with a fantastic tale of his travels, explaining one of his alchemy experiments, or telling fortunes. Gather a cast, develop any staging you need, and rehearse and present your scene.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial and Verbal/Linguistic 5. Encyclopedia Map and Entry Create a simple map of Latin America that shows political boundaries, capital cities, and major land formations. Include latitude and longitude on your map. Then write a 300-word description of Latin America for a children's encyclopedia. Keep the language simple. Verbal/Linguistic and Intrapersonal 6. Journal Entry Imagine that you are Clara, who is now grown up. You still remember all the wonderful things Uncle Marcos taught you. Write a journal entry in which you record your memories of what you learned. Then speculate about how you will provide similar ad ventures and marvels to your own (Le., Clara's) nieces and nephews. Verbal/Linguistic 7. Character Descriptions The author of "Blues Ain't No Mockin Bird" creates two strong and memorable characters in Granny and Granddaddy Cain. They mayor may not remind you of your own grandparents or older adults that you know. Develop two characters for a story. The characters should be "mature"-at least old enough to be your grandparents. Give your characters distinguishing characteristics. They may be strong and opinionated like Granny or gentle and soft-spoken. Develop your character descriptions fully, including made-up anecdotes about their lives that illustrate their distinctive qualities.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Blues/Uncle

37

"The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant (text page 536) "The Harvest" by Tomas Rivera (text page 542)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Journal Entry Have you, like Madame Loisel in ''The Necklace," ever wished for a material possession or wished to be accepted by a particular person or group? Write a jOUITlal entry in which you describe this wish and how it affected you. 2. Opinion Piece ''The Necklace" and "The Harvest" address two human problems-envy and gossip. In ''The Necklace," Madame Loisel is never at peace with her life because of her in tense envy of wealthy people. In ''The Harvest," townspeople do not understand the behavior of Don Trine, so they gossip about him. Write a short opinion piece about your own personal experiences with envy or gossip. More Advanced Students 3. Sequel At the end of "The Necklace," Madame Loisel makes a shocking discovery about the necklace she borrowed from Madame Forestier many years before. What do you think might happen next? Write a sequel to "The Necklace" that begins with Madame Forestier's statement "Oh, my poor, poor Mathilde! Mine was false. It was worth five hundred francs at the most'" 4. Character Sketch The character of Madame Loisel struggles to find a place in a world that seems more glamorous than her own. Use your imagination to create a character who. for one reason or another. is unsatisfied with his or her life and is searching for change. Describe your character in detail. Share your sketch with the rest of the class.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Unguistic, Logical/Mathematical, and Visual/Spatial

5. Harvest Fair Organize a class harvest fair that encourages people in your school or com munity to appreciate the earth and its connection to their lives. Working individually or in pairs, create presentations that celebrate different aspects of the earth and the natural world-from paintings and essays to science exhibits. If possible, invite people from outside your classroom to see your work.

Verbal/Unguistic, Interpersonal, and Logical/Mathematical 6. Discussion and Essay As a class, hold a discussion about the societal values presented in "The Necklace." Then discuss the following questions: Do you believe that the society in which you live is captivated by wealth and material goods? In what ways is wealth desir able? In what ways is it harmful? Present concrete examples to back up your statements. Mter the discussion, write a brief essay describing what you leaITIed from the discussion.

Verbal/Unguistic and Body/Kinesthetic 7. Class Reading "The Harvest" focuses on a man's simple and private celebration of the earth. In contrast, "The Necklace" shows a society completely caught up in the material world. Many poems, stories, songs, and essays have been written to celebrate the natural world and to encourage people to tUITl away from some of the trappings of civil1zed society. Plan a class reading of works that touch on these themes. Search through poetry. essay. and story collections, anthologies. and children's books. Each student should read at least one selection.

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© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Necklace/Harvest

39

"The Washwoman" by Isaac Bashevis Singer (text page 568)

"On Summer" by Lorraine Hansberry (text page 572)

"A Celebration of Grandfathers" by Rudolfo A. Anaya (text page 576)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Lesson List These essays convey the lessons their writers have learned from interesting el derly people in their lives. Think about the lessons and insights into life the writers gained through observation and conversation. Then make a list in which you clearly state these life lessons. 2. Reflection on Family In "The Washwoman," Isaac Bashevis Singer and his mother share their concern for the washwoman and her loneliness without her own family. In "On Sum mer," Lorraine Hansberry remembers the first impressions she had of her grandmother. In "A Celebration of Grandfathers," Rudolfo Anaya shares with readers the valuable insights of his ancestors. Write a brief reflective piece about an experience with your own family. Show why the experience is important to you.

More Advanced Students 3. Persuasive Essay Write a persuasive essay about an issue or a cause that is important to you. Perhaps you believe your town needs to establish a recycling center or you feel strongly about who should be the next mayor. Maybe you want to convince people to support a par ticular charity, or take part in a certain activity. Make a list of reasons that will appeal to potential readers. When you write, describe your topic thoroughly and back up your state ments with concrete facts. 4. Poem These essays focus on people who have made differences in the lives of the writers. Write a poem for an important person in your own life. To begin, think about a person who would make an interesting subject. Then write that person's name on a sheet of paper. Be neath the person's name, list any colorful details that you might include in your poem. The poem does not have to rhyme, but should be filled with vivid images. When it is complete, present it to your subject.

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For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 5. Book of Advice Although you are not yet elderly, you have probably had experiences that make you wiser than students who are much younger than you. As a class, put together a book of advice for children or younger students. Each person in the class should contribute one or two pages that share a story, anecdote, or bit of advice. Include both humorous and serious pieces. Visual/Spatial and Interpersonal 6. Family Album Put together a family album that shows the diverse and interesting aspects of your own family. Your album can contain not only photos but also drawings, recipes, and family stories. Ask family members to share anecdotes and family history. When it is com plete, share your album with classmates.

~

Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal 7. Song Work with another student to write a song about a particular season or stage of life. You can write your own original music, or you can set your lyrics to a popular song with which you are already familiar. Perform your song for the rest of your class. Washwoman/Summer/Celebration 41 © Prentice-Hall, Inc.

"Understanding Comics" by Scott McCloud (text page 606)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Single-Frame Message Some comics artists have the luxury of conveying meaning by

mean~ of comic books that are a dozen and more pages long. Other comics artists limit their format to a single frame. Use visuals and as few words as possible to convey a message in a single frame. 2. Definition Write a brief definition of your favorite hobby, sport, or other activity. Describe how your definition may differ from what others may offer.

More Advanced Students 3. Promotional Flyer Imagine that the museum where you work is preparing an exhibit titled

"Comics in Review." Your job is to develop a promotional flyer for the exhibit, which will ex amine the history of comics. Conduct research and then choose two or three important comics artists, or characters to feature in your flyer. 4. Oral Presentation Consider the role that visuals play in the material you read on a daily basis: newspapers, magazines, textbooks. What do visuals add to the material you read? Do some sources contain better visuals than others? Answer these questions in an oral presen tation. Acquire several examples of ways visuals are used. Use your examples as you present your analysis.

For Learning Modalities

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Verbal/Linguistic and Intrapersonal 5. Career Plan Scott McCloud had a passion for comics, which he pursued by practicing drawing and creating his own comics. What skills or hobbies do you have that, with some practice or development, could be the foundation of a career? Build a plan for how that skill or hobby could turn into a career. Visual/Spatial 6. "Dilbert" Revised The "Dilbert" character, created by Scott Adams, is an average employee working for corporate America. He experiences all of the hassles of the work a day life, from commuting to corporate cutbacks. Create a high school version of "Dilbert." Your "hero" should be an average student who faces a typical, minor annoyance, such as a jammed locker or a long lunch line. Create a strip your fellow students will identify with. Verbal/Linguistic and Visual/Spatia' 7. Standard Essay Take any five frames of McCloud's visual essay and translate each one into a standard essay format. In your essay, communicate all of the ideas that are conveyed in each frame. When you are finished, compare the length of your standard essay with the amount of space taken up by the original five frames. What can you conclude about the use of visuals to communicate? Explain your answer.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Understanding Comics

43

The Dancers by Horton Foote (text page 640)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Diary Entry Take the part of either Horace or Mary Catherine. Write a diary entry that one or the other of the characters might have written after returning home from the dance. De scribe what happened at the dance, explaining why you did or did not have a good time. Also explain how the discussion about confidence helped you at the dance. 2. Letter of Advice Inez Stanley and Elizabeth Crews try to arrange for Horace and Emily to attend the dance together. Think about the plans Inez and Elizabeth made and how they went about making them. What is their purpose in making such plans? Write a letter of ad vice, addressed to Inez and Elizabeth. In your letter, offer advice that you believe would be in the best interests of Horace and Emily.

More Advanced Students

3. Venn Diagram and Paragraph In what ways are Emily Crews and Mary Catherine Davis alike? How are they different from each other? Using a Venn Diagram, compare and contrast the various characteristics of these two friends. Then write a paragraph summarizing the de tails organized in your diagram. 4. Performance With one or two other students, select a scene from the play you would like to perform. Together, rehearse the scene, coaching each other on the action and dialogue. When you feel prepared, perform the scene for the rest of the class.

\...."

For Learning Modalities

Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal 5. 1950's Dance Music While dancing together at the end of the play, Horace and Mary Catherine enjoy the music they hear playing softly on the radio. With a partner. find out which songs were on the top ten chart in 1956, the year in which this play was published. Then, find a recording of at least two of the songs and play them for the class. Visual/Spatial 6. Stage Design Reread the various stage directions that appear throughout the play. Then se lect one scene in the play and create a stage design of that scene. Carefully select the mini mum number of props you wish to include in your drawing. (The playwright says, "Only the barest amount of furnishings should be used to suggest what each area represents.") Use color to show the hue and intensity of lights needed for the scene. Verbal/Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical 7. Gulf Coast Essay and Map The Dancers is set in the fictional town of Harrison, a Gulf Coast town in southeast Texas. Find out about the Gulf Coast region of southeast Texas, in cluding its major cities and unique geographical features. Write a brief essay describing the features of this region. Then prepare a map illustrating the region and the location of the features deSCribed in your essay.

© Prentice~Hall, Inc.

The Dancers

45

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Act III by William Shakespeare (text page 721)

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Act IV by William Shakespeare (text page 747)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1.~)Scene Organizer Are you having a hard time keeping the acts and scenes straight? There

are a lot of details, so U's easy to get confused. Make a graphic organizer that consists of five circles, one for each scene of Act III. Label each circle with a scene number. Then in each circle. write five to ten descriptive or identifying words or short phrases to remind you at a glance what occurs in each scene. 2. Panel Discussion In the beginning of Act IV. Juliet comes to Friar Lawrence for help and he proposes a daring and dangerous plan. Had he been unwilling to help. what do you think she would have done? Convene a panel discussion with two or three classmates to consider the heroine's options. Record the possibilities.

More Advanced Students (SJ Miniature Plot Summaries Plot the rising and falling action of each scene in Act III. For

each scene, identify several events that constitute rising action, a climax, and any falling ac tion that occurs. 4. Herbal Medicine Report Friar Lawrence's interest in herbs is not merely a pursuit of antiq uity. Herbal medicines have been around since the beginning of time. In recent years, health foods have generated a close look from a scientific perspective. Some herbal medicines seem to have no validity, but others are gaining respect from the medical community as useful treatment. Do research and write a report on herbal medicines, focusing on those that have been shown to be of value SCientifically.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial and Verbal/Linguistic 5. Poster Description Imagine that your school is putting on a performance of Act III from Romeo and Juliet. On the advertising poster. the director wants one setup photo from each scene of the act. Your job is to choose the point in each scene that should be photographed for the poster. Choose significant scenes that illustrate the drama without giving away the plot. Identify each scene by speaker and line number, explain what the photo should look like, and then write your reasons for choosing that scene. Verbal/Linguistic 6. Text Aids Suppose you are an editor preparing this text for high school students. Create

some more helpful text aids by paraphrasing six difficult passages that do not have foot

notes in your text.

Visual/Spatial and Logical/Mathematical 7. Timeline Act IV demonstrates the old adage that timing is everything. Friar Lawrence has come up with a scheme that could yet give Romeo and Juliet a chance. Everything hinges on the plan going off as scheduled. It's Tuesday morning when Juliet comes to visit Lawrence. Make a timeline that shows exactly what has to happen and when for Friar Lawrence's bold gamble to succeed. Include all the events he describes in his outline of the plan in Act IV, Scene i.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Acts III & IV

47

"I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" by William Wordsworth (text page 789)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students

1. Description In "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud," Wordsworth expresses appreciation for one

small aspect of nature that changes his life: an impressive field of daffodils. After school, make time to go for a walk or look out a window. With paper and pencil in hand, focus on one small aspect of nature, such as a single tree, a bed of flowers, or a pond. On paper, de scribe your subject in great detail. Then describe your feelings toward your subject. Share your description with the rest of your class. 2. Journal Entry Wordsworth described how his memory-his "inward eye"-evoked powerful and comforting images of a field of daffodils. In your journal, describe your strongest good memory and the feelings you associate with it.

More Advanced Students 3. Conversation Poem or Story "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" was inspired by a conversa tion Wordsworth had with his sister, Dorothy. Recall a memorable conversation that you've had with a friend, family member, teacher, or casual acquaintance. Use the details of this conversation to create a short poem or a short story. 4. Nature Essay Before the poetry of Wordsworth, people were more likely to view nature as something to be used rather than appreciated as a thing of beauty. Do you believe people today view nature as something to be cherished? Do most people think of nature as a re source to be used without restraint, or do more people follow the philosophy of nature put forth by Wordsworth? Answer these questions in a personal essay. Back up your statements with concrete details of your observations.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic and Interpersonal 5. Group Poem Working in a small group, use your imagination to write a group poem that begins "I wandered lonely as a cloud." Write this first line at the top of a piece of paper. Then circulate the piece of paper several times, giving each person a chance to add lines to the poem. Each line should build on the previous line. The poem should be about a person who encounters something interesting as he or she is on a solitary walk. When your group is fin ished, share your piece with the rest of the class. Verbal/Linguistic and Rhythmic/Musical 6. Musical Reading Hold a class reading of poems from the Romantic movement of literature. Each student can be responsible for locating and rehearsing one poem for the reading. As you prepare your poem, you might also think about how you can establish mood with a carefully selected piece of music. When the reading is finished, discuss as a class the poems that were read and what the ideas expressed in the poems have in common with the ideas of Wordsworth. Also discuss how the musical selections helped create particular moods.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

49

"Blackberry Eating" by Galway Kinnell (text page 804)

"Memory" by Margaret Walker (text page 805)

"Woman's Work" by Julia Alvarez (text page 806)

"Meciendo" by Gabriela Mistral (text page 807)

"Eulogy for a Hermit Crab" by Pattiann Rogers (text page 808)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Art Collection In the history of art, perhaps no depiction has been more frequent than that of mother and child, a subject Gabriela Mistral writes about in her poem "Meciendo." The subject appears often, not only in fine art, but also in print advertisements, television com mercials, religious art, and other forms as well. Collect examples of mother and child art that express the many feelings of motherhood. Display your collection in class. 2. Eulogy Pattiann Rogers's "Eulogy for a Hermit Crab" memorializes a creature she encoun tered on a seashore, but you could hardly say she "knew" the crab. Have you known an ani mal of which you were fond? Write a tribute in prose form that characterizes the animal and shows how you feel (or felt) about it and why. More Advanced Students 3. Defense Strategies In "Blackberry Eating," Galway Kinnell refers to the blackberry thorns as "a penalty/they earn for knowing the black art/of blackberry-making." From spears to camouflage to chemical warfare, plants have developed mechanisms to protect themselves. Do research and write a report on the natural defenses of living things that can't run. 4. Graph The speaker in Julia Alvarez's "Woman's Work" contrasts her mother's life with her own. Now more than ever before, women work outside the home. Consult an almanac, or check the library for labor statistics, and prepare a graph of your own design expressing the numbers of women who have worked outside the home. Begin your comparison in the 1950's, and represent each decade up to the present.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial 5. Cityscape Margaret Walker paints a grim picture of the streets, bUildings, and lives of the city in her poem "Memory." Draw, sketch, or sculpt your interpretation of her poem in what ever medium you prefer. Express in your medium what you think she's expressing in hers. Interpersonal and Visual/Spatial 6. Children's Story Sometimes. unusual creatures become the heroes of children's books. Working in a group with two or three other students, design, write, and illustrate a short children's book about a charming hermit crab. Intrapersonal and Verbal/Linguistic 7. Word List In "Blackberry Eating." Kinnell describes some words that he likes, "certain pe culiar words/like strengths or squinched." Some words seem to have a pleasing quality to them, almost a character of their own beyond their meaning. Make a list of words you like and explain why you like them.

@) Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Blackberry/Memory/WorkiMeciendo/Eulogy

51

UThe Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe (text page 832)

"The Seven Ages of Man" by William Shakespeare (text page 836)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Photo Album How have you changed over the years? Of course, you look and behave much

differently from the way you did at one, four, or eight years old. Prepare your own personal photo album that shows your progression from infancy to now. Then, with a good friend, share your photo albums, exchanging stories that you remember from the different times in your life. If you wish, keep up the album, adding a new photo each year. 2. Letter of Condolence Write a letter to the speaker in "The Raven," expressing your sympa thies on the loss of his beloved Lenore. Convey to the speaker your understanding of what Lenore meant to him.

More Advanced Students 3. Portrait of the Artist Many artists. such as Rembrandt or Picasso, painted portraits of

themselves at different ages. Prepare an art exhibit on the theme "Portrait of the Artist" that represents an artist's portrayal of himself or herself over a series of years. To accompany the exhibit, prepare a summary that discusses the changes that can be seen in the collection of portraits. Discuss not only the artist's physical changes, but also changes in attitude or out look as expressed in the portraits. 4. Raven Report In Poe's poem, the Raven says, "Nevermore!" Can ravens really speak? They are known for having a large and varied vocabulary of caws and croaks. The sounds they create can be very deep and distinctive. Find out how ravens are trained to speak and ex plain the process in a report. Include in your report an illustration of a raven.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial 5. Stage Set If Poe's "The Raven" were performed as a play, what do you think the stage set would look like? Create a large drawing depicting your interpretation of the poem's setting as a stage set. Use color and details from the poem to evoke the melancholy mood. Consider the use of perspective and foreshortening to heighten the drama of certain elements, such as the placement of the raven upon the bust. Logical/Mathematical and Verbal/Linguistic 6. Life Expectancy Graph In Shakespeare's time, people were lucky to live into their fortieth year. How have life expectanCies changed? Do life expectancies differ from country to coun tty? Find out what the life expectancies are for men and women in at least five different countries. Then create a bar graph illustrating your findings. Bodily/Kinesthetic and Interpersonal 7. Mime With a partner, create "living sculptures" of the seven stages of life as described in Shakespeare's poem. Reread Shakespeare's poem and decide what body gesture would best portray each of the seven ages. Then practice "creating" the sculptures with your partner. Offer feedback to each other as to how you may improve each sculpture. When you feel pre pared, take turns with your partner presenting the "living sculptures" to the class.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Raven/Ages

53

The Odyssey, Part 1 by Homer (text page 860)

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Job Description Write a job description for an epic hero. Detail the physical and mental requirements that such a role demands. Use Odysseus and his feats as a model for your description. 2. Sailing Terminology Research the Sailing terminology used in the Odyssey. Define at least five terms, such as starboard, port. mast. stem, and bow. If possible, use a diagram to illus trate and support your definitions. More Advanced Students 3. Myth Analysis Write a brief analysis of the gods and goddesses of Greek mythology, based on the characters in Part 1 of the Odyssey. Detail the powers that the gods possess, the connection between gods and the natural world, and the relationship between gods and mortals. Draw conclusions about the importance of gods in ancient Greek culture. 4. Film Treatment Adapt a scene from Part 1 of the Odyssey for a film script. Include brief setting descriptions, lighting cues, stage directions, and camera angles. Adapt lines of verse into dialogue for the script, indicating the speaker for each set of lines.

For Learning Modalities

Visual/Spatial and Verbal/Linguistic 5. Comic Book Odysseus' adventures are the stuff of comic book heroes. Create your own comic book to illustrate an episode from Part 1 of the Odyssey. Illustrate the characters and locations and provide appropriate text, including dialogue in balloons. Intrapersonal and Logical/Mathematical 6. Cause and Effect Chart At times, Odysseus' shortcomings get the hero into trouble. What are his character weaknesses? What negative results did he have because of them? In a chart, list his character weaknesses and a negative experience caused by each weakness. Musical/Rhythmic 7. Siren Songs Set the Sirens' song to music. Choose a tune you already know, or invent one of your own. The music should reflect your interpretation of the mood or tone of the Sirens' song. Then, record the music on an audiocassette. Play the recording for your class. Visual/Spatial 8. mustration Create a painting. collage, or drawing to illustrate an episode from Part 1 of the Odyssey. Your illustration does not have to be realistic. You may choose instead to illus trate the tension, conflict, or action of an episode through brushstrokes. color, and shapes. Be prepared to explain your interpretation.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

rhe Odyssey, Part 1 55

"An Ancient Gesture" by Edna St. Vincent Millay (text page 926) "Siren Song" by Margaret Atwood (text page 927) "Prologue" and "Epilogue" from The Odyssey by Derek Walcott (text page 928) "Ithaca by Constantine Cavafy (text page 930)

tt

Activities for Alternative Assessment

For Performance Levels

Less Advanced Students 1. Journal Entry In Cavafy's "Ithaca," Odysseus' journey to Ithaca is compared to the journey of life. In a journal entry. compare specific details of your life to the voyage of Odysseus. What problems have you encountered that you can compare to Odysseus' encounters with the Cyclops or the Lestrygonians? What did you do to overcome these problems? What im portant lessons have you learned on your journey so far? 2. Letter to Penelope While Odysseus is on his difficult journey. Penelope is left at horne in Ithaca to deal with her own troubles. Think about a time in which you've missed someone or felt left behind. What did you do to try to lift your sadness? Write a personal letter to Pene lope as she is portrayed in "An Ancient Gesture." Share your own experience and offer her some advice on how do deal with her situation.

More Advanced Students

3. Siren Song In her poem "Siren Song." Margaret Atwood gives readers a new perspective on Horner's Strens. Write an original Siren song. based on your own interpretation of these characters from Homer's epic. To begin. think about what you believe the Strens might say to sailors as they pass by. Do you believe they enjoy their role, or do they regret their ac tions? Share your song with the rest of the class. 4. Point of View Rewrite In these poems, the writers have experimented with point of view. Think about a story. play. or poem that you have read and enjoyed. Then rewrite a small part of It from the point of view of a minor character. or from the point of view of a character whose feelings are unknown.

For Learning Modalities

Verbal/Linguistic and Interpersonal 5. Greek Myth Oral Report Classical Greek mythology has had an enormous amount of influ ence on the world of art and literature through the centuries. Working with a partner, re search other poems. stories. plays, and works of art that have been influenced by classical Greek mythology. Find at least two such works of art and literature. take notes, and then share the results of your research with the rest of your class in an oral report. Verbal/Linguistic and Interpersonal 6. Group Epic Work in small groups to write an original epic about an exciting journey. Your journey should be inspired by the work of Horner, but It should contain characters and events from the modern world. To begin, hold a group brainstorming session to try to corne up with interesting ideas. What kinds of adventures might take place in the modern world? Share your works with the rest of the class. Verbal/Linguistic and Body/Kinesthetic 7. Walcott's The Odyssey Performance Working in a small group, locate a copy of Derek Walcott's play The Odyssey. Read through the play and choose key scenes to act out. Assign parts. Rehearse. Invite classmates to see your performance.

© Prentice·Hall, Inc. Ancient/Siren/Prologue/lthaca

57

4. Put a check beside the responses that describe what you do when you

encounter these problems. You may check more than one response. You may also add additional responses. When I come across an unfamiliar word, I

_ _ try to figure out its meaning from the way it is used.

_ _ consult a dictionary.

_ _ ignore it and hope it will become clear as I read further.

When I do not understand the meaning of a sentence, I

_ _ read the sentence several times.

_ _ read the other sentences in the paragraph several times.

_ _ ignore the sentence and hope it will become clear as I read.

When I want to remember important information I have read in subjects

such as science and social studies, I

_ _ ask myself questions about the important ideas.

_ _ relate the information to something I already know.

_ _ repeat the information to myself several times.

_ _ take notes.

When I read an entire passage over again, it is usually because

_ _ I do not understand it.

_ _ it seemed important to remember that particular passage.

_ _ I want to summarize it for myself.

When reading a textbook, I

_ _ read faster or slower depending on the difficulty of the material.

_ _ skip parts I do not understand.

_ _ make predictions about what I am reading.

When reading a textbook, I assume that

_ _ all the sentences are important or they would not be there.

_ _ some sentences are more important than others.

_ _ sentences with the most details are the most important sentences.

Review your answers to the above questions regarding your reading interests and strategies. Then set goals for yourself by answering these questions.

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59

Preparing 10 Read

~arne

________________________________

Date _ _ _ _ __

Directions to the Student: Use these two sets of questions to help you prepare to read a selection, to assess the results of your reading. Title ____________________ Author ___________________

Before I Read

1. What type of selection is this? ____________________ 2. Why am I reading this? _____________________________

3. What do the title, pictures, and general appearance of the selection suggest about the subject or theme?

4. What do I know that might help me better understand this selection?

5. What do I know about the author and his/her style? Have I read other works by this author? __________________________

6. How might the theme or subject of this selection relate to my own life and experiences? __________________________

7. I expect this selection will provide (circle one or more)

information instruction pleasure other because ____________________________________ 8. I expect this to be (circle one) easy average challenging reading because ______________________________________

9. The best approach to reading this selection is to (circle one) scan skim read casually read carefully

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61

~

3

~. ±

Reading Log

~arne

"

(

(

__________________________________________________________________________

Directions to the Student: Use this log to keep a record of the books you have read and those

you want to read. Write the information in the columns, beginning with the title and the author.

~

5'

~

Books I Have Read

T

f

Title

Author

.re

Number es

LJQU::: D Started

DJate L Completed

Comments and Recommendations

Books I Want to Read

Title

IAuthor

_

IType of

Literatur~

I Reason for Reading

I Recommended by

CJ) (,.)

Response to the Short Story

Rate this short story by circling the appropriate word.

\."

11. The characters and dialogue are

believable, and the plot engages my interest.

12. This story is written in a style

weak weak weak weak weak

fair fair fair fair fair

strong strong strong strong strong

that is clear and interesting.

13. This story helps me understand

people and events.

14. The details in this story could be

easily visualized as I read.

15. Overall, I rate this story as

Reasons for my rating:

16. What predictions and questions occurred to me as I read this story? Were

my predictions accurate? Were my questions answered?

Reader's Response Journal

· Was there one passage or event you found puzzling in this short story? If so, write one or more questions you would like to ask the author to explain. · In a short paragraph, describe an element of the short story that reminds you of something in your own life.

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65

Response to the Play

Rate this play by circling the appropriate word.

11. The characters and dialogue are believable. 12. The stage directions and the action of the

~

weak weak weak weak weak weak weak

fair fair fair fair fair fair fair

strong strong strong strong strong strong strong

characters are easily visualized.

13. The plot of the play engages my interest. 14. This play helps me understand people and

events.

15. This play evokes strong feelings or thoughts

about the message or the characters.

16. Reading this play increases my interest in

seeing a performance of the play.

17. Overall, I rate this playas

Reasons for my rating:

18. What predictions and questions occurred to me as I read this story? Were my predictions accurate? Were my questions answered?

Reader's Response Journal

· Is there a dialogue or a scene in this play that you find unclear or puzzling? If so, write one or more questions you would like to ask the playwright to explain. · Briefly describe a character or a scene in this play that reminds you of someone you know or an experience in your life.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

67

6. Summarize the theme or central idea of this selectiQn.

7. Is there a sentence or short passage that states or strongly implies the

message or main idea? If so, what is it?

Response to the Nonfiction Selection

Rate this nonfiction selection by circling the appropriate word.

8. This selection is written in a style that is clear and interesting. 9. The topic, main idea, or purpose is obvious.

10. The details are helpful, informative, and understandable. 11. I can connect with the author's thoughts or feelings about the subject. 12. This selection helps me understand people and events. 13. Overall, I rate this nonfiction selection as

weak weak weak weak weak weak

fair fair fair fair fair fair

strong strong strong strong strong strong

Reasons for my rating:

14. What predictions and questions occurred to me as I read this selection? Were my predictions accurate? Were my questions answered?

Reader's Response Journal

· Is there something especially important that you learned from reading this selection? If so, write about it and explain its significance. · What do you think is this author's greatest strength as a writer? Write a short paragraph to explain your reason, and give an example from the selection to support your reason.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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7. Does a particular word or phrase carry important meaning for the poem? If so, which word or phrase and what meaning does it convey?

Response to the Poem

Rate this poem by circling the appropriate word. 8. The words appeal to my sense of sight, hearing, touch, taste, or smell. 9. The meaning of this poem is clear and precise. 10. I can feel the rhythm of the poem as I read it. 11. I can easily connect the feelings or events in this poem with my own experiences. 12. Overall, I rate this poem as Reasons for my rating: weak weak weak weak weak fair fair fair fair fair strong strong strong strong strong

13. What qualities did I like or dislike about this poem? Why? _ _ _ _ __

14. What predictions and questions occurred to me as I read this poem? Were my predictions accurate? Were my questions answered?

Reader's Response Journal

· When you reread the poem, did you discover something that was not obvious upon your first reading? Explain your discovery and the reason it may have occurred. · Copy a phrase, line, or passage from the poem, and then write a brief comment describing your feelings or thoughts about the passage.

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7. What cultural value, belief, idea, or custom is this selection about?

\...-,

8. Summarize the theme, central idea, or message of this selection.

9. Is there a sentence or short passage that states or strongly implies the theme, central idea, or message? If so, what is it?

Response to the Myth, Folk Tale, Fable, or Legend

Rate this selection by circling the appropriate word.

10. This selection is written in a style that is clear and interesting. 11. This selection engages my interest. 12. The message of this selection is obvious. 13. The message is worthwhile for today's culture. 14. Overall, I rate this selection as

weak weak weak weak weak

fair fair fair fair fair

strong strong strong strong strong

Reasons for my rating:

~

15. Does this selection remind me of other selections I have read? If so, in what way? 16. What predictions and questions occurred to me as I read this story? Were my predictions accurate? Were my questions answered?

Reader's Response Journal

· After a careful rereading of the story, write a new ending for the story and include a new message or lesson if one is required. · Does this story remind you of an experience or event in your life? Briefly tell how the experience relates to the story.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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12. Is there a sentence or short passage that states or strongly implies the theme?

If so, what is it?

Response to the Novel

Rate this novel by circling the appropriate word.

13. The characters and dialogue are believable. 14. The plot engages my interest. 15. This novel is written in a style that is clear and interesting. 16. The details in this novel add to its appeal. 17. Overall, I rate this novel as

weak weak weak weak weak

fair fair fair fair fair

strong strong strong strong strong

Reasons for my rating:

18. What predictions and questions occurred to me as I read this story? Were my predictions accurate? Were my questions answered?

Reader's Response Journal

· Is there a character in this novel that you have strong feelings abQut? Explain the feelings. Does this character remind you of someone you know? If so, in what way? Did your feelings about this character change as the story progressed? · Is there one event in this novel that was surprising or confusing? If so, write a brief paragraph to the author expressing your thoughts.

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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\...-,

7. I perform the following steps when I write (circle the word that applies): Use a journal, brainstorming, or a similar method for deciding on a topic. never occasionally always Think carefully about the audience for which I am writing never occasionally always Write down my purpose for writing before beginning a first draft never occasionally always Write a draft without stopping to correct spelling and mechanical problems never occasionally always Ask someone else to read my draft before revising never occasionally always Proofread and correct mechanical spelling errors after the draft has been revised never occasionally always Try to make my final copy neat and attractive never occasionally always

8. The step in the writing process I do best is

\....,..

9. The reason I am particularly good at this is _____________

10. The best thing about my writing is _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

11. The step in the writing process I most need to improve is _______

12. I need to work on this because _________________

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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7. Are my ideas arranged in a logical way and easy to follow? Are there any places you found confusing? If so, where?

8. How could I modify the organization to make it easier to follow?

9. What do you like best about what I have written? Why?

10. What could I do to improve what I have written?

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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7. Are the ideas presented logically and are they easy to follow? Are there any

parts you found confusing? If so, what parts?

8. What could the writer do to make the paper easier to follow?

9. What do you like best about the paper?

Why? ________________________________________________

10. What one thing could the writer do to most improve this paper?

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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Punel'uation and Capitalization

_ _ Did I end each sentence with the correct punctuation?

_ _ Did I use commas and semicolons correctly?

_ _ Did I capitalize all proper nouns correctly, including names of

characters, nicknames, and place names? _ _ Did I begin each sentence or direct quotation with a capital letter? _ _ Did I use quotation marks to show the beginning and end of another's exact words? _ _ Did I use apostrophes where needed to show possession or missing letters?

Spelling

_ _ Did I check the spelling of the names of people and places? _ _ Did I use the correct form of words that sound alike but have different spellings and meanings? _ _ Did I check the spelling of words I am not sure of, especially

troublesome words like their and there?

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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7. One strategy I used in revising that helped was _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

\..."

8. One strategy I wish I had tried is _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

9. In proofreading for grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling errors, I need

to pay more attention to _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

10. The thing I did most successfully in this paper was _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

11. The thing I most need to work on in my next paper is _ _ _ _ _ _ __

12. The next time I write a paper of this type, I want to be sure to remember

© Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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Scoring Rubric:

~arne

Expression

Date

1

The writing does not have a noticeable orga nization. A letter may lack two or more essential parts. A para graph or essay may have no introduction or conclusion.

__________________________________________________

4 3

The writer uses a con sistent organization throughout. A per sonalletter follows the complete form. Other writing uses an appro priate form. The body of the writing contains the writer's personal observations, experi ences, and feelings. A conclusion brings the writing to a natural stopping place.

2

The organization is not consistent. A personal letter may lack an es sential part. Other writ ing may not exhibit ei ther a clear intro duction or a conclusion.

Organization

The writer uses a con sistent organization throughout. A personal letter follows the cor rect and complete form. Other writing uses an appropriate form. The body of the writing contains the writer's personal observations, experi ences, and feelings; a conclusion (in a para graph or essay) leaves the reader with a thought or question to consider. The writing is engaging and personaL It contains precise details about and vivid de scriptions of experi ences, people, or obser vations. The tone is relaxed, and the details are appropriate for the intended audience. Most details support the writer's final con clusion or insight. The writer consistently uses the first-person point of view.

Elements of Expressive Writing

The writing is personal and contains details and descriptions of ex periences, people, or observations. The tone is informal, and the de tails are appropriate for the intended audience. Many details support a main idea or focus. The writer usually uses the first-person point of view.

The writing is personal and contains some details and descrip tions of experiences, people, or observa tions. The tone may be slangy rather than in formal. The tone and the types of details do not always demon strate an awareness of the audience. The point of view may be inconsistent.

The writing is personal, but the amount and types of details do not demonstrate an aware ness of the intended audience. Essential details are missing. The point of view may be random or keep shifting.

Grammar, Usa e, Mechanics, an Spelling

8

There are few or no errors in mechanics,

usage,gramma~or

spelling. The writer correctly uses first-per son pronouns, includ ing I and me. Dialogue is punctuated correctly.

There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. The case of the firstperson pronouns may occasionally be wrong. The punctuation in the dialogue may have minor errors.

There are several errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Word choice or spelling may hinder easy comprehension.

Numerous errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling interfere with meaning. Dialogue may lack es sential punctuation. Word choice or spelling may interfere with comprehension.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

Narrative Based on Personal Experience

Date

4

3

The narrative has a be ginning, middle, and end. It begins with the first, last, or most im portant event. It ends with a personal com ment or reflection.

2

The narration may lack a clear beginning or end. It contains a per sonal comment or thought, but this may require further elaboration.

1

The writing does not have a beginning, mid dIe, or end. It may lack any personal comment or reflection.

Organization

The narrative has a clear beginning, mid dle, and end. It begins with the first, last, or most important event. It ends with the writers feelings or thoughts about the experience. The narrative is interesting and has a clear point. It is told in chronological order; transitions make the order clear. The narra tive contains numerous and specific details about people, places, and events; the details are appropriate for the intended audience. The writer consistently uses the first-person point of view. There are few or no errors in mechanics,

usage,gramma~or

Elements of Narration

The narrative has a clear point. It is told in chronological order; transitions make the order clear, although they may be repetitive. The narrative contains some specific details about people, places, and events; some may not be identified clearly enough for the in tended audience. The writer usually uses the first-person point of view. There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. The writer usually uses first-person pronouns, but the case may be wrong. The punctua tion in the dialogue may have minor errors.

The narrative is told in chronological order. Transitions are seldom used and may be repet itive. The amount and types of detail do not demonstrate an aware ness of the intended audience. The point of view may shift.

The order of events may be confusing or the narrative may lack essential details. The amount and types of detail do not demon strate an awareness of the intended audience. The point of view keeps shifting.

Grammar, Usaae, Mechanics, an Spelling

spelling. The writer correctly uses first-per son pronouns, includ ing I and me. Dialogue is punctuated correctly.

There are several errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. The writer may use second and thirdperson pronouns. Dia logue is punctuated in consistently. Word choice or spelling may hinder easy compre hension.

Numerous errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling interfere with meaning. Dialogue may lack es sential punctuation. Word choice or spelling may interfere with comprehension.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

Summary

Date

4

3

The summary begins with a topic sentence that states the main idea of the original se lection; all other major ideas are stated and arranged in a generally logical order; a con cluding sentence brings the summary to a close, but extraneous details or reflections may be added; the progression of ideas and informa tion is, for the most part, logical. The purpose is generally clear; the summary expresses only the main idea and most major points of the original selection; most of the writing is tai lored to the audience. Word choice is fairly concise. There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

2

The summary mayor may not state the main idea of the original se lection, or it may not do so at the beginning; it states some, but not all, major ideas and not necessarily in a logical order; the summary may lack a conclusion or include extraneous details or reflections; the development of ideas is not completely logical or coherent. The purpose wavers; the summary does not accurately express the main idea or most major points of the original selection; most of the writing is not tai lored to the audience. Word choice is vague or repetitive. There are serious errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

1

The summary does not state the main idea of the original selection; it states few major ideas and does not use a logi cal order; it lacks a con clusion and includes extraneous or minor details or reflections; the writing lacks unity and coherence.

Organization

The summary begins with a clear topic sen tence that states the main idea of the origi nal selection; all other major points are stated economically and arranged in logical order; a concluding sentence effectively brings the summary to a close, but no details or reflections are added; the writing is unified and coherent throughout. The overall purpose of the summary is clear; the summary ex presses only the main idea and major points of the original selec tion; the writing is tai lored to the audience. Word choice is consis tently efficient and concise.

Elements of Summaries

The purpose is unclear; the summary does not convey the main idea or major points of the original selection; most of the writing is not tailored to the audience. Word choice is confusing or misleading. Serious errors in me chanics, usage, grammar, or spelling make the summary difficult to understand.

Grammar, Usa e, Mechanics, an Spelling

8

There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage,grammar,or spelling.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

How-to/Process Explanation

Date

4

3

The introduction con tains a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or the sis sentence (in an essay); the body ex plains the steps in volved in doing or making something; the conclusion presents the last step or another logical ending; transitions are used throughout.

2

The introduction con tains a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or the sis sentence (in an essay), but the sentence may be unclear, impre cise, or undeveloped; the body explains only some of the steps in volved in doing or making something; the conclusion does not present the last step or any other logical reflec tion on the process; more or better transi tions are needed throughout. The purpose is unclear; steps may be presented out of order; the writing lacks transitional words and phrases that show order; the writing does not address the intended audience. Most word choices are imprecise, redundant, or confusing. Errors in mechanics, usage,grammar,or spelling interfere with the audience's understanding of the process.

1

The introduction lacks a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or thesis sentence (in an essay); the body does not break the process into steps; the conclusion is missing or repetitive; the writing lacks transitions.

Organization

The introduction con tains a clearly stated topic sentence (in a paragraph) or clearly stated thesis sentence (in an essay); the body fully and clearly ex plains the steps in volved in doing or making something; the conclusion effectively ends the writing with the last step, with the author's perspective on the activity, or with a clincher statement; ef fective and varied tran sitions are used throughout. The overall purpose is clear; the steps are presented in the order in which they are performed; transitional words and phrases that show order are used ef fectively; the writing is tailored to the audi ence. Word choice is consistently precise. There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

Elements of How-tol Process Explanation Writing

The purpose is generally clear; most steps are presented in the order in which they are performed; transitional words and phrases that show order are used; the writing is generally focused on the audience.Mostword choices are precise. There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

No purpose is appar ent. The writing does not address the intended audience. Word choices are im precise, redundant, or confusing.

Grammar, Usa e, Mechanics, an Spelling

8

Serious and numerous errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling block the audi ence's understanding of the process.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

Cause-Effect

Date

4

3

The introduction con tains a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or the sis sentence (in an essay); the body exam ines the topic by break ing it down into causes and effects; the conclu sion brings the writing to a close; there is a generally logical pro gression of ideas and information.

2

The introduction con tains a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or the sis sentence (in an essay), but the sentence may be unclear, impre cise, or inadequate; the body explains at least one cause and effect; a conclusion is present but may be weak or repetitive; more logical development is needed throughout.

1

The introduction lacks a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or thesis sentence (in an essay), or the sentence is mis leading or unclear; the body does not explain causes and effects; the conclusion is missing, contradictory, or repet itive; the writing lacks unity and coherence.

Organization

The introduction con tains a clearly stated topic sentence (in a paragraph) or clearly stated thesis sentence (in an essay); the body fully and competently examines the topic by breaking it down into causes and effects; the conclusion effectively ends the writing, with out repetition, and con tains a clincher state ment; unity and coherence is achieved throughout. The overall purpose is clear; causes and effects are logical; cause-effect transition words and phrases are used effec tively; the writing is tailored to the audi ence. Word choice is consistently careful and often particularly precise, powerful, or apt. There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage,grammar,or spelling.

Elements of Cause-Effect Writing

Overall purpose is generally clear; most causes and effects are logical; there is some use of spe ciflc cause-effect transi tion words; the writing shows fairly consistent awareness of the audi ence. Most word choices are precise.

The purpose is not always obvious; causes and effects are not en tirely clear or logical; there is little or no use of cause-effect transi tion words; greater at tention should be given to the intended audi ence.Severalword choices are redundant, vague, or imprecise. There are several errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

The purpose is not clear; causes and effects are illogical or missing; the writing lacks causeeffect transition words and phrases; the writ ing is not tailored for the intended audience. Word choice is consis tently confusing or unclear. ExpreSsion is blocked by numerous errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

Grammar, Usaae, Mechanics, an Spelling

There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

Evaluation/Review

Date

4

3

The review begins with a thesis statement that identifies the work by title and author and states an overall evalu ation of the work. The body provides reasons for the evaluation; most points are ex plained and supported with details and exam pIes from the work. The conclusion brings the review to an appro priate close.

2

The review begins with a thesis statement that may fail to identify the work or state an overall evaluation of it. The body provides some explanation, but most points lack develop ment, and little evi dence is used from the work. The conclusion is weak or repetitive.

1

The review does not begin with a thesis statement. The body does not explain and develop supporting ev idence. No organiza tional plan is evident.

Organization

The review begins with a clear thesis statement that identifies the work by title, author, and genre and succinctly states an overall evalu ation of the work. The body provides specific reasons for the evalua tion; all points are fully explained and sup ported with details and examples from the work. The conclusion leaves the reader with a memorable final point or a strong im pression of the writer's evaluation. The writing focuses solely on explaining ei ther the negative or positive worth of the work. The review es tablishes, explains, and sticks to the same crite ria for evaluation throughout. The tone is appropriate to the evaluation. There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. The title of the work and evidence from the work are correctly capitalized and punctuated throughout.

Elements of Evaluation! Review

The writing generally focuses on explaining either the negative or positive worth of the work. The review uses the same criteria for evaluation throughout. The tone is generally appropriate to the evaluation. There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Most conventions re lated to capitalizing and punctuating the title of the work and supplying evidence from the work are followed.

The evaluation does not clearly focus on ei ther the negative or positive worth of the work. Criteria for eval uation are unclear or inconsistent. The tone is marginally appropri ate to the evaluation.

The evaluation does not focus on either the negative or positive worth of the work. The review fails to establish criteria or does not pre sent an understandable point of view. The tone is inappropriate.

Grammar, usaJe, Mechanics, an Spelling

There are several errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Only some of the con ventions related to cap italizing and punctuat ing the title of the work and supplying evi dence from the work are followed.

There are many serious errors in mechanics,

usage,gramma~or

spelling. Few or none of the conventions related to capitalizing and punctuating the title of the work and supplying evidence from the work are followed.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

~arne

Research Report/Paper

Date

1

The report is generally confusing and hard to follow. The writing lacks any real organiza tion and it may also lack a thesis statement. The body presents sup port that may be re lated to the topic but only in a general way. The organization is poor or nonexistent. Transitions may be used inconsistently or may be lacking.

_________________________________________________

4

3

The report is accurate and clear. The writing begins with an intro duction that contains a clear thesis statement. The body explores the topic and presents in formation in a sensible order. The conclusion restates the thesis or of fers a comment or question on it. Transi tions link most ideas.

2

The report is factual and shows evidence of some work. The writ ing begins with an in troduction that con tains a thesis statement, but this might need clarification. The body explores the topic and presents a variety of in formation. The organi zation of this informa tion may not always be clear or logical. Some transitions are used, but more are needed.

Organization

The report is both accurate and com pelling. The writing begins with an inter esting or provocative introduction that contains a clear and concise thesis state ment. The body fully explores the topic and presents information in a sensible order. The conclusion restates the thesis or offers a com ment or question on it. Effective and varied transitions link all ideas. The writer provides facts and quotations from a variety of sources. Facts and ideas are either ex pressed in the writer's words or else com pletely and correctly documented. The body of the report sup ports and develops the writer's thesis, and it contains no extraneous ideas. The report ineludes a complete and correct bibliography or source list. There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage/grammar,or spelling. Word choice is precise and appropriate for the audience.

Elements of Research Reports/Papers

The writer provides facts and quotations from several sources. Facts and ideas are ei ther expressed in the writer's words or else documented. The body of the report sup ports and develops the writer's thesis, and it usually exhibits unity and coherence. The re port includes a com plete bibliography or source list.

The writer provides facts and quotations from more than one source. Facts and ideas are not always docu men ted or expressed in the writer's words. The body of the report lacks real unity and co herence, although most details are somewhat related to the topic. The report includes an in complete or incorrect bibliography or source list. There are numerous er rors in mechanics,

usage,gramma~or

The writer prOvides a mixture of opinions, facts, and statements. Facts and ideas are often not expressed in the writer's words or else they lack documen tation. The body of the report lacks unity and coherence, and may be difficult to understand. The report may not in clude a bibliography or source list, or this may be incomplete or incorrect. Numerous errors in me chanics, usage, grammar, or spelling may hinder comprehension. Word choice shows lit tIe understanding of the audience.

I

Grammar, Usa e, Mechanics, an Spelling

8

There are minor errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Word choice is usually appropriate for the audience.

spelling. Word choice is not always appropriate for the audience.

Comments

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99

Scoring Rubric:

Name

Poetry

Date

4

3

The form of the poem is appropriate to the subject. The poem en abIes the reader to see, hear, feel, or think about the subject.

2

The form of the poem should be more appropriate to the subject. The poem enables the reader to see, hear, feel, or think about the sub ject, but this is accom plished through cliches, wornout im ages, or other pre dictable choices. Sensory details and figurative language may be overused, underused, or inappropriate to the subject; sound devices, such as rhyme, alliteration, or ono matopoeia, may be overused or underused, or they may fail to add to the meaning of the poem. Word choices may be vague, repetitive, or imprecise. The poem is difficult to understand at times be cause of errors in me chanics, usage, gram mar, or spelling.

1

The form of the poem is not appropriate to the subject. The poem does not enable the reader to see, hear, feel, or think about the subject.

Oraanization an Overall Impact

The fonn of the poem is appropriate to the subject. The poem en abIes the reader to see, hear, feel, or think about the subject in a new way or in a more potent way than ever before.

Elements of Poetry

Sensory details and figurative language create vivid images that con tribute significantly to the meaning of the poem; sound devices, such as rhyme, allitera tion, or onomatopoeia, are used effectively and contribute to the meaning of the poem. Word choice is vivid and exact throughout. There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage/grammar, or spelling.

Sensory details and figurative language con tribute to the meaning of the poem; sound de vices, such as rhyme, alliteration, or ono matopoeia, also add to the meaning of the

poem.~ostword

There is no use - or consistently confusing or inappropriate useof sensory details, figu rative language, or sound devices. Words may be misused or unclear.

choices are precise.

Grammar, Usaae, Mechanics, an Spelling

There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

The poem is consistently difficult to understand because of errors in mechanics, usage/grammar,or spelling.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

Response to Literature

Date

4

3

The response begins with a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or a thesis statement (in an essay) that identifies the work by title and author and states a re sponse to the work. The body explores the response through ex pressing thoughts and feelings. Some reasons are explored and sup porting examples given. The conclusion brings the response to a satisfactory close.

2

The response begins with a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or a thesis statement (in an essayt but the sentence may not identify the work by title, author, and genre or state an overall response to the work. The body ex plores the response, but more thoughts, feelings, reasons, and specific examples from the work are needed. The conclusion may be weak or repetitive.

1

The response does not begin with either a topic sentence (in a paragraph) or a thesis statement (in an essay), and the writer fails to identify the work by title, author, and genre. The overall response is unstated, unclear, or unsupported. No organizational plan is evident.

Organization

The response begins with a clear topic sen tence (in a paragraph) or a clear thesis state ment (in an essay) that identifies the work by title, author, and genre, and states an overall response to the work. The body explores the overall response through expressing thoughts and feelings, by giving reasons, and by supporting points with examples from the work. The conclusion leaves the reader with a question, a quotation, a fresh insight, or another memorable impression. The purpose of expressing feelings and thoughts, and thereby deepening the writer's and the reader's under standing of the work, is achieved. The response summarizes the work as needed to clarify main points but does not retell the work. Word choice is consis tently precise, vivid, or expressive.

Elements of Responses to Literature

The writing offers some degree of new in sight into the work. The response summa rizes the work to clarify main points but may also unnecessarily retell the work. Word choice is generally precise.

The writing does little to deepen the writer's or the reader's under standing of the work. The response may also unnecessarily retell the work or fail to summa rize when necessary. Word choice is vague.

The writing does not deepen the writer's or the reader's under standing of the work. The response unneces sarily retells the work or fails to summarize when necessary. Words are misused or create confusion.

Grammar, Usa e, Mechanics, an Spelling

8

There are few or no errors in m~hanics,

usage,gramma~or

spelling. Titles of works are correctly punctuated throughout.

There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Titles of works are cor rectly punctuated.

Several errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling make it difficult to understand parts of the response. Titles of works are not correctly punctuated.

Numerous and serious errors in mechanics,

usage,gramma~or

spelling make it diffi cult to understand the response. Titles of works are not correctly punctuated.

Comments

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Scoring Rubric:

Name

Literary Analysis/Interpretation

Date

4

3

The analysis begins with a thesis statement that identifies the work by title and author and states the meaning of the whole work or some part of it. The body explains and develops the thesis and provides supporting examples from the work. The conclusion brings the analysis to a satisfactory close.

2

The analysis begins with a thesis statement that identifies the work by title and author, but it may not address the meaning of the whole work or some part of it. The body only partially explains or develops the thesis; few supporting examples from the work are given. The conclusion may be weak, repetitive, or missing.

1

The analysis does not begin with a thesis statement, and the writer fails to identify the work by title, au thor, and genre. No organizational plan is evident.

Organization

The analysis begins with a clear thesis statement that identifies the work by title, author, and genre and suc cinctly states the meaning of the whole work or some part of it. The body expertly explains and develops the thesis and provides supporting examples from the work itself or from related works that back up the thesis. The conclusion leaves the

reader with a question,

a quotation, a fresh in sight, or another memo rable impression. The purpose of explaining meaning is achieved, thereby deepening the reader's understanding of the work or related works. The analysis summarizes the work to the extent needed to clarify main points but does not retell the work. Word choice is consis tently precise, vivid, or

powerful.

There are few or no errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. The title of the work and evidence from the work are correctly capitalized and punctuated throughout.

Elements of Literary Analyses! Interpretations

The writing offers some new insight into the work or related works, but the analysis may not consistently summarize the work to the extent needed to clarify main points, or it may unnec essarily retell the work. Word choice is gener ally precise.

The writing does little to deepen the reader's understanding of the work or related works. The analysis may sum marize instead of ana lyze, or fail to summarize as needed to explain points. Word choice is generally imprecise and may be misleading.

The writing does not deepen the reader's understanding of the work or related works. Summary may be substi tuted for analysis. Word choice is incorrect or confusing.

Grammar, Usa e, Mechanics, an Spelling

8

There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Most conventions related to capitalizing and punctuating the title of the work and supplying evidence from the work are followed.

There are several errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling. Only some of the conventions related to capitalizing and punctuat ing the title of the work and supplying evi dence from the work are followed.

There are many serious errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, and spelling. Few or none of the conventions related to capitalizing and punctuating the title of the work and supplying evidence from the work are followed.

Comments

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Scorillg Rubric:

Name

Resume and Cover Letter

Date

4

3

The writer uses an or ganized resume for mat and the correct form for a business let ter. The resume has identified sections, which contain accu rate facts. Sections are organized in a sensible way: chronologically, by order of impor tance, or by skill. The cover letter contains the six essential parts: heading, inside ad dress, salutation, body, closing, and signature. The resume fills a single page. It is written in phrases and contains mostly facts about edu cational background and experience. The letter identifies what the writer wants: a job, an interview, or consid eration. The letter uses formal language, but the level of language may be inconsistent.

2

The writer tries to arrange the resume on the page and approxi mates the correct form for a business letter. The resume contains accurate facts, but these may not be arranged in a logical way. The cover letter may be missing one or two essential parts.

1

The writer demon strates a lack of under standing of the correct form for a resume and business letter. The re sume is disorganized and hard to under stand; section headings may be used inconsis tently or may be miss ing entirely. The letter may lack several essen tial parts.

Organization and Form

The writer uses a clear and organized resume format and the correct and complete form for a business letter. The resume has identified sections, which con tain complete and ae curate facts. Sections are organized in a sen sible way: chronologi cally, by order of im portance, or by skill. The cover letter con tains the six essential parts: heading, inside address, salutation, body, closing, and signature. The resume fills a single page. It is written in brief, understandable phrases and contains relevant or standard facts. It does not con tain the pronoun 1. The letter explains its pur pose and identifies what the writer wants: a job, an interview, or consideration. The let ter uses formal lan guage and contains no extraneous details. There are no errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling.

Elements of Business Writing

The resume may not fill the page. It is writ ten in words and phrases that contain assorted facts about educational back ground and experi ence; these details may be incomplete or hard to understand. The let ter may not clearly identify what the writer wants, and some parts may be missing or may be missing elements. There are noticeable errors in mechanics, usage,grammar/or spelling. Some of these may hinder comprehension.

The resume may not fill the page. Facts about educational background and expe rience may be incom plete and difficult to understand. Important details are omitted. In the letter, the writer does not state the purpose for writing. The level of language is inconsistent or inappropriate.

Grammar, usaae, Mechanics, an Spelling

There are some errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, or spelling, but they do not detract from the meaning.

The resume and letter are hard to understand because of numerous errors in mechanics, usage,grammar,or spelling.

Comments

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Initial Self-Assessment:

~arne

Speaking and Ustening

_____________________________________________ Date _ _ _ _ __

Directions to the Student: This self-assessment is designed to help you recognize and focus on your strengths and weaknesses as a speaker and listener. Your responses can help you set goals to improve your speaking and listening skills. Consider each question carefully and answer as hon estly as you can. During the year, review and update your assessment. At the end of the year, use this assessment sheet to set new goals.

Circle your response to each statement. 1. When I am speaking, I watch my listeners to be sure they are following me. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

2. I enjoy giving a speech or oral presentation to a group of people. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

3. When I give a speech or oral presentation, I am able to hold everyone's attention. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

4. I use gestures and body language effectively when I speak. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

5. I make eye contact with my audience. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

6. In school, I listen carefully and can recall most of what I hear. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

7. I am able to identify the main points and supporting details in an oral

presentation and record them clearly in my notes. strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

8. My strongest skill as a speaker is ____________________________

9. One thing I can do to improve my listening skills is _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

Share your responses to these items with a family member or a friend. Discuss their opinions of your listening and speaking skills as they apply at school, at home, and in the community.

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Peer Assessment: Speaker/Speech

~arne

____________________________________________ Date _ _ _ _ __

Directions to the Reviewer: Use this sheet to assess a speech given by one of your classmates. Be honest, but keep in mind that harsh, critical com ments can be hurtful. Your goal is to help your classmate recognize the successful elements of his or her speech as well as areas that need improvement.

NameofSpeaker: _____________________________________________ Topic: ____________________________________________________ _ _ Assigned by Teacher _ _ Chosen by Student Point Scale Rate the speaker according to the scale. Write the matching number in the space. _ _ 1. The speaker prepared for this speech. ____ 2. The speaker was relaxed and confident.

_ _ 3. The speaker spoke clearly and slowly.

4 = Thoroughly 3 = Mostly

2 = Very little 1 = Not at all

____ 4. The speaker made eye contact with listeners.

_ _ 5. The speaker used appropriate gestures and facial expressions.

_ _ 6. The speaker used graphic aids effectively.

Use your own words to assess each element of the speech: Introduction ______________________________

Body Conclusion _________________________________

Organization of Ideas __________________________

Sentence Variety ______________________________

LevelofInterest _________________________________

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Peer Assessment:

Dramatic Performance

Name _____________________________________________ Date __~______

Directions to the Student: You may have an opportunity to watch two or

three of your classmates give a short dramatic performance. Use this sheet

to evaluate their performance. Answer each question as thoroughly and

as honestly as you can.

1. Who participated in the performance? ________________ 2. What work did they perform? ____________________ 3. How appropriate was the work for the audience? Was this an original piece written by one of the performers, a piece assigned by the teacher, or a piece

selected by the student actors? ________________________

4. How prepared were the student performers? Did they know their lines? Did their movements, gestures, and facial expressions seem planned and wellrehearsed? _____________________________________________

5. Were the movements, gestures, and facial expressions appropriate to the work? Explain. ______________________________________

6. How well could you hear the performers? Why do you think this was so?

7. Did the performers make use of any props during the performance? In what

way did they enhance or detract from the performance? ________

8. How did the audience. react? ________________________

9. Overall, I think this performance was ________________

10. If students have a chance to perform this work again, I would suggest they

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Self-Assessment:

~arne

Speaking and Listening Progress

_______________________________________________ Date _______

Directions to the Student: These pages are designed to help you track your speaking and listening progress. The journal section will give you in sight into your average daily speaking and listening opportunities. The checklist will help you note specific areas where your speaking and listen ing skills have improved and where you could still use improvement.

Daily Log of Speaking and Listening Opportuni'ties

Use this section to record the speaking and listening opportunities you had today and to assess your behavior during each opportunity.

Timeofday: ________________

Place: _______________

Was this a speaking or listening opportunity? ____________ Explain what happened, who participated, and the speaking and listening skills that you practiced at this time.

How would you rate your speaking and listening behavior for this opportunity? (Circle one.) Excellent Good Satisfactory Needs Improvement

Timeofday: ______________

Place: ____________

Was this a speaking or listening opportunity? _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Explain what happened, who participated, and the speaking and listening skills that you practiced at this time.

How would you rate your speaking and listening behavior for this opportunity? (Circle one.) Excellent Good Satisfactory Needs Improvement

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Teacher Observation

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Speaking and Listening Progress Chart:

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Directions to the Teacher: This chart is designed to help you track the progress of students' speaking and listen ing behavior. Write the students' names in the first column. Use the Key to record your observations for each be havior. Share your observations with students to help them recognize how their speaking and listening skills have progressed and to help them set goals for improving. Key P Proficient I = Improving N Needs Attention

Progress Chart: Speaking

Student's Name Enjoys speaking to a group. Appears calm and confident. Is prepared and knows material. Uses body language and gestures effectively. Uses visual aids effectively.

.

~~~~~~~~~

.

..... .....

.......

Work Readiness Skills:

~arne

Teacher Observation

________________________________________________ Date ____________

Directions to the Teacher: This instrument is designed to help you iden

tify and record behavior related to future job performance. It has been de

rived from a report by the Secretary's Commission on Achieving N eces

sary Skills (SCANS), published by the Department of Labor. In the center

column, write a brief description of the behavior observed and the date

and circumstances of the observation. In the right column indicate the

level of readiness you assess this behavior demonstrates: P for Prepara

tory, W for Work Ready, and A for Advanced. Add to this log periodi

cally throughout the school year.

I. Basic Skills: Reading

1. Locates, understands, and interprets written information from text, graphs, or schedules to perform a task. 2. Identifies the main idea or essential message in written text.

Behavior

Level of Readiness

3. Infers relevant details, facts, and specifications.

4. Uses contextual clues or finds meaning for

unknown or technical vocabulary.

5. Judges the accuracy, appropriateness, style, and plausibility of reports or proposals of other writers.

II. Basic Skills: Writing

6. Records information completely and accurately. 7. Uses graphs and flow charts to present information. 8. Uses language, style, organization, and format appropriate to the subject matter, purpose, and audience.

9. Includes supporting documentation.

10. Uses appropriate level of detail. 11. Checks, edits, and revises for correct information, appropriate emphasis, and form. 12. Checks, edits, and revises for correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

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VI. Thinking Skills: Decision Making

30. Specifies goals and limitations. 31. Generates alternatives. 32. Considers risks. 33. Evaluates and chooses best alternatives.

Behavior

Level of Readiness

VII. Thinking Skills: Problem Solving

34. Recognizes that a problem exists (Le., identifies a

discrepancy between what is and what should or could be).

35. Identifies possible reasons for discrepancy. 36. Devises and implements a plan to resolve discrepancy. 37. Evaluates and monitors progress of the resolution. 38. Revises plan as indicated by findings.

VIII. Thinking Skills: Seeing Things in the Mind's Eye

39. Organizes and processes abstract information

(Le., sees a building from a blueprint, a system's operation from schematics, the flow of work activities from narrative descriptions, or the taste of food from reading a recipe.) IX. Thinking Skills: Knowing H.ow to Learn

40. Knows his or her personal learning style

I

(visual, aural, and kinesthetic).

41. Practices formal learning strategies such as note

taking or clustering items that share some characteristics.

42. Evaluates information and opinions, identifying

false assumptions and illogical conclusions.

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XIV. Personal Qualities: Sociability

57. Demonstrates understanding, friendliness,

Behavior

Level of Readiness

adaptability, empathy, and politeness in new and on-going group settings.

58. Asserts self in familiar and unfamiliar social

situa tions.

59. Relates well to others. 60. Responds appropriately as situations require. 61. Shows an interest in what others do and say.

XV. Personal Qualities: Self-Management

62. Assesses own knowledge, skills, and abilities

accurately.

63. Sets well-defined and realistic personal goals. 64. Monitors progress toward goal attainment. 65. Motivates self through goal achievement

(Le., a self starter).

66. Exhibits self-control and responds to feedback

unemotionally and non defensively . XVI. Personal Qualities: Integrity/Honesty

67. Demonstrates trustworthiness. 68. Recognizes decision or behavior that may not

coincide with commonly-held personal or social values.

69. Understands impact on self, others, and

organizations of violating commonly-held personal or social values.

70. Chooses an ethical course of action.

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Portfolio Planner Part II: Strategies and Resources

6. I will need to do these assignments and activities to reach my goals:

7. I expect to complete this portfolio by _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ 8. Complete the following chart to plan the specific steps in completing your portfolio. As you complete each step, record the date in the last column. Goal:

Step

Task: Assignment or Activity

Materials and Resources Needed

Will be Completed By

Date Completed

1.

2.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8.

Plan Approval

Date of Conference Suggestions

Teacher's Signature

Progress Check

Date of Conference Suggestions

Date of Conference Teacher's Signature

Teacher's Signature

~

Suggestions

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Type of Writing: Exposition - Making Connections

Title of Paper

~

Stage of Development:

Prewriting Drafting Revising and Editing Finished Paper

Date Date Date Date

Type of Writing: Persuasion

Title of Paper Stage of Development: Prewriting Drafting Revising and Editing Finished Paper Date Date Date Date

Type of Writing: Reports

Title of Paper Stage of Development: Prewriting Drafting Revising and Editing Finished Paper Date Date Date Date

~

Type of Writing: Creative

Title of Paper Stage of Development: Prewriting Drafting Revising and Editing Finished Paper Date Date Date Date

Type of Writing: Response to Literature

Title of Paper Stage of Development: Prewriting Drafting Revising and Editing Finished Paper Date Date Date Date

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Portfolio Final Evaluation:

~arne

Teacher Raling

_____________________________________________ Date ______

Directions to the Teacher: Use this form for an overall assessment of the completed student portfolio. In addition, you may ask the student to com plete a Portfolio Final Self Evaluation form. These forms can be placed in the portfolio and referred to during student or parent conferences.

I. Assessment of Individual Items

Rate each item in the portfolio from 1 to 4, with 4 being the highest. ITEM GOAL RATING COMMENTS

II. Overall Assessment

Rate the overall achievement of the portfolio in these areas using the following rubrics:

_ _ Focus 4. All items reflect a clear sense of goals and a focused

strategy for attaining them.

3. Most items reflect the stated goals of the portfolios, but work includes a few unproductive strategies. 2. Goals are lacking in clarity and strategies have regular lapses in focus.

1. No consistent goal and generally aimless activities in

this portfolio.

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Date: -----------------Dear Parent or Guardian: Recent studies show how important parental involvement is in helping students achieve suc cess in school. Because I know that you want your child to have an excellent year in English, I'm pleased to tell you about our curriculum and suggest some ways you can participate in improv ing your child's performance. In English this year we will be using Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. This program combines a wide variety of quality reading selections with literature analysis, critical thinking and reading skills, and composition. Importantly, it connects the literature to students' own experiences through the development of themes relevant to students' lives. You can help your child get the most from this program and from all of his or her homework by following this expert-tested advice. · Find the best time for studying. Work with your teenager to decide on the best time for studying. Then set that time aside at least five days out of every week. If there is no home work, your child can use the time to review or plan ahead. · Eliminate common distractions. Set aside a study area that is free from noise and other distractions. Turn off the TV. Your teenager may say that watching television is helpful, but no research supports this. In fact, watching television allows students to "turn off their minds" because it requires no action or interaction. · Avoid common interruptions. Take messages if the telephone rings, and have your

teenager alert his or her friends not to drop by during the established study time.

· Provide physical conditions that help concentration. Ensure that the study area has ade quate lighting and is kept at a comfortable temperature. Provide a table or desk that has enough space for writing. · Keep supplies handy. Keeping studying materials nearby saves time. Placing them in a small bucket or box makes it easy to move them to the study area. A list of supplies should also include a dictionary and a thesaurus. · Encourage computer literacy. Help your teenager to see the value of using the computer to write his or her compositions and other assignments. Encourage your child to use the com puters at school or the public library. If you have a home computer, provide quality word processing software for your child. · Ask to see your child's books. Looking through the books gives you a better idea of what your teenager is learning, and shows him or her that you think the material is important. · Ask to see your child's work on a regular basis. You do not need to criticize or regrade the papers. That will only make your teenager less willing to show you his or her work. Just let your child know you are interested. · Read. By watching you read, your teenager will see reading as a valuable activity. You can be especially effective if you occasionally read and discuss one of the selections your child is covering in class. I look forward to working with your child and hope you will contact me if you have any questions during the school year. Cordially,

English Teacher

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Writing:

Home Review Letter

Name _______________________________________________ Date _ _ _ _ __

To the Student: Fill in the name of a family member or an adult friend, and attach this letter to the final version of your work to request com ments on your work. Date _______________ Dear ________________ I am attaching something that I wrote in school recently. I would appreciate it if you would read it and tell me what you think of it. I am particularly interested in getting your answers to the questions below . You can answer them on the lines under each question. What do you think my purpose is for writing this?

Were you able to follow my thoughts? If not, where did you get lost? What could I have done to make it easier to follow along?

Is there any information you wish I had included? If so, what?

Are there any parts you think I could have left out? If so, which parts?

What do you like best about what I have written?

What else would you like to tell me about what I have written?

Thank you for your help. Sincerely yours,

Writing Student

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