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Assignment given to the students on Wednesday, February 2, 2005 Part I is due on Thursday, February 10, 2005 The whole project is due on Thursday, March 10, 2005 ______________________________ Parent's Signature ______________ Date

The Heroes and Heroines Final Project Number of Cards: 75 (40 using Bloom's Taxonomy Learning Verbs) All question cards must have answers on them. Key Principles: 1) Heroes and heroines reflect cultural values. 2) Heroes and heroines meet a need for an individual or group. 3) What can be considered heroic in one time period may not be considered heroic in another. 4) Not all people in a given time or culture agree on what is heroic. 5) Chance and circumstance shape heroes and heroines. 6) Society may vary criteria by gender for heroes and heroines. 7) Fictional heroes and heroines are both like and different from real-life heroes and heroines. 8) Real-life heroes and heroines have both strengths and weaknesses. 9) No individual embodies every heroic ideal. Part I: This must be typed up or written neatly in ink: 1) Pick a person you consider a hero/heroine who lived prior to 1900. Our social studies book is an excellent resource. Create question/chance cards that demonstrate your understanding of the key principles of this person. For example: "Muhammad made sure that more rights were given to women as provided through the Quran, move forward 4 spaces." (Key Principles #1, #2, & #4.) Make sure that you label it with the Key Principle/s. 2) Pick a person you consider a contemporary (recent) hero/heroine. The summer Olympics should supply a wide range of choices. You must pick someone who is considered heroic for different reasons than the other person you selected. In addition, you must pick people that represent different ethnic groups. For example, Asian and Afro-American. Create question/chance that demonstrate your understanding of the key principles of this person. 3) Create a diagram graphic organizer in which you compare and contrast real-life heroes and fictional heroes. 4) Create question/chance cards that demonstrate your understanding of the key principles from the television programs that you watched: "The Outsiders," "The Quest for King Arthur," "Seven Wonders of Ancient Greece," "First Olympian," "Stylianos Kyriakides, The Journey of a Warrior," "Nostradamus: 500 Years Later," "EYEWITNESS IN IRAQ," and "Portraits of Grief." For example, Nostradamus is a good example of Key Principle #4: Not all people in a given time or culture agree on what is heroic. Your question/chance card could say: "Which historic figure that we saw on TV is controversial? Some people consider him a hero, other people think of him as a charlatan." Answer: Nostradamus. Make sure that you label it Key Principle #4." 5) Create questions/chance cards that show the key principles from the guest speakers that have visited our classroom. "Like Dr. Silverio Chavez, you pursue a higher education to help others, move two spaces forward." (Key Principle #2). Another example: "Cesar Chavez helped the rights of farm workers, move 4 spaces forward." (Key Principle #2). Another Example: "You helped with controlling the wildfires, move 3 spaces forward." (Key Principles #2 & #5). 6) Create questions/chance cards that show the key principles about the soldiers. Try and use specific people when possible. "Wesley Salis on the USS Duluth, came to the aid of the victims of the Tsunami, move forward 2 spaces." (Key Principles #2 and #5). Names of soldiers on USS Duluth: MRFA Wesley Salis LCpl James Joines, Cpl Jacob M. Baughman, LCpl Damien Moore, HM3 Darin M. Taylor, LCpl Curtis Bailey and Sgt. Rob Elliott. Plus, CPL Rebekah Cowley (Military Police in Iraq), Sgt. James Bourdon (Iraq), and Captain Brendan Hobbs (Mrs. Xinos's nephew).

7) You need to make sure that you cover all of the key principles through the use of question/chance cards. You can use other sources to make sure that they are all covered. Use your social studies book, literature book, the internet, cartoons etc. For example, Lenny Skutnik became a hero by circumstance (Key Principle #5). He happened to be on a bridge outside Washington, D.C., when an Air Florida jetliner on take-off hit the bridge and crashed in to the Potomac River. Skutnik dove in to the freezing waters and rescued an injured and drowning crash survivor. Skutnik was lionized because the public saw themselves in his face and actions. We want to think that Skutnik was only one among the thousands of us who would have done the same-and possibly greater-deed under the circumstances. We somehow need to feel that, like Skutnik, we are prepared to risk life and limb in an unselfish willingness to aid, aid, or even to die for, other people. On a question/chance card you could say: "Like Skutnik you are at the right place at the right time and save an injured passenger, move 2 spaces forward." Make sure that you label it Key Principle #5. 8) For the squares (write these down): a) Think of pictures that you can create that represent scenes in "A Boy and a Man" that demonstrate elements of heroism and label them. For example, you could create a picture of Rudi making a lifeline out of his clothes. You could label this square bravery. This could be written the following way: In square one I will draw a picture of Rudi making a lifeline out of his clothes. I will label it bravery. b) Think of pictures that represent scenes in "Rikki Tikki Tavi" that demonstrate elements of heroism and label them (examples: bravery, leadership, kindness, persistence, willingness to sacrifice one's life for the good of others etc.) c) Think of pictures that represent scenes in The Outsiders that demonstrate elements of heroism and label them. d) Think of pictures from the television programs that show elements of heroism and label them. e) Think of pictures that depict the help that the guest speakers have provided and show elements of heroism and label them. f) Think of pictures that depict the help that the soldiers have provided and show elements of heroism and label them. 9) After all of the new knowledge that you have gained, write your new definition of a hero/heroine. Note: Create question/statement cards using higher-level questions. Please refer to the Bloom's Taxonomy chart. Make as many questions as possible come from analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. For example, "Predict how the commercial that talks about Nostradamus will affect his standing as a historic figure." (Key Principles #3 & #4). Sample answer: "It will peek the interest of the people to find out more about him. Part II: Game Board: 1. Use the legal file folder that I provide as the board. 2. Create your own markers. Do not use pieces from another game. 3. Create a method that will enable people to move. You may not use dice or any other pieces from another game. 4. Create question/chance cards that demonstrate your understanding of the key principles (For example: Lenny Skutnik became a hero by circumstance.) 5. On the squares: a) Draw pictures that represent scenes in "A Boy and a Man" that demonstrate elements of heroism and label them (examples: bravery, leadership, kindness, persistence, willingness to sacrifice one's life for the good of others etc.) b) Draw pictures that represent scenes in "Rikki Tikki Tavi" that demonstrate elements of heroism and label them. c) Draw pictures that represent scenes in The Outsiders that demonstrate elements of heroism and label them. d) Draw pictures from the television programs that show elements of heroism and label them. e) Draw pictures that depict the help that the guest speakers have provided and show elements of heroism and label them. f) Draw pictures that depict the help that the soldiers have provided and show elements of heroism and label them.

III: Putting it all together: 1) On the front of the file folder put the following items: logo for the game, name of your game, your name, and the diagram or graphic organizer. 2) Inside: squares and a place to put your question cards 3) Back of the file folder: markers in a Ziploc baggie 4) Back of the file folder: directions 5) Back of the file folder: definition of a hero Grading: 6=Wow! Exemplary Achievement: Demonstrates deep understanding of the key principles of heroism // surpassed teacher expectations // used sources to discover new facts about heroes/heroines/key principles that had not been discussed in class // unusually excellent craftsmanship // clever// exceptional quality 5=Commendable Achievement: Demonstrates detailed understanding of the key principles of heroism // somewhat exceeded teacher expectations // used some sources to discover new facts about heroes/heroines/key principles // carefully crafted // neat// interesting 4=Adequate Achievement: Demonstrates a fundamental level of understanding of the key principles of heroism // completed required material // at least one source used // a few new facts about heroes/heroines/key principles presented // average quality 3=Some Evidence of Achievement: Demonstrates partial understanding of the key principles of heroism // majority of requirements met // may not have used outside sources // no new facts about heroes/heroines/key principles presented // looks hurried 2=Limited Evidence of Achievement: Demonstrates a lack of required skills to complete task // no sources used // no new facts // incomplete // messy 1=Minimal Evidence of Achievement: Demonstrates a lack of understanding of task // does not meet the standards to be accepted // lacks most requirements 0=No participation or Response

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