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2011 Annual Report

Foundation Mission `to improve knowledge, prevention and treatment of prostate cancer"

2011 Board and Executive

Back row left to right: Mark White, Executive Director Leah LaRiviere, Dr. Michael Cox, Peter Fairey, Jeff Morgan, Dan Cohen. Front row: Vice Chair Len Gross, Chair Ted Butterfield, Vice Chair Bryan McPherson, Treasurer Judy Rothwell

Who we are

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC is a volunteer-based organization that represents BC's prostate cancer patients, their families and communities. The Foundation was established in 1998 by a group of prostate cancer survivors who saw the need to raise monies in order to fund and support research into the causes, detection, prevention and the treatment of prostate cancer. To this day event fundraising for prostate cancer research is a primary initiative of the foundation. The Foundation also provides programs for education, advocacy and to increase awareness about the prevention, detection and treatment of prostate cancer. The Foundation is a registered charity led by a Board of Directors, and an Executive Director and is supported by it's many volunteers.

Our service goals

A. Promote public awareness of prostate cancer; including testing and screening for all BC men. B. Provide a focus for prostate cancer advocacy. C. Raise funds to support continued prostate cancer research. D. Faciliate The Prostate Cancer Support Group Council BC and assist with the formation of new support groups throughout British Columbia. E. Promote cooperation amongst all stakeholders involved in prostate cancer. F. Raising funds from its supporters to enable achievement of the 5 service goals.

A message from your Chair - Ted Butterfield

Your Foundation's Board is most gratified with the support in 2011 from an expanding funding base, the positive reception of important awareness programs, the accolades of the medical community from our research awards and the very important role of support group members across BC. These priorities are a key element of the Foundation's strategic plan going into 2012. With more that 3,000 BC men diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2011, living with prostate cancer has become a reality for many thousands of men and their families. With early detection and appropriate treatment a longer better life is now more likely. The periodic controversy over the use of PSA testing has not been very useful to those helped from having such information. PSA history assists men and their doctors to determine if they have prostate cancer, assess its nature and plan their treatment journey. Working with PCCN, the Foundation and the BC Prostate Cancer Support Group Council continues to strengthen the Support Group network throughout BC for men living with prostate cancer. Support Groups are a vital source of information and engagement for new and returning members and their spouses. Yet beyond just those attending Support groups, more families also look to their doctors, other contacts and the internet for helpful guidance. Thus, the Foundation's media awareness programs, speaker's bureau, websites and the "Reef Knot" information kits provided through BC urologists are growing in importance. Much more remains to be done which makes expanding Foundation and national fundraising events and programs so vitally important. However, prostate cancer is not just a BC story ­ it is a Canadian and indeed a world wide issue. As the most common cancer affecting men, prostate cancer is reaching the forefront of medical and public awareness, including donors, evident by the success of "Movember". Important treatment breakthroughs that will improve the lives of millions of men are near at hand. Foundation directors have long believed in combining its resources and vision with other like minded prostate cancer organizations across Canada into one combined Canada wide prostate cancer brand. Thus in 2011 the Foundation's board completed an Affiliation Agreement with Prostate Cancer Canada to work together on regional and national fundraising, awareness and support programs. Prostate Cancer Canada is now leading the way to bring prostate cancer to the top of mind with citizens across our country. Still, an independent BC based Foundation operating within the national brand is able to engage committed individuals to develop and deliver regionally specific programs that compliment those national broader based programs. In the year ahead, while your Foundation aligns its underlying strategies to focus on its BC programs, it will do this within the greater goal of collaborating with Prostate Cancer Canada leading the way. In this respect we have encouraged BC support groups to also `affiliate' with PCCN and BC Support Group Council. As examples, the Foundation actively promoted Movember, the largest prostate cancer fundraising yet, and organizes in mainland BC the annual national Father's Day Walk Run. Your Foundation continues to seek and add leadership to its Board of directors with Dr. Michael Cox of the VGH/Prostate Research Centre and John Kenyon of KPMG joining the Board in the last year. I thank all of our directors, especially our Executive Director, Leah LaRiviere, our members and supporters for assuring our strategic plan objectives are priorities and our year has been one of growth and service. While a very busy year, I have enjoyed being your Chair with the support of an active board and as I retire as Chair handing the gavel to incoming Chair, Bryan McPherson.

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC

Statement of Financial Position as at September 30, 2011

Operating and Capital $ 267,065 24,499 18,005 309,569 1,806 311,375 $ Endowment Fund 12,000 12,000 $ 2011 Total 267,065 24,499 18,005 309,569 12,000 1,806 323,375 $ 2010 Total 277,324 19,640 10,874 307,838 2,258 310,096

Assets Current assets: Cash and investments Accounts receivable Prepaid expenses and other assets Investments Capital assets Liabilities: Current liabilities: Accounts payable Grants payable Net assets: Endowment Invested in capital assets Unrestricted

2011 Expenses and Allocations

$

$

$

$

$

57,640 110,000 167,640 1,806 141,929 143,735 311,375

$

12,000 12,000 12,000

$

57,640 110,000 167,640 12,000 1,806 141,929 155,735 323,375

$

52,077 151,000 203,077 2,258 104,761 107,019 310,096

General an 26183 Fundraising 121942 Grants 110000 Awareness 54176 Reserved f10% 12000 7% 3% Future Gra 36717

15% 31%

General and Administrative Fundraising Costs Grants

34%

Awareness and Support Reserved for Endowment Future Grants

$

$

$

$

Statement of Operations and Change in Net Assets Year Ended September 30, 2011

Revenues: Fundraising events Donations Interest and sundry Expenses: Fundraising costs General and administrative Excess revenue over expense before allocations Allocation: Awareness and support Grants Excess of revenues over expenses Net assets, beginning of year Net assets, end of year $ 314,638 45,830 550 361,018 121,942 26,183 148,125 212,893 54,177 110,000 164,177 48,716 107,019 155,735 $ 330,455 24,299 668 355,422 110,244 20,991 131,235 224,187 69,376 136,000 205,376 18,811 88,208 107,019

Safeway Father's Day Walk/Run

2011 Revenue

Safeway Fa 145842 Westcoast Motorcycle Ride to Live Westcoast 149280 Third Party General Do Memoriams General Donations Endowmen Interest

Third Party Events Memoriams Endowment Interest

19516 22348 11482 12000 550

3% 6% 6% 3%

0% 41%

41%

$

$

2011 Grant Review Committee

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC's granting committee is made up of Scientists, Doctors, Professors, Researchers and others in the field of prostate cancer. The committee also has input and participation from members of support groups and the medical community. All grant applications provided to the committee are kept confidential. The granting committee receives numerous excellent applications each year and it is a difficult task selecting the best. The selected recipients of our grants are supervised and monitored for their performance and achievements. All grant recipients are eager to share with us their results, to speak to our support groups and provide us with a progress report and final report co-signed by their principal investigator. Our granting committee decisions are based on the quality of the application. The work and dedication of our committee members reflects a foundation mandate of support - supporting prostate cancer research. Our funds provide seed capital to students and post doctoral researchers enabling them to apply for national funding that will further enhance their research.

2011 Review committee from left to right:

· · · · · · · · · Dr. Michael Cox, Senior Scientist ,The Prostate Centre at VGH Mr. Dan Cohen ,Director, Prostate Cancer BC, Chair review committee Mr.. Bryan McPherson, Chair Prostate Cancer Foundation BC Dr. .Lynda Balneaves, Assistant Professor, School of nursing, UBC Dr. Amina Zoubeidi, Senior Scientist, The Prostate Centre Dr. Dirk Lange Dr Christopher Og, Senior Scientist, The Prostate Centre Mr. Rene Norena, Manager Actuarial Services ,Pacific Blue Cross Dr. Peter Bullen, Retired Math Professor UBC, member of PCCN Vancouver

2003 - 2010 Grants Given $608,000 in total

Substantial grants started in 2003 with $60,000 going to Dr. Kim Chi, Dr. Emma Guns and Dr. Joyce Davison. Over the next 8 years we have provided seed capital to Students, Doctors and Scientists in British Columbia. Individuals and organizations that have benefited from our funding are: The BC Cancer Agency, UBC, VGH Prostate Centre, Inspire Health, UBC School of Nursing, Burnaby Hospital, and The Genome Centre. Dr. Marianne Sadar, Larry Mroz, Dr. Michael Cox, Fred Crawford, Dr. Joyce Davison, Dr. Hal Gunn, Dr. Kim Chi, Dr. Emma Guns, Doug Lin, Darrell Bessette, Anousheh Zardan, Jennifer Locke, Darya Habibi, Melanie Lehman, Dr. Pippa Hawley, Dr. Deb Subrata, Mazyar Ghaffari, Nic Chng, Sarah Madahvi, and Dr. Julius Halascheck.

I have been the recipient of generous support for trainees from Prostate Cancer Foundation BC. This funding has helped launch the careers of 3 talented young scientists. Dr. Jodie Palmer performed her postdoctoral fellowship with me under PCFBC support. This work is credited in her manuscript published in The Prostate (vol 68 pg 245, 2008) and provided some of the preliminary results that help ensure funding for a major grant from the Canadian Cancer Society (2009-2012). PCFBC funding also partially supported recruitment of a research associate, Dr. Yubin Guo, who established new prostate cancer models that are the subject of numerous presentations at international symposia and a manuscript under review. That work has been parlayed into first a one year "bridge" award from the CIHR and then into a major operating grant from the Terry Fox Foundation/CIHR New Frontiers program as part of the Vancouver Prostate Centre's Program Project on Prostate Cancer Progression. Most recently PCFBC supported a graduate student, Mazyar Ghaffari, whose work from PCFBC support has been leveraged into an exciting industrial partnership (2011-2013) with Takeda Pharmaceuticals Global Research Development program performing preclinical evaluation of a novel therapeutic for management of advanced prostate cancer. I also co-supervised a graduate student recipient of PCFBC support, Anousheh Zardan, whose work with Dr. Amina Zoubeidi help secure another operating grant that is part of the Terry Fox Foundation/CIHR New Frontiers/ Vancouver Prostate Centre's Program Project on Prostate Cancer Progression. Dr. Michael Cox Associate Professor, Department of Urologic Sciences at the University of British Columbia Senior Scientist at The Vancouver Prostate Centre

8 November 2011 I am writing this letter in support of Prostate Cancer Foundation of BC research funding programs. As one of the earlier recipients of a research award in 2003, I can attest to the importance of these research award funds for helping the development of early career researchers in British Columbia. The funds I received from Prostate Cancer Foundation of BC enabled the conduct of an investigator initiated clinical study of a novel combination therapy for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. This study was an important contribution to establishing us as a centre of excellence for the management of men with advanced prostate cancer and as a clinical trials centre to find new treatments for the disease. We now have one of the most successful clinical research units for Prostate Cancer in Canada. This provides early access to the latest in new treatments for prostate cancer, often for men who have no other treatment options. As an example, abiraterone acetate is a new drug that was just recently approved by Health Canada for use in men progressing with prostate cancer after chemotherapy and only now being used widely; however because of our clinical trials program, we have previously treated well over 100 men with abiraterone acetate on clinical trials over the last several years. I am now a nationally and internationally recognized clinical researcher in prostate cancer and there is no doubt in my mind that the funds I received 8 years ago have had an important impact on my career. New investigators are faced with increasing competition for ever shrinking funding. Without dedicated funding directed to early career researchers like that currently provided by Prostate Cancer Foundation of BC, we will fail to raise a new generation of researchers and maintain the momentum we have created in British Columbia as a centre of excellence in prostate cancer research that is directed at looking for new ways to manage prostate cancer. Your group's efforts in raising dollars for research funding have had an important impact for the men of British Columbia who have had to deal with prostate cancer. I have been proud of my connections with your group, and hope that you are able to continue your contributions to promoting prostate cancer research in British Columbia. Kim N. Chi, MD FRCPC Medical Oncologist / Associate Professor of Medicine, University of British Columbia Chair, Genitourinary Tumour Group, BC Cancer Agency Medical Director, Clinical Trials Unit, Vancouver Cancer Centre

What our grants mean

What our grants have done

December 12, 2011 I would like to take this opportunity to thank PCFBC for providing me post-doctoral fellowships during 2009-2011. This funding immensely helped me in receiving advanced training in prostate cancer research after my Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Subsequent to PCFBC funding duration, I received a Michael Smith postdoctoral research fellowship. Recently, I have received two faculty position offers from Universities in India and Buffalo, NY and have accepted the position in India. Overall, the PCFBC postdoctoral fellowship provided me the platform to get trained and disseminate the knowledge in prostate cancer and launch my career in academia with focus on reproductive cancer research. S Subrata Deb

s

I am one of the scholars of Prostate Cancer Foundation BC and the recipient of the 2009 Carter Family grant in aid. The generous support from PCFBC helped our laboratory to perform pre-clinical research in order to develop new therapies for treatment of advanced stages of prostate cancer. As a proud PCFBC scholar, I am happy to share with you some of my achievements during my Ph.D. studies, none of which would have become possible without the generous support of PCFBC. I have been the recipient of many prestigious awards and scholarships including Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute Rising Star award, University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine Fellowship in Medical Research, and University of British Columbia Graduate Fellowship to name a few. In addition, I have had 3 publications in peer-reviewed journals, 10 oral presentations, and more than 14 poster presentations during the course of my Ph.D. studies and presented my research in multiple local and international conferences. PCFBC also gave me the opportunity to directly interact with patients suffering from prostate cancer through patient support groups which made me even more determined in my research. I have also been heavily involved in different extracurricular and volunteer activities during my Ph.D. program including organizing the prostate centre's bi-weekly journal clubs and helping Student Biotechnology Network. PCFBC also provided me with the opportunity to attend different social activities including the Father's day run and have a better appreciation of the people who donate their money to enable researchers find novel therapies for prostate cancer. I eagerly ask you to please continue to support this outstanding program in future to help other graduate and post-doctoral students with their research so that more people can have the same opportunities as I did. Thanks again for your support, Darya Habibi Nov08, 2011 I received the PCFBC grant-in-award in year 2008. This award was the very first research scholarship that I received and has had an important impact on my career as a graduate student. By awarding me PCFBC allowed me to focus on the most important aspect of graduate studies which was learning, and I am very appreciative that I was selected as one of the recipients of this scholarship. PCFBC's support allowed me to attend and present my work at a number of provincial, national and international conferences in year 2008 including: 1. "5th international meeting on tumor microenvironment" and 2. The American society for cell biology conference. Attending those conferences allowed me to meet and make connections with international scientists in my research field that had been very helpful throughout my PhD. PCFBC is a one of a kind research scholarship that gives the scholars the opportunity of meeting and presenting their work to the patients dealing with prostate cancer. As a PCFBC scholar I was fortunate enough to meet and present my research in 3 meetings held by different PCFBC support groups. As a second year PhD student this was a very unique experience that allowed me to truly understand the importance and impact of the research I convey. Moreover this research scholarship opened a door for me to receive a number of very prestigious awards in my 3rd and 4th year of study at UBC such as the Four Year Doctoral Fellowship (4YF) from UBC and The Faculty of Medicine graduate student award. This would have been impossible to receive this scholarship without having the PCFBC award in the second year of my PhD. This research award has had a very special impact on my research career and I hope that the foundation keeps the great work of supporting early career graduate students. Best Regards, Anousheh Zardan 4th year PhD (c) Vancouver Prostate Centre

Presented September 2009 by Ted Butterfield Chair and Dan Cohen Grant Committee Prostate Cancer Foundation BC

2009 Carter Auto Family $25,000 Doctoral Scholarship Award Winner Darya Habibi from The Prostate Centre at VGH

I would like to convey my most heartfelt thanks to Prostate Cancer Foundation BC for the Gordon Dunn 2010 pioneer award. This funding has enabled me to dramatically accelerate the progress of my clinical research projects on pain and symptom management and palliative care. Before I had the award I struggled to get my research ideas put into action. The time needed to get the studies properly put together, approved by the various committees, patients recruited and followed through, data entered and analysed, and then the results written up for presentation and publishing was next to impossible to find when on call 7 days a week. Prior to the award my studies were languishing either unable to open, or open but not recruiting sufficiently to have a hope of being completed in a useful time frame. With the award I have been able to arrange for one of my clinic associates to take calls for me one day a week, allowing me to work free from distraction. It has also allowed me to organize a research team to support the projects, so that I am not the only person working on them. This November, after many frustrations and delays, a research nurse started working with me 2 days a week, and already between us we have made enormous strides. For example, over the last year we had recruited only 10 patients to the laxative comparison trial, but in just the last 2 weeks we have together recruited 4! My study of lidocaine infusions for opioid-resistant cancer pain has been very time-consuming to get approved, but will finally be opening in the next couple of weeks, with a grant from the BC Cancer Foundation covering the cost of the nurse. The study on honey for radiation mucositis is now closed, and statistical analysis will be able to be done ready for presentation in February at the BCCA Head and Neck meeting. In addition to these 3 studies, which were the focus of my application, I have also been able to carry out 3 additional projects with particular relevance to prostate cancer. I authored a chapter on "Genitourinary Symptoms" in "Palliative Medicine: a casebased manual", shortly to be published by the Oxford University Press. This is a new edition of this core textbook for medical students and residents worldwide. I wrote it around 2 hypothetical cases, one of which has prostate cancer, so that trainees should be able to be well-informed on how to care for men with prostate cancer. I also worked with a resident to complete a survey of BC family physicians about the use of methadone for pain management in palliative care, with the goal of iidentifying barriers to cancer patients being able to access this very useful pai-killer. Lastly I have just opened an industry-sponsored study in which patients with breakthrough pain will be interviewed about their pain management. Breakthrough pain is commonly seen in prostate cancer where bone metastases have occurred.

Funding from Prostate Cancer Foundation provided me with the funds necessary to provide evidence-based counseling services to patients at the time of diagnosis. Generated pilot data that was used to move my research program forward. The funding was Instrumental in helping me to establish a research career in the area of information and decision making which is the only such program being conducted in Canada. B. Joyce Davison RN, PhD Associate Professor, College of Nursing University of Saskatchewan

November 7, 2011 In 2008 I was fortunate to be the recipient of the Carter Family Scholarship from Prostate Cancer Foundation British Columbia. Without this support I would not have been able to complete my PhD in prostate cancer biology from the University of British Columbia where I was able to show that prostate cancer cells avoid death induced by androgen deprivation therapy by developing their own ability to make androgens. This work describes the mechanism by which the newly available drug, Abiraterone, acts on the cancer cells. Astounding, recent results from Phase III clinical trials evaluating Abiraterone have been promising for men with refractory prostate cancer. Further to this work, with the contribution of the Carter Family Scholarship I was accepted to medical school at the University of Toronto in 2009. During my medical school training so far I have continued to pursue my interest in prostate cancer research through the identification of new genetic markers that predict for poor outcome in men with this disease. These results may help triage men with prostate cancer into those who require minimal treatment from those who require intensive treatment. In the future I plan to pursue a medical career in oncology, specifically helping patients with prostate cancer. Only with the help of the Carter Family Scholarship could this be possible. I strongly support Prostate Cancer Foundation British Columbia's contributions to graduate student and post-doctoral fellow awards.

Sincerely, Jennifer A. Locke, PhD, University of Toronto Medical Student

2011 Grants Given $110,000 in total

UBC department of exp. Therapeutics BC Cancer Agency: $25,000 to Yanting Chiang: Targeting ASAP1 in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

Exp. Medicine Program UBC, The Prostate Centre: $20,000 to Kevin Tam: Characterization of SEMA3C signalling a potential pathway in PC.

The Vancouver Prostate Centre: $ 40,000 to Dr. Thomas Cordonnier: CRISP-3 as a target to improve anti-androgen treatment lethal PC.

EXP Medical Program UBC, The Prostate Centre: $25,000 to Peter Raven: Cancer/testis antiens as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in over expressing PC.

The Don Wilson Founders Award

The Don Wilson Founders Award was presented to Yanting Chiang for her research into Prostate Cancer Metastasis. Shortly after having been treated for Prostate Cancer in 1993 Don Wilson became active helping develop survivor run prostate support groups in BC. New survivor run support groups developed quickly and successfully through the efforts of a handful of men who networked and shared this common desire. As a play on the familiar abbreviation for the PSA test the support groups were called "Prostate Support and Awareness" with the physical location tacked on. In the lower mainland several PSA groups sprung up. By 1997 Don's interest turned to drawing greater government attention to this disease and to lobby for funding for research aimed at providing better care and treatment of Prostate Cancer. In April of 1997, Don contacted the Chairs of local support groups, which at that time included: Vancouver, North Vancouver, Surrey, Tri-City, White Rock and Abbotsford and asked them if they would meet with him to form what became known as the " Greater Vancouver Region- Fraser Valley PSA Groups"( GVR-FV, PSA Groups) They met for the first time at a meeting room at Don's employer, BCIT. Everyone agreed to serve on the Executive Committee and meet on a regular monthly basis with Don as Chairman. The numbers attending began to swell as PSA Chairs brought members from their support groups to the meetings. One of the members proposed that we form a non profit Foundation to raise funds. The GVR-FV members voted to proceed with the initiative and Don was asked to pursue this. In due course they received their Certificate of Incorporation on January 14, 1998 and on July 21, 1998 they received Registration as a charity. The words Prostate Cancer were not available for use in the foundation s name alternatively the foundation was to be named "BC Foundation for Prostate Disease" which years later was changed to PCFBC. Don served as Chair and President of the Foundation until stepping down in 2001. During his tenure, it was an exciting time, the accomplishments of the Foundation achieved were many fold, they initiated or influenced a lot of wonderful changes that have benefited many men. Don stayed on as an active Past Chair with the Foundation until June, 2004. In Don's words "I am very proud of the volunteer work and the team of men who served on the Foundation with me, together we accomplished an enormous amount. I treasure this time as some of the most important work of my life." Donald F. Wilson PhD

Val Stijack Pioneer Award was presented to Dr. Thomas Cordonnier for his research into CRISP-The Val Stijack Pioneer Award was presented The Val Stijack Pioneer Award was presented to Dr. Thomas Cordonnier from the Vancouver Prostate Centre for his work into CRISP3 as a target to improve anti-androgen MDV3100 treatment for lethal prostate cancer. As a founding member of Prostate Cancer Foundation BC Val Stijack was a pioneer in websites, logos and anything electronic. Diagnosed himself in 1994, Val was initially on the Support Group Steering Committee that later led to incorporation as a Foundation. Val started the Abbotsford Support Group as there was then no group beyond Surrey. This led to spin-off groups in Mission and Chilliwack and assisted in getting a Langley group going for a time. As well as serving as the only chair of the Abbotsford Support Group, Val was the chair of Prostate Cancer Foundation BC when Don Wilson stepped down and continued as Past-Chair and Director when Ted Butterfield became Chair. Val was an active member of the Canadian Prostate Cancer Research Initiative (CPCRI) who met in Toronto and Montreal (2000-2004). He sat with Len Gross on the SPORE Committee at the University of Washington, Seattle. Always pitching in, Val was an active member of the "run" committee for 13 years. Val designed and maintained the first foundation website, the first walk/run website, the first logos, electronic letterhead and anything the foundation needed. Val was truly a pioneer in moving the foundation into the electronic age. Val has been the longest sitting director of the Foundation; 12 years from it's beginning in 1998 until Feb 2010. Val was involved in the difficult negotiations with PCC that lead to the current affiliation. Val has always been the Foundation's contact with other like minded organizations across Canada including Nova Scotia and Ottawa. Although Val is now retired as a director he continues to be the Chair of the Abbotsford Support Group and is co-chair on the BC Support Group Council.

The Val Strijack Pioneer Award

Support Groups in BC

Abbotsford Ashcroft Burnaby/New Westminster, Campbell River Comox Valley Coquitlam Cowichan Valley East Kootenay Kamloops Kelowna Nanaimo North Vancouver Parksville Prince Rupert Qualicum Quesnel Revelstoke Salt Spring Island Sunshine Coast Surrey Vancouver Vernon Victoria

BC has over 20 BC support groups serving men and their families in large urban areas as well as small communities. Some support group are run by a committee and others by a hard working individual. However, they all have the same goal in mind and that is helping other men through a very difficult time. The newly formed BC Support Group Council continues to answer the concerns and needs of the Support Group leaders. Launching in early 2012 is a new website devoted to BC support Groups. Procansupport.com gives each support group their own information page where they can post events and meeting information as well as pictures. There is a forum for discussion on what matters to Prostate Cancer pateints in BC, a section on clinical trials and the latest Prostate Cancer news.

PCCN Chilliwack is the newest BC Support Group

A year in review

Reef Knot Information Kits

In continuing to supply support to newly diagnosed men the Foundation continues to supply Reef Knot Information Kits to Urologists in BC. Reef Knot Kits were first introduced in 2002. Comprised of the latest books, pamphlets and information regarding prostate cancer, these kits are provided free of charge by the Foundation to Urologists, Physicians, Support Groups and individuals in the Province of BC. Since it's inception the Foundation has given out over 8000 Reef Knot Information Kits.

Speaker and Displays

There are many sides to prostate cancer and the Foundation's volunteers speak at businesses and forums around the Province on the risks, prevention, signs and symptoms. We strive to educate, inform and provide as much free information as possible to British Columbians. In 2011 we had displays at the Mining Convention, Wellbrook Winery, and The Vancouver Canucks Cancer night. Our speakers gave presentations to Vancouver Transit Employees, Vancouver Airport maintenance workers and UBC Employees.

Awareness

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Our 10 part survivor series in the Province was a tremendous success, reaching men all over BC.

Wednesday, september 7, 2011

theprovince.com

SURVIVOR'S STORY

Wednesday, september 7, 2011

SURVIVOR'S STORY

theprovince.com

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The facts

Wednesday, september 14, 2011

In an effort to raise awareness for prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the battle stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by prostate cancer. This week, we bring you the story of Ted Butterfield, chairman of the Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C., a businessman, husband, father and grandfather whose active role in his community has inspired him in his own fight against cancer. Featured next week is the story of Frank Burm, a turkey farmer who always brought his team to the annual Father's Day Walk/Run, who died last year from prostate cancer.

Ready to fight cancer, again

Len Gross, a founding member of the foundation and the Prostate Cancer Canada Network, as well as facilitator of the Vancouver Prostate Support Group known as Vancouver PSA Group, stresses the importance of working together to overcome the disease. Gross himself is a cancer survivor, having been diagnosed in May 1992. "Health care in Canada is a provincial responsibility so B.C. Cancer Agency here is a Crown agency of the province responsible for treatment of all cancers in the province. They set all the rules and regulations as to how people will be treated, what format will be used, what drugs will be approved. A similar organization is all across Canada in every province," says Gross. "So it's important from our point of view to have a provincial body that addresses provincial issues and therefore our organization can work with them because our interests are provincial. Drug approval for example, may be approved in Canada, but its use is not approved in B.C until B.C. approves it." Originally from Alberta, Butterfield is a chartered accountant with a background in manufacturing and distribution, and for the last 20 years has held the post of CFO for public companies in the aviation and aerospace sector. Before being on the board of Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C., Butterfield, for many years, was director and officer of the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Vancouver and served a term on the Pacific Space Centre board. He still works as a director with the Rotary Club in North Vancouver. His managing experiences through his career have allowed him to apply those skills to charitable causes, he says, which have likewise prepared him for the leadership role with Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C. During his term as chairman, he says he faces the challenge of enhancing the involvement of working professionals and volunteers who can add value and networking to the role of the foundation to look for new fundraising opportunities. Also critical is to define the real needs of prostate cancer in this province and nationally: support groups, awareness and education, research and raising funds. He says the challenge on a national level has been to get diverse organizations all on the same page and working together, and they're just starting to achieve that with their

fight to the finish

In an effort to raise awareness for prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the battle stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by prostate cancer. This week, we bring you the story of Frank Burm, a nature-loving turkey farmer who fought the disease with positivity and hope to his last days. He was also a great supporter of the annual Father's Day Walk/Run for prostate cancer, a fundraiser that he and his family have participated in for 10 years running. Featured next week: The story of Ron Johnson, a Coquitlam prostate-cancer support group member who is dying of the disease, but says he is living each day to the fullest.

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BATTLE: Prostate-cancer survivor Ted Butterfield's inspiring tale

By Lina Toyoda

the province

Speaking up against a silent killer

Ted Butterfield, here with his wife Fay, says he faces the challenge of enhancing the involvement of working professionals and volunteers who can add value and networking to the role of the foundation. GLEnn BAGLo -- PnG

Knowledge is power, and in the face of adversity, in a moment of truth, that steadfast belief can hold more weight than it ever has before. Ted Butterfield says his own journey with prostate cancer has been a long and winding road but taking on an active role in improving education, prevention and treatment through his work with Prostate Cancer Founda-

How you can donate

Funding to Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C. goes to building awareness, research and to local support groups. a donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, and to support prevention and advance treatments. Go to prostate cancerbc.ca. You can designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. all contributions are tax deductible.

tion B.C. has empowered him in his own fight against cancer. Butterfield, who's now serving his fourth year as chairman of the foundation, is a cancer survivor, and was first diagnosed nine years ago. He opted for surgery among a few options of his early diagnosis in an active effort to rid the cancer from his body. While the surgery was a success and he has been living cancer free for nearly a decade, he has recently experienced a recurrence. "Fate often leads you into different directions in life. You know, you encounter an event and situation and you get engaged in what cards are dealt, and away you go," says Butterfield. "So I've made the decision to do salvage radiation and I'll be doing that this fall. I think again, we're catching it really early so I'm optimistic the outcome will be real good but you just never know. Living with prostate cancer is always with you and there's nothing to say that it won't reoccur so you always have to be alert to that."

Ted Butterfield is serving his fourth year as chairman of Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C. and is a prostate-cancer survivor. Glenn BaGlo -- PnG

While there's a lot of information about initial treatments, he says there's still a long way to go both provincially and on a national level to raise awareness and research, and to find advances in treatment. "Once you're living with prostate cancer, the information available is somewhat scattered. A lot of uncer-

tainty around whether there is recurrence or there isn't, and when you act. So I've just gone through that, realizing the limited information for people who are living with prostate cancer." In Canada, 25,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year, 3,000 in B.C., of which a certain

percentage will die of their outcomes. Butterfield says the worst cases are generally those diagnosed in later stages or when the cancer is particularly aggressive. The current blood test that measures PSA levels is somewhat controversial, says Butterfield, but is still a good tool for early diagnosis.

affiliation with Prostate Cancer Canada, which has taken the umbrella lead for prostate cancer to get its fair place in the public consciousness. Aside from primary treatments like surgery and radiation, both Butterfield and Gross believe in the importance of support groups and complementary treatments. Through the efforts of the likes of both men, today there are prostate cancer support groups in every area of the Lower Mainland that meet once a month to let men share experiences and to learn from each other. Specialists are often brought in to the meetings who have specific areas of expertise, including oncologists, physiotherapists, psychiatrists and sexual therapists covering topics like depression, incontinence, nutrition, physical exercise and even alternative practices like relaxation, mediation, healing touch and coping methods. "I've had a very supportive family and all the way along I always shared where I'm at," says Butterfield. "When I was diagnosed nine years ago we had dinner with the whole family at the house and we shared that, my experience." His openness has been an inspiration to others in the local community and beyond. In the spring of 2002, when

CBC was putting together a documentary about prostate cancer and looking for people to share their stories, Butterfield happened to be sitting in the doctor's office. "So I was followed right through the decision process by the cameras and the director of the documentary. They came to the house, met the family and followed me right into the operating room," says Butterfield. The documentary includes the surgery of his prostate being extracted, including interviews with the doctors. Airing in the fall of 2002, his became one of five stories featured in the documentary. "My father had prostate cancer so he was treated in his 60s but he still lived to age 94. He didn't die of prostate cancer but he still had some indications when he did die," says Butterfield. "It's been disappointing that it's back in some form albeit at this point it is modest, but it makes you nervous about how it's going to come and what side effects you may incur and the doubts now linger and rise again." Butterfield will go through a six-week treatment of external beam radiation in October. The process involves radiating the prostate bed by first marking

the torso for the beams to be aimed for 33 treatments. Each session is about five minutes in duration on a five-day schedule per week. "I've known people who've had radiation fairly shortly after surgery just to make sure the surrounding tissue is free of cancer cells. In my case it's much later in the game but the purpose of doing that is still the same. If there is cancer there, it's at such a low level that they couldn't visualize it in traditional scanners." With his wife Fay by his side, along with his two daughters, a son and four grandchildren in his corner, Butterfield says he'll fight again. The more informed you are, and the more opportunities to talk with others of their experiences, help you to not be so fearful of the potential outcome, he says, because people have travelled this road time and time again, and they're still around. "I think in my case because I've been pretty actively involved in all aspects of education and support, I'm probably as prepared as anyone might be. "But in part, it motivated me to get involved in the organization as I did to try and help solve things for everybody else only to find out that perhaps I was doing it for myself as well."

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in Canadian men. B.C has one of the highest incidences of prostate cancer in Canada. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in Canadian men (behind lung cancer). Current fatality rate is about 25 per cent. Prostate cancer afflicts men 45 years of age and older, with the incidence increasing with age. Men with a family history of prostate cancer are at increased risk so examinations and tests should begin at age 40. Prostate cancer has no known causes or prevention. Detection and treatment in its earliest stages (while it is still small and confined to the prostate) provides the best chance for a cure. PSA tests in B.C. are not covered by the Medical Services Plan. Prostate cancer is a "silent disease" and the best chance for a cure is through early detection. The PSA test is the single best blood test for detecting tumours in all forms of cancer. PSA tests are covered if you have a history of prostate cancer in your family. The cause of prostate cancer is not known but research suggests genetics, a high-fat diet and lack of exercise may play a role. (The growth of cancer cells is stimulated by male hormones.) Risk of prostate cancer increases with age. Eighty per cent of new cases are diagnosed in men over 65. Testosterone is an important factor in the incidence rate. Men with an affected close relative are two to three times more likely to develop prostate cancer. Diet is a major factor.

Source: prostatecancerbc.ca

Battle waged with hope and grace

Frank burm: Surrey farmer lived each day to its fullest, says family

By Lina Toyoda

the province

Frank Burm was a happy, goodnatured turkey farmer who loved spending his days outdoors working on his Surrey farm, remembers wife Gini, who lost her husband to prostate cancer one year ago. When he was first diagnosed 13 years ago, Burm, who was 64, underwent surgery and radiation as his initial treatment. Gini says he recovered

How you can donate

Funding to Prostate Cancer Foundation BC goes directly to building awareness, to research and to local support groups. Your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, and to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the Donate tab. You can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. All contributions are tax deductible.

well, and everything was back to normal for many years. But the cancer came back several times over the course of a decade. He always kept a positive outlook and said, "We deal with it day by day," recalls Gini, as he continued to work with his son who joined him on the family farm. "He was a nature person. He loved animals and trees and the freedom of being on the farm. He never complained about his sickness. Never did. Frank always said it was a good life." Burm was a big supporter of the annual Father's Day Walk/Run for prostate cancer and brought his aptly-named team "Gobble" to the fundraiser every year for 10 years running. His family continues to participate in honour of Burm. Prostate Cancer Foundation BC is now looking for donations to fund further cancer-research projects, promote awareness and education, and support men and their families who are affected by this often silent and reoccurring disease. Burm's youngest daughter, Kelly, who is a nurse, accompanied her dad

Gini Burm (left) and her daughter, Kelly Bos on the Langley property that husband and father Frank, who died of prostate cancer last year, so loved. WArD Perrin -- PnG

to all of his doctors' appointments and kept a journal of his treatment. She would be the one who cared for him in his last days at home. "It was my time with him. We went all the way to Vancouver because they can do more there. It was our time to connect and I loved going with him and I worked my shifts around so I could go with him to see Dr. [Kim] Chi. He looked after him and he loved him," says Kelly. It was in 2006, five years after the surgery, that his PSA level started to rise again. Burm began trial drugs and that worked for a little while, says Kelly. Steroid treatment started in '08 and in June of that year, they found out the cancer had spread.

"Around the abdomen there's a layer that sort of holds everything in place, and the cancer had spread to there, which was bad news. He was fine through all of that, but he was starting to feel sick. Some fluid would build up in his stomach, so he was on medication to try to control that," says Kelly. By the end of 2008, Burm had started chemotherapy. "I think he believed that I would help him live longer," Kelly says tearfully. "We would talk about the plan together like ,`Should we continue the chemo?' because it would make him feel sick and weak. But he was always happy and very thankful for his life and what he had." Gini says that the last few years were

the hardest for her husband, but it meant a lot to him that his daughter was there to care for him. "And that's why he stayed home until the end," says Gini. "He wanted to stay home when he died and that's what he did. He died in his chair." She says her husband was strong and he always had hope. "He even went to Holland in the last year. He wanted to go and see his relatives one more time. He went in August and a month later, he passed away." Kelly, who also went on that trip along with her own children, fondly remembers pushing her dad around in a wheelchair. "It was a wonderful trip for him to say goodbye to his family, and I will always remember that."

Getting active to help battle the disease

Check out your butt. Have a PSA test today.

Thanks to our partners:

Participate

We Need you to: Volunteer

Donate

1 in 7 Canadian men will be diagnosed with Prostate Cancer in their lifetime.

To donate go to www.prostatecancerbc.ca

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Fundraising events are an important way to raise money for prostate cancer. The annual Safeway Father's Day Walk/ Run is a family friendly event where teams and individuals come together for a great cause to honour the men in their lives on the Sunday morning.

Routes are available for all ages and skills, from a tot run and two-kilometre stroll to both a five- and 10-km run. Live music, a free barbecue and hundreds of prizes are given away with special guests on site. More info at fathersdayrun.ca Westcoast Motorcycle Ride To Live

happens in May bringing out the biking crowd. The police, fire, search-and-rescue and ambulance services come out in full support but anyone with a motorcycle can take part in the ride that goes through the Lower Mainland. The ride starts from either Vancouver or Chilliwack and usually meets at a central place for a

barbecue. Join the members of the 911 community in the battle against prostate cancer. During the year there are a number of smaller local events that benefit the Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C. Go to prostatecancer bc.ca for a complete calendar of events.

-- The Province

Check out your butt. Have a PSA test today.

Thanks to our partners:

Participate

We Need you to: Volunteer

Donate

1 in 7 Canadian men will be diagnosed with Prostate Cancer in their lifetime.

To donate go to www.prostatecancerbc.ca

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Wednesday, september 21, 2011

silent Killer

To raise awareness of prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by it. This week, we bring you the story of Ron Johnson, who was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer three years ago. With humour and a lighthearted spirit, Johnson says he's enjoying life with his family and close friends. Featured next week is the story of Len Gross, a founding member of Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C., who was diagnosed with the disease in 1992.

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Wednesday, september 28, 2011

prostate cancer

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Ron Johnson savours life `past my due date'

life expectancy: Lighthearted outlook helps him cope with condition

By Lina Toyoda

the province

How you can donate

funding to Prostate Cancer foundation B.C. goes to building awareness, to research and to local support groups. your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, and to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the donate tab. you can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. all contributions are tax deductible. "For a normal 50-year-old male it should be 3.5 or less," says Johnson. "So my doctor said, `I don't really know what this means. I've never had a patient who got this high a number before they died.' Which was great news," he adds with a laugh. His family doctor ordered a second test to make sure the results were accurate, and sent Johnson to see a specialist. After the surgeon conducted another round of tests, he was told it was already too late for surgery. "There really wasn't much that I could do," says Johnson, who then underwent a series of tests that confirmed that the cancer had spread outside of the prostate capsule. He was put on hormone blockers immediately as testosterone progresses the disease. But more bad

For Ron Johnson, laughter might be the best medicine. In February 2008, just before his 50th birthday, he was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer and was told he had three years to live. Without a single symptom, Johnson says he was feeling good at the time, a regular runner who kept in pretty good shape. He had also just been invited on a cruise to the Caribbean to celebrate a good friend's 50th birthday, which happened to be the reason why he had gone to see his doctor. "One of the stops on the cruise was Haiti, and I had seen a commercial on TV: `Did you know that you can catch hepatitis A or B from an ice cube? If you're travelling to the Caribbean you should ask your doctor about Twinrix vaccinations,'" says Johnson. When he asked his doctor for the vaccination, Johnson was told it was time for a physical since there were no recent blood tests of his on record, and he was about to turn 50. "We did the blood test and the DRA [digital rectal exam] and he said that my prostate felt a little firm. I didn't take it as anything serious." He got his blood test results back soon after his 50th birthday, and while his cholesterol and blood sugar were a little high, he was told his PSA was at a dangerously high level of 558.

news would follow. "I went for an ultrasound and they found that it had spread to my liver. Then I asked what that meant in terms of my life expectancy, and the doctor said, `Let's just say less than three years,'" he says and laughs. Today, Johnson says he's feeling good and keeps moving forward with a lighthearted attitude about his condition. "If you looked at me, you wouldn't know that I was past my due date." He says he's grateful for his wife, two stepdaughters, family and close friends, and the amazing experiences he's shared with them in the last few years that included trips to Hawaii, Europe and Mexico. Johnson, who regularly attends the Coquitlam prostate cancer support group, says he learns something new at every meeting. "They've got great speakers on all kinds of related subjects, everything from nutrition, surgery to drugs, supplements to whatever. It's just a huge amount of information and there's a bunch of people who are going through the same thing." Every three months Johnson gets a shot for his hormone therapy. He's feeling healthy and strong these days, so continues to go on his five-kilometre runs a few times a week. If he could go back in time, though, he says he would've had a PSA test 10 years earlier than he did. With early

Time to look at cancer in different way

webinar:

In an effort to raise awareness for prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the battle stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by prostate cancer. This week, we bring you the story of Len Gross, who underwent surgery in 1992 after being diagnosed with prostate cancer. He says that he would do things differently if he had to do it over again, taking an integrated approach to managing his cancer with complementary treatments that focus on nutrition, exercise and mental health. To support men who are living with the disease, Prostate Cancer Foundation BC and InspireHealth, an integrated cancer care centre in Vancouver, are jointly launching a weekly webinar series starting Wednesday, Oct. 5 that give practical tips on self-care and improving quality of life. Go to prostatecancerbc.ca for more information.

Four free talks can help patients stay healthy and in control

By Lina Toyoda

The Province

A diagnosis of cancer is not a death sentence, says Len Gross, a founding member of the Prostate Cancer Foundation BC, who calls himself a cancer "patient" since being diagnosed in 1992. He says we need to collectively think of cancer in a different way.

Ron Johnson says he keeps moving ahead with a lighthearted attitude. one thing he would have done differently: Get a PSa test 10 years earlier than he did. Wayne LeidenfrosT -- PnG

How you can donate

Funding to Prostate Cancer Foundation BC goes directly to building awareness, to research and to local support groups. Your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, and to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the Donate tab. You can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. All contributions are tax deductible.

diagnosis, there are far better chances to beat cancer with different options to pursue. "It wasn't something that I thought about and it's not covered by the medical plan. "Two things that saved my life. No. 1, my good friend Bill who invited me on the cruise, and my doctor who suggested getting a checkup," says Johnson. "Other than that, I wouldn't have thought about a PSA test otherwise." According to Prostate Cancer Foun-

dation B.C., all men should begin PSA testing at age 40. If there is a close relative who had prostate cancer in the family, tests should start at an earlier age. The foundation is looking for donations to support B.C.'s prostate-cancer community, which includes patients, their families and the volunteers working to provide awareness, research and support-group programs in B.C.

"Those of us who have a heart condition and go to the doctor, don't consider that to be a death sentence. We should be thinking about cancer in the same way, and have a regular test to determine the status of your heart or your prostate." says Gross. Gross who underwent a prostatectomy almost 20 years ago, says he believes his surgery could have been delayed or possibly avoided altogether by practising alternative treatments for cancer care, those with a holistic approach that's more readily available and accepted today. On Oct. 5, the foundation, with integrated cancer care centre InspireHealth, will run a free four-week webinar series on Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. The first of the hour-long session nights will focus on nutrition and how food can act as medicine for the body. Eating Right -- the Healing Power of Nutrition, will discuss the benefits of good nutrition and how it can fortify the immune system. "Supplements, super foods and vitamins for prostate health and

Len Gross, a founding member of Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C., says there are complementary treatments that are effective in managing the disease. Glenn BAGlo -- PnG

cancer recovery" is the second session running Oct. 12. Gross says that vitamin D has been found to be particularly beneficial to those living in northern climes, but the benefits of myriad other minerals and fatty acids like omega 3, selenium, vitamins E, A, B, and B3 will be covered. "I think it's fair to say that for anyone who's diagnosed with cancer, the first line of attack is to cut out fatty red meats," says Gross, adding that a healthy heart diet that keeps sugar, salt, white flour and rice in check is always a good starting point. Each webinar presentation will fol-

low with a question period. The third week, on Wednesday Oct. 19, will focus on exercise and stress management. The impact of exercise on prostate cancer, and how physical activity can help in coping with the disease are discussed. The final session Oct. 26 deals with "how to manage depression and anxiety" says Gross who believes many people are often suffering quietly. "I've asked the lecturer to identify or at least explain how we might understand who might have depression, and who may be experiencing anxiety, and what kinds of elements do we

need to look for so people will know when they should get some help. I think many of us don't really understand what we're experiencing." Gross, who says he would do things differently had he been diagnosed today, is a believer of these non-invasive complementary treatments. Over the last decade, Gross says there's also been a shift in focus from how to care for cancer patients to prevention, and how to avoid getting cancer in the first place. To register for the free webinar series, email: [email protected] or call 604.574.4012.

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC and Inspirehealth are proud to present FREE webinars

"How can you optimize your recovery from Prostate Cancer?"

Thanks to our partners:

Check out your butt. Have a PSA test today.

Thanks to our partners:

Participate

We Need you to: Volunteer

Donate

1 in 7 Canadian men will be diagnosed with Prostate Cancer in their lifetime.

Wed. Oct 5th 7pm - Eating right ­ the healing power of nutrition (food as medicine) Wed. Oct 12th 7 pm - Supplements, super foods and vitamins for prostate health and cancer recovery Wed. Oct 19th 7 pm - Exercise and stress management when facing prostate cancer Wed. Oct. 26th 7pm - How to manage depression and anxiety for prostate cancer patients

To donate go to www.prostatecancerbc.ca

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To sign up go to: http://tinyurl.com/prostaterecovery or call 604-574-4012

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a28 | news

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theprOvince.cOm

you're not alone

In an effort to raise awareness for prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the battle stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by prostate cancer. This week, we bring you the story of Leno Zecchel and George Main of the Surrey support group who say that talking openly with other men going through similar experiences provides immeasurable help on the road to recovery. Also, to support men who are living with the disease, a webinar series starts today. Go to prostatecancerbc.ca for more information.

Wednesday, OctOber 5, 2011

Wednesday, october 12, 2011

`love is freer'

In an effort to raise awareness for prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by prostate cancer. This week, we bring you the story of Richard Wassersug, a research scientist who underwent prostate-cancer treatments himself and says the side effects can often affect the patients' relationships with their partners. To support men who are living with the disease, Prostate Cancer Foundation BC and InspireHealth are currently running a webinar series on Wednesday nights at 7 p.m., providing tips on diet and lifestyle changes that benefit prostate cancer patients. Go to prostatecancerbc.ca for more information.

theprovince.com

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theprOvince.cOm

Wednesday, OctOber 26, 2011

In an effort to raise awareness for prostate cancer, a silent disease often with no symptoms that can affect any man, The Province is running a 10-part series telling the stories of cancer survivors and those whose lives have been affected by prostate cancer. This week, we bring you the story of Bryan McPherson, who has a history of prostate cancer in his family. He urges other men in this high-risk group to be on top of their health through regular PSA and DRE testing.

Fellow patients an invaluable resource

health:

Local support groups act as reassuring guide

By Lina Toyoda

the province

How you can donate

Funding to Prostate cancer Foundation B.c. goes directly to building awareness, to research and local support groups. Your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the Donate tab. You can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. All contributions are tax deductible. the support group of about 40 men meet in the cafeteria of Surrey Memorial Hospital, where they can speak freely about their condition, share their personal and private experiences and learn from each other, a vital part of the process for many cancer patients, he says. Over the last two decades advances in prostate cancer treatments have made leaps and bounds, progressing locally due to the work of organizations like Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C., Inspire Health, the B.C. Cancer Agency and Vancouver Prostate Centre, says Surrey support-group co-chairman George Main, a cancer survivor himself since 1997. "Prostate cancer is not the same disease it was 10 years ago. It's more of a chronic illness now because if you

When facing a diagnosis of cancer, knowing that you're not alone can be an inspiration and a rare comfort on a path often paved with fear, uncertainty and unrelenting treatments. Local support groups are an invaluable resource for both newly diagnosed and long-term cancer patients, a time and a place for men to share their prostate-cancer experiences and to learn vast amounts of information from specialists on various angles of treatment options, lifestyle choices, medications, side effects and general health and wellness. The meetings often provide reassurance for those who have to make difficult decisions about their own treatment. Chairman of the Surrey support group, Leno Zecchel, a 17-year cancer survivor, says support from family and fellows at the meetings meant a lot to him through his own journey, especially in the early days. "It has helped me a great deal. At that time, it meant that there were other people who were in the same boat as you were. Otherwise, you feel like you're out on a deserted island. It's knowing that you're not the only one. "At our meetings we're very open and we talk about everything," he says. On the last Saturday of each month

catch it early it's very treatable," says Main. "You're able to do a lot of things to prevent it from spreading." Diet plays a critical role in maintaining and preventing prostate cancer, he says. Active surveillance is a term that's used for the close monitoring of lifestyle and diet changes, particularly to the Mediterranean diet, says Main, which includes cutting out red meat, starches, canola oil and dairy products, while boosting fruits and vegetables, fish and chicken, olive oil, and plant-based protein from beans and lentils. "We know that if a man catches it early, with active surveillance, you can delay having to treat it for a long period of time. If you can delay having to treat the cancer for 10 years you've just given a man 10 years where impotence and incontinence are not the issue. Growing old is," says Main. Whereas surgery was once considered the first-line treatment for a diagnosis, Main explains that there are three different types of prostate cancer. "There's one that a man can have in his prostate and it'll just stay there and do nothing for the rest of his life -- that, we call the `turtle.' And then there's the `bird' -- it's a very fast, aggressive cancer and it's a very small percentage but it flies out of that prostate and metastasizes in no time. "Eighty per cent, the bulk are what

Battling cancer can take heavy toll on sex life

DISEASE:

If it runs in the family, get tested

high risk:

Got a hereditary background of prostate cancer? Your odds of getting it are one in two

By Lina Toyoda

the province

Prostate survivors need to accept a potential new reality

By Lina Toyoda

the province

How you can donate

funding to Prostate Cancer foundation BC goes directly to building awareness, to research and local support groups. your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the donate tab. you can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. all contributions are tax deductible. brother are cancer free, which he credits to the regular screening. He says early diagnosis means everything, and because they caught it early, the risk for recurrence is also very low; less than three per cent. "We're both totally clear and we did have our prostate removed -- a prostatectomy -- but we're really lucky because it was caught very early and it was nowhere near metastasizing. And because of my family history, the kind of prostate cancer they suspected that I had was aggressive." Although he had a genetic disposition, he says it's important to note that the type of cancer in younger patients

after prostate-cancer treatment, relationships between middle-aged couples can change.

-- isTock PhoTo

Leno Zecchel (left) and George Main wear blue-striped ties to support national awareness of prostate cancer. Ric ERnsT -- PnG

we call `rabbits.' They'll hop around the prostate and will eventually hop out. So this is the group where active surveillance is great because for some reason, you can keep it in the pen, and slow the growth down tremendously." With modern research leading to more options, many men are now opting for alternatives to surgery if possible to avoid harsh side effects that often include impotence and incontinence. Vancouver's integrated cancer care

centre InspireHealth, which offers complementary treatments for men in the prevalent `rabbit' category to keep their disease in check, is also a highly recommended resource for men who are newly diagnosed. The centre, in a joint effort with Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C., is launching a free webinar series today at 7 p.m. at prostatecancerbc.ca providing tips that benefit cancer patients covering nutrition, super foods, supplements, exercise and stress management.

We need you to: · Participate · Volunteer · Donate

Thanks to our partners:

Carrying the label of an "old man's disease," prostate cancer is still shrouded in a cloud of misinformation, embarrassment and shame due to the brutal side-effects that come with its primary treatments, says Dalhousie University research scientist Richard Wassersug. "The tragedy is that if men have erectile dysfunction, it's an emasculating and demoralizing problem for them." If they lose their libido, then the bond between a couple becomes affected, he says, because the patient doesn't think to touch his partner anymore. "The partner often feels truly and deeply and genuinely abandoned. So then the disease becomes not only a problem for the patient but for the partner as well. This is a tragedy of a scope that we just haven't even begun to inform the public about." A patient himself, Wassersug was diagnosed 13 years ago and underwent the first-line treatments of sur-

RiCHaRd WaSSERSUG

-- sUBMiTTED PhoTo

gery and radiation, as well as what he refers to as the largely under-discussed treatment of hormone therapy. All three treatments often cause impotence and incontinence. Fascinated by the side effects of the treatments and drugs, as a scientist, he decided to redirect his research into the subject, exploring not only the changes in the body but also of

the mind and spirit, and interpersonal relationships. Because the growth of prostate cancer cells are stimulated by male hormones, part of the treatment for advanced patients or those experiencing recurrence is to use drugs that deplete the body of testosterone in hormone therapy. "It would be great to get past the imprecise and vague language here because what we're really dealing with here -- the proper term is androgen deprivation therapy -- are drugs that are chemically castrating," he says. Sharp decreases in hormone levels can cause other side-effects, including hot flashes, growth of breast tissue, osteoporosis, loss of muscle mass, fatigue and changes in mood. However, George Main, 70, a prostate cancer survivor and co-chairman of the Surrey support group says that most men learn to accept a new reality, and there are devices and treatments to deal with these sensitive issues. Main, who was treated for prostate cancer when he was 57, says when you're faced with the options of being

depressed about the changes or getting along with your life, most men choose to move on. "Usually I think from 60 on, sex is no longer the driving force," he says, noting though that the emergence of Viagra has changed the situation for many older men. "As far as my wife and I, we've had a tremendous marriage. And the other parts of your life become far closer. Conversations become more meaningful," he says. "It's almost like a completely different angle than what you might expect." He agrees with Wassersug on the point that many patients and their partners are still uncomfortable and embarrassed talking about their issues in the bedroom. "It is extremely private because in our society we make such a big thing about it," he says. "But you know, what is normal?" "As far as incontinence is concerned, most men find it a pain in the butt but it becomes an issue that you live with and the problems are treatable," says Main.

When it comes to love without sex, he says it can be an emotionally and spiritually lifting relationship. "When there is no sex, it's a completely different dimension. It's very emotional, it's really hard to describe. It's like your soulmate. It frees you to do other things," says Main. "And it's pure love for another person without any physical attachment. "It's so different than what you'd imagine. What I'm saying is love is freer."

How you can donate

Funding to Prostate cancer Foundation Bc goes directly to building awareness, to research and local support groups. Your donation will make a difference to those living with prostate cancer, to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the Donate tab. You can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. All contributions tax deductible.

One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer within his lifetime; it is the most common cancer to afflict men in Canada. However, if there is a family history of the disease, the risk increases to one in two, says Bryan McPherson who was diagnosed six years ago, and whose father and brother both had prostate cancer. "It's that high of a risk. It's not just a father or brother, it can be an uncle or grandfather so anyone in your reasonably immediate family. And just because your dad didn't have it, but maybe your grandfather did, it's still something you have to be aware of. You don't escape from that statistic." McPherson's dad Jim was diagnosed when he was 58, and died of the disease four years later. "Fortunately we had a good family doctor and his advice to my brother and I was that we should get checked too. We were 40 years old when we started getting checked and everything was fine but we kept up with the checking. And my brother, when he was 46, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and then when I was 49, I was diagnosed." Today, both McPherson and his

tend to be more aggressive, so early detection becomes that much more critical for successful treatment. Over 90 per cent of prostate cancer cases are curable if detected and treated in the earliest stages, according to the Canadian Cancer Society. "That doesn't mean I'll never have it again but the odds are very, very low. I don't have to deal with radiation or all the drug therapy, and all the other things. I just have to keep a watchful eye and I'm still getting tested. Every year for the rest of my life, I'm going to be tested," he said. He notes that in the last couple of years, a lot more attention has finally been given to the disease, and with it has come a flood of information about the benefits of diet, exercise, vitamins and supplements in preventing and managing prostate cancer. "Nobody ever told us that lifestyle plays a big part in this, and stress reduction, exercise and Vitamin D. All of those things are really important and all of those things are coming out now. I think all of that was known but the story wasn't being told very well," he said. "Typically anything that's good for prostate health is good for diabetic health, for your heart, blood pressure and cholesterol as well. They all follow in the same package," he said. "You

Bryan McPherson believes men should have regular screenings for prostate cancer. Wayne Leidenfrost -- PnG

don't have to be perfect, but a little change has a phenomenal impact." "But guys are guys and they don't tend to look after themselves," he adds. "It's time for men to start taking care of themselves. It's all about being proactive rather than reactive. When it comes to diseases like cancer and heart disease, it's too late when all of a sudden you're having trouble with your heart." In its earliest, most curable stage, the disease has no symptoms so Pros-

tate Cancer Foundation B.C. and the Canadian Cancer Society recommend all men at age 40 to begin regular screening which includes both a DRE and PSA blood test. In B.C., PSA tests are currently not covered by the Medical Services Plan unless you have a history of prostate cancer in your family. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in Canadian men, with 25,500 new cases this year across the country.

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC and Inspirehealth are proud to present FREE webinars

"How can you optimize your recovery from Prostate Cancer?"

Tonight: 7pm - Eating right ­ the healing power of nutrition (food as medicine) Wed. Oct 12th 7 pm - Supplements, super foods and vitamins for prostate health and cancer recovery Wed. Oct 19th 7 pm - Exercise and stress management when facing prostate cancer Wed. Oct. 26th 7pm - How to manage depression and anxiety for prostate cancer patients

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC and Inspirehealth are proud to present FREE webinars

"How can you optimize your recovery from Prostate Cancer?"

Tonight: 7 pm - Supplements, super foods and vitamins for prostate health and cancer recovery Wed. Oct 19th 7 pm - Exercise and stress management when facing prostate cancer Wed. Oct. 26th 7pm - How to manage depression and anxiety for prostate cancer patients

We need you to: · Participate · Volunteer · Donate

Thanks to our partners:

To sign up go to: http://tinyurl.com/prostaterecovery or call 604-574-4012

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To sign up go to: http://tinyurl.com/prostaterecovery or call 604-574-4012

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A22 | news

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theprovince.com

ride to live

Wednesday, november 2, 2011

a36 | news

|

theprovince.com

fighting prostate cancer

Wednesday, november 9, 2011

Revved up to raise awareness

By Lina Toyoda

the province

ride to live: Couple make it their mission to educate the community about the disease

As our series concludes, we address the male mystique. Norm Sherling, chairman of the Prostate Cancer Canada Network's Coquitlam support group, has seen many newcomers come through monthly meetings who know little or nothing about the disease at a critical time -- when they are deciding a course of treatment. Some haven't even told their wives they have the disease. They need access to information , and support.

If the rumble on the road of 1,800 motorcycles doesn't get your attention, VPD Sgt. Peter Groenland and wife Colleen will make it their mission to raise prostate cancer awareness by revving up their engines and getting their message across with smoke in their wheels. As volunteers and co-chairs of the annual Westcoast Motorcycle Ride To Live, the husband-and-wife team leads the local organization to raise funds for prostate-cancer research and to support men in B.C. who are affected by the most prevalent male cancer in the country. "I'm one of those guys you'll see everywhere. I don't go to the doctor unless my arm has been sliced and it's hanging by a thread of meat, and I'd be thinking that a band-aid will fix that. I'm one of those guys that thinks that way. And those are the guys that we really try to target as far as awareness," said Groenland. It was early 2008 when the national fundraiser Ride For Dad was looking for somebody to organize the event in Vancouver, says Groenland. Inspired by Colleen's elderly dad who had recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, they decided to take on the role together. An unexpected and perhaps serendipitous series of events would end up saving Groenland's own life. "We set up the ride for the last Sunday in May, and I took a poster to my doctor. And he says, `When's the last time you've been checked?' "I get my PSA checked every year and it's 1.2. It's pretty low. Shouldn't be a problem," Groenland replied. His doctor asked, "When's the last time you had a physical checkup?" Groenland answered honestly. "`That's really something I really don't do.' Being a guy," he laughs. "He told me to get up on the table." In that examination, his family doctor found a lump. Groenland was sent to see a specialist. "They did the biopsy and sure enough, three days after our ride, in June of that year, I was diag-

How you can donate

Funding for Prostate Cancer Foundation BC goes directly to building awareness, to research and local support groups. Your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, to support prevention and advance treatments. Please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the Donate tab. You can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. All contributions are tax deductible.

VPd Sgt. Peter Groenland and wife Colleen help raise funds for prostate-cancer research.

-- VPD Photo

info: Often it's the women who bring their husbands to the first support-group meeting

By Lina Toyoda

The Province

Drop the strong-andsilent act

How you can donate

Funding for prostate Cancer Foundation b.C. goes directly to building awareness, to research and local support groups. Your donation will make a real difference to those living with prostate cancer, to support prevention and advance treatments. please go to prostatecancerbc.ca and click on the donate tab. You can choose to designate your contribution to a specific cause or give in memory of a loved one. All contributions are tax deductible. the public consciousness should be. His wife Noreen says women have been so successful with their breastcancer campaigns because of their openness, while men have suffered in silence. Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer in the country and will affect one in seven men within their lifetime. If there is a family history, the risk increases to one in two, says Bryan McPherson of Prostate Cancer Foundation B.C. The foundation recommends all men start screening at age 40 through both PSA and DRE tests, and earlier if it runs in the family. The popularity of the global campaign Movember has also helped raise awareness and vital funds for prostate cancer as thousands turn their faces into walking billboards for men's health during this month's "mustache season." Sherling hopes to see more improvements to come. "When you go to a doctor and he says to you, `You have cancer,' you don't hear anything else. You hear noise but nothing sinks into your head after the word `cancer.' "So what we're trying to do with doctors is when they tell someone that they've got prostate cancer, to hand him one of our brochures and say, `Give these guys a call and go to their meetings. Get them to help you.' "

nosed with prostate cancer." Groenland was adopted so he didn't know his medical background. Still, he says, he was surprised at the diagnosis at age 53. His wife Colleen says it was an overwhelming time for her. All of a sudden, she had two men in the house with prostate cancer. "We were in shock and worried but we tried to keep our humour up even going through the different stages. You have to stay positive." After talking to several medical professionals including a counsellor and nurse, he opted for surgery, which was successful in ridding his cancer. Back then, he says there was a program run by the Vancouver Prostate Centre, which provided counselling to newly-diagnosed men. "They ran out of funding for it but it was a place you could go to and they'd discuss the process and all the events that could happen after prostate cancer, especially after you've had the operation. That's something that's really needed," he said. The couple started setting up a pros-

Logo designed by B.C. artist Roy Henry Vickers. -- suBmitteD Photo

tate-cancer awareness booth at the Vancouver Motorcycle Show every year, and says they are amazed by the public response. "I had wives coming up to me and saying, `My husband has prostate cancer and he won't go to the doctor and he won't talk about it. I don't know what to do," says Colleen. "And men themselves would come up. It was almost like, `Here's a booth about something that nobody has talked to me about or I haven't been able to talk about it with anyone,' and

they just open right up and tell you what stage they're at. Colleen says an important change she hopes to see is to have experienced counsellors available to men who will tell the whole truth and scope of the disease. Groenland has been vocal about his own experience and made it his mission to educate "guys like him" who often have invincible "superman" attitudes. "I give lectures to policemen. I explain to them about the prostate and how it functions and what it does for you. And if you don't keep it healthy and you don't get it checked, your little brain or your little buddy there is just going to shrivel up and die on you. So, that usually gets them to the doctor. "But I also tell them that they should bring a candle and a bottle of wine because it's kind of an intimate thing you're going to go through there," he jokes. Last year, the Groenlands brought the 911 community on-board the Westcoast Motorcycle Ride To Live.

Partnering with Prostate Cancer Foundation BC, the money raised through the ride now goes directly to cancer research and funding for the network of 25 support groups throughout the province, which they hope to expand into the Interior and northern B.C. Renowned B.C. native artist Roy Henry Vickers designed their new logo adorned with a prostate-cancer ribbon, which Groenland wears prominently on his crested jacket as he continues to rumble down the open road. Visit ridetolive.ca for more info.

There's no doubt in most people's minds that men and women have their share of differences. Norm Sherling, chairman of the Prostate Cancer Canada Network's Coquitlam support group, says the way the genders cope in the face of cancer is no different, and the reactions he's seen from men and women can be like night and day. "Men don't gather the information by talking to anybody. They seem to want to have an `expert' like a specialist give them all the information, instead of gathering a whole bunch of information and then putting it together and coming up with the right solution. Men just don't seem to do that. "Women, when they're facing breast cancer, they talk to other women. They talk to people and they learn a lot quicker than most men, I think. We've got guys coming to our meeting who haven't even told their wives they have prostate cancer. Can you believe that?"

Often it's the woman who brings her husband to the first support-group meeting, he says. For more than a decade Sherling has been involved with the prostate cancer group -- since he was diagnosed in 1997 -- and over the years he's seen many newcomers come through the monthly meetings who have little to no information about the disease at a most critical time: when they are deciding a course of treatment. "Nine times out of 10, they haven't looked into everything that's involved. So that's what we do. The whole purpose of the support groups is to help guys learn what's going to happen and how to put up with some of the things that you have to put up with." Fellow Coquitlam group member Eric Huffey says the first thing he did when he was diagnosed 12 years ago was seek out a support group. "I don't think I'm in the majority of men there but that was my feeling. I needed information and support and the ability to talk to people who had gone through what I was about to go

Prostate Cancer Canada network's norm Sherling, pictured with wife noreen, says the way men and women deal with the disease can be like night and day. noreen says women have been so successful with their breast-cancer campaigns because of their openness, while men have suffered in silence. -- submitted photo

through. It can't get better than actually talking to somebody who's been through it rather than a surgeon." Sherling encourages people to see several specialists before making a decision on treatment. "When a doctor is talking to you, if he is a surgeon, you know he's going to recommend surgery. If he's a radiation oncologist, well, there's no doubt he's going to recommend radiation, you see." Sherling tells all new patients to see an urologist, a surgeon and an oncologist. "They will each recommend what their specialty is but you will then make up your own mind as to

which one of those you want to take, or none." Active surveillance is also an option for those diagnosed with milder forms of prostate cancer, those with a lower PSA reading and a low Gleason score, a measure of the cancer's aggressiveness. But the most significant factor for success is early diagnosis, as 90 per cent of prostate cancer cases are curable if detected and treated at the earliest stages, according to Prostate Cancer Canada. Though awareness and education for the disease has come a long way, Sherling says it's still far behind where

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Our 2011 Events

The May 29th 2011 event was a great success with the addition of a second starting location in Chilliwack. There were two routes for the riders who all ended up at Fraser Downs for a large celebration supported by Police, Fire, Sheriffs, Ambulance and Military personnel. The event raised over $140,000 in 2011 www.ridetolive.ca

The 13th annual Father's Day walk/run (Do it for Dad) was another great success. To date this event has raised more than 1.5 million dollars. For 2012 we have added 2 more locations for a total of 4. Burnaby, Kamloops, Kelowna and Chilliwack www.fathersdayrun.ca www.walktolive.ca

Third party events are happening everyday in BC and they all help us in our fundraising and awareness efforts. In 2011 we had 16 events raising over $26,000. Some of the types of events were Golf Tournaments, Hockey Games, Student Projects, School Concerts, Spa days and Barbecues. The foundation supports these events and is always looking for new and innovative ideas to help fund our many programs.

Movember: The foundation participated in Movember with a team that raised over $9000.00

Volunteers are our backbone

Where we go from here

Advocacy, Research, Support, Awareness... the sky's the limit. 2012 is underway and Prostate Cancer Foundation BC is moving ahead at lightening spead. With a new chair and new board format the members are looking forward to seeing more exciting changes. Expansion and growth are going to be on the agenda as the Foundation continues to work with PCC on projects such as the Wake up Breakfast and September's Awareness month. The Foundations walk run has doubled its locations for 2012 and the Westcoast Motorcycle Ride is expanding with a show and shine. None of this could be possible without the incredible work of our 100s of volunteers. Because of the tremendous contributions our volunteers make the Foundation is able to operate on a very slim budget ensuring that the most funds possible go to helping achieve our goals. Onward and upward.........

Prostate Cancer Foundation BC #4 17918 55th Avenue Surrey BC V3S 6C8 Tel:(604)574-4012 Fax: (604)574-8011 www.prostatecancerbc.ca [email protected]

All contributions received by Prostate Cancer Foundation BC are greatly appreciated. We recognize there are many worthy charities competing for your annual donation dollars and we appreciate your consideration and any support you can provide. Your privacy is taken seriously and we will not sell or distribute your information to anyone. Charitable Reg. # 87105 7840 RR0001

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