Read 2011 NAPLAN Handbook for Principals text version

2011

National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy

Handbook

for Principals

NATIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

LITERACY AND NUMERACY

Handbook for Principals 2011

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Table of Contents Handbook overview ............................................................................................................................ 3 PART A ­ National information from relevant sections of the National Protocols for Test Administration .................................................................................................................................... 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................... 4 CODE OF CONDUCT .................................................................................................................... 5 COMMUNICATIONS ................................................................................................................... 7 SECURITY OF TEST MATERIALS ................................................................................................... 7 STUDENT PARTICIPATION COHORTS.......................................................................................... 9 SPECIAL PROVISIONS ................................................................................................................ 13 PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE TEST ..................................................................................... 20 ADMINISTERING THE TESTS ..................................................................................................... 21 MARKING.................................................................................................................................. 25 BREACHES OF TEST PROTOCOLS .............................................................................................. 26 DEFINITIONS ............................................................................................................................. 28 TEST ADMINISTRATION AUTHORITY CONTACT DETAILS ......................................................... 29

PART B ­ Jurisdictional information .................................................................................................. 30

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Handbook overview

The purpose of this Handbook for Principals is to make sure that principals and teachers understand what is required to administer the 2011 National Assessment Program -- Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests. This handbook is designed for principals, who have ultimate responsibility within their school for ensuring that the tests are appropriately administered. Principals are expected to ensure that all relevant information is conveyed in a timely manner to all staff members involved in the administration of NAPLAN tests at the school. There are two parts to this handbook: · · Part A: Relevant sections of National Protocols for Test Administration from ACARA, including the Code of Conduct. These protocols apply to all schools in Australia. Part B: State or territory operational information and instructions.

Principals and test administrators should not assume that what they have done in the past complies with the testing requirements for this year's tests. For further information, the Handbook for Principals for each jurisdiction may be viewed online at the relevant Test Administration Authority websites.

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PART A ­ National information from relevant sections of the National Protocols for Test Administration

1

INTRODUCTION

The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has responsibility for the central management of the National Assessment Program ­ Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). The Test Administration Authority (TAA) in each state and territory is responsible for the administration of the tests in their jurisdiction. NAPLAN tests are held during May each year and in 2011 the tests will be held on 10, 11 and 12 May. In total approximately 5 million tests will be sat by over 1 million students nationally. All states and territories administer the tests in accordance with nationally agreed protocols. The National Protocols for Test Administration provide detailed information on all aspects of the administration of the tests. They specify security requirements and uniform processes and procedures to ensure students complete the tests under similar conditions. In cases where individual students require special arrangements to complete the tests these are provided at the school in consultation with the school and the relevant Test Administration Authority. In order to maintain the integrity of the tests and the testing process these protocols must be followed carefully. Breaches of the National Protocols for Test Administration and allegations of cheating or improper behaviour are taken very seriously, and substantiated cases of improper behaviour will be reported publicly. To assist Test Administration Authorities and schools determine what are appropriate and inappropriate behaviours, a code of conduct is included for the first time in the 2011 National Protocols for Test Administration, along with information on how breaches are dealt with, and potential consequences for substantiated cases. ACARA, in cooperation with states and territories, will continue to review the National Protocols for Test Administration to ensure that tests are delivered in an appropriate and consistent manner across all states and territories.

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2

CODE OF CONDUCT

The NAPLAN code of conduct is designed to uphold the integrity of the tests by outlining the fundamental principles upon which the tests are based. Undermining test integrity by breaching these principles or the National Protocols for Test Administration will lead to an investigation and, if allegations are substantiated, to potentially serious consequences. This code provides a summary of acceptable and unacceptable behaviours. At all times educators must ensure that tests are administered in a way that is fair and equitable for all students, in order to provide an accurate assessment of students' capabilities at the time of testing. 2.1 NAPLAN is a national assessment, and all students are expected to participate. NAPLAN should be accessible to all students to demonstrate their actual skills and knowledge. 2.1.1 2.1.2 Special provisions should be granted that are appropriate for students to access and participate in the test. Exerting influence on parents to withdraw their children from testing is inappropriate.

2.2 NAPLAN is primarily an assessment of learning, so the test environment must be tightly controlled to maintain test integrity. This includes the conduct of test administrators, support staff, and the presence of unauthorised teaching or support material. 2.2.1 2.2.2 2.2.3 2.2.4 2.2.5 2.2.6 2.2.7 2.2.8 The integrity of the tests must be maintained at all times; cheating is not permitted. The test environment must confer neither advantage nor disadvantage on the students. Tests should be appropriately administered, being mindful of the time, location, and supervision requirements. Active supervision of students during the tests is required. Providing unauthorised assistance to students during the tests is inappropriate. Providing additional time for the tests (unless special provisions have been granted) is inappropriate. Allowing students access to unauthorised materials and aids during the test is inappropriate. Test administrators should ensure their actions before, during and after the tests do not unduly impact on students' results.

2.3 Schools and teachers should adopt appropriate test preparation strategies that familiarise students with the test process, but do not excessively rehearse students such that results reflect prepared work rather than students' own abilities. 2.3.1 The best preparation schools can provide for students is teaching the curriculum, as the tests reflect core elements of the curricula of all states and territories.

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2.3.2 2.3.3 2.3.4 2.3.5 2.3.6

Any actions that compromise the ability of students to produce results that reflect their own unrehearsed knowledge and skill are inappropriate. The pre-preparation of possible responses is inappropriate. Any attempt by school staff to unfairly or dishonestly manipulate test results is inappropriate. Any attempts by students to gain an unfair advantage are inappropriate. Any attempts by any party to modify an answer after the test are inappropriate.

2.4 The security of the tests is critical to ensure that students' individual results accurately reflect their abilities. Test materials must be kept in a secure location under lock and key to avoid any premature disclosure of content, or unauthorised disclosure of materials during the test period. 2.4.1 2.4.2 2.4.3 The security and confidentiality of the tests must be maintained from the time they are delivered to the school to the end of the test security period. The content of tests must not be disclosed prior to the scheduled tests or during the test security period. Tests should not be conducted outside the secure school location unless prior permission has been granted by the Test Administration Authority.

2.5 Attention to communication at all levels underpins the effective and transparent delivery of the tests. 2.5.1 Principals and all relevant school staff must read and understand the Handbook for Principals (which includes relevant sections of the National Protocols for Test Administration), and Test Administration Handbook for Teachers. Failure to read or become aware of these protocols and documents is not a valid reason for breaching protocols. Test administrators must follow the instructions outlined in the National Protocols for Test Administration, Handbook for Principals and Test Administration Handbook for Teachers correctly, and seek clarification from the Test Administration Authority if unsure of any points. Dishonest and inappropriate practices should be actively discouraged and will not be tolerated and allegations of breaches of the National Protocols for Test Administration should be reported promptly to the Test Administration Authority. Making students, parents or carers aware of the main activities involved in the testing is the responsibility of the principal.

2.5.2 2.5.3

2.5.4

2.5.5

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3

COMMUNICATIONS

3.1 National responsibility 3.1.1 3.1.2 A NAPLAN website (www.naplan.edu.au) is maintained with updates on all aspects of the national tests. A communications strategy clearly outlining the respective roles played by ACARA and the Test Administration Authorities with regard to communication to schools will be made available on the NAPLAN website. Principals are responsible for acknowledging that they have read and understood the relevant sections of the National Protocols for Test Administration, included in the Handbook for Principals, in a manner outlined by the relevant jurisdiction.

3.1.3

3.2 Responsibilities of Test Administration Authorities Content for this section can be found in the complete National Protocols for Test Administration, located at www.naplan.edu.au.

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SECURITY OF TEST MATERIALS

4.1 Responsibilities of Test Administration Authorities Content for this section can be found in the complete National Protocols for Test Administration, located at www.naplan.edu.au. 4.2 Responsibilities of Test Administration Authorities with contractors Content for this section can be found in the complete National Protocols for Test Administration, located at www.naplan.edu.au. 4.3 Responsibilities for security of materials in the delivery to schools, storage at schools and protocols for distribution to teachers acting as test administrators Content for this section can be found in the complete National Protocols for Test Administration, located at www.naplan.edu.au. 4.4 Responsibilities of the principal 4.4.1 The principal is responsible for the overall security, receipt and confidentiality of all test materials from the time of receipt of those materials at the school through to the end of the test security period and including the safe collection or dispatch of those materials on conclusion of the tests. Where couriers cannot avoid making deliveries after school hours, the principal or the principal's delegate (someone who occupies a position of suitable responsibility, whom the principal determines or nominates as an eligible person to accept the test material delivery) must take delivery of the test material. NAPLAN materials must be received in person by the principal or the principal's delegate. The principal is to ensure that the authorised person who receives the test material signs for it and legibly records their name and the time the material arrives 7|Page

4.4.2

4.4.3

at the school. This information may be requested by the Test Administration Authority. Materials must not be left unattended by a courier. If this occurs, the Test Administration Authority must be notified immediately. 4.4.4 The principal (or the principal's delegate who signs for the materials) is to ensure the contents and quantities of deliveries are correct as soon as possible after the receipt of the material. Materials will be delivered securely such that: · materials can be checked for correct content and quantities without opening the tamper-evident packaging · the Writing stimulus is not visible · tampering of packaging is evident. Packages should be checked for tampering, and to ensure correct quantities have been delivered without opening the packages. In the event of incorrect/incomplete delivery or evidence of tampering, the relevant Test Administration Authority must be notified immediately. Any additional test materials dispatched to schools will be forwarded using the same level of security as that used for the original dispatch. 4.4.5 4.4.6 The Test Administration Authority must also be notified if the security of test materials has been compromised during transit. The principal is responsible for ensuring test materials are sorted and prepared for distribution to classes in advance of the test period, but no earlier than is necessary for the effective administration of the tests. A reasonable period to sort materials may be up to one day. Test content must not be accessed during this process. Schools which need greater flexibility must apply to their Test Administration Authority. Except in special circumstances, where the size of the school precludes this, any person/s acting as a delegate of the principal and assisting the principal in this task should not be a classroom teacher of any class sitting the tests. The principal must ensure that all test materials, including the Reading magazines and the Writing stimulus, are kept secure until the end of the test security period. Teachers and students not involved in the tests may not have access to the test materials during the secure period. Under no circumstances may materials be given to parents/carers or members of the wider community, including the media before the end of the test security period. The principal must ensure that videos or photographs for media opportunities are taken outside the test sessions and do not reveal any secure materials. The principal must ensure that test administrators involved in the testing are informed of test processes and are made familiar with information provided on test administration.

4.4.7

4.4.8 4.4.9

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5

STUDENT PARTICIPATION COHORTS

5.1 Assessed students All students are expected to participate in NAPLAN tests. National test results are based on the number of assessed students. Assessed students include students who attempt the test and are not otherwise treated as absent due to abandonment due to illness or injury and students exempt from testing. 5.1.1 5.1.2 Students in each state and territory attending government and non-government schools who are in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are expected to participate in the testing. Students in ungraded classes, who are equivalent in age to students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9, are expected to sit the relevant year level national tests.

5.2 Exempt students Students may be exempted from one or more of the tests (ie Language Conventions, Reading, Writing or Numeracy). 5.2.1 Parent/carer signed consent for exemptions Principals must obtain signed parent/carer consent for all exempted students. Principals can expect information from Test Administration Authorities on the preferred method for collecting and recording this information. 5.2.2 English language proficiency Students with a language background other than English, who arrived from overseas less than a year before the test, should be given the opportunity to participate in testing, but may be exempted. Principals can expect information from Test Administration Authorities on the preferred method for collecting and recording this information. 5.2.3 Students with disabilities Students with significant intellectual or complex disabilities should be given the opportunity to participate in testing should their parent/carer wish that they do so, however they may be exempted from sitting the national tests. 5.3 Treatment of exempt students 5.3.1 Exempt students are counted as part of the cohort of assessed students. In accordance with the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA) reporting protocols, students who qualify for exemption and do not submit a test attempted under test conditions are considered as assessed students and are counted in the below minimum standard calculations for reporting purposes in national and jurisdictional data. Results for exempt students are not included in school-level calculations, but will be reported.

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5.3.2

Students who qualify for exemption but for whom the exemption is not enacted, and who complete the test under test conditions and formally submit the test, must be counted as assessed students with the score that they achieved. Exempt students who were absent on the testing day will still be reported as exempt students, rather than absent students. The text that will appear on the individual student report for tests for which students are exempted will read: Your child was exempt from this test and is considered not to have achieved the national minimum standard. Where a student is exempted from all tests it is recommended that an individual student report not be issued.

5.3.3 5.3.4

5.3.5

5.4 Absent students 5.4.1 Absent students are students who did not sit the tests because they were not present at school when the test was administered or were unable to sit the test as a result of an accident or mishap, and are recorded as absent by the school. Principals are encouraged to facilitate the participation in the tests of students who were absent on the day of the test but return to school within the week scheduled for NAPLAN testing.

5.4.2

5.5 Treatment of absent students 5.5.1 5.5.2 Absent students are not counted as part of the cohort of assessed students. Students who are marked as absent but for whom a test is formally submitted must be counted as assessed. Test Administration Authorities must validate discrepancies, for example where a student was absent for a test, but then completed the test in a catch-up session. A student who is unable to sit the test as a result of an accident or mishap, but who is present at school, is to be recorded as absent unless the student's parent had previously notified the school in writing. A student in Year 7 or 9 who is absent for one of the two Numeracy tests (calculatorallowed or non-calculator) will be treated as an absent student for that test only. Students who are present for the tests but who do not attempt any part of a test must be recorded as being present and are considered as assessed students. The text that will appear on the individual students' reports for tests for which students are absent will read: Your child was absent from this test and no result has been recorded. The text that will appear on the individual student report for Year 7 and 9 Numeracy where students have completed only one of the two test forms will read: Your child was absent from one of the two Numeracy tests. The result presented here is an estimate of the score your child would have received if both tests had been completed.

5.5.3

5.5.4 5.5.5 5.5.6

5.5.7

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5.5.8

Where a student is absent from all tests it is recommended that an individual student report be issued.

5.6 Withdrawn students 5.6.1 Students may be withdrawn from the testing program by their parent/carer. This is a matter for consideration by individual parents/carers in consultation with their child's school. Withdrawals are intended to address issues such as religious beliefs and philosophical objections to testing. A formal application in the manner specified by the Test Administration Authority must be received by the principal prior to the testing.

5.7 Treatment of withdrawn students 5.7.1 5.7.2 The text that will appear on the individual student reports for tests for which students are withdrawn will read: Your child was withdrawn from this test. Where a student is withdrawn from all tests it is recommended that an individual student report not be issued.

5.8 Abandonment due to illness or injury 5.8.1 Abandonment of a test refers only to students who attempt one or more questions in a test but who abandon the test due to illness or injury (ie a sanctioned reason verified by the school). Students who are unable to sit the test during the scheduled test session due to misadventure should be able to sit the test during a catch-up session.

5.8.2

5.9 Treatment of abandonment due to illness or injury 5.9.1 5.9.2 Reasons for abandonment due to illness or injury must be recorded to avoid the student being considered assessed. Abandonment due to illness or injury does NOT apply to students who do not complete the test but are present for the entire test session, or who choose to leave the session without a sanctioned reason that is verified by the school; such students must be counted as assessed with the score that they achieve (see non-attempts). The text that will appear on the individual student reports for tests which students have abandoned due to illness or injury will read: Your child did not complete the test due to illness or injury.

5.9.3

5.10 Non-attempts 5.10.1 Students in attendance for the entire testing session but who do not attempt any part of a test must be recorded as present and are considered assessed.

5.11 Treatment of non-attempts 5.11.1 Students who are present for the entire test session but do not complete any part of the test must be counted as assessed students with a score of zero. Students who submit a blank test-book must not be treated as absent. 11 | P a g e

5.11.2

The text that will appear on the individual student reports for tests where there is no evidence of participation will read: Your child was present for this test but did not complete any part of the test paper.

5.12 International fee-paying students 5.12.1 International fee-paying students are encouraged to participate in NAPLAN tests, to facilitate classroom and school level learning outcomes, however results are not recorded as part of jurisdictional data for public policy purposes. International fee-paying students are not included in jurisdiction data sets but will receive a student report. The text that will appear on the individual student reports for international feepaying students for tests where there is no evidence of participation will read: Your child was present for this test but did not complete any part of the test paper.

5.12.2 5.12.3

5.13 Hosted and visiting students 5.13.1 If a student is away from their regular home location (eg visiting interstate), they should be given an opportunity to take the tests at a school in the student's temporary location. Principals of potential host schools are encouraged to facilitate the participation of visiting students. The principal at the host school is responsible for sending the student's test-books back to the Test Administration Authority in the student's home state by registered post (see Section 12 for Test Administration Authority postal details). The student's results will be included in the data set for their home state. The student will receive a student report through their own school.

5.13.2 5.13.3

5.13.4 5.13.5

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6

SPECIAL PROVISIONS

6.1 Disability Discrimination Act and Disability Standards for Education 6.1.1 The Disability Standards for Education, which came into effect in August 2005, set out the rights of students with disabilities in relation to education and the obligations of school education providers under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992. The Standards set out a framework for education providers to meet this obligation. This includes an obligation to make reasonable adjustments where necessary to ensure the maximum participation of students with disabilities. The framework provides for: · · · · consultation with the student (or an associate of the student) consideration of whether an adjustment is necessary if an adjustment is necessary, identification of a reasonable adjustment making the reasonable adjustment.

The term `reasonable adjustment' is described as a measure or action taken to assist a student with a disability to participate in education on the same basis as other students. An adjustment is reasonable if it achieves this purpose while taking into account the student's learning needs and balancing the interests of all parties affected, including those of the student with the disability, the education provider, staff and other students. 6.1.2 Reasonable adjustments are provided to students with disabilities or special needs through a range of `special provisions'. Special provisions may be accessed by a student for all or part of the tests (see special provisions summary table).

6.2 Special provisions and student participation NAPLAN tests are intended to be as inclusive as possible to enable participation by all students. Where access to the tests is compromised by disability, special provisions may be granted to facilitate access. NAPLAN is primarily an assessment of learning but is also a diagnostic test that gives information about specific aspects of student performance. It is important, when providing special provisions, that a student is neither advantaged nor disadvantaged. · · Special provisions should allow students with various disabilities to access NAPLAN. Special provisions should generally reflect the kind of support and assistance provided in the classroom in order for students to demonstrate what they know and can do. Special provisions must be within reason and must not compromise assessment conditions or the rigour of the assessment standards. For example, reading the stimulus material and/or questions to a student during the Reading test (even if

·

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· ·

this is what the student has in their normal classroom) is not appropriate or permitted. Special provisions should not be applied to confer an advantage over other students. A student may have access to more than one special provision in any one test.

6.3 Responsibilities of Test Administration Authorities 6.3.1 Each Test Administration Authority will: · make known to schools in their jurisdiction, the requirements under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the subsequent obligations of education providers under the Disability Standards for Education 2005 comply with a consistent approach across all states and territories where students access any special provisions as set out in the National Protocols for Test Administration collate requests for alternative format papers and organise provision of the alternative formats within a given production timeframe.

·

·

6.4 Responsibilities of the principal 6.4.1 The principal must: · · identify students who require access to special provisions and where necessary, apply in writing for permission and/or special materials ensure that parents of students who may require special provisions are informed about, and have agreed to, the nature of the provision that their child or children will receive document all special provision arrangements and keep a record of these for audit purposes make arrangements at the local level to accommodate students accessing the special provisions they require in order for them to participate in the tests apply for alternative format test-books to the relevant Test Administration Authority, well in advance of the test comply with the Test Administration Authority requirements for reporting special provisions offered by the school ensure that the test administrator supervising the test has an understanding of the protocols related to special provisions and their administration.

· · · · ·

6.5 Use of a scribe The role of a scribe is to provide access to the test, not to improve a student's performance. Scribes are only appropriate for students who make use of them on a regular basis in the classroom, and where appropriate, students should be encouraged to undertake the tests independently of a scribe using alternative special provisions. A scribe may be either a teacher or a support person engaged by the school (not a parent of the student or another student), must be trained as a scribe and be familiar with the NAPLAN scribe rules.

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6.5.1

A scribe may be provided for a student who: · · · has difficulty with writing or fine motor control due to a disability experiences excessive fatigue of hands or upper limbs due to a medical condition does not have fluency using alternative support, eg students in Year 3 who lack fluency using Braille code

Prior written permission to use a scribe must be sought and given by the respective Test Administration Authority. See also section 6.6 Temporary injuries. 6.5.2 Use of a scribe in the Writing test A trained scribe is permitted to assist a student to complete the Writing test only where the student usually uses a trained scribe in the classroom and where the student would be unable to access a pencil and paper test without the use of a scribe. The student must be familiar with the scribing process and rules. All scribes must adhere to the scribe rules outlined in these Protocols. 6.5.3 Scribe rules for the Writing test The scribe must be fully aware of the test administration procedures and the following conditions: · · Test instructions should be delivered exactly as outlined in the Test Administration Handbook for Teachers. After allowing the student time to reflect and consider, the scribe will write as the student dictates and must not suggest ideas or words to use nor prompt in any other way. As the student dictates, the scribe will write word for word to represent the student's own language, printing all words in lower case without any punctuation. The student may request the scribe read the text back throughout the test for the purpose of maintaining continuity, however the scribe should not lead the student to re-read the text. A spelling check must be performed before the student can be given the scribed text to proofread and edit. The scribe will select four (4) easy words, four (4) average words and four (4) difficult words that have been used in the text and ask the student to orally spell each one. The scribe will record the student's oral spelling of each word in a space below the text. When completed, the scribe must cover the scribed text and show the student only the 12 spelling words. The scribe must ask the student to check these words and indicate any change that the scribe should make. When the test is over, the scribe will write the selected words in brackets next to each of the words spelt by the student to avoid any confusion during the marking process. 15 | P a g e

·

·

·

·

·

·

· ·

During the editing time, the scribed text is given to the student to proofread and to indicate where punctuation is to be placed. (The scribe will then mark the capitals, full stops, paragraphs etc as directed by the student.) During this time the student may also indicate any changes or additions to the text, and the scribe will write these where indicated by the student. An alternative test setting should be provided so that other students are not disturbed and additional time may be allocated if needed.

6.6 Temporary injuries 6.6.1 Where a temporary injury has been sustained prior to the test which impacts on the student's ability to access the test independently, the school may make appropriate special provisions available. A doctor's certificate may be requested to support an application for special provisions. It is not appropriate to request special provisions where these are not warranted by the nature of the injury. Temporary injuries and the Writing test A student with a recent temporary injury, such as a broken arm, may be granted the use of appropriate assistive technology (eg a computer) to assist with the Writing test. A scribe is not permitted for students with recent temporary injuries in the Writing test. If no alternative special provision is appropriate, the student must be marked absent from this test. 6.6.4 Temporary injuries and the Language Conventions, Reading, and Numeracy tests A student with a recent temporary injury, such as a broken arm, may be granted the use of a support person to provide access to the other tests (eg to shade bubbles indicated by the student or write short responses or answers dictated by the student). A support person may be either a teacher or a support person engaged by the school (not a parent of the student or another student), and should be familiar to the student. 6.7 Use of assistive technology 6.7.1 Where a student with a disability uses assistive technology as part of the reasonable adjustments in classroom practice, this special provision may be appropriate for use during the tests. Test Administration Authority procedures for the granting of special provisions for the use of assistive technology should be followed. Where students currently access a special provision that is not appropriate in an assessment setting, including some computer based programs, an assistive technology program (in the form of an interactive PDF version of the test) will be made available in pilot form in 2011. This may facilitate access for some students who are unable to access a pencil and paper test through any of the other special provisions that are available. 16 | P a g e

6.6.2

6.6.3

6.7.2 6.7.3

6.7.4

The interactive PDF will enable the students to answer questions on screen by clicking a radio button or typing their answer in a text box and may be appropriate for students who: · · · have severe vision problems and require a font size significantly larger than N36, but who are not Braille proficient have severe physical disabilities which restrict movement due to disability, regularly access the curriculum in the classroom through assistive technology.

6.7.5 6.7.6

Access will be granted to the pilot provision on the basis that students are not otherwise able to access the test in the standard pencil and paper format. Schools wishing to access this special provision must apply to their Test Administration Authority in line with these protocols.

6.8 Summary of special provisions It is anticipated that students will have normal access to standard non-educational facilities (eg furniture) that form part of their every-day accommodations under the Disability Discrimination Act and Standards for Education where these do not impact on the integrity of the assessment activities. The following table outlines some of the types of special provisions that may be provided. This list is not exhaustive, and granting of a listed special provision is not automatic; each application will be assessed individually according to the relevant state/territory process and the student's needs. Special Provision Comments Students who have behavioural patterns that limit their performance in a large group situation may require separate supervision as a special provision. A distinction should be made between students requiring separate supervision to facilitate access to the test, and appropriate general management of the test environment (eg ensuring that students using assistive technology or requiring breaks do not disrupt other students during the test). To maintain test integrity, it is recommended that a maximum of 5 minutes per half hour of test time be granted. The total allowable time can be taken when and as necessary within the duration of each test. *

* To maintain test integrity, it is recommended that a maximum cumulative amount of 10 minutes rest break and extra time per half hour of test time be permitted, if both special provisions are applied.

Separate supervision

Extra time

Rest breaks

To maintain test integrity, it is recommended that a maximum of 5 minutes per half hour of test time be granted. The total allowable time can be taken when and as necessary within the duration of each test. *

* To maintain test integrity, it is recommended that a maximum cumulative amount of 10 minutes rest break and extra time per half hour of test time be permitted, if both special provisions are applied.

Assistive technology

Assistive technology may be appropriate for students with a disability who would normally use it in a classroom situation and where it does not 17 | P a g e

undermine the integrity of the tests. Assistive technology that is not acceptable includes: Word prediction Spelling and grammar checking Text-to-speech software (unless it is a screen reader for a student with vision impairment) Large print Screen reader Braille Large print test-books are available for students who generally access their classroom activities in this manner. A screen reader is permitted for students with vision impairment who normally use a screen reader in their classroom activities. Braille test-books are available for students who normally use Braille in their classroom activities. Coloured overlays may be appropriate for students who generally use this educational adjustment. Black and white copies of the test may also be requested as a special provision if required. Students who are deaf or have a hearing impairment may access oral or signed communication (eg Auslan). The support person must be a skilled and familiar communication partner with the student and is permitted to read or sign the instructions in all tests. Signing is permitted only for sections of the tests that can be read to non-hearing impaired students. Scribes can be used for the tests only if this is the usual assessment practice (not learning practice) in the classroom and if the student is experienced with scribe practice. Scribes are permitted for all tests, including the Writing test where the disability is of an enduring nature. Scribes are not permitted for the Writing test where the disability is of a temporary nature. Reading to students is a provision available to all students, in line with the following: Test administrators are permitted to: Read test instructions Read Writing instructions Read practice questions Read the Writing stimulus Read Numeracy questions (but not numbers or symbols) The literacy demands of the test should not exclude a student from accessing the Numeracy tests, however it is not intended that a teacher lead the class through the Numeracy test, question by question, unless the literacy standard of the whole class is a barrier to access. Test administrators are not permitted to: 18 | P a g e

Coloured overlays

Oral sign support

Use of a scribe

Reading to students

Read numbers or symbols Interpret diagrams or rephrase questions Read questions, multiple choice distracters or stimulus material in the Reading or Language Conventions tests Paraphrase, interpret or give hints about questions or texts Have a reader who is a parent or student (the reader should be a regular support person) A support person is permitted for the Reading, Language Conventions, and Numeracy tests where the disability is of a temporary nature. Use of a support person (temporary injuries only) A support teacher may be available for students with a temporary disability only, to assist with shading bubbles indicated by the student or writing short responses or answers dictated by the student. A support person may be either a teacher or a support person engaged by the school (not a parent of the student or another student). This provision is limited to those students who are unable to access a pencil and paper test through any of the other special provisions that are available.

Interactive PDF (pilot)

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7

PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE TEST

NAPLAN tests provide point-in-time information in relation to student performance. It is important that the results accurately reflect student ability and they are not intended to be pass/fail type tests. NAPLAN tests are intended to complement the existing range of school-based assessments and it is important that teachers ensure that students, while taking the NAPLAN tests seriously, are not overwhelmed by the experience. Past NAPLAN test papers can be used to ensure that students are familiar with the format and response types but excessive practice is not recommended. The provision of broad and comprehensive teaching and learning programs is the best preparation that schools can provide for their students. Excessive coaching and test preparation are not condoned. 7.1 Practice for the NAPLAN Writing test 7.1.1 It is appropriate for students to be instructed in the type of writing that will be expected from them in the NAPLAN Writing test. It is also appropriate for students to gain experience in producing this type of writing under timed test conditions using practice topics. It is not appropriate for teachers to instruct students in the preparation of a common script for the purpose of reproducing it during the test. Where scripts from students at the same school are found to have significant commonalities such that they could be considered to be pre-prepared learned scripts, this will be considered a breach of protocol. 7.2 Practice for other NAPLAN tests 7.2.1 It is appropriate for students, particularly students participating in the NAPLAN tests for the first time, to be made familiar with the format, language, response types and time constraints of the Reading, Language Conventions and Numeracy tests before they sit the tests. Students should understand that they must complete the tests without communicating with other students and without teacher assistance (except where special provisions are deemed necessary).

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8

ADMINISTERING THE TESTS

8.1 Responsibilities of Test Administration Authorities

Content for this section can be found in the complete National Protocols for Test Administration, located at www.naplan.edu.au. 8.2 Responsibility of the principal 8.2.1 8.2.2 Principals are responsible for the administration of tests within their school. Principals are responsible for the administration of arrangements for students undertaking catch-up tests and the conditions under which they are taken for 2011.

8.3 Time for testing 8.3.1 Monday 9 May The test period starts on 10 May 2011 and finishes on 20 May 2011. The test security period finishes on 20 May 2011. The test timetable is as follows: Tuesday 10 May Official test date

1. Language Conventions Yr 3: 40 mins Yr 5: 40 mins Yr 7: 45 mins Yr 9: 45 mins 2. Writing Yr 3: 40 mins Yr 5: 40 mins Yr 7: 40 mins Yr 9: 40 mins

Wednesday 11 May Official test date

3. Reading Yr 3: 45 mins Yr 5: 50 mins Yr 7: 65 mins Yr 9: 65 mins

Thursday 12 May Official test date

4. Numeracy Yr 3: 45 mins Yr 5: 50 mins Yr 7 (calculator): 40 mins Yr 9 (calculator): 40 mins Yr 7 (non-calculator): 40 mins Yr 9 (non- calculator): 40 mins

Friday 13 May

catch-up day

catch-up day

catch-up day

Monday 16 May

Test security to be maintained

Tuesday 17 May

Test security to be maintained

Wednesday 18 May

Test security to be maintained

Thursday 19 May

Test security to be maintained

Friday 20 May

Test security to be maintained End of test security period

8.3.2 8.3.3

Tests must NOT be conducted before the official test date under any circumstances. Only schools with compelling reasons are able to vary test dates with permission from the relevant Test Administration Authority. The reason must be of a serious order; for example, where a local public holiday occurs during the testing period or where schools are expected to participate in State-based activities such as Show days. This option is only available to classes or groups, and not individual students. Schools must request permission from their Test Administration Authority to vary the test dates. Schools must schedule tests so that they are undertaken in morning sessions on the official test dates. Schools must administer the tests in the sequence specified in the 21 | P a g e

8.3.4

Handbook for Principals. Schools with permission to vary the test dates must follow the instructions provided by their Test Administration Authority. 8.3.5 8.3.6 Where there is more than one test scheduled for any day, a minimum of 20 minutes' break time for students should be provided between the two test sessions. These protocols also apply to test catch-up days and approved variations. Individual students are not able to undertake catch-up tests in the week following the national tests. They may undertake catch-up tests on the days in the test week only, after the scheduled test.

8.4 Preparation for test administration 8.4.1 Responsibilities of the principal · · The principal will determine and appoint, if required, relevant persons to act as test administrators. The principal will ensure test administrators are provided with all relevant test administration instructional material and are familiar with the requirements of the role. Principals will need to obtain permission from their Test Administration Authority, in accordance with Test Administration Authority guidelines, where computers or network enabled devices are used. Where permission is granted, the internet connection, spelling and grammar check, and text prediction functions must be disabled. The principal will ensure test administrators are provided with a copy of the code of conduct.

·

·

8.4.2

The Principal must ensure that: · · · under no circumstances any student undertakes a test before the test date under no circumstances any student undertakes a test without supervision during the test, students are not able to view material within the test area that could assist them to answer questions (such as multiplication tables, spelling lists, writing charts, etc).

8.4.3

The principal has the responsibility to adhere to and enforce the procedures outlined in the National Protocols for Test Administration.

8.5 Administering the tests -- appropriate behaviours 8.5.1 Test administrators must ensure that professional and ethical behaviour is demonstrated regarding all aspects of test administration. Any assistance that answers a question for a student or advantages them in any way will be considered cheating. `Cheating' refers to behaviour undertaken with the intent of conferring or obtaining unfair advantage in or from the assessment process.

8.5.2

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8.5.3

In the case of students, an advantage would generally be observed in their individual result, and cheating may include: · · · · taking unauthorised equipment or prohibited information into the test room; eg mobile phone, dictionary communicating with any person other than an administrator during the test introduction time, planning time or during the test looking at another student's work working on the incorrect test in the `flip' test-book.

8.5.4

In the case of a teacher, test administrator, or school, an advantage would generally be observed in the performance of the school or cohort, and cheating may include: · · · · · viewing test materials before the morning of the test and using this knowledge to prepare students explaining, paraphrasing or interpreting questions giving verbal or physical hints to students about the accuracy of their responses reminding students about related work completed in class providing extra time for students to complete a test (this does not apply where a documented special provision is in place, or where a student has experienced an interruption) informing individual students, or groups of students undertaking the test in a catch-up session of test content changing student responses during or after the test knowingly allowing students to engage in behaviour amounting to cheating.

· · · 8.5.5

During the tests, students should be seated so they are not able to read other students' work. If students sit the tests in their classroom, it is expected that the teacher will be present at all times. If students are seated with a larger group; eg in a hall, the student/teacher ratio must be comparable to that of a regular classroom. It is expected that test administrators will actively supervise students at all times; eg walk around the room to ensure that test conditions are maintained. When administering the tests in the `flip' test-books, test administrators must ensure that students are working on the correct test. The page borders in the test-books have been shaded differently to assist this supervision. Test administrators are responsible for ensuring that only permitted items are taken into the test area. Students are NOT permitted to take mobile phones into the test area under any circumstances. Test administrators must ensure that students take only the items permitted into the test area. The items permitted are: · 2B or HB pencils 23 | P a g e

8.5.6

8.5.7 8.5.8 8.5.9

· · · · · · ·

pencil sharpener eraser blue or black ballpoint pens (may be permitted for some tests as determined by the Test Administration Authority) one blank piece of paper for planning for the Writing test, which is to be collected by the test administrator at the end of the test blank paper for working in the Numeracy tests, which is to be collected by the test administrator at the end of the test calculators for the Year 7 and 9 Numeracy calculator-allowed tests where necessary, assistive technology as a special provision, which may include a laptop.

8.5.10

Test administrators are responsible for the use of calculators in the Years 7 and 9 Numeracy tests. · · · Students will be permitted to take into the test the calculator that they currently use at school or with which they are most familiar. Schools should ensure that they have a sufficient reserve supply of calculators. Test administrators are responsible for ensuring that any calculator used during the test has been checked to ensure that no information that might advantage a student has been stored on the calculator.

8.5.11

Reading to students (see also special provisions table) Test administrators are permitted to read: · · · · · test instructions practice questions Writing instructions Writing stimulus Numeracy questions (not numbers or symbols).

The literacy demands of the test should not exclude a student from accessing the Numeracy tests, however it is not intended that a teacher lead the class through the Numeracy test, question by question, unless the literacy standard of the whole class is a barrier to access. Test Administrators are NOT permitted to: · · · · read numbers or symbols in the Numeracy tests interpret diagrams or rephrase questions read questions or stimulus material in the Reading or Language Conventions tests paraphrase, interpret or give hints about questions or texts.

8.6 Time taken to complete tests 8.6.1 All students must complete the test within the time allocated for each test. 24 | P a g e

8.6.2

Variations from the allocated time may be permitted only in cases where students have been granted extra time as a special provision prior to the tests and should be recorded in a way that is consistent with the procedures outlined by the Test Administration Authority.

8.7 Instructions by test administrators 8.7.1 Test instructions must be delivered exactly as documented in the Test Administration Handbook for Teachers. Instructions outside those specified in the Test Administration Handbook should be minimal. Typically these other instructions may be to: · · · remind students of elapsed time maintain test conditions for all students remind students to check that they have completed all questions.

Under no circumstances is it appropriate to prompt students to record or change any response. 8.8 Collection of test materials 8.8.1 Test administrators are to collect all test-books from the test area and keep them secure until returned for processing. All other material including stimulus materials and unused test-books must also be collected from the test area and kept secure until the end of the testing period. No students, teachers (unless they are a test administrator) or any unauthorised person should remove any test material from the test area. Test-books must be returned for processing, in the manner specified by the Test Administration Authority, on the specified date. The absence of the principal (or delegate) from the school is not a reason for the late return of test-books. Schools should have an alternative plan in place if the principal or delegate is absent during the test period. Under no circumstances should test administrators mark any test-books or provide results to teachers and/or students. Test administrators are not to transcribe special print books unless advised by Test Administration Authorities.

8.8.2

8.8.3 8.8.4

9

MARKING

9.1 National responsibilities 9.1.1 9.1.2 A common set of quality assurance procedures and processes to ensure comparable marking standards across the country have been set at the national level. ACARA is responsible for the quality assurance procedures for marking.

Content for this section can be found in the complete National Protocols for Test Administration, located at www.naplan.edu.au.

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10 BREACHES OF TEST PROTOCOLS

10.1 Reporting of incidents 10.1.1 Any allegation of a situation or incident that contravenes these protocols, including the code of conduct, or is suspected of breaching these protocols, is taken seriously and must be investigated. All allegations of test incidents or breaches of these protocols must be reported immediately to the relevant Test Administration Authority. Where incidents are reported or suspected at a school level, the school is required to document the allegations and pass the information on to the Test Administration Authority as soon as possible. Failure to do so is itself a breach of these protocols. Where incidents are reported directly to a Test Administration Authority, the school/s concerned and/or the appropriate school authority/school owners/school boards must be notified directly.

10.1.2 10.1.3

10.1.4

10.2 Investigation of incidents 10.2.1 When a report is received by a Test Administration Authority alleging a breach of the protocols, the relevant Test Administration Authority will require that an investigation of the allegation is undertaken. The investigation of an incident may involve other authorities in cases where the governance of the school does not reside with the state or territory education department or authority. Similarly, any action taken against an individual or a school as the result of an investigation confirming a breach or cheating will be undertaken by the relevant authority or agency. A record of all alleged incidents and breaches, together with the findings and subsequent outcome of the investigation will be recorded in an incident register and reported to ACARA as soon as possible. ACARA will publish annually a statement reporting NAPLAN test incidents.

10.2.2

10.2.3

10.2.4

10.2.5

10.3 Types of incidents 10.3.1 Situations or incidents cited in this document as examples are not inclusive of all possible situations or incidents. Any incident that occurs that compromises the security or integrity of NAPLAN testing, including behaviours listed as `inappropriate', should be considered as a possible breach of protocol and reported accordingly for investigation.

10.4 Breaches of security for the Writing test 10.4.1 While it is important that the security of all NAPLAN tests is maintained until the test days, the content of the Writing test is particularly vulnerable, as the Writing test is a single task. Any pre-publication of the content of the Writing test poses a significant face validity issue. 26 | P a g e

10.4.2

If the Writing topic is known to students in advance, and they have had opportunity to practice their writing, this exposure provides a significant advantage to students and may compromise the test data. Any alleged breaches of Writing test content must be immediately reported to ACARA, which will activate the appropriate back-up plan. The following procedures will be followed if an allegation of a local test breach is received and able to be investigated before the Writing test is administered. a. Test Administration Authority is notified of an alleged test breach. b. Test Administration Authority contacts ACARA and provides details of the alleged breach so that ACARA understands the scope of the allegation in order to provide advice on the necessary actions. c. Test Administration Authority conducts an investigation with the relevant school authority to determine: · · whether the allegation is substantiated the number of students who may be affected.

10.4.3 10.4.4

d. The Test Administration Authority will provide a report to ACARA with an analysis and outcomes of the investigation. e. No further action will be necessary if the security breach is not substantiated. f. If a security breach is substantiated, ACARA will activate the appropriate backup plan depending on the number of students affected.

g. States or territories would be liable for the additional costs of printing, distribution and marking of the alternative Writing test for localised incidents. 10.5 Consequences of substantiated incidents 10.5.1 10.5.2 Any substantiated breach of security that occurs during the testing period may result in students sitting an alternative test. Any substantiated breach of protocol that is deemed to have affected the validity of any test data may result in a Test Administration Authority or ACARA withholding this data. The employing agency, be it the Test Administration Authority, Education Department or the school authority/school owners/school boards, is directly responsible for any disciplinary action in schools in their jurisdiction that follows from inappropriate behaviour by school staff or students in relation to security of test material and/or of test administration. National guidelines describe the appropriate consequences for breaches of test security, cheating, and breaches of the National Protocols for Test Administration.

10.5.3

10.5.4

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11 DEFINITIONS

Breach of protocol A breach of protocol refers to any breach of the National Protocols for Test Administration, and may relate to test security, cheating, or any other breach. A breach of security refers to any breach of the National Protocols for Test Administration that bears upon the security of the test materials prior to and during the test security period. Behaviour undertaken with the intent of conferring or obtaining unfair advantage in or from the assessment process. A scribe is a trained support person who may be a teacher, teacher's aide, or other appropriate person who is able to write under direction from a student. A scribe may not be a parent of the student or another student. A support teacher may be either a teacher or a support person engaged by the school (not a parent of the student or another student). Teachers, school staff members, school support staff who are involved in delivering (administering) the NAPLAN tests to students. The test period encompasses the three official days of test administration (10-12 May 2011). The test security period starts as soon as secure NAPLAN materials are received by a school, and runs until the Friday in the week following the official test days (20 May 2011).

Breach of security

Cheating Scribe

Support teacher Test administrator Test period Test security period

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12 TEST ADMINISTRATION AUTHORITY CONTACT DETAILS

ACT Simon Tiller Educational Performance Department of Education and Training GPO Box 158 Canberra ACT 2601 Tel: (02) 6205 9317 Web: http://www.det.act.gov.au NSW Robyn Roberts NSW Department of Education and Training Locked Bag 5002 Bankstown NSW 1885 Tel: (02) 9707 6267 Web: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au NT Ellen Herden Department of Education and Training Northern Territory Government PO Box 4821 Darwin NT 0801 Tel: (08) 8999 3784 Web: http://www.det.nt.gov.au QLD Sue Robertson Queensland Studies Authority PO Box 307 Spring Hill QLD 4004 Tel: (07) 3864 0347 Web: http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au SA Gary O'Neill Educational Measurement and Analysis Department of Education and Children's Services 31 Flinders Street Adelaide SA 5000 Tel: (08) 8226 2470 Web: http://www.decs.sa.gov.au TAS Paul Becker Educational Performance Services Department of Education GPO Box 169 Hobart TAS 7001 Tel: (03) 6233 6957 Web: http://www.education.tas.gov.au VIC Cathy Boldiston VCAA Assessment Centre c/- Pearson Research and Assessment 100 Station Street Nunawading VIC 3131 Tel: (03) 9225 2367 Web: http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au WA Marilyn McKee Educational Measurement Branch Department of Education 151 Royal Street East Perth WA 6004 Tel: (08) 9264 4508 Web: http://www.det.wa.edu.au

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PART B ­ Jurisdictional information

Administering the NAPLAN tests in Queensland

This Handbook for Principals replaces the Test Preparation Handbook that QSA supplied to schools in previous years. There are two parts to this handbook:

Part A:

Relevant sections of the National Protocols for Test Administration, including the Code of Conduct, from ACARA. These protocols apply to all schools in Australia.

Part B:

Operational information for the administration of the NAPLAN test in Queensland schools. It is imperative that principals and test administrators read and understand both sections of this handbook. It should not be assumed that what has been done in the past complies with the testing requirements for this year's test.

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Contents

Principal's checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 1. About the NAPLAN tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2. Security of test materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3. School security action plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 4. Student participation in the tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 5. Special provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 6. Preparing students for the tests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 7. Receipt of 2011 test materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 8. Administering the tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 9. After the tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 10. Marking and reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Appendix 1 -- NAPLAN 2011 forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

31

Principal's checklist

Date February­March Read this handbook. Check that there are sufficient copies of the Handbook for Principals 2011 for all test administrators (class teachers and specialist teachers administering the tests) and distribute copies of the handbook to teachers, including specialist teachers, whose students are involved in the testing program. (The handbook is also available on the QSA website.) Advise parents/carers and the school community of the test dates. Decide on the venues for the tests (e.g. classrooms, hall), how students will be grouped and how staff will be organised to supervise the tests. Enter and/or verify school data on the QSA NAPLAN Student Details Website. This database provides the information used to print and package test materials and for reporting. Print a copy of the school data for use in the administration of the tests. Friday 25 February late March­ early April Friday 1 April Friday 8 April April Submit written applications for alternative format tests -- Braille, Large Print, Black and White, Interactive PDF -- to the QSA on the appropriate form by this date. Advise teachers of the test preparation/practice materials on the QSA and NAPLAN websites. Prepare a security plan for the handling of the test materials. Submit Variance request for the 2011 test dates by this date. Submit to the QSA on the appropriate form by this date written applications for permission for students to use a scribe or assistive technology . Initiate arrangements for students requiring other special provisions and/or test exemptions and finalise by Friday 29 April (forms available on the QSA website). Develop a school timetable for the testing period. Make arrangements for students not participating in the tests. April­early May (on receipt of test materials) Read the labels on the tamper-evident bags to check the quantities of test materials received but do not open the tamper-evident bags. (See Part B Section 7.) Access the SALMAT link on the QSA NAPLAN Student Details Website <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9> NAPLAN (Years 3, 5, 7 and 9) >NAPLAN Portal to advise receipt of test materials and of any shortages. Store test materials securely. Check that all test administrators have read the Handbook for Principals 2011. Distribute the relevant 2011 Test Administration Handbook for Teachers to each test administrator. Tuesday 3 May Make sure that teachers have familiarised students with testing processes and have conducted test preparation sessions with their classes. Check that spare calculators are available for use by Year 7 and/or Year 9 students. Friday 6 May Make sure each test administrator/class teacher has read the relevant 2011 Test Administration Handbook for Teachers and is familiar with their role. Finalise arrangements for the administration of the tests and students' participation. Complete arrangements for students requiring test exemptions. Complete arrangements for all students requiring special provisions. Monday 9 May Provide each test administrator with a list of students in their class/group who are eligible to sit the tests. Indicate those who have valid test exemptions, require special provisions, or been withdrawn by parents/carers. Teachers can use this list to check the covers of testbooks. Prepare classrooms for tests (e.g. rearrange furniture, remove charts from walls). Where a school feels that it is necessary to sort materials earlier than the morning of a scheduled test, they may begin sorting the combined Language conventions and Writing testbooks on this date, but only after students have left for the day. Under no circumstances are tests to be conducted on this day. Task

32

Date Tuesday 10 May

Task Distribute Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 combined Language conventions and Writing testbooks to test administrators. Administer Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 Language conventions test. Distribute Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 Writing test stimulus to test administrators. Administer Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 Writing test. Collect and account for all testbooks and stimulus materials. Check student details on the covers of testbooks. Store all testbooks and stimulus materials and securely.

Wednesday 11 May

Distribute Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 Reading test stimulus and testbooks to test administrators. Administer Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 Reading test. Collect and account for all testbooks and stimulus materials. Check student details on the covers of testbooks. Store all testbooks and stimulus materials securely.

Thursday 12 May

Distribute Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 Numeracy testbooks to test administrators. Administer Years 3 and 5 Numeracy tests and Years 7 and 9 Numeracy (calculator allowed) tests. Collect and account for all Numeracy testbooks for Years 3 and 5. Check student details on the covers of testbooks and store all testbooks securely. Administer Years 7 and 9 Numeracy (non-calculator) tests. Collect and account for all Years 7 and 9 Numeracy testbooks. Check student details on the covers of testbooks and store securely.

Friday 13 May

"Catch-up" day: Manage the administration of the Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 tests for students absent on 10, 11 or 12 May. Collect and account for all testbooks. Check that the absent bubbles on the testbook covers for these students are not shaded. Store testbooks securely until packaged for return. Make sure details on the covers of all testbooks have been completed correctly for all students eligible to sit for the tests. Include testbooks for those who were absent, had a valid test exemption or were withdrawn by parents/carers. If you have not completed the cover details of the testbooks accurately, your reports will not be accurate.

By Tuesday 17 May

Check the accuracy of the information entered on the covers of all testbooks. Make sure that testbooks for all students are packed for return. Post testbooks to SALMAT using the return address labels provided. All testbooks must be lodged at the local post office by close of business on Tuesday 17 May. Have the Returned materials lodgement form stamped, then mail it to SALMAT in the replypaid envelope supplied with the test materials.

13­18 May By Friday 15 July By Friday 16 September By Friday 7 October

Access the secure section of the QSA website to complete the Principal's declaration form (see Part B Section 9.5). Complete the 2011 school survey and return it to the QSA. Access class and school reports on the QSA website and check that all reports are accurate. Download files of results from website to populate SunLANDA. Make sure that the Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 student reports and the 2011 Test Reporting Handbook have been received from SALMAT. Check with your local post office before contacting SALMAT if you have not received them. Check that all reports are accurate (e.g. student's name, test participation details). Complete and submit an Application to query student report form for any perceived errors on reports. No requests for amendments to reports will be accepted after Friday 7 October 2011. Distribute student reports to parents/carers. Make arrangements to use the test results as suggested in the 2011 Test Reporting Handbook and to use SunLANDA.

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1. About the NAPLAN tests

1.1 Literacy

There are three tests in Literacy: · Language conventions · Writing · Reading. There are no oral components to these tests. None of the items can be read to the students and discussion of the Writing test stimulus is not permitted. The Language conventions test incorporates spelling, grammar (including English usage) and punctuation. The spelling is assessed through proofreading, which requires students to recognise misspelling. The grammar items require students to answer questions that relate to things such as subject­verb agreement, tense and parts of speech. The punctuation items require students to recognise correct punctuation or to accurately insert punctuation. The Writing test requires a response to a given stimulus. Students will be asked to write a persuasive essay. As is normal assessment practice, students are required to demonstrate their knowledge and control of written language. Students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 will all have the same Writing test stimulus and be required to write their persuasive essay in a maximum of three pages. The Reading test is organised in units with items based on a stimulus text contained in a colour magazine. Test items require students to answer multiple-choice questions and questions that require students to write an answer.

1.2 Numeracy

Students in all year levels will complete Numeracy tests that contain questions from the four numeracy strands: · Number · Algebra, function and pattern · Space · Measurement, chance and data. Students in Years 3 and 5 will complete one numeracy test. Questions from the Algebra, function and pattern strand on these tests include no formal algebra. Students in Years 3 and 5 will not require a calculator to answer questions. Students in Years 7 and 9 will complete two numeracy tests. In the first of these, the Numeracy (calculatorallowed) test, students are able to use a calculator for assistance -- although it will not be necessary for all items. Students will be permitted to use the calculator that they currently use at school or with which they are most familiar. In the second test, the Numeracy (non-calculator) test, students will not be permitted to use a calculator.

1.3 Test response formats

Two response formats are used in both the literacy and numeracy tests: multiple-choice and constructedresponse. Icons are used to show students the types of responses required.

Shade one bubble.

Multiple-choice items require students to shade a bubble or, in some instances, two bubbles. Constructedresponse items require students to write their responses: · in the box or boxes provided · on lines · by sequencing numbers in boxes. Some constructed-response questions require more than one answer to be correct. The icons will direct the students to write responses in boxes. All responses need to be correct for the item to be scored as correct.

1.3.1 Practice questions

There will be some simple practice questions in each testbook to remind students of the different ways they will have to show their answers.

34

When going through the practice questions with the students, it is important that test administrators follow exactly the script supplied. This ensures that all students nationally receive the same information and no-one is advantaged or disadvantaged.

1.4 Times for testing

1.4.1 Test dates

The tests are scheduled for the mornings of Tuesday 10 May, Wednesday 11 May and Thursday 12 May 2011. These dates were agreed by the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee (AEEYSOC). Schools must schedule tests on the dates agreed by AEEYSOC. Tests must not be conducted prior to the published test date under any circumstances.

1.4.2 "Catch-up" tests for groups of students Catch-up tests

Schools with compelling reasons may request permission from the QSA to administer the tests in the week after the scheduled test dates to 21 May. This option is available only to classes or groups of students and not to individual students. The compelling reasons must be of a serious order and could, for example, include cases where schools are expected to participate in state-based activities such as show holidays. A Variance Request form is available on the QSA website <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9> NAPLAN (Years 3, 5, 7 and 9) > Test dates. Applications for variation to the 2011 test dates must be submitted by Friday 1 April. Evidence to support the application must be provided.

1.4.3 Test timetable

Principals are responsible for making sure that there are minimal disruptions and changes to normal school and classroom practices. Some adjustments to the school timetable may be required, for example, to accommodate session breaks on days when two tests are scheduled. Where there is more than one test scheduled for any day, a minimum of 20 minutes break time should be provided between the two test sessions. Both tests are to be completed by 1 pm. While schools may choose the most appropriate starting time before 9:30 am for each test, the order of the tests cannot be varied. The length of the sessions cannot be varied, except for students receiving special provisions (see Part A Section 6.8). When planning for the tests, approximately 15 minutes test introduction time should be added to the times stated for each of the tests. This introduction time is necessary for distributing testbooks, checking and completing student details on the front covers of testbooks, checking equipment and completion of the practice questions.

1.4.4 Small schools

Principals in small schools may need to adjust times for the administration of the tests to accommodate their needs and to make the best use of teacher support time. There are a number of ways small schools could vary the administration of the tests, such as by staggering the starting times of some sessions. The practice questions on the tests are generally repeated for two year levels (e.g. Years 3 and 5, and Years 7 and 9). Where necessary for a particular year level, an additional question that exemplifies a particular response format is included. Therefore, the tests for Years 3 and 5 could be administered by one person with another responsible for administering the tests for students in Years 7 and 9. As the Writing test for all year levels is conducted using the same stimulus and under the same conditions, all students could begin this test at the same time.

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2. Security of test materials

For security purposes, testbooks and stimulus materials will be distributed to schools in tamper-evident packages. Test materials must be kept secure through the whole process of delivery to schools, storage at schools and distribution during the testing period up to and including 20 May 2011. Where couriers cannot avoid making deliveries after school hours, the principal or the principal's delegate (someone who occupies a position of suitable responsibility, whom the principal determines or nominates as an eligible person to accept test materials delivery) must take delivery of the test materials. Test materials will not be left unattended at schools or other locations. If the principal or the principal's delegate is unavailable to accept the materials, delivery contractors are required to return the packages to the post office. Australia Post will normally leave a card to advise that they were unable to deliver mail.

2.1 Responsibilities of the principal

2.1.1 Where a school feels that it is necessary to sort materials earlier than the morning of a scheduled test, they may begin sorting on the afternoon of the previous day, but only after students have left for the day. Schools that need greater flexibility should apply to the QSA for permission to access materials earlier. 2.1.2 Teachers and students not involved in the tests must not have access to the test materials until after Friday 20 May.

2.2 Emergency arrangements

Planning for the tests must include the development of a school security plan. This plan should include provision for action to be taken in an emergency situation such as a loss of power to the school on the test days. The QSA must be advised as soon as possible of any emergency situations that arise. (See contact details inside the back cover.)

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3. School security action plan

Activity

Handbook for Principals 2011 is distributed to all test administrators to inform them of test processes and security arrangements.

Action/Notes

Test materials are delivered to the school and signed for by an authorised staff member and placed in a secure area. Principal or delegate checks quantities of test materials listed on packing slip, reseals boxes and places boxes back in the secure area. Access SALMAT weblink on NAPLAN Portal of QSA website to advise of receipt of test materials and any shortages. 6 May -- ensure class teachers/test administrators have been given a 2011 Test Administration Handbook for Teachers for the relevant year level to inform them of test instructions. 10­12 May -- on each morning of the tests, testbooks are removed from secure storage and given to test administrators to administer the tests. Each test administrator is to be given a list of students sitting the test in their room. 10­12 May -- after each test, completed testbooks are checked and accounted for before being returned to the secure storage area. All stimulus and unused test materials are stored securely until 20 May. 13 May -- "Catch-up" day -- where necessary, administer tests for students who were absent on 10, 11, 12 May.

13­17 May -- all completed testbooks (including those for absent, exempt and withdrawn students) are checked and packed in boxes that are sealed and labelled for return to SALMAT. 13­17 May -- boxes of testbooks are delivered to the post office for return to Salmat. Returned materials lodgement form is stamped by post office staff. 13­17 May -- Returned materials lodgement form is copied and the original is mailed to SALMAT in the reply-paid envelop supplied with the test materials (copy retained in school).

13­18 May --Access the NAPLAN Portal on the QSA website to complete and lodge the Principal's declaration form. 13­17 May -- advise QSA of any irregularities noted during the tests. For irregularities related to testbook usage, complete and return School testbook usage advice form (available from QSA website).

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4. Student participation in the tests

The NAPLAN tests are structured to be inclusive of all students, within budgetary and administrative limitations. It is desirable that all students attempt the tests. Every effort should be made to ensure all eligible students are assessed during the testing week (10­13 May). Refer to Part A Section 5 of this handbook for detailed information about student participation.

4.1 Exempting students from the tests

4.1.1 Parent/carer signed consent for exemptions

Principals must obtain signed parent/carer consent for all exempted students. The Application for variation to student participation form is to be used for all students who meet the criteria for exemption. This form is available from the QSA website. A copy of the completed form should be given to the parents/carers and the original retained by the school. Students cannot be granted exemption solely because of poor academic performance or disciplinary problems.

4.1.2 Students with disabilities

On all matters of exemption, the principal must consult with the parents/carers. The principal, in consultation with specialist and support staff and parents/carers, should use professional judgment when making decisions about a student's participation in the tests. Exemption from a test is indicated by shading the appropriate bubble on the cover of the testbook. Exemption is not a special consideration.

4.1.3 Students in special schools

Students in special schools are not automatically exempt from the tests. Special provisions may be made to maximise student access to the NAPLAN tests. For information about special provisions, refer to Part A Section 6 of this handbook. Principals of special schools will need to access the QSA NAPLAN Student Details Website <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9> NAPLAN (Years 3, 5, 7 and 9) >NAPLAN Portal using their school Brief Identification Code (BIC) and their school password to edit and verify all students' details. Special school principals are also required to indicate which students are being granted exemption from the tests. Testbooks for exempt students will not be sent to special schools. Special schools will be sent Type 1 testbooks (overprinted with students' names) for non-exempt students and some Type 2 testbooks (see Part B Section 7.4).

4.2 Withdrawing students from the tests

Parents/carers wishing to withdraw students from the testing program must complete and submit a signed Notice of parent withdrawal form to the principal by 7 May. This form is available for download from the QSA website. A copy of the completed form should be given to the parents/carers and the original retained by the school. Parental withdrawal from a test is indicated by shading the appropriate bubble on the cover of the testbook.

4.3 Abandonment of a test

Abandonment of a test refers only to students who attempt one or more questions in a test but who do not complete the test session owing to illness or injury (e.g. a nose bleed). Abandonment of a test is indicated by shading the appropriate bubble on the cover of the testbook.

4.4 International fee-paying students

International fee-paying students are eligible to sit the tests. The participation of international fee-paying students is indicated by shading the appropriate bubble on the cover of the testbook.

4.5 Repeating students

Students repeating a year level must sit the tests with their current cohort.

4.6 Excluded students

Students who have been excluded (or suspended) during the test week are to be marked absent.

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4.7 Exchange students

Students on short exchanges from other countries should not sit the tests.

4.8 Distance education students

To access the tests, students enrolled in schools of distance education are able to: · attend the campus of the school of distance education in which they are enrolled and sit the tests of the scheduled test dates under test conditions administered by staff of that facility · attend their nearest school and sit the tests as a "visiting student". That is, they sit the tests on the scheduled test dates under test conditions administered by the staff of that school. Testbooks for these students will be supplied by the host school (Type 2 testbooks). A student who intends visiting another school to sit the tests should be provided with all the details necessary for the accurate completion of the covers of their testbooks. When ordering Large Print materials for a distance education student, principals should advise the QSA of the name of the school that the student will be visiting to sit the tests so arrangements can be made to mail the materials to that school.

4.9 Hosted and visiting students

On occasions, students may sit the tests at a school other than their own (i.e. a host school). Students may sit for the tests at another school if they are: · · · · attending a cultural or sporting event on holiday attending a School of Distance Education home-schooled.

The participation of a visiting student is indicated by the shading of the appropriate bubble on the cover of the testbook. The name of the school in which the student is enrolled must be recorded on the cover. Schools hosting visiting students are advised to keep a record of the names and details of these students for verification purposes and to assist with reporting queries. For further information about visiting students, refer to Part A Section 5.13. For information about returning testbooks for visiting students, see Part B Section 9.3.1.

4.10 Test participation

By 7 May 2011, principals should have finalised arrangements for student participation in the tests (e.g. exemptions, parent withdrawals, special provisions, separate supervision).

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5. Special provisions

5.1 Process for special provisions

Refer to Part A Section 6 of this handbook for detailed information about special provisions. Where a student's circumstances meet the criteria for special provisions, the principal, parents/carers and teacher must complete an Application for variation to student participation form which is available for download from the QSA website. Each application should be discussed with specialist personnel to determine the most equitable and appropriate special provision/s to enable the student to access the tests and to demonstrate what they know and can do. It is expected that the special provisions used in the tests will be the same as the adjustments made for learning and assessment in the classroom. A copy of the completed form should be given to the student's parents/carers and the original retained in the student's file. Schools need to keep a copy of this information as they may be requested to provide it for audit purposes at a later date. Please note: The Application for variation to student participation form is for school use only. Do not send it to the QSA or to SALMAT.

5.1.1 Application for Interactive PDF format of the tests

An interactive PDF version of the test is available for students who access a special provision that is not appropriate in an assessment setting (see Part A Sction 6.7.3). Principals must complete and submit an Application to participate in pilot of Interactive PDF to the QSA by Friday 25 February to ensure that students needing this format are able to access it. This form is available from the QSA website. Return of materials: Where a student completes the tests in an interactive PDF format, the school must print the student's response sheets. The following information must be printed clearly on the top of each sheet of paper used: · the school name and code, · the student's name, date of birth, year level and EQ ID number (where applicable). These loose pages must be inserted in the testbook bearing the student's name. They are not to be glued, stapled or affixed to the testbook in any way. The printed pages, the student's Type 1 testbook and the Interactive PDF disc must be returned in the envelope provided. A copy of the student's work must also be faxed or emailed to the QSA (see details inside the back cover) by Tuesday 17 May 2011.

5.1.2 Application for Braille testbooks

Braille testbooks are available for students who normally access this educational adjustment for learning and assessment. Principals must complete and submit a Request for Braille form to the QSA by Friday 25 February to ensure that students needing this format are able to access it. This form is available from the QSA website. Return of materials: It is the responsibility of the school to transcribe the Braille responses into the student's Type 1 (named) testbook. Both the Braille responses and the Type 1 testbooks must be returned in the envelope provided with the alternative format materials.

5.1.3 Application for Large Print or Black and White testbooks

Large Print and Black and White testbooks are available for students who normally use these educational adjustments for learning and assessment. Principals must complete and submit a Request for Large Print form to the QSA by Friday 25 February to ensure that students needing these formats are able to access them. This form is available from the QSA website. The provision of coloured overlays for students who generally use this education adjustment is the responsibility of the school. Return of materials: Schools are not required to transcribe the responses from the Large Print or Black and White testbooks into the Type 1 testbooks. Both sets of testbooks for these students -- the Large Print/Black and White testbooks and the Type 1 (named) testbooks -- are to be returned in the envelope provided with the alternative format materials.

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5.1.4 Application to use a scribe for the Writing test

Where a student requires the use of a scribe to access and complete the Writing test, prior approval must be sought from the QSA. Principals must complete and submit an Application to use a scribe by Friday 8 April. This form is available from the QSA website. For detailed information about the use of a scribe for the writing test, refer to Part A Section 6.5 of this handbook.

5.1.5 Application to use assistive technology for the Writing test

Where a student requires the use of assistive technolgy to access and complete the Writing test, prior approval must be sought from the QSA. Principals must complete and submit an Application to use assistive technology by Friday 8 April. This form is available from the QSA website. Return of materials: When a student uses assistive technology or a computer for the Writing test, the following information must be printed clearly on the top of each sheet of paper used: · the school name and code, · the student's name, date of birth, year level and EQ ID number (where applicable). These loose pages must be inserted in the testbook bearing the student's name. They are not to be glued, stapled or affixed to the testbook in any way. A copy of the student's work must also be faxed or emailed to the QSA by Tuesday 17 May 2011 (see details inside the back cover).

5.1.6 Temporary injuries and the use of assistive technology for the Writing test

A student with a temporary injury, such as a broken arm, may be granted the use of appropriate assistive technology (e.g. a computer) to assist with the Writing test. A scribe is not permitted. Principals must complete and submit an Application to use assistive technology -- temporary injury by Tuesday 17 May. This form is available from the QSA website. When a student uses assistive technology or a computer for the Writing test, the following information must be printed clearly on the top of each sheet of paper used: · the school name and code, · the student's name, date of birth, year level and EQ ID number (where applicable). These loose pages must be inserted in the testbook bearing the student's name. They are not to be glued, stapled or affixed to the testbook in any way. A copy of the student's work must also be faxed or emailed to the QSA by Tuesday 17 May 2011 (see details inside the back cover) .

5.2 Testbook covers

Test administrators should make sure that they shade the "special provision" bubble on the cover of each testbook for every student who is granted special provision to access the tests.

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6. Preparing students for the tests

The NAPLAN tests should be presented to students as one method by which teachers collect information about what students know and can do. Students should be aware that other methods of assessment are very important and will also form the basis of reporting to parents/carers. Students should be encouraged to do the best they can in the tests, but told not to be too anxious or worried. It is important that sitting for the tests is not a traumatic experience for students. Some items will be easy and others will be more difficult. It should be emphasised that all students are not expected to answer every item correctly.

6.1 For the Literacy tests

The following suggestions may help teachers to prepare their students for the Literacy tests:

6.1.1 Language conventions

· Give students proofreading tasks with a range of spelling words, starting with easy words and progressing to more difficult ones. Tasks should include both identified and non-identified spelling errors. · Make sure students know that they should write the spelling words in the spaces provided. · Tell students that they must erase any errors carefully and completely so the scanner can clearly pick up the response they intended. In spelling: · Teach the whole system, i.e. how letters are used to represent the sound, the function and meaning links in language. · Pay particular attention to the doubling conventions when adding inflected endings and in syllables. · Teach conventions for adding suffixes (e.g. -able, -ible). · Use strategies such as vocabulary notebooks and wordsorts to help. · Use the spelling scope and sequence. From the QSA home page <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9 > Year 1 - 9 Essential learnings > English > Scope and sequence > Spelling. In grammar: · Teach the difference in the grammar of spoken and oral language (i.e. the difference between oral and written language). · Use the grammar scope and sequence. From the QSA home page <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9 > Year 1­ 9 Essential learnings > English > Scope and sequence > Grammar. In punctuation: · Teach the sentence boundary punctuation and insist on its use. Revisit this as the complexity of sentences develops. · Teach apostrophes of possession and contraction. · Use the punctuation of the grammar scope and sequence from the QSA website. · See also the Teacher's notes: Notes on grammar under Teaching ideas on the NAPLAN page of the Kindergarten­Year 9 section of the website.

6.1.2 Writing

· Provide students with opportunities to analyse a task and write a persuasive essay from a stimulus. There is a sample task on the NAPLAN website (www.naplan.edu.au) and practice writing tasks on the QSA website. · Inform students that no help will be available during the test. · Tell students to write to the specific task demand, stimulus and topic words given on the test stimulus. · Discuss possible audiences for writing a persuasive essay. · Discuss the marking criteria for the Writing test as a means of focusing on the outcomes expected. These are available on the NAPLAN website. · Discuss and provide strategies to help students with written planning. Have students complete written planning before they begin a writing task. · Engage students in short, uninterrupted, silent writing time to encourage them to get started quickly and to write without interruption. Students should develop a sense of how much they can write in 30 minutes. · Encourage students to do a good first draft. · Discuss the purpose of the proofreading and editing time at the end of the writing session. · Encourage students to write legibly. Scripts that are too faint to read or that are written in very small handwriting are difficult to mark. · Tell students that the markers know they are assessing a first draft, and that there is no penalty for crossing out or using other drafting techniques. In small and multi-aged classes, discussions about the Writing test could take place across year levels.

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6.1.3 Reading

The types of items on the test papers will focus on the following reading purposes and processes: · · · · retrieval of explicitly stated information making straightforward inferences interpreting and integrating ideas and information examining, evaluating and responding to content, language and textual elements.

The purpose and meaning of the language commonly used in the item stems of multiple-choice items could be discussed to assist understanding of the item demands. For example, discuss the words suggest, describe, imply, indicate, show, most likely, main purpose. In preparation for the Reading test, tell students to: · Read the complete stimulus for a unit before attempting to answer the items for that unit. · Read an item and try to answer it before reading the answer alternatives. By thinking of the response first, students are less likely to choose incorrectly. · Reread the stimulus to confirm answers. · Read all response alternatives carefully before shading the bubble in multiple-choice items. · Avoid spending too much time on one item. · Attempt to answer every item. If unsure of the correct response, students should choose the option that is the most likely. · Check their answers if there is time. · Change an answer only if there is a good reason to do so.

6.2 For the Numeracy tests

The following suggestions may help teachers to prepare students for the Numeracy test/s. · Encourage students to read the entire question before attempting to answer it. · Give students practice in identifying key words and phrases in questions. Encourage them to underline or circle important information in questions. · Provide opportunities for students to become familiar with multiple-choice questions. · Encourage students to read a question and to try to estimate the answer before reading the options provided. By thinking of the response first, students are less likely to choose incorrectly. · Encourage students to read all options carefully in multiple-choice questions before shading a bubble. · Discuss strategies for checking the reasonableness of answers. · Explore different problem-solving strategies with students. · Advise students not to spend too much time on any one question. · Encourage students to attempt to answer every item. If unsure of the correct response, students should choose the option that is the most likely. · Make sure that students in Years 7 and 9 have a calculator with which they are familiar. · Advise students to check their answers to all questions if there is time. · Suggest that students change an answer only if there is a good reason to do so.

6.3 Test preparation materials

Test preparation materials for all tests are available on the QSA website <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9> NAPLAN (Years 3, 5, 7 and 9) > select Test preparation -- Literacy or Test preparation -- Numeracy. These materials are designed to help teachers and students understand and experience the types of responses required in the tests. Test preparation materials may also be used to provide students with the opportunity to work under test conditions before the tests. Students should be shown the sample questions and told that these questions do not reflect the range of curriculum content of the actual tests. For the sample test questions to be effective, they should be given to students close to the testing week. Teachers should take as much time as necessary for students to become familiar with the response formats. The QSA website has other resources that are intended to support teachers in their everyday teaching and assessment practices. These can also be used for test preparation. Teachers can access the Persuasive Writing Marking Guide on the NAPLAN website: www.naplan.edu.au > select Domains > Writing 2011. This document is also available via a link from the Test preparation -- Literacy page of the QSA website.

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7. Receipt of 2011 test materials

7.1 Packages of materials

The packages of materials delivered to schools will contain: · a letter to the principal · Test Administration Handbooks for each year level (supplied in non-tamper-evident bags) · student lists (includes the names of students for whom testbooks have been overprinted) · Type 1 (named) testbooks · Type 2 (unnamed) testbooks · stimulus materials for the Reading and Writing tests · address labels for returning test materials · Post office lodgement form for return of materials Test materials will be sent to schools in cardboard cartons. Where more than one carton is used, cartons will be labelled to indicate the number of each carton and the total number of cartons dispatched to a school (e.g. 2 of 3). Year 9 test materials will be packaged separately from those of other year levels. Materials for Years 3, 5 and 7 will be packaged and delivered together.

7.2 Receiving test materials

7.2.1 The principal (or their delegate) who receives the test materials should check that:

· the cartons are being delivered to the correct school before signing for them. The recipient must legibly record on the delivery docket their name and the time that the packages arrived at the school. The recipient must also advise the principal that the materials have been received · the security of the materials has not been compromised during transit · the contents and quantities of deliveries are correct. Schools are required to check the student lists to see the names of students for whom Type 1 (named) testbooks have been supplied and the number of Type 2 (unnamed) testbooks that have been provided. This information is listed on the packing slip. The labels on the bags containing the writing stimulus should be checked to verify that the quantities provided are sufficient · the tamper-evident bags are not opened to count the materials. Checking of the quantities of materials should be done by checking the packing slips and, if necessary, through the bags. In the event of incorrect/incomplete delivery, notify SALMAT immediately using the SALMAT link on the QSA website <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9> NAPLAN (Years 3, 5, 7 and 9) >NAPLAN Portal. If, at any stage prior to the tests, it is seen that the seals of these bags have been tampered with, the QSA must be notified immediately via email <[email protected]> or by telephoning 3864 0210.

7.2.2 Secure test materials will be packaged in tamper-evident bags according to the way in which a school has

organised its student data on the QSA NAPLAN Student Details Website (i.e. in classes, alphabetically in year level cohorts).

7.3 Number of testbooks

There will be three testbooks for each student -- one for each day of the tests. Day 1: The Language Conventions and Writing tests will be in the same testbook. There will also be a stimulus page for the Writing test. Day 2: A testbook for the Reading test and a coloured stimulus magazine Day 3: For Years 3 and 5, the testbook will contain one Numeracy test. Day 3: For Years 7 and 9, both Numeracy tests -- the calculator-allowed and the non-calculator -- will be in the same testbook. The calculator-allowed test is to be completed first.

7.4 Types of testbooks

All testbooks sent to a school will be overprinted with the school name and school code. The covers on these testbooks will be of two different types. Type 1 (named) testbooks: These have the students' details printed on the covers -- names, date of birth, class, EQ ID (where applicable). The enrolment data entered on the QSA NAPLAN Student Details Website by schooling authorities and individual schools is used to overprint the information on these testbooks.

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A list of the students for whom Type 1 (named) testbooks have been supplied is included with the test materials. Type 2 (unnamed) testbooks: These do not have student details printed on them (but do have the school name and code) and are to be used for students: · for whom there is no Type 1 testbook (e.g. a new enrolment) · whose assigned testbook is lost or damaged (Refer to Part B Section 8.3.12) · visiting from another school, for example a distance education student or students on holiday. (Refer to Part B Sections 4.8 and 4.9.) The number of Type 2 testbooks supplied to a school is included on the student list. Test administrators will be required to enter a student's details in the vacant fields on Type 2 testbooks. For most schools, Type 2 testbooks will be packaged separately from Type 1 testbooks. Where there are a small number of students in a year level, both types of testbooks will be packed in the same tamper-evident bag.

7.5 Non-receipt of test materials

Prompt action must be taken if test materials have not been received by Wednesday 4 May. Schools that have not received materials by this date should contact their local post office to see if their test materials are awaiting collection before contacting SALMAT. Contact details for SALMAT are inside the back cover of this handbook.

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8. Administering the tests

8.1 Time for testing

Schools must schedule tests so that they are undertaken in morning sessions on the agreed test dates. Tests must have commenced by 9:30 am at the latest. Where there is more than one test scheduled for any day, a minimum of 20 minutes break time for students should be provided between the two test sessions. Both tests are to be completed by 1 pm.

8.2 Distributing testbooks

Test administrators should distribute Type 1 (named) testbooks to the students whose names are printed on them. Other students should be given a Type 2 (unnamed) testbook. Testbooks should not be distributed to students who have a valid exemption or are withdrawn by parents/carers. These students should be given another activity to do. When one testbook is being used for two tests, test administrators must make sure that students are completing the second test in the testbook bearing their name. Teachers and students not involved in the tests must not have access to the test materials during the secure period (i.e until after Friday 20 May.)

8.3 Completing testbook covers

The information required on the covers of testbooks is the same for all year levels.

8.3.1 All information on the covers of the testbooks is to be entered using a 2B or HB pencil. 8.3.2 If there is an error in the student details printed on the testbook, the test administrator must rule a single line through the incorrect information and print the correct details neatly above (as shown below).

Where no class information is indicated on Type 1 (overprinted) testbooks, students should be told to leave this field blank.

8.3.3 Test administrators should instruct students to write their names in exactly the same way on both covers of dual testbooks at the beginning of the first test of the day. Dual or "flip" testbooks will be used for Language conventions/Writing (Tuesday) and Numeracy for Years 7 and 9 (Thursday).

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Cover of Type 1 (named) testbook

The details in this section are already printed on the testbook. Student to check name and date of birth. Teacher to check other information and make any amendments (see 8.3.2). Teacher to shade the bubble according to school data. Teacher to shade one bubble only to indicate student participation. Exemption is not a special provision.*

Student to complete: ­ names to be written in same way on each testbook (see 8.3.3) ­ bubbles to be shaded. Teacher to check accuracy. * Special schools with large numbers of exempted students will be advised of alternative arrangements.

7610117

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Cover of Type 2 (unnamed) testbook

Teacher to print the student's names in capitals and to enter student's date of birth, class and EQ ID number, if applicable. The remaining sections of the cover should be completed as for Type 1 testbooks.

Cover of Type 1 and Type 2 testbooks for Writing and Years 7 and 9 Numeracy (non-calculator) tests

Teacher to shade one bubble only to indicate student participation. Exemption is not a special provision. Student to complete. Names to be written in same way on each testbook. Teacher to check accuracy.

8.3.4 Testbook covers must be completed for all students, including those who do not sit for a test. The reason

for non-participation must be indicated in the appropriate section.

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8.3.5 It is possible that an absent student could sit the test in a "catch-up" session. Do not shade the absent bubble until after it has become clear whether or not the student will be completing the test in a "catch-up" session. 8.3.6 Details to be provided by the teacher on testbooks -- Type 1 and Type 2

Teachers are required to shade the bubble on the cover of the testbook to indicate that a student has a language background other than English (LBOTE). This bubble should be shaded only for students whose main language spoken at home is a language other than English. Teachers will be also be required to shade bubbles on covers of testbooks for all tests (e.g. both Language conventions and Writing; both Numeracy tests for Years 7 and 9) to indicate whether a student: · · · · · · · · · is absent is exempt has been withdrawn by parents abandoned the test due to illness or injury is no longer at the school is no longer in this year level is an international fee-paying student is a visiting student has received special consideration.

The covers of the testbooks are the records of attendance and participation. All student details must be completed accurately as the information on the covers of the testbooks is used for reporting purposes. Note: Exemption overrides all other bubbles.

8.3.7 Details to be provided by the teacher on Type 2 (unnamed) testbooks only

Teachers will be required to enter all student details -- first names, last name, date of birth, class, EQ ID (where applicable) -- and to shade bubbles on the covers of all Type 2 testbooks to indicate language background and student participation .

8.3.8 Details to be provided by the student on testbooks -- Type 1 and Type 2.

Each student will receive three testbooks. They will be required to write their first names and last name clearly in the spaces provided on the covers of each of these testbooks on the day of the test. Test administrators should tell students to write their names in exactly the same way on each testbook. For example, a student should not write Susan McDonald on one testbook and Sue McDonald or Susan Jane Mc Donald on other testbooks. Students will also have to shade bubbles to indicate their sex and whether they are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. Students should be told not to shade any of the bubbles in the section of the cover that is to be completed by the teacher.

8.3.9 Under no circumstances should covers or pages be removed from the testbooks. 8.3.10 Any school error in the details recorded on the cover of a testbook will result in incorrect data being

provided on school, class and student reports and for national reporting. It is imperative therefore that the covers of all testbooks are thoroughly checked. Schools will be required to meet the cost of reprinting reports where errors result from incorrect school data.

8.3.11 Refer to pages 47 and 48 for annotated examples of the covers of testbooks. 8.3.12 Where the use of testbooks has been varied in ways that may impact on the reporting of test results

(e.g. a student using a Type 1 testbook for one test and Type 2 testbooks for other tests), the school must advise the QSA of these occurrences by completing a School testbook usage form by Friday 20 May. This form is available for download from the QSA website.

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8.4 Students completing the tests at other schools

On occasions, students may sit the tests at a school other than their own (i.e. a host school). Students may sit for the tests at another school if they are: · · · · attending a cultural or sporting event on holiday attending a School of Distance Education home-schooled.

For visiting students: · use Type 2 (unnamed) testbooks · rule a single line through the name and code of the host school and print the name and code of the student's school above them (see Part B Section 8.3.2). Where possible, a visiting student's details, including the name and code of the school that the student normally attends, should be given to the host school prior to the test week. Schools hosting visiting students should keep a record of the names and details of these students for verification purposes and to resolve any queries relating to reports.

8.5 Test supervision

8.5.1 Responsibilities of test administrators

The test administrator is the critical link in the ultimate validity and fairness of the tests. Test administrators are responsible for monitoring the test sessions according to the specific scripts set out in the test administration handbooks and according to the instructions that follow. In delivering the test, the test administrator should encourage student participation in the tests and supervise student conduct and engagement during the tests.

8.5.2 If a student arrives late, before the test session has begun, the test administrator should give the student his or her testbook.

Once the actual test has begun (that is, once the students have opened their testbooks and the test administrator has begun reading the instructions), discretion should be used as to whether a late student is admitted.

8.5.3 Students who ask to leave a session may do so only if it is essential. In these cases, the test administrator

should collect the test materials when the student leaves the room and record the times of departure and return. Materials are to be returned to the student when they re-enter the room and the student is allowed to complete the test. The total time the student engages with the test should be uniform for all students.

8.5.4 Students who leave the test area temporarily should be supervised to make sure they do not take any prohibited items back into the test session. 8.5.5 Students finishing early should be encouraged to review their work. Those who have completely finished a test may be permitted to engage in a quiet activity that is not related to the domain being tested. 8.5.6 Perceived errors

Test administrators should not make comments to students regarding what they believe is an error on a test paper. Contact the QSA on 3864 0210 after the test about perceived errors.

8.6 Emergency considerations

Teachers should attend immediately to a student who experiences some emergency during the administration of the tests. If this means that the administration of a test has to be temporarily suspended to assist the student, teachers should instruct the class to put their pencils down, close their testbooks and wait. After attending to the student, teachers should resume administration of the test. The finishing time for the test should be adjusted to take into account the lost time. If a student has an accident with a testbook during a test (e.g. is sick on, or tears, a testbook) and the testbook is unable to be submitted or read, the school must immediately contact the QSA for advice.

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9. After the tests

9.1 After each test

Test administrators should: · collect all the test materials from the students · separate testbooks from working pages and stimulus materials · use a class list to make sure all testbooks have been returned and accounted for. Check that the number of testbooks collected is the same as the number of students who sat the test in that room · make sure that there are testbooks for all absent, exempt and parent withdrawn students, and for students who are no longer at the school or in the year level · keep testbooks for any visiting students separate from those of the class or cohort so these can be returned in the prescribed way (see Part B Section 9.3.1) · check that the cover details on all testbooks are accurate (e.g. participation bubble shaded) · ensure that students have written their names in the same way on both covers of dual testbooks · arrange for the transcription of any Braille tests · arrange for the printing of the response pages of students who have used a computer or other assistive technology · return testbooks to the principal or their delegate for secure storage until dispatch · return other test materials (e.g. stimulus materials) to the designated secure storage area to be held until 20 May.

9.2 Checking materials

9.2.1 The principal should make sure that:

· testbooks for each student eligible to sit the test, including testbooks for students who were absent, exempt, or were withdrawn by parents/carers, have been collected · there is only one testbook collected (Type 1 or Type 2) for each student for a single test · all students' details on the covers of testbooks, including on the covers of testbooks used by visiting students, have been completed accurately using 2B or HB pencil.

9.3 After completion of all the tests

9.3.1 Return of test materials

Once all test sessions, including "catch-up" sessions, have been completed, the following test materials must be returned to SALMAT: · a complete set of testbooks for each student who sat the tests, as well as all testbooks for students who were absent, had a valid exemption, were withdrawn by parent/carers, abandoned a test due to illness or injury, were no longer at the school or no longer in the designated year level · both the special print materials and the Type 1 (named) testbooks for students who accessed Braille, Large Print or Black and White test papers. Both sets of testbooks should be placed in the envelope supplied with the alternative format materials. (Braille responses are to transcribed into the student's Type 1 testbook at the school prior to the return of test materials.) · the Interactive PDF disc, a printed copy of the student's responses and the Type 1 (named) testbooks for students who accessed the test using this technology should be placed in the envelope supplied with the alternative format materials · testbooks for visiting Queensland students. These must be placed in an envelope clearly marked "Visiting students" and are to be returned with the testbooks of students from the host school. (School to supply the envelope.) This means that all Type 1 testbooks and completed Type 2 testbooks must be returned. Any unused Type 2 (unnamed) testbooks may be retained by the school for reference. Do not return any other test materials. The testbooks for visiting students from other Australian states or territories are to be mailed directly to the Test Administration Authority in the student's home state by registered post (see Part A Section 12 for postal addresses). Schools hosting visiting students should keep a record of the names and details of these students for verification purposes and to resolve any queries relating to reports.

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9.4 Packaging materials for return

Return of materials will be by Australia Post. The weight of individual cartons/boxes used to return test materials must not exceed 16 kg. Where possible, schools should return test materials in the packaging in which they were delivered. Package testbooks carefully as damaged testbooks cannot be machine read and may delay the delivery of reports to all schools. Attach the return address labels supplied by SALMAT and follow the instructions regarding the return of these materials. Special arrangements will be made for some remote schools (e.g. Torres Strait Island schools) to return their test materials. All test papers must be lodged at the local post office no later than Tuesday 17 May 2011. The post office lodgement form must be stamped as proof that the materials were returned by the specified date, then mailed to SALMAT in the reply-paid envelope supplied with the test materials. (A copy should be retained for the school records.) In the event that return labels are misplaced or lost, contact SALMAT for replacements. Contact details are inside the back cover of this handbook.

9.5 Principal's declaration form

Principals are responsible for the security of the NAPLAN test materials and for administration of the tests in their school according to the national protocols set out in this Principal's Handbook. School principals are required to access the NAPLAN Portal on the QSA website before close of business on Wednesday 18 May to complete and sign a Principal's declaration form indicating that they have read, understood and adhered to the protocols.

9.6 School survey

A survey form will be sent to schools in the last week of May to gather feedback on all phases of the testing program. Principals and teachers are asked to complete the survey and return it to the QSA by 2 July 2011.

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10. Marking and reporting

10.1 Marking

The multiple-choice items for literacy and numeracy will be machine marked. All constructed-response items for literacy and numeracy will be individually verified. The Writing test will be marked at a marking centre by Queensland teachers specifically trained for the task.

10.2 Reporting

Once all data have been finalised, class and school reports will be made available to schools in electronic formats on the secure section of the QSA website. Schools will receive a printed report for each student. The 2011 Test Reporting Handbook will provide information to help interpret the test results. It will be sent to schools with the report package in September and made available on the QSA website. Schools will also be able to access the SunLANDA program to assist them to analyse their data. The NAPLAN tests should be considered tests that complement other effective classroom assessment and reporting practices.

10.2.1 Checking of reports

Principals should check that the information provided in the student, class and school reports is correct as soon as the reports are received by the school. It is the responsibility of schools, not parents/carers, to check the data on student reports. If any perceived errors are identified in the reports, principals should complete an Application to query student report. This form will be available for download from the QSA website. Schools will be required to meet the cost of reprinting reports where errors result from incorrect school data.

10.2.2 Distribution of reports

Student reports for parents/carers should be distributed as soon as possible. Student reports are confidential documents containing personal information about each student and how their results compare to others in Australia, GIven the need for confidentiality, schools should consider either a direct mailout of reports or direct issue to parents/carers, for example on an information evening or by parent/carer collection from the school. Schools should retain evidence of distribution of reports to parents at the school, for example a letter addressed to parents/carers or notification in the school newsletter. All queries regarding problems with reports must be sent to the QSA from the school using the form on the QSA website. The closing date for queries about reports is Friday 7 October 2011.

10.3 Privacy

Under the legislation governing the QSA, Education (Queensland Studies Authority) Act 2002, the Authority has the following functions: · to analyse systemic information about the performance of persons who undertake the tests and report the results of the analysis to the Minister, the chief executive, the Independent Schools of Queensland (ISQ) and Queensland Catholic Education Commission (QCEC) · to give the principal of a school individual results of the school's students who undertake the tests · to give a person who undertakes the tests the person's results in the tests. In performing these functions and complying with the Information Privacy Act (2009), the authority must have arrangements in place to ensure that the privacy of individuals is protected. At no time will the QSA report results that have the potential to identify individual students. Therefore, schools should not direct parents/carers to contact the QSA for test results as we cannot give information to an individual without extensive identity checks. Parents wishing to query test results or obtain replacement reports should do so through their student's school. It is important that principals and teachers give consideration to confidentiality and security issues associated with the reports. Access to these reports should be limited to those who have a legitimate reason to do so.

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Appendix 1 -- NAPLAN 2011 forms

The following forms for the 2011 National Assessment Program -- Literacy and Numeracy tests are available for download from the QSA website <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> select Kindergarten­Year 9> NAPLAN (Years 3, 5, 7 and 9)> Test administration> Forms

Test preparation and administration

Request for Braille Request for Large Print (this includes Black and White) Application to participate in pilot of Interactive PDF Variance request Application to use a scribe Application to use assistive technology Application for variation to student participation (for school use only) Notice of parent withdrawal (for school use only) Principal's declaration School testbook usage advice

Test reporting

Application to query student report Data request

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Index

A

applications for variations 32 Preparing for the tests 42 Privacy 53 Process for special provisions 40

B

Braille 51, 54 Braille and Large print 32, 40

R

Receiving test materials 44 Reporting 53 Responsibilities of the principal 36

C

Catch-up tests 35 Checking materials 51 Completing testbook covers 46

S

School security 37 scribe or assistive technology 32 Security 36 Small schools 35 sorting 32, 36 Special provisions 40 Student participation 38 Students in special schools 38

D

Distance education students 39 Distributing testbooks 46

E

Emergency arrangements 36 Emergency considerations 50 Exchange students 39 Excluded students 38

T

Test Administration Guide 32, 37 Test dates 35 test materials 44 Test response formats 34 Test supervision 50 testbooks 44 timetable 35

F

forms 54

I

International fee-paying students 38

M

Marking 53

N

Non-receipt of test materials 45

V

Visiting students 39

P

Packaging materials for return 52

W

Withdrawn students 38

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Key contacts

Materials

Enquiries about:

· delivery of 2011 Handbook for Principals and test materials · number of copies of 2011 Handbook for Principals and test materials · delivery of reports and 2011 Test Reporting Handbooks.

Contact

SALMAT Helpdesk SALMAT Tel: (07) 3275 4690 Fax: (07) 3395 8271 Email: [email protected]

Note: Please return all completed testbooks using the return labels provided with the test materials. If labels are misplaced, contact SALMAT Helpdesk.

Administration

Enquiries about:

· special consideration and test exemption (but first refer to 2011 Handbook for Principals) · test emergencies · contents of the reports for the 2011 tests.

Contact

NAPLAN Tests Queensland Studies Authority Tel: (07) 3864 0210 or (07) 3864 0347 Fax: (07) 3221 2553 Email: [email protected]

NAPLAN tests

For further information about the 2011 National Assessment Program -- Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests, refer to the NAPLAN website at <www.naplan.edu.au>. Queensland Studies Authority 154 Melbourne Street, South Brisbane Queensland, Australia PO Box 307 Spring Hill Qld 4004 Australia Tel: (07) 3864 0299 Fax: (07) 3221 2553 Email: [email protected] Website: www.qsa.qld.edu.au

Information

2011 NAPLAN Handbook for Principals

60 pages

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