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MODULE OUTLINE ­ MANAGEMENT

MGT 2013 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 2009

Administrative and Contact Details PREREQUISITES: 110MGT101 Note that this module may only be taken if specified on an approved degree pathway. LECTURE TIMES, LOCATION AND ROOM: Friday: 10am -- 12noon, Room 209 Peter Froggart Centre TUTORIALS: Tutorials begin in week 3 of the Semester. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that they are in a tutorial group. Attendance at tutorials and completion of coursework is strongly recommended. MODULE COORDINATOR: Dr. Titus Oshagbemi Room: G04 26 University Square Email: t.oshaqbemigub.ac.uk Tel: 028 9097 3644

MODULE LECTURER:

Dr. Titus Oshagbemi Office Hours: Friday: 2pm -- 4pm or by appointment

MODULE DESCRIPTION This module introduces students to the management of human resources in organisations. The content of the module examines human resource environment and includes the processes of acquiring and preparing human resources, assessing performance and developing employees, compensating human resources and meeting other human resource goals. MODULE AIM The module provides students with a basic knowledge of the activities, functions and processes of human resource departments within organisations. This knowledge will hopefully enable them to perform better with greater benefits to themselves and the organisations that they will work for on graduation. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of this module students should be able to: 1. Develop an understanding of the role, responsibilities and functions of human resource management in today's organisations and the challenges human resource managers face. 2. Understand and appreciate the ethical issues in human resource management and know how human resource management contributes to an organisation's performance and the types of skills needed for effective practices of human resource management functions. 3. Work alone or in small groups and deliver tutorial presentations. KEY SKILLS 1. The module aims to develop the intellectual and practical skills of the student in acquiring, analysing, interpreting and understanding the current human resource management issues by introducing them to the theoretical concepts and principles underpinning the effective management of human resources in a variety of organisational contexts. 2. Students will be encouraged to work independently and in groups to improve their own learning and to solve future human resource problems in their organisations. Students can access information about key skills on the web at the following web address: http://www.gub.ac.uklkeyskills/entersite.html MODULE ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed by one piece of coursework and a final examination. The continuous assessment comprises one individual case study on human resource management worth 40 % of the total module mark. The final examination is worth 60 % of the total module mark and will take place at the end of the semester. It will consist of a two-hour paper. There will be four questions in the final examination and students will be asked to attempt any two of these questions, i.e. no question will be compulsory. CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT -- DETAILS AND DEADLINES The continuous assessment will consist of an analysis of one case study on human resource management. Students will be asked to answer some questions at the end of

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the case study. The assignment must be completed using computer-based word processing and using either of the following two fonts: Times New Roman, size 12 or Arial, size 11. The assignment will be posted on Queen's Online nearer the date. It is important for students to regularly check the module web page for any additional relevant information. Messages may be broadcast on the intranet from time to time. Tutorial work is made up of seminar presentations. Students are to prepare written answers to tutorial case study questions and come to present and defend these during tutorial classes. Continuous Assignment: Set: 9 March 2009 (Teaching Week 6). Due Date: 27 April 2009 (Teaching Week 10). Feedback will be given on the assignment during the tutorial class, as soon as possible after the marking not later than during teaching week 12. Assignment must be handed-in at the School of Management School Office, 24 University Square. Make sure you complete the sign-in procedure before 4:30pm on deadline day. Assessed work submitted after the deadline will be penalised at the rate of 5 % off the assessed mark awarded for each working day late up to a maximum of five working days (i.e. Monday to Friday excluding days of official University closure) after which a mark of zero will be awarded. Exemption from such penalties requires written evidence, such as a medical certificate. The continuous assessment will be retained for consideration by the external examiner. However, in addition to providing everyone his or her mark in writing, an oral feedback will be provided on the general performance in class where specific issues will be highlighted. TEACHING PLAN WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5 WEEK 6 WEEK 7 WEEK 8 WEEK 9 WEEK 10 WEEK 11 WEEK 12 Introduction to Human Resource Management Human Resource Planning and Resourcing Trends in Human Resource Management and Recruiting Selecting the Right People Remuneration and Reward Learning, Training and Development Private Study /Free Teaching Week Managing and Developing Performance Employee Relations, Participation and Involvement Health, Safety and Employee Well-Being Equal Opportunities and Managing Diversity Current Issues and New Developments

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ESSENTIAL READING There are several good textbooks on human resource management. You are, however, advised to buy Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management. Other books that are recommended as useful purchases are listed below. Both the Science Library and the Main Library hold a good selection of books on the various topics of human resource management and you are advised to consult these sources. A basic reading list of the topic areas covered will be provided throughout the module. Students are expected to undertake additional reading of relevant texts and to make use of relevant associated journals as well as sourcing information from the appropriate sites on the World Wide Web. Highly recommended -- for purchase by all students Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. The other very useful books include: Foot, M and Hook, C (2008), Introducing Human Resource Management, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Angelo S DeNisi and Ricky W Griffin (2008), Human Resource Management, 3rd Edition, Houghto Mifflin Company, New York. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. TUTORIAL CLASSES WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5 WEEK 6 WEEK 7 WEEK 8 WEEK 9 WEEK 10 WEEK 11 WEEK 12 A Guide to Case Analysis Case Study I -- Great Plains Software: Pursuing a People-First Strategy Case Study 2 -- Employment and Resignation Case Study 3 -- Salary Inequities at Acme Manufacturing Private Case Study Discussions/ Free Teaching Week Case Study 4 -- Employee Attitudes at Omega Technical Services Ltd Case Study 5 -- Appraising the Secretaries at Sweetwater University Case Study 6 -- Comparing Different Styles of People Management Discussion of Essay Questions Feedback on Continuous Assessment

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MODULE OUTLINE AND READING LIST Week 1 Introduction to Human Resource Management (HRM) This topic introduces students to the development of human resource management from a historical perspective and explains the debate between HRM and personnel management. It concludes with a discussion about `hard' and `soft' models of HRM and the implications for the human resource manager. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Identify the historical developments and their impact on HRM. · Outline the development and functions of HRM. · Understand the differences between HRM and Personnel Management. · Evaluate `hard' and `soft' approaches to HRM. · Understand how diversity is an issue in human relations (HR) practice. · Consider HRM as an international issue. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 1 pp 3-40. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 1 pp 1-31. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 1 pp 4-33. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 1 pp 1-28. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 1 pp 3-29. Week 2 Human Resource Planning and Resourcing This topic focuses on the human resource planning process and covers all aspects of the planning process. First, it takes a look at standard planning and focuses HR managers to the needs of linking the human resource to productivity. The topic looks at strategic planning and links plans to the strategic aims of the business. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Identify how to align an organisation's strategic direction with human resource planning. · Identify aspects that affect the demand and supply of labour. · Identify the changing demographics and the response of HR planners. · Understand the role of forecasting as part of the HR planning process and its response to change. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 2 pp 41-73.

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Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 2 pp 32-62. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapters 3 & 5; pp 83-118;157-188. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 2 pp 29-65. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 3 pp 50-71. Week 3 Trends in Human Resource Management and Recruiting This topic focuses on the variations that exist and they fall into two main types: the `narrow' and `broad' definitions, both of which formulate recruitment in terms of constituent activities and in relation to selection. It looks at job analysis in detail and focuses on the various methods that can be utilised. It then shows how this information is used in the formation of job and person specifications and looks at how to attract internal and external candidates to vacant posts. The legal aspects of recruitment and selection are also discussed. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Identify `broad' and `narrow' definitions of recruitment in the HR literature. · Provide outline descriptions of the procedures involved in `formative' recruitment. · Understand recruitment within its employment law context. · Recognise the range of possible sources and methods of recruitment. · Assess their comparative strengths and weaknesses. · Offer an account as to why organisations may use a multi-source and a multi method approach to recruitment. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 4 pp 105-137. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 3 pp 63-96. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 6 pp 189-224. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 5 pp 136-173. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 4 pp-92. Week 4 Selecting the Right People This topic introduces students to selection techniques. Good selection decisions can provide managers with valuable new members of staff who can contribute additional skills, increase productivity and, perhaps, even change the working ethos. It looks at the traditional selection process from the use of application forms to short-listing, interviewing and making the appointment.

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After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Outline the key components of the traditional selection process. · Review the grounds for their usage and their relative merits and drawbacks. · Discuss the main contemporary selection instruments. · Understand and explain their strengths and limitations. · Recognise the value of induction to the selection process. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 5 pp 138-175. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapters 4 & 5 pp 96-164. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 7 pp 225-255. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 6 pp 174-207. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 7 pp 145-190. Week 5 Remuneration and Reward This topic considers the issues of remuneration and reward, monetary and nonmonetary. First it takes a look and the definitions before it considers the role of job evaluation in determining payment structures. The topic looks at deciding how much money to pay and the role of market forces on reward. It later introduces the ideals of traditional pay and new pay and the payment schemes used as an incentive to improve performance. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Understand the role of pay and reward and its link to performance. · Evaluate the different aspects of the reward package. · Understand legal issues effecting pay and reward. · Discuss the importance of ethics in remuneration and reward. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 6 pp 176-2 12. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 10 pp 300-324. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 13 pp 487-524. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 5 pp 136-1 73. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 26 pp 631-715.

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Week 6

Learning, Training and Development

This topic introduces the concepts of training and development and the theories of learning that can help to guide practitioners. It follows the debate on education versus training and how employers decide whether to provide training on or off the job. It introduces learning theory and looks at the concepts of behavioural conditioning before introducing the reader to how people differ in their learning. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Understand the nature and process of learning. · Identify different styles and approaches to learning. · Understand the education and training debate. · Identify strategies for training. · Understand the relationship between competence and performance. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 7 pp 215-251. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapters 7 & 8; pp 191-262. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapters 8 & 9; pp 260-358. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 7 pp 208-245. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 18 pp 412-439.

Week 7 Revision ­ Free Teaching/Tutorial Week Week 8 Managing and Developing Performance This topic focuses on the issue of managing and developing performance. Performance management is the process by which managers ensure that their employees' outputs match the organisation's goals. The topic introduces managers to the need to manage performance and develop staff. Models of performance management are illustrated and explained to the reader and the need for a clear rationale and criteria is demonstrated. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Understand the role of appraisal systems in the management of performance. · Examine the importance of participation and involvement. · Recognise the role of empowerment and its relationship to performance. · Understand the concept of a learning organisation. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 8 pp 252-285.

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Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 9 pp 263-299. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 10 pp 359-410. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 8 pp 248-284. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapters 11 & 12 pp 253-270. Week 9 Employee Relations, Participation and Involvement This topic introduces the reader to the concept of employee relations and the role of the human resource manager. It looks at the role of trade unions and the move to employee representation through employee work councils. It defines the concepts of employee participation and looks at their similarities and differences. The discussion introduces the approaches to conflict in the organisation and looks at the different perspectives of conflict from a Unitarist, Pluralist, Marxist and Interactionist perspective. The introduction moves on to discuss the stages of conflict and management styles used in conflict resolution. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Understand the theoretical perspectives of employee relations. · Understand strategies for employee participation and involvement. · Define and describe the conflict process. · Recognise symptoms of conflict. · Identify sources of conflict and appropriate conflict management strategies. · Understand the role of negotiation and bargaining. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 9 pp 286-319. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapters 6 & 11; pp 164-1 90; 335-362. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 14 pp 525-560. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 9 pp 285-322. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapters 20 & 21 pp 485-525. Week 10 Health, Safety and Employee Well-Being This topic introduces the reader to health, safety and employee wellbeing and this is an expanding domain of HR management. In part, this is a consequence of the growth in UK and EU legislation, regulation, guidance and codes of practice covering a widening field of work activities and generating additional employer responsibilities for safety. It

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takes a look at health and safety legislation and the responsibility of the employer to ensure that employees are protected at work. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Understand the importance of health, safety and employee wellbeing in the workplace. · Appreciate the development of statutory and regulatory requirements concerning health and safety at work. · Understand the operations of the UK health and safety agencies, the Health and Safety Commission and the Health and Safety Executive. · Understand current developments in the provision of employee health and care. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 10 pp323-360. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 13 pp 401-426. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 11 pp 416-453. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 12 pp 390-420. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 22 pp 526-546. Week 11 Equal Opportunities and Managing Diversity This topic introduces the reader to the concepts of equal opportunities and diversity. It explores the theories of diversity and discusses the role of managers and the management of diversity in the workplace. The topic takes a look at the problems with policies and practice. It moves on to discuss the approaches to diversity and the issues around positive action. Leading on from this is a discussion of the differences in managing diversity and equal opportunity. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Define what is meant by Equal opportunities and managing diversity. · Have an understanding of anti-discrimination legislation and approaches to workplace equality and diversity. · Understand how equal opportunities and managing diversity are issues in HR practice. · Outline the development and functions of equal opportunity units and their role of managing diversity. · Have an appreciation of the challenges in developing and delivering equality and diversity in organisations. · Evaluate approaches to equality and diversity in organisations. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 11 pp 361-398.

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Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 12 pp 363-400. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 14 pp 525-560. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 13 pp 421-456. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 24 pp 569-594. Week 12 Current Issues and New Developments This topic focuses on the current issues that people managers are currently facing. It begins with a discussion on flexible learning and the costs of employment. It moves on to discuss career concepts and the change in expectation from today's workers. It looks at the changing nature of work and the impact downsizing and redundancies can have on an organisation and its employees. After studying this topic, the student should be able to: · Have an understanding of the changing nature of work. · Recognise the impact of globalisation on all organisations. · Be aware of the reasons for outsourcing both facilities and expertise. · Understand the implications of relocating personnel on the HRM requirement. · Acknowledge the consequences of change involving downsizing and mergers. · Recognise the impact of technological innovation and virtual organisations. Recommended Reading Bloisi, W (2007), An Introduction to Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill, London. Chapter 13 pp 435-470. Oshagbemi, T (2008) "The impact of personal and organisational variables on the leadership styles of managers, The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19, 10, October 2008, 1896-1910. Foot, M and Hook, C (2005), Introducing Human Resource Management, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapter 15 pp 456-496. Beardwell, J and Claydon, T (2007), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall, London. Chapters 15 & 17; pp 564-597; 634666. Noe, R. A, Hollenbeck, J.R, Gerhart, B, Wright, P. M. (2004), Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, McGraw-Hill Irwin, London. Chapter 15 pp 495-532. Torrington, D, Hall, L & Taylor S (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition FT Prentice Hall, Harlow. Chapter 31 pp759-780.

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