Read Microsoft Word - MGT2014 text version

MODULE OUTLINE ­ MANAGEMENT

MGT2014 Principles of Management II 2008 Administrative and Contact Details PREREQUISITES: MGT1005 Note that this module may only be taken if specified on an approved degree pathway. This module online is also available in alternative formats on request, including large print. For further information, please contact the lecturer. LECTURE TIMES, LOCATION AND ROOM: Tuesday: 2pm ­ 4pm, Phy/Bell

TUTORIALS: Tutorials begin in week 3 of the Semester. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that they are in a tutorial group. Attendance at tutorials and completion of coursework is strongly recommended.

MODULE COORDINATOR: Dr. Titus Oshagbemi Room: G04 26 University Square Email: [email protected] Tel: 028 9097 3644 MODULE LECTURER: Dr. Titus Oshagbemi Office Hours: Wednesday: 2pm ­ 4pm or by appointment

110MGT214 Principles of Management II Module Description

This module builds on the content of the previous module, Principles of Management I. It contains three major dimensions ­ organisational theory, marketing and strategy. The organisational theory aspect will discuss organisational goals and effectiveness to complement your earlier knowledge of organisational behaviour at level I. The marketing dimension of the module will introduce you to the marketing management philosophy, processes and environment while the strategy element will focus on strategic management in general including defining purpose, goals and objectives and formulating and implementing organisational strategy. The module adopts conceptual as well as practical perspectives and case studies will be used to illustrate theory. Aim To complement Principles of Management I by providing a robust background and an extension to the elements of management studied in Level One. Learning Outcomes Aims to widen and strengthen the Learning Outcomes in Principles of Management I and to incorporate understanding of some elements of organisational theory, marketing and strategic management. Skills Similarly, this module complements Principles of Management I to widen and deepen the key skills acquired earlier, namely ­ the development of the intellectual and practical skills of the learner in the acquisition, analysis, interpretation and understanding of current issues relevant to management. Students can access information about key skills on the web at the following web address: http://www.qub.ac.uk/keyskills/entersite.html MODULE ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed by one piece of coursework and a final examination. The continuous assessment comprises one individual case study on Organisational Management worth 40 % of the total module mark. The final examination is worth 60 % of the total module mark and will take place at the end of the semester. It will consist of a two-hour paper. There will be four questions in the final examination and students will be asked to attempt any two of these questions, i.e. no question will be compulsory. Two questions will come from organisation theory area, one question will come from marketing area while the fourth question, not necessarily in that order, will come from the strategic management area. CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT ­ DETAILS AND DEADLINES The continuous assessment will consist of an analysis of one case study on Organisational Management. Students will be asked to answer some questions at the end of the case study. The assignment must be completed using computer-based word processing and using either of the following two fonts: Times New Roman, size 12 or Arial, size 11. The assignment will be posted on Queen's Online nearer the date. It is important for students to regularly check the module web page for any additional relevant information. Messages may be broadcast on the intranet from time to time. Tutorial work is made up of seminar presentations. Students are to prepare written answers to tutorial case study questions and come to present and defend these during tutorial classes. Continuous Assignment: Set: 27th October 2008 (Week 5). Due Date: 17th November 2008 (Week 8). Feedback on the assignment will be given during the tutorial class in week 11, at the latest, or as soon as possible after the marking.

2

Assignment must be handed-in at the School of Management School Office, 24 University Square. Make sure you complete the sign-in procedure before 4:30pm on deadline day. Assessed work submitted after the deadline will be penalised at the rate of 5 % off the assessed mark awarded for each working day late up to a maximum of five working days (i.e. Monday to Friday excluding days of official University closure) after which a mark of zero will be awarded. Exemption from such penalties requires written evidence, such as a medical certificate. The continuous assessment will be retained for consideration by the external examiner. However, in addition to providing everyone his or her mark in writing, an oral feedback will be provided on the general performance in class where specific issues will be highlighted. TEACHING PLAN WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5 WEEK 6 WEEK 7 WEEK 8 WEEK 9 WEEK 10 WEEK 11 WEEK 12 Introduction to organisations Organisational theory and organisational behaviour Organisational goals 1 Organisational goals 2 Organisational effectiveness 1 Organisational effectiveness 2 Introduction to marketing The marketing environment/ mix Marketing and ethics Introduction to strategic management Formulating and implementing a strategy Revision

ESSENTIAL READING There are several good textbooks on Management Principles but there is no single comprehensive textbook that completely covers the topics that will be discussed in this module. You are therefore advised to consult the several sources of useful information listed below amongst others. Both the Science Library and the Main Library hold a good selection of books on the various topics of Management Principles, Marketing and Organisational Strategy and you are advised to consult these sources. A basic reading list of the topic areas covered will be provided throughout the module. Students are expected to undertake additional reading of relevant texts and to make use of relevant associated journals as well as sourcing information from the appropriate sites on the World Wide Web. Good books recommended for consultation include the following: Meyer, E Ashleigh, M George, JM and Jones, GR (2007), Contemporary Management: European Edition, McGraw-Hill, Higher Education, London. Kotler, P Armstrong, G Wong, V and Saunders, J (2008), Principles of Marketing, 5th European Edition, Financial Times Press, London.

3

Cole GA (2000), Strategic Management, Ashford Colour Press, Hampshire, UK. David, F (2009), Strategic Management: Concepts and cases, Pearson International Edition, London, 12th Edition. McAuley, J Johnson, P and Duberley, J (2007), Organisation Theory: Challenges and Perspectives, Financial Times Press, London. Wheelen, T and Hunger, D (2008), Strategic Management and Business Policy, Pearson Higher Education Publishers, 11th Edition, London. Robbins, SP (1990), Organisation Theory: Structure, Design and Applications, Prentice Hall International Inc., New Jersey. Etzioni, A (1964), Modern Organisations, Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey. Scott, WR (1998), Organisations: Rational, Natural and Open Systems, Prentice Hall International, Inc. London. Tutorial Classes WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5 WEEK 6 WEEK 7 WEEK 8 WEEK 9 WEEK 10 WEEK 11 WEEK 12 A guide to Case Analysis Case Study 1 ­ Great Plains Software: Pursuing a People-First Strategy Case Study 2 ­ Employment and Resignation Case Study 3 ­ Thanks for 24 Years of Service. Now here's the door! Case Study 4 ­ Salary Inequities at Acme Manufacturing Case Study 5 ­ Job satisfaction at Omega Technical Services Ltd Case Study 6 ­ Motivating or Punishment at Click Interative, Inc. Discussion of Essay Questions Feedback on Continuous Assessment Revision

Week 1 Introduction to Organisations Amitai Etzioni wrote in 1964 that "Our society is an organisational society". The lecture will expand and discuss this statement and its implications on the management of organisations today. The lecture will seek to explain, with examples, what organisations are and their characteristics and discuss whether or not organisational rationality and human happiness can go hand-in-hand. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Explain, with examples, what organisations are and their importance. 2. Explain the characteristics of organisations. 3. Understand the problems that managers face in attempting to make organisations more efficient and more effective at the same time.

4

Recommended Reading Robbins, SP (1990), Organisation Theory: Structure, Design and Applications, Prentice Hall International Inc., New Jersey. Etzioni, A (1964), Modern Organisations, Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey. Scott, WR (1998), Organisations: Rational, Natural and Open Systems, Prentice Hall International, Inc. London. Week 2 Organisational Theory and Behaviour In the second week we explore the evolution and development of organisation theory and compare organisational theory with organisational behaviour bringing out, in particular, the differences between them. We also explain, in general terms, the characteristics and functions of organisations. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Understand organisation theory and its development. 2. Explain the differences between organisational theory and organisational behaviour. Recommended Reading B. J. Hodge, William P. Anthony and Lawrence Gales (1996), Organization Theory: A Strategic Approach, Fifth Edition, Prentice Hall International (UK) Limited, London. Chapter 1, pp 3-29. Weeks 3, 4, 5 and 6 Organisational Goals and Effectiveness After stating a general definition of goals we examine different classes of goals or objectives in typical organisations. We explain the process of managing goals in organisations, including setting goals, managing conflicting goals, and assessing the objective of goal attainment. Goals provide us with a bridge to the issue of organisational effectiveness. Like goals, organisational effectiveness is a complex and multifaceted issue. There are problems in answering the question of what makes an organisation effective. This is because, to a large extent, the answer depends on who is asking the question and for what purpose. There are several models of organisational effectiveness that may be useful for different purposes. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Explain different types of organisational goals and their measurement. 2. Understand the problem of effectiveness in relation to goals. 3. Understand different measures of organisational effectiveness. Recommended Reading B. J. Hodge, William P. Anthony and Lawrence Gales (1996), Organization Theory: A Strategic Approach, Fifth Edition, Prentice Hall International (UK) Limited, London. Chapter 3, pp 55-86. Week 7 Introduction to Marketing

5

The lecture will define marketing and explain some terms generally associated with it such as needs, wants, demands, products, exchange, transactions and markets. It will explain the marketing management philosophy and the goals of the marketing system. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Define marketing and discuss its role in the economy. 2. Compare the five marketing management philosophies. 3. Identify the goals of the marketing system. Recommended Reading Philip Kotler and Gary Armstrong (2007), Marketing: An Introduction, Prentice-Hall International, New Jersey. Chapter 1 Week 8 The marketing environment/ mix A company's marketing environment consists of the actors and forces outside marketing that affect marketing management's ability to develop and maintain successful transactions with its target customers. To be successful, a company must adapt its marketing mix to trends and developments in this environment. Students will discuss the environment of marketing and how it affects the functioning of the marketing system. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Describe the environmental forces that affect the company's ability to serve its customers. 2. Explain how changes in the demographic and economic environments affect marketing decisions. Recommended Reading Philip Kotler and Gary Armstrong (2007), Marketing: An Introduction, Prentice-Hall International, New Jersey. Chapter 3 Week 9 Marketing and ethics Consumers have many concerns about how well the marketing system in general serves their interests ­ in the areas of high prices, deceptive practices, high-pressure selling, shoddy or unsafe products, planned obsolescence and poor service to disadvantaged consumers and so on. They also have concerns about marketing's impact on society as a whole as well as its impact on other businesses. These issues will be discussed. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. List and respond to the social criticisms of marketing. 2. Explain the role of ethics in marketing. Recommended Reading Philip Kotler and Gary Armstrong (2007), Marketing: An Introduction, Prentice-Hall International, New Jersey. Chapter 19 Week 10 Introduction to Strategic Management Steiner (1979) defined strategic management as "designing a desired future and identifying ways to bring it about". Strategic management is usually contrasted with

6

operational management which is basically short-term and detailed in scope while strategic management involves thinking and actions that are focused on the long-term future of the whole organisation. In general strategic management attempts to define what a business is and what it should be. The lecture will briefly introduce the student to this new area of study. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Understand and be familiar with key definitions and explanations (Views) of strategy. 2. Understand the interrelationships between strategy and operations. Recommended Reading Cole GA (2000), Strategic Management, Ashford Colour Press, Hampshire, UK. Chapters 1 and 2 Week 11 Formulating and Implementing a Strategy The process of strategy (policy) formulation and its implementation will be introduced here. The key alternatives in strategic choices will be presented followed by a basic model of choice. The principal strategic options open to a business organisation are also identified after which an overview of strategy implementation is presented. Learning Objectives After studying this topic, the student should be able to: 1. Identify strategic from operational management. 2. Understand the interrelationships between strategy formulation and implementation. Recommended Reading Cole GA (2000), Strategic Management, Ashford Colour Press, Hampshire, UK. Chapters 6 and 7

Week 12 Revision

7

Information

Microsoft Word - MGT2014

7 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

332440


Notice: fwrite(): send of 206 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531