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Queens University of Belfast School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy

PAI3032 Ethnicity Multiculturalism and the Nation State

Dr. Ephraim Nimni

Autumn Semester 2009-2010

Module Convenor: Room Email address: Consultation Hours: Timetable Lectures: 2 hour Seminars: Assessment: Coursework: Deadlines: Examination: one book review , one research essay Monday 16 November by noon Book Review; Thursday 17 December by noon Research Essay This module has no exams!! Tuesdays 1-2PM repeat on Thursdays 11-12 (Thursday seminar only) 1) Tuesdays 2-4PM , 2) Tuesdays 4-6PM 3) Thursdays 12-2 PM Ephraim Nimni 18.104 [email protected] Wednesdays 11-12

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School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy Student Handbook This module guide should be read in conjunction with the Undergraduate Student Handbook which contains important details of School policies. A copy of the Undergraduate Student Handbook can be obtained from the School Office (21 University Square) or downloaded from the resources section of any PAI or PHL module on Queen's Online. MODULE DESCRIPTION

This module examines the relationship between ethnicity, multiculturalism and nationalism. Can we reconcile nationalism with multiculturalism? We further discuss nationalism, minority rights and the crisis of the nation state, the politics of difference, ethnic and national minority rights. We will consider key contemporary dilemmas, such as: liberal democratic self-determination: territorial or non-territorial? Must we grant individual or collective rights to minorities? Should every nation have its own separate state? Is it possible to have successful multiethnic and multi-nation states? We discuss conceptual approaches and exemplify arguments with current problems, such as the position of Islamic minorities in Europe, and we will finish the module with the film, "The Road to Guantamo".

MODULE AIMS:

Ascertain if multiculturalism and nationalism are divergent or complementary. To examine the complex relation between ethnic majorities and minorities in liberal democracies. To critically evaluate and distinguish between the demands for equally and sameness in contemporary liberal democracies. To evaluate and discuss of non-territorial forms of self-determination. Learn about the debate between individual and collective rights for minorities in contemporary liberal democracies.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students should be able to: Understand the complex relation between ethnic majorities and minorities in liberal democracies. Critically evaluate and distinguish between the demands for equally and sameness in contemporary liberal democracies. Have an appreciation of non-territorial forms of self-determination. Have an appreciation of the debate between individual and collective rights for minorities in contemporary liberal democracies.

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SKILLS This module will assist in developing students' skills in a number of important areas. These include:

Sensitivity and appreciation of cultural diversity Learning how live in multicultural environments.

Intellectual skills Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one's own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field Professional and career development skills Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the learning environment Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one's own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance Technical and practical skills Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT Organizational skills Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear argument; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways Assessment

1)

A literature review comprising one key book from the list below, see page 8. This literature review should be no more than 2,000 words long and it is due at the

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beginning of week 8, on Monday 16 November 2009 by noon. It is worth 35% of the final mark. See below in page 10 a detailed explanation of what a literature review is. 2) A research essay examining a prescribed issue or a problem central to the module. See list of research essay topics in page 5 below. The research essay should be no more than 3,000 words long and it is worth 55% of the final mark. The research essay is due on Week 12, on Thursday 17 December 2009 by noon. 3) All students must contribute to discussions and where possible, introduce a seminar. Because of the small number of seminars, it will not be possible for every student to introduce a seminar. Seminar participation AND contributions to the discussion will attract a mark which it is worth 10% of the final mark.

1. Attendance and Seminar Participation Students must attend a one hour lecture per week Students must attend a two hour seminar per week Students receive a mark out of 10 for their participation and general contribution to seminars on all undergraduate modules excluding the dissertation, internship or project. This mark will count as 10% of the overall mark for the module. Marks will be awarded for individuals not groups. No more than 5% of seminar marks should be allocated for seminar presentations, should these be used by the tutor. For further details, see the School's Undergraduate Student Handbook. This module is worth 10 credits on the ECTS scale (equivalent to 20 Queen's University CATS points, Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme). This is calculated by the University as the equivalent of 200 hours' academic study over the course of the semester (12 `teaching' weeks plus the three week examination period). Students should therefore expect to spend on average at least 13 hours each week undertaking academic study associated with this module. 2. COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENTS

1)

A literature review comprising one key book from the list below, SEE PAGE 8. This literature review should be no more than 2,000 words long and it is due at the beginning of week 8, on Monday 16 November 2009. It is worth 35% of the final mark. See below in page 10 on what a literature review is. 4) A research essay examining a prescribed issue or a problem central to the module. See list of research essay topics below. The research essay should be no more than 3,000 words long and it is worth 55% of the final mark. The research essay is due on Week 12, on Thursday 17 December 2009 5) All students must contribute to discussions and where possible, introduce a seminar. Because of the small number of seminars, it will not be possible for every student to introduce a seminar. Seminar participation AND contributions to the discussion will attract a mark which it is worth 10% of the final mark.

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The submission deadlines are: Book Review: 1200 noon Monday 16 November 2009 Research Essay: 1200 noon Thursday 17 December 2009 RESEARCH ESSAYS TOPICS

The research essay should be no more than 3,000 words long (excluding footnotes and references) and it is worth 55% of the final mark. The research essay is due on Thursday 17 December 2009 AT 12:00 NOON. Choose ONE TOPIC ONLY from the list below: 1) Is there an "ethnic revival" in contemporary liberal democracies? Explain conceptually and give examples. 2) Evaluate the idea that Multiculturalism and Nationalism are compatible. Illustrate your argument with examples. 3) What is the right to national self-determination? Evaluate if it can be exercised by stateless nations. Give examples. 4) Should ethnic minorities have individual or collective rights or a mixture of both in contemporary liberal democracies? Explain conceptually and give examples. 5) Evaluate if the "politics of difference" has made an impact on contemporary liberal democracies. Give examples 6) Are forms of non-territorial Self Determination feasible? Give examples. 7) Evaluate the concept of "Islamophobia". Is it similar to other forms of religious discrimination? 8) Is the concept of national self-determination a problematic idea? Discuss conceptually and historically and give concrete examples.

Submission of assignments A single copy of each assessed assignment must be submitted to the School Office (21 University Square) on or before 1200 noon on the due date indicated above. When submitting an assessed assignment, you must complete and sign an `Essay Cover Sheet' available from the School Office. The School uses a system of anonymous marking so do not include your name on the assignment. All assignments are retained by the School for scrutiny by internal and external examiners. All assignments submitted after the deadline will be penalized 5 percentage points per day after 12 noon. Conceptual Equivalents Marking Scale The School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy uses the University's conceptual equivalent marking scheme for all undergraduate assessment. Individual pieces of work are allocated a `discrete' mark. For further information on the University's conceptual equivalent marking scheme and the marks used, see the School's Undergraduate Student Handbook. This is available from the School Office and will be posted on the resources page on QOL for each module. This is University's

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conceptual equivalent marking scale can also be accessed on line at: www.qub.ac.uk/pisp/Education/Undergraduates/Assessment/. Feedback The School is committed to return feedback to students within three weeks of the deadline for submission of coursework. It is important that students who submit their essays by the deadline receive feedback in a timely fashion so that they can properly prepare for their exams or further assignments. Students can therefore expect to receive feedback on their essays within no later than 3 weeks of the submission deadline (this policy does not apply to students who submit their coursework after the deadline). The module convenor will contact all students advising them when hardcopies of their essay report sheets are available to collect in the Main Office, 21 University Square. If students have not received feedback within 3 weeks of the deadline, they should contact their module convenor directly. Students who wish to discuss their grade should do so with the convenor during his or her office hours. School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy Student Handbook This module guide should be read in conjunction with the Undergraduate Student Handbook which contains important details of School policies. A copy of the Undergraduate Student Handbook can be obtained from the School Office (21 University Square) or downloaded from the resources section of any PAI or PHL module on Queen's Online.

Plagiarism The School takes a very severe line on students who plagiarise work. Students who attempt to pass off another's work as their own will receive a mark of ZERO. In some cases, acts of plagiarism can result in the student failing the entire degree. Remember, plagiarism includes information from books, newspapers, journals and the Internet. All suspected cases of plagiarism will be investigated in line with University procedures. For details of University Regulations on Academic Offences, see: www.qub.ac.uk/pisp/Education. The page also provides a link to guidance on how to identify and so avoid plagiarism. Please also refer to the School's Student Handbook Guide for more information about referencing and plagiarism, as well as general advice on essay-writing: www.qub.ac.uk/pisp/FileStore/PDFfiles/Filetoupload,38127,en.pdf

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Lecture Schedule

Week 1 (28 Sept- 2 Oct) 2 (5-9 Oct) 3 (12 ­ 16 Oct) 4 (19 - 23 Oct) 5 (26- 30 Oct) 6 ( 2- 5 Nov) 7 (9- 13 Nov) 8 (16- 20 Nov) 9 (23-27 Nov) 10 (30 Nov- 4 Dec) 11 (7-11 Dec) 12 (14-18 Dec) Seminar Schedule

Date

Topic Introduction and Administration

Introduction to Ethnicity Nationalism and the state Multiculturalism Politics of Recognition Individual or collective rights for minorities?

Reading Week ­ No Lecturers or Seminars

The dilemmas of Self Determination National-Cultural Autonomy Islamic Minorities in the West Film "The Road to Guantanamo" and discussion

Summary and Conclusion

Seminars will be held once a week beginning the first week of the semester. The first seminar is a short administrative meeting. You should consult Queens online (https://learn.qol.qub.ac.uk/home/) to sign up for your seminar l groups. You are advised to do this as soon as possible to be sure you sign up for a suitable time. All required reading material for seminars will be posted in QOL. Seminar participation is compulsory in the School, and it counts for 10% of your final grade. If you cannot attend a seminar for legitimate reasons, you MUST contact your tutor beforehand to explain your absence (contact either directly or through the School Office). You must make every effort to acquire the class material if you are absent.

Week 1 (28 Sept- 2 Oct) 2 (5-9 Oct) 3 (12 ­ 16 Oct) 4 5 6 7 8 9 (19 - 23 Oct) (26- 30 Oct) ( 2- 5 Nov) (9- 13 Nov) (16- 20 Nov) (23-27 Nov)

Date

Topic Administration What is Ethnicity? What is the connection between Nationalism and the State? Why Multiculturalism now?

What is the Politics of Recognition? Individual or collective rights for minorities?

Reading Week ­ No Lecturers or Seminars

Why is Self Determination a problematic term Is National-Cultural Autonomy relevant to contemporary societies?

What is Islamophobia?

10 (30 Nov- 4 Dec) 11 (7-11 Dec) 12 (14-18 Dec)

Discussion of the Film "The Road to Guantanamo"

Summary and Conclusion

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IMPORTANT READING Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Ethnicity and nationalism 2nd ed. 2002, Umut Ozkirimli, Theories of Nationalism: A Critical Overview, London 2000, Anthony Smith's book, Nationalism and Modernism Routledge, London 1998 provides a good general overview of contemporary theories of nationalism, and a very good defence of his own position, Ethno-Symbolism (see chapter 8). There are also several edited collections on nationalism, such as Gopal Balakrishnan (ed.), Mapping the Nation, Verso, London 1994; J. Couture, K. Nielsen, S. Seymour, (eds.) Rethinking Nationalism, University of Calgary Press, 1996; O. Dahbour and M. Ishay (eds.) The Nationalism Reader, Humanities Press, 1995. M. Guibernau and J. Rex (eds.) The Ethnicity Reader, Nationalism, Multiculturalism and Migration, Polity Press, London 1997. A. Smith and J. Hutchinson (eds.), Nationalism, Series Oxford Readers, Oxford University Press, 1994. On Multiculturalism the best collection (except my article, it is old hat) is still W. Kymlicka (ed) The Rights of Minority Cultures, Oxford, 1995. For ". . . an impressive collection of resources related to the study of nationalism." -- Electronic Resources Review, see: http://www.nationalismproject.org/ ELECTRONIC AND PAPER JOURNALS There are several important journals fort the study of multiculturalism, ethnicity and nationalism in the library and are available on line (hereafter OL). Ethnicity and Multiculturalism Ethnicities (Bib Id 1371997) Ethnicity (Bib Id 309711) Ethnic and Racial Studies (Bib Id 252690) Ethnopolitics (Electronic access to full text only) Nationalism Nations and Nationalism (Bib Id 867052)) Nationalities papers (Bib Id 1584919) Nationalism & Ethnic Politics (Bib Id 873113) In preparing your essays and looking for wider reading you are urged to consult them LIST OF BOOKS ACCEPTABLE FOR THE LITERATURE REVIEW

Students must review ONE of the following books, you have THIRTY to choose from. Please note that reviews of books not on this list will NOT BE ACCEPTED. The list below indicates no preference and it is in alphabetical order. Baumeister, Andrea, Liberalism and the Politics of Difference, Edinburgh Univ. Press, 2000. Brown, David, Contemporary Nationalism, Routledge, 2000 Connor, Walker, Ethnonationalism: the quest for understanding Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1994. Day, Graham and Thompson, Andrew, Theorizing Nationalism, Palgrave, Basinsgstoke, 2004.

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Delanty Gerard and O'Mahony Patrick, Nationalism and social theory : modernity and the recalcitrance of the nation , London : SAGE, 2002. Eriksen T. H., Ethnicity and Nationalism, Second Edition, Pluto Press, London, 2002 Gellner Ernest, Nations and Nationalism, with an Introduction by John Breuilly, 2nd ed. Malden, Mass. Oxford : Blackwell, 2006 Goulbourne, Harry. Ethnicity and nationalism in post-imperial Britain Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1991. Gutmann Amy (ed).Multiculturalism, examining the Politics of Recognition, Princeton University Press, 1994 Jusdanis, Gregory, The Necessary Nation, Princeton University Press, 2001 Keating M. & Mcgarry J., Minority Nationalism and the Changing International Order, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001 Keating, Michael, Stateless Nations in a Post sovereign Era, Oxford University Press, 2001 Kymlicka W., Multicultural Citizenship, Oxford University Press, 1995 Kymlicka W., Multicultural Odysseys, Oxford University Press, 2007 Leoussi, Athena S. and Grosby, Steven (eds.) Nationalism and Ethnosymbolism: history, culture and ethnicity in the formation of nations, Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2007. Bennett, David (ed) Multicultural states, Rethinking Difference and Identity London New York: Routledge, 2001. Jenkins, Richard, Rethinking Ethnicity : arguments and explorations. London: Sage, 1997. Modood Tariq, Multiculturalism, A Civic Idea, Polity Press, Cambridge, 2007 Modood, Tariq, Anna Triandafyllidou and Ricard Zapata-Barrero (eds.), Multiculturalism, Muslims and citizenship: a European approach , Abingdon, Routledge, 2006 Ozkirimli, Umut, Theories of Nationalism: A Critical Overview, London 2000 Parekh, Bhikhu, A New Politics of Identity, Political Principles for an Interdependent World, Palgrave, 2008 Parekh, Bhikhu, Rethinking Multiculturalism, Cultural Diversity and Political Theory, MacMillan, 2000 Roach , Steven C,.Cultural autonomy, minority rights, and globalization Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2005. Roe, Paul, Ethnic violence and the societal security dilemma , London : Routledge, 2005. Said , Edward W., Orientalism, Penguin classics, London 2003.

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Smith Anthony, D, Ethno-Symbolism and Nationalism, Routledge, London 2009 Smith David J. and Cordel, Karl l (eds.) Cultural autonomy in Contemporary Europe, London, Routledge, 2008 Smith, Anthony D., The Ethnic Revival in the Modern World, 1991, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981. Smith, Anthony D., Nationalism and Modernism Routledge, London 1998 Stephen May, Tariq Modood, and Judith Squires (eds) Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Minority Rights , Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2004. Tully James, Strange multiplicity: constitutionalism in an age of diversity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

WHAT IS A LITERATURE REVIEW? When you read academic journals you will notice that there are, normally at the end of the volume, book reviews. The book review for this seminar will be of roughly the same length and format of a book review in an academic journal. You can review any book from the list above ONLY. A literature review is a description AND an evaluation of a literature that you have read. A literature report is different from a literature review in that it concentrates on a summary of what the author has to say, and only marginally comments on the reader's opinion of what the author says and how he/she says it. You are asked here to do a literature review, not a literature report. A good literature review is well organized, gives a sense of the literature as a whole, and includes publication details. Structure of a Literature Review Introduction: Give the name of the literature you have read, the author, and the publishing details. Tell the reader how the literature is organized. Tell the reader the main thesis or argument of the literature. Summary of Content: Take each section of the literature and summarize the important points in that section, and how it relates to the overall structure and content. Give each section proportional weight in your summary. For example, if the literature is divided into four sections of approximately equal length, you should devote the same amount of space in your summary for each section. If, however, section one is twice as long as the other three sections, you should devote more space to a discussion of this section than the other three. The Conclusion: Tell the reader why you liked/ didn't like the literature, referring to elements discussed in your introduction and summary sections. Questions to Ask Yourself

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Have I included all the important publication details of the literature in my report? Have I organized my summary in a way that is easy to follow and reflects the organization of the literature? Have I accurately represented the point of view of the author of the literature? Have I accurately represented the structure of the argument presented in the literature? Have I inserted my opinion of the subject matter dealt with in the literature? Have I indicated at the end of the report whether or not I liked the literature and why? Questions to ask yourself about the book you are reviewing Has the author formulated a problem/issue? Is the problem/issue ambiguous or clearly articulated? Is its significance (scope, severity, relevance) discussed? What are the strengths and limitations of the way the author has formulated the problem or issue? Could the problem have been approached more effectively from another perspective? What is the author's research orientation? What is the author's theoretical framework? What is the relationship between the theoretical and research perspectives? Has the author evaluated the literature relevant to the problem/issue? Does the author include literature taking positions s/he does not agree with? How does the author structure his or her argument? Can you `deconstruct' the flow of the argument to analyse if/where it breaks down? Is this a literature or article that contributes to our understanding of the problem under study, and in what ways is it useful for practice? What are the strengths and limitations? Tuesday 29 September, Thursday 1ST October Week 1 Introduction and Organisation Reading: None. Tuesday 6 October, Thursday 8 October Week 2: Introduction to Ethnicity Questions for briefing papers: A Why ethnicity became important in the contemporary world B Is there an ethnic revival?

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Required Reading: T. H. Eriksen, Ethnicity and Nationalism, Second Edition, 2002, Ch. 1, "What is Ethnicity" pp. 1-19. QOL A. D. Smith, The Ethnic Revival in the Modern World, 1991, Ch1, An Ethnic Revival? , pp. 8-25 QOL Further reading Stefan Wolff, Ethnic Conflict: a Global Perspective, Ch2, Ethnicity and Nationalism, Oxford University Press, 2006, pp. 25-57. Epstein, A. L., Ethos and Identity, three studies in ethnicity London: Tavistock , 1978 -1982 Introduction. W. Adebanwi, "Territoriality and the Discourse of Ethnic Groups Clashes", Nationalism & Ethnic Politics 2007 vol:13 2 pp. 213-243 OL Kellas, James, The Politics of Nationalism and Ethnicity, Ch. 2, "Nationalism and Ideology", pp. 20-33 Alonso A., "The politics of space, time and substance: state formation, nationalism, and ethnicity." Annual Review of Anthropology 23, 1994: pp 379-405. JSTOR Brass, Paul R.,(ed.) Ethnicity and nationalism; theory and comparison, Sage Publications, 1991. Rex, John, "Ethnic Mobilisation in Multi-Cultural Societies", in J. Rex and B. Drury (eds.) Ethnic Mobilisation in Multi-Cultural Europe, pp. 3-13, Aldershot : Avebury, 1994 Brass, Paul R. (ed.), Ethnic groups and the state, London : Croom Helm, c1985 Calhoun, Craig, "Nationalism and ethnicity" Annual Review of Sociology, v.19, pp 211-39, '93 Connor, W., "A nation is a nation, is a State is an Ethnic Group" , Ethnic and Racial Studies, 1978, 1, pp. 377-400. OL Glazer, N. & Moynihan D., (eds.) Ethnicity, Theory and Experience Cambridge, Mass. ; London : Harvard University Press, 1975 Oommen, T. K. "Race, ethnicity and class: an analysis of interrelations", International Social Science Journal, v. 46, pp 83-93 February '94. OL Tuesday 13 October, Thursday 15 October Week 3: Nationalism and the state Questions for briefing papers:

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A) What is the connection between nation and state? B) Do nations require states? Required Readings T. H. Eriksen, Ethnicity and Nationalism, Second Edition, 2002, Ch. 6, "Nationalism", pp. 96120 QOL M. Keating, "Nationalism without States: The Accommodation of Nationalism in the New State Order", in M. Keating & J. Mcgarry, Minority Nationalism and the Changing International Order, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001, pp. 19-44 Danforth, Loring, The Macedonian Conflict, Ethnic nationalism in a Transnational World, Chapter 1, "Ethnic Nationalism: The Construction of National Identities and Cultures" pp. 1127, Princeton University Press, 1995. QOL Further Readings W. Kymlicka, and C. Straehle, "Cosmopolitanism, Nation-States and Minority Nationalism: A Critical Review of Recent Literature", European Journal of Philosophy, 7:1, April 1999, pp. 65-88. OL Taras Kuzio, "The myth of the civic state: a critical survey of Hans Kohn's framework for understanding nationalism" Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2002 vol:25 pp. 20-39 OL Walker Connor, 'A Nation is a Nation, is a State, is an Ethnic Group, is a...' in John Hutchinson and Anthony Smith (eds.) :Nationalism Oxford University Press, 1994., pp.36-46. A. D. Smith, "Culture Community and Territory: The Politics of Ethnicity and Nationalism", International Affairs, 72, 3, (1996) pp. 445-458 OL Stephen Ryan, "Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict", in Brian White, Richard Little and Michael Smith, Issues in World Politics, MacMillan, London, 1997 and 2001. John Breuilly, Nationalism and the State , Manchester University Press, 1982. A. D. Smith, The Ethnic Origin of Nations, Chapters 2 and 3. QOL C. Calhoun, Nationalism and Ethnicity, Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 19: 211-239 1993 Daniele Conversi, (ed.), Ethnonationalism in the contemporary world : Walker Connor and the study of nationalism London : Routledge, 2002. SH E. Gellner, Nations and Nationalism, Ch 4 and 5. B. P. O'Leary, "On the Nature of Nationalism: An Appraisal of Ernest Gellner's Writings on Nationalism", British Journal of Political Science (1997), 27:191-222.

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B. Parekh, , "The Incoherence of Nationalism", in R. Beiner (ed.) Theorizing Nationalism, State University of New York Press, 1999, pp. 295-325.

Tuesday 20 October, Thursday 22 October Week 4: Multiculturalism Questions for briefing papers: A) Is multiculturalism appropriate for the 21st Century? B) Why liberal democracies have difficulties with multiculturalism? Required readings T. Madood, Multiculturalism, a Civic Idea, 2007, Ch 1 "Is multiculturalism appropriate for the twenty-first Century?",.pp. 1-20, and Ch 2, "A Liberal bias" pp21-36 (Seamus Heaney, HM1271 MODO). Sasja Tempelman, "Constructions of Cultural Identity: Multiculturalism and Exclusion", Political Studies, Volume 47, Number 1, March 1999, pp. 17-31. QOL "Introduction" in Bhikhu Parekh, Rethinking Multiculturalism, Cultural Diversity and Political Theory, MacMillan, 2000, pp. 1-15. Further readings W. Kymlicka, Multicultural Citizenship, Oxford University Press, 1995, ch2 The politics of multiculturalism, pp. 10-33 see also Ch. 3, "Individual rights and collective rights", pp. 34-48, see also Ch. 4 "Rethinking the Liberal Tradition", pp. 49-74. O. Reitman, "Multiculturalism and feminism: Incompatibility, compatibility, or synonymity?" Ethnicities, June 2005; 5(2): pp. 216 - 247. OL Vernon, Van Dyke, "The Individual, the State and Ethnic communities in Political Theory", in W. Kymlicka (ed.) The Rights of Minority Cultures, Oxford University Press, 1995 pp. 31-56 SH W.E. Connolly, "Pluralism, Multiculturalism, and the Nation-State: Rethinking the Connections", Journal of Political Ideologies1 (1), 1996, pp53-73 QOL Stephen May, Tariq Modood, and Judith Squires, "Ethnicity, nationalism, and minority rights" in Stephen May, Tariq Modood, and Judith Squires (eds.), Ethnicity, nationalism, and minority rights Cambridge University Press, 2004. pp. 1-23 Michael Mousa Karayanni, "Multiculture Me No More! On Multicultural Qualifications and the Palestinian-Arab Minority of Israel", Diogenes, Vol. 54, No. 3, 39-58 (2007) QOL

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B. Parekh, "Redistribution or Recognition, a Misguided Debate", in Stephen May, Tariq Modood, and Judith Squires (eds.), Ethnicity, nationalism, and minority rights Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 199-213 B. Parekh, "Dilemmas of a Multicultural Theory of Citizenship", Constellations, 1997, Vol. 4, No.1, pp. 54-62. Birch, A. "The question of Minority Rights", in A. Birch, Nationalism and National Integration, Chapter 5, pp. 52-62, London : Unwin Hyman, 1989 Chandran Kukathas, "Are there any cultural rights?", Political Theory, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 105139, 1992 (argument against cultural rights) Tuesday 27 October Thursday 29 October Week 5: the Politics of Recognition Questions for briefing papers: A) Is the Politics of Recognition a useful concept in the twenty first century? B) Evaluate Habermas' opposing view. Required readings Charles Taylor, "The Politics of Recognition" in Multiculturalism, examining the Politics of Recognition, introduced and edited by by Amy Gutmann. Princeton University Press, 1994. pp. 25-73 (Seamus Heaney) Jurgen Habermas, "Struggles for Recognition in the Democratic Constitutional State" in Multiculturalism, examining the Politics of Recognition, introduced and edited by by Amy Gutmann. Princeton University Press, 1994. pp. pp.107-48 (Seamus Heaney) Further readings J. E. Fossum, Deep diversity versus constitutional patriotism, Ethnicities 2001:1 :2 pp. 179206 Andrea Baumeister "Ways of belonging; Ethnonational minorities and models of differentiated citizenship", Ethnicities, Vol 3(3), 2003, pp. 393­416 Ruth Abbey, Pluralism in Practice: The Political Thought of Charles Taylor, Critical Review of International social and Political Philosophy (CRISP), 5, 3, 2002, pp. 98-123. Charles Taylor, "The Dynamics of Democratic Exclusion", Journal of Democracy 9.4 1998 143156 Andrea Baumeister, Liberalism and the Politics of Difference, 2000, Edinburgh University Press

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Ruth Abbey, Charles Taylor's Politics of Recognition: a Reply to Jonathan Seglow Political Studies, Volume 47, Number 4, September 1999 , pp. 710-714(5) Linda Nicholson, "Identity and the Politics of Recognition. To Be Or Not To Be: Charles Taylor And The Politics Of Recognition", Constellations 3 (1), 1­16. april 1996 Mark Redhead "Charles Taylor's Deeply Diverse Response to Canadian Fragmentation: A Project Often Commented On but Seldom Explored" Canadian Journal of Political Science 36:1 (March 2003) pp. 61-83 Ruth Lister, "A Politics of Recognition and Respect: Involving People with Experience of Poverty in Decision making that affects their Lives", Social Policy & Society , 2002, 1:1, pp 37-46 Levent Koker, "Political Toleration or Politics of Recognition: The Headscarves Affair Revisited", Political Theory, Vol. 24, No. 2. (May, 1996), pp. 315-320

Tuesday 3 November, Thursday 5 November Week 6: Equality: Individual or collective rights for minorities? Questions for briefing papers: A) Evaluate Barry's critique of multiculturalism. B) Should minorities have collective or individual rights? Required Readings Brian Barry, Culture and equality: an egalitarian critique of multiculturalism , Polity, London, 2002, Part 1, multiculturalism and Equal Treatment (SH) James Tully, "The Illiberal Liberal, Barry's Attack on multiculturalism", Ch6, pp. 102-113, Ch 7, J. Squires, "Culture, Equality and Diversity", pp. 114-132, Bikhu Parekh, " Barry and the Dangers of liberalism", Ch8, pp. 133-150 of Paul Kelly (ed.) Multiculturalism Reconsidered, Polity Press, 2002 (SH) Margaret Moore, "Brian Barry's Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism, a Liberal Nationalist Defence", in Bruce Haddock and Peter Such, Multiculturalism, Identity and Rights. Routledge, London, 2003, Ch, 11 pp. 158-174 (QOL) Further Readings:

Several Authors, "Review Symposium of Brian Barry Culture and Equality: An Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism", Ethnicities, Vol. 2(2) pp. 261-287, 2002 (OL) Steve On, "Brian Barry and the Headscarf Case in France", Contemporary Political Theory 5, 2006, pp. 176-192 (OL)

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Adrian Little, "Multiculturalism, Diversity and Liberal Egalitarianism In Northern Ireland" , Irish Political Studies, 18, 2, 2003, pp. 23-39. (OL) Bernard Yack, "Multiculturalism and the Political Theorists", European Journal of Political Theory, 2002; 1; pp. 107-118 (OL) J. Waldron, "Minority Cultures and the cosmopolitan alternative", in Will Kymlicka (ed) The Rights of Minority Cultures, 1995, pp. 93-122. (SH) Dominic McGoldrick, "Multiculturalism and its Discontents", Human Rights Law Review 5:1 (2005), pp. 27-56. (OL) Seyla Benhabib, , The claims of culture: equality and diversity in the global era , Princeton, N.J. ; Woodstock : Princeton University Press, 2002 (SH) Dwight G.Newman, "Collective Rights", Philosophical Books Vol. 48 No. 3 July 2007 pp. 221232 (OL) Roland Pierik, "Conceptualizing Cultural Groups and Cultural Difference", Ethnicities, 2004, Vol. 4, No. 4, pp. 523-544 (OL) Brian Barry, "The Muddles Of Multiculturalism", New Left Review 8, March-April 2001 (OL). Hans-Jörg Trenz, "Reconciling diversity and unity: Language minorities and European integration", Ethnicities 2007; 7; 157-185

Tuesday 10 November Thursday 12 November Reading Week: No seminars, Reading Week

BOOK REVIEW DUE ON MONDAY 16 NOVEMBER!

Tuesday 17 November, Thursday 19 November Week 8: The dilemmas of Self Determination Questions for briefing papers: A) What is National Self-Determination? B) Why is the concept ambiguous and tricky? Required Reading: Benyamin Neuberger, "National Self-Determination: Dilemmas of a Concept" Nations and Nationalism 1995, 1 (3), 297­325. OL M. Moore. The territorial dimension of Self-Determination, in Margaret Moore (ed.), National Self-determination and Secession, Oxford University Press 1998, Ch7 , pp.135-57

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(SH), QOL Additional Reading: Marc Weller and Stefan Wolff , Autonomy, Self-Governance, and Conflict Resolution, Innovative Approaches to Institutional Design in Divided Societies, London : Routledge, 2005. Introduction: "Self-Determination and Autonomy: a Conceptual Introduction", pp. 5-37 David Knight & Maureen Davies, Self Determination, an interdisciplinary annotated bibliography, excerpts, Garland, 1987 QOL Musgrave, Thomas, Self-Determination and National Minorities, Oxford University, 1997 Martti Koskenniemi, "National Self-Determination Today: Problems of Legal Theory and Practice", The International and Comparative Law Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 2. (Apr., 1994), pp. 241-269. Krasner, Stephen, Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy, Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 1999. Yonah Alexander, (ed.) Self-determination : national, regional, and global dimensions. Boulder, Colorado : Westview Press, 1980 Etzioni, Amitai, "The evils of self-determination", Foreign Policy vol. 89, pp21-35, Winter '92/'93 Cobban, Alfred, The Nation state and national self-determination Chicago : Univ. of Chicago Press, Hannum, Hurst, Autonomy, sovereignty, and self-determination: the accommodation of conflicting rights, Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996. Mayall, James; Simpson, Mark, "Ethnicity is not enough: reflections on protracted secessionism in the Third World", International Journal of Comparative Sociology, vol. 33, pp.5-25 January/April '92. Heraclides, Alexis, "Secession, self-determination and non-intervention: in quest of a normative symbiosis, Journal of International Affairs, vol. 45, pp.399-420 Winter '92. Ronen, Dov, The quest for self-determination, New Haven ; London : Yale University Press, 1979 A. Cassese, Self determination in international law, New York ; Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1995 M. Pomerance, Self Determination in law and practice, The Hague ; London : Nijhoff, 1982. Wolfgang Danspeckgruber, (ed.) The self-determination of peoples: community, nation, and state in an interdependent world Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2001

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Tuesday 24 November, Thursday 26 November Week 9: National-Cultural Autonomy Questions for briefing papers: A) Evaluate the National-Cultural Autonomy model B) Is it historically obsolete or applicable in the twenty first century? Required Reading Karl Renner, State & Nation, In E. Nimni (ed.) National Cultural Autonomy and its contemporary critics, Routledge, London 2005 E. Nimni, "National-Cultural Autonomy as an Alternative to minority Territorial Nationalism", Ethnopolitics, Vol. 6, 3, September 2007 pp. 1-20 (QOL) also available in David J. Smith and Karl Cordell (eds.) Cultural autonomy in contemporary Europe, London, Routledge, 2008 pp. 9-28, library No.: D1060/SMIT Additional Reading Tim Nieguth, "An Austrian Solution for Canada? Problems and Possibilities of National Cultural Autonomy", Canadian Journal of Political Science, 2009 42:1-16 QOL Steven C Roach,. Cultural autonomy, minority rights, and globalization Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2005., Ch2, & Ch3 and Conclusion Anne Julie Semb "Sami self-determination in the making?" Nations and Nationalism, 2005, 11 (4), pp. 531­549. OL John Coakley, "Approaches to the Resolution of Ethnic Conflict: The Strategy of NonTerritorial Autonomy", International Political Science Review, 1994, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 297314. Bill Bowring, "Austro-Marxism's Last Laugh: The Struggle for Recognition of National-Cultural Autonomy for Rossians and Russians", in, Europe-Asia Studies, vol. 54 No. 2, 2002, pp. 229250 Steven C Roach, , "Minority Rights and the Dialectics of the Nation: Otto Bauer's Theory of the Nation and Its Contributions to Multicultural Theory and Globalization", Human Rights Review, Oct-Dec2004, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p91. U. Ra'anan (ed.), State and Nation in Multi-ethnic societies, Chapter 1, "Nation and state: order out of chaos" QOL Otto Bauer, The Question of Nationalities and Social Democracy, introduction and Section on national-cultural Autonomy Edited by E. Nimni, University of Minnesota Press, 2000.

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E. Nimni, Nationalist Multiculturalism in late Imperial Austria as a Critique of Contemporary Liberalism: the case of Bauer and Renner, Journal of Political Ideologies, 4 (3) October 1999, pp. 289-314 QOL Codagnone and Filipov, "Equity, Exit and National Identity in a Multinational Federation: The Multicultural Constitutional Patriotism in Russia", Journal of Ethnic And Migration Studies, Vol. 26, No.2 April 2000. OL T. Nieguth,. "Accommodating Ethnic Minorities: The Austro-Marxist Personality Principle and Canada's Multicultural Condition" Canadian Review Studies in Nationalism, XXVI, 1999 (QOL) Tuesday 1 December, Thursday 3 December Week 10: Islamic Minorities in Contemporary Europe Questions for briefing papers: A) B) What is Orientalism and can it explain contemporary European prejudices against European Muslims? Is there a wave of "Islamophobia" in Europe?

Required Reading: Katherine Margaret Kirk, "Embodied Enlightenment: The Submissive Islamic Female Body in the Contemporary Dutch Enlightenment Project", The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations, Volume 7, Issue 2, 2007, pp.199-204. QOL Nasar Meer, and Tehseen Noorani, "A sociological comparison of anti-Semitism and antiMuslim sentiment in Britain", The Sociological Review, Volume 56, Number 2, May 2008 , pp. 195-219 (25) QOL Edward W. Said, Orientalism , Penguin classics, London 2003. Chapter 1: The Scope of Orientalism, Chapter 3: Orientalism Now. QOL Tariq Modood, British Muslims and the Politics of Multiculturalism, in Tariq Modood, Anna Triandafyllidou and Ricard Zapata-Barrero (eds.), Multiculturalism, Muslims and citizenship : a European approach , Abingdon, Routledge, 2006 (QOL), pp. 37-56 Further readings: Lorraine P. Sheridan, "Islamophobia Pre- and Post September 11, 2001", Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 21, 3, March 2006, pp. 317-336. QOL Scott Poynting, and Victoria Mason, "Tolerance, freedom, justice and peace'? Britain, Australia and anti-Muslim racism since 11 September 2001" Journal of Intercultural Studies v.27, no.4, Nov 2006: pp 365-391 QOL

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Maxime.Rodinson, Europe and the mystique of Islam , London : Tauris, 1988 Tariq Modood and Fauzia Ahmad, "British Muslim Perspectives on Multiculturalism", Theory, Culture & Society, 2007, Vol. 24, No. 2, 187-213 OL Armando Salvatore, "Authority in Question Secularity, Republicanism and `Communitarianism' in the Emerging Euro-Islamic Public Sphere", Theory Culture Society 2007; Vol. 24; 135-160 OL Tahir Abbas, "Recent Developments to British Multicultural Theory, Policy and Practice, The Case of British Muslims", Citizenship Studies, 2005, 9,2, pp. 153-166 OL Riva Kastoryano, French Secularism and Islam, in Tariq Modood, Anna Triandafyllidou and Ricard Zapata-Barrero (eds.), Multiculturalism, Muslims and citizenship : a European approach , Abingdon, Routledge, 2006 (QOL), pp. 57-69 Tariq Ramadan, Western Muslims and the Future of Islam, Oxford University Press, 2004 Review Symposium, "British Muslim's Expectations of the government, Secular or Islamic?"British Journal of Sociology of Education, Nov. 2006, Vol. 27, 5, pp. 659-671. OL Statham et al., "Resilient or Adaptable Islam?", Ethnicities, 2005, Vol. 5, No. 4, pp427-459 OL Ruba Salih, "The Backward and the New: National, Transnational and Post-National Islam in Europe", Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies Vol 30, 5, 2004 , pp. 995-1011, OL Sami Zubaida (2003) "Islam in Europe" Critical Quarterly, 2003, 45 (1-2), 88­98. OL F. Halliday, "Islamophobia Reconsidered", Ethnic and Racial Studies, 1999 , 22, 5, pp.892902. OL Sami Zubaida, "Islam and nationalism: continuities and contradictions" Nations and Nationalism 10 (4), 2004, 407­420. OL

Tuesday 8 December, Thursday 10 December, Week 11: Film by Michael Winterbottom, "The Road to Guantanamo" See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Road_to_Guantanamo Followed by a discussion

Tuesday 15 December, Thursday 17 December Week 12: Summary and Conclusions

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FURTHER READING: Benner, Erica. Really Existing Nationalisms: A Post-Communist View from Marx and Engels. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1995. Billig, Michael. Banal Nationalism. London: Sage Publications, 1995. Brubaker, Rogers. Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Chatterjee, Partha. The Nation and Its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993. Chatterjee, Partha. Nationalist Thought and the Colonial World: A Derivative Discourse? London: Zed Books for the United Nations University, 1986. Greenfeld, Liah. Nationalism: Five Roads to Modernity. Cambridge (USA) and London (UK): Harvard University Press, 1992. Levy, Jacob. The Multiculturalism of Fear. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Miller, David. Citizenship and National Identity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Nimni, Ephraim, Marxism and Nationalism, Theoretical Origins of a Political Crisis, London, Pluto 1994 Poole, Ross. Nation and Identity. London and New York: Routledge, 1999. Tamir, Yael. Liberal Nationalism. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993. Zimmer, Oliver. Nationalism in Europe, 1890-1940 Studies in European History. New York: Palgrave, 2003

Summary of Module Review (2008-09) Students were enthusiastic about the subject matter, the diversity and variety of different points of view and the availability of material on QOL. Students appreciated that a handout was given in every lecture summarising in one page the argument of the lecture. 100% of the students surveyed said the outcomes of the module were achieved, that they were encouraged to participate and that written work was returned within reasonable time. The high achievement of students was commended by the moderator and external examiner

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School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy Student Handbook This module guide should be read in conjunction with the Undergraduate Student Handbook which contains important details of School policies. A copy of the Undergraduate Student Handbook can be obtained from the School Office (21 University Square) or downloaded from the resources section of any PAI or PHL module on Queen's Online.

INTERESTED IN FURTHER STUDY? The School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy offers masters programmes in the following: MA Cognitive Science MA Comparative Ethnic Conflict MA European Union Politics MA Gender and Society MA International Relations MA Irish Politics MA Legislative Studies and Practice MA Political Philosophy MA Politics MRes Politics MA Violence, Terrorism and Security

For further details, see: www.qub.ac.uk/pisp/ProspectiveStudents/PostgraduateTaughtDegrees/

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