Read Research%20LessonPlan%20091304.pdf text version

LESSON PLAN: RESEARCH SKILLS Help elementary and middle-school students research, organize and write reports about topics they design themselves! LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will: * discuss how to form research questions * demonstrate an understanding of the Internet's function and history * evaluate Internet sites' relevance and reliability * research a report on the Internet * outline a research report PREPARATION: Teachers should familiarize themselves with all videos and PDF files. They should print out one copy per instructor of: * "Internet: Beyond the Browser" Discussion Starters <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/17/InternetTG.pdf> * "Internet: Beyond the Browser" Review Questions <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/17/InternetTG.pdf> * "Research 101: Mastering the Library" Review Questions <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/15/LG-after.htm> They should print out one copy per student of: * QuickMind.net Paths Sheet * "Relying on the Internet" quiz Interactive Study Guides>E-Learning Modules>Modern Research Skills> Internet: Beyond the Browser>Quizzes>Print button in lower right corner * Website Evaluation Links Sheet * APA Style: Reference Examples for Electronic Source Materials * "Organizing Your Outline" handout

STEPS:

Introduction (10 minutes): 1. Tell students that you are going to answer all of their questions ­ now and forever ­ by teaching them to find, analyze and organize information. To do this, they will need to: find a good question; break it into component parts; determine where to find information; and evaluate and organize that information. 2. If your students are working in small groups or alone in the computer lab, distribute the QuickMind.net Paths Sheet. Ask students to watch the video "Defining Topics, Determining Needs"; then use "Research 101: Mastering the Library" Review Questions #3 and #4 <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/15/LG-after.htm> to check students' comprehension. 3. Ask students to name the one question they most want to answer this year; write all these questions on a whiteboard. Then, discuss with students what makes a good question. Be sure to explain that a really good question may not be answerable; the best questions are those that you benefit from exploring. After this discussion, ask students to vote for the best question. Explain that, as a class, you will be learning research and information literacy skills in order to begin to answer this question. 4. Ask students what sub-questions might help to answer their main question; list these on the board and encourage students to write them down in their notebooks. Then, ask students to brainstorm ways they could answer these sub-questions. Students may come up with: interviews, looking up information in a library and performing searches on the Internet. Ask them what the benefits and challenges of each method are. 5. Explain that they are going to begin by researching on the Internet to find answers to their questions. Note that while research on the Internet is convenient, it also requires them to analyze and evaluate the information they find. Explain that in this lesson, students will learn to be suspicious, mean-minded people ­ and great researchers.

Relying on the Internet (50 minutes):

1. Use the "Internet: Beyond the Browser" Discussion Starters <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/17/InternetTG.pdf> to initiate a group discussion about the Internet. 2. Ask students to watch the "What Is the Net?" and "History of the Net" videos. Then use the "Internet: Beyond the Browser" Review Questions #1-#4 <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/17/InternetTG.pdf> to check for comprehension. 3. Distribute a printed copy of the "Relying on the Internet" quiz; suggest that students mark off the answers as watch the next videos, "Common Sense on the Web" and "Online Activities." Then, use the "Internet: Beyond the Browser" Review Questions #7-#9 <http://www.quickmind.net/source/learning/17/InternetTG.pdf> to check for comprehension. 4. Ask students to visit three of the Website Evaluation Links Sheet's recommended sites and jot down information or evaluation questions that seem valuable. Then, engage students in a class discussion about what questions they should use to evaluate the sites they visit. List their suggestions on a white board labeled "Web Site Evaluation Checklist" and ask students to vote on the most important questions on the list. Put a star next to those questions and keep those questions posted on the board while students complete the next activity. (Note: It's a good idea to keep this list posted in the computer lab. You can add to it as students learn more about using the Internet as a resource.) 5. Tell students that in the next lesson they will take what they've learned about evaluating sources and will use it to research and answer the question they chose.

From Research to Writing (50 minutes):

1. Distribute one copy of APA Style: Reference Examples for Electronic Source Materials to each student. 2. Remind students of the question they're researching, the sub-questions they've generated, and the evaluation. Then divide students into small groups, assign each one a subquestion, and distribute three index cards per student. Ask each member of the group to use the QuickMind Yellow Pages to locate one Web site that will help them to answer the subquestion. Each member should then write out an evaluation of the Web site they found with a citation of the Web site. They should also list any information that will help them to answer their group's question on their index cards. 3. Distribute the "Organizing Your Outline" handout and allow students time to work through this sheet on their own. Then, as a whole class, ask students to share ideas about how to organize information. When students have determined principles of report organizing, ask them to gather again into their small groups and organize the index cards into an outline. Ask each group to present their outline to the class and write the outline on a whiteboard. Make sure that students provide feedback to others about the organization of their information.

Assessment 1. When every group has written their outline on the board, ask each student to write a final outline of the report in the Report Writer based on the outlines students have written on the board, along with a brief paragraph discussing how valid they think this information is.

Extension 1. Teach students what plagiarism is by assigning them the "Writing Honesty" WebHunt (location listed on the QuickMind.net Paths Sheet). STANDARDS To find the state standards met by this lesson, log in and select standards (on the homepage under Browse). Select Search by Resource, E-Learning Modules, and Middle School (6-8). Then click Go. When Middle School (6-8) appears in the window, click on it. Select Modern Library & Research Skills and (in the window on the right) your state. Then click Go. Standards will appear in the window to the right.

QUICKMIND.NET PATHS * "What Is the Net?" Interactive Study Guides>E-Learning Modules>Modern Research Skills> Internet: Beyond the Browser * "History of the Net" Interactive Study Guides>E-Learning Modules>Modern Research Skills> Internet: Beyond the Browser * "Common Sense on the Web" Interactive Study Guides>E-Learning Modules>Modern Research Skills> Internet: Beyond the Browser * "Online Activities" Interactive Study Guides>E-Learning Modules>Modern Research Skills> Internet: Beyond the Browser * QuickMind Yellow Pages Linked from Homepage * Report Writer Linked from Homepage * Writing Honesty WebHunt Webstudio>Web Hunt Projects>QuickMind Hunts>High School>Writing Honesty WEBSITE EVALUATION LINKS A Student's Guide to WWW Research http://www.slu.edu/departments/english/research/ Evaluating Web Resources http://www2.widener.edu/Wolfgram-Memorial-Library/webevaluation/webeval.htm UCLA College Library: Thinking Critically about WWW Resources http://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/college/help/critical/index.htm Website Investigator (Elementary level) http://www.olmc.burraneer.syd.catholic.edu.au/teachers/curriculum/ web_investigator_year7.pdf Elementary School Critical Evaluation Page http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalelem.html Middle-school Critical Evaluation Page http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html USM Libraries: Evaluating Web Resources http://library.usm.maine.edu/research/researchguides/webevaluating.html

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